WorldWideScience

Sample records for compact hydrogen disks

  1. Winds from disks in compact binaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauche, C.W.

    1993-10-27

    We herein present an observational and theoretical review of the winds of compact binaries. After a brief consideration of the accretion disk coronae and winds of X-ray binaries, the review concentrates on the winds of cataclysmic variables (CVs). Specifically, we consider the related problems of the geometry and mass-loss rate of the winds of CVs, their ionization state and variability, and the results from studies of eclipsing CVs. Finally, the properties of bona fide accretion disk wind models are reviewed.

  2. Linear Quadratic Controller with Fault Detection in Compact Disk Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Enrique Sanchez; Hansen, K.G.; Andersen, R.S.

    2001-01-01

    The design of the positioning controllers in Optical Disk Drives are today subjected to a trade off between an acceptable suppression of external disturbances and an acceptable immunity against surfaces defects. In this paper an algorithm is suggested to detect defects of the disk surface combined...... with an observer and a Linear Quadratic Regulator. As a result, the mentioned trade off is minimized and the playability of the tested compact disk player is considerably enhanced....

  3. Transonic properties of the accretion disk around compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2008-01-01

    An accretion flow is necessarily transonic around a black hole. However, around a neutron star it may or may not be transonic, depending on the inner disk boundary conditions influenced by the neutron star. I will discuss various transonic behavior of the disk fluid in general relativistic (or pseudo general relativistic) framework. I will address that there are four types of sonic/critical point possible to form in an accretion disk. It will be shown that how the fluid properties including location of sonic points vary with angular momentum of the compact object which controls the overall disk dynamics and outflows.

  4. Cell Analysis System Based on Compact Disk Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tibbe, Arjan G.J.; de Grooth, B.G.; Greve, Jan; Rao, Chandra; Dolan, Gerald J.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie

    2002-01-01

    Background: A cell analysis system was developed to enumerate and differentiate magnetically aligned cells selected from whole blood. The cellular information extracted is similar to the readout of musical information from a compact disk (CD). Here we describe the optical design and data processing

  5. COMPACT DUST CONCENTRATION IN THE MWC 758 PROTOPLANETARY DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marino, S.; Casassus, S.; Perez, S.; Avenhaus, H. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Lyra, W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Roman, P. E. [Millenium Nucleus “Protoplanetary Disks in ALMA Early Science,” Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Wright, C. M. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, UNSW@ADFA, Canberra ACT 2600 (Australia); Maddison, S. T., E-mail: smarino@das.uchile.cl [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    The formation of planetesimals requires that primordial dust grains grow from micron- to kilometer-sized bodies. Dust traps caused by gas pressure maxima have been proposed as regions where grains can concentrate and grow fast enough to form planetesimals, before radially migrating onto the star. We report new VLA Ka and Ku observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star MWC 758. The Ka image shows a compact emission region in the outer disk, indicating a strong concentration of big dust grains. Tracing smaller grains, archival ALMA data in band 7 continuum shows extended disk emission with an intensity maximum to the northwest of the central star, which matches the VLA clump position. The compactness of the Ka emission is expected in the context of dust trapping, as big grains are trapped more easily than smaller grains in gas pressure maxima. We develop a nonaxisymmetric parametric model inspired by a steady-state vortex solution with parameters adequately selected to reproduce the observations, including the spectral energy distribution. Finally, we compare the radio continuum with SPHERE scattered light data. The ALMA continuum spatially coincides with a spiral-like feature seen in scattered light, while the VLA clump is offset from the scattered light maximum. Moreover, the ALMA map shows a decrement that matches a region devoid of scattered polarized emission. Continuum observations at a different wavelength are necessary to conclude whether the VLA-ALMA difference is an opacity or a real dust segregation.

  6. Compact dust concentration in the MWC 758 protoplanetary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Marino, S; Perez, S; Lyra, W; Roman, P E; Avenhaus, H; Wright, C M; Maddison, S T

    2015-01-01

    The formation of planetesimals requires that primordial dust grains grow from micron- to km-sized bodies. Dust traps caused by gas pressure maxima have been proposed as regions where grains can concentrate and grow fast enough to form planetesimals, before radially migrating onto the star. We report new VLA Ka & Ku observations of the protoplanetary disk around the Herbig Ae/Be star MWC 758. The Ka image shows a compact emission region in the outer disk indicating a strong concentration of big dust grains. Tracing smaller grains, archival ALMA data in band 7 continuum shows extended disk emission with an intensity maximum to the north-west of the central star, which matches the VLA clump position. This segregation of grains sizes is expected in the context of dust trapping, where big grains are trapped more easily than smaller grains in gas pressure maxima. We develop a non-axisymmetric parametric model inspired by a steady state vortex solution which reproduces the observations, including the spectral en...

  7. Thermo-Rotational Instability in Plasma Disks Around Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Coppi, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Differentially rotating plasma disks, around compact objects, that are imbedded in a ``seed'' magnetic field are shown to develop vertically localized ballooning modes that are driven by the combined radial gradient of the rotation frequency and vertical gradients of the plasma density and temperature. When the electron mean free path is shorter than the disk height and the relevant thermal conductivity can be neglected, the vertical particle flows produced by of these modes have the effect to drive the density and temperature profiles toward the ``adiabatic condition'' where $\\eta_{T}\\equiv(dlnT/dz)/(dlnn/dz)=2/3$. Here $T$ is the plasma temperature and $n$ the particle density. The faster growth rates correspond to steeper temperature profiles $(\\eta_{T}>2/3)$ such as those produced by an internal (e.g., viscous) heating process. In the end, ballooning modes excited for various values of $\\eta_{T}$ can lead to the evolution of the disk into a different current carrying configuration such as a sequence of pl...

  8. The Evolution of Galaxy Disks in Dense Environments - Lessons from Compact Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Rasmussen, J; Verdes-Montenegro, L; Yun, M S; Borthakur, S

    2008-01-01

    Disk galaxies in compact galaxy groups exhibit a remarkable shortfall of neutral hydrogen compared to both isolated spirals and spirals in more loose groups, but the origin of this HI deficiency remains unclear. Based on a sample of highly HI deficient compact galaxy groups, here updated to also include HCG 58 and HCG 93, we summarise the first results of a multi-wavelength campaign aimed at understanding the processes responsible for modifying the HI content of galaxy disks in these environments. While tidal stripping, ram pressure stripping by hot intragroup gas, and star-formation induced strangulation could individually be affecting the ISM in some of the group members, these processes each face specific difficulties in explaining the inferred deficiency of HI for the sample as a whole. A complete picture of the mechanisms driving the ISM evolution in the disk galaxies of these groups has thus yet to emerge, but promising avenues for further progress in this field are briefly discussed on the basis of the...

  9. The adoption of the compact disk player: an event history analysis for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansman, H.; Mulder, C.H.; Verhoeff, R.

    1999-01-01

    The compact disk (CD) player was one of the major audio innovations of the 1980sin the Netherlands. For studies of the temporal and social diffusion pattern of the CD player andthe compact disks, both cultural and economic theories about innovations and music consumptionare available. In this paper,

  10. On Magnetic Dynamos in Thin Accretion Disks around Compact and Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of geometrically thin accretion disks commonly associated with such astronomical objects as X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, and protostars are likely to be seats of MHD dynamo actions. Thin disk geometry and the particular physical environment make accretion disk dynamos different from stellar, planetary, or even galactic dynamos. We discuss those particular features of disk dynamos with emphasis on the difference between protoplanetary disk dynamos and those associated with compact stars. We then describe normal mode solutions for thin disk dynamos and discuss implications for the dynamical behavior of dynamo-magnetized accretion disks.

  11. Building massive compact planetesimal disks from the accretion of pebbles

    CERN Document Server

    Moriarty, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a model in which planetesimal disks are built from the combination of planetesimal formation and accretion of radially drifting pebbles onto existing planetesimals. In this model, the rate of accretion of pebbles onto planetesimals quickly outpaces the rate of direct planetesimal formation in the inner disk. This allows for the formation of a high mass inner disk without the need for enhanced planetesimal formation or a massive protoplanetary disk. Our proposed mechanism for planetesimal disk growth does not require any special conditions to operate. Consequently, we expect that high mass planetesimal disks form naturally in nearly all systems. The extent of this growth is controlled by the total mass in pebbles that drifts through the inner disk. Anything that reduces the rate or duration of pebble delivery will correspondingly reduce the final mass of the planetesimal disk. Therefore, we expect that low mass stars (with less massive protoplanetary disks), low metallicity stars and stars with gian...

  12. Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, E (Editor); Stepinski, T. F. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the two-day Workshop on Physics of Accretion Disks Around Compact and Young Stars was to bring together workers on accretion disks in the western Gulf region (Texas and Louisiana). Part 2 presents the workshop program, a list of poster presentations, and a list of workshop participants. Accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of these disks form around compact stars, such as white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes that are members of binary systems and reveal themselves as a power source, especially in the x-ray and gamma regions of the spectrum. On the other hand, protostellar disks are believed to be accretion disks associated with young, pre-main-sequence stars and manifest themselves mostly in infrared and radio observations. These disks are considered to be a natural outcome of the star formation process. The focus of this workshop included theory and observations relevant to accretion disks around compact objects and newly forming stars, with the primary purpose of bringing the two communities together for intellectual cross-fertilization. The nature of the workshop was exploratory, to see how much interaction is possible between distinct communities and to better realize the local potential in this subject. A critical workshop activity was identification and documentation of key issues that are of mutual interest to both communities.

  13. Multiwavelength optical properties of compact dust aggregates in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Min, M; Woitke, P; Dominik, C; Ménard, F

    2015-01-01

    In protoplanetary disks micron-size dust grains coagulate to form larger structures with complex shapes and compositions. The coagulation process changes the absorption and scattering properties of particles in the disk in significant ways. To properly interpret observations of protoplanetary disks and to place these observations in the context of the first steps of planet formation, it is crucial to understand the optical properties of these complex structures. We derive the optical properties of dust aggregates using detailed computations of aggregate structures and compare these computa- tionally demanding results with approximate methods that are cheaper to compute in practice. In this way we wish to understand the merits and problems of approximate methods and define the context in which they can or cannot be used to analyze observations of objects where significant grain growth is taking place. For the detailed computations we used the discrete dipole approximation (DDA), a method able to compute the in...

  14. Adaptive Feature Based Control of Compact Disk Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Stoustrup, Jakob; Vidal, Enrique Sanchez

    2005-01-01

    of the Compact Disc. The problem is to design servo controllers which are well suited for handling surface faults which disturb the position measurement and still react sufficiently against normal disturbances like mechanical shocks. In previous work of the same authors a feature based control scheme for CD...

  15. Open and Closed Loop Parametric System Identification in Compact Disk Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vidal, Enrique Sanchez; Stoustrup, Jakob; Andersen, Palle;

    2001-01-01

    By measuring the current through the coil of the actuators in the optical pick-up in a compact disk player, open loop parametric system identification can be performed. The parameters are identified by minimizing the least-squares loss function of the ARX model. The only parameter which cannot...

  16. APPROXIMATION BY COMPLEX SZ ´ASZ-DURRMEYER OPERATORS IN COMPACT DISKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorin G.GAL; Vijay GUPTA

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we deal with the complex Sz´asz-Durrmeyer operators and study Voronovskaja type results with quantitative estimates for these operators attached to analytic functions of exponential growth on compact disks. Also, the exact order of approximation is found.

  17. Mass measurements in protoplanetary disks from hydrogen deuteride

    CERN Document Server

    McClure, Melissa; Cleeves, Ilse; van Dishoeck, Ewine; Blake, Geoff; Evans, Neal; Green, Joel; Henning, Thomas; Öberg, Karin; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Salyk, Colette

    2016-01-01

    The total gas mass of a protoplanetary disk is a fundamental, but poorly determined, quantity. A new technique \\citep{bergin+13} has been demonstrated to assess directly the bulk molecular gas reservoir of molecular hydrogen using the HD J=1-0 line at 112 $\\mu$m. In this work we present a {\\it Herschel} Space Observatory\\footnote{Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.} survey of six additional T Tauri disks in the HD line. Line emission is detected at $>$3$\\sigma$ significance in two cases: DM Tau and GM Aur. For the other four disks, we establish upper limits to the line flux. Using detailed disk structure and ray tracing models, we calculate the temperature structure and dust mass from modeling the observed spectral energy distributions, and include the effect of UV gas heating to determine the amount of gas required to fit the HD line. The range of gas masses are 1.0-4.7$\\times10^{-2...

  18. Evolution of dynamo-generated magnetic fields in accretion disks around compact and young stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1994-01-01

    Geometrically thin, optically thick, turbulent accretion disks are believed to surround many stars. Some of them are the compact components of close binaries, while the others are throught to be T Tauri stars. These accretion disks must be magnetized objects because the accreted matter, whether it comes from the companion star (binaries) or from a collapsing molecular cloud core (single young stars), carries an embedded magnetic field. In addition, most accretion disks are hot and turbulent, thus meeting the condition for the MHD turbulent dynamo to maintain and amplify any seed field magnetic field. In fact, for a disk's magnetic field to persist long enough in comparison with the disk viscous time it must be contemporaneously regenerated because the characteristic diffusion time of a magnetic field is typically much shorter than a disk's viscous time. This is true for most thin accretion disks. Consequently, studying magentic fields in thin disks is usually synonymous with studying magnetic dynamos, a fact that is not commonly recognized in the literature. Progress in studying the structure of many accretion disks was achieved mainly because most disks can be regarded as two-dimensional flows in which vertical and radial structures are largely decoupled. By analogy, in a thin disk, one may expect that vertical and radial structures of the magnetic field are decoupled because the magnetic field diffuses more rapidly to the vertical boundary of the disk than along the radius. Thus, an asymptotic method, called an adiabatic approximation, can be applied to accretion disk dynamo. We can represent the solution to the dynamo equation in the form B = Q(r)b(r,z), where Q(r) describes the field distribution along the radius, while the field distribution across the disk is included in the vector function b, which parametrically depends on r and is normalized by the condition max (b(z)) = 1. The field distribution across the disk is established rapidly, while the radial

  19. Compact Star Clusters in the M31 Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Vansevicius, V; Narbutis, D; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A; Deveikis, V; Semionov, D

    2009-01-01

    We have carried out a survey of compact star clusters (apparent size 0.15 arcsec (>0.6 pc). We derived cluster parameters based on the photometric data and multiband images by employing simple stellar population models. The clusters have a wide range of ages from ~5 Myr (young objects associated with 24 um and/or Ha emission) to ~10 Gyr (globular cluster candidates), and possess mass in a range of 3.0 < log(m/M_sol) < 4.3 peaking at m ~ 4000 M_sol. Typical age of these intermediate-mass clusters is in the range of 30 Myr < t < 3 Gyr, with a prominent peak at ~70 Myr. These findings suggest a rich intermediate-mass star cluster population in M31, which appears to be scarce in the Milky Way galaxy.

  20. Molecular Hydrogen in the Quiescent Disk of SW UMa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.

    2004-01-01

    The FUSE observation has been reduced and a paper has been submitted to ApJ. The analysis has been slow because of the very noisy quality of the data, but we have derived line profile information for O VI and limits to the continuum brightness which place an interesting limit on the white dwarf temperature. The primary results are that a narrow O VI emission component seems to arise from the accretion flow onto the white dwarf itself, in agreement with cooling flow models for the X-ray spectra of low accretion rate dwarf novae. The broad component of the O VI lines is weaker than the observed C IV emission, suggesting that the UV line emission from the disk comes from photoionized plasma. A secondary result is that there is no H-2 fluorescent emission. The upper limits indicate that if molecular gas is present in the disk, it is shielded from Ly alpha photons by a layer of atomic hydrogen on the disk surface. We also derive an upper limit to the continuum level is below that observed by IUE. The limits are compatible with the lower end of the WD temperature range derived from IUE measurements, and they appear to agree with unpublished analysis of HST spectra. The grant has provided partial support for a data aide (Matt Povich) and a postdoc (Alex Lobel). It purchased a computer for M. Menou.

  1. Inner edges of compact debris disks around metal-rich white dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, Roman R

    2012-01-01

    A number of metal-rich white dwarfs (WDs) are known to host compact, dense particle disks, which are thought to be responsible for metal pollution of these stars. In many such systems the inner radii of disks inferred from their spectra are so close to the WD that particles directly exposed to starlight must be heated above 1500 K and are expected to be unstable against sublimation. To reconcile this expectation with observations we explore particle sublimation in H-poor debris disks around WDs. We show that because of the high metal vapor pressure the characteristic sublimation temperature in these disks is 300-400 K higher than in their protoplanetary analogues, allowing particles to survive at higher temperatures. We then look at the structure of the inner edges of debris disks and show that they should generically feature superheated inner rims directly exposed to starlight with temperatures reaching 2500-3500 K. Particles migrating through the rim towards the WD (and rapidly sublimating) shield the disk ...

  2. NODC Standard Product: Experimental Compact Disk NODC-01 Pacific Ocean Temperature-Salinity Profiles (1900-1988) (NODC Accession 0086259)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) created a compact disk containing over 1.3 million temperature-depth and salinity-depth profiles taken in the Pacific...

  3. Global Properties of Neutral Hydrogen in Compact Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, Lisa May; Gallagher, Sarah C; Privon, George C; Kepley, Amanda A; Whelan, David G; Desjardins, Tyler D; Zabludoff, Ann I

    2015-01-01

    Compact groups of galaxies provide a unique environment to study the evolution of galaxies amid frequent gravitational encounters. These nearby groups have conditions similar to those in the earlier universe when galaxies were assembled and give us the opportunity to witness hierarchical formation in progress. To understand how the compact group environment affects galaxy evolution, we examine the gas and dust in these groups. We present new single-dish GBT neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of 30 compact groups and define a new way to quantify the group HI content as the HI-to-stellar mass ratio of the group as a whole. We compare the HI content with mid-IR indicators of star formation and optical [g-r] color to search for correlations between group gas content and star formation activity of individual group members. Quiescent galaxies tend to live in HI-poor groups, and galaxies with active star formation are more commonly found in HI-rich groups. Intriguingly, we also find "rogue" galaxies whose star forma...

  4. GLOBAL PROPERTIES OF NEUTRAL HYDROGEN IN COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, Lisa May [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Privon, George C. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Kepley, Amanda A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Whelan, David G. [Physics Department, Austin College, Sherman, TX 75090 (United States); Desjardins, Tyler D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Compact groups of galaxies provide a unique environment to study the evolution of galaxies amid frequent gravitational encounters. These nearby groups have conditions similar to those in the earlier universe when galaxies were assembled and give us the opportunity to witness hierarchical formation in progress. To understand how the compact group environment affects galaxy evolution, we examine the gas and dust in these groups. We present new single-dish GBT neutral hydrogen (H i) observations of 30 compact groups and define a new way to quantify the group H i content as the H i-to-stellar mass ratio of the group as a whole. We compare the H i content with mid-IR indicators of star formation and optical [g − r] color to search for correlations between group gas content and star formation activity of individual group members. Quiescent galaxies tend to live in H i-poor groups, and galaxies with active star formation are more commonly found in H i-rich groups. Intriguingly, we also find “rogue” galaxies whose star formation does not correlate with group H i content. In particular, we identify three galaxies (NGC 2968 in RSCG 34, KUG 1131+202A in RSCG 42, and NGC 4613 in RSCG 64) whose mid-IR activity is discrepant with the H i. We speculate that this mismatch between mid-IR activity and H i content is a consequence of strong interactions in this environment that can strip H i from galaxies and abruptly affect star formation. Ultimately, characterizing how and on what timescales the gas is processed in compact groups will help us understand the interstellar medium in complex, dense environments similar to the earlier universe.

  5. Kilonova Light Curves from the Disk Wind Outflows of Compact Object Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Kasen, Daniel; Metzger, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We study the radioactively-powered transients produced by accretion disk winds following a compact object merger. Starting with the outflows generated in two-dimensional hydrodynamical disk models, we use wavelength-dependent radiative transfer calculations to generate synthetic light curves and spectra. We show that the brightness and color of the resulting kilonova transients carry information about the merger physics. In the regions of the wind where neutrino irradiation raises the electron fraction to Ye > 0.25, r-process nucleosynthesis halts before producing high-opacity, complex ions (the lanthanides). The kilonova light curves thus show two distinct components: a brief (~2 day) blue optical transient produced in the outer lanthanide-free ejecta, and a longer (~10 day) infrared transient produced in the inner, lanthanide line-blanketed region. Mergers producing a longer-lived neutron star, or a more rapidly spinning black hole, have stronger neutrino irradiation, generate more lanthanide-free ejecta, a...

  6. CO LINE EMISSION FROM COMPACT NUCLEAR STARBURST DISKS AROUND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armour, J. N.; Ballantyne, D. R., E-mail: jarmour3@gatech.edu [Center for Relativistic Astrophysics, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State Street, Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    There is substantial evidence for a connection between star formation in the nuclear region of a galaxy and growth of the central supermassive black hole. Furthermore, starburst activity in the region around an active galactic nucleus (AGN) may provide the obscuration required by the unified model of AGNs. Molecular line emission is one of the best observational avenues to detect and characterize dense, star-forming gas in galactic nuclei over a range of redshift. This paper presents predictions for the carbon monoxide (CO) line features from models of nuclear starburst disks around AGNs. These small-scale ({approx}< 100 pc), dense and hot starbursts have CO luminosities similar to scaled-down ultra-luminous infrared galaxies and quasar host galaxies. Nuclear starburst disks that exhibit a pc-scale starburst and could potentially act as the obscuring torus show more efficient CO excitation and higher brightness temperature ratios than those without such a compact starburst. In addition, the compact starburst models predict strong absorption when J{sub Upper} {approx}> 10, a unique observational signature of these objects. These findings allow for the possibility that CO spectral line energy distributions (SLEDs) could be used to determine if starburst disks are responsible for the obscuration in z {approx}< 1 AGNs. Directly isolating the nuclear CO line emission of such compact regions around AGNs from galactic-scale emission will require high-resolution imaging or selecting AGN host galaxies with weak galactic-scale star formation. Stacking individual CO SLEDs will also be useful in detecting the predicted high-J features.

  7. Smearing of mass accretion rate variation by viscous processes in accretion disks in compact binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, A.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2016-09-01

    Variation of mass supply rate from the companion can be smeared out by viscous processes inside an accretion disk. Hence, by the time the flow reaches the inner edge, the variation in X-rays need not reflect the true variation of the mass supply rate at the outer edge. However, if the viscosity fluctuates around a mean value, one would expect the viscous time scale t_{{visc}} also to spread around a mean value. In high mass X-ray binaries, which are thought to be primarily wind-fed, the size of the viscous Keplerian disk is smaller and thus such a spread could be lower as compared to the low mass X-ray binaries which are primarily fed by Roche lobe overflow. If there is an increasing or decreasing trend in viscosity, the interval between enhanced emission would be modified systematically. In the absence of a detailed knowledge about the variation of mass supply rates at the outer edge, we study ideal circumstances where modulation must take place exactly in orbital time scales, such as when there is an ellipticity in the orbit. We study a few compact binaries using long term All Sky monitor (ASM) data (1.5-12 keV) of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) and all sky survey data (15-50 keV) of Swift satellites by different methods to look for such smearing effects and to infer what these results can tell us about the viscous processes inside the respective disks. We employ three different methods to seek imprints of periodicity on the X-ray variation and found that in all the cases, the location of the peak in the power density spectra is consistent with the orbital frequencies. Interestingly, in high mass X-ray binaries the peaks are sharp with high rms values, consistent with a small Keplerian disk in a wind fed system. However, in low mass X-ray binaries with larger Keplerian disk component, the peaks are spreaded out with much lower rms values. X-ray reflections, or superhump phenomena which may also cause such X-ray modulations would not be affected by the size of

  8. Solar to hydrogen: Compact and cost effective CPV field for rooftop operation and hydrogen production

    KAUST Repository

    Burhan, Muhammad

    2016-11-25

    Current commercial CPV systems are designed as large units which are targeted to be installed in open desert fields with high DNI availability. It appeared that the CPV is among some of those technologies which gained very little attention of people, with less customers and market. For conventional PV systems, the installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings have a significant share in the total installed capacity of PV systems. That is why for most of the countries, the PV installations at the rooftop of commercial and residential buildings are aimed to be increased to half of total installed PV. On the other hand, there is no commercial CPV system available to be suitable for rooftop operation, giving motivation for the development of CPV field of compact systems. This paper discusses the development of a CPV field for the rooftop operation, comprising of compact CPV system with cost effective but highly accurate solar tracking sensor and wireless master slave control. In addition, the performance of the developed CPV systems is evaluated for production of hydrogen, which can be used as energy carrier or energy storage and a maximum solar to hydrogen efficiency of 18% is obtained. However, due to dynamic nature of the weather data and throughout the day variations in the performance of CPV and electrolyser, the solar to hydrogen performance is proposed to be reported as daily and long term average efficiency. The CPV-Hydrogen system showed daily average conversion efficiency of 15%, with solar to hydrogen production rate of 218 kW h/kg.

  9. First correlation between compact object and circumstellar disk in the Be/X-ray binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Zamanov, R K

    2000-01-01

    A remarkable correlation between the H-alpha emission line and the radio behaviour of LSI+61 303 (V615 Cas, GT 0236+610) over its 4 yr modulation is discovered. The radio outburst peak is shifted by a quarter of the 4 yr modulation period (about 400 days) with respect to the equivalent width of the H-alpha emission line variability. The onset of the LSI+61 303 radio outbursts varies in phase with the changes of the H-alpha emission line, at least during the increase of H-alpha equivalent width. This is the first clear correlation between the emission associated to the compact object and the Be circumstellar disk in a Be/X-ray binary system.

  10. Generation of droplets to serpentine threads on a rotating compact-disk platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Shantimoy; Joshi, Sumit; Chaudhary, Kaustav; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-12-01

    We generate stable monodisperse droplets of nano-liter volumes and long serpentine liquid threads in a single, simple "Y"-shaped microchannel mounted on a rotationally actuated lab-on-a-compact-disk platform. Exploitation of Coriolis force offers versatile modus operandi of the present setup, without involving any design complications. Based on the fundamental understanding and subsequent analysis, we present scaling theories consistent with the experimental observations. We also outline specific applications of this technique, in the biological as well as in the physical domain, including digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR), controlled release of medical components, digital counting of colony forming units, hydrogel engineering, optical sensors and scaffolds for living tissues, to name a few.

  11. Radial-pattern formation in the polycarbonate substratum of recordable compact disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimura, M.; Ishikawa, I.; Tachibana, M.; Shinozaki, K.; Kojima, K.

    2001-09-01

    A radial pattern is found to form in the polycarbonate (PC) substratum of a recordable compact disk. Characteristic features of the pattern are that it is composed of about 80 needle-like regions, the shape of which closely resembles a thin film. In addition, white light is found to scatter at the needle-like region/matrix boundaries. This suggests that the PC substratum may have inferior transparency due to the formation of this pattern. Thus, it is important to understand the bifurcation of the radial-pattern formation from the viewpoint of materials science and engineering. Based on the mechanics of the PC viscous fluid, it has been found that the bifurcation of the pattern formation has a Reynolds number of about 10-3.

  12. Smearing of mass accretion rate variation by viscous processes in accretion disks in compact binary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    Variation of mass supply rate from the companion can be smeared out by viscous processes inside an accretion disk. By the time the flow reaches the inner edge, the variation in X-rays needs not reflect the true variation of the rate at the outer edge. However, if the viscosity fluctuates around a mean value, one would expect the viscous time scale also to spread around a mean value. In HMXBs, the size of the viscous Keplerian disk is smaller & thus such a spread could be lower as compared to the LMXBs. If there is an increasing or decreasing trend in viscosity, the interval between enhanced emission would be modified systematically. In the absence of a full knowledge about the variation of mass supply rates at the outer edge, we study ideal circumstances where modulation must take place exactly in orbital time scales when there is an ellipticity in the orbit. We study a few compact binaries using long term RXTE/ASM(1.5-12 keV) & Swift/BAT(15-50keV) data to look for such effects & to infer what the...

  13. Compact ultrafast semiconductor disk laser for nonlinear imaging in living organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles-Espinosa, Rodrigo; Filippidis, G.; Hamilton, Craig; Malcolm, Graeme; Weingarten, Kurt J.; Südmeyer, Thomas; Barbarin, Yohan; Keller, Ursula; Artigas, David; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    Ultrashort pulsed laser systems (such as Ti:sapphire) have been used in nonlinear microscopy during the last years. However, its implementation is not straight forward as they are maintenance-intensive, bulky and expensive. These limitations have prevented their wide-spread use for nonlinear imaging, especially in "real-life" biomedical applications. In this work we present the suitability of a compact ultrafast semiconductor disk laser source, with a footprint of 140x240x70 mm, to be used for nonlinear microscopy. The modelocking mechanism of the laser is based on a quantumdot semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM). The laser delivers an average output power of 287 mW with 1.5 ps pulses at 500 MHz, corresponding to a peak power of 0.4 kW. Its center wavelength is 965 nm which is ideally suited for two-photon excitation of the widely used Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) marker as it virtually matches its twophoton action cross section. We reveal that it is possible to obtain two photon excited fluorescence images of GFP labeled neurons and secondharmonic generation images of pharynx and body wall muscles in living C. elegans nematodes. Our results demonstrate that this compact laser is well suited for long-term time-lapse imaging of living samples as very low powers provide a bright signal. Importantly this non expensive, turn-key, compact laser system could be used as a platform to develop portable nonlinear bio-imaging devices, facilitating its wide-spread adoption in "real-life" applications.

  14. 4.6-W compact and efficient NdA13(BO3)4 thin-disk laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Zong; Fangqin Li; Lin Han; Qinjun Peng; Dafu Cui; Zuyan Xu; Haohai Yu; Huaijin Zhang; Jiyang Wang

    2011-01-01

    Since the first demonstration of the principle in 1993[1],the thin-disk laser has attracted considerable attention because of its outstanding features,which include high output power,high efficiency,and excellent beam quality.Greater than 5-kW continuous wave (CW) output power has been obtained with one single Yb:YAG disk,with a maximum optical efficiency of 65% and a beam propagation factor M2 of approximately 20[2].%The capabilities of a compact and highly efficient NdAl3(BO2)4 (NAB) thin-disk laser are demonstrated. Under a pump power of 8.2 W, the NAB disk laser delivers an average output power of 4.6 W at 1063 nm, with a slope efficiency of 64%. The difficulty and complexity of the thin-disk laser design are minimized by the high absorbance of the NAB crystal. To reduce the thermal effect, low repetition frequency pulsed 885 nm direct pumping is considered an efficient way to realize a compact and highly efficient NAB thin-disk laser.

  15. Euler force actuation mechanism for siphon valving in compact disk-like microfluidic chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yongbo; Fan, Jianhua; Zhou, Song; Zhou, Teng; Wu, Junfeng; Li, Yin; Liu, Zhenyu; Xuan, Ming; Wu, Yihui

    2014-03-01

    Based on the Euler force induced by the acceleration of compact disk (CD)-like microfluidic chip, this paper presents a novel actuation mechanism for siphon valving. At the preliminary stage of acceleration, the Euler force in the tangential direction of CD-like chip takes the primary place compared with the centrifugal force to function as the actuation of the flow, which fills the siphon and actuates the siphon valving. The Euler force actuation mechanism is demonstrated by the numerical solution of the phase-field based mathematical model for the flow in siphon valve. In addition, experimental validation is implemented in the polymethylmethacrylate-based CD-like microfluidic chip manufactured using CO2 laser engraving technique. To prove the application of the proposed Euler force actuation mechanism, whole blood separation and plasma extraction has been conducted using the Euler force actuated siphon valving. The newly introduced actuation mechanism overcomes the dependence on hydrophilic capillary filling of siphon by avoiding external manipulation or surface treatments of polymeric material. The sacrifice for highly integrated processing in pneumatic pumping technique is also prevented by excluding the volume-occupied compressed air chamber.

  16. Developing an Interactive Instructional Compact Disk for the Course of Basic Housekeeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurlaila Nurlaila

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed at creating the product based on the concept of learning for basic housekeeping.  The development of interactive media in the form of interactive compact disk (CD was conducted at Universitas Negeri Jakarta. Based on the review from the media expert, the total average score was categorized good i.e. 4,31. Meanwhile, from the material expert, the average score was categorized good i.e. 4,51 with the percentage of 90,28% and categorized as very good. The individual test (one to one and the limited test showed the average scores of 4,13 and 4,09 respectively which were both categorized as good. In the field study, it was tested to 23 college students mutually and the total of average score was very good, i.e. 3,8 with the percentage score of 76 %. It showed that the quality of interactive CD of housekeeping course was very good.

  17. A circumnuclear disk of atomic hydrogen in Centaurus A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T.; Struve, C.; Saripalli, L.

    2008-01-01

    We present new observations, performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, of the Hi absorption in the central regions of Centaurus A. For the first time, absorption is detected against the radio core at velocities blueshifted with respect to the systemic velocity. Moreover, the data show th

  18. A Survey of Compact Star Clusters in the S-W Field of the M31 Disk. Structural Parameters. II

    CERN Document Server

    Sableviciute, I; Kodaira, K; Narbutis, D; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A

    2007-01-01

    The King and the EFF (Elson, Fall & Freeman 1987) analytical models are employed to determine the structural parameters of star clusters using an 1-D surface brightness profile fitting method. The structural parameters are derived and a catalogue is provided for 51 star cluster candidates from the survey of compact star clusters in the South-West field of the M31 disk performed by Kodaira et al. (2004).

  19. A Survey of Compact Star Clusters in the South-West Field of the M31 Disk. UBVRI Photometry

    CERN Document Server

    Narbutis, D; Kodaira, K; Sableviciute, I; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of UBVRI broad-band aperture CCD photometry of 51 compact star clusters located in the South-West part of the M31 disk. The mean rms errors of all measured star cluster colors are less than 0.02 mag. In color vs. color diagrams the star clusters show significantly tighter sequences when compared with the photometric data from the compiled catalog of the M31 star clusters published by Galleti et al. (2004).

  20. Detection of warm molecular hydrogen in the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star HD97048

    CERN Document Server

    Martin-Zaidi, C; Pantin, E; Habart, E

    2007-01-01

    We present high resolution spectroscopic mid-infrared observations of the circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star HD97048 with the VLT Imager and Spectrometer for the mid-InfraRed (VISIR). We detect the S(1) pure rotational line of molecular hydrogen (H2) at 17.035 microns arising from the disk around the star. This detection reinforces the claim that HD97048 is a young object surrounded by a flared disk at an early stage of evolution. The emitting warm gas is located within the inner 35 AU of the disk. The line-to-continuum flux ratio is much higher than expected from models of disks at local thermodynamics equilibrium. We investigate the possible physical conditions, such as a gas-to-dust mass ratio higher than 100 and different excitation mechanisms of molecular hydrogen (X-ray heating, shocks, ...) in order to explain the detection. We tentatively estimate the mass of warm gas to be in the range from 0.01 to nearly 1 Jupiter Mass. Further observations are needed to better constrain the excitation mec...

  1. Formation of Massive Galaxies at High Redshift: Cold Streams, Clumpy Disks and Compact Spheroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dekel, Avishai; Ceverino, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple theoretical framework for massive galaxies at high redshift, where most of the assembly and star formation occurred. The evolution is governed by the interplay between fueling by smooth and clumpy streams and stabilization by a spheroid, leading to a bimodality in galaxy type by z~3. Disks of giant clumps and high star formation rate (SFR) form when the streams are smoother than average. The streams maintain a dense disk that undergoes gravitational fragmentation into several giant clumps, each a few percent of the disk mass. The disk may reach a disk-to-total mass ratio d~0.5 due to the dark-matter halo before it settles into a steady state with a slowly growing bulge, d=0.5-0.25. The clump interactions self-regulate an unstable disk with a dispersion-to-rotation ratio sigma_r/V=0.3-0.15. Encounters and dynamical friction induce inward clump migration in 10 dynamical times, ~0.5Gyr, while the disk expands in response. The inflowing smooth streams replenish the draining disk and prolong th...

  2. Ultrafiltration by a compacted clay membrane. I - Oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation. II - Sodium ion exclusion at various ionic strengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, T. B.; Hanshaw, B. B.

    1973-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the magnitude of the isotopic fractionation of distilled water and of 0.01N NaCl forced to flow at ambient temperature under a hydraulic pressure drop of 100 bars across a montmorillonite disk compacted to a porosity of 35% by a pressure of 330 bars. The ultrafiltrates in both experiments were depleted in D by 2.5% and in O-18 by 0.8% relative to the residual solution. No additional isotopic fractionation due to a salt-filtering mechanism was observed at NaCl concentrations up to 0.01N. Adsorption is most likely the principal mechanism which produces isotopic fractionation, but molecular diffusion may play a minor role. The results suggest that oxygen and hydrogen isotopic fractionation of ground water during passage through compacted clayey sediments should be a common occurrence, in accord with published interpretations of isotopic data from the Illinois and Alberta basins. It is shown how it is possible to proceed from the ion exchange capacity of clay minerals and, by means of the Donnan membrane equilibrium concept and the Teorell-Meyer-Siever theory, develop a theory to explain why and to what extent ultrafiltration occurs when solutions of known concentration are forced to flow through a clay membrane.

  3. A Survey of Compact Star Clusters in the South-West Field of the M31 Disk. Structural Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Sableviciute, I; Kodaira, K; Narbutis, D; Stonkute, R; Bridzius, A

    2006-01-01

    We present structural parameters for 51 compact star clusters from the survey of star clusters conducted in the South-West field of the M31 disk by Kodaira et al. (2004). Structural parameters of the clusters were derived by fitting the 2-D King and EFF (Elson, Fall and Freeman 1987) models to the V-band cluster images. Structural parameters derived for two M31 clusters, which are in common with the study based on the HST data (Barmby et al. 2002), are consistent with earlier determination. The M31 star cluster structural parameters in general are compatible with the corresponding Milky Way galaxy and Magellanic Clouds cluster parameters.

  4. Molecular Hydrogen Emission from Protoplanetary Disks II. Effects of X-ray Irradiation and Dust Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Nomura, H; Tsujimoto, M; Nakagawa, Y; Millar, T J

    2007-01-01

    Detailed models for the density and temperature profiles of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks are constructed by taking into account X-ray and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation from a central T Tauri star, as well as dust size growth and settling toward the disk midplane. The spatial and size distributions of dust grains in the disks are numerically computed by solving the coagulation equation for settling dust particles. The level populations and line emission of molecular hydrogen are calculated using the derived physical structure of the disks. X-ray irradiation is the dominant heating source of the gas in the inner disk region and in the surface layer, while the far UV heating dominates otherwise. If the central star has strong X-ray and weak UV radiation, the H2 level populations are controlled by X-ray pumping, and the X-ray induced transition lines could be observable. If the UV irradiation is strong, the level populations are controlled by thermal collisions or UV pumping, depending on the properties of...

  5. A novel, compact disk-like centrifugal microfluidics system for cell lysis and sample homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Smith, David; Zoval, Jim; Norton, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characterization of a novel platform for mechanical cell lysis of even the most difficult to lyse cell types on a micro or nanoscale (maximum 70 microL total volume). The system incorporates a machined plastic circular disk assembly, magnetic field actuated microfluidics, centrifugal cells and tissue homogenizer and centrifugation system. The mechanism of tissue disruption of this novel cell homogenization apparatus derives from the relative motion of ferromagnetic metal disks and grinding matrices in a liquid medium within individual chambers of the disk in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The oscillation of the ferromagnetic disks or blades produces mechanical impaction and shear forces capable of disrupting cells within the chamber both by direct action of the blade and by the motion of the surrounding lysis matrix, and by motion induced vortexing of buffer fluid. Glass beads or other grinding media are integrated into each lysis chamber within the disk to enhance the transfer of energy from the oscillating metal blade to the cells. The system also achieves the centrifugal elimination of solids from each liquid sample and allows the elution of clarified supernatants via siphoning into a collection chamber fabricated into the plastic disk assembly. This article describes system design, implementation and validation of proof of concept on two samples--Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae representing model systems for cells that are easy and difficult to lyse, respectively.

  6. Water transport in protoplanetary disks and the hydrogen isotopic composition of chondrites

    CERN Document Server

    Jacquet, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The D/H ratios of carbonaceous chondrites, believed to reflect that of water in the inner early solar system, are intermediate between the protosolar value and that of most comets. The isotopic composition of cometary water has been accounted for by several models where the isotopic composition of water vapor evolved by isotopic exchange with hydrogen gas in the protoplanetary disk. However, the position and the wide variations of the distribution of D/H ratios in carbonaceous chondrites have yet to be explained. In this paper, we assume that the D/H composition of cometary ice was achieved in the disk building phase and model the further isotopic evolution of water in the inner disk in the classical T Tauri stage. Reaction kinetics compel isotopic exchange between water and hydrogen gas to stop at $\\sim$500 K, but equilibrated water can be transported to the snow line (and beyond) via turbulent diffusion and consequently mix with isotopically comet-like water. Under certain simplifying assumptions, we calcul...

  7. The Majority of Compact Massive Galaxies at z~2 are Disk Dominated

    CERN Document Server

    van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; McGrath, Elizabeth J; Koekemoer, Anton M; Bell, Eric F; Holden, Bradford P; Robaina, Aday R; McIntosh, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the stellar structure of massive, quiescent galaxies at z~2, based on HST/WFC3 imaging from the Early Release Science program. Our sample of 14 galaxies has stellar masses of M* > 10^{10.8} Msol and photometric redshifts of 1.5 < z < 2.5. In agreement with previous work, their half-light radii are <2 kpc, much smaller than equally massive galaxies in the present-day universe. A significant subset of the sample appear highly flattened in projection, which implies, considering viewing angle statistics, that a significant fraction of the galaxies in our sample have pronounced disks. This is corroborated by two-dimensional surface brightness profile fits. We estimate that 65% +/- 15% of the population of massive, quiescent z~2 galaxies are disk-dominated. The median disk scale length is 1.5 kpc, substantially smaller than the disks of equally massive galaxies in the present-day universe. Our results provide strong observational evidence that the much-discussed ultra-dense high-redshift gal...

  8. On Relativistic Disk Spectroscopy in Compact Objects with X-ray CCD Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. M.; D'Aì, A.; Bautz, M. W.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Burrows, D. N.; Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Freyberg, M. J.; Haberl, F.; Kennea, J.; Nowak, M. A.; Reis, R. C.; Strohmayer, T. E.; Tsujimoto, M.

    2010-12-01

    X-ray charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are the workhorse detectors of modern X-ray astronomy. Typically covering the 0.3-10.0 keV energy range, CCDs are able to detect photoelectric absorption edges and K shell lines from most abundant metals. New CCDs also offer resolutions of 30-50 (E/ΔE), which is sufficient to detect lines in hot plasmas and to resolve many lines shaped by dynamical processes in accretion flows. The spectral capabilities of X-ray CCDs have been particularly important in detecting relativistic emission lines from the inner disks around accreting neutron stars and black holes. One drawback of X-ray CCDs is that spectra can be distorted by photon "pile-up," wherein two or more photons may be registered as a single event during one frame time. We have conducted a large number of simulations using a statistical model of photon pile-up to assess its impacts on relativistic disk line and continuum spectra from stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars. The simulations cover the range of current X-ray CCD spectrometers and operational modes typically used to observe neutron stars and black holes in X-ray binaries. Our results suggest that severe photon pile-up acts to falsely narrow emission lines, leading to falsely large disk radii and falsely low spin values. In contrast, our simulations suggest that disk continua affected by severe pile-up are measured to have falsely low flux values, leading to falsely small radii and falsely high spin values. The results of these simulations and existing data appear to suggest that relativistic disk spectroscopy is generally robust against pile-up when this effect is modest.

  9. Metal organoclays with compacted structure for truly physical capture of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, M. Nazir; Sennour, Radia; Arus, Vasilica Alisa; Sallam, Lamyaa M.; Roy, René; Azzouz, Abdelkrim

    2017-03-01

    Truly reversible capture of hydrogen was achieved at ambient conditions on Pd-loaded organo-montmorillonites obtained by photo-addition of different thiols on propargylated-TRIS cations already grafted on the clay surface. TEM insights showed that more than 90% of Pd0 incorporated occur as 0.3-0.5 nm subnanoparticles (PdSNPs). XPS and NMR analyses revealed simultaneous strong S:Pd0 and O:Pd0 interactions that "cement" the organic moiety around PdSNPs. The significant decrease in porosity suggests a compacted structure that impedes not only metal aggregation, but also hydrogen diffusion in the metal bulk. Thus, hydrogen appears to adsorb mainly via physical condensation around PdSNPs. These thiol-clay matrices showed hydrogen surface affinity factors of up to 0.51 mmol m-2 at ambient temperature and pressure. This is higher than those reported for much more sophisticated materials. DSC measurements showed very low desorption heat between 20 and 80 °C. Hydrogen release was achieved merely under vacuum or slight heating starting from 40 °C and was almost completed up to 85 °C. This provides a proof of concept of truly reversible capture of hydrogen for concentration and/or storage purposes. Such a performance has never been achieved at ambient temperature and pressure. These findings open new prospects to develop low-cost materials for reversible hydrogen storage without energy and safety constraints.

  10. Multi-cell disk-and-ring tapered structure for compact RF linacs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Boucher, S.; Kutsaev, S.; Hartzell, J.; Savin, E.

    2016-09-01

    A tubular disk-and-ring, tapered accelerating structure for small electron linacs and MicroLinacs is considered. It consists of metal and dielectric elements inserted into a metallic tube to eliminate multi-cell, multi-step brazing. The structure enables a wide range of phase velocities (including non-relativistic), a wide bandwidth allowing large number of cells (for standing wave mode) or short filling time (for traveling wave mode), combination of compensated and purely π-mode cells, alternative periodic focusing built-in to the RF structure (the disks), and combining of RF and vacuum windows. RF and accelerating performance of such a long structure having up to four dozens cells is analyzed. Some of beam dynamics, thermal, and vacuum aspects of the structure and MicroLinac performance are considered as well.

  11. Resonance oscillation of radiative shock waves in accretion disks around compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Molteni, D; Chakrabarti, S K; Molteni, Diego M; Chakrabarti, Sandip K

    1995-01-01

    We extend our previous numerical simulation of accretion disks with shock waves when cooling effects are also included. We consider bremsstrahlung and other power law processes: \\Lambda \\propto T^{\\alpha} \\rho^2 to mimic cooling in our simulation. We employ {\\it Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics} technique as in the past. We observe that for a given angular momentum of the flow, the shock wave undergoes a steady, radial oscillation with the period is roughly equal to the cooling time. Oscillations seem to take place when the disk and cooling parameters (i.e., accretion rate, cooling process) are such that the infall time from shock is of the same order as the post-shock cooling time. The amplitude of oscillation could be up to ten percent of the distance of the shock wave from the black hole when the black hole is accreting. When the accretion is impossible due to the centrifugal barrier, the amplitude variation could be much larger. Due to the oscillation, the energy output from the disk is also seen to vary q...

  12. Formation and evolution of molecular hydrogen in disk galaxies with different masses and Hubble types

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the physical properties of molecular hydrogen (H2) in isolated and interacting disk galaxies with different masses and Hubble types by using chemodynamical simulations with H2 formation on dust grains and dust growth and destruction in interstellar medium (ISM). We particularly focus on the dependences of H2 gas mass fractions (f_H2), spatial distributions of HI and H2, and local H2-scaling relations on initial halo masses (M_h), baryonic fractions (f_bary), gas mass fractions (f_g), and Hubble types. The principal results are as follows. The final f_H2 can be larger in disk galaxies with higher M_h, f_bary, and f_g. Some low-mass disk models with M_h smaller than 10^10 M_sun show extremely low f_H2 and thus no/little star formation, even if initial f_g is quite large (>0.9). Big galactic bulges can severely suppress the formation of H2 from HI on dust grains whereas strong stellar bars can not only enhance f_H2 but also be responsible for the formation of H2-dominated central rings. The projec...

  13. Speciation and dissolution of hydrogen in the proto-lunar disk

    CERN Document Server

    Pahlevan, Kaveh; Fegley, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Despite very high temperatures accompanying lunar origin, indigenous water in the form of OH has been unambiguously observed in Apollo samples in recent years. Such observations have prompted questions about the abundance and distribution of lunar hydrogen. Here, we investigate the related question of the origin of lunar H: is the hydrogen observed a remnant of a much larger initial inventory that was inherited from a wet Earth but partly depleted during the process of origin, or was hydrogen quantitatively lost from the lunar material, with water being delivered to lunar reservoirs via subsequent impacts after the origins sequence? Motivated by recent results pointing to a limited extent of hydrogen escape from the gravity field of the Earth during lunar origin, we apply a newly developed thermodynamic model of liquid-vapor silicates to the proto-lunar disk to interrogate the behavior of H as a trace element in the energetic aftermath of the giant impact. We find that: (1) pre-existing H-bearing molecules ar...

  14. First Extragalactic Direct Detection of Large-Scale Molecular Hydrogen in the Disk of NGC 891

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentijn, Edwin A.; van der Werf, Paul P.

    1999-09-01

    We present direct observations of molecular hydrogen in the disk of the nearby edge-on spiral galaxy NGC 891. With Infrared Space Observatory's Short-Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) it has been possible, for the first time, to observe the lowest pure rotational lines of H2 [S(0) at 28.2 μm and S(1) at 17.0 μm] at eight positions throughout the stellar disk of NGC 891. Both lines have been detected at all the surveyed positions out to 11 kpc north of the center of the galaxy. An H2 rotation curve is derived, and we compare H2 radial profiles with CO and H I data. The observed line ratios indicate relatively warm (T=150-230 K) molecular clouds scattered throughout the disk in addition to a massive cooler (T=80-90 K) component which dominates the signal in the outer regions. For H2 ortho/para ratios of 2-3, the cool gas has typical edge-on column densities (1-3)×1023 cm-2 (or ~3000 Msolar pc-2), in which case it outweighs the H I by a factor of 5-15. This factor matches well the mass required to resolve the problem of the missing matter of spiral galaxies within at least the optical disk. The newly discovered cool H2 component would be less massive in the case in which its dominant ortho/para ratio is near unity. We address the thermal balance of this component by a comparison with [C II] 158 μm data. When combining the new coolish molecular gas results with recent SCUBA cold dust observations of NGC 891, the total gas-to-dust ratio at rISO, an ESA project with instruments funded by ESA member states (especially the PI countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom) and with the participation of ISAS and NASA.

  15. On Relativistic Disk Spectroscopy in Compact Objects with X-ray CCD Cameras

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, J M; Bautz, M W; Bhattacharyya, S; Burrows, D N; Cackett, E M; Fabian, A C; Freyberg, M J; Haberl, F; Kennea, J; Nowak, M A; Reis, R C; Strohmayer, T E; Tsujimoto, M

    2010-01-01

    X-ray charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are the workhorse detectors of modern X-ray astronomy. Typically covering the 0.3-10.0 keV energy range, CCDs are able to detect photoelectric absorption edges and K shell lines from most abundant metals. New CCDs also offer resolutions of 30-50 (E/dE), which is sufficient to detect lines in hot plasmas and to resolve many lines shaped by dynamical processes in accretion flows. The spectral capabilities of X-ray CCDs have been particularly important in detecting relativistic emission lines from the inner disks around accreting neutron stars and black holes. One drawback of X-ray CCDs is that spectra can be distorted by photon "pile-up", wherein two or more photons may be registered as a single event during one frame time. We have conducted a large number of simulations using a statistical model of photon pile-up to assess its impacts on relativistic disk line and continuum spectra from stellar-mass black holes and neutron stars. The simulations cover the range of current X-...

  16. Compact Planetary Nebulae in the Galactic Disk: Analysis of the Central Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno-Ibáñez, Manuel; Shaw, Richard A; Stanghellini, Letizia

    2016-01-01

    We have obtained multi-wavelength observations of compact Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) to probe post-Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) evolution from the onset of nebular ejection. We analyze new observations from HST to derive the masses and evolutionary status of their central stars (CSs) in order to better understand the relationship between the CS properties and those of the surrounding nebulae. We also compare this sample with others we obtained using the same technique in different metallicity environments: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. We work with HST/WFC3 images of 51 targets obtained in a snapshot survey (GO-11657). The high spatial resolution of HST allows us to resolve these compact PNe and distinguish the CS emission from that of their surrounding PNe. The targets were imaged through the filters F200LP, F350LP, and F814W from which we derive Johnson V and I magnitudes. We derive CS bolometric luminosities and effective temperatures using the Zanstra technique, from a combination of HST p...

  17. Compact and portable multiline UV and visible Raman lasers in hydrogen-filled HC-PCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Y; Couny, F; Light, P S; Mangan, B J; Benabid, F

    2010-04-15

    We report on the realization of compact UV visible multiline Raman lasers based on two types of hydrogen-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber. The first, with a large pitch Kagome lattice structure, offers a broad spectral coverage from near IR through to the much sought after yellow, deep-blue and UV, whereas the other, based on photonic bandgap guidance, presents a pump conversion concentrated in the visible region. The high Raman efficiency achieved through these fibers allows for compact, portable diode-pumped solid-state lasers to be used as pumps. Each discrete component of this laser system exhibits a spectral density several orders of magnitude larger than what is achieved with supercontinuum sources and a narrow linewidth, making it an ideal candidate for forensics and biomedical applications.

  18. Compact Cryogenic Source of Periodic Hydrogen and Argon Droplet Beams for Intense Laser-Plasma Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Fraga, R A Costa; Kühnel, M; Hochhaus, D C; Schottelius, A; Polz, J; Kaluza, M C; Neumayer, P; Grisenti, R E

    2011-01-01

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen (H2) and argon (Ar) droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art low-repetition rate high-power lasers, in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We demonstrate this explicitly by irradiating Ar droplets with pulses from a Petawatt laser.

  19. Compact cryogenic source of periodic hydrogen and argon droplet beams for relativistic laser-plasma generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraga, R. A. Costa; Kalinin, A.; Kuehnel, M.; Schottelius, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hochhaus, D. C.; Neumayer, P. [EMMI Extreme Matter Institute and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Polz, J. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Froebelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen and argon droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art high-power lasers in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We show this by irradiating argon droplets with multi-terawatt pulses.

  20. A preliminary study of a negative hydrogen PIG-type ion source for the compact cyclotron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhen; LONG Ji-Dong; DONG Pan; WANG Tao; WEI Tao; HE Xiao-Zhong; ZHANG Kai-Zhi; SHI Jin-Shui

    2012-01-01

    A Penning ion gauge (PIG)-type ion source has been used for the generation of negative hydrogen ions (H-) as the internal ion source of the compact cyclotron.The discharge characteristics of the ion source are systematically studied for hydrogen operation at different discharge currents and gas flow rates on the prototype cyclotron.The preliminary study results for the low DC voltage H- extraction measurements are presented in this paper.The H- beam current is measured by the order of magnitude from several tens to hundreds of microamperes at different parameter conditions.The discussion and analysis for the experimental results are good for improving the design and working stability of the ion source.

  1. K$\\alpha$ iron line profile from accretion disks around regular and singular exotic compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the super-massive black hole candidates in galactic nuclei can be tested by analyzing the profile of the K$\\alpha$ iron line observed in their X-ray spectrum. In this paper, we consider the possibility that the spacetime in the immediate vicinity of these objects may be described by some non vacuum exact solutions of Einstein's equations resulting as the end-state of gravitational collapse. The vacuum far away portion of the spacetime is described by the Schwarzschild metric, while the interior part may be either regular or have a naked singularity at the center. The iron line generated around this class of objects has specific features, which can be used to distinguish such objects from Kerr black holes. In particular, their iron line cannot have the characteristic low-energy tail of the line generated from accretion disks around fast-rotating Kerr black holes. We can thus conclude that the super-massive black hole candidates whose spin parameter has been estimated to be close to 1 assuming the...

  2. Signatures of Hot Molecular Hydrogen Absorption from Protoplanetary Disks. I. Non-thermal Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Keri; France, Kevin; Arulanantham, Nicole; Parke Loyd, R. O.; Kruczek, Nicholas

    2017-09-01

    The environment around protoplanetary disks (PPDs) regulates processes that drive the chemical and structural evolution of circumstellar material. We perform a detailed empirical survey of warm molecular hydrogen (H2) absorption observed against H i-Lyα (Lyα: λ1215.67) emission profiles for 22 PPDs, using archival Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet (UV) spectra to identify H2 absorption signatures and quantify the column densities of H2 ground states in each sightline. We compare thermal equilibrium models of H2 to the observed H2 rovibrational level distributions. We find that, for the majority of targets, there is a clear deviation in high-energy states (T exc ≳ 20,000 K) away from thermal equilibrium populations (T(H2) ≳ 3500 K). We create a metric to estimate the total column density of non-thermal H2 (N(H2)nLTE) and find that the total column densities of thermal (N(H2)) and N(H2)nLTE correlate for transition disks and targets with detectable C iv-pumped H2 fluorescence. We compare N(H2) and N(H2)nLTE to circumstellar observables and find that N(H2)nLTE correlates with X-ray and far-UV luminosities, but no correlations are observed with the luminosities of discrete emission features (e.g., Lyα, C iv). Additionally, N(H2) and N(H2)nLTE are too low to account for the H2 fluorescence observed in PPDs, so we speculate that this H2 may instead be associated with a diffuse, hot, atomic halo surrounding the planet-forming disk. We create a simple photon-pumping model for each target to test this hypothesis and find that Lyα efficiently pumps H2 levels with T exc ≥ 10,000 K out of thermal equilibrium.

  3. Sharp edges to neutral hydrogen disks in galaxies and the extragalactic radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Philip

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that the very sharp truncation of the neutral hydrogen distribution seen in NGC 3198 (and probably M33) is well modeled as the result of ionization of the atomic gas by the extragalactic radiation field. Below a critical column density of about a few times 10 exp 19/sq cm the gas is dominantly ionized and undetectable in the 21-cm line. It is inferred from the photoionization models that the total disk gas distribution in NGC 3198 is actually fairly axisymmetric. The critical column density for ionization is not a strong function of galaxy mass or mass distribution; thus, all galaxies should show a cutoff at approximately the same column density. Specific models of 3198 suggest that the extragalactic ionizing photon flux is 5000-10,000 photons/sq cm s.

  4. Sharp edges to neutral hydrogen disks in galaxies and the extragalactic radiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Philip

    1993-09-01

    It is shown that the very sharp truncation of the neutral hydrogen distribution seen in NGC 3198 (and probably M33) is well modeled as the result of ionization of the atomic gas by the extragalactic radiation field. Below a critical column density of about a few times 10 exp 19/sq cm the gas is dominantly ionized and undetectable in the 21-cm line. It is inferred from the photoionization models that the total disk gas distribution in NGC 3198 is actually fairly axisymmetric. The critical column density for ionization is not a strong function of galaxy mass or mass distribution; thus, all galaxies should show a cutoff at approximately the same column density. Specific models of 3198 suggest that the extragalactic ionizing photon flux is 5000-10,000 photons/sq cm s.

  5. ORFEUS echelle spectra Molecular hydrogen in disk, IVC, and HVC gas in front of the LMC

    CERN Document Server

    Bluhm, H J; Marggraf, O; Richter, P; Bluhm, Hartmut; Boer, Klaas. S. de; Marggraf, Ole; Richter, Philipp

    2001-01-01

    In front of the LMC molecular hydrogen is found in absorption near 0 km/s, being local disk gas, near +60 km/s in an intermediate velocity cloud, and near +120 km/s, in a high velocity halo cloud. The nature of the gas is discussed based on four ORFEUS far UV spectra of LMC stars and including data from the ground and from the IUE satellite. The local gas is cool and, given a span of sight lines of only 2.5 deg, rather fluffy. The fractional abundance of H_2 varies from log(f)=-5.4 to -3.3. Metal depletions (up to -1.7 dex for Fe) are typical for galactic disk gas. In the IV and HV gas an apparent underabundance of neutral oxygen points to an ionization level of the gas of about 90%. H_2 is detected in IV and HV gas toward HD 269546. In the IV gas we find an H_2 column density of log(N)\\simeq15.6. The H_2 excitation indicates that the line of sight samples a cloud at a temperature below 150 K. Column densities are too small to detect the higher UV pumped excitation levels. The high velocity H_2 (log(N)\\simeq1...

  6. Compact disk (CD)-shaped device for single cell isolation and PCR of a specific gene in the isolated cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hidenori; Takamura, Yuzuru; Kubo, Izumi

    2010-12-01

    For immediate discrimination among isolated cells we propose a novel device and technique for isolation of cells and sequential detection of specific gene(s) within them by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we isolated Salmonella enterica cells and detected the Salmonella-specific invA gene from isolated cells by PCR on a compact disk (CD)-shaped device. This device enabled liquid flow by centrifugal force without a micro pump, and was fabricated from silicon wafer and glass to avoid evaporation of a small amount of reagent. One device has 24 microchannels, and 313 microchambers integrated on each microchannel. One microliter of PCR mixture containing cells was separated into microchambers on the device at 5000 rpm for 30 s. Each microchamber contained approximately 1.5 nL PCR mixture. A Poisson distribution of S. enterica cells was observed for different densities of cell suspension. At 200 cells μL(-1) of S. enterica or less, isolated single cells could be determined on the device by amplification of DNA of the invA gene; at 400 cells μL(-1), chambers containing no, one, two, or three cells could be determined on the device. Selective detection of S. enterica was achieved by PCR from a mixture of S. enterica and Escherichia coli on the CD-shaped device.

  7. A Portable Automatic Endpoint Detection System for Amplicons of Loop Mediated Isothermal Amplification on Microfluidic Compact Disk Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Mukim Uddin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many improvements have been made in foodborne pathogen detection methods to reduce the impact of food contamination. Several rapid methods have been developed with biosensor devices to improve the way of performing pathogen detection. This paper presents an automated endpoint detection system for amplicons generated by loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP on a microfluidic compact disk platform. The developed detection system utilizes a monochromatic ultraviolet (UV emitter for excitation of fluorescent labeled LAMP amplicons and a color sensor to detect the emitted florescence from target. Then it processes the sensor output and displays the detection results on liquid crystal display (LCD. The sensitivity test has been performed with detection limit up to 2.5 × 10−3 ng/µL with different DNA concentrations of Salmonella bacteria. This system allows a rapid and automatic endpoint detection which could lead to the development of a point-of-care diagnosis device for foodborne pathogens detection in a resource-limited environment.

  8. THE COMPACT, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO SOURCE PROJECTED INSIDE W3(OH): EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOEVAPORATED DISK?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodriguez-Garza, Carolina B.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan E.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A.; Lizano, Susana, E-mail: s.dzib@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radiostronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico)

    2013-08-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the compact ({approx}0.''05), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact H II region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 (S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). This spectral index and the brightness temperature of the source ({approx}6500 K) suggest that we are most likely detecting partially optically thick free-free radiation. The radio source is probably associated with the ionizing star of W3(OH), but an interpretation in terms of an ionized stellar wind fails because the detected flux densities are orders of magnitude larger than expected. We discuss several scenarios and tentatively propose that the radio emission could arise in a static ionized atmosphere around a fossil photoevaporated disk.

  9. Compact stellar systems in the polar ring galaxies NGC 4650A and NGC 3808B: Clues to polar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    Ordenes-Briceño, Yasna; Puzia, Thomas H; Goudfrooij, Paul; Arnaboldi, Magda

    2016-01-01

    Polar ring galaxies (PRGs) are composed of two kinematically distinct and nearly orthogonal components, a host galaxy (HG) and a polar ring/disk (PR). The HG usually contains an older stellar population than the PR. The suggested formation channel of PRGs is still poorly constrained. Suggested options are merger, gas accretion, tidal interaction, or a combination of both. To constrain the formation scenario of PRGs, we study the compact stellar systems (CSSs) in two PRGs at different evolutionary stages: NGC 4650A with well-defined PR, and NGC 3808B, which is in the process of PR formation. We use archival HST/WFPC2 imaging. PSF-fitting techniques, and color selection criteria are used to select cluster candidates. Photometric analysis of the CSSs was performed to determine their ages and masses using stellar population models at a fixed metallicity. Both PRGs contain young CSSs ($< 1$ Gyr) with masses of up to 5$\\times$10$^6$M$_\\odot$, mostly located in the PR and along the tidal debris. The most massive ...

  10. Hydrocarbon reforming catalysts and new reactor designs for compact hydrogen generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.; Schwab, E.; Urtel, H. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Farrauto, R. [BASF Catalysts LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-30

    A hydrogen based future energy scenario will use fuel cells for the conversion of chemically stored energy into electricity. Depending upon the type of fuel cell, different specifications will apply for the feedstock which is converted in the cell, ranging from very clean hydrogen for PEM-FC's to desulfurized methane for SOFC and MCFC technology. For the foreseeable future, hydrogen will be supplied by conventional reforming, however operated in compact and dynamic reformer designs. This requires that known catalyst formulations are offered in specific geometries, giving flexibility for novel reactor design options. These specific geometries can be special tablet shapes as well as monolith structures. Finally, also nonhydrocarbon feedstock might be used in special applications, e.g. bio-based methanol and ethanol. BASF offers catalysts for the full process chain starting from feedstock desulfurization via reforming, high temperature shift, low temperature shift to CO fine polishing either via selective oxidation or selective methanation. Depending upon the customer's design, most stages can be served either with precious metal based monolith solutions or base metal tablet solutions. For the former, we have taken the automobile catalyst monolith support and extended its application to the fuel cell hydrogen generation. Washcoats of precious metal supported catalysts can for example be deposited on ceramic monoliths and/or metal heat exchangers for efficient generation of hydrogen. Major advantages are high through puts due to more efficient heat transfer for catalysts on metal heat exchangers, lower pressure drop with greater catalyst mechanical and thermal stability compared to particulate catalysts. Base metal tablet catalysts on the other hand can have intrinsic cost advantages, larger fractions of the reactor can be filled with active mass, and if produced in unconventional shape, again novel reactor designs are made possible. Finally, if it comes to

  11. The Morphologies of Massive Galaxies at 1Compact Bulges, and the Rise and Fall of Massive Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bruce, V A; Cirasuolo, M; McLure, R J; Targett, T A; Bell, E F; Croton, D J; Dekel, A; Faber, S M; Ferguson, H C; Grogin, N A; Kocevski, D D; Koekemoer, A M; Koo, D C; Lai, K; Lotz, J M; McGrath, E J; Newman, J A; van der Wel, A

    2012-01-01

    We have used deep, HST, near-IR imaging to study the morphological properties of the most massive galaxies at high z, modelling the WFC3/IR H-band images of the ~200 galaxies in the CANDELS-UDS field with 1 10^11 M_sun. We have used both single-Sersic and bulge+disk models, have investigated the errors/biases introduced by uncertainties in the background and the PSF, and have obtained formally-acceptable model fits to >90% of the galaxies. Our results indicate that these massive galaxies at 1 2 the compact bulges display effective radii a factor ~4 smaller than local ellipticals of comparable mass. These trends appear to extend to the bulge components of disk-dominated galaxies, and vice versa. We also find that, while such massive galaxies at low z are bulge-dominated, at 1 2 they are mostly disk-dominated. The majority of the disk-dominated galaxies are actively forming stars, but this is also true for many of the bulge-dominated systems. Interestingly, however, while most of the quiescent galaxies are b...

  12. A Circumbinary Disk Scenario for the Negative Orbital-period Derivative of the Ultra-compact X-Ray Binary 4U 1820-303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Chen, Wen-Cong; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-03-01

    It is generally thought that an ultra-compact X-ray Binary is composed of a neutron star and a helium white dwarf donor star. As one of the most compact binaries, 4U 1820-303 in globular cluster NGC 6624 was predicted to have an orbital period of \\dot{P}/P∼ 1.1× {10}-7 yr‑1 if the mass transfer is fully driven by gravitational radiation. However, recent analysis of 16 year data from Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer and other historical records has yielded a negative orbital-period derivative in the past 35 years. In this work, we propose an evolutionary circumbinary (CB) disk model to account for this anomalous orbital-period derivative. 4U 1820-30 is known to undergo superburst events caused by runaway thermal nuclear burning on the neutron star. We assume that, for a small fraction of the superbursts, part of the ejected material may form a CB disk around the binary. If the recurrence time of such superbursts is ∼10,000 year and ∼10% of the ejected mass feeds a CB disk, the abrupt angular-momentum loss causes a temporary orbital shrink, and the donor’s radius and its Roche lobe radius do not keep in step. Driven by mass transfer and angular-momentum loss, the binary would adjust its orbital parameters to recover a new stable stage. Based on theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, we find that the required feed mass at the CB disk is approximately ∼10‑8 M ⊙.

  13. Atomic Hydrogen Gas in Dark-Matter Minihalos and the Compact High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, A; Wolfire, M G

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the coupled hydrostatic and ionization structures of pressure-supported gas clouds that are confined by gravitationally dominant dark-matter (DM) mini-halos and by an external bounding pressure provided by a hot medium. We focus on clouds that are photoionized and heated by the present-day background metagalactic field and determine the conditions for the formation of warm (WNM), and multi-phased (CNM/WNM) neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) cores in the DM-dominated clouds. We consider LCDM dark-matter halos, and we compute models for a wide range of halo masses, total cloud gas masses, and external bounding pressures. We present models for the pressure-supported HI structures observed in the Local Group dwarf galaxies Leo A and Sag DIG. We then construct minihalo models for the multi-phased (and low-metallicity) compact high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs). If the CHVCs are drawn from the same family of halos that successfully reproduce the dwarf galaxy observations, then the CHVCs must be "circumgalactic ...

  14. Mechanistic Switching by Hydronium Ion Activity for Hydrogen Evolution and Oxidation over Polycrystalline Platinum Disk and Platinum/Carbon Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2014-07-22

    Fundamental electrochemical reactions, namely the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), are re-evaluated under various pH conditions over polycrystalline Pt disk electrodes and Pt/C electrodes to investigate the overpotential and Tafel relations. Kinetic trends are observed and can be classified into three pH regions: acidic (1-5), neutral (5-9), and alkaline (9-13). Under neutral conditions, in which H2O becomes the primary reactant, substantial overpotential, which is not affected by pH and the supporting electrolyte type, is required for electrocatalysis in both directions. This ion independence, including pH, suggests that HER/HOR performance under neutral conditions solely reflects the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity of Pt in the rate determining steps, which involve electron transfer with water molecules. A global picture of the HER/HOR, resulting from mechanistic switching accompanied by change in pH, is detailed.

  15. Disk Stability and Neutral Hydrogen as a Tracer of Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Meurer, Gerhardt R; de Blok, W J G

    2012-01-01

    We derive the projected surface mass distribution Sigma_M for spherically symmetric mass distributions having an arbitrary rotation curve. For a galaxy with a flat rotation curve and an ISM disk having a constant Toomre stability parameter, Q, the ISM surface mass density Sigma_g as well as Sigma_M both fall off as 1/R. We use published data on a sample of 20 well studied galaxies to show that ISM disks do maintain a constant Q over radii usually encompassing more than 50% of the HI mass. The power law slope in Sigma_g covers a range of exponents and is well correlated with the slope in the epicyclic frequency. This implies that the ISM disk is responding to the potential, and hence that secular evolution is important for setting the structure of ISM disks. We show that the gas to total mass ratio should be anti-correlated with the maximum rotational velocity, and that the sample falls on the expected relationship. A very steep fall off in Sigma_g is required at the outermost radii to keep the mass and angula...

  16. The compact, time-variable radio source projected inside W3(OH): Evidence for a Photoevaporated Disk?

    CERN Document Server

    Dzib, Sergio A; Rodriguez, Luis F; Kurtz, Stan E; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A; Lizano, Susana

    2013-01-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of the compact (~ 0.05"), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact HII region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of \\alpha = 1.3 +- 0.3 (S_\

  17. ALMA reveals a candidate hot and compact disk around the O-type protostar IRAS 16547$-$4247

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, Luis; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Rodriguez, Luis F; Garay, Guido; Moran, James M; Franco-Hernandez, Ramiro

    2014-01-01

    We present high angular resolution ($\\sim$ 0.3$"$) submillimeter continuum (0.85 mm) and line observations of the O-type protostar IRAS 16547$-$4247 carried out with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). In the 0.85 mm continuum band, the observations revealed two compact sources (with a separation of 2$"$), one of them associated with IRAS 16547$-$4247, and the other one to the west. Both sources are well resolved angularly, revealing a clumpy structure. On the other hand, the line observations revealed a rich variety of molecular species related to both continuum sources. In particular, we found a large number of S-bearing molecules, such as the rare molecule methyl mercaptan (CH$_3$SH). At scales larger than 10,000 AU, molecules (e.g., SO$_2$ or OCS) mostly with low excitation temperatures in the upper states (E$_k$ $\\lesssim$ 300 K) are present in both millimeter continuum sources, and show a southeast-northwest velocity gradient of 7 km s$^{-1}$ over 3$"$ (165 km s$^{-1}$ pc$^{-1}$). W...

  18. Subarcsecond Imaging of the NGC 6334 I(N) Protocluster: Two Dozen Compact Sources and a Massive Disk Candidate

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, T R; Cyganowski, C J; Young, K H

    2014-01-01

    Using the SMA and VLA, we have imaged the massive protocluster NGC6334I(N) at high angular resolution (0.5"~650AU) from 6cm to 0.87mm, detecting 18 new compact continuum sources. Three of the new sources are coincident with previously-identified water masers. Together with the previously-known sources, these data bring the number of likely protocluster members to 25 for a protostellar density of ~700 pc^-3. Our preliminary measurement of the Q-parameter of the minimum spanning tree is 0.82 -- close to the value for a uniform volume distribution. All of the (nine) sources with detections at multiple frequencies have SEDs consistent with dust emission, and two (SMA1b and SMA4) also have long wavelength emission consistent with a central hypercompact HII region. Thermal spectral line emission, including CH3CN, is detected in six sources: LTE model fitting of CH3CN(J=12-11) yields temperatures of 72-373K, confirming the presence of multiple hot cores. The fitted LSR velocities range from -3.3 to -7.0 km/s, with a...

  19. Novel design of a disk-shaped compacted micro-structured air-breathing PEM fuel cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of microelectromechanical system (MEMS technology makes it possible to manufacture the miniaturized fuel cell systems for application in portable electronic devices. The majority of research on micro-scale fuel cells is aimed at micro-power applications. There are many new miniaturized applications which can only be realized if a higher energy density power source is available compared to button cells and other small batteries. In small-scale applications, the fuel cell should be exceptionally small and have highest energy density. One way to achieve these requirements is to reduce the thickness of the cell (compacted-design for increasing the volumetric power density of a fuel cell power supply. A novel, simple to construct, air-breathing micro-structured PEM fuel cell which work in still or slowly moving air has been developed. The novel geometry enables optimum air access to the cathode without the need for pumps, fans or similar devices. In addition, the new design can achieve much higher active area to volume ratios, and hence higher volumetric power densities. Three-dimensional, multi-phase, non-isothermal CFD model of this novel design has been developed. This comprehensive model account for the major transport phenomena in an air-breathing micro-structured PEM fuel cell: convective and diffusive heat and mass transfer, electrode kinetics, transport and phase-change mechanism of water, and potential fields. The model is shown to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, and transport phenomena that cannot be studied experimentally. Fully three-dimensional results of the species profiles, temperature distribution, potential distribution, and local current density distribution are presented and analyzed with a focus on the physical insight and fundamental understanding. They can provide a solid basis for optimizing the geometry of the PEM micro fuel cell stack running with a passive mode.

  20. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Low Mass X-ray Binaries : Accretion Disk Contamination and Compact Object Mass Determination in V404 Cyg and Cen X-4

    CERN Document Server

    Khargharia, Juthika; Robinson, Edward L

    2010-01-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) broadband (0.80--2.42 $\\mu$m) spectroscopy of two low mass X-ray binaries: V404 Cyg and Cen X-4. One important parameter required in the determination of the mass of the compact objects in these systems is the binary inclination. We can determine the inclination by modeling the ellipsoidal modulations of the Roche-lobe filling donor star, but the contamination of the donor star light from other components of the binary, particularly the accretion disk, must be taken into account. To this end, we determined the donor star contribution to the infrared flux by comparing the spectra of V404 Cyg and Cen X-4 to those of various field K-stars of known spectral type. For V404 Cyg, we determined that the donor star has a spectral type of K3 III. We determined the fractional donor contribution to the NIR flux in the H- and K-bands as $0.98 \\pm .05$ and $0.97 \\pm .09$, respectively. We remodeled the H-band light curve from \\citet{sanwal1996} after correcting for the donor star contribution...

  1. Hydrogen oxidation kinetics on model Pd/C electrodes: Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and rotating disk electrode study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pronkin, Sergey N., E-mail: sergey.pronkin@unistra.f [Laboratory of Materials, Surfaces and Catalytic Processes, UMR 7515 of CNRS-UdS-ECPM, 25 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg (France); Bonnefont, Antoine [Institut de Chimie de Strasbourg, UMR 7177, CNRS-Universite de Strasbourg, 4 rue Blaise Pascal, 67000 Strasbourg (France); Ruvinskiy, Pavel S.; Savinova, Elena R. [Laboratory of Materials, Surfaces and Catalytic Processes, UMR 7515 of CNRS-UdS-ECPM, 25 rue Becquerel, 67087 Strasbourg (France)

    2010-03-30

    This work reports on the kinetics of the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) on model Pd nanoparticles supported on a low surface area carbon substrate. Two Pd/C samples, with the average particle size 2.6 and 4.0 nm were used. The structure of the catalysts was characterized with the ex situ (electron microscopy) and in situ (electrochemical) methods. We utilized the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry to study the kinetics of the HOR on Pd/C. The relevance of these techniques for elucidating the kinetics and the mechanism of the HOR on Pd/C was explored. The experimental results suggest that the catalytic activity of Pd in the HOR is more than 2 orders of magnitude lower than that of Pt, and does not depend on the particle size in the range from 2.6 to 4.0 nm. Computational modeling of the experimental steady-state (RDE) and non-steady-state (EIS) data shows that the reaction kinetics can be adequately described within Heyrovsky-Volmer mechanism, with the rate constants upsilon{sub 0H} = (8.8 +- 1.5) x 10{sup -10} mol cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} and upsilon{sub 0V} = (1.0 +- 0.3) x 10{sup -8} mol cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The model suggests that underpotentially deposited hydrogen H{sub UPD} is unlikely to be the active intermediate H{sub ad} of the HOR. It is concluded that the surface coverage of H{sub ad} deviates from that of H{sub UPD} with increasing overpotential, and the lateral interactions within H{sub ad} adlayer are weak.

  2. J-R Curve Determination for Disk-shaped Compact Specimens Based on the Normalization Method and Direct Current Potential Drop Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiang [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Material ductile fracture toughness can be described by J-integral versus crack extension relationship (J-R curve). As a conventional J-R curve measurement method, unloading compliance (UC) becomes impractical in elevated temperature testing due to relaxation of the material and a friction induced back-up shape of the J-R curve. In addition, the UC method may underpredict the crack extension for standard disk-shaped compact (DC(T)) specimens. In order to address these issues, the normalization method and direct current potential drop (DCPD) technique were applied for determining J-R curves at 24 C and 500 C for 0.18T DC(T) specimens made from type 316L stainless steel. For comparison purchase, the UC method was also applied in 24 C tests. The normalization method was able to yield valid J-R curves in all tests. The J-R curves from the DCPD technique need adjustment to account for the potential drop induced by plastic deformation, crack blunting, etc. and after applying a newly-developed DCPD adjustment procedure, the post-adjusted DCPD J-R curves essentially matched J-R curves from the normalization method. In contrast, the UC method underpredicted the crack extension in all tests resulting in substantial deviation in the derived J-R curves manifested by high Jq values than the normalization or DCPD method. Only for tests where the UC method underpredicted the crack extension by a very small value, J-R curves determined by the UC method were similar to those determined by the normalization or DCPD method.

  3. Two-dimensional vortices and accretion disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, Michiel Doede

    2001-01-01

    Observations show that there are disks around certain stars that slowly rain down on the central (compact) object: accretion disks. The rate of depletion of the disk might be slow but is still larger than was expected on theoretical grounds. That is why it has been suggested that the disks are tu

  4. Why are some galaxy disks extremely thin?

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Arunima

    2012-01-01

    Some low surface brightness galaxies are known to have extremely thin stellar disks with the vertical to planar axes ratio 0.1 or less, often referred to as superthin disks. Although their existence is known for over three decades, the physical origin for the thin distribution is not understood. We model the stellar thickness for a two-component (gravitationally coupled stars and gas) disk embedded in a dark matter halo, for a superthin galaxy UGC 7321 which has a dense, compact halo, and compare with a typical dwarf galaxy HoII which has a non-compact halo. We show that while the presence of gas does constrain the disk thickness, it is the compact dark matter halo which plays the decisive role in determining the superthin disk distribution in low-mass disks. Thus the compact dark matter halo significantly affects the disk structure and this could be important for the early evolution of galaxies.

  5. Multi-resonant silver nano-disk patterned thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar cells for Staebler-Wronski effect compensation

    CERN Document Server

    Vora, Ankit; Pearce, Joshua M; Bergstrom, Paul L; Güney, Durdu Ö

    2014-01-01

    We study polarization independent improved light trapping in commercial thin film hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar photovoltaic cells using a three-dimensional silver array of multi-resonant nano-disk structures embedded in a silicon nitride anti-reflection coating (ARC) to enhance optical absorption in the intrinsic layer (i-a-Si:H) for the visible spectrum for any polarization angle. Predicted total optical enhancement (OE) in absorption in the i-a-Si:H for AM-1.5 solar spectrum is 18.51% as compared to the reference, and producing a 19.65% improvement in short-circuit current density (JSC) over 11.7 mA/cm2 for a reference cell. The JSC in the nano-disk patterned solar cell (NDPSC) was found to be higher than the commercial reference structure for any incident angle. The NDPSC has a multi-resonant optical response for the visible spectrum and the associated mechanism for OE in i-a-Si:H layer is excitation of Fabry-Perot resonance facilitated by surface plasmon resonances. The detrimental Staebl...

  6. THE DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF LOW-MASS HYDROGEN-BURNING STARS, BROWN DWARFS, AND PLANETARY-MASS OBJECTS FORMED THROUGH DISK FRAGMENTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yun; Kouwenhoven, M. B. N. [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Yiheyuan Lu 5, Haidian Qu, Beijing 100871 (China); Stamatellos, D. [Jeremiah Horrocks Institute for Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE (United Kingdom); Goodwin, S. P., E-mail: yunli@pku.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Sheffield, Hicks Building, Hounsfield Road, Sheffield S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-01

    Theory and simulations suggest that it is possible to form low-mass hydrogen-burning stars, brown dwarfs (BDs), and planetary-mass objects (PMOs) via disk fragmentation. As disk fragmentation results in the formation of several bodies at comparable distances to the host star, their orbits are generally unstable. Here, we study the dynamical evolution of these objects. We set up the initial conditions based on the outcomes of the smoothed-particle hydrodynamics simulations of Stamatellos and Whitworth, and for comparison we also study the evolution of systems resulting from lower-mass fragmenting disks. We refer to these two sets of simulations as set 1 and set 2, respectively. At 10 Myr, approximately half of the host stars have one companion left, and approximately 22% (set 1) to 9.8% (set 2) of the host stars are single. Systems with multiple secondaries in relatively stable configurations are common (about 30% and 44%, respectively). The majority of the companions are ejected within 1 Myr with velocities mostly below 5 km s{sup −1}, with some runaway escapers with velocities over 30 km s{sup −1}. Roughly 6% (set 1) and 2% (set 2) of the companions pair up into very low-mass binary systems, resulting in respective binary fractions of 3.2% and 1.2%. The majority of these pairs escape as very low-mass binaries, while others remain bound to the host star in hierarchical configurations (often with retrograde inner orbits). Physical collisions with the host star (0.43 and 0.18 events per host star for set 1 and set 2, respectively) and between companions (0.08 and 0.04 events per host star for set 1 and set 2, respectively) are relatively common and their frequency increases with increasing disk mass. Our study predicts observable properties of very low-mass binaries, low-mass hierarchical systems, the BD desert, and free-floating BDs and PMOs in and near young stellar groupings, which can be used to distinguish between different formation scenarios of very low

  7. Kinematic Dynamo In Turbulent Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T.

    1993-01-01

    Many circumstellar disks associated with objects ranging from protoplanetary nebulae, to accretion disks around compact stars allow for the generation of magnetic fields by an (alpha)omega dynamo. We have applied kinematic dynamo formalism to geometrically thin accretion disks. We calculate, in the framework of an adiabatic approximation, the normal mode solutions for dynamos operating in disks around compact stars. We then describe the criteria for a viable dynamo in protoplanetary nebulae, and discuss the particular features that make accretion disk dynamos different from planetary, stellar, and galactic dynamos.

  8. The Birth of Disks Around Protostars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    The dusty disks around young stars make the news regularly due to their appeal as the birthplace of early exoplanets. But how do disks like these first form and evolve around their newly born protostars? New observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) are helping us to better understand this process.Formation from CollapseStars are born from the gravitational collapse of a dense cloud of molecular gas. Long before they start fusing hydrogen at their centers when they are still just hot overdensities in the process of contracting we call them protostars. These low-mass cores are hidden at the hearts of the clouds of molecular gas from which they are born.Aerial image of the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array. [EFE/Ariel Marinkovic]During this contraction phase, before a protostar transitions to a pre-main-sequence star (which it does by blowing away its outer gas envelope, halting the stars growth), much of the collapsing material will spin into a centrifugally supported Keplerian disk that surrounds the young protostar. Later, these circumstellar disks will become the birthplace for young planets something for which weve seen observational evidence in recent years.But how do these Keplerian disks which eventually have scales of hundreds of AU first form and grow around protostars? We need observations of these disks in their early stages of formation to understand their birth and evolution a challenging prospect, given the obscuring molecular gas that hides them at these stages. ALMA, however, is up to the task: it can peer through to the center of the gas clouds to see the emission from protostellar cores and their surroundings.ALMA observations of the protostar Lupus 3 MMS. The molecular outflows from the protostar are shown in panel a. Panel b shows the continuum emission, which has a compact component that likely traces a disk surrounding the protostar. [Adapted from Yen et al. 2017]New Disks Revealed?In a recent

  9. Identification of hydrogen and helium in elastic recoil detection measurements using a compact ({delta}E - E {sub r}) ionization chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantelica, D. [HH National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania)]. E-mail: pantel@ifin.nipne.ro; Isbasescu, A. [HH National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Negoita, F. [HH National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Petrascu, H. [HH National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Petrascu, M. [HH National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Ionescu, P. [HH National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania); Scintee, N. [HH National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, 76900 Bucharest, Magurele (Romania)

    2006-08-15

    Recoil spectrometry with heavy ions has evolved into a rather universal IBA technique. Hydrogen is an important element in a wide variety of thin film materials. In this paper we present the capabilities of a compact {delta}E(gas ionization chamber) - E {sub res}(solid) telescope for simultaneous light and medium heavy element detection. To increase the resolution an integrated preamplifier was mounted close to the ionization chamber. To achieve the simultaneous detection of very light elements (H and He) and of the heavier ones (C, O, Mg, Al) the two outputs from the preamplifier were fed into two main amplifiers, operated with high and low gain, respectively. The calibration procedure for the telescope and the software for the quantitative evaluation of the data are briefly presented. The results obtained in some ERDA measurements using a {sup 63}Cu beam from the FN tandem accelerator of NIPNE are also presented.

  10. The Design and Test of a Compact Hydrogen Plasma Gun System%紧凑型氢等离子体枪设计和实验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨建华; 张亚洲; 刘金亮

    2000-01-01

    设计了一种紧凑型氢等离子体枪及驱动电路. 这种枪采用同轴结构,电极之间有两层石墨环和两层氢化钛,利用氢化钛作为气源储存体, 利用表面闪络机制产生等离子体.实验诊断表明,等离子体枪能产生密度为1010~10 12/cm3,半径为1~2cm,长度为60~80cm的等离子体柱,它在磁场导引下存在时间大于400μs.%A compact hydrogen plasma gun system was designed and test ed. There are two rings of graphite and two rings of Ti hydride between coaxial electrodes. Ti hydride is utilized as a reservoir of hydrogen. The surface flash over is taken advantage to produce plasma. The produced plasma density is 1010cm -3~1012cm-3 in a volume of a column with radius 1~2cm and len gth of 60~80cm. The plasma existing time is over 400μs.

  11. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks (PPDs) surrounding young stars are short-lived (~0.3-10 Myr), compact (~10-1000 AU) rotating reservoirs of gas and dust. PPDs are believed to be birthplaces of planetary systems, where tiny grains are assembled into pebbles, then rocks, planetesimals, and eventually planets, asteroids, and comets. Strong variations of physical conditions (temperature, density, ionization rate, UV/X-rays intensities) make a variety of chemical processes active in disks, producing simple molecules in the gas phase and complex polyatomic (organic) species on the surfaces of dust particles. In this entry, we summarize the major modern observational methods and theoretical paradigms used to investigate disk chemical composition and evolution, and present the most important results. Future research directions that will become possible with the advent of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and other forthcoming observational facilities are also discussed.

  12. Galaxy Disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kruit, P. C.; Freeman, K. C.

    The disks of disk galaxies contain a substantial fraction of their baryonic matter and angular momentum, and much of the evolutionary activity in these galaxies, such as the formation of stars, spiral arms, bars and rings, and the various forms of secular evolution, takes place in their disks. The

  13. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)/ultraviolet radiations) at 25°C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) at 50°C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)), system operating at 50°C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  15. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azabou, Samia [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Najjar, Wahiba [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouaziz, Mohamed [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, Abdelhamid [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Sayadi, Sami, E-mail: sami.sayadi@cbs.rnrt.tn [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  16. The Evolution of Inner Disk Gas in Transition Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hoadley, Keri; Alexander, Richard D; McJunkin, Matthew; Schneider, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks provides insight into how the molecular disk environment changes during the transition from primordial to debris disk systems. We conduct a small survey of molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) fluorescent emission, using 14 well-studied Classical T Tauri stars at two distinct dust disk evolutionary stages, to explore how the structure of the inner molecular disk changes as the optically thick warm dust dissipates. We simulate the observed HI-Lyman $\\alpha$-pumped H$_2$ disk fluorescence by creating a 2D radiative transfer model that describes the radial distributions of H$_{2}$ emission in the disk atmosphere and compare these to observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the radial distributions that best describe the observed H$_2$ FUV emission arising in primordial disk targets (full dust disk) are demonstrably different than those of transition disks (little-to-no warm dust observed). For each best-fit model, we estimate inner a...

  17. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  18. Development of a compact disk type microfluidic chip based on DNA hybridization for phenylketonuria screening%基于DNA杂交CD式微流控芯片筛查苯丙酮尿症方法的建立

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈斌; 王秋平; 李春宇; 邹晓; 雷秀霞; 周小棉; 江剑辉; 刘大渔

    2010-01-01

    Objective To develop a phenylketonuria (PKU) screening method based on a compact disk (CD) type microfluidic chip capable of generating reciprocating flow within the microchannels that facilitate rapid DNA hybridization. Methods This microfluidic device consists of a two-layer structure: a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) top layer containing 12 DNA hybridization microchannels, and a bottom glass layer with immobilized hydrogel conjugated DNA arrays. The DNA arrays included R243Q, V245V and the blank control probes. When the CD device was spun, the PCR products were driven into the hybridization channel by centrifugal force. When the rotation of the CD device was stopped, capillary force pulled the PCR products solution to flow back to the channel. After the on-chip hybridization, the hybridization signals were captured on a fluorescence microscope. The specificity, detection limitation and reproducibility of this device were evaluated. Thirty DNA samples from pregnant women with suspected PKU were detected by this device.Then the results were compared with DNA sequencing results. Results With the compact disk type microfluidic chip, the hybridization time could be reduced to 15 min, sample consume could be as low as 1. 5 μl and the detection limitation was 0. 7 ng/μl. With the chip based method, samples of PKU patients and healthy controls were detected and the results were consistent with DNA sequencing results. Five different batches of chips and five micro-channels of each chip were selected to test one PKU patients with V245V mutation. All the results were positive, indicating good reproducibility. Four cases of V245V mutation and 1 case of R243Q mutation were found in 30 suspected PKU carried pregnant women. Conclusion The compact disk microfluidic device has advantages of simple, rapid and highly sensitive, thus is well suited to PKU screening.%目的 建立一种基于往复流的DNA杂交CD式微流控芯片技术,用于PKU基因突变快速筛查.方法

  19. Early dust evolution in protostellar accretion disks

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    We investigate dust dynamics and evolution during the formation of a protostellar accretion disk around intermediate mass stars via 2D numerical simulations. Using three different detailed dust models, compact spherical particles, fractal BPCA grains, and BCCA grains, we find that even during the early collapse and the first 10,000 yr of dynamical disk evolution, the initial dust size distribution is strongly modified. Close to the disk's midplane coagulation produces dust particles of sizes ...

  20. Volatiles in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Bergin, Edwin A; Brittain, Sean; Marty, Bernard; Mousis, Olvier; Oberg, Karin L

    2014-01-01

    Volatiles are compounds with low sublimation temperatures, and they make up most of the condensible mass in typical planet-forming environments. They consist of relatively small, often hydrogenated, molecules based on the abundant elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Volatiles are central to the process of planet formation, forming the backbone of a rich chemistry that sets the initial conditions for the formation of planetary atmospheres, and act as a solid mass reservoir catalyzing the formation of planets and planetesimals. This growth has been driven by rapid advances in observations and models of protoplanetary disks, and by a deepening understanding of the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Indeed, it is only in the past few years that representative samples of molecules have been discovered in great abundance throughout protoplanetary disks - enough to begin building a complete budget for the most abundant elements after hydrogen and helium. The spatial distributions of key volatiles are being mapped...

  1. Fault Predictive Control of Compact Disk Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Wickerhauser, Mladen Victor

    2006-01-01

    Optical disc players such as CD-players have problems playing certain discs with surface faults like scratches and fingerprints. The problem is to be found in the servo controller which positions the optical pick-up, such that the laser beam is focused on the information track. A scheme handling ...... of the feature based control scheme, such that a prediction step is included. The proposed scheme is compared with the feature based control scheme, in the perspective of handling surface faults, by simulations. These simulations show the improvements given by the proposed algorithm....

  2. Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kruit, P C

    2011-01-01

    The formation and evolution of galactic disks is particularly important for understanding how galaxies form and evolve, and the cause of the variety in which they appear to us. Ongoing large surveys, made possible by new instrumentation at wavelengths from the ultraviolet (GALEX), via optical (HST and large groundbased telescopes) and infrared (Spitzer) to the radio are providing much new information about disk galaxies over a wide range of redshift. Although progress has been made, the dynamics and structure of stellar disks, including their truncations, are still not well understood. We do now have plausible estimates of disk mass-to-light ratios, and estimates of Toomre's $Q$ parameter show that they are just locally stable. Disks are mostly very flat and sometimes very thin, and have a range in surface brightness from canonical disks with a central surface brightness of about 21.5 $B$-mag arcsec$^{-2}$ down to very low surface brightnesses. It appears that galaxy disks are not maximal, except possibly in ...

  3. Poynting Jets from Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lovelace, R V E; Ustyugova, G V; Romanova, M M; Colgate, S A

    2002-01-01

    The powerful narrow jets observed to emanate from many compact accreting objects may arise from the twisting of a magnetic field threading a differentially rotating accretion disk which acts to magnetically extract angular momentum and energy from the disk. Two main regimes have been discussed, {\\it hydromagnetic outflows}, which have a significant mass flux and have energy and angular momentum carried by both the matter and the electromagnetic field and, Poynting outflows, where the mass flux is negligible and energy and angular momentum are carried predominantly by the electromagnetic field. Here we consider a Keplerian disk initially threaded by a dipole-like magnetic field and we present solutions of the force-free Grad-Shafranov equation for the coronal plasma. We find solutions with Poynting jets where there is a continuous outflow of energy and toroidal magnetic flux from the disk into the external space. This behavior contradicts the commonly accepted ``theorem'' of Solar plasma physics that the motio...

  4. Geometrical Structures of Chemically Decomposed Thick and Thin Disk Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, D.; Brook, C. B.; Rahimi, A.; Gibson, B. K.

    2016-10-01

    We summarize the thick and thin disk formation commonly seen in cosmological N-body simulations. As suggested in Brook et al. (2004), a hierarchical clustering scenario causes multiple minor gas-rich mergers, and leads to the formation of a kinematically hot disk, thick disk population, at a high redshift. Once the mergers become less significant at a later epoch, the thin disk population starts building up. Because in this scenario the thick disk population forms intensively at high redshift through multiple gas-rich mergers, the thick disk population is compact and has systematically higher [α/Fe] abundance than the thin disk population. We discuss that the thick disk population would be affected by the formation of the thin disk and suffer from the radial migration, which helps the thick disk population to be observed in the solar neighborhood. In addition, we show that the current cosmological simulations also naturally predict that the thin disk population is flaring at the outer region. As shown in Rahimi et al. (2014), at high vertical height from the disk plane, the compact thick disk population (low metallicity and high [α/Fe]) is dominant in the inner region and the flaring thin disk population (high metallicity and low [α/Fe]) contributes more in the outer region. This helps to explain the positive radial metallicity gradient and negative radial [α/Fe] gradient observed at high vertical height in the Milky Way stellar disk.

  5. A Discovery of a Compact High Velocity Cloud-Galactic Supershell System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, Joshua Eli Goldston; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are neutral hydrogen (HI) gas clouds having very different radial velocities from those of the Galactic disk material. While some large HVC complexes are known to be gas streams tidally stripped from satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, there are relatively isolated and small angular-sized HVCs, so called “compact HVCs (CHVCs)”, the origin of which remains controversial. There are about 300 known CHVCs in the Milky Way, and many of them show a head-tail structure, implying a ram pressure interaction with the diffuse Galactic halo gas. It is, however, not clear whether CHVCs are completely dissipated in the Galactic halo to feed the multi-phase circumgalactic medium or they can survive their trip through the halo and collide with the Galactic disk. The colliding CHVCs may leave a gigantic trail in the disk, and it had been suggested that some of HI supershells that require ≧ 3 x 1052 erg may be produced by the collision of such HVCs.Here we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040+01-282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” HI 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  6. Compact Orthoalgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Wilce, A

    2004-01-01

    We initiate a study of topological orthoalgebras (TOAs), concentrating on the compact case. Examples of TOAs include topological orthomodular lattices, and also the projection lattice of a Hilbert space. As the latter example illustrates, a lattice-ordered TOA need not be a topological lattice. However, we show that a compact Boolean TOA is a topological Boolean algebra. Using this, we prove that any compact regular TOA is atomistic, and has a compact center. We prove also that any compact TOA with isolated 0 is of finite height. We then focus on stably ordered TOAs: those in which the upper-set generated by an open set is open. These include both topological orthomodular lattices and interval orthoalgebras -- in particular, projection lattices. We show that the topology of a compact stably-ordered TOA with isolated 0 is determined by that of of its space of atoms.

  7. Compactness of composition operators on BMOA and VMOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasi WULAN

    2007-01-01

    We give a new and simple compactness condition for composition operators on BMOA, the space of all analytic functions of the bounded mean oscillation on the unit disk. Using our results one may immediately obtain that compactness of a composition operator on BMOA implies its compactness on the Bloch space as well as on the Hardy space. Similar results on VMOA are also given.

  8. Accretion disks in Algols: progenitors and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Van Rensbergen, W

    2016-01-01

    There are only a few Algols with measured accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems, narrowing down the initial parameter space. We investigate the origin and evolution of 6 Algol systems with accretion disks to find the initial parameters and evolutionary constraints for them. With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution are calculated to obtain the best match for observed individual systems. Initial parameters for 6 Algol systems with accretion disks were determined matching both the present system parameters and the observed disk characteristics. When RLOF starts during core hydrogen burning of the donor, the disk lifetime was found to be short. The disk luminosity is comparable to the luminosity of the gainer during a large fraction of the disk lifetime.

  9. Extended Operations of the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Pilot-Scale Compact Reformer: Year 6 - Activity 3.2 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almlie, Jay

    2011-10-01

    U.S. and global demand for hydrogen is large and growing for use in the production of chemicals, materials, foods, pharmaceuticals, and fuels (including some low-carbon biofuels). Conventional hydrogen production technologies are expensive, have sizeable space requirements, and are large carbon dioxide emitters. A novel sorbent-based hydrogen production technology is being developed and advanced toward field demonstration that promises smaller size, greater efficiency, lower costs, and reduced to no net carbon dioxide emissions compared to conventional hydrogen production technology. Development efforts at the pilot scale have addressed materials compatibility, hot-gas filtration, and high-temperature solids transport and metering, among other issues, and have provided the basis for a preliminary process design with associated economics. The process was able to achieve a 93% hydrogen purity on a purge gasfree basis directly out of the pilot unit prior to downstream purification.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamic Origin of Jets from Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Lovelace, R V E; Koldoba, A V

    1999-01-01

    A review is made of recent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory and simulations of origin of jets from accretion disks. Many compact astrophysical objects emit powerful, highly-collimated, oppositely directed jets. Included are the extra galactic radio jets of active galaxies and quasars, and old compact stars in binaries, and emission line jets in young stellar objects. It is widely thought that these different jets arise from rotating, conducting accretion disks threaded by an ordered magnetic field. The twisting of the magnetic field by the rotation of the disk drives the jets by magnetically extracting matter, angular momentum, and energy from the accretion disk. Two main regimes have been discussed theoretically, hydromagnetic winds which have a significant mass flux, and Poynting flux jets where the mass flux is negligible. Over the past several years, exciting new developments on models of jets have come from progress in MHD simulations which now allow the study of the origin - the acceleration and collima...

  11. Thin disk lasers: history and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speiser, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    During the early 1990s, collaboration between the German Aerospace Center and the University of Stuttgart started to work on the Thin Disk concept. The core idea behind the thin disk design is the use of a thin, disk-shaped active medium that is cooled through one of the flat faces of the disk. This ensures a large surface-to-volume ratio and therefore provides very efficient thermal management. Today, the thin disk concept is used in various commercial lasers - ranging from compact, efficient low power systems to multi-kW lasers, including cw lasers and also pulsed (femtosecond to nanosecond) oscillators and amplifiers. The whole development of the Thin Disk laser was and will be accompanied by numerical modeling and optimization of the thermal and thermo-mechanic behavior of the disk and also the heat sink structure, mostly based on finite element models. For further increasing the energy and efficiency of pulsed Thin Disk lasers, the effects of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) are a core issue. Actual efforts are oriented towards short pulse and ultra-short pulse amplifiers with (multi-)kW average power or Joule-class Thin Disk amplifiers, but also on new designs for cw thin disk MOPA designs.

  12. Analysis and development of an ethanol compact reformer for hydrogen production for fuel cell; Analise e modelagem de reformador compacto de etanol para obtencao de hidrodenio para celula a combustivel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, P.R.F.; Oliveira, A.A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Lab. de Combustao e Engenharia de Sistemas Termicos], e-mail: renzo@labcet.ufsc.br, e-mail: amirol@emc.ufsc.br

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this work is to analyze the ethanol steam reforming for hydrogen production in a compact and modular reforming unit designed for the generation of 1 kw of electrical power. For this, initially the thermodynamic limits for the steam reforming of ethanol are calculated in order to assess the limits in the production of hydrogen and other by-products and to select the best values of process stoichiometry, temperature and pressure for maximum hydrogen selectivity and minimum coke formation. In the following, a First and second Laws analysis is performed to analyze the equilibrium conditions of the main chemical reactions and to estimate the magnitude of the heat transfer required by the heating, evaporation, superheating and reforming of ethanol. Then, the catalytic reformer reactor is analyzed and sized, basing the analysis into the application of the equation for the conservation of mass of the chemical species and a model for the chemical kinetics. A basic reactor design is then proposed accompanied by the corresponding sizes and operating conditions. (author)

  13. A Dwarf Protoplanetary Disk around XZ Tau B

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Mayra; Anglada, Guillem; Carrasco-Gonzalez, Carlos; Galvan-Madrid, Roberto; Zapata, Luis; Calvet, Nuria; Gomez, Jose F; Nagel, Erick; Rodriguez, Luis F; Torrelles, Jose M; Zhu, Zhaohuan

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a dwarf protoplanetary disk around the star XZ Tau B that shows all the features of a classical transitional disk but on a much smaller scale. The disk has been imaged with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA), revealing that its dust emission has a quite small radius of ~ 3.4 au and presents a central cavity of ~ 1.3 au in radius that we attribute to clearing by a compact system of orbiting (proto)planets. Given the very small radii involved, evolution is expected to be much faster in this disk (observable changes in a few months) than in classical disks (observable changes requiring decades) and easy to monitor with observations in the near future. From our modeling we estimate that the mass of the disk is large enough to form a compact planetary system.

  14. Improving the thin-disk models of circumstellar disk evolution. The 2+1-dimensional model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobyov, Eduard I.; Pavlyuchenkov, Yaroslav N.

    2017-09-01

    thermal balance calculation. The presented method has a lower time overhead than the purely 2D models and is particularly suited for the long-term simulations of circumstellar disks including compact chemical reaction networks.

  15. Secure Disk Mixed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myongchol Ri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a disk encryption method, called Secure Disk Mixed System (SDMS in this paper, for data protection of disk storages such as USB flash memory, USB hard disk and CD/DVD. It is aimed to solve temporal and spatial limitations of existing disk encryption methods and to control security performance flexibly according to the security requirement of system.

  16. Al2O3 Disk Supported Si3N4 Hydrogen Purification Membrane for Low Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoteng Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reformate gas, a commonly employed fuel for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs, contains carbon monoxide, which poisons Pt-containing anodes in such devices. A novel, low-cost mesoporous Si3N4 selective gas separation material was tested as a hydrogen clean-up membrane to remove CO from simulated feed gas to single-cell PEMFC, employing Nafion as the polymer electrolyte membrane. Polarization and power density measurements and gas chromatography showed a clear effect of separating the CO from the gas mixture; the performance and durability of the fuel cell was thereby significantly improved.

  17. Al2O3 Disk Supported Si3N4 Hydrogen Purification Membrane for Low Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoteng; Christensen, Paul A; Kelly, Stephen M; Rocher, Vincent; Scott, Keith

    2013-12-05

    Reformate gas, a commonly employed fuel for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs), contains carbon monoxide, which poisons Pt-containing anodes in such devices. A novel, low-cost mesoporous Si3N4 selective gas separation material was tested as a hydrogen clean-up membrane to remove CO from simulated feed gas to single-cell PEMFC, employing Nafion as the polymer electrolyte membrane. Polarization and power density measurements and gas chromatography showed a clear effect of separating the CO from the gas mixture; the performance and durability of the fuel cell was thereby significantly improved.

  18. Interstellar Gas and a Dark Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Eric David; Randall, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a potentially powerful method for constraining or discovering a thin dark matter disk in the Milky Way. The method relies on the relationship between the midplane densities and scale heights of interstellar gas being determined by the gravitational potential, which is sensitive to the presence of a dark disk. We show how to use the interstellar gas parameters to set a bound on a dark disk and discuss the constraints suggested by the current data. However, current measurements for these parameters are discordant, with the uncertainty in the constraint being dominated by the molecular hydrogen midplane density measurement, as well as by the atomic hydrogen velocity dispersion measurement. Magnetic fields and cosmic ray pressure, which are expected to play a role, are uncertain as well. The current models and data are inadequate to determine the disk's existence, but taken at face value, may favor its existence depending on the gas parameters used.

  19. DVD - digital versatile disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    An international standard has emerged for the first true multimedia format. Digital Versatile Disk (by its official name), you may know it as Digital Video Disks. DVD has applications in movies, music, games, information CD-ROMS, and many other areas where massive amounts of digital information is needed. Did I say massive amounts of data? Would you believe over 17 gigabytes on a single piece of plastic the size of an audio-CD? That`s the promise, at least, by the group of nine electronics manufacturers who have agreed to the format specification, and who hope to make this goal a reality by 1998. In this major agreement, which didn`t come easily, the manufacturers will combine Sony and Phillip`s one side double-layer NMCD format with Toshiba and Matsushita`s double sided Super-Density disk. By Spring of this year, they plan to market the first 4.7 gigabyte units. The question is: Will DVD take off? Some believe that read-only disks recorded with movies will be about as popular as video laser disks. They say that until the eraseable/writable DVD arrives, the consumer will most likely not buy it. Also, DVD has a good market for replacement of CD- Roms. Back in the early 80`s, the international committee deciding the format of the audio compact disk decided its length would be 73 minutes. This, they declared, would allow Beethoven`s 9th Symphony to be contained entirely on a single CD. Similarly, today it was agreed that playback length of a single sided, single layer DVD would be 133 minutes, long enough to hold 94% of all feature-length movies. Further, audio can be in Dolby`s AC-3 stereo or 5.1 tracks of surround sound, better than CD-quality audio (16-bits at 48kHz). In addition, there are three to five language tracks, copy protection and parental ``locks`` for R rated movies. DVD will be backwards compatible with current CD-ROM and audio CD formats. Added versatility comes by way of multiple aspect rations: 4:3 pan-scan, 4:3 letterbox, and 16:9 widescreen. MPEG

  20. Compact NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bluemich, Bernhard; Haber-Pohlmeier, Sabina; Zia, Wasif [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische und Makromolekulare Chemie (ITMC)

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the most popular method for chemists to analyze molecular structures, while Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for medical doctors that provides high-contrast images of biological tissue. In both applications, the sample (or patient) is positioned inside a large, superconducting magnet to magnetize the atomic nuclei. Interrogating radio-frequency pulses result in frequency spectra that provide the chemist with molecular information, the medical doctor with anatomic images, and materials scientist with NMR relaxation parameters. Recent advances in magnet technology have led to a variety of small permanent magnets to allow compact and low-cost instruments. The goal of this book is to provide an introduction to the practical use of compact NMR at a level nearly as basic as the operation of a smart phone.

  1. Compact Vortices

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; Zafalan, I

    2016-01-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  2. Compact vortices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M.A.; Zafalan, I. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Rio Tinto, PB (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Departamento de Fisica, Campina Grande, PB (Brazil)

    2017-02-15

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane. (orig.)

  3. THE GALFA-H I COMPACT CLOUD CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saul, Destry R.; Peek, J. E. G.; Grcevich, J.; Putman, M. E.; Brown, A. R. H.; Hamden, E. T. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Douglas, K. A. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary/Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada); Korpela, E. J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stanimirovic, S.; Lee, M.; Burkhart, B.; Pingel, N. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N Charter St, Madison, WI 53703 (United States); Heiles, C. [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gibson, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Begum, A. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, ITI Campus (Gas Rahat) Building, Govindpura, Bhopal-23 (India); Tonnesen, S. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    We present a catalog of 1964 isolated, compact neutral hydrogen clouds from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Survey Data Release One. The clouds were identified by a custom machine-vision algorithm utilizing the difference of Gaussian kernels to search for clouds smaller than 20'. The clouds have velocities typically between |V{sub LSR}| =20 and 400 km s{sup -1}, line widths of 2.5-35 km s{sup -1}, and column densities ranging from 1 to 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. The distances to the clouds in this catalog may cover several orders of magnitude, so the masses may range from less than a solar mass for clouds within the Galactic disk, to greater than 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} for high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at the tip of the Magellanic Stream. To search for trends, we separate the catalog into five populations based on position, velocity, and line width: HVCs; galaxy candidates; cold low-velocity clouds (LVCs); warm, low positive-velocity clouds in the third Galactic quadrant; and the remaining warm LVCs. The observed HVCs are found to be associated with previously identified HVC complexes. We do not observe a large population of isolated clouds at high velocities as some models predict. We see evidence for distinct histories at low velocities in detecting populations of clouds corotating with the Galactic disk and a set of clouds that is not corotating.

  4. Stochastic oscillations of general relativistic disks

    CERN Document Server

    Harko, Tiberiu

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the general relativistic oscillations of thin accretion disks around compact astrophysical objects interacting with the surrounding medium through non-gravitational forces. The interaction with the external medium (a thermal bath) is modeled via a friction force, and a random force, respectively. The general equations describing the stochastically perturbed disks are derived by considering the perturbations of trajectories of the test particles in equatorial orbits, assumed to move along the geodesic lines. By taking into account the presence of a viscous dissipation and of a stochastic force we show that the dynamics of the stochastically perturbed disks can be formulated in terms of a general relativistic Langevin equation. The stochastic energy transport equation is also obtained. The vertical oscillations of the disks in the Schwarzschild and Kerr geometries are considered in detail, and they are analyzed by numerically integrating the corresponding Langevin equations. The vertical displacement...

  5. The $Spitzer$ infrared spectrograph survey of protoplanetary disks in Orion A: I. disk properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, K H; Manoj, P; Forrest, W J; Furlan, Elise; Najita, Joan; Sargent, Benjamin; Hernández, Jesús; Calvet, Nuria; Adame, Lucía; Espaillat, Catherine; Megeath, S T; Muzerolle, James; McClure, M K

    2016-01-01

    We present our investigation of 319 Class II objects in Orion A observed by $Spitzer$/IRS. We also present the follow-up observation of 120 of these Class II objects in Orion A from IRTF/SpeX. We measure continuum spectral indices, equivalent widths, and integrated fluxes that pertain to disk structure and dust composition from IRS spectra of Class II objects in Orion A. We estimate mass accretion rates using hydrogen recombination lines in the SpeX spectra of our targets. Utilizing these properties, we compare the distributions of the disk and dust properties of Orion A disks to those of Taurus disks with respect to position within Orion A (ONC and L1641) and to the sub-groups by the inferred radial structures, such as transitional disks vs. radially continuous full disks. Our main findings are as follows. (1) Inner disks evolve faster than the outer disks. (2) Mass accretion rate of transitional disks and that of radially continuous full disks are statistically significantly displaced from each other. The m...

  6. Compactness of composition operators on BMOA and VMOA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasi; WULAN

    2007-01-01

    We give a new and simple compactness condition for composition operators on BMOA,the space of all analytic functions of the bounded mean oscillation on the unit disk.Using our results one may immediately obtain that compactness of a composition operator on BMOA implies its compactness on the Bloch space as well as on the Hardy space.Similar results on VMOA are also given.

  7. Hydrogen negative ion production in a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance compact ion source with a cone-shaped magnetic filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, T.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M., E-mail: mwada@mail.doshisha.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto (Japan); Kenmotsu, T. [School of Biomedical Sciences, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto (Japan); Maeno, S. [Novelion Systems Co. Ltd., Kyotanabe, Kyoto (Japan); Nishiura, M.; Shimozuma, T. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Yamaoka, H. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    The plasma electrode structure of a 14 GHz ECR ion source was modified to enlarge the plasma volume of low electron temperature region. The result shows that the extracted beam current reached about 0.6 mA/cm{sup 2} with about 40 W microwave power. To investigate the correlation between the volume of the low electron temperature region and the H{sup −} current, a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer had been installed to observe light emission in the VUV wavelength range from the plasma. From the results of the negative ion beam current and that from VUV spectrometry, production rate of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecule seems to be enhanced by increasing the volume of low electron temperature region.

  8. Hydrogen negative ion production in a 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance compact ion source with a cone-shaped magnetic filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, T; Kasuya, T; Kenmotsu, T; Maeno, S; Nishiura, M; Shimozuma, T; Yamaoka, H; Wada, M

    2014-02-01

    The plasma electrode structure of a 14 GHz ECR ion source was modified to enlarge the plasma volume of low electron temperature region. The result shows that the extracted beam current reached about 0.6 mA/cm(2) with about 40 W microwave power. To investigate the correlation between the volume of the low electron temperature region and the H(-) current, a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrometer had been installed to observe light emission in the VUV wavelength range from the plasma. From the results of the negative ion beam current and that from VUV spectrometry, production rate of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecule seems to be enhanced by increasing the volume of low electron temperature region.

  9. Dynamo magnetic field modes in thin astrophysical disks - An adiabatic computational approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1991-01-01

    An adiabatic approximation is applied to the calculation of turbulent MHD dynamo magnetic fields in thin disks. The adiabatic method is employed to investigate conditions under which magnetic fields generated by disk dynamos permeate the entire disk or are localized to restricted regions of a disk. Two specific cases of Keplerian disks are considered. In the first, magnetic field diffusion is assumed to be dominated by turbulent mixing leading to a dynamo number independent of distance from the center of the disk. In the second, the dynamo number is allowed to vary with distance from the disk's center. Localization of dynamo magnetic field structures is found to be a general feature of disk dynamos, except in the special case of stationary modes in dynamos with constant dynamo number. The implications for the dynamical behavior of dynamo magnetized accretion disks are discussed and the results of these exploratory calculations are examined in the context of the protosolar nebula and accretion disks around compact objects.

  10. Galaxy Disks are Submaximal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.

    2011-01-01

    We measure the contribution of galaxy disks to the overall gravitational potential of 30 nearly face-on intermediate-to-late-type spirals from the DiskMass Survey. The central vertical velocity dispersion of the disk stars (sigma(disk)(z,R=0)) is related to the maximum rotation speed (V-max) as sigm

  11. Quantified Morphology of HI Disks in the Universe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, W.J.G. de; Holwerda, B.W.; Bouchard, A.; Blyth, S.-L.; Heyden, K. van der; Prizkal, N.

    2009-01-01

    The upcoming new perspective of the high redshift Universe in the 21 cm line of atomic hydrogen opens possibilities to explore topics of spiral disk evolution, hitherto reserved for the optical regime. The growth of spiral gas disks over Cosmic time can be explored with the new generation of radio

  12. Explorations of Dusty Debris Disk Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dennihy, E; Clemens, J C

    2016-01-01

    As the sample of white dwarfs with signatures of planetary systems has grown, statistical studies have begun to suggest our picture of compact debris disk formation from disrupted planetary bodies is incomplete. Here we present the results of an effort to extend the preferred dust disk model introduced by \\citet{jur03} to include elliptical geometries. We apply this model the observed distribution of fractional infrared luminosities, and explore the difference in preferred parameter spaces for a circular and highly elliptical model on a well-studied dusty white dwarf.

  13. 3D Relativistic MHD Simulation of a Tilted Accretion Disk Around a Rapidly Rotating Black Hole

    CERN Document Server

    Fragile, P Chris; Blaes, Omer M; Salmonson, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    We posit that accreting compact objects, including stellar mass black holes and neutron stars as well as supermassive black holes, may undergo extended periods of accretion during which the angular momentum of the disk at large scales is misaligned with that of the compact object. In such a scenario, Lense-Thirring precession caused by the rotating compact object can dramatically affect the disk. In this presentation we describe results from a three-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulation of an MRI turbulent disk accreting onto a tilted rapidly rotating black hole. For this case, the disk does not achieve the commonly described Bardeen-Petterson configuration; rather, it remains nearly planar, undergoing a slow global precession. Accretion from the disk onto the hole occurs predominantly through two opposing plunging streams that start from high latitudes with respect to both the black-hole and disk midplanes. This is a consequence of the non-sphericity of the gravitational spacetime of the bl...

  14. A High-Velocity Collision With Our Galaxy's Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-08-01

    What caused the newly discovered supershell in the outskirts of our galaxy? A new study finds evidence that a high-velocity cloud may have smashed into the Milky Ways disk millions of years ago.Mysterious Gas ShellsA single velocity-channel map of the supershell GS040.2+00.670, with red contours marking the high-velocity cloud at its center. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The neutral hydrogen gas that fills interstellar space is organized into structures like filaments, loops, and shells. Supershells are enormous shells of hydrogen gas that can have radii of a thousand light-years or more; weve spotted about 20 of these in our own galaxy, and more in nearby dwarfs and spiral galaxies.How do these structures form? One theory is that they result from several supernovae explosions occurring in the same area. But the energy needed to create a supershell is more than 3 x 1052 erg, which corresponds to over 30 supernovae quite a lot to have exploding in the same region.Theres an interesting alternative scenario: the supershells might instead be caused by the impacts of high-velocity clouds that fall into the galactic disk.Velocity data for the compact high-velocity cloud CHVC040. The cloud is moving fast enough to create the supershell observed. [Adapted from Park et al. 2016]The Milky Ways Speeding CloudsHigh-velocity clouds are clouds of mostly hydrogen that speed through the Milky Way with radial velocities that are very different from the material in the galactic disk. The origins of these clouds are unknown, but its proposed that they come from outside the galaxy they might be fragments of a nearby, disrupting galaxy, or they might have originated from flows of accreting gas in the space in between galaxies.Though high-velocity clouds have long been on the list of things that might cause supershells, weve yet to find conclusive evidence of this. But that might have just changed, with a recent discovery by a team of scientists led by Geumsook Park (Seoul National

  15. Oscillations of disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Shoji

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the current state of research on disk oscillation theory, focusing on relativistic disks and tidally deformed disks. Since the launch of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 1996, many high-frequency quasiperiodic oscillations (HFQPOs) have been observed in X-ray binaries. Subsequently, similar quasi-periodic oscillations have been found in such relativistic objects as microquasars, ultra-luminous X-ray sources, and galactic nuclei. One of the most promising explanations of their origin is based on oscillations in relativistic disks, and a new field called discoseismology is currently developing. After reviewing observational aspects, the book presents the basic characteristics of disk oscillations, especially focusing on those in relativistic disks. Relativistic disks are essentially different from Newtonian disks in terms of several basic characteristics of their disk oscillations, including the radial distributions of epicyclic frequencies. In order to understand the basic processes...

  16. Chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks - the effects of viscous accretion, turbulent mixing and disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzeller, Dominikus; Walsh, Catherine; Millar, Tom J

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks considering radial viscous accretion, vertical turbulent mixing and vertical disk winds. We study the effects on the disk chemical structure when different models for the formation of molecular hydrogen on dust grains are adopted. Our gas-phase chemistry is extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry (Rate06) to which we have added detailed gas-grain interactions. We use our chemical model results to generate synthetic near- and mid-infrared LTE line emission spectra and compare these with recent Spitzer observations. Our results show that if H2 formation on warm grains is taken into consideration, the H2O and OH abundances in the disk surface increase significantly. We find the radial accretion flow strongly influences the molecular abundances, with those in the cold midplane layers particularly affected. On the other hand, we show that diffusive turbulent mixing affects the disk chemistry in the warm molecular layers, influencing the line ...

  17. The First Galaxies: Assembly of Disks and Prospects for Direct Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlik, Andreas H; Bromm, Volker

    2010-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will enable observations of galaxies at redshifts z > 10 and hence allow to test our current understanding of structure formation at very early times. Previous work has shown that the very first galaxies inside halos with virial temperatures T 10 are probably too faint, by at least one order of magnitude, to be detected even in deep exposures with JWST. The light collected with JWST may therefore be dominated by radiation from galaxies inside ten times more massive halos. We use cosmological zoomed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations to investigate the assembly of such galaxies and assess their observability with JWST. We compare two simulations that are identical except for the inclusion of non-equilibrium H/D chemistry and radiative cooling by molecular hydrogen. In both simulations a large fraction of the halo gas settles in two nested, extended gas disks which surround a compact massive gas core. The presence of molecular hydrogen allows the disk gas to reach...

  18. Tilt, Warp, and Simultaneous Precessions in Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, M M

    2012-01-01

    Warps are suspected in disks around massive compact objects. However, the proposed warping source -- non-axisymmetric radiation pressure -- does not apply to white dwarfs. In this letter we report the first Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of accretion disks in SU UMa-type systems that naturally tilt, warp, and simultaneously precess in the prograde and retrograde directions using white dwarf V344 Lyrae in the Kepler field as our model. After ~79 days in V344 Lyrae, the disk angular momentum L_d becomes misaligned to the orbital angular momentum L_o. As the gas stream remains normal to L_o, hydrodynamics (e.g., the lift force) is a likely source to disk tilt. In addition to tilt, the outer disk annuli cyclically change shape from circular to highly eccentric due to tidal torques by the secondary star. The effect of simultaneous prograde and retrograde precession is a warp of the colder, denser midplane as seen along the disk rim. The simulated rate of apsidal advance to nodal regression per orbit ne...

  19. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Availability of a safe, low-pressure, lightweight, compact hydrogen storage system is an enabling technology for hydrogen electric fuel cell usage for space...

  20. Intermediate mass black holes in AGN disks: I. Production & Growth

    CERN Document Server

    McKernan, B; Lyra, W; Perets, H B

    2012-01-01

    Here we propose a mechanism for efficiently growing intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in disks around supermassive black holes. Stellar mass objects can efficiently agglomerate when facilitated by the gas disk. Stars, compact objects and binaries can migrate, accrete and merge within disks around supermassive black holes. While dynamical heating by cusp stars excites the velocity dispersion of nuclear cluster objects (NCOs) in the disk, gas in the disk damps NCO orbits. If gas damping dominates, NCOs remain in the disk with circularized orbits and large collision cross-sections. IMBH seeds can grow extremely rapidly by collisions with disk NCOs at low relative velocities, allowing for super-Eddington growth rates. Once an IMBH seed has cleared out its feeding zone of disk NCOs, growth of IMBH seeds can become dominated by gas accretion from the AGN disk. However, the IMBH can migrate in the disk and expand its feeding zone, permitting a super-Eddington accretion rate to continue. Growth of IMBH seeds via N...

  1. Disk Storage Server

    CERN Multimedia

    This model was a disk storage server used in the Data Centre up until 2012. Each tray contains a hard disk drive (see the 5TB hard disk drive on the main disk display section - this actually fits into one of the trays). There are 16 trays in all per server. There are hundreds of these servers mounted on racks in the Data Centre, as can be seen.

  2. Galactic Disk Warps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijken, K.; García, I.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract: This review addresses recent developments in the field of disk galaxy warps. Both results from a new HI survey of edgeon disk galaxies, and of simulations of the interaction between a disk+halo and an orbiting satelite, will be discussed.

  3. Galactic Disk Warps

    CERN Document Server

    Kuijken, K; Kuijken, Konrad; Garcia, Inigo

    2000-01-01

    This review addresses recent developments in the field of disk galaxy warps. Both results from a new HI survey of edgeon disk galaxies, and of simulations of the interaction between a disk+halo and an orbiting satelite, will be discussed.

  4. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of gas, solids and molecular ices in protoplanetary disks. Key findings related to disk physics and chemistry, both observationally and theoretically, are highlighted. We discuss which molecular probes are used to derive gas temperature, density, ionization state, kinematics, deuterium fractionation, and study organic matter in protoplanetary disks.

  5. Optical Disk Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, George L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This special feature focuses on recent developments in optical disk technology. Nine articles discuss current trends, large scale image processing, data structures for optical disks, the use of computer simulators to create optical disks, videodisk use in training, interactive audio video systems, impacts on federal information policy, and…

  6. Modeling the Structure of Hot Star Disks: a Critical Evaluation of the Viscous Decretion Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Carciofi, A. C.; Bjorkman, J. E.; Miroshnichenko, A. S.; Magalhães, A.M.; Bjorkman, K. S.

    2006-01-01

    We present self-consistent solutions for the disk structure of classical Be stars. Our disk model is hydrostatically supported in the vertical direction and the radial structure is governed by viscosity ($\\alpha$-disks). We perform three-dimensional non-LTE Monte Carlo simulations to calculate simultaneously both the equilibrium temperature and Hydrogen level populations and to solve self-consistently for the density structure of the disk. We discuss the general properties of the solution for...

  7. Simple spark erosion device based on optical disk or hard disk drive actuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamer, O

    2011-12-01

    We present the design of a compact electric discharge device incorporating hard disk or optical disk drive actuators. It is simple enough to be assembled in the absence of a mechanical workshop. The electronic circuit allows the adjustment of current, voltage, and discharge power. The system has been tested with organic dielectric liquids and deionized water and spark conditions; dynamic properties and machining characteristics were investigated. This device can be used to shape materials or to produce powdered samples with low material loss and minimal liquid consumption.

  8. Brackett γ radiation from the inner gaseous accretion disk, magnetosphere, and disk wind region of Herbig AeBe stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambovtseva, L. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Weigelt, G.

    2016-05-01

    Various disk and outflow components such as the magnetosphere, the disk wind, the gaseous accretion disk, and other regions may contribute to the hydrogen line emission of young Herbig AeBe stars. Non-LTE modeling was performed to show the influence of the model parameters of each emitting region on the intensity and shape of the Brγ line profile, to present the spatial brightness distribution of each component, and to compare the contribution of each component to the total line emission. The modeling shows that the disk wind is the dominant contributor to the Brγ line rather than the magnetosphere and inner gaseous accretion disk. The contribution of the disk wind region to the Hα line is also considered.

  9. REMARKS ON JOHN DISKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu Yuming; Cheng Jinfa; Wang Gendi

    2009-01-01

    Let D R2 be a Jordan domain, D* = -R2 \\ -D, the exterior of D. In this article, the authors obtained the following results: (1) If D is a John disk, then D is an outer linearly locally connected domain; (2) If D* is a John disk, then D is an inner linearly locally connected domain; (3) A homeomorphism f: R2→R2 is a quasiconformal mapping if and only if f(D) is a John disk for any John disk D(∈)R2; and (4) If D is a bounded quasidisk, then D is a John disk, and there exists an unbounded quasidisk which is not a John disk.

  10. Exploring Disks Around Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-07-01

    Giant planets are thought to form in circumstellar disks surrounding young stars, but material may also accrete into a smaller disk around the planet. Weve never detected one of these circumplanetary disks before but thanks to new simulations, we now have a better idea of what to look for.Image from previous work simulating a Jupiter-mass planet forming inside a circumstellar disk. The planet has its own circumplanetary disk of accreted material. [Frdric Masset]Elusive DisksIn the formation of giant planets, we think the final phase consists of accretion onto the planet from a disk that surrounds it. This circumplanetary disk is important to understand, since it both regulates the late gas accretion and forms the birthplace of future satellites of the planet.Weve yet to detect a circumplanetary disk thus far, because the resolution needed to spot one has been out of reach. Now, however, were entering an era where the disk and its kinematics may be observable with high-powered telescopes (like the Atacama Large Millimeter Array).To prepare for such observations, we need models that predict the basic characteristics of these disks like the mass, temperature, and kinematic properties. Now a researcher at the ETH Zrich Institute for Astronomy in Switzerland, Judit Szulgyi, has worked toward this goal.Simulating CoolingSzulgyi performs a series of 3D global radiative hydrodynamic simulations of 1, 3, 5, and 10 Jupiter-mass (MJ) giant planets and their surrounding circumplanetary disks, embedded within the larger circumstellar disk around the central star.Density (left column), temperature (center), and normalized angular momentum (right) for a 1 MJ planet over temperatures cooling from 10,000 K (top) to 1,000 K (bottom). At high temperatures, a spherical circumplanetary envelope surrounds the planet, but as the planet cools, the envelope transitions around 64,000 K to a flattened disk. [Szulgyi 2017]This work explores the effects of different planet temperatures and

  11. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force....

  12. Isolated unilateral disk edema

    OpenAIRE

    Varner P

    2011-01-01

    Paul VarnerJohn J Pershing VAMC, Poplar Bluff, MO, USAAbstract: Isolated unilateral disk edema is a familiar clinical presentation with myriad associations. Related, non-consensus terminology is a barrier to understanding a common pathogenesis. Mechanisms for the development of disk edema are reviewed, and a new framework for clinical differentiation of medical associations is presented.Keywords: disk edema, axoplasmic flow, clinical multiplier, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy, papi...

  13. Isolated unilateral disk edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varner P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Paul VarnerJohn J Pershing VAMC, Poplar Bluff, MO, USAAbstract: Isolated unilateral disk edema is a familiar clinical presentation with myriad associations. Related, non-consensus terminology is a barrier to understanding a common pathogenesis. Mechanisms for the development of disk edema are reviewed, and a new framework for clinical differentiation of medical associations is presented.Keywords: disk edema, axoplasmic flow, clinical multiplier, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy, papilledema

  14. A valve disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khayrullin, N.A.; Isayev, B.N.; Kruglov, S.A.; Molokanov, Yu.K.; Shchelkunov, V.A.; Shegay, V.R.; Vizhgorodskiy, B.N.

    1982-01-01

    A valve disk is proposed which includes a horizontal bed, on which there are laminar valves arranged in staggered order. To ensure the stable and effective operation of the disk in a broad range of loads by compensating for the direct flow and the partial sectioning of the disk bed, it is equipped with compensating elements installed in openings in the bed and hinged with it. They are made in the form of straight, triangular prisms with ports in the bases. The prisms are installed with the capability of movement relative to the disk bed. The valves are positioned on the upper lateral facets of the compensating elements.

  15. Measuring Plank constant with colour LEDs and compact disk

    CERN Document Server

    Gourev, Vassil N; Yordanov, Vasil G; Mishonov, Todor M

    2016-01-01

    This problem was given on the Open Experimental Physics Olympiad (OEPO) "The day of the photon" on 25 April 2015. The Olympiad was a part of the celebration of the International Year of Light (IYL) http://www.light2015.org/Home/Event-Programme/2015/Competition/Bulgaria-Second-Experimental-Physics-Olympiad--25-April-2015-in-Sofia.-The-Day-of-the-Photon-in-the-International-Year-of-the-Light.html and was organized by the Sofia Branch of the Union of Physicist in Bulgaria and the Regional Society of Physicists of Strumica, Macedonia.

  16. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyman alpha photons, since the Lyman alpha line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more ...

  17. The Location of the Snow Line in Protostellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Podolak, Morris

    2009-01-01

    The snow line in a gas disk is defined as the distance from the star beyond which the water ice is stable against evaporation. Since oxygen is the most abundant element after hydrogen and helium, the presence of ice grains can have important consequences for disk evolution. However, determining the position of the snow line is not simple. I discuss some of the important processes that affect the position of the snow line.

  18. Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    Planetesimals form in gas-rich protoplanetary disks around young stars. However, protoplanetary disks fade in about 10 Myr. The planetesimals (and also many of the planets) left behind are too dim to study directly. Fortunately, collisions between planetesimals produce dusty debris disks. These debris disks trace the processes of terrestrial planet formation for 100 Myr and of exoplanetary system evolution out to 10 Gyr. This chapter begins with a summary of planetesimal formation as a prelude to the epoch of planetesimal destruction. Our review of debris disks covers the key issues, including dust production and dynamics, needed to understand the observations. Our discussion of extrasolar debris keeps an eye on similarities to and differences from Solar System dust.

  19. MHD of accretion-disk flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankova, Krasimira

    2015-01-01

    Accretion is one of the most important problems of astrophysics concerning the transfer of matter and the transformation of energy into space. Process represents a falling of the substance on a cosmic object from the surrounding area and is a powerful gravitational mechanism for the production of radiation. Accretion disc effectively converts the mass of the substance by viscous friction and released potential energy transformed into radiation by particle collisions. Accretion onto compact object shows high energy efficiency and temporal variability in a broad class of observational data in all ranges. In the disks of these objects are developed a series instabilities and structures that govern the distribution of the energy. They are expressed in many variety non-stationary phenomena that we observe. That is why we propose generalized model of magnetized accretion disk with advection, which preserves the nonlinearity of the problem. We study interaction of the plasmas flow with the magnetic field, and how this affects the self-organizing disk. The aim of the work is to describe the accretion flow in detail, in his quality of the open astrophysical system, to investigate the evolution and to reveal the mechanisms of the structuring the disk-corona system for to interpret correctly the high energy behavior of such sources.

  20. Disk magnetohydrodynamic power conversion system for NERVA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, W.D. (HMJ Corporation. 10400 Connecticut Ave., Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)); Bernard, F.E. (Westinghouse Corp., P.O. Box 355, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15230 (United States)); Holman, R.R. (HMJ Corporation, 10400 Connecticut Ave., Kensington, Maryland 20895 (United States)); Maxwell, C.D. (STD Research Corp., P.O. Box C, Arcadia, California 91006 (United States)); Seikel, G.R. (SeiTec, Inc., P.O. Box 81264, Cleveland, Ohio 44181 (United States))

    1993-01-15

    The combination of a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator of the disk type with a NERVA reactor yields an advanced power system particularly suited to space applications with the capability of producing up to gigawatt pulses and multi-megawatt continuous operation. Several unique features result from the combination of this type of reactor and a disk MHD generator in which hydrogen serves as the plasma working fluid. Cesium seedings is utilized under conditions which enable the generator to operate stably in the non-equilibrium electrical conduction mode. In common with all practical MHD generators, the disk output is DC and voltages in the range 20--100 kV are attainable. This leads to a simplification of the power conditioning system and a major reduction in specific mass. Taken together with the high performance capabilities of the NERVA reactor, the result is an attractively low overall system specific mass. Further, the use of non-equilibrium ionization enables system specific enthalpy extractions in excess of 40% to be attained. This paper reports the results of a study to establish the basis for the design of a cesium seeded hydrogen MHD disk generator. Generator performance results are presented in terms of a stability factor which is related to cesium seeded hydrogen plasma behavior. It is shown that application of the results already obtained with cesium seeded noble gases (argon and helium) to the case of hydrogen as the working fluid in a disk MHD generator enables a high performance power system to be defined.

  1. The statistical mechanics of self-gravitating Keplerian disks

    CERN Document Server

    Touma, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    We describe the dynamics and thermodynamics of collisionless particle disks orbiting a massive central body, in the case where the disk mass is small compared to the central mass, the self-gravity of the disk dominates the non-Keplerian force, and the spread in semi-major axes is small. We show that with plausible approximations such disks have logarithmic two-body interactions and a compact phase space, and therefore exhibit thermodynamics that are simpler than most other gravitating systems, which require a confining box and artificial softening of the potential at small scales to be thermodynamically well-behaved. We solve for the microcanonical axisymmetric thermal equilibria and demonstrate the existence of a first-order phase transition to lopsided equilibria. We discuss the relation between thermal and dynamical instability in these systems and draw connections to astrophysical settings, as well as to the wider subject of the statistical mechanics of particles with logarithmic long-range interactions, ...

  2. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in thin Keplerian disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepinski, T. F.; Levy, E. H.

    1990-01-01

    The combined action of nonuniform rotation and helical convection in protoplanetary disks, in the Galaxy, or in accretion disks surrounding black holes and other compact objects, enables an alpha-omega dynamo to generate a large-scale magnetic field. In this paper, the properties of such magnetic fields are investigated using a two-dimensional, partially numerical method. The structures of the lowest-order steady state and oscillatory modes are calculated for two kinds of external boundary conditions. A quadruple, steady state, highly localized mode is the most easily excited for low values of the dynamo number. The results indicate that, except under special conditions, disk dynamo modes tend to consist of relatively localized rings structures. For large values of the dynamo number, the magnetic field consists of a number of quasi-independent, spatially localized modes generated in various concentric rings filling the disk inward of a dynamo generation 'front'.

  3. Generation of dynamo magnetic fields in thin Keplerian disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, T.F.; Levy, E.H. (Arizona Univ., Tucson (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The combined action of nonuniform rotation and helical convection in protoplanetary disks, in the Galaxy, or in accretion disks surrounding black holes and other compact objects, enables an alpha-omega dynamo to generate a large-scale magnetic field. In this paper, the properties of such magnetic fields are investigated using a two-dimensional, partially numerical method. The structures of the lowest-order steady state and oscillatory modes are calculated for two kinds of external boundary conditions. A quadruple, steady state, highly localized mode is the most easily excited for low values of the dynamo number. The results indicate that, except under special conditions, disk dynamo modes tend to consist of relatively localized rings structures. For large values of the dynamo number, the magnetic field consists of a number of quasi-independent, spatially localized modes generated in various concentric rings filling the disk inward of a dynamo generation front. 36 refs.

  4. A model for neutrino emission from nuclear accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaton, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Compact object mergers involving at least one neutron star can produce short-lived black hole accretion engines. Over tens to hundreds of milliseconds such an engine consumes a disk of hot, nuclear-density fluid, and drives changes to its surrounding environment through luminous emission of neutrinos. The neutrino emission may drive an ultrarelativistic jet, may peel off the disk's outer layers as a wind, may irradiate those winds or other forms of ejecta and thereby change their composition, may change the composition and thermodynamic state of the disk itself, and may oscillate in its flavor content. We present the full spatial-, angular-, and energy-dependence of the neutrino distribution function around a realistic model of a nuclear accretion disk, to inform future explorations of these types of behaviors. Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

  5. On Compact Graphs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping WANG; Jiong Sheng LI

    2005-01-01

    Let G be a finite simple graph with adjacency matrix A, and let P(A) be the convex closure of the set of all permutation matrices commuting with A. G is said to be compact if every doubly stochastic matrix which commutes with A is in P(A). In this paper, we characterize 3-regular compact graphs and prove that if G is a connected regular compact graph, G - v is also compact, and give a family of almost regular compact connected graphs.

  6. Compactness in Metric Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakasho Kazuhisa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we mainly formalize in Mizar [2] the equivalence among a few compactness definitions of metric spaces, norm spaces, and the real line. In the first section, we formalized general topological properties of metric spaces. We discussed openness and closedness of subsets in metric spaces in terms of convergence of element sequences. In the second section, we firstly formalize the definition of sequentially compact, and then discuss the equivalence of compactness, countable compactness, sequential compactness, and totally boundedness with completeness in metric spaces.

  7. HI absorption in nearby compact radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, M.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Curran, S. J.; Musaeva, A.; Deng, C.; Parry, R.; Sligo, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    HI absorption studies yield information on both AGN feeding and feedback processes. This AGN activity interacts with the neutral gas in compact radio sources, which are believed to represent the young or recently re-triggered AGN population. We present the results of a survey for HI absorption in a sample of 66 compact radio sources at 0.040 100 km s-1) features, indicative of disturbed gas kinematics. Such broad, shallow and offset features are also found within low-excitation radio galaxies which is attributed to disturbed circumnuclear gas, consistent with early-type galaxies typically devoid of a gas-rich disk. Comparing mid-infrared colours of our galaxies with HI detections indicates that narrow and deep absorption features are preferentially found in late-type and high-excitation radio galaxies in our sample. These features are attributed to gas in galactic disks. By combining XMM-Newton archival data with 21-cm data, we find support that absorbed X-ray sources may be good tracers of HI content within the host galaxy. This sample extends previous HI surveys in compact radio galaxies to lower radio luminosities and provides a basis for future work exploring the higher redshift universe.

  8. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and pressur

  9. Hydrogen Storage in Nanostructured Light Metal Hydrides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, S.

    2009-01-01

    The global energy issues can be solved by the abundantly available hydrogen on earth. Light metals are a compact and safe medium for storing hydrogen. This makes them attractive for vehicular use. Unfortunately, hydrogen uptake and release is slow in light metals at practical temperature and

  10. Exploring the Interstellar Media of Optically Compact Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Most, Hans P; Salzer, John J; Rosenberg, Jessica J; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer

    2013-01-01

    We present new Very Large Array HI spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii less than 1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M_B >= -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H alpha or [OIII] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km/s = 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an HI halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have HI radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the HI disk in the "giant disk" dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared to similarly compact stellar populations.

  11. Disk Defect Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — How Data Was Acquired: The data presented is from a physical simulator that simulated engine disks. Sample Rates and Parameter Description: All parameters are...

  12. Verbatim Floppy Disk

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    Introduced under the name "Verbatim", Latin for "literally", these disks that sized more than 5¼ inches have become almost universal on dedicated word processing systems and personal computers. This format was replaced more slowly by the 3½-inch format, introduced for the first time in 1982. Compared to today, these large format disks stored very little data. In reality, they could only contain a few pages of text.

  13. Acceleration and collimation of relativistic MHD disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Porth, O

    2009-01-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100x200 inner disk radii. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 degrees. When we increase the outflow Poynting flux by injecting an additional disk toroidal field into the inlet, Lorentz factors up to 6 are reached. These flows gain super-magnetosonic speed and remain Poynting flux dominated. The light surface of...

  14. Microlensing by stars in the disk of M31

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, A

    1994-01-01

    The optical depth to microlensing toward M31 due to known stars in the disk of M31 itself is \\tau\\sim 2\\times 10^{-7}e^{-r/d} where d is the disk scale length and r is the distance along the major axis. Thus, there can be significant lensing toward the M31 disk even if M31 contains no dark compact objects. The optical depth has a strong dependence on azimuthal angle: at fixed radius \\tau\\propto[1+ (h/d)\\tan i\\cos\\phi]^{-2} where h is the scale height of the disk, i=75^\\circ is the inclination of M31, and \\phi is the azimuthal angle relative to the near minor axis. By measuring the optical depth as a function of radial and azimuthal position, it is possible to estimate h and d for the mass of the M31 disk, and so determine whether the disk light traces disk mass. Ground-based observations in 0.\\hskip-2pt''5 seeing of 0.8 \\rm deg^2 once per week could yield \\sim 3 events per year. With an ambitious space-based project, it would be possible to to observe \\sim 80 events per year. If lensing events were dominated ...

  15. Properties of Circumstelar Disks of Three Northern Galactic Be Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubaque Brito, K. Y.; Sabogal Martínez, B. E.; García-Varela, A.; Salas, L.; álvarez, M.

    2017-07-01

    Be stars have a very rapid rotation that leads, along with other mechanisms, to the generation of circumstellar decretion disks. Spectroscopic analysis of their Hydrogen emission lines in the infrared can be useful to understand the disk evolution. This is possible through characterizing the dependency with wavelenght of physical parameters of the lines, such as integrated flux and full width at half maximum. In this work, we obtained integrated fluxes for Humphreys, Pfund and Brackett spectral lines of a sample of 3 Be stars: γ Cas, φ Per and 28 Tau. With these data, we analized changes in optical depth and density of the disks. We found that the circumstellar disks of these stars are optically thin, based on a flux ratio diagram and from a qualitative description of the morphology found in the infrared spectra. We studied also the optical spectra of BeSS database of these stars and found that the variability of the Hα profile is correlated with the evolution and stages of stability in Be star disks. In our case, we could say that γ Cas and φ Per have circumstellar disks stable with a high density, which have remained almost constant. By contrast the remarkable variability of Hα profile for star 28 Tau lead us to believe that its disk has had episodes of dissipation and slight changes in density. All these results are in agreement with previous studies for different Be stars, confirming the mentioned aspects as general indicators of density changes suffered by circumstellar disks of Be stars.

  16. 2TB hard disk drive

    CERN Multimedia

    This particular object was used up until 2012 in the Data Centre. It slots into one of the Disk Server trays. Hard disks were invented in the 1950s. They started as large disks up to 20 inches in diameter holding just a few megabytes (link is external). They were originally called "fixed disks" or "Winchesters" (a code name used for a popular IBM product). They later became known as "hard disks" to distinguish them from "floppy disks (link is external)." Hard disks have a hard platter that holds the magnetic medium, as opposed to the flexible plastic film found in tapes and floppies.

  17. Jets and Accretion Disks in X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsick, John

    The outflow of material in the form of jets is a common phenomenon in astronomical sources with accretion disks. Even though jets are seen coming from the cores of galaxies, Galactic compact objects in X-ray binaries, and stars as they are forming, we do not understand in detail what accretion disk conditions are necessary to support a relativistic jet. This proposal focuses on multi-wavelength studies of X-ray binaries in order to improve our understanding of the connection between the disk and the jet. Specifically, this proposal includes work on two approved cycle 14 Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) programs, an approved XMM-Newton program, as well as a synthesis study of transient black hole X-ray binaries using archival RXTE and radio data. We plan to use X-ray spectral and timing properties to determine the disk properties during the re-activation of the compact jet (as seen in the radio and infrared) during the decays of black hole transient outbursts, to determine how the inner disk properties change at low mass accretion rates, and to use RXTE along with multi-wavelength observations to constrain the jet properties required for the microquasar Cygnus~X-3 to produce high- energy emission. Due to the ubiquity of jets in astrophysical settings, these science topics are relevant to NASA programs dealing with the origin, structure, evolution, and destiny of the Universe, and especially to understanding phenomena near black holes.

  18. The fate of high-redshift massive compact galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    de la Rosa, Ignacio G; Ferreras, Ignacio; Almeida, Jorge Sánchez; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Martínez-Valpuesta, Inma; Stringer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Massive high-redshift quiescent compact galaxies (nicknamed red nuggets) have been traditionally connected to present-day elliptical galaxies, often overlooking the relationships that they may have with other galaxy types. We use large bulge-disk decomposition catalogues based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to check the hypothesis that red nuggets have survived as compact cores embedded inside the haloes or disks of present-day massive galaxies. In this study, we designate a "compact core" as the bulge component that satisfies a prescribed compactness criterion. Photometric and dynamic mass-size and mass-density relations are used to show that, in the inner regions of galaxies at z ~ 0.1, there are "abundant" compact cores matching the peculiar properties of the red nuggets, an abundance comparable to that of red nuggets at z ~ 1.5. Furthermore, the morphology distribution of the present-day galaxies hosting compact cores is used to demonstrate that, in addition to the standard channel connecting red ...

  19. Compaction behavior of isomalt after roll compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quodbach, Julian; Mosig, Johanna; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2012-09-27

    The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  20. Compaction Behavior of Isomalt after Roll Compaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Kleinebudde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The suitability of the new isomalt grade galenIQ™ 801 for dry granulation and following tableting is evaluated in this study. Isomalt alone, as well as a blend of equal parts with dibasic calcium phosphate, is roll compacted and tableted. Particle size distribution and flowability of the granules and friability and disintegration time of the tablets are determined. Tensile strength of tablets is related to the specific compaction force during roll compaction and the tableting force. In all cases, the tensile strength increases with raising tableting forces. The specific compaction force has a different influence. For isomalt alone the tensile strength is highest for tablets made from granules prepared at 2 kN/cm and 6 kN/cm and decreases at higher values, i.e., >10 kN/cm. Tensile strength of the blend tablets is almost one third lower compared to the strongest tablets of pure isomalt. Friability of pure isomalt tablets is above the limit. Disintegration time is longest when the tensile strength is at its maximum and decreases with higher porosity and lower tensile strengths. Isomalt proves to be suitable for tableting after roll compaction. Even though the capacity as a binder might not be as high as of other excipients, it is a further alternative for the formulation scientist.

  1. Lefschetz Fibrations on Compact Stein Manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Akbulut, Selman

    2010-01-01

    Here we prove that a compact Stein manifold W of dimension 2n+2>4 admits a Lefschetz fibration over the 2-disk with Stein fibers, such that the monodromy of the fibration is a symplectomorphism induced by compositions of "generalized Dehn twists" along imbedded n-spheres on the generic fiber. Also, the open book on the boundary of W, which is determined by the fibration, is compatible with the contact structure induced by the Stein structure. This generalizes the Stein surface case of n=1, previously proven by Loi-Piergallini and Akbulut-Ozbagci.

  2. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  3. Self-Compacting Concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Okamura, Hajime; Ouchi, Masahiro

    2003-01-01

    Self-compacting concrete was first developed in 1988 to achieve durable concrete structures. Since then, various investigations have been carried out and this type of concrete has been used in practical structures in Japan, mainly by large construction companies. Investigations for establishing a rational mix-design method and self-compactability testing methods have been carried out from the viewpoint of making self-compacting concrete a standard concrete.

  4. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  5. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  6. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  7. Compact Polarimetry Potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-Loi, My-Linh; Dubois-Fernandez, Pascale; Pottier, Eric

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to show the potential of a compact-pol SAR system for vegetation applications. Compact-pol concept has been suggested to minimize the system design while maximize the information and is declined as the ?/4, ?/2 and hybrid modes. In this paper, the applications such as biomass and vegetation height estimates are first presented, then, the equivalence between compact-pol data simulated from full-pol data and compact-pol data processed from raw data as such is shown. Finally, a calibration procedure using external targets is proposed.

  8. Compact Antenna Range

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Facility consists of a folded compact antenna range including a computer controlled three axis position table, parabolic reflector and RF sources for the measurement...

  9. An Old Disk That Can Still Form a Planetary System

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, Edwin A; Gorti, Uma; Zhang, Ke; Blake, Geoffrey A; Green, Joel D; Andrews, Sean M; Evans, Neal J; Henning, Thomas; Oberg, Karin; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Qi, Chunhua; Salyk, Colette; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-01

    From the masses of planets orbiting our Sun, and relative elemental abundances, it is estimated that at birth our Solar System required a minimum disk mass of ~0.01 solar masses within ~100 AU of the star. The main constituent, gaseous molecular hydrogen, does not emit from the disk mass reservoir, so the most common measure of the disk mass is dust thermal emission and lines of gaseous carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide emission generally probes the disk surface, while the conversion from dust emission to gas mass requires knowledge of the grain properties and gas-to-dust mass ratio, which likely differ from their interstellar values. Thus, mass estimates vary by orders of magnitude, as exemplified by the relatively old (3--10 Myr) star TW Hya, with estimates ranging from 0.0005 to 0.06 solar masses. Here we report the detection the fundamental rotational transition of hydrogen deuteride, HD, toward TW Hya. HD is a good tracer of disk gas because it follows the distribution of molecular hydrogen and its emissi...

  10. Dispersion in unit disks

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrescu, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    We present two new approximation algorithms with (improved) constant ratios for selecting $n$ points in $n$ unit disks such that the minimum pairwise distance among the points is maximized. (I) A very simple $O(n \\log{n})$-time algorithm with ratio 0.5110 for disjoint unit disks. In combination with an algorithm of Cabello \\cite{Ca07}, it yields a $O(n^2)$-time algorithm with ratio of 0.4487 for dispersion in $n$ not necessarily disjoint unit disks. (II) A more sophisticated LP-based algorithm with ratio 0.6495 for disjoint unit disks that uses a linear number of variables and constraints, and runs in polynomial time. The algorithm introduces a novel technique which combines linear programming and projections for approximating distances. The previous best approximation ratio for disjoint unit disks was 1/2. Our results give a partial answer to an open question raised by Cabello \\cite{Ca07}, who asked whether 1/2 could be improved.

  11. Generalized Langevin equation with colored noise description of the stochastic oscillations of accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Harko, Tiberiu; Mocanu, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    We consider a description of the stochastic oscillations of the general relativistic accretion disks around compact astrophysical objects interacting with their external medium based on a generalized Langevin equation with colored noise, which accounts for the general memory and retarded effects of the frictional force, and on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The presence of the memory effects influences the response of the disk to external random interactions, and modifies the dynamical behavior of the disk, as well as the energy dissipation processes. The generalized Langevin equation of the motion of the disk in the vertical direction is studied numerically, and the vertical displacements, velocities and luminosities of the stochastically perturbed disks are explicitly obtained for both the Schwarzschild and the Kerr cases. The Power Spectral Distribution (PSD) of the disk luminosity is also obtained. As a possible astrophysical application of the formalism we investigate the possibility that the Intra...

  12. On rapid migration and accretion within disks around supermassive black holes

    CERN Document Server

    McKernan, B; Lyra, W; Perets, H B; Winter, L M; Yaqoob, T

    2011-01-01

    Galactic nuclei should contain a cluster of stars and compact objects in the vicinity of the central supermassive black hole due to stellar evolution, minor mergers and gravitational dynamical friction. By analogy with protoplanetary migration, nuclear cluster objects (NCOs) can migrate in the accretion disks that power active galactic nuclei by exchanging angular momentum with disk gas. Here we show that an individual NCO undergoing runaway outward migration comparable to Type III protoplanetary migration can generate an accretion rate corresponding to Seyfert AGN or quasar luminosities. Multiple migrating NCOs in an AGN disk can dominate traditional viscous disk accretion and at large disk radii, ensemble NCO migration and accretion could provide sufficient heating to prevent the gravitational instability from consuming disk gas in star formation. The magnitude and energy of the X-ray soft excess observed at ~0.1-1keV in Seyfert AGN could be explained by a small population of ~10^{2}-10^{3} accreting stella...

  13. Evolution of the protolunar disk: dynamics, cooling timescale and implantation of volatiles onto the Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Charnoz, Charnoz

    2015-01-01

    It is thought that the Moon accreted from the protolunar disk that was assembled after the last giant impact on Earth. Due to its high temperature, the protolunar disk may act as a thermochemical reactor in which the material is processed before being incorporated into the Moon. Outstanding issues like devolatilisation and istotopic evolution are tied to the disk evolution, however its lifetime, dynamics and thermodynamics are unknown. Here, we numerically explore the long term viscous evolution of the protolunar disk using a one dimensional model where the different phases (vapor and condensed) are vertically stratified. Viscous heating, radiative cooling, phase transitions and gravitational instability are accounted for whereas Moon s accretion is not considered for the moment. The viscosity of the gas, liquid and solid phases dictates the disk evolution. We find that (1) the vapor condenses into liquid in about 10 years, (2) a large fraction of the disk mass flows inward forming a hot and compact liquid di...

  14. Formation of TRAPPIST-1 and other compact systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormel, Chris W.; Liu, Beibei; Schoonenberg, Djoeke

    2017-07-01

    TRAPPIST-1 is a nearby 0.08 M⊙ M-star that was recently found to harbor a planetary system of at least seven Earth-sized planets, all within 0.1 au. The configuration confounds theorists as the planets are not easily explained by either in situ or migration models. In this paper we present a scenario for the formation and orbital architecture of the TRAPPIST-1 system. In our model, planet formation starts at the H2O iceline, where pebble-sized particles whose origin is the outer disk accumulate to trigger streaming instabilities. After their formation, planetary embryos quickly mature by pebble accretion. Planet growth stalls at Earth masses, where the planet's gravitational feedback on the disk keeps pebbles at bay. Planets are transported by type I migration to the inner disk, where they stall at the magnetospheric cavity and end up in mean motion resonances. During disk dispersal, the cavity radius expands and the innermost planets escape resonance. We argue that the model outlined here can also be applied to other compact systems and that the many close-in super-Earth systems are a scaled-up version of TRAPPIST-1. We also hypothesize that few close-in compact systems harbor giant planets at large distances, since they would have stopped the pebble flux from the outer disk.

  15. Silica in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sargent, B A; Tayrien, C; McClure, M K; Li, A; Basu, A R; Manoj, P; Watson, D M; Bohac, C J; Furlan, E; Kim, K H; Green, J D; Sloan, G C

    2008-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectra of a few T Tauri stars (TTS) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope show prominent narrow emission features indicating silica (crystalline silicon dioxide). Silica is not a major constituent of the interstellar medium; therefore, any silica present in the circumstellar protoplanetary disks of TTS must be largely the result of processing of primitive dust material in the disks surrouding these stars. We model the silica emission features in our spectra using the opacities of various polymorphs of silica and their amorphous versions computed from earth-based laboratory measurements. This modeling indicates that the two polymorphs of silica, tridymite and cristobalite, which form at successively higher temperatures and low pressures, are the dominant forms of silica in the TTS of our sample. These high temperature, low pressure polymorphs of silica present in protoplanetary disks are consistent with a grain composed mostly of tridymite named Ada found...

  16. Compaction properties of isomalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K.; Engelhart, Jeffrey J. P.; Eissens, Anko C.

    2009-01-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispoma

  17. Compact Information Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-02

    network traffic, information retrieval, and databases are faced with very large, inherently high-dimensional, or naturally streaming datasets. This...proposal aims at developing mathematically rigorous and general- purpose statistical methods based on stable random projections, to achieve compact...detections (e.g., DDoS attacks), machine learning, databases , and search. Fundamentally, compact data representations are highly beneficial because they

  18. Evolution of protoplanetary disks from their taxonomy in scattered light: Group I vs. Group II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garufi, A.; Meeus, G.; Benisty, M.; Quanz, S. P.; Banzatti, A.; Kama, M.; Canovas, H.; Eiroa, C.; Schmid, H. M.; Stolker, T.; Pohl, A.; Rigliaco, E.; Ménard, F.; Meyer, M. R.; van Boekel, R.; Dominik, C.

    2017-07-01

    Context. High-resolution imaging reveals a large morphological variety of protoplanetary disks. To date, no constraints on their global evolution have been found from this census. An evolutionary classification of disks was proposed based on their IR spectral energy distribution, with the Group I sources showing a prominent cold component ascribed to an earlier stage of evolution than Group II. Aims: Disk evolution can be constrained from the comparison of disks with different properties. A first attempt at disk taxonomy is now possible thanks to the increasing number of high-resolution images of Herbig Ae/Be stars becoming available. Methods: Near-IR images of six Group II disks in scattered light were obtained with VLT/NACO in polarimetric differential imaging, which is the most efficient technique for imaging the light scattered by the disk material close to the stars. We compare the stellar/disk properties of this sample with those of well-studied Group I sources available from the literature. Results: Three Group II disks are detected. The brightness distribution in the disk of HD 163296 indicates the presence of a persistent ring-like structure with a possible connection with the CO snowline. A rather compact (self-shadowed and compact). HD 163296 could be the primordial version of a typical Group I disk. Other Group II disks, like AK Sco and HD 142666, could be smaller counterparts of Group I unable to open cavities as large as those of Group I. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere, Chile, under program number 095.C-0658(A).

  19. From Disks to Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youdin, Andrew N.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    This pedagogical chapter covers the theory of planet formation, with an emphasis on the physical processes relevant to current research. After summarizing empirical constraints from astronomical and geophysical data, we describe the structure and evolution of protoplanetary disks. We consider the growth of planetesimals and of larger solid protoplanets, followed by the accretion of planetary atmospheres, including the core accretion instability. We also examine the possibility that gas disks fragment directly into giant planets and/or brown dwarfs. We defer a detailed description of planet migration and dynamical evolution to other work, such as the complementary chapter in this series by Morbidelli.

  20. Lupus Alma Disk Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, Megan

    2016-07-01

    We present the first unbiased ALMA survey of both dust and gas in a large sample of protoplanetary disks. We surveyed 100 sources in the nearby (150-200 pc), young (1-2 Myr) Lupus region to constrain M_dust to 2 M_Mars and M_gas to 1 M_Jup. Most disks have masses < MMSN and gas-to-dust ratios < ISM. Such rapid gas depletion may explain the prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.

  1. New approaches to hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of a Hydrogen Economy will require the development of new media capable of safely storing hydrogen in a compact and light weight package. Metal hydrides and complex hydrides, where hydrogen is chemically bonded to the metal atoms in the bulk, offer some hope of overcoming the challenges associated with hydrogen storage. The objective is to find a material with a high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen density that can also meet the unique demands of a low temperature automotive fuel cell. Currently, there is considerable effort to develop new materials with tunable thermodynamic and kinetic properties. This tutorial review provides an overview of the different types of metal hydrides and complex hydrides being investigated for on-board (reversible) and off-board (non-reversible) hydrogen storage along with a few new approaches to improving the hydrogenation-dehydrogenation properties.

  2. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties.

  3. Hierarchical Star Formation Across Galactic Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Most stars form in clusters. This fact has emerged from the finding that "embedded clusters account for the 70 - 90% fraction of all stars formed in Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs)." While this is the case at scales of few 10 parsecs, typical for GMCs, a look at star-forming galaxies in the Local Group (LG) shows significant populations of enormous loose complexes of early-type stars extending at scales from few 100 to few 1000 parsecs. The fact that these stellar complexes host extremely large numbers of loosely distributed massive blue stars implies either that stars form also in an unbound fashion or they are immediately dislocated from their original compact birthplaces or both. The Legacy Extra-Galactic UV Survey (LEGUS) has produced remarkable collections of resolved early-type stars in 50 star-forming LG galaxies, suited for testing ideas about recent star formation. I will present results from our ongoing project on star formation across LEGUS disk galaxies. We characterize the global clustering behavior of the massive young stars in order to understand the morphology of star formation over galactic scales. This morphology appears to be self-similar with fractal dimensions comparable to those of the molecular interstellar medium, apparently driven by large-scale turbulence. Our clustering analysis reveals compact stellar systems nested in larger looser concentrations, which themselves are the dense parts of unbound complexes and super-structures, giving evidence of hierarchical star formation up to galactic scales. We investigate the structural and star formation parameters demographics of the star-forming complexes revealed at various levels of compactness. I will discuss the outcome of our correlation and regression analyses on these parameters in an attempt to understand the link between galactic disk dynamics and morphological structure in spiral and ring galaxies of the local universe.

  4. The effect of environment on the structure of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Pranger, Florian; Kelvin, Lee S; Cebrián, María

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of environment on the structure of disk galaxies, using IMFIT to measure the g- and r-band parameters of the surface-brightness profiles for ~200 low-redshift (z<0.051) cluster and field disk-galaxies with intermediate stellar mass (10^10 M_sol < M_star < 4 x 10^10 M_sol) from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, DR7. Based on this measurement, we assign each galaxy to a surface-brightness profile type (Type I single-exponential, Type II truncated, Type III anti-truncated). In addition, we measure (g-r) restframe colour for disk regions separated by the truncation radius. Cluster disk galaxies (at the same stellar mass) have redder (g-r) colour by ~0.2 mag than field galaxies. This reddening is the same inside and outside the break radius. Cluster disk galaxies are also more compact than field disks by 10%. This change is reflected in the outer scalelengths, which increase by ~10% in the cluster environment compared to the field. Finally, Type I galaxies are 3 times more frequent in t...

  5. Possible Local Spiral Counterparts to Compact Blue Galaxies at Intermediate Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, E J; Barton, Elizabeth J.; Zee, Liese van

    2001-01-01

    We identify nearby disk galaxies with optical structural parameters similar to those of intermediate-redshift compact blue galaxies. By comparing HI and optical emission-line widths, we show that the optical widths substantially underestimate the true kinematic widths of the local galaxies. By analogy, optical emission-line widths may underrepresent the masses of intermediate-z compact objects. For the nearby galaxies, the compact blue morphology is the result of tidally-triggered central star formation: we argue that interactions and minor mergers may cause apparently compact morphology at higher redshift.

  6. Polarimetric microlensing of circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sajadian, Sedighe

    2015-01-01

    We study the benefits of polarimetry observations of microlensing events to detect and characterize circumstellar disks around the microlensed stars located at the Galactic bulge. These disks which are unresolvable from their host stars make a net polarization effect due to their projected elliptical shapes. Gravitational microlensing can magnify these signals and make them be resolved. The main aim of this work is to determine what extra information about these disks can be extracted from polarimetry observations of microlensing events in addition to those given by photometry ones. Hot disks which are closer to their host stars are more likely to be detected by microlensing, owing to more contributions in the total flux. By considering this kind of disks, we show that although the polarimetric efficiency for detecting disks is similar to the photometric observation, but polarimetry observations can help to constraint the disk geometrical parameters e.g. the disk inner radius and the lens trajectory with resp...

  7. Warm gas in protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Gerrit

    2010-12-01

    This thesis presents a study of warm CO, [OI] and H2 gas coming from the disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These various gas tracers are each a proxy for a different radial and vertical region of the PP disk surface. Our sample consists of disks whose shape (based on modeling of the the disk dust emission) can be divided into flaring and self-shadowed (flat). We find [1] evidence for the vertical decoupling of gas and dust in one disks (Chapter 2); [2] That disk geometry has a large influence on the spatial distribution and excitation mechanism of the CO emission (chapters 3,4); [3] Near-IR H 2 emission around 2 (out of 14) HAEBE stars, probably originating from large (±50AU) radii of the disk (chapter 5). In chapter 6 we investigate the trends between CO emission and disk geometry as noted in Chapter 3 and 4.

  8. Galactic Thin Disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kruit, P.; Murdin, P.; Murdin, Paul

    2000-01-01

    Of the components of our MILKY WAY GALAXY, the thin disk is the most prominent part to our eyes. It manifests itself as the band of faint light that we see encircling the whole sky. Except for the bulge in the direction of the center of our Galaxy, the stars that make up the Milky Way as we see it

  9. More approximation on disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Paepe, P.J.I.M.; Wiegerinck, J.J.O.O.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: In this article we study the function algebra generated by z2 and g2 on a small closed disk centred at the origin of the complex plane. We prove, using a biholomorphic change of coordinates and already developed techniques in this area, that for a large class of functions g this algebra co

  10. Herniated disk repair (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is one of the most common causes of lower back pain. The mainstay of treatment for herniated disks is an initial period of rest with pain and anti-inflammatory medications followed by physical therapy. If pain and symptoms persist, surgery to remove ...

  11. Planet formation signposts: observability of circumplanetary disks via gas kinematics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Sebastian; Casassus, Simon; Roman, Pablo; Szulágyi, Judit; Flores, Christian; Marino, Sebastian; Montesinos, Matias

    2015-01-01

    The identification of on-going planet formation requires the finest angular resolutions and deepest sensitivities in observations inspired by state-of-the-art numerical simulations. Hydrodynamic simulations of planet-disk interactions predict the formation of circumplanetary disks (CPDs) around accreting planetary cores. These CPDs have eluded unequivocal detection -their identification requires predictions in CPD tracers. In this work, we aim to assess the observability of embedded CPDs with ALMA as features imprinted in the gas kinematics. We use 3D Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) simulations of CPDs around 1 and 5 M_Jup planets at large stellocentric radii, in locally isothermal and adiabatic disks. The simulations are then connected with 3D radiative transfer for predictions in CO isotopologues. Observability is assessed by corrupting with realistic long baseline phase noise extracted from the recent HL Tau ALMA data. We find that the presence of a CPD produces distinct signposts: 1) compact emission s...

  12. Testing protostellar disk formation models with ALMA observations

    CERN Document Server

    Harsono, Daniel; Bruderer, Simon; Li, Zhi-Yun; Jorgensen, Jes

    2015-01-01

    Abridged: Recent simulations have explored different ways to form accretion disks around low-mass stars. We aim to present observables to differentiate a rotationally supported disk from an infalling rotating envelope toward deeply embedded young stellar objects and infer their masses and sizes. Two 3D magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) formation simulations and 2D semi-analytical model are studied. The dust temperature structure is determined through continuum radiative transfer RADMC3D modelling. A simple temperature dependent CO abundance structure is adopted and synthetic spectrally resolved submm rotational molecular lines up to $J_{\\rm u} = 10$ are simulated. All models predict similar compact components in continuum if observed at the spatial resolutions of 0.5-1$"$ (70-140 AU) typical of the observations to date. A spatial resolution of $\\sim$14 AU and high dynamic range ($> 1000$) are required to differentiate between RSD and pseudo-disk in the continuum. The peak-position velocity diagrams indicate that the...

  13. Near infrared and the inner regions of protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vinkovic, D; Jurkic, T; Elitzur, M; Vinkovic, Dejan; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jurkic, Tomislav; Elitzur, Moshe

    2005-01-01

    We examine the ``puffed-up inner disk'' model (Dullemond, Dominik & Natta 2001), proposed for explaining the near-IR excess radiation from Herbig Ae/Be stars. Detailed model re-computations and comparison with the observed distribution of near-IR excess show that the model requires fine tuning of free parameters. In particular, only perfectly gray dust opacity can produce the observed near-IR excess, yet such dust is in conflict with the observed 10$\\mu$m spectral feature. We find that an alternative model consisting of a compact ($\\sim$ 10 AU) tenuous dusty halo around the disk inner regions readily explains the observed near-IR excess. Furthermore, this model also resolves the puzzling relationship noted by Monnier and Millan-Gabet (2002) between luminosity and the interferometric inner radii of disks.

  14. Small Valdivia compact spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Kubi's, W; Kubi\\'s, Wieslaw; Michalewski, Henryk

    2005-01-01

    We prove a preservation theorem for the class of Valdivia compact spaces, which involves inverse sequences of ``simple'' retractions. Consequently, a compact space of weight $\\loe\\aleph_1$ is Valdivia compact iff it is the limit of an inverse sequence of metric compacta whose bonding maps are retractions. As a corollary, we show that the class of Valdivia compacta of weight at most $\\aleph_1$ is preserved both under retractions and under open 0-dimensional images. Finally, we characterize the class of all Valdivia compacta in the language of category theory, which implies that this class is preserved under all continuous weight preserving functors.

  15. Thin accretion disks around cold Bose–Einstein condensate stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dănilă, Bogdan, E-mail: bogdan.danila22@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Babes-Bolyai University, Kogalniceanu Street, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Harko, Tiberiu, E-mail: t.harko@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, WC1E 6BT, London (United Kingdom); Kovács, Zoltán, E-mail: kovacsz2013@yahoo.com [Max-Fiedler-Str. 7, 45128, Essen (Germany)

    2015-05-09

    Due to their superfluid properties some compact astrophysical objects, like neutron or quark stars, may contain a significant part of their matter in the form of a Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC). Observationally distinguishing between neutron/quark stars and BEC stars is a major challenge for this latter theoretical model. An observational possibility of indirectly distinguishing BEC stars from neutron/quark stars is through the study of the thin accretion disks around compact general relativistic objects. In the present paper, we perform a detailed comparative study of the electromagnetic and thermodynamic properties of the thin accretion disks around rapidly rotating BEC stars, neutron stars and quark stars, respectively. Due to the differences in the exterior geometry, the thermodynamic and electromagnetic properties of the disks (energy flux, temperature distribution, equilibrium radiation spectrum, and efficiency of energy conversion) are different for these classes of compact objects. Hence in this preliminary study we have pointed out some astrophysical signatures that may allow one to observationally discriminate between BEC stars and neutron/quark stars.

  16. Thin accretion disks around cold Bose-Einstein condensate stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danila, Bogdan [Babes-Bolyai University, Department of Physics, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Harko, Tiberiu [University College London, Department of Mathematics, London (United Kingdom); Kovacs, Zoltan

    2015-05-15

    Due to their superfluid properties some compact astrophysical objects, like neutron or quark stars, may contain a significant part of their matter in the form of a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). Observationally distinguishing between neutron/quark stars and BEC stars is a major challenge for this latter theoretical model. An observational possibility of indirectly distinguishing BEC stars from neutron/quark stars is through the study of the thin accretion disks around compact general relativistic objects. In the present paper, we perform a detailed comparative study of the electromagnetic and thermodynamic properties of the thin accretion disks around rapidly rotating BEC stars, neutron stars and quark stars, respectively. Due to the differences in the exterior geometry, the thermodynamic and electromagnetic properties of the disks (energy flux, temperature distribution, equilibrium radiation spectrum, and efficiency of energy conversion) are different for these classes of compact objects. Hence in this preliminary study we have pointed out some astrophysical signatures that may allow one to observationally discriminate between BEC stars and neutron/quark stars. (orig.)

  17. Compact Quiescent Galaxies at Intermediate Redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Shih, Hsin-Yi

    2014-01-01

    From several searches of the area common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey, we have identified objects that have properties similar to those of the luminous quiescent compact galaxies found at z > 2. Here we present our results of 22 galaxies between z ~ 0.4 and z ~ 0.9 based on observations with the Keck I, Keck II and Subaru telescopes on Mauna Kea. By exploring sizes, morphologies, and stellar populations of these galaxies, we found that most of the galaxies we identified actually formed most of their stars at z 2 in the literature. Several of these young objects appear to be disk-like or possibly prolate. This lines up with several previous studies, which found that massive quiescent galaxies at high redshifts often have disk-like morphologies. If these galaxies were to be confirmed to be disks, their formation would be more likely caused by gas accretion than by major mergers. On the other hand, if these galaxies were to be confirmed to be...

  18. White dwarfs with hydrogen-deficient atmospheres and the dark matter content of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, S; Isern, J; Garcia-Berro, E

    2010-01-01

    The nature of the several microlensing events observed by the MACHO team towards the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is still a subject of debate. Low-mass substellar objects and stars with masses larger than ~M_{sun} have been ruled out as major components of a Massive Astrophysical Compact Halo Object (MACHO) Galactic halo, while stars of half a solar mass seem to be viable candidates. Main sequence stars have been already discarded, and there are tight restrictions on the role played by white dwarfs with hydrogen-dominated atmospheres. In this paper we evaluate the contribution to the dark matter content of the Galaxy of white dwarfs with hydrogen-deficient atmospheres. For this purpose we use a Monte Carlo simulator which incorporates up-to-date evolutionary sequences of white dwarfs with hydrogen-rich and hydrogen-deficient atmospheres. We also take into account detailed descriptions of the thick disk and the halo of our Galaxy as well as of a reliable model of the LMC. We find that the contribution of whit...

  19. The Tilt between Acretion Disk and Stellar Disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shiyin Shen; Zhengyi Shao; Minfeng Gu

    2011-03-01

    The orientations of the accretion disk of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the stellar disk of its host galaxy are both determined by the angular momentum of their forming gas, but on very different physical environments and spatial scales. Here we show the evidence that the orientation of the stellar disk is correlated with the accretion disk by comparing the inclinations of the stellar disks of a large sample of Type 2 AGNs selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS, York et al. 2000) to a control galaxy sample. Given that the Type 2 AGN fraction is in the range of 70–90 percent for low luminosity AGNs as a priori, we find that the mean tilt between the accretion disk and stellar disk is ∼ 30 degrees (Shen et al. 2010).

  20. Compact microchannel system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  1. Formation of Water in the Warm Atmospheres of Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Glassgold, A E; Najita, J R

    2009-01-01

    The gas-phase chemistry of water in protoplanetary disks is analyzed with a model based on X-ray heating and ionization of the disk atmosphere. Several uncertain processes appear to play critical roles in generating the column densities of warm water that are detected from disks at infrared wavelengths. The dominant factors are the reactions that form molecular hydrogen, including formation on warm grains, and the ionization and heating of the atmosphere. All of these can work together to produce a region of high water abundances in the molecular transition layer of the inner disk atmosphere, where atoms are transformed into molecules, the temperature drops from thousands to hundreds of Kelvins, and the ionization begins to be dominated by the heavy elements. Grain formation of molecular hydrogen and mechanical heating of the atmosphere can play important roles in this region and directly affect the amount of warm water in protoplanetary disk atmospheres. Thus it may be possible to account for the existing me...

  2. Discovery of a Circumstellar Disk in the Lagoon Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    photos as tear-drop shaped, bright-rimmed areas with the cusps of the ionised regions aligned towards the exciting star. Such a region is also a very compact source of radio emission. Clearly, the harsh environment in which these disks reside does not favour planet formation. These findings were facilitated by the fact that, at a distance of `only' 1500 lightyears (about 450 parsec), the Orion Nebula is the closest site of high-mass star formation. Furthermore, many circumstellar disks around stars in this nebula are seen in silhouette against a bright and uniform background and are therefore comparatively easy to detect. The Lagoon Nebula In principle, similar phenomena should occur in any giant molecular cloud that gives rise to the birth of massive stars. However, the detection of such disks in other clouds would be very difficult, first of all because of their much larger distance. The Lagoon Nebula (M8) is located four times further away than the Orion Nebula and it is also a site of recent high-mass star formation. Its brightest part constitutes a conspicuous region of ionised hydrogen gas (an `HII-region') dubbed `The Hourglass' because of the resemblance. The gas in this area is ionised by the action of the nearby, hot star Herschel 36 (Her 36) . High-resolution radio maps show that the emission from the ionised gas peaks at 2.7 arcsec southeast of Her 36. An early explanation was that this emission is due to an unseen, massive star that is deeply embedded in the gas and dust and which is causing an ultra-compact HII-region (UCHR), catalogued as G5.97-1.17 according to its galactic coordinates. High-resolution images from ESO During a detailed investigation of such ultra-compact HII regions, Bringfried Stecklum and his colleagues found that, unlike ordinary UCHRs, this particular object is visible on optical images obtained with the HST Wide-Field Planetary Camera (HST-WFPC). This means that, contrary to the others, it is not deeply embedded in the nebula - its

  3. Developing Insights into Debris Disk Composition from Dust Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Alycia

    Science Goals: To enable interpretation of visible to near-IR spectrophotometric imaging of debris disks, we propose realistic modeling of scattering of light by small aggregate dust grains and new laboratory measurements of meteoritic organic analogs. We will determine if disk colors, phase functions, and polarizations place unique constraints on the composition of debris dust. Ongoing collisions of planetesimals generate dust; therefore, the dust provides unique information on compositions of the parent bodies. These exosolar analogs of asteroids and comets bear clues to the history of a planetary system including migration and thermal processing. In the solar system, small bodies delivered volatiles to Earth, and they presumably play the same role for exoplanets. Because directly imaged debris disks are cold, they have no solid-state emission features. Grain scattering properties as a function of wavelength are our only tool to reveal their compositions. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging showed debris disks to be populated with small grains, a few tenths of a micron and larger. Radiation pressure and blasting by the interstellar medium sweep the dust away. New work from HST and ground-based adaptive optics systems reveal the color and polarization of the scattered light at wavelengths from visible to near-IR, with two dozen disks imaged at some subset of wavelengths. Far-IR and submm images from Herschel and ALMA show that the same disks also contain large, i.e. mm-sized, grains. Our goal is to develop dust calculations so that spectrophotometry of disks can determine dust compositions. Solar system interplanetary dust particles are fluffy aggregates, but most previous work on debris disk composition relied on Mie theory, i.e. assumed compact spherical grains. Mie calculations do not reproduce the observed colors and phase functions observed from debris disks. The few more complex calculations that exist do not explore the range of compositions and sizes

  4. Vibration of imperfect rotating disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the theoretical and numerical calculations of the flexural vibrations of a bladed disk. The main focus of this study is to elaborate the basic background for diagnostic and identification methods for ascertaining the main properties of the real structure or an experimental model of turbine disks. The reduction of undesirable vibrations of blades is proposed by using damping heads, which on the experimental model of turbine disk are applied only on a limited number of blades. This partial setting of damping heads introduces imperfection in mass, stiffness and damping distribution on the periphery and leads to more complicated dynamic properties than those of a perfect disk. Calculation of FEM model and analytic—numerical solution of disk behaviour in the limited (two modes frequency range shows the splitting of resonance with an increasing speed of disk rotation. The spectrum of resonance is twice denser than that of a perfect disk.

  5. High Q-factor resonant photoluminescence from Ge-on-insulator micro-disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuejun; Hashimoto, Hideaki; Yoshida, Keisuke; Sawano, Kentarou; Maruizumi, Takuya

    2016-05-01

    Micro-disk resonators with high Q-factor have been experimentally demonstrated on germanium-on-insulator (GOI). GOI substrates fabricated by direct wafer bonding show better crystal quality that germanium films directly grown on Si. Sharp resonant peaks with Q-factor around 1000-4000 have been observed from micro-disks fabricated on GOI substrate by low-temperature photoluminescence measurements. The light emission properties against pump laser power and device temperature are also investigated. Our results indicating that GOI micro-disks are promising resonators for low threshold, ultra-compact Ge lasers on Si.

  6. Acceleration and Collimation of Relativistic Magnetohydrodynamic Disk Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porth, Oliver; Fendt, Christian

    2010-02-01

    We perform axisymmetric relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations to investigate the acceleration and collimation of jets and outflows from disks around compact objects. Newtonian gravity is added to the relativistic treatment in order to establish the physical boundary condition of an underlying accretion disk in centrifugal and pressure equilibrium. The fiducial disk surface (respectively a slow disk wind) is prescribed as boundary condition for the outflow. We apply this technique for the first time in the context of relativistic jets. The strength of this approach is that it allows us to run a parameter study in order to investigate how the accretion disk conditions govern the outflow formation. Substantial effort has been made to implement a current-free, numerical outflow boundary condition in order to avoid artificial collimation present in the standard outflow conditions. Our simulations using the PLUTO code run for 500 inner disk rotations and on a physical grid size of 100 × 200 inner disk radii. The simulations evolve from an initial state in hydrostatic equilibrium and an initially force-free magnetic field configuration. Two options for the initial field geometries are applied—an hourglass-shaped potential magnetic field and a split monopole field. Most of our parameter runs evolve into a steady state solution which can be further analyzed concerning the physical mechanism at work. In general, we obtain collimated beams of mildly relativistic speed with Lorentz factors up to 6 and mass-weighted half-opening angles of 3-7 deg. The split-monopole initial setup usually results in less collimated outflows. The light surface of the outflow magnetosphere tends to align vertically—implying three relativistically distinct regimes in the flow—an inner subrelativistic domain close to the jet axis, a (rather narrow) relativistic jet and a surrounding subrelativistic outflow launched from the outer disk surface—similar to the spine-sheath structure

  7. The effect of gaseous accretion disk on dynamics of the stellar cluster in AGN

    CERN Document Server

    Shukirgaliyev, Bekdaulet

    2016-01-01

    There is a supermassive black hole, a gaseous accretion disk and compact star cluster in the center of active galactic nuclei, as known today. So the activity of AGN can be represented as the result of interaction of these three subsystems. In this work we investigate the dynamical interaction of a central star cluster surrounding a supermassive black hole and a central accretion disk. The dissipative force acting on stars in the disk leads to an asymmetry in the phase space distribution of the central star cluster due to the rotating accretion disk. In our work we present some results of Stardisk model, where we see some changes in density and phase space of central star cluster due to influence of rotating gaseous accretion disk.

  8. CAN BLACK HOLE NEUTRINO-COOLED DISKS POWER SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tong; Gu, Wei-Min [Department of Astronomy and Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Lin, Yi-Qing [School of Opto-electronic and Communication Engineering, Xiamen University of Technology, Xiamen, Fujian 361024 (China); Hou, Shu-Jin, E-mail: tongliu@xmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan 650011 (China)

    2015-06-10

    Stellar-mass black holes (BHs) surrounded by neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) are plausible sources of power for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) via neutrino emission and their annihilation. The progenitors of short-duration GRBs (SGRBs) are generally considered to be compact binary mergers. According to the simulation results, the disk mass of the NDAF is limited after merger events. We can estimate such disk masses using the current SGRB observational data and fireball model. The results show that the disk mass of a certain SGRB mainly depends on its output energy, jet opening angle, and central BH characteristics. Even for the extreme BH parameters, some SGRBs require massive disks, which approach or exceed the limits in simulations. We suggest that there may exist alternative MHD processes or mechanisms that increase the neutrino emission to produce SGRBs with reasonable BH parameters and disk masses.

  9. Can black-hole neutrino-cooled disks power short gamma-ray bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tong; Hou, Shu-Jin; Gu, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    Stellar-mass black holes (BHs) surrounded by neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) are the plausible candidates to power gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) via neutrinos emission and their annihilation. The progenitors of short-duration GRBs (SGRBs) are generally considered to be compact binaries mergers. According to the simulation results, the disk mass of the NDAF has been limited after merger events. We can estimate such disk mass by using the current SGRB observational data and fireball model. The results show that the disk mass of a certain SGRB mainly depends on its output energy, jet opening angle, and central BH characteristics. Even for the extreme BH parameters, some SGRBs require massive disks, which approach or exceed the limits in simulations. We suggest that there may exist alternative magnetohydrodynamic processes or some mechanisms increasing the neutrino emission to produce SGRBs with the reasonable BH parameters and disk mass.

  10. First Results from the Disk Eclipse Search with KELT (DESK) Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Joseph E; Stassun, Keivan G

    2015-01-01

    Using time-series photometry from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope (KELT) exoplanet survey, we are looking for eclipses of stars by their protoplanetary disks, specifically in young stellar associations. To date, we have discovered two previously unknown, large dimming events around the young stars RW Aurigae and V409 Tau. We attribute the dimming of RW Aurigae to an occultation by its tidally disrupted disk, with the disruption perhaps resulting from a recent flyby of its binary companion. Even with the dynamical environment of RW Aurigae, the distorted disk material remains very compact and presumably capable of forming planets. This system also shows that strong binary interactions with disks can also influence planet and core composition by stirring up and mixing materials during planet formation. We interpret the dimming of V409 Tau to be due to a feature, possibly a warp or perturbation, lying at least 10 AU from the host star in its nearly edge-on circumstellar disk.

  11. FIRST IMAGES OF DEBRIS DISKS AROUND TWA 7, TWA 25, HD 35650, AND HD 377

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Chen, Christine H.; Soummer, Rémi; Pueyo, Laurent; Hagan, James B.; Gofas-Salas, Elena; Golimowski, David A.; Hines, Dean C.; Mazoyer, Johan; Debes, John; Stark, Christopher C.; N’Diaye, Mamadou [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rajan, Abhijith [Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ 85004 (United States); Schneider, Glenn [Steward Observatory, The University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Augereau, Jean-Charles [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Wolff, Schuyler; Hsiao, Kevin, E-mail: choquet@stsci.edu [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore MD 21218 (United States)

    2016-01-20

    We present the first images of four debris disks observed in scattered light around the young (4–250 Myr old) M dwarfs TWA 7 and TWA 25, the K6 star HD 35650, and the G2 star HD 377. We obtained these images by reprocessing archival Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS coronagraph data with modern post-processing techniques as part of the Archival Legacy Investigation of Circumstellar Environments program. All four disks appear faint and compact compared with other debris disks resolved in scattered light. The disks around TWA 25, HD 35650, and HD 377 appear very inclined, while TWA 7's disk is viewed nearly face-on. The surface brightness of HD 35650's disk is strongly asymmetric. These new detections raise the number of disks resolved in scattered light around M and late-K stars from one (the AU Mic system) to four. This new sample of resolved disks enables comparative studies of heretofore scarce debris disks around low-mass stars relative to solar-type stars.

  12. Spin-Induced Disk Precession in Sagittarius A*

    CERN Document Server

    Rockefeller, G M; Melia, F; Rockefeller, Gabriel; Fryer, Christopher L.; Melia, Fulvio

    2005-01-01

    In Sgr A* at the Galactic center, by far the closest and easiest supermassive black hole we can study, the observational evidence is increasingly pointing to the presence of a compact, hot, magnetized disk feeding the accretor. In such low-Mach-number plasmas, forces arising, e.g., from pressure gradients in the plasma, can altogether negate the warping of disks around Kerr black holes caused by the Bardeen-Petterson effect and can lead to coherent precession of the entire disk. In this Letter, we present for the first time highly detailed 3D SPH simulations of the accretion disk evolution in Sgr A*, guided by observational constraints on its physical characteristics, and conclude that indeed the Bardeen-Petterson effect is probably absent in this source. Given what we now understand regarding the emission geometry in this object, we suggest that a ~ 50-500-day modulation in Sgr A*'s spectrum, arising from the disk precession, could be an important observational signature; perhaps the ~ 106-day period seen ea...

  13. Compactness theorems of fuzzy semantics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The relationship among diverse fuzzy semantics vs. the corresponding logic consequence operators has been analyzed systematically. The results that compactness and logical compactness of fuzzy semantics are equivalent to compactness and continuity of the logic consequence operator induced by the semantics respectively have been proved under certain conditions. A general compactness theorem of fuzzy semantics have been established which says that every fuzzy semantics defined on a free algebra with members corresponding to continuous functions is compact.

  14. Signs of Early-stage Disk Growth Revealed with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Koch, Patrick M.; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Aso, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    We present ALMA 1.3 mm continuum, 12CO, C18O, and SO data for the Class 0 protostars Lupus 3 MMS, IRAS 15398‑3559, and IRAS 16253‑2429 at resolutions of ∼100 au. By measuring a rotational profile in C18O, a 100 au Keplerian disk around a 0.3 M⊙ protostar is observed in Lupus 3 MMS. No 100 au Keplerian disks are observed in IRAS 15398‑3559 and IRAS 16253‑2429. Nevertheless, embedded compact (<30 au) continuum components are detected. The C18O emission in IRAS 15398‑3559 shows signatures of infall with a constant angular momentum. IRAS 16253‑2429 exhibits signatures of infall and rotation, but its rotational profile is unresolved. By fitting the C18O data with our kinematic models, the protostellar masses and the disk radii are inferred to be 0.01 M⊙ and 20 au in IRAS 15398‑3559, and 0.03 M⊙ and 6 au in IRAS 16253‑2429. By comparing the specific angular momentum profiles from 10,000 au to 100 au in eight Class 0 and I protostars, we find that the evolution of envelope rotation can be described with conventional inside-out collapse models. In comparison with a sample of 18 protostars with known disk radii, our results reveal signs of disk growth, with the disk radius increasing as {{M}* }0.8+/- 0.14 or {t}1.09+/- 0.37 in the Class 0 stage, where M* is the protostellar mass and t is the age. The disk growth rate slows down in the Class I stage. In addition, we find a hint that the mass accretion rate declines as {t}-0.26+/- 0.04 from the Class 0 to the Class I stages.

  15. Intelligent compaction theory of high roller compacted concrete dam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Donghai

    2012-01-01

    The concept and realization process of intelligent compaction for the construction of high roller compacted concrete dam were presented, as well as the theory of monitoring and intelligent feedback control. Based on the real-time analysis of the compaction index, a multiple regression model of the dam compactness was established and a realime estimation method of compaction quality for the entire work area of roller compacted concrete dam was proposed finally. The adaptive adjustment of the roiling process parameters was achieved, with the speed, the exciting force, the roller pass and the compaction thickness meeting the standards during the whole construction process. As a result, the compaction quality and construction efficiency can be improved. The research provides a new way for the construction quality control of roller compacted concrete dam.

  16. Searching for H2 emission from protoplanetary disks using near- and mid-infrared high-resolution spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carmona, A.; van den Ancker, M.E.; Henning, T.; Pavlyuchenkov, Y.; Dullemond, C.P.; Goto, M.; Fedele, D.; Stecklum, B.; Thi, W.F.; Bouwman, J.; Waters, L.B.F.M.

    2008-01-01

    The mass and dynamics of protoplanetary disks are dominated by molecular hydrogen (H2). However, observationally very little is known about the H2. In this paper, we discuss two projects aimed to constrain the properties of H2 in the disk's planet forming region (R<50AU). First, we present a

  17. Audit: Automated Disk Investigation Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Karabiyik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Software tools designed for disk analysis play a critical role today in forensics investigations. However, these digital forensics tools are often difficult to use, usually task specific, and generally require professionally trained users with IT backgrounds. The relevant tools are also often open source requiring additional technical knowledge and proper configuration. This makes it difficult for investigators without some computer science background to easily conduct the needed disk analysis. In this paper, we present AUDIT, a novel automated disk investigation toolkit that supports investigations conducted by non-expert (in IT and disk technology and expert investigators. Our proof of concept design and implementation of AUDIT intelligently integrates open source tools and guides non-IT professionals while requiring minimal technical knowledge about the disk structures and file systems of the target disk image.

  18. Ringed accretion disks: equilibrium configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a model of ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the General Relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can be then determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We pr...

  19. Mesoscale Modeling of Impact Compaction of Primitive Solar System Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Davison, Thomas M; Bland, Philip A

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a method for simulating the mesoscale compaction of early solar system solids in low velocity impact events, using the iSALE shock physics code. Chondrules are represented by nonporous disks, placed within a porous matrix. By simulating impacts into bimodal mixtures over a wide range of parameter space (including the chondrule-to-matrix ratio, the matrix porosity and composition and the impact velocity), we have shown how each of these parameters influences the shock processing of heterogeneous materials. The temperature after shock processing shows a strong dichotomy: matrix temperatures are elevated much higher than the chondrules, which remain largely cold. Chondrules can protect some matrix from shock compaction, with shadow regions in the lee side of chondrules exhibiting higher porosity that elsewhere in the matrix. Using the results from this mesoscale modelling, we show how the $\\varepsilon-\\alpha$ porous compaction model parameters depend on initial bulk porosity. We also show that ...

  20. IBM 3390 Hard Disk Platter

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    The 3390 disks rotated faster than those in the previous model 3380. Faster disk rotation reduced rotational delay (ie. the time required for the correct area of the disk surface to move to the point where data could be read or written). In the 3390's initial models, the average rotational delay was reduced to 7.1 milliseconds from 8.3 milliseconds for the 3380 family.

  1. Disks and Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L. F.

    2002-05-01

    The presence of disks and outflows characterizes the earliest stages of stellar evolution. I will review recent results that exemplify how the radio observations have become powerful tools in the study of these extremely young objects. Binarity and multiplicity seem to be factors that we are only starting to understand. Outflows are now seen as laboratories for the chemistry of shocked regions. Finally, the efforts to extend the paradigm for low-mass stellar formation to more massive protostars can be tested critically in the radio wavelengths. I acknowledge the support from CONACyT, Mexico.

  2. Axisymmetric Two-Dimensional Computation of Magnetic Field Dragging in Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we model a geometrically thin accretion disk interacting with an externally imposed, uniform, vertical magnetic field. The accretion flow in the disk drags and distorts field lines, amplifying the magnetic field in the process. Inside the disk the radial component of the field is sheared into a toroidal component. The aim of this work is to establish the character of the resultant magnetic field and its dependence on the disk's parameters. We concentrate on alpha-disks driven by turbulent viscosity. Axisymmetric, two-dimensional solutions are obtained without taking into account the back-reaction of the magnetic field on the structure of the disk. The character of the magnetic field depends strongly on the magnitude of the magnetic Prandtl number, P . We present two illustrative examples of viscous disks: a so-called 'standard' steady state model of a disk around a compact star (e.g., cataclysmic variable), and a steady state model of a proto-planetary disk. In both cases, P = 1, P = 10(sup -1), and P = 10(sup -2) scenarios are calculated. Significant bending and magnification of the magnetic field is possible only for disks characterized by P of the order of 10(sup -2). In such a case, the field lines are bent sufficiently to allow the development of a centrifugally driven wind. Inside the disk the field is dominated by its toroidal component. We also investigate the dragging of the magnetic field by a nonviscous protoplanetary disk described by a phenomenological model. This scenario leads to large distortion and magnification of the magnetic field.

  3. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  4. The Formation of Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Mo, H J; White, S D M; Mao, Shude; White, Simon D.M.

    1997-01-01

    We study the population of galactic disks expected in current hierarchical clustering models for structure formation. A rotationally supported disk with exponential surface density profile is assumed to form with a mass and angular momentum which are fixed fractions of those of its surrounding dark halo. We assume that haloes respond adiabatically to disk formation, and that only stable disks can correspond to real systems. With these assumptions the predicted population can match both present-day disks and the damped Lyman alpha absorbers in QSO spectra. Good agreement is found provided: (i) the masses of disks are a few percent of those of their haloes; (ii) the specific angular momenta of disks are similar to those of their haloes; (iii) present-day disks were assembled recently (at z3kpc/h and about 10% at r>10kpc/h. The cross-section for absorption is strongly weighted towards disks with large angular momentum and so large size for their mass. The galaxy population associated with damped absorbers should...

  5. HI content in galactic disks: The role of gravitational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zasov, A. V.; Zaitseva, N. A.

    2017-07-01

    We examine the dependence of the total hydrogen mass M HI in late-type star-forming galaxies on rotation velocity V rot and optical size D 25 or radial scale length R 0 of the disk for two samples of galaxies: (i) isolated galaxies (AMIGA) and (ii) galaxies with edge-on disks (flat galaxies according to Karachentsev et al.). M HI given in the HYPERLEDA database for flat galaxies have turned out to be, on average, overestimated by 0.2 dex compared to isolated galaxies with similar V rot or D 25, which is apparently due to an overestimation of the self-absorption in the HI line. The hydrogen mass in the galaxies of both samples closely correlates with the total specific angular momentum of the galactic disk J, which is proportional to V rot D 25 or V rot R 0, with the low-surface-brightness galaxies lying along the common V rot R 0 sequence. We discuss the possibility of explaining the relationship between M HI and V rot D 25 by assuming that the gas mass in the disk is regulated by the marginal gravitational stability condition for the gas layer. Comparison of the observed and theoretically expected dependences leads us to conclude that either the gravitational stability corresponds to higher values of the Toomre parameter than is usually assumed, or the threshold stability condition formost galaxies was fulfilled only in the past, when the gasmass in the disks was a factor of 2-4 higher than that at present (except for the galaxies with an anomalously high observed HI content). The latter condition requires that for most galaxies the conversion of gas into stars be not compensated by the external accretion of gas onto the disk.

  6. Limestone compaction: an enigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinn, Eugene A.; Halley, Robert B.; Hudson, J. Harold; Lidz, Barbara H.

    1977-01-01

    Compression of an undisturbed carbonate sediment core under a pressure of 556 kg/cm2 produced a “rock” with sedimentary structures similar to typical ancient fine-grained limestones. Surprisingly, shells, foraminifera, and other fossils were not noticeably crushed, which indicates that absence of crushed fossils in ancient limestones can no longer be considered evidence that limestones do not compact.

  7. Compact rotating cup anemometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellman, J. B.

    1968-01-01

    Compact, collapsible rotating cup anemometer is used in remote locations where portability and durability are factors in the choice of equipment. This lightweight instrument has a low wind-velocity threshold, is capable of withstanding large mechanical shocks while in its stowed configuration, and has fast response to wind fluctuations.

  8. Dust Extinction in Compact Planetary Nebulae

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, TH; Kwok, S.

    2005-01-01

    The effects of dust extinction on the departure from axisymmetry in the morphology of planetary nebulae (PNs) are investigated through a comparison of the radio free-free emission and hydrogen recombination line images. The dust extinction maps from five compact PNs are derived using high-resolution (̃0"1) Hα and radio maps of the HST and VLA. These extinction maps are then analyzed by an ellipsoidal shell ionization model including the effects of dust extinction to infer the nebulae's intrin...

  9. Disk storage at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mascetti, L; Chan, B; Espinal, X; Fiorot, A; Labrador, H Gonz; Iven, J; Lamanna, M; Presti, G Lo; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ; Ponce, S; Rousseau, H; van der Ster, D

    2015-01-01

    CERN IT DSS operates the main storage resources for data taking and physics analysis mainly via three system: AFS, CASTOR and EOS. The total usable space available on disk for users is about 100 PB (with relative ratios 1:20:120). EOS actively uses the two CERN Tier0 centres (Meyrin and Wigner) with 50:50 ratio. IT DSS also provide sizeable on-demand resources for IT services most notably OpenStack and NFS-based clients: this is provided by a Ceph infrastructure (3 PB) and few proprietary servers (NetApp). We will describe our operational experience and recent changes to these systems with special emphasis to the present usages for LHC data taking, the convergence to commodity hardware (nodes with 200-TB each with optional SSD) shared across all services. We also describe our experience in coupling commodity and home-grown solution (e.g. CERNBox integration in EOS, Ceph disk pools for AFS, CASTOR and NFS) and finally the future evolution of these systems for WLCG and beyond.

  10. Disk storage at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascetti, L.; Cano, E.; Chan, B.; Espinal, X.; Fiorot, A.; González Labrador, H.; Iven, J.; Lamanna, M.; Lo Presti, G.; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ; Ponce, S.; Rousseau, H.; van der Ster, D.

    2015-12-01

    CERN IT DSS operates the main storage resources for data taking and physics analysis mainly via three system: AFS, CASTOR and EOS. The total usable space available on disk for users is about 100 PB (with relative ratios 1:20:120). EOS actively uses the two CERN Tier0 centres (Meyrin and Wigner) with 50:50 ratio. IT DSS also provide sizeable on-demand resources for IT services most notably OpenStack and NFS-based clients: this is provided by a Ceph infrastructure (3 PB) and few proprietary servers (NetApp). We will describe our operational experience and recent changes to these systems with special emphasis to the present usages for LHC data taking, the convergence to commodity hardware (nodes with 200-TB each with optional SSD) shared across all services. We also describe our experience in coupling commodity and home-grown solution (e.g. CERNBox integration in EOS, Ceph disk pools for AFS, CASTOR and NFS) and finally the future evolution of these systems for WLCG and beyond.

  11. Improving the compaction properties of roller compacted calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, C; Olsen, P M; Bertelsen, P; Kristensen, J; Sonnergaard, J M

    2007-09-05

    The effects of roller compaction process parameters, morphological forms of calcium carbonate and particle size of sorbitol on flow, compaction and compression properties were investigated. The morphology of the calcium carbonate and the sorbitol particle size were more influential on the compaction properties than the settings of the roller compactor. The roller compaction process was demonstrated to be robust and stable in regard to flowability and compactibility. The flowability of the granules was improved adequately to facilitate compression in a production scale rotary tablet press. By adding sorbitol to the calcium carbonate, the compressibility - characterized by the Walker coefficient W(ID) - and the compactibility C(P) were improved considerably. A correlation between the consolidation characteristics was demonstrated. Compactibility data from the compaction simulator correlated with the tablet press for two of the calcium carbonates, the cubic form and the ground quality.

  12. ALMA Observations of Circumstellar Disks in the Upper Scorpius OB Association

    CERN Document Server

    Barenfeld, Scott A; Ricci, Luca; Isella, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA observations of 106 G-, K-, and M-type stars in the Upper Scorpius OB Association hosting circumstellar disks. With these data, we measure the 0.88 mm continuum and $^{12}$CO $J = 3-2$ line fluxes of disks around low mass ($0.14-1.66$ $M_{\\odot}$) stars at an age of 5-11 Myr. Of the 75 primordial disks in the sample, 53 are detected in the dust continuum and 26 in CO. Of the 31 disks classified as debris/evolved transitional disks, 5 are detected in the continuum and none in CO. The lack of CO emission in approximately half of the disks with detected continuum emission can be explained if CO is optically thick but has a compact emitting area ($\\lesssim 40$ AU), or if the CO is heavily depleted by a factor of at least $\\sim1000$ relative to interstellar medium abundances and is optically thin. The continuum measurements are used to estimate the dust mass of the disks. We find a correlation between disk dust mass and stellar host mass consistent with a power-law relation of $M_{dust}\\propto M_*^...

  13. Chemistry in evolving protoplanetary disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkheid, Bastiaan Johan

    2006-01-01

    Planets form in disks of gas and dust around young stars. Since the gas makes up 99 % of the disk mass, it is critical for our understanding of planet formation to gain direct information from the gas, independently of what can be learned from dust emission. In this thesis, calculations are presente

  14. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z., E-mail: d.pugliese.physics@gmail.com, E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz [Institute of Physics and Research Centre of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Philosophy and Science, Silesian University in Opava, Bezručovo náměstí 13, CZ-74601 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  15. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  16. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find

  17. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find th

  18. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  19. Physical processes in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Armitage, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    This review introduces physical processes in protoplanetary disks relevant to accretion and the initial stages of planet formation. After reprising the elementary theory of disk structure and evolution, I discuss the gas-phase physics of angular momentum transport through turbulence and disk winds, and how this may be related to episodic accretion observed in Young Stellar Objects. Turning to solids, I review the evolution of single particles under aerodynamic forces, and describe the conditions necessary for the development of collective gas-particle instabilities. Observations show that disks are not always radially smooth axisymmetric structures, and I discuss how gas and particle processes can interact to form observable large-scale structure (at ice lines, vortices and in zonal flows). I conclude with disk dispersal.

  20. Detection of precessing circumpulsar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Grimani, C

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidences indicate that formations of disks and planetary systems around pulsars are allowed. Unfortunately, direct detections through electromagnetic observations appear to be quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24, the hypothesis of a rigid precessing disk penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio transient observations from this star. Disk self-occultation and precession may limit electromagnetic observations. Conversely, we show here that gravitational waves generated by disk precessing near the light cylinder of young and middle aged pulsars would be detected by future space interferometers with sensitivities like those expected for DECIGO (DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) and BBO (Big Bang Observer). The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing disks are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar System. Speculations on upper limits to detection rates are presented.

  1. A Disk Scheduling Algorithm: SPFF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Ming

    2005-01-01

    We put forward an optimal disk schedule with n disk requests and prove its optimality mathematically. Generalizing the idea of an optimal disk schedule, we remove the limit of n requests and, at the same time, consider the dynamically arrival model of disk requests to obtain an algorithm, shortest path first-fit first (SPFF). This algorithm is based on the shortest path of disk head motion constructed by all the pendent requests. From view of the head-moving distance, it has the stronger globality than SSTF. From view of the head-moving direction, it has the better flexibility than SCAN. Therefore, SPFF keeps the advantage of SCAN and, at the same time, absorbs the strength of SSTF. The algorithm SPFF not only shows the more superiority than other scheduling polices, but also have higher adjustability to meet the computer system's different demands.

  2. Crystalline structure of accretion disks: features of a global model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montani, Giovanni; Benini, Riccardo

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, we develop the analysis of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical configuration for an axially symmetric and rotating plasma (embedded in a dipolelike magnetic field), modeling the structure of a thin accretion disk around a compact astrophysical object. Our study investigates the global profile of the disk plasma, in order to fix the conditions for the existence of a crystalline morphology and ring sequence, as outlined by the local analysis pursued in Coppi [Phys. Plasmas 12, 7302 (2005)] and Coppi and Rousseau [Astrophys. J. 641, 458 (2006)]. In the linear regime, when the electromagnetic back-reaction of the plasma is small enough, we show the existence of an oscillating radial behavior for the flux surface function, which very closely resembles the one outlined in the local model, apart from a radial modulation of the amplitude. In the opposite limit, corresponding to a dominant back-reaction in the magnetic structure over the field of central object, we can recognize the existence of a ringlike decomposition of the disk, according to the same modulation of the magnetic flux surface, and a smoother radial decay of the disk density, with respect to the linear case. In this extreme nonlinear regime, the global model seems to predict a configuration very close to that of the local analysis, but here the thermostatic pressure, crucial for the equilibrium setting, is also radially modulated. Among the conditions requested for the validity of such a global model, the confinement of the radial coordinate within a given value sensitive to the disk temperature and to the mass of the central objet, stands; however, this condition corresponds to dealing with a thin disk configuration.

  3. Compact and user-friendly ultrasound acquisition systems optimized for field recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Specht Raimund

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A compact and rugged hardware interface for laptop-based ultrasound recording in the field has been developed. The versatile devices overcome the limitations and drawbacks of previously available solutions. The accompanying recording software enables flexible hard disk recording for both manual and automated operation.

  4. 37 CFR 1.52 - Language, paper, writing, margins, compact disc specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... structures, and sequence data) are considered part of the numbered paragraph around or above the elements... Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII). (ii) Each compact disc must be enclosed in a hard... their order (e.g., “1 of X”). (vi) An indication that the disk is “Copy 1” or “Copy 2” of the submission...

  5. Numerical Investigation of Circumplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tyler R.; Stewart, G. R.

    2012-10-01

    The regular satellites of Jupiter and Saturn are believed to have formed in circumplanetary disks that were present during the late stages of giant planet formation. At present, there is a large amount of uncertainly in both the structure of these disks and the nature of angular momentum transport within them. In circumstellar disks, magnetorotational rotational instability (MRI) is generally invoked as a mechanism to transfer angular momentum and drive accretion. It is unclear whether circumplanetary disks are sufficiently ionized for the MRI to be active. In an effort to better understand the physical nature of circumplanetary disks, we present 1+1D numerical models of Jovian and Saturnian circumplanetary disks. Our models include viscous diffusion, infall from the solar nebula and external photoevaporation. The combination of these three processes allow for steady-state, truncated disks roughly consistent with the present state of the regular satellite systems of Jupiter and Saturn (Mitchell & Stewart, 2011). Unlike recent models of tidal truncation (Martin & Lubow, 2010), our initial models showed that photoevaporation is able to truncate circumplanetary disks to a small fraction of the Hill radius. One goal of this work is to verify our previous results and confirm that truncated disks can be formed using models with more realistic viscous processes. In order to simplify the problem, our initial models employed a viscosity that was linearly dependent on radius. Our current disk models use a viscosity that is calculated locally based on the midplane temperature that is determined from detailed vertical structure calculations. These models are used to conduct an initial investigation of the viability of an active MRI as well as baroclinic instability and other instabilities that may exist.

  6. Evolution of magnetized protoplanetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Ruiz, Mauricio; Stepinski, Tomasz F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigate the global evolution of a turbulent protoplanetary disk in its viscous stage, incorporating the effects of Maxwell stress due to a large-scale magnetic field permeating disk. We assume that the viscous stress is given by an alpha model. A magnetic field is produced contemporaneously by an alpha omega dynamo mechanism and the resultant Maxwell stress assists the viscous stress in providing the means for disk evolution. The aim of this work is to compare the evolution of magnetized and nonmagnetized disks driven by turbulent viscosity of the same magnitude and thus assess the effects of a self-generated magnetic field on the structure and dynamical evolution of protoplanetary disks. Two illustrative examples corresponding to two different initial conditions are considered: a high-mass case that starts with a disk of 0.245 solar mass and angular momentum of 5.6 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s, and a low-mass that case starts with a disk of 0.11 solar mass and angular momentum of 1.8 x 10(exp 52)g sq cm/s. For each of these two cases the radial development of a disk is calculated numerically assuming a fiducial value of the dimensionless viscosity parameter alpha(sub ss) = 0.01, as well as alpha(sub ss) = 2 x 10(exp -3). In all cases the central star has a mass equal to 1 solar mass. The most striking feature of magnetized disk evolution is the presence of the surface density bulge located in the region of the disk where the dynamo mechanism cannot support a magnetic field. The bulge persists for a time of the order of 10(exp 5)-10(exp 6) yr. The presence and persistence of the surface density bulge may have important implications for the process of planet formation and the overall characteristics of resultant planetary systems.

  7. Evolution of the proto-lunar disk and the origin of the Moon's material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Michaut, Chloe

    2014-11-01

    The Earth’s Moon is thought to have accreted from an impact generated disk. Whereas many works have studied the impact itself, the evolution of the disk that gave birth to the Moon is largely unknown and in particular its dynamical evolution and coolingtimescale. These are important parameters as they control the onset of the gravitational instability that triggers satellite formation. In particular, the chemical and isotopical composition of the Earth’s moon is thought to be largely inherited from the protolunar disk (formed after an impact on the proto-earth). However, for the moon to form, the disk must cool down first. During this cooling phase, major dynamical, chemical and isotopical restructuration may happen in the disk, and thus, the material that will get ultimately incorporated in the protomoon may be largely different from the average composition of the Earth or its impactor.We have developed a viscous model of a two-phase protolunar disk, including phase transition, gravitational instability and Kelvin Helmoltz instability (KH) to investigate the evolution of this disk on several 10^4 years, from the impact up to its ultimate cooling and assembling into a protomoon. We show that the protolunar disk forms rapidly a dense and compact disk below 2 earth radii, with a high density. This high density promotes long cooling timescales, about 10^4 to 10^5 years. During this phase the material hasenough time to equilibrate isotopicaly. In addition if the disk is turbulent then the gas phase is very mobile an cand efficiently separate from the liquid phase and lead to an incomplete condensation of the disk material, which is a good candidate to explain the today moon devolatilisation with respect to Earth material. Extension of this work to the formation of Ice giant planet's satellites will be also presented.

  8. GEMINI PLANET IMAGER OBSERVATIONS OF THE AU MICROSCOPII DEBRIS DISK: ASYMMETRIES WITHIN ONE ARCSECOND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jason J.; Graham, James R.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Kalas, Paul; Chiang, Eugene; Duchêne, Gaspard [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Pueyo, Laurent; Chen, Christine; Greenbaum, Alexandra Z. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Nielsen, Eric L. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Millar-Blanchaer, Max [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Ammons, S. Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94040 (United States); Bulger, Joanna [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Cardwell, Andrew; Goodsell, Stephen J. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Chilcote, Jeffrey K. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Doyon, René [Institut de Recherche sur les Exoplanètes, Départment de Physique, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Draper, Zachary H. [University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); Esposito, Thomas M.; Fitzgerald, Michael P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    We present Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) observations of AU Microscopii, a young M dwarf with an edge-on, dusty debris disk. Integral field spectroscopy and broadband imaging polarimetry were obtained during the commissioning of GPI. In our broadband imaging polarimetry observations, we detect the disk only in total intensity and find asymmetries in the morphology of the disk between the southeast (SE) and northwest (NW) sides. The SE side of the disk exhibits a bump at 1″ (10 AU projected separation) that is three times more vertically extended and three times fainter in peak surface brightness than the NW side at similar separations. This part of the disk is also vertically offset by 69 ± 30 mas to the northeast at 1″ when compared to the established disk midplane and is consistent with prior Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array and Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations. We see hints that the SE bump might be a result of detecting a horizontal sliver feature above the main disk that could be the disk backside. Alternatively, when including the morphology of the NW side, where the disk midplane is offset in the opposite direction ∼50 mas between 0.″4 and 1.″2, the asymmetries suggest a warp-like feature. Using our integral field spectroscopy data to search for planets, we are 50% complete for ∼4 M{sub Jup} planets at 4 AU. We detect a source, resolved only along the disk plane, that could either be a candidate planetary mass companion or a compact clump in the disk.

  9. Stochastic disks that roll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes-Cerfon, Miranda

    2016-11-01

    We study a model of rolling particles subject to stochastic fluctuations, which may be relevant in systems of nano- or microscale particles where rolling is an approximation for strong static friction. We consider the simplest possible nontrivial system: a linear polymer of three disks constrained to remain in contact and immersed in an equilibrium heat bath so the internal angle of the polymer changes due to stochastic fluctuations. We compare two cases: one where the disks can slide relative to each other and the other where they are constrained to roll, like gears. Starting from the Langevin equations with arbitrary linear velocity constraints, we use formal homogenization theory to derive the overdamped equations that describe the process in configuration space only. The resulting dynamics have the formal structure of a Brownian motion on a Riemannian or sub-Riemannian manifold, depending on if the velocity constraints are holonomic or nonholonomic. We use this to compute the trimer's equilibrium distribution with and without the rolling constraints. Surprisingly, the two distributions are different. We suggest two possible interpretations of this result: either (i) dry friction (or other dissipative, nonequilibrium forces) changes basic thermodynamic quantities like the free energy of a system, a statement that could be tested experimentally, or (ii) as a lesson in modeling rolling or friction more generally as a velocity constraint when stochastic fluctuations are present. In the latter case, we speculate there could be a "roughness" entropy whose inclusion as an effective force could compensate the constraint and preserve classical Boltzmann statistics. Regardless of the interpretation, our calculation shows the word "rolling" must be used with care when stochastic fluctuations are present.

  10. TRANSITIONAL DISKS AROUND YOUNG LOW MASS STARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D'Alessio

    2009-01-01

    have been interpreted as produced by disks with inner holes, which have been classi ed as \\Transitional Disks". These disks are considered the evolutionary link between the full disks typically found around the young T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars, and the debris disks, found around some main sequence stars. In this contribution we summarize the observed/inferred characteristics of these transitional disks and also some of the models proposed to explain their peculiar geometry.

  11. Detection of Strong Millimeter Emission from the Circumstellar Dust Disk Around V1094 Sco: Cold and Massive Disk around a T Tauri Star in a Quiescent Accretion Phase?

    CERN Document Server

    Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Momose, Munetake; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Hiramatsu, Masaaki; Ikeda, Norio; Kamegai, Kazuhisa; Wilson, Grant; Yun, Min S; Scott, Kimberly; Austermann, Jay; Perera, Thushara; Hughes, David; Aretxaga, Itziar; Mauskopf, Philip; Ezawa, Hajime; Kohno, Kotaro; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2010-01-01

    We present the discovery of a cold massive dust disk around the T Tauri star V1094 Sco in the Lupus molecular cloud from the 1.1 millimeter continuum observations with AzTEC on ASTE. A compact ($r\\lesssim$320 AU) continuum emission coincides with the stellar position having a flux density of 272 mJy which is largest among T Tauri stars in Lupus. We also present the detection of molecular gas associated with the star in the five-point observations in $^{12}$CO J=3--2 and $^{13}$CO J=3--2. Since our $^{12}$CO and $^{13}$CO observations did not show any signature of a large-scale outflow or a massive envelope, the compact dust emission is likely to come from a disk around the star. The observed SED of V1094 Sco shows no distinct turnover from near infrared to millimeter wavelengths, which can be well described by a flattened disk for the dust component, and no clear dip feature around 10 $\\micron$ suggestive of absence of an inner hole in the disk. We fit a simple power-law disk model to the observed SED. The es...

  12. Accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from protoplanetary disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, Takayuki [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0819 (Japan); Maruta, Akito; Machida, Masahiro N., E-mail: tanigawa@pop.lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from heliocentric orbits rotating in protoplanetary disks, which is a key process for the formation of regular satellite systems. In the late stage of the gas-capturing phase of giant planet formation, the accreting gas from protoplanetary disks forms circumplanetary disks. Since the accretion flow toward the circumplanetary disks affects the particle motion through gas drag force, we use hydrodynamic simulation data for the gas drag term to calculate the motion of solid materials. We consider a wide range of size for the solid particles (10{sup –2}-10{sup 6} m), and find that the accretion efficiency of the solid particles peaks around 10 m sized particles because energy dissipation of drag with circum-planetary disk gas in this size regime is most effective. The efficiency for particles larger than 10 m becomes lower because gas drag becomes less effective. For particles smaller than 10 m, the efficiency is lower because the particles are strongly coupled with the background gas flow, which prevents particles from accretion. We also find that the distance from the planet where the particles are captured by the circumplanetary disks is in a narrow range and well described as a function of the particle size.

  13. The United Nations Global Compact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Waddock, Sandra; McIntosh, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    This article reviews the interdisciplinary literature on the UN Global Compact. The review identifies three research perspectives, which scholars have used to study the UN Global Compact so far: a historical perspective discussing the Global Compact in the context of UN-business relations...

  14. Compact fusion reactors

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    Fusion research is currently to a large extent focused on tokamak (ITER) and inertial confinement (NIF) research. In addition to these large international or national efforts there are private companies performing fusion research using much smaller devices than ITER or NIF. The attempt to achieve fusion energy production through relatively small and compact devices compared to tokamaks decreases the costs and building time of the reactors and this has allowed some private companies to enter the field, like EMC2, General Fusion, Helion Energy, Lawrenceville Plasma Physics and Lockheed Martin. Some of these companies are trying to demonstrate net energy production within the next few years. If they are successful their next step is to attempt to commercialize their technology. In this presentation an overview of compact fusion reactor concepts is given.

  15. Compact Spreader Schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  16. Compact fiber optic accelerometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Peng; Jun Yang; Bing Wu; Yonggui Yuan; Xingliang Li; Ai Zhou; Libo Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A compact fiber optic accelerometer based on a Michelson interferometer is proposed and demonstrated.In the proposed system,the sensing element consists of two single-mode fibers glued together by epoxy,which then act as a simple supported beam.By demodulating the optical phase shift,the acceleration is determined as proportional to the force applied on the central position of the two single-mode fibers.This simple model is able to calculate the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the compact accelerometer.The experimental results show that the sensitivity and the resonant frequency of the accelerometer are 0.42 rad/g and 600 Hz,respectively.

  17. Analysis of laboratory compaction methods of roller compacted concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trtík, Tomáš; Chylík, Roman; Bílý, Petr; Fládr, Josef

    2017-09-01

    Roller-Compacted Concrete (RCC) is an ordinary concrete poured and compacted with machines typically used for laying of asphalt road layers. One of the problems connected with this technology is preparation of representative samples in the laboratory. The aim of this work was to analyse two methods of preparation of RCC laboratory samples with bulk density as the comparative parameter. The first method used dynamic compaction by pneumatic hammer. The second method of compaction had a static character. The specimens were loaded by precisely defined force in laboratory loading machine to create the same conditions as during static rolling (in the Czech Republic, only static rolling is commonly used). Bulk densities obtained by the two compaction methods were compared with core drills extracted from real RCC structure. The results have shown that the samples produced by pneumatic hammer tend to overestimate the bulk density of the material. For both compaction methods, immediate bearing index test was performed to verify the quality of compaction. A fundamental difference between static and dynamic compaction was identified. In static compaction, initial resistance to penetration of the mandrel was higher, after exceeding certain limit the resistance was constant. This means that the samples were well compacted just on the surface. Specimens made by pneumatic hammer actively resisted throughout the test, the whole volume was uniformly compacted.

  18. The Gas Disk: Evolution and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rab, Christian; Baldovin-Saavedra, Carla; Dionatos, Odysseas; Vorobyov, Eduard; Güdel, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the birthplaces of planetary systems. The evolution of the star-disk system and the disk chemical composition determines the initial conditions for planet formation. Therefore a comprehensive understanding of the main physical and chemical processes in disks is crucial for our understanding of planet formation. We give an overview of the early evolution of disks, discuss the importance of the stellar high-energy radiation for disk evolution and describe the general thermal and chemical structure of disks. Finally we provide an overview of observational tracers of the gas component and disk winds.

  19. The gas disk: Evolution and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Rab, Ch; Dionatos, O; Vorobyov, E; Güdel, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the birthplaces of planetary systems. The evolution of the star-disk system and the disk chemical composition determines the initial conditions for planet formation. Therefore a comprehensive understanding of the main physical and chemical processes in disks is crucial for our understanding of planet formation. We give an overview of the early evolution of disks, discuss the importance of the stellar high-energy radiation for disk evolution and describe the general thermal and chemical structure of disks. Finally we provide an overview of observational tracers of the gas component and disk winds.

  20. Protecting geothermal operations with rupture disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, D.W.

    1983-02-01

    Potential rupture disk applications in geothermal operations are reviewed. Several wells manifolded together, to form the geothermal feed, cause erratic pressure. Rupture disks are used for relief. Flash tanks are equipped with rupture disks. Brine separators, heat exchanger shells, and turbine casings are protected by rupture disks. An analysis of geothermal steam will determine the rupture disk metal. Reverse Buckling disks are recommended over tension loaded disks for dealing with geothermal pressure cycling. Erratic temperature suggests that metals which retain tensile strength with temperature be used (Inconel is mentioned). In summary, geothermal projects represent an excellent rupture disk market.

  1. Forming Compact Massive Galaxies at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    van Dokkum, Pieter G; Franx, Marijn; Momcheva, Ivelina; Brammer, Gabriel; Schreiber, Natascha M Forster; Skelton, Rosalind E; Whitaker, Katherine E; van der Wel, Arjen; Bezanson, Rachel; Fumagalli, Mattia; Kriek, Mariska; Leja, Joel; Wuyts, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study a key phase in the formation of massive galaxies: the transition of star forming galaxies into massive (M_stars~10^11 Msun), compact (r_e~1 kpc) quiescent galaxies, which takes place from z~3 to z~1.5. We use HST grism redshifts and extensive photometry in all five 3D-HST/CANDELS fields, more than doubling the area used previously for such studies, and combine these data with Keck MOSFIRE and NIRSPEC spectroscopy. We first confirm that a population of massive, compact, star forming galaxies exists at z~2, using K-band spectroscopy of 25 of these objects at 2.0disks of ionized gas that are a factor of ~2 more extended than the stellar distribution. By combining measurements of individual galaxies, we find that the kinematics are co...

  2. Searching for circumplanetary disks around LkCa 15

    CERN Document Server

    Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M; Pe'rez, Laura M; Ricci, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the 7 mm continuum emission from the disk surrounding the young star LkCa 15. The observations achieve an angular resolution of 70 mas and spatially resolve the circumstellar emission on a spatial scale of 9 AU. The continuum emission traces a dusty annulus of 45 AU in radius that is consistent with the dust morphology observed at shorter wavelengths. The VLA observations also reveal a compact source at the center of the disk, possibly due to thermal emission from hot dust or ionized gas located within a few AU from the central star. No emission is observed between the star and the dusty ring, and, in particular, at the position of the candidate protoplanet LkCa 15 b. By comparing the observations with theoretical models for circumplanetary disk emission, we find that if LkCa~15~b is a massive planet (>5 M_J) accreting at a rate greater than 1.e-6 M_J yr^{-1}, then its circumplanetary disk is less massive than 0.1 M_J, or smaller than 0.4 Hill r...

  3. Stability of black hole accretion disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czerny B.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the issues of stability of accretion disks that may undergo the limit-cycle oscillations due to the two main types of thermal-viscous instabilities. These are induced either by the domination of radiation pressure in the innermost regions close to the central black hole, or by the partial ionization of hydrogen in the zone of appropriate temperatures. These physical processes may lead to the intermittent activity in AGN on timescales between hundreds and millions of years. We list a number of observational facts that support the idea of the cyclic activity in high accretion rate sources. We conclude however that the observed features of quasars may provide only indirect signatures of the underlying instabilities. Also, the support from the sources with stellar mass black holes, whose variability timescales are observationally feasible, is limited to a few cases of the microquasars. Therefore we consider a number of plausible mechanisms of stabilization of the limit cycle oscillations in high accretion rate accretion disks. The newly found is the stabilizing effect of the stochastic viscosity fluctuations.

  4. General relativistic spectra of accretion disks around rotating neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, S; Thampan, A V

    2000-01-01

    General relativistic spectra from accretion disks around rotating neutron stars in the appropriate space-time geometry for several different equation of state, spin rates and mass of the compact object have been computed. The analysis involves the computation of the relativistically corrected radial temperature profiles and the effect of Doppler and gravitational red-shifts on the spectra. Light bending effects have been omitted for simplicity. The relativistic spectrum is compared with the Newtonian one and it is shown that the difference between the two is primarily due to the different radial temperature profile for the relativistic and Newtonian disk solutions. To facilitate direct comparison with observations, a simple empirical function has been presented which describes the numerically computed relativistic spectra well. This empirical function (which has three parameters including normalization) also describes the Newtonian spectrum adequately. Thus the function can in principle be used to distinguish...

  5. Photometry of long-period algol binaries. III - The accretion disk and mass transfer in RZ Ophiuchi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Edward C.

    1987-11-01

    Five-color photometric observations of RZ Oph have been obtained from 1981 through 1986, in an effort to deduce the properties of the accretion disk in this long-period Algol. The partial eclipse of the disk by the cool star, and the partial occultation of the cool star by the disk, have both been observed in some detail. A simple gravitationally stratified model of the disk accounts very well for the emitted flux. The disk is viewed nearly edge-on, and is of moderate optical thickness. The principal extinction source in the disk is Rayleigh scattering from neutral hydrogen, and H(-) contributes to the thermal absorption. Disk temperatures run from about 5600 K to about 4400 K at the edge of the disk, and the disk appears to overflow the Roche lobe of the hot star. Most of the disk's luminosity is supplied by gravitational accretion, implying a mass-transfer rate of less than about 10 to the -6th solar mass/yr. Brightness fluctuations of the disk seem to account for small intrinsic scatter that is present in the observations at most phases.

  6. Stellar energetic particle ionization in protoplanetary disks around T Tauri stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rab, Ch.; Güdel, M.; Padovani, M.; Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Woitke, P.; Aresu, G.

    2017-07-01

    Context. Anomalies in the abundance measurements of short lived radionuclides in meteorites indicate that the protosolar nebulae was irradiated by a large number of energetic particles (E ≳ 10 MeV). The particle flux of the contemporary Sun cannot explain these anomalies. However, similar to T Tauri stars the young Sun was more active and probably produced enough high energy particles to explain those anomalies. Aims: We aim to study the interaction of stellar energetic particles with the gas component of the disk (i.e. ionization of molecular hydrogen) and identify possible observational tracers of this interaction. Methods: We used a 2D radiation thermo-chemical protoplanetary disk code to model a disk representative for T Tauri stars. We used a particle energy distribution derived from solar flare observations and an enhanced stellar particle flux proposed for T Tauri stars. For this particle spectrum we calculated the stellar particle ionization rate throughout the disk with an accurate particle transport model. We studied the impact of stellar particles for models with varying X-ray and cosmic-ray ionization rates. Results: We find that stellar particle ionization has a significant impact on the abundances of the common disk ionization tracers HCO+ and N2H+, especially in models with low cosmic-ray ionization rates (e.g. 10-19 s-1 for molecular hydrogen). In contrast to cosmic rays and X-rays, stellar particles cannot reach the midplane of the disk. Therefore molecular ions residing in the disk surface layers are more affected by stellar particle ionization than molecular ions tracing the cold layers and midplane of the disk. Conclusions: Spatially resolved observations of molecular ions tracing different vertical layers of the disk allow to disentangle the contribution of stellar particle ionization from other competing ionization sources. Modelling such observations with a model like the one presented here allows to constrain the stellar particle flux in

  7. The compactness of presupernova stellar cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukhbold, Tuguldur; Woosley, S. E., E-mail: sukhbold@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The success or failure of the neutrino-transport mechanism for producing a supernova in an evolved massive star is known to be sensitive not only to the mass of the iron core that collapses, but also to the density gradient in the silicon and oxygen shells surrounding that core. Here we study the systematics of a presupernova core's 'compactness' as a function of the mass of the star and the physics used in its calculation. Fine-meshed surveys of presupernova evolution are calculated for stars from 15 to 65 M {sub ☉}. The metallicity and the efficiency of semiconvection and overshoot mixing are both varied and bare carbon-oxygen cores are explored as well as full hydrogenic stars. Two different codes, KEPLER and MESA, are used for the study. A complex interplay of carbon and oxygen burning, especially in shells, can cause rapid variations in the compactness for stars of very nearly the same mass. On larger scales, the distribution of compactness with main sequence mass is found to be robustly non-monotonic, implying islands of 'explodabilty,' particularly around 8-20 M {sub ☉} and 25-30 M {sub ☉}. The carbon-oxygen (CO) core mass of a presupernova star is a better, (though still ambiguous) discriminant of its core structure than the main sequence mass.

  8. Near-Infrared Observations of Compact Binary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khargharia, Juthika

    Low mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) are a subset of compact binary systems in which a main-sequence or slightly evolved star fills its Roche lobe and donates mass to a neutron star or a black hole (BH) via an accretion disk. Robust estimates of compact object masses in these systems are required to enhance our current understanding of the physics of compact object formation, accretion disks and jets. Compact object masses are typically determined at near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths when the system is in quiescence and the donor star is the dominant source of flux. Previous studies have assumed that any non-stellar contribution at these wavelengths is minimal. However, this assumption is rarely true. By performing NIR spectroscopy, we determined the fractional donor star contribution to the NIR flux and the compact object masses in two LMXBs: V404 Cyg and Cen X-4. In our analysis, it was assumed that the light curve morphology remains consistent throughout quiescence. It has now been shown in several systems that veiling measurements from non-stellar sources are meaningful only if acquired contemporaneously with light curve measurements. We accounted for this in the measurement of the BH mass in the LMXB, XTE J1118+480. LMXBs are also considered to be the most likely candidates responsible for the formation of milli-second pulsars (MSP). Here, I present the unique case of PSR J1903+0327 that challenges this currently accepted theory of MSP formation and is a potential candidate for testing General Relativity. Observations in the NIR come with their own set of challenges. NIR detector arrays used in these observations generally have high dark current and readout noise. In an effort to lower the read noise in NICFPS at APO, we present a study done on the Hawaii-1RG engineering grade chip that served as a test bed for reducing the read noise in NICFPS.

  9. IMPROVEMENT OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN HYDROGEN POWER ENGINEERING

    OpenAIRE

    Covaliova O.V.; Covaliov V.V.; Duca Gh.G.; Ivanov M. V.

    2011-01-01

    The possibility is studied of using the three-dimensional voluminous-porous electrodes made of the carbonic-fibrous materials and foamy metals, which surface is covered with Ni-Re alloy, for hydrogen electrochemical generation. Electrode surface modification makes it possible to obtain high reactive surface with low overvoltage of hydrogen evolution. The design is given of the developed compact electrochemical reactors for hydrogen power engineering. The method is described of oxygen-hydrogen...

  10. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  11. EXPLORING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIA OF OPTICALLY COMPACT DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Most, Hans P.; Cannon, John M.; Engstrom, Eric; Fliss, Palmer [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macalester College, 1600 Grand Avenue, Saint Paul, MN 55105 (United States); Salzer, John J. [Department of Astronomy, Indiana University, 727 East Third Street, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Rosenberg, Jessica L., E-mail: hmost@macalester.edu, E-mail: jcannon@macalester.edu, E-mail: slaz@astro.indiana.edu, E-mail: jrosenb4@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    We present new Very Large Array H I spectral line, archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and archival Spitzer Space Telescope imaging of eight star-forming blue compact dwarf galaxies that were selected to be optically compact (optical radii <1 kpc). These systems have faint blue absolute magnitudes (M{sub B} {approx}> -17), ongoing star formation (based on emission-line selection by the H{alpha} or [O III] lines), and are nearby (mean velocity = 3315 km s{sup -1} {approx_equal} 45 Mpc). One galaxy in the sample, ADBS 113845+2008, is found to have an H I halo that extends 58 r-band scale lengths from its stellar body. In contrast, the rest of the sample galaxies have H I radii to optical-scale-length ratios ranging from 9.3 to 26. The size of the H I disk in the 'giant disk' dwarf galaxy ADBS 113845+2008 appears to be unusual as compared with similarly compact stellar populations.

  12. 8-inch IBM floppy disk

    CERN Multimedia

    1971-01-01

    The 8-inch floppy disk was a magnetic storage disk for the data introduced commercially by IBM in 1971. It was designed by an IBM team as an inexpensive way to load data into the IBM System / 370. Plus it was a read-only bare disk containing 80 KB of data. The first read-write version was introduced in 1972 by Memorex and could contain 175 KB on 50 tracks (with 8 sectors per track). Other improvements have led to various coatings and increased capacities. Finally, it was surpassed by the mini diskette of 5.25 inches introduced in 1976.

  13. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton Observations of 1E1743.1-2843: Indications of a Neutron Star LMXB Nature of the Compact Object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotti, Simone; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K.; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Hailey, Charles J.; Harrison, Fiona A.; Hong, Jaesub; Krivonos, Roman A.; Rahoui, Farid; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A.; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W.

    2016-05-01

    We report on the results of NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of the persistent X-ray source 1E1743.1-2843, located in the Galactic Center region. The source was observed between 2012 September and October by NuSTAR and XMM-Newton, providing almost simultaneous observations in the hard and soft X-ray bands. The high X-ray luminosity points to the presence of an accreting compact object. We analyze the possibilities of this accreting compact object being either a neutron star (NS) or a black hole, and conclude that the joint XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum from 0.3 to 40 keV fits a blackbody spectrum with {kT}˜ 1.8 {keV} emitted from a hot spot or an equatorial strip on an NS surface. This spectrum is thermally Comptonized by electrons with {{kT}}e˜ 4.6 {keV}. Accepting this NS hypothesis, we probe the low-mass X-ray binary (LMXB) or high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) nature of the source. While the lack of Type-I bursts can be explained in the LMXB scenario, the absence of pulsations in the 2 mHz-49 Hz frequency range, the lack of eclipses and of an IR companion, and the lack of a {K}α line from neutral or moderately ionized iron strongly disfavor interpreting this source as a HMXB. We therefore conclude that 1E1743.1-2843 is most likely an NS-LMXB located beyond the Galactic Center. There is weak statistical evidence for a soft X-ray excess which may indicate thermal emission from an accretion disk. However, the disk normalization remains unconstrained due to the high hydrogen column density ({N}{{H}}˜ 1.6× {10}23 {{cm}}-2).

  14. Magneto-thermal Disk Wind from Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is governed by disk angular momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a 1D model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on 1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfv\\'en speed $v_{Ap}$, 2) the sound speed $c_s$ near the wind base, and 3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve $R^{-2}$ scaling). When $v_{Ap}\\gg c_s$, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accel...

  15. Development of a compact powdery sample negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Motoi [Doshisha Univ., Tanabe, Kyoto (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Sasao, Mamiko; Kawano, Hiroyuki

    1997-02-01

    A gas-feed-free compact negative ion source can be realized by utilizing the process of electron stimulated desorption from powdery sample. A negative ion source of this type is designed to be attached to a standard 1.33 inch copper-gasket-flange. The ion source is operated stable with LiH powder for more than 10 hours with the mass-separated negative hydrogen ion current of 1 nA. The source causes minute gas emission, and particularly suitable for ion beam applications in which a good vacuum is required. The present status of the compact ion source development is briefly described. (author)

  16. GRAIN GROWTH IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS OF THE YOUNG STARS CY Tau AND DoAr 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez, Laura M.; Chandler, Claire J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Isella, Andrea [Rice University, 6100 Main Street, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Carpenter, John M.; Sargent, Anneila I. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Calvet, Nuria [University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Corder, Stuartt A. [Joint ALMA Observatory, Av. Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Deller, Adam T. [The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Dullemond, Cornelis P. [Heidelberg University, Center for Astronomy, Albert Ueberle Str 2, Heidelberg (Germany); Greaves, Jane S. [University of St. Andrews, Physics and Astronomy, North Haugh, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Harris, Robert J. [University of Illinois, 1002 West Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Henning, Thomas; Linz, Hendrik [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kwon, Woojin [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Lazio, Joseph [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States); Mundy, Lee G.; Storm, Shaye [University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Tazzari, Marco [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2015-11-01

    We present new results from the Disks@EVLA program for two young stars: CY Tau and DoAr 25. We trace continuum emission arising from their circusmtellar disks from spatially resolved observations, down to tens of AU scales, at λ = 0.9, 2.8, 8.0, 9.8 mm for DoAr 25 and at λ = 1.3, 2.8, 7.1 mm for CY Tau. Additionally, we constrain the amount of emission whose origin is different from thermal dust emission from 5 cm observations. Directly from interferometric data, we find that observations at 7 mm and 1 cm trace emission from a compact disk while millimeter-wave observations trace an extended disk structure. From a physical disk model, where we characterize the disk structure of CY Tau and DoAr 25 at wavelengths shorter than 5 cm, we find that (1) dust continuum emission is optically thin at the observed wavelengths and over the spatial scales studied, (2) a constant value of the dust opacity is not warranted by our observations, and (3) a high-significance radial gradient of the dust opacity spectral index, β, is consistent with the observed dust emission in both disks, with low-β in the inner disk and high-β in the outer disk. Assuming that changes in dust properties arise solely due to changes in the maximum particle size (a{sub max}), we constrain radial variations of a{sub max} in both disks, from cm-sized particles in the inner disk (R < 40 AU) to millimeter sizes in the outer disk (R > 80 AU). These observational constraints agree with theoretical predictions of the radial-drift barrier, however, fragmentation of dust grains could explain our a{sub max}(R) constraints if these disks have lower turbulence and/or if dust can survive high-velocity collisions.

  17. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; O' Hara, J F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rybarcyk, L J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  18. Compact synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weihreter, Ernst

    1996-01-01

    This book covers a new niche in circular accelerator design, motivated by the promising industrial prospects of recent micromanufacturing methods - X-ray lithography, synchrotron radiation-based micromachining and microanalysis techniques. It describes the basic concepts and the essential challenges for the development of compact synchrotron radiation sources from an accelerator designer's point of view and gives an outline of the actual state of the art. The volume is intended as an introduction and as a reference for physicists, engineers and managers involved in this rapidly developing fiel

  19. Compact Q-balls

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Marques, M A; Menezes, R; da Rocha, R

    2016-01-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  20. Chondrule Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Goldberg, Aaron Z; Jacquet, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Chondrule formation remains one of the most elusive early Solar System events. Here, we take the novel approach of employing numerical simulations to investigate chondrule origin beyond purely cosmochemical methods. We model the transport of generically-produced chondrules and dust in a 1D viscous protoplanetary disk model, in order to constrain the chondrule formation events. For a single formation event we are able to match analytical predictions of the memory chondrule and dust populations retain of each other (complementarity), finding that a large mass accretion rate ($\\gtrsim 10^{-7}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$) allows for delays on the order of the disk's viscous timescale between chondrule formation and chondrite accretion. Further, we find older disks to be severely diminished of chondrules, with accretion rates $\\lesssim 10^{-9}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$ for nominal parameters. We then characterize the distribution of chondrule origins in both space and time, as functions of disk parameters and chondrule format...

  1. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kormendy, John

    2013-01-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via available evolution processes. The inner parts shrink and the outer parts expand, provided that some physical process transports energy or angular momentum outward. The evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks, and galaxy disks are all fundamentally similar. These processes for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. Part 1 discusses formation, growth, and death of bars. Part 2 details the slow ("secular") rearrangement of angular momentum that results from interactions between stars or gas and nonaxisymmetries such as bars. We have a heuristic understanding of how this forms outer rings, inner rings, and stuff dumped into the center. Observations show that barred galaxies have central concentrations of gas and star formation. Timescales imply that they grow central "pseudobulges" that get mistaken for ellip...

  2. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability, and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability, supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the non-linear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analyt...

  3. ALMA Observations of Circumstellar Disks in the Upper Scorpius OB Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenfeld, Scott A.; Carpenter, John M.; Ricci, Luca; Isella, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    We present ALMA observations of 106 G-, K-, and M-type stars in the Upper Scorpius OB Association hosting circumstellar disks. With these data, we measure the 0.88 mm continuum and 12CO J = 3-2 line fluxes of disks around low-mass (0.14-1.66 M ⊙) stars at an age of 5-11 Myr. Of the 75 primordial disks in the sample, 53 are detected in the dust continuum and 26 in CO. Of the 31 disks classified as debris/evolved transitional disks, five are detected in the continuum and none in CO. The lack of CO emission in approximately half of the disks with detected continuum emission can be explained if CO is optically thick but has a compact emitting area (≲40 au), or if the CO is heavily depleted by a factor of at least ˜1000 relative to interstellar medium abundances and is optically thin. The continuum measurements are used to estimate the dust mass of the disks. We find a correlation between disk dust mass and stellar host mass consistent with a power-law relation of {M}{dust}\\propto {M}* 1.67+/- 0.37. Disk dust masses in Upper Sco are compared to those measured in the younger Taurus star-forming region to constrain the evolution of disk dust mass. We find that the difference in the mean of {log}({M}{dust}/{M}* ) between Taurus and Upper Sco is 0.64 ± 0.09, such that M dust/M * is lower in Upper Sco by a factor of ˜4.5.

  4. All-metal, compact heat exchanger for space cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, Walter L.; Valenzuela, Javier; Sixsmith, Herbert

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the development of a high performance, all metal compact heat exchanger. The device is designed for use in a reverse Brayton cryogenic cooler which provides five watts of refrigeration at 70 K. The heat exchanger consists of a stainless steel tube concentrically assembled within a second stainless steel tube. Approximately 300 pairs of slotted copper disks and matching annular slotted copper plates are positioned along the centerline axis of the concentric tubes. Each of the disks and plates has approximately 1200 precise slots machined by means of a special electric discharge process. Positioning of the disk and plate pairs is accomplished by means of dimples in the surface of the tubes. Mechanical and thermal connections between the tubes and plate/disk pairs are made by solder joints. The heat exchanger assembly is 9 cm in diameter by 50 cm in length and has a mass of 10 kg. The predicted thermal effectiveness is greater than 0.985 at design conditions. Pressure loss at design conditions is less than 5 kPa in both fluid passages. Tests were performed on a subassembly of plates integrally soldered to two end headers. The measured thermal effectiveness of the test article exceeded predicted levels. Pressure losses were negligibly higher than predictions.

  5. Collisional Grooming of Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchner, Marc J

    2009-01-01

    Debris disk images show clumps, rings, warps, and other structures, many of which have been interpreted as perturbations from hidden planets. But so far, no models of these structures have properly accounted for collisions between dust grains. We have developed new steady-state 3D models of debris disks that self-consistently incorporate grain-grain collisions. We summarize our algorithm and use it to illustrate how collisions interact with resonant trapping in the presence of a planet.

  6. Heating of protostellar accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Campos, R. R.; Jatenco-Pereira, V.

    2017-07-01

    The magneto-rotational instability (MRI) is believed to be the mechanism responsible for a magneto-hydrodynamic turbulence that could lead to the accretion observed in protoplanetary disks. The need of a minimum amount of ionization in protostellar accretion disks is necessary for the MRI to take place. There are in the literature several studies that include the damping of Alfvén waves as an additional heating source besides the viscous heating mechanism in a geometrically thin and optically thick disk. The damping of the waves transfers energy to the disk increasing the temperature and consequently its ionization fraction, making possible the presence of the MRI in a large part of the disk. We analyzed the contribution of non-ideal effects such as Ohmic and ambipolar diffusion for the disk heating and compare these heating rates with those obtained by damping of Alfvén waves. In order to study these non-ideal effects, we have estimated the radiation emission of each effect through the energy conservation equation, and associated each emission with a black body radiation, which enabled us to assign a temperature contribution of each effect. Using the ATHENA code we were able to simulate the disk at different radial distances, and estimate the electric current density needed to calculate the radiation emission associated with each effect. Once we have those data, we were able to compare the results with other heating sources, like viscosity and Alfvén waves damping, and we concluded that the Ohmic and ambipolar diffusions do not heat the disk in any significant way.

  7. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  8. Resolved observations of transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Resolved observations are bringing new constraints on the origin of radial gaps in protoplanetary disks. The kinematics, sampled in detail in one case-study, are indicative of non-Keplerian flows, corresponding to warped structures and accretion which may both play a role in the development of cavities. Disk asymmetries seen in the radio continuum are being interpreted in the context of dust segregation via aerodynamic trapping. We summarise recent observational progress, and also describe prospects for improvements in the near term.

  9. Cosmological Mestel Disks and the Rossby Vortex Instability: The Origin of Supermassive Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Colgate, S A; Li, H; Currier, N; Warren, M S; Colgate, Stirling A.; Cen, Renyue; Li, Hui; Currier, Nathan; Warren, Michael S.

    2003-01-01

    A scenario is put forth for the formation of supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. It depends upon the formation of a Mestel disk with a flat rotation curve, where the mass is proportional to r and thickness to 1/r. Such disks should form from the collapse of uniformly rotating, isolated, gaseous clouds, either proto-galactic, galaxy-mass damped Lyman alpha clouds or the gas that survives galaxy mergers. We propose that in any case the disk will be unstable to the Rossby vortex instability (RVI). This instability grows from any large, steep pressure gradient in an optically thick disk. Such pressure gradients either occur adjacent to compact objects or could be triggered by individual supernovae in and around the disk. Upon excitation, the RVI transports angular momentum far more efficiently than the turbulence of a viscosity-based Shakura-Sunyaev disk. The critical column density condition in a L* Mestel disk predicts that the black hole mass is ~ 10^8 Msolar and is also proportional to the 1/...

  10. The advantage of an alternative substrate over Al/NiP disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiaa, Chi L.; Eltoukhy, Atef

    1994-02-01

    Compact-size disk drives with high storage densities are in high demand due to the popularity of portable computers and workstations. The contact-start-stop (CSS) endurance performance must improve in order to accomodate the higher number of on/off cycles. In this paper, we looked at 65 mm thin-film canasite substrate disks and evaluated their mechanical performance. We compared them with conventional aluminum NiP-plated disks in surface topography, take-off time with changes of skew angles and radius, CSS, drag test and glide height performance, and clamping effect. In addition, a new post-sputter process aimed at the improvement of take-off and glide as well as CSS performances was investigated and demonstrated for the canasite disks. From the test results, it is indicated that canasite achieved a lower take-off velocity, higher clamping resistance, and better glide height and CSS endurance performance. This study concludes that a new generation disk drive equipped with canasite substrate disks will consume less power from the motor due to faster take-off and lighter weight, achieve higher recording density since the head flies lower, can better withstand damage from sliding friction during the CSS operations, and will be less prone to disk distortion from clamping due to its superior mechanical properties.

  11. Unveiling the gas and dust disk structure in HD 163296 using ALMA observations

    CERN Document Server

    de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Dent, W; Pinte, C; López, C; Klaassen, P; Hales, A; Cortés, P; Rawlings, M G; Tachihara, K; Testi, L; Takahashi, S; Chapillon, E; Mathews, G; Juhasz, A; Akiyama, E; Higuchi, A E; Saito, M; Nyman, L - Å; Phillips, N; Rodń, J; Corder, S; Van Kempen, T

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this work is to study the structure of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. Methods: We have used high-resolution and high-sensitivity ALMA observations of the CO(3-2) emission line and the continuum at 850 microns, as well as the 3- dimensional radiative transfer code MCFOST to model the data presented in this work. Results: The CO(3-2) emission unveils for the first time at sub-millimeter frequencies the vertical structure details of a gaseous disk in Keplerian rotation, showing the back- and the front-side of a flared disk. Continuum emission at 850 microns reveals a compact dust disk with a 240 AU outer radius and a surface brightness profile that shows a very steep decline at radius larger than 125 AU. The gaseous disk is more than two times larger than the dust disk, with a similar critical radius but with a shallower radial profile. Radiative transfer models of the continuum data confirms the need for a sharp outer edge to the dust disk. The models for the ...

  12. Ammonia Imaging of the Disks in the NGC 1333 IRAS 4A Protobinary System

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Minho; Park, Geumsook; Kang, Miju

    2007-01-01

    The NGC 1333 IRAS 4A protobinary was observed in the ammonia (2, 2) and (3, 3) lines and in the 1.3 cm continuum with a high resolution (about 1.0 arcsec). The ammonia maps show two compact sources, one for each protostar, and they are probably protostellar accretion disks. The disk associated with IRAS 4A2 is seen nearly edge-on and shows an indication of rotation. The A2 disk is brighter in the ammonia lines but dimmer in the dust continuum than its sibling disk, with the ammonia-to-dust flux ratios different by about an order of magnitude. This difference suggests that the twin disks have surprisingly dissimilar characters, one gas-rich and the other dusty. The A2 disk may be unusually active or hot, as indicated by its association with water vapor masers. The existence of two very dissimilar disks in a binary system suggests that the formation process of multiple systems has a controlling agent lacking in the isolated star formation process and that stars belonging to a multiple system do not necessarily ...

  13. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  14. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  15. Herschel evidence for disk flattening or gas depletion in transitional disks

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, J T; Espaillat, C; Woitke, P; Andrews, S; Kamp, I; Thi, W -F; Meeus, G; Dent, W R F

    2014-01-01

    Transitional disks are protoplanetary disks characterized by reduced near- and mid-infrared emission with respect to full disks. This characteristic spectral energy distribution indicates the presence of an optically thin inner cavity within the dust disk believed to mark the disappearance of the primordial massive disk. We present new Herschel Space Observatory PACS spectra of [OI] 63 micron for 21 transitional disks. Our survey complements the larger Herschel GASPS program "Gas in Protoplanetary Systems" (Dent et al. 2013) by quadrupling the number of transitional disks observed with PACS at this wavelength. [OI] 63 micron traces material in the outer regions of the disk, beyond the inner cavity of most transitional disks. We find that transitional disks have [OI] 63 micron line luminosities two times fainter than their full disk counterparts. We self consistently determine various stellar properties (e.g. bolometric luminosity, FUV excess, etc.) and disk properties (e.g. disk dust mass, etc.) that could in...

  16. Disks around young stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C Bhatt

    2011-07-01

    By 1939, when Chandrasekhar’s classic monograph on the theory of Stellar Structure was published, although the need for recent star formation was fully acknowledged, no one had yet recognized an object that could be called a star in the process of being born. Young stellar objects (YSOs), as pre-main-sequence stars, were discovered in the 1940s and 1950s. Infrared excess emission and intrinsic polarization observed in these objects in the 1960s and 1970s indicated that they are surrounded by flattened disks. The YSO disks were seen in direct imaging only in the 1980s. Since then, high-resolution optical imaging with HST, near-infrared adaptive optics on large groundbased telescopes, mm and radiowave interferometry have been used to image disks around a large number of YSOs revealing disk structure with ever-increasing detail and variety. The disks around YSOs are believed to be the sites of planet formation and a few such associations have now been confirmed. The observed properties of the disk structure and their evolution, that have very important consequences for the theory of star and planet formation, are discussed.

  17. Modeling leaks from liquid hydrogen storage systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winters, William Stanley, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    This report documents a series of models for describing intended and unintended discharges from liquid hydrogen storage systems. Typically these systems store hydrogen in the saturated state at approximately five to ten atmospheres. Some of models discussed here are equilibrium-based models that make use of the NIST thermodynamic models to specify the states of multiphase hydrogen and air-hydrogen mixtures. Two types of discharges are considered: slow leaks where hydrogen enters the ambient at atmospheric pressure and fast leaks where the hydrogen flow is usually choked and expands into the ambient through an underexpanded jet. In order to avoid the complexities of supersonic flow, a single Mach disk model is proposed for fast leaks that are choked. The velocity and state of hydrogen downstream of the Mach disk leads to a more tractable subsonic boundary condition. However, the hydrogen temperature exiting all leaks (fast or slow, from saturated liquid or saturated vapor) is approximately 20.4 K. At these temperatures, any entrained air would likely condense or even freeze leading to an air-hydrogen mixture that cannot be characterized by the REFPROP subroutines. For this reason a plug flow entrainment model is proposed to treat a short zone of initial entrainment and heating. The model predicts the quantity of entrained air required to bring the air-hydrogen mixture to a temperature of approximately 65 K at one atmosphere. At this temperature the mixture can be treated as a mixture of ideal gases and is much more amenable to modeling with Gaussian entrainment models and CFD codes. A Gaussian entrainment model is formulated to predict the trajectory and properties of a cold hydrogen jet leaking into ambient air. The model shows that similarity between two jets depends on the densimetric Froude number, density ratio and initial hydrogen concentration.

  18. Lacunarity for compact groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, R E; Hewitt, E; Ross, K A

    1971-01-01

    Let G be a compact Abelian group with character group X. A subset Delta of X is called a [unk](q) set (1 < q < infinity) if for all trigonometric polynomials f = [unk](k=1) (n) alpha(k)chi(k) (chi(1),...,chi(n) [unk] Delta) an inequality parallelf parallel(q) [unk] [unk] parallelf parallel(1) obtains, where [unk] is a positive constant depending only on Delta. The subset Delta is called a Sidon set if every bounded function on Delta can be matched by a Fourier-Stieltjes transform. It is known that every Sidon set is a [unk](q) set for all q. For G = T, X = Z, Rudin (J. Math. Mech., 9, 203 (1960)) has found a set that is [unk](q) for all q but not Sidon. We extend this result to all infinite compact Abelian groups G: the character group X contains a subset Delta that is [unk](q) for all q, 1 < q < infinity, but Delta is not a Sidon set.

  19. A compact SADM family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  20. Compact electrostatic comb actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M. Steven; Burg, Michael S.; Jensen, Brian D.; Miller, Samuel L.; Barnes, Stephen M.

    2000-01-01

    A compact electrostatic comb actuator is disclosed for microelectromechanical (MEM) applications. The actuator is based upon a plurality of meshed electrostatic combs, some of which are stationary and others of which are moveable. One or more restoring springs are fabricated within an outline of the electrostatic combs (i.e. superposed with the moveable electrostatic combs) to considerably reduce the space required for the actuator. Additionally, a truss structure is provided to support the moveable electrostatic combs and prevent bending or distortion of these combs due to unbalanced electrostatic forces or external loading. The truss structure formed about the moveable electrostatic combs allows the spacing between the interdigitated fingers of the combs to be reduced to about one micron or less, thereby substantially increasing the number of active fingers which can be provided in a given area. Finally, electrostatic shields can be used in the actuator to substantially reduce unwanted electrostatic fields to further improve performance of the device. As a result, the compact electrostatic comb actuator of the present invention occupies only a fraction of the space required for conventional electrostatic comb actuators, while providing a substantial increase in the available drive force (up to one-hundred times).

  1. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerdemann, Stephen,J; Jablonski, Paul, J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines<150 {micro}m,<75 {micro}m, and<45 {micro}m; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH]<75 {micro}m and<45 {micro}m; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  2. Global Models for Embedded, Accreting Protostellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M; Krumholz, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    Most analytic work to date on protostellar disks has focused on disks in isolation from their environments. However, observations are now beginning to probe the earliest, most embedded phases of star formation, during which disks are rapidly accreting from their parent cores and cannot be modeled in isolation. We present a simple, one-zone model of protostellar accretion disks with high mass infall rates. Our model combines a self-consistent calculation of disk temperatures with an approximate treatment of angular momentum transport via several mechanisms. We use this model to survey the properties of protostellar disks across a wide range of stellar masses and evolutionary times, and make predictions for disks' masses, sizes, spiral structure, and fragmentation that will be directly testable by future large-scale surveys of deeply embedded disks. We define a dimensionless accretion-rotation parameter which, in conjunction with the disk's temperature, controls the disk evolution. We track the dominant mode of...

  3. Fragmentation of Kozai–Lidov Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Wen; Lubow, Stephen H.; Martin, Rebecca G.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the gravitational instability (GI) of a locally isothermal inclined disk around one component of a binary system. Such a disk can undergo global Kozai–Lidov (KL) cycles if the initial disk tilt is above the critical KL angle (of about 40◦). During these cycles, an initially circular disk exchanges its inclination for eccentricity, and vice versa. Self-gravity may suppress the cycles under some circumstances. However, with hydrodynamic simulations that include self-gravity, we show that for a sufficiently high initial disk tilts and for certain disk masses, disks can undergo KL oscillations and fragment due to GI, even when the Toomre Q value for an equivalent undisturbed disk is well within the stable regime (Q> 2). We suggest that KL triggered disk fragmentation provides a mechanism for the efficient formation of giant planets in binary systems and may enhance the fragmentation of disks in massive black hole binaries.

  4. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  5. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-04-01

    We give exact and approximation algorithms for two-center problems when the input is a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in D intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2011-01-01

    We consider new versions of the two-center problem where the input consists of a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. We give exact and approximation algorithms for these versions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Timescales of Disk Evolution and Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Jayawarhana, R

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that circumstellar disks evolve from dense, actively accreting structures to low-mass, replenished remnants. During this transition, grains may assemble into planetesimals, or the disk may be cleared by newborn planets. Recently identified nearby groups of young stars provide valuable laboratories for probing disk evolution. I discuss the properties of dust disks in the TW Hydrae Association and the MBM 12 cloud, and compare the results to other studies of disk evolution and planet formation timescales.

  8. Compact Optical Counterparts of Ultraluminous X-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Lian; Grise, Fabien; Kaaret, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging data, we report the multiband photometric properties of 13 ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) that have a unique compact optical counterpart. Both magnitude and color variation are detected at time scales of days to years. The optical color, variability, and X-ray to optical flux ratio indicate that the optical emission of most ULXs is dominated by X-ray reprocessing on the disk, similar to that of low mass X-ray binaries. For most sources, the optical spectrum is a power-law, $F_{\

  9. On stable compact minimal submanifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Torralbo, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of a sphere and any Riemannian manifold are classified whenever the dimension of the sphere is at least three. The complete classification of the stable compact minimal submanifolds of the product of two spheres is obtained. Also, it is proved that the only stable compact minimal surfaces of the product of a 2-sphere and any Riemann surface are the complex ones.

  10. PAHs in protoplanetary disks: emission and X-ray destruction

    CERN Document Server

    Siebenmorgen, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We study the PAH emission from protoplanetary disks. First, we discuss the dependence of the PAH band ratios on the hardness of the absorbed photons and the temperature of the stars. We show that the photon energy together with a varying degree of the PAH hydrogenation accounts for most of the observed PAH band ratios without the need to change the ionization degree of the molecules. We present an accurate treatment of stochastic heated grains in a vectorized three dimensional Monte Carlo dust radiative transfer code. The program is verified against results using ray tracing techniques. Disk models are presented for T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars. Particular attention is given to the photo-dissociation of the molecules. We consider beside PAH destruction also the survival of the molecules by vertical mixing within the disk. By applying typical X-ray luminosities the model accounts for the low PAH detection probability observed in T Tauri and the high PAH detection statistics found in Herbig Ae disks. Spherical h...

  11. HYDROGEN NEUTRAL OUTFLOWING DISKS OF B[E] SUPERGIANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kraus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemos modelado la línea [Oi] de emisión en la supergigante B[e] R126 en la LMC asumiendo un disco con flujo de masa. Encontramos que el hidrógeno en el disco debe estar ionizado al menos un 0.1%, lo que implica que el material del disco debe ser predominantemente neutral. La emisión libre-libre se calcula del viento polar y el contraste mínimo de densidad entre el viento polar y del disco debe ser de - 10.

  12. Efficient pump beam shaping for high-power thin-disk laser systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Rui; Weichelt, Birgit; Liang, Dawei; Morais, Paulo J; Gouveia, Helena; Abdou-Ahmed, Marwan; Voss, Andreas; Graf, Thomas

    2010-09-20

    We report a beam-shaping technique whereby the output power from a high-power laser-diode stack is efficiently coupled, reconfigured, and transmitted to a thin-disk laser by means of a compact optical fiber bundle. By using this technique, the power density is increased by a factor of 2 when compared to direct coupling with a octagonal fused silica rod while the numerical aperture is kept constant. Transmission efficiency of 80% was measured for the beam shaper without antireflection coating. The top-hat distribution is numerically calculated at the thin-disk laser crystal.

  13. 2.5-dimensional solution of the advective accretion disk:a self-similar approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shubhrangshu Ghosh; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2009-01-01

    We provide a 2.5-dimensional solution to a complete set of viscous hydrodynamical equations describing accretion-induced outflows and plausible jets around black holes/compact objects. We prescribe a self-consistent advective disk-outflow coupling model, which explicitly includes the information of vertical flux. Inter-connecting dynamics of an inflow-outflow system essentially upholds the conservation laws. We provide a set of analytical family of solutions through a self-similar approach. The flow parameters of the disk-outflow system depend strongly on the viscosity parameter α and the cooling factor f.

  14. Generalized Langevin equation description of the stochastic oscillations of general relativistic disks

    CERN Document Server

    Leung, Chun Sing; Harko, Tiberiu

    2013-01-01

    We consider a description of the stochastic oscillations of the general relativistic accretion disks around compact astrophysical objects based on the generalized Langevin equation, which accounts for the general retarded effects of the frictional force, and on the fluctuation-dissipation theorems. The vertical displacements, velocities and luminosities of the stochastically perturbed disks are explicitly obtained for both the Schwarzschild and the Kerr cases. The Power Spectral Distribution of the luminosity it is also obtained, and it is shown that it has non-standard values. The theoretical predictions of the model are compared with the observational data for the luminosity time variation of the BL Lac S5 0716+714 object.

  15. Generalized Langevin Equation Description of Stochastic Oscillations of General Relativistic Disks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chun Sing Leung; Gabriela Mocanu; Tiberiu Harko

    2014-09-01

    We consider a description of the stochastic oscillations of the general relativistic accretion disks around compact astrophysical objects based on the generalized Langevin equation, which accounts for the general retarded effects of the frictional force, and on the fluctuation–dissipation theorems. The vertical displacements, velocities and luminosities of the stochastically perturbed disks are explicitly obtained for both the Schwarzschild and Kerr cases. The power spectral distribution of the luminosity is also obtained, and it is shown that it has non-standard values. The theoretical predictions of the model are compared with the observational data for the luminosity time variation of the BL Lac S5 0716+714 object.

  16. Atacama Compact Array Antennas

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Masao; Nakanishi, Kouichiro; Naoi, Takahiro; Yamada, Masumi; Saito, Hiro; Ikenoue, Bungo; Kato, Yoshihiro; Morita, Kou-ichiro; Mizuno, Norikazu; Iguchi, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    We report major performance test results of the Atacama Compact Array (ACA) 7-m and 12-m antennas of ALMA (Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array). The four major performances of the ACA antennas are all-sky pointing (to be not more than 2.0 arcsec), offset pointing (to be < 0.6 arcsec) surface accuracy (< 25(20) micrometer for 12(7)m-antenna), stability of path-length (15 micrometer over 3 min), and high servo capability (6 degrees/s for Azimuth and 3 degrees/s for Elevation). The high performance of the ACA antenna has been extensively evaluated at the Site Erection Facility area at an altitude of about 2900 meters. Test results of pointing performance, surface performance, and fast motion capability are demonstrated.

  17. Compact particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2017-08-29

    A compact particle accelerator having an input portion configured to receive power to produce particles for acceleration, where the input portion includes a switch, is provided. In a general embodiment, a vacuum tube receives particles produced from the input portion at a first end, and a plurality of wafer stacks are positioned serially along the vacuum tube. Each of the plurality of wafer stacks include a dielectric and metal-oxide pair, wherein each of the plurality of wafer stacks further accelerate the particles in the vacuum tube. A beam shaper coupled to a second end of the vacuum tube shapes the particles accelerated by the plurality of wafer stacks into a beam and an output portion outputs the beam.

  18. A massive, dead disk galaxy in the early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Sune; Zabl, Johannes; Richard, Johan; Gallazzi, Anna; Zibetti, Stefano; Prescott, Moire; Grillo, Claudio; Man, Allison W S; Lee, Nicholas Y; Gómez-Guijarro, Carlos; Stockmann, Mikkel; Magdis, Georgios; Steinhardt, Charles L

    2017-06-21

    At redshift z = 2, when the Universe was just three billion years old, half of the most massive galaxies were extremely compact and had already exhausted their fuel for star formation. It is believed that they were formed in intense nuclear starbursts and that they ultimately grew into the most massive local elliptical galaxies seen today, through mergers with minor companions, but validating this picture requires higher-resolution observations of their centres than is currently possible. Magnification from gravitational lensing offers an opportunity to resolve the inner regions of galaxies. Here we report an analysis of the stellar populations and kinematics of a lensed z = 2.1478 compact galaxy, which-surprisingly-turns out to be a fast-spinning, rotationally supported disk galaxy. Its stars must have formed in a disk, rather than in a merger-driven nuclear starburst. The galaxy was probably fed by streams of cold gas, which were able to penetrate the hot halo gas until they were cut off by shock heating from the dark matter halo. This result confirms previous indirect indications that the first galaxies to cease star formation must have gone through major changes not just in their structure, but also in their kinematics, to evolve into present-day elliptical galaxies.

  19. Compaction of LiBH4-LiAlH4 nanoconfined in activated carbon nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plerdsranoy, Praphatsorn; Javadian, Payam; Jensen, Nicholai Daugaard

    2017-01-01

    To enhance volumetric hydrogen capacity for on-board fuel cells, compaction of LiAlH4-LiBH4 nanoconfined in activated carbon nanofibers (ACNF) is for the first time proposed. Loose powders of milled and nanoconfined LiAlH4-LiBH4 samples are compacted under 976 MPa to obtain the pellet samples wit...

  20. Stark Broadening in Compact Stars: Xe VI Lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević; Zoran Simić; Andjelka Kovačević; Aleksandar Valjarević; Sylvie Sahal-Bréchot

    2015-12-01

    We will consider Stark broadening of non hydrogenic spectral lines in the impact approximation in compact stars: pre-white dwarf and white dwarf atmospheres. In order to show an example, Stark broadening parameters have been calculated, using the impact semiclassical perturbation approach for four Xe VI spectral lines. Obtained results have been used to demonstrate the influence of Stark broadening in DA and DB white dwarf atmospheres.

  1. Ultrafast disk lasers and amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Dirk H.; Kleinbauer, Jochen; Bauer, Dominik; Wolf, Martin; Tan, Chuong; Gebs, Raphael; Budnicki, Aleksander; Wagenblast, Philipp; Weiler, Sascha

    2012-03-01

    Disk lasers with multi-kW continuous wave (CW) output power are widely used in manufacturing, primarily for cutting and welding applications, notably in the automotive industry. The ytterbium disk technology combines high power (average and/or peak power), excellent beam quality, high efficiency, and high reliability with low investment and operating costs. Fundamental mode picosecond disk lasers are well established in micro machining at high throughput and perfect precision. Following the world's first market introduction of industrial grade 50 W picosecond lasers (TruMicro 5050) at the Photonics West 2008, the second generation of the TruMicro series 5000 now provides twice the average power (100 W at 1030 nm, or 60 W frequency doubled, green output) at a significantly reduced footprint. Mode-locked disk oscillators achieve by far the highest average power of any unamplified lasers, significantly exceeding the 100 W level in laboratory set-ups. With robust long resonators their multi-microjoule pulse energies begin to compete with typical ultrafast amplifiers. In addition, significant interest in disk technology has recently come from the extreme light laser community, aiming for ultra-high peak powers of petawatts and beyond.

  2. Disk Instabilities and Cooling Fronts

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T

    1998-01-01

    Accretion disk outbursts, and their subsequent decline, offer a unique opportunity to constrain the physics of angular momentum transport in hot accretion disks. Recent work has centered on the claim by Cannizzo et al. that the exponential decay of luminosity following an outburst in black hole accretion disk systems is only consistent with a particular form for the dimensionless viscosity, $\\alpha=35(c_s/r\\Omega)^{3/2}$. This result can be understood in terms of a simple model of the evolution of cooling fronts in accretion disks. In particular, the cooling front speed during decline is $\\sim cooling front, and the exact value of $n$ depends on the hot state opacity, (although generally $n\\approx 1/2$). Setting this speed proportional to $r$ constrains the functional form of $\\alpha$ in the hot phase of the disk, which sets it apart from previous arguments based on the relative durations of outburst and quiescence. However, it remains uncertain how well we know the exponent $n$. In addition, more work is nee...

  3. Simultaneity on the Rotating Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koks, Don

    2017-04-01

    The disk that rotates in an inertial frame in special relativity has long been analysed by assuming a Lorentz contraction of its peripheral elements in that frame, which has produced widely varying views in the literature. We show that this assumption is unnecessary for a disk that corresponds to the simplest form of rotation in special relativity. After constructing such a disk and showing that observers at rest on it do not constitute a true rotating frame, we choose a "master" observer and calculate a set of disk coordinates and spacetime metric pertinent to that observer. We use this formalism to resolve the "circular twin paradox", then calculate the speed of light sent around the periphery as measured by the master observer, to show that this speed is a function of sent-direction and disk angle traversed. This result is consistent with the Sagnac Effect, but constitutes a finer analysis of that effect, which is normally expressed using an average speed for a full trip of the periphery. We also use the formalism to give a resolution of "Selleri's paradox".

  4. Cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, William J. D.

    1990-01-01

    Extensively utilizing a special advanced airbreathing propulsion archives database, as well as direct contacts with individuals who were active in the field in previous years, a technical assessment of cryogenic hydrogen-induced air liquefaction, as a prospective onboard aerospace vehicle process, was performed and documented. The resulting assessment report is summarized. Technical findings are presented relating the status of air liquefaction technology, both as a singular technical area, and also that of a cluster of collateral technical areas including: compact lightweight cryogenic heat exchangers; heat exchanger atmospheric constituents fouling alleviation; para/ortho hydrogen shift conversion catalysts; hydrogen turbine expanders, cryogenic air compressors and liquid air pumps; hydrogen recycling using slush hydrogen as heat sink; liquid hydrogen/liquid air rocket-type combustion devices; air collection and enrichment systems (ACES); and technically related engine concepts.

  5. CONSTRAINTS ON THE RADIAL VARIATION OF GRAIN GROWTH IN THE AS 209 CIRCUMSTELLAR DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, Laura M.; Carpenter, John M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, Luca; Sargent, Anneila I. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chandler, Claire J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Andrews, Sean M.; Harris, Robert J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Calvet, Nuria [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 830 Dennison Building, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Corder, Stuartt A. [Joint ALMA Observatory, Av. Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Deller, Adam T. [The Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), 7990-AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Linz, Hendrik [Center for Astronomy, Heidelberg University, Albert Ueberle Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Greaves, Jane S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Henning, Thomas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kwon, Woojin [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Lazio, Joseph [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States); Mundy, Lee G.; Storm, Shaye [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Testi, Leonardo [European Southern Observatory, Karl Schwarzschild Str. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2012-11-20

    We present dust continuum observations of the protoplanetary disk surrounding the pre-main-sequence star AS 209, spanning more than an order of magnitude in wavelength from 0.88 to 9.8 mm. The disk was observed with subarcsecond angular resolution (0.''2-0.''5) to investigate radial variations in its dust properties. At longer wavelengths, the disk emission structure is notably more compact, providing model-independent evidence for changes in the grain properties across the disk. We find that physical models which reproduce the disk emission require a radial dependence of the dust opacity {kappa}{sub {nu}}. Assuming that the observed wavelength-dependent structure can be attributed to radial variations in the dust opacity spectral index ({beta}), we find that {beta}(R) increases from {beta} < 0.5 at {approx}20 AU to {beta} > 1.5 for R {approx}> 80 AU, inconsistent with a constant value of {beta} across the disk (at the 10{sigma} level). Furthermore, if radial variations of {kappa}{sub {nu}} are caused by particle growth, we find that the maximum size of the particle-size distribution (a{sub max}) increases from submillimeter-sized grains in the outer disk (R {approx}> 70 AU) to millimeter- and centimeter-sized grains in the inner disk regions (R {approx}< 70 AU). We compare our observational constraint on a{sub max}(R) with predictions from physical models of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. For the dust composition and particle-size distribution investigated here, our observational constraints on a{sub max}(R) are consistent with models where the maximum grain size is limited by radial drift.

  6. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  7. Benchmarking Pt-based electrocatalysts for low temperature fuel cell reactions with the rotating disk electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christoffer Mølleskov; Escribano, Maria Escudero; Velazquez-Palenzuela, Amado Andres

    2015-01-01

    We present up-to-date benchmarking methods for testing electrocatalysts for polymer exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), using the rotating disk electrode (RDE) method. We focus on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) in the presence of CO. We have chosen...

  8. The Finslerian compact star model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahaman, Farook; Paul, Nupur [Jadavpur University, Department of Mathematics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); De, S.S. [University of Calcutta, Department of Applied Mathematics, Kolkata (India); Ray, Saibal [Government College of Engineering and Ceramic Technology, Department of Physics, Kolkata, West Bengal (India); Jafry, M.A.K. [Shibpur Dinobundhoo Institution, Department of Physics, Howrah, West Bengal (India)

    2015-11-15

    We construct a toy model for compact stars based on the Finslerian structure of spacetime. By assuming a particular mass function, we find an exact solution of the Finsler-Einstein field equations with an anisotropic matter distribution. The solutions are revealed to be physically interesting and pertinent for the explanation of compact stars. (orig.)

  9. Warm compacting behavior of stainless steel powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖志瑜; 柯美元; 陈维平; 召明; 李元元

    2004-01-01

    The warm compacting behaviors of four different kinds of stainless steel powders, 304L, 316L, 410L and 430L, were studied. The results show that warm compaction can be applied to stainless steel powders. The green densities and strengths of compacts obtained through warm compaction are generally higher than those obtained through cold compaction. The compacting behaviors in warm compaction and cold compaction are similar.Under the compacting pressure of 700 MPa, the warm compacted densities are 0. 10 - 0.22 g/cm3 higher than the cold compacted ones, and the green strengths are 11.5 %-50 % higher. The optimal warm compacting temperature is 100 - 110 ℃. In the die wall lubricated warm compaction, the optimum internal lubricant content is 0.2%.

  10. Crystalline Structure of Accretion Disks: Features of the Global Model

    CERN Document Server

    Montani, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop the analysis of a two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical configuration for an axially symmetric and rotating plasma (embedded in a dipole like magnetic field), modeling the structure of a thin accretion disk around a compact astrophysical object. Our study investigates the global profile of the disk plasma, in order to fix the conditions for the existence of a crystalline morphology and ring sequence, as outlined by the local analysis pursued in [1, 2]. In the linear regime, when the electromagnetic back-reaction of the plasma is small enough, we show the existence of an oscillating radial behavior for the flux surface function which very closely resembles the one outlined in the local model, apart from a radial modulation of the amplitude. In the opposite limit, corresponding to a dominant back-reaction in the magnetic structure over the field of central object, we can recognize the existence of a ring-like decomposition of the disk, according to the same modulation of the magnetic f...

  11. Signs of Early-Stage Disk Growth Revealed with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Yen, Hsi-Wei; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Ohashi, Nagayoshi; Aso, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    We present ALMA 1.3 mm continuum, 12CO, C18O, and SO data for the Class 0 protostars, Lupus 3 MMS, IRAS 15398-3559, and IRAS 16253-2429 at resolutions of ~100 AU. By measuring a rotational profile in C18O, a 100 AU Keplerian disk around a 0.3 Msun protostar is observed in Lupus 3 MMS. No 100 AU Keplerian disks are observed in IRAS 15398-3559 and IRAS 16253-2429. Nevertheless, embedded compact (<30 AU) continuum components are detected. The C18O emission in IRAS 15398-3559 shows signatures of infall with a constant angular momentum. IRAS 16253-2429 exhibits signatures of infall and rotation, but its rotational profile is unresolved. By fitting the C18O data with our kinematic models, the protostellar masses and the disk radii are inferred to be 0.01 Msun and 20 AU in IRAS 15398-3559, and 0.03 Msun and 6 AU in IRAS 16253-2429. By comparing the specific angular momentum profiles from 10,000 to 100 AU in 8 Class 0 and I protostars, we find that the evolution of envelope rotation can be described with conventio...

  12. Massive Young Clusters in the Disk of M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusi Pecci, F.; Bellazzini, M.; Buzzoni, A.; De Simone, E.; Federici, L.; Galleti, S.

    2005-08-01

    We have studied the properties of a sample of 67 very blue and likely young massive clusters in M31 extracted from the Bologna Revised Catalog of globular clusters, selected according to their color [(B-V)0=3.5 Å). Their existence in M31 has been noted by several authors in the past; we show here that these blue luminous compact clusters (BLCCs) are a significant fraction (>~15%) of the whole globular cluster system of M31. Compared to the global properties of the M31 globular cluster system, they appear to be intrinsically fainter and morphologically less concentrated, with a shallower Balmer jump and enhanced Hβ absorption in their spectra. Empirical comparison with integrated properties of clusters with known ages, as well as with theoretical simple stellar population models, consistently indicates that their typical age is less than ~2 Gyr, so they are probably not as metal-poor as would be deduced if they were older. When selecting BLCCs by either their (B-V)0 colors or the strength of their Hβ index, the cluster sample turns out to be distributed on the outskirts of the M31 disk, sharing the kinematic properties of the thin, rapidly rotating disk component. If confirmed to be young and not metal-poor, these clusters indicate the occurrence of significant recent star formation in the thin disk of M31, although they do not set constraints on the epoch of its early formation.

  13. 24mum excesses of hot WDs - Evidence of dust disks?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilikova, Jana; Chu, Y-H; Gruendl, Robert [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Su, Kate [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States); Rauch, Thomas [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Kepler Center for Astro and Particle Physics, Eberhard Karls University, Tuebingen (Germany); Marco, Orsola De [American Museum of Natural History, Department of Astrophysics, Central Park West at 79th St., New York, NY 10024 (United States); Volk, Kevin, E-mail: jbiliko2@astro.uiuc.ed [Gemini Observatory, Northers Operations Center, 670 N. A ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope observations of the Helix Nebula's hot (T{sub eff} approx 110 000 K) central star revealed mid-IR excess emission consistent with a continuum emission from a dust disk located at 35-150 AU from the central white dwarf (WD), and the dust is most likely produced by collisions among Kuiper Belt-like objects (Su et al. 2007). To determine how common such dust disks are, we have carried out a Spitzer 24 mum survey of 72 hot WDs, and detected at least 7 WDs that exhibit clear IR excess, all of them still surrounded by planetary nebulae (PNe). Inspired by the prevalence of PN environment for hot WDs showing IR excesses, we have surveyed the Spitzer archive for more central stars of PN (CSPNs) with IR excesses; the search yields four cases in which CSPNs show excesses in 3.6-8.0 mum, and one additional case of 24 mum excess. We present the results of these two searches for dust-disk candidates, and discuss scenarios other than KBO collisions that need to be considered in explaining the observed near and/or mid-IR excess emission. These scenarios include unresolved companions, binary post-AGB evolution, and unresolved compact nebulosity. We describe planned follow-up observations aiming to help us distinguish between different origins of observed IR excesses.

  14. Anchoring Polar Magnetic Field in a Stationary Thick Accretion Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadi, Maryam; Abbassi, Shahram

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the properties of a hot accretion flow bathed in a poloidal magnetic field. We consider an axisymmetric viscous-resistive flow in the steady-state configuration. We assume that the dominant mechanism of energy dissipation is due to turbulence viscosity and magnetic diffusivity. A certain fraction of that energy can be advected toward the central compact object. We employ the self-similar method in the radial direction to find a system of ODEs with just one varible, θ in the spherical coordinates. For the existence and maintenance of a purely poloidal magnetic field in a rotating thick disk, we find that the necessary condition is a constant value of angular velocity along a magnetic field line. We obtain an analytical solution for the poloidal magnetic flux. We explore possible changes in the vertical structure of the disk under the influences of symmetric and asymmetric magnetic fields. Our results reveal that a polar magnetic field with even symmetry about the equatorial plane makes the disk vertically thin. Moreover, the accretion rate decreases when we consider a strong magnetic field. Finally, we notice that hot magnetized accretion flows can be fully advected even in a slim shape.

  15. A Novel Approach to Constraining the Lifetime of Primordial Gas in Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Dana; Bergin, Edwin A.; Blake, Geoffrey A.; Zhang, Ke; Carpenter, John M.; Schwarz, Kamber R.

    2016-10-01

    The lifetime of primordial gas in circumstellar disks limits the timescale for gas-giant planet formation, determines the impact of gas-particle dynamics throughout disk evolution, and therefore influences the composition and architecture of planetary systems forming from these disks. Current estimates of the gas lifetime are based mainly on indirect tracers of the primordial gas, predominately IR through sub-mm dust and CO emission, in systems of different ages. However, these conventional gas tracers may be less reliable in older systems where the gas-to-dust ratio is highly uncertain and observations suggest that carbon may be severely depleted from the gas relative to interstellar abundances. Here we investigate the evolution of primordial disk gas using a novel approach based on evidence from our own solar system. The enhanced carbon-to-nitrogen (C/N) ratios in meteorites and comets relative to the solar value suggest that N is less likely than C to be sequestered into the solid phase as the disk evolves. Therefore, observable N-bearing volatile species such as N2H+ may be more accurate tracers of the gas than CO in older disks. N2H+ was detected in two mature, ˜5-11 Myr old, disks in the Upper Scorpious OB Association using ALMA. Comparison with previous CO measurements of these sources by Barenfeld et al. (2016) result in high N2H+/CO flux ratios relative to estimates of comparable measurements for younger, gas-rich disks based on a survey by Öberg et al. (2010, 2011). These preliminary results demonstrate that the mature disks retain primordial gas and may suggest a greater depletion of C relative to N from the gas as the disk evolves. Chemical modeling of these systems will aid in determining molecular column densities and relating the observed emission to the total molecular hydrogen mass.

  16. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  17. The Milky Way's Stellar Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    A suite of vast stellar surveys mapping the Milky Way, culminating in the Gaia mission, is revolutionizing the empirical information about the distribution and properties of stars in the Galactic stellar disk. We review and lay out what analysis and modeling machinery needs to be in place to test mechanisms of disk galaxy evolution and to stringently constrain the Galactic gravitational potential, using such Galactic star-by-star measurements. We stress the crucial role of stellar survey selection functions in any such modeling; and we advocate the utility of viewing the Galactic stellar disk as made up from `mono-abundance populations' (MAPs), both for dynamical modeling and for constraining the Milky Way's evolutionary processes. We review recent work on the spatial and kinematical distribution of MAPs, and lay out how further study of MAPs in the Gaia era should lead to a decisively clearer picture of the Milky Way's dark matter distribution and formation history.

  18. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testi, L.; Birnstiel, T.; Ricci, L.; Andrews, S.; Blum, J.; Carpenter, J.; Dominik, C.; Isella, A.; Natta, A.; Williams, J. P.; Wilner, D. J.

    In the core-accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow up to micrometer-sized particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds, the growth to pebbles and kilometer-sized bodies must occur at the high densities within protoplanetary disks. This critical step is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in extrasolar systems before the appearance of large planetary-sized bodies. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational signatures of these processes are summarized. We briefly discuss grain growth in molecular cloud cores and in collapsing envelopes of protostars, as these likely provide the initial conditions for the dust in protoplanetary disks. We then review the observational constraints on grain growth in disks from millimeter surveys, as well as the very recent evidence for radial variations of the dust properties in disks. We also include a brief discussion on the small end of the grain size distribution and dust settling as derived from optical, near-, and mid-infrared observations. Results are discussed in the context of global dust-evolution models; in particular, we focus on the emerging evidence for a very efficient early growth of grains and the radial distribution of maximum grain sizes as the result of growth barriers. We also highlight the limits of the current models of dust evolution in disks, including the need to slow the radial drift of grains to overcome the migration/fragmentation barrier.

  19. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  20. Nonaxisymmetric evolution in protostellar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughlin, Gregory; Bodenheimer, Peter

    1994-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional, multigridded hydrodynamical simulation of the collapse of an axisymmetric, rotating, 1 solar mass protostellar cloud, which forms a resolved, hydrotastic disk. The code includes the effects of physical viscosity, radiative transfer and radiative acceleration but not magnetic fields. We examine how the disk is affected by the inclusion of turbulent viscosity by comparing a viscous simulation with an inviscid model evolved from the same initial conditions, and we derive a disk evolutionary timescale on the order of 300,000 years if alpha = 0.01. Effects arising from non-axisymmetric gravitational instabilities in the protostellar disk are followed with a three-dimensional SPH code, starting from the two-dimensional structure. We find that the disk is prone to a series of spiral instabilities with primary azimulthal mode number m = 1 and m = 2. The torques induced by these nonaxisymmetric structures elicit material transport of angular momentum and mass through the disk, readjusting the surface density profile toward more stable configurations. We present a series of analyses which characterize both the development and the likely source of the instabilities. We speculate that an evolving disk which maintains a minimum Toomre Q-value approximately 1.4 will have a total evolutionary span of several times 10(exp 5) years, comparable to, but somewhat shorter than the evolutionary timescale resulting from viscous turbulence alone. We compare the evolution resulting from nonaxisymmetric instabilities with solutions of a one-dimensional viscous diffusion equation applied to the initial surface density and temperature profile. We find that an effective alpha-value of 0.03 is a good fit to the results of the simulation. However, the effective alpha will depend on the minimum Q in the disk at the time the instability is activated. We argue that the major fraction of the transport characterized by the value of alpha is due to the action of

  1. The Herschel Cold Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Andras

    2013-01-01

    The Herschel "DUst around NEarby Stars (DUNES)" survey has found a number of debris disk candidates that are apparently very cold, with temperatures near 22K. It has proven difficult to fit their spectral energy distributions with conventional models for debris disks. Given this issue we carefully examine the alternative explanation, that the detections arise from confusion with IR cirrus and/or background galaxies that are not physically associated with the foreground star. We find that such an explanation is consistent with all of these detections.

  2. Neutral hydrogen compact absorption features in Cassiopeia A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynoso, EM; Goss, WM; Dubner, GM; Winkler, PF; Schwarz, UJ

    1997-01-01

    Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the lambda 21 cm HI line towards Cassiopeia A (Gas A) have been performed. The velocity interval observed was from -38 to -362 (LSR) km s(-1), with a resolution of 2.6 km s(-1) and a beam size of 14.2'' x 11.4'' Opacity images show the presence of a number of s

  3. Neutral hydrogen in galactic fountains

    CERN Document Server

    Booth, C M

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of an isolated Milky Way-like galaxy, in which supernovae power a galactic fountain, reproduce the observed velocity and 21cm brightness statistics of galactic neutral hydrogen (HI). The simulated galaxy consists of a thin HI disk, similar in extent and brightness to that observed in the Milky Way, and extra-planar neutral gas at a range of velocities due to the galactic fountain. Mock observations of the neutral gas resemble the HI flux measurements from the Leiden-Argentine-Bonn (LAB) HI, survey, including a high-velocity tail which matches well with observations of high-velocity clouds. The simulated high-velocity clouds are typically found close to the galactic disk, with a typical line-of-sight distance of 13kpc from observers on the solar circle. The fountain efficiently cycles matter from the centre of the galaxy to its outskirts at a rate of around 0.5 M_sun/yr

  4. The Disk-Wind-Jet Connection in the Black Hole H 1743-322

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, J M; Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C S; King, A L; Kallman, T R; Cackett, E M; van der Klis, M; Steeghs, D T H

    2012-01-01

    X-ray disk winds are detected in spectrally soft, disk-dominated phases of stellar-mass black hole outbursts. In contrast, compact, steady, relativistic jets are detected in spectrally hard states that are dominated by non-thermal X-ray emission. Although these distinctive outflows appear to be almost mutually exclusive, it is possible that a disk wind persists in hard states but cannot be detected via X-ray absorption lines owing to very high ionization. Here, we present an analysis of a deep, 60 ksec Chandra/HETGS observation of the black hole candidate H 1743-322 in the low/hard state. The spectrum shows no evidence of a disk wind, with tight limits, and within the range of ionizing flux levels that were measured in prior Chandra observations wherein a wind was clearly detected. In H 1743-322, at least, disk winds are actually diminished in the low/hard state, and disk winds and jets are likely state-dependent and anti-correlated. These results suggest that although the launching radii of winds and jets ma...

  5. Numerical Simulation of Interaction between an L1 Stream and an Accretion Disk in a Close Binary System

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, H; Nagae, T; Matsuda, T; Fujiwara, Hidekazu; Makita, Makoto; Nagae, Takizo; Matsuda, Takuya

    2001-01-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of an accretion disk in a close binary system is numerically simulated. Calculation is made for a region including the compact star and the gas-supplying companion. The equation of state is that of an ideal gas characterized by the specific heat ratio $\\gamma$. Two cases with $\\gamma$ of 1.01 and 1.2 are studied. Our calculations show that the gas, flowing from the companion via a Lagrangian L1 point towards the accretion disk, forms a fine gas beam (L1 stream), which penetrates into the disk. No hot spot therefore forms in these calculations. Another fact discovered is that the gas rotating with the disk forms, on collision with the L1 stream, a bow shock wave, which may be called an L1 shock. The disk becomes hot because the L1 shock heats the disk gas in the outer parts of the disk, so that the spiral shocks wind loosely even with $\\gamma=1.01$. The L1 shock enhances the non-axisymmetry of the density distribution in the disk, and therefore the angular momentum transfer by the tid...

  6. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  7. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  8. An Analysis of HCN Observations of The Galactic Centre's Circumnuclear Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Ian Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    The Circumnuclear Disk (CND) is a torus of dust and moleular gas rotating about the galactic centre and extends from 1.6 to 7pc from the central massive black hole SgrA*. Large Velocity Gradient modelling of selected transitions of HCN rotational collisions with molecular hydrogen is used to infer Hydrogen density and HCN opacities. The analysis concludes that the predicted hydrogen number density of CND clumps is about 10^6 which is insufficiently dense to withstand the tidal shear forces generated by SgrA* and the stellar group in the cavity between the galactic centre and the CND.

  9. Herniated Disk in the Lower Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two components: Healthy intervertebral disk (cross- section view). • Annulus fibrosus. This is the tough, flexible outer ring ... the Lower Back cont. Surgical Treatment Only a small percentage of patients with lumbar disk herniations require ...

  10. ALMA HINTS AT THE PRESENCE OF TWO COMPANIONS IN THE DISK AROUND HD 100546

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Catherine; Juhász, Attila; Pinilla, Paola; Harsono, Daniel; Mathews, Geoffrey S.; Hogerheijde, Michiel R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Dent, William R. F. [Joint ALMA Observatory (JAO), Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile); Birnstiel, T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Meeus, Gwendolyn [Dep. de Física Teórica, Fac. de Ciencias, UAM Campus Cantoplanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Nomura, Hideko [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, 152-8551 Tokyo (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, 657-8501 Kobe (Japan); Millar, T. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Sandell, Göran [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Rm. 146, P.O. Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    HD 100546 is a well-studied Herbig Be star-disk system that likely hosts a close-in companion with compelling observational evidence for an embedded protoplanet at 68 AU. We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array observations of the HD 100546 disk which resolve the gas and dust structure at (sub)millimeter wavelengths. The CO emission (at 345.795 GHz) originates from an extensive molecular disk (390 ± 20 AU in radius) whereas the continuum emission is more compact (230 ± 20 AU in radius), suggesting radial drift of the millimeter-sized grains. The CO emission is similar in extent to scattered light images indicating well-mixed gas and micrometer-sized grains in the disk atmosphere. Assuming azimuthal symmetry, a single-component power-law model cannot reproduce the continuum visibilities. The visibilities and images are better reproduced by a double-component model: a compact ring with a width of 21 AU centered at 26 AU and an outer ring with a width of 75 ± 3 AU centered at 190 ± 3 AU. The influence of a companion and protoplanet on the dust evolution is investigated. The companion at 10 AU facilitates the accumulation of millimeter-sized grains within a compact ring, ≈20-30 AU, by ≈10 Myr. The injection of a protoplanet at 1 Myr hastens the ring formation (≈1.2 Myr) and also triggers the development of an outer ring (≈100-200 AU). These observations provide additional evidence for the presence of a close-in companion and hint at dynamical clearing by a protoplanet in the outer disk.

  11. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  12. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  13. Vortex migration in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Paardekooper, S -J; Papaloizou, J C B

    2010-01-01

    We consider the radial migration of vortices in two-dimensional isothermal gaseous disks. We find that a vortex core, orbiting at the local gas velocity, induces velocity perturbations that propagate away from the vortex as density waves. The resulting spiral wave pattern is reminiscent of an embedded planet. There are two main causes for asymmetries in these wakes: geometrical effects tend to favor the outer wave, while a radial vortensity gradient leads to an asymmetric vortex core, which favors the wave at the side that has the lowest density. In the case of asymmetric waves, which we always find except for a disk of constant pressure, there is a net exchange of angular momentum between the vortex and the surrounding disk, which leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Numerical hydrodynamical simulations show that this migration can be very rapid, on a time scale of a few thousand orbits, for vortices with a size comparable to the scale height of the disk. We discuss the possible effects of vortex migrat...

  14. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the CO and CO2 net reaction rates from the FGM. This, in turn, provides another benefit . That is, the source term in YC is not just now dependent on...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0010 HIGH IMPACT TECHNOLOGY COMPACT COMBUSTION (HITCC) COMPACT CORE TECHNOLOGIES Andrew W. Caswell Combustion...information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. *Disseminated

  15. Vertical Convection in Turbulent Accretion Disks and Light Curves of the A0620-00 1975 Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Malanchev, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    We present a model of the non-stationary $\\alpha$-disk with account for the irradiation and the vertical convection in the outer accretion disk where hydrogen is partially ionized. We include the viscous energy generation in the mix-length convection equations in accretion disks. The optical and X-ray light curves of X-ray nova A0620-00 are investigated in terms of this model. The turbulent viscosity parameter of the accretion disk is estimated, $\\alpha = 0.5 \\div 0.6$, which is necessary to explain the luminosity decay rate on the descending branch of the X-ray light curve for the A0620-00 1975 outburst. The secondary luminosity maximum on the light curves is explained by assuming an additional injection of matter into the accretion disk from the optical companion.

  16. The Structure of Brown Dwarf Circumstellar Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Christina; Wood, Kenneth; Lada, C. J.; Robitaille, Thomas; Bjorkman, J. E.; Whitney, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    We present synthetic spectra for circumstellar disks that are heated by radiation from a central brown dwarf. Under the assumption of vertical hydrostatic equilibrium, our models yield scaleheights for brown dwarf disks in excess of three times those derived for classical T Tauri (CTTS) disks. If the near-IR excess emission observed from brown dwarfs is indeed due to circumstellar disks, then the large scaleheights we find could have a significant impact on the optical and near-IR detectabili...

  17. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harvey, James [NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  18. Fabrication of Large YBCO Superconducting Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczor, Ronald J.; Noever, David A.; Robertson, Glen A.

    1999-01-01

    We have undertaken fabrication of large bulk items to develop a repeatable process and to provide test articles in laboratory experiments investigating reported coupling of electromagnetic fields with the local gravity field in the presence of rotating superconducting disks. A successful process was developed which resulted in fabrication of 30 cm diameter annular disks. The disks were fabricated of the superconductor YBa2Cu3O(7-x). Various material parameters of the disks were measured.

  19. Disk wind and magnetospheric accretion in emission from the Herbig Ae star MWC 480

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambovtseva, L. V.; Grinin, V. P.; Potravnov, I. S.; Mkrtichian, D. E.

    2016-09-01

    The young Herbig Ae star MWC 480 (HD 31648) is one of the comprehensively spectroscopically studied stars in the ultraviolet, optical, and infrared spectral ranges. Using non-LTE modeling of its hydrogen spectrum, we have calculated the contribution to the hydrogen emission from such important regions of the circumstellar environment as the disk wind and the magnetosphere. We have used our own observations of the stellar spectrum performed with the 2.4-m telescope at the Thai National Observatory to quantitatively check our theoretical calculations. In addition, all of the visible and infrared spectra available in the literature have been used for a qualitative comparison. The modeling results have revealed a significant role of the magneto-centrifugal disk wind in the formation of atomic hydrogen emission. The cause of the emission line variability in the spectrum ofMWC 480 is discussed.

  20. PSOCT studies of intervertebral disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcher, Stephen J.; Winlove, Peter C.; Gangnus, Sergey V.

    2004-07-01

    Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PSOCT) is an emerging optical imaging technique that is sensitive to the birefringence properties of tissues. It thus has applications in studying the large-scale ordering of collagen fibers within connective tissues. This ordering not only provides useful insights into the relationship between structure and function for various anatomical structures but also is an indicator of pathology. Intervertebral disk is an elastic tissue of the spine and possesses a 3-D collagen structure well suited to study using PSOCT. Since the outer layer of the disk has a lamellar structure with collagen fibers oriented in a trellis-like arrangement between lamellae, the birefringence fast-axis shows pronounced variations with depth, on a spatial scale of about 100 μm. The lamellar thickness varies with age and possibly with disease. We have used a polarisation-sensitive optical coherence tomography system to measure the birefringence properties of freshly excised, hydrated bovine caudal intervertebral disk and compared this with equine flexor tendon. Our results clearly demonstrate the ability of PSOCT to detect the outer three lamellae, down to a depth of at least 700 μm, via discontinuities in the depth-resolved retardance. We have applied a simple semi-empirical model based on Jones calculus to quantify the variation in the fast-axis orientation with depth. Our data and modeling is in broad agreement with previous studies using x-ray diffraction and polarization microscopy applied to histological sections of dehydrated disk. Our results imply that PSOCT may prove a useful tool to study collagen organisation within intervertebral disk in vitro and possibly in vivo and its variation with age and disease.

  1. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  2. Compact instantaneous water heater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, Jorge G.W.; Machado, Antonio R.; Ferraz, Andre D.; Rocha, Ivan C.C. da; Konishi, Ricardo [Companhia de Gas de Santa Catarina (SCGAS), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Lehmkuhl, Willian A.; Francisco Jr, Roberto W.; Hatanaka, Ricardo L.; Pereira, Fernando M.; Oliveira, Amir A.M. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental study of combustion in an inert porous medium in a liquid heating device application. This project aims to increase efficiency in the application of natural gas in residential and commercial sectors with the use of advanced combustion and heat transfer. The goal is to facilitate the development of a high performance compact water heater allowing hot water supply for up to two simultaneous showers. The experiment consists in a cylindrical porous burner with an integrated annular water heat exchanger. The reactants were injected radially into the burner and the flame stabilizes within the porous matrix. The water circulates in a coiled pipe positioned at the center of the burner. This configuration allows for heat transfer by conduction and radiation from the solid matrix to the heat exchanger. This article presented preliminary experimental results of a new water heater based on an annular porous burner. The range of equivalence ratios tested varied from 0.65 to 0.8. The power range was varied from 3 to 5 kW. Increasing the equivalence ratio or decreasing the total power input of the burner resulted in increased thermal efficiencies of the water heater. Thermal efficiencies varying from 60 to 92% were obtained. The condition for the goal of a comfortable bath was 20 deg C for 8-12 L/min. This preliminary prototype has achieved water temperature of 11deg C for 5 L/min. Further optimizations will be necessary in order to achieve intense heating with high thermal efficiency. (author)

  3. Coronae as Consequence of Large Scale Magnetic Fields in Turbulent Accretion Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    G. Blackman, Eric; Pessah, Martin Elias

    2009-01-01

    Non-thermal X-ray emission in compact accretion engines can be interpreted to result from magnetic dissipation in an optically thin magnetized corona above an optically thick accretion disk. If coronal magnetic field originates in the disk and the disk is turbulent, then only magnetic structures...... large enough for their turbulent shredding time to exceed their buoyant rise time survive the journey to the corona. We use this concept and a physical model to constrain the minimum fraction of magnetic energy above the critical scale for buoyancy as a function of the observed coronal to bolometric...... AGN, for which of order 30 per cent of the bolometric flux is in the X-ray band, we find that more than 20 per cent of the magnetic energy must be of large enough scale to rise and dissipate in the corona....

  4. The Evolutionary State of Anemic Circumstellar Disks and the Primordial-to-Debris Disk Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Currie, Thayne

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of $\\sim$ 3 Myr-old MIPS-detected circumstellar disks in IC 348 that may be in an intermediate stage between primordial, optically-thick disks of gas/dust and debris disks characteristic of the final stages of planet formation. We demonstrate that these \\textit{anemic} disks are not a homogenous class of objects corresponding to a unique evolutionary state. Rather, such disks around early (B/A) spectral type stars are most likely warm, terrestrial zone debris disks; MIPS-detected anemic disks around later (M) stars are likely \\textit{evolved primordial disks} such as transition disks in their mid-IR colors, accretion signatures, and disk luminosities. Anemic disks surrounding G and K stars contain both populations. The difference in evolutionary states between anemic disks surrounding early type vs. late-type stars is consistent with a mass-dependent evolution of circumstellar disks from the primordial disk phase through the debris disk phase. Specifically, disks characteristicall...

  5. Compactness Aromaticity of Atoms in Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available A new aromaticity definition is advanced as the compactness formulation through the ratio between atoms-in-molecule and orbital molecular facets of the same chemical reactivity property around the pre- and post-bonding stabilization limit, respectively. Geometrical reactivity index of polarizability was assumed as providing the benchmark aromaticity scale, since due to its observable character; with this occasion new Hydrogenic polarizability quantum formula that recovers the exact value of 4.5 a03 for Hydrogen is provided, where a0 is the Bohr radius; a polarizability based–aromaticity scale enables the introduction of five referential aromatic rules (Aroma 1 to 5 Rules. With the help of these aromatic rules, the aromaticity scales based on energetic reactivity indices of electronegativity and chemical hardness were computed and analyzed within the major semi-empirical and ab initio quantum chemical methods. Results show that chemical hardness based-aromaticity is in better agreement with polarizability based-aromaticity than the electronegativity-based aromaticity scale, while the most favorable computational environment appears to be the quantum semi-empirical for the first and quantum ab initio for the last of them, respectively.

  6. Compact portable QEPAS multi-gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Kosterev, Anatoliy A.; Thomazy, David; Tittel, Frank K.

    2011-01-01

    A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) based multi-gas sensor was developed to quantify concentrations of carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen cyanide (HCN), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and carbon dioxide (CO2) in ambient air. The sensor consists of a compact package of dimensions 25cm x 25cm x 10cm and was designed to operate at atmospheric pressure. The HCN, CO2, and HCl measurement channels are based on cw, C-band telecommunication-style packaged, fiber-coupled diode lasers, while the CO channel uses a TO can-packaged Sb diode laser as an excitation source. Moreover, the sensor incorporates rechargeable batteries and can operate on batteries for at least 8 hours. It can also operate autonomously or interact with another device (such as a computer) via a RS232 serial port. Trace gas detection limits of 7.74ppm at 4288.29cm-1 for CO, 450ppb at 6539.11 cm-1 for HCN, 1.48ppm at 5739.26 cm-1 for HCl and 97ppm at 6361.25 cm-1 for CO2 for a 1sec average time, were demonstrated.

  7. NASA Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program is designed for K-12 classroom educators who work in K-12 schools, museums, libraries, or planetariums. Educators have to be certified to borrow the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks by attending a NASA Certification Workshop provided by a NASA Authorized Sample Disk Certifier.

  8. Air-lubrication of magnetic disk sliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreßler, B.; Graichen, K.; Bärwolff, G.; Jehring, L.; Seifert, G.

    1993-03-01

    Steady-state and dynamic flying of a self-acting magnetic disk slider over a hard disk are considered. Some tasks for computations are formulated and the possibilities of developed numerical codes are illustrated. Numerical results of dynamic flying over a disk surface with an obstacle are in agreement with experimental data.

  9. Growing and moving planets in disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2006-01-01

    Planets form in disks that are commonly found around young stars. The intimate relationship that exists between planet and disk can account for a lot of the exotic extrasolar planetary systems known today. In this thesis we explore disk-planet interaction using numerical hydrodynamical simulations.

  10. ALMA hints at the presence of two companions in the disk around HD 100546

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Catherine; Pinilla, Paola; Harsono, Daniel; Mathews, Geoffrey S; Dent, William R F; Hogerheijde, Michiel R; Birnstiel, T; Meeus, Gwendolyn; Nomura, Hideko; Aikawa, Yuri; Millar, T J; Sandell, Goran

    2014-01-01

    HD 100546 is a well-studied Herbig Be star-disk system that likely hosts a close-in companion with compelling observational evidence for an embedded protoplanet at 68 AU. We present ALMA observations of the HD 100546 disk which resolve the gas and dust structure at (sub)mm wavelengths. The CO emission (at 345.795 GHz) originates from an extensive molecular disk (390+/-20 AU in radius) whereas the continuum emission is more compact (230+/-20 AU in radius) suggesting radial drift of the mm-sized grains. The CO emission is similar in extent to scattered light images indicating well-mixed gas and um-sized grains in the disk atmosphere. Assuming azimuthal symmetry, a single-component power-law model cannot reproduce the continuum visibilities. The visibilities and images are better reproduced by a double-component model: a compact ring with a width of 21 AU centered at 26 AU and an outer ring with a width of 75+/-3 AU centered at 190+/-3 AU. The influence of a companion and protoplanet on the dust evolution is inv...

  11. Compact, Ultrasensitive Formaldehyde Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase II proposal seeks to develop a compact UV laser ?based sensor for Earth science and planetary atmosphere exploration....

  12. Countably determined compact abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Dikranjan, Dikran

    2008-01-01

    For an abelian topological group G let G^* be the dual group of all continuous characters endowed with the compact open topology. A subgroup D of G determines G if the restriction homomorphism G^* --> D^* of the dual groups is a topological isomorphism. Given a scattered compact subset X of an infinite compact abelian group G such that |X|compact abelian group determined by its countable subgroup must be metrizable. This gives a negative answer to questions of Comfort, Hernandez, Macario, Raczkowski and Trigos-Arrieta, as well as provides short proofs of main results established in three manuscripts by these authors.

  13. Compact energy conversion module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes like structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  14. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  15. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  16. Compact, Airborne Multispecies Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Small Business Innovative Research Phase I proposal seeks to develop a compact mid-infrared laser spectrometer to benefit Earth science research activities. To...

  17. Circumplanetary disks around young giant planets: a comparison between core-accretion and disk instability

    CERN Document Server

    Szulágyi, J; Quinn, T

    2016-01-01

    Circumplanetary disks can be found around forming giant planets, regardless of whether core accretion or gravitational instability built the planet. We carried out state-of-the-art hydrodynamical simulations of the circumplanetary disks for both formation scenarios, using as similar initial conditions as possible to unveil possible intrinsic differences in the circumplanetary disk mass and temperature between the two formation mechanisms. We found that the circumplanetary disks mass linearly scales with the circumstellar disk mass. Therefore, in an equally massive protoplanetary disk, the circumplanetary disks formed in the disk instability model can be only a factor of eight more massive than their core-accretion counterparts. On the other hand, the bulk circumplanetary disk temperature differs by more than an order of magnitude between the two cases. The subdisks around planets formed by gravitational instability have a characteristic temperature below 100 K, while the core accretion circumplanetary disks a...

  18. Advanced fusion MHD power conversion using the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, M.A.; Campbell, R.; Logan, B.G. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA); Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1988-10-01

    The CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle concept for a tokamak reactor involves the use of a high-temperature Rankine cycle in combination with microwave superheaters and nonequilibrium MHD disk generators to obtain a compact, low-capital-cost power conversion system which fits almost entirely within the reactor vault. The significant savings in the balance-of-plant costs are expected to result in much lower costs of electricity than previous concepts. This paper describes the unique features of the CFAR cycle and a high- temperature blanket designed to take advantage of it as well as the predicted performance of the MHD disk generators using mercury seeded with cesium. 40 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A compact filament-driven multicusp ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Gough, R. A.; Kunkel, W. B.; Leung, K. N.; Perkins, L. T.; Pickard, D. S.; Sun, L.; Vujic, J.; Williams, M. D.; Wutte, D.

    1996-12-01

    A compact filament-driven multicusp ion source has been studied using both hydrogen and helium. Three aspects of the source have been investigated: hydrogen ion species, axial energy spread and extractable current. An atomic ion fraction (H +) of approximately 30% could be obtained with a discharge power of 80 V and 3 A. A magnetic analyzer was used to determine the axial energy spread of the extracted (i.e. accelerated) ion beam species, and an electrostatic energy analyzer was used to determine the energy spread of the ions at the source exit. The energy spread of the extracted beam for the individual species of positive hydrogen ions (H +, H 2+, H 3+) and that for the negative hydrogen ions (H -) was measured as well. Energy spreads as low as 2.3 eV were obtained for H +, 2 eV for H 2+, 1.7 eV for H 3+, and 1 eV for H -. The axial energy spread in the source exit without extraction for hydrogen and helium was measured to be approximately 1 eV for both cases. The source can generate a hydrogen beam current density of approximately 12 mA/cm 2.

  20. PHOTOIONIZATION MODELS OF THE INNER GASEOUS DISK OF THE HERBIG BE STAR BD+65 1637

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, P.; Sigut, T. A. A.; Landstreet, J. D., E-mail: ppatel54@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario Canada N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2016-01-20

    We attempt to constrain the physical properties of the inner, gaseous disk of the Herbig Be star BD+65 1637 using non-LTE, circumstellar disk codes and observed spectra (3700–10500 Å) from the ESPaDOnS instrument on the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope. The photoionizing radiation of the central star is assumed to be the sole source of input energy for the disk. We model optical and near-infrared emission lines that are thought to form in this region using standard techniques that have been successful in modeling the spectra of classical Be stars. By comparing synthetic line profiles of hydrogen, helium, iron, and calcium with the observed line profiles, we try to constrain the geometry, density structure, and kinematics of the gaseous disk. Reasonable matches have been found for all line profiles individually; however, no disk density model based on a single power law for the equatorial density was able to simultaneously fit all of the observed emission lines. Among the emission lines, the metal lines, especially the Ca ii IR triplet, seem to require higher disk densities than the other lines. Excluding the Ca ii lines, a model in which the equatorial disk density falls as 10{sup −10} (R{sub *}/R){sup 3} g cm{sup −3} seen at an inclination of 45° for a 50 R{sub *} disk provides reasonable matches to the overall line shapes and strengths. The Ca ii lines seem to require a shallower drop-off as 10{sup −10} (R{sub *}/R){sup 2} g cm{sup −3} to match their strength. More complex disk density models are likely required to refine the match to the BD+65 1637 spectrum.

  1. Evolution of the Radial Abundance Gradient and Cold Gas of the Galactic Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi-Shi, Chen; Rui-Xiang, Chang; Jun, Yin

    2014-10-01

    In order to understand the forming mechanism of the radial abun- dance gradient of the Galactic disk and the evolution of cold gas, we have con- structed a chemical evolution model of the Galactic disk, in which the star for- mation law concerned with molecular hydrogens is adopted, and the evolution of mass surface density is calculated for the molecular and atomic hydrogens separately, then the model predictions and the observed radial distributions of some physical quantities are compared. The result indicates that the model prediction is sensitive to the adopted infall timescale, the model which adopts the star formation law concerned with the molecular hydrogens can agree well with the major observed properties of the Galactic disk, especially can obtain naturally the radial oxygen abundance gradient of the Galactic disk, and the radial surface density profile of cold gas. The assumption of instantaneous or non-instantaneous recycling approximation has a small effect on the evolution of cold gas, especially in the case of rather low gas density.

  2. Braking the Gas in the β Pictoris Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Brandeker, Alexis; Wu, Yanqin

    2006-05-01

    The star β Pictoris hosts the best studied circumstellar disk to date. Nonetheless, a long-standing puzzle has been around since the detection of metallic gas in the disk: radiation pressure from the star should blow the gas away, yet the observed motion is consistent with Keplerian rotation. In this work we search for braking mechanisms that can resolve this discrepancy. We find that all species affected by radiation force are largely ionized and dynamically coupled into a single fluid by Coulomb collisions, reducing the radiation force on species feeling the strongest acceleration. For a gas of solar composition, the effective radiation force still exceeds gravity, while a gas of enhanced carbon abundance could be self-braking. We also explore two other braking agents: collisions with dust grains and neutral gas. Grains surrounding β Pic are photoelectrically charged to a positive electrostatic potential. If a significant fraction of the grains are carbonaceous (10% in the midplane and larger at higher altitudes), ions can be slowed down to satisfy the observed velocity constraints. For neutral gas to brake the ion fluid, we find a minimum required mass ~0.03 M⊕, consistent with observed upper limits on the hydrogen column density and substantially reduced relative to previous estimates. Our results favor a scenario in which metallic gas is generated by grain evaporation in the disk, perhaps during grain-grain collisions. We exclude a primordial origin for the gas but cannot rule out its production by falling evaporating bodies near the star.

  3. A giant protogalactic disk linked to the cosmic web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D Christopher; Matuszewski, Mateusz; Morrissey, Patrick; Neill, James D; Moore, Anna; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Prochaska, J Xavier; Chang, Daphne

    2015-08-13

    The specifics of how galaxies form from, and are fuelled by, gas from the intergalactic medium remain uncertain. Hydrodynamic simulations suggest that 'cold accretion flows'--relatively cool (temperatures of the order of 10(4) kelvin), unshocked gas streaming along filaments of the cosmic web into dark-matter halos--are important. These flows are thought to deposit gas and angular momentum into the circumgalactic medium, creating disk- or ring-like structures that eventually coalesce into galaxies that form at filamentary intersections. Recently, a large and luminous filament, consistent with such a cold accretion flow, was discovered near the quasi-stellar object QSO UM287 at redshift 2.279 using narrow-band imaging. Unfortunately, imaging is not sufficient to constrain the physical characteristics of the filament, to determine its kinematics, to explain how it is linked to nearby sources, or to account for its unusual brightness, more than a factor of ten above what is expected for a filament. Here we report a two-dimensional spectroscopic investigation of the emitting structure. We find that the brightest emission region is an extended rotating hydrogen disk with a velocity profile that is characteristic of gas in a dark-matter halo with a mass of 10(13) solar masses. This giant protogalactic disk appears to be connected to a quiescent filament that may extend beyond the virial radius of the halo. The geometry is strongly suggestive of a cold accretion flow.

  4. Ground state structures and properties of small hydrogenated silicon clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Prasad

    2003-01-01

    We present results for ground state structures and properties of small hydrogenated silicon clusters using the Car–Parrinello molecular dynamics with simulated annealing. We discuss the nature of bonding of hydrogen in these clusters. We find that hydrogen can form a bridge like Si–H–Si bond connecting two silicon atoms. We find that in the case of a compact and closed silicon cluster hydrogen bonds to the silicon cluster from outside. To understand the structural evolutions and properties of silicon cluster due to hydrogenation, we have studied the cohesive energy and first excited electronic level gap of clusters as a function of hydrogenation. We find that first excited electronic level gap of Si and SiH fluctuates as function of size and this may provide a first principle basis for the short-range potential fluctuations in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The stability of hydrogenated silicon clusters is also discussed.

  5. Mapping out the origins of compact stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Romanowsky, Aaron J; SAGES, the

    2015-01-01

    We present a suite of extragalactic explorations of the origins and nature of globular clusters (GCs) and ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs), and the connections between them. An example of GC metallicity bimodality is shown to reflect underlying, distinct metal-poor and metal-rich stellar halo populations. Metallicity-matching methods are used to trace the birth sites and epochs of GCs in giant E/S0s, pointing to clumpy disk galaxies at z ~ 3 for the metal-rich GCs, and to a combination of accreted and in-situ formation modes at z ~ 5-6 for the metal-poor GCs. An increasingly diverse zoo of compact stellar systems is being discovered, including objects that bridge the gaps between UCDs and faint fuzzies, and between UCDs and compact ellipticals. Many of these have properties pointing to origins as the stripped nuclei of larger galaxies, and a smoking-gun example is presented of an omega Cen-like star cluster embedded in a tidal stream.

  6. Mapping out the origins of compact stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Brodie, Jean P.; SAGES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We present a suite of extragalactic explorations of the origins and nature of globular clusters (GCs) and ultra-compact dwarfs (UCDs), and the connections between them. An example of GC metallicity bimodality is shown to reflect underlying, distinct metal-poor and metal-rich stellar halo populations. Metallicity-matching methods are used to trace the birth sites and epochs of GCs in giant E/S0s, pointing to clumpy disk galaxies at z ~ 3 for the metal-rich GCs, and to a combination of accreted and in-situ formation modes at z ~ 5-6 for the metal-poor GCs. An increasingly diverse zoo of compact stellar systems is being discovered, including objects that bridge the gaps between UCDs and faint fuzzies, and between UCDs and compact ellipticals. Many of these have properties pointing to origins as the stripped nuclei of larger galaxies, and a smoking-gun example is presented of an ω Cen-like star cluster embedded in a tidal stream.

  7. CANDELS: The progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Barro, Guillermo; Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G; Koo, David C; Williams, Christina C; Kocevski, Dale D; Trump, Jonathan R; Mozena, Mark; McGrath, Elizabeth; van der Wel, Arjen; Wuyts, Stijn; Bell, Eric F; Croton, Darren J; Dekel, Avishai; Ashby, M L N; Ferguson, Henry C; Fontana, Adriano; Giavalisco, Mauro; Grogin, Norman A; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish P; Hopkins, Philip F; Huang, Kuang-Han; Koekemoer, Anton M; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S; Lee, Kyoung-Soo; Newman, Jeffrey A; Porter, Lauren A; Primack, Joel R; Ryan, Russell E; Rosario, David; Somerville, Rachel S

    2012-01-01

    We combine high-resolution HST/WFC3 images with multi-wavelength photometry to track the evolution of structure and activity of massive (log(M*) > 10) galaxies at redshifts z = 1.4 - 3 in two fields of the Cosmic Assembly Near-infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS). We detect compact, star-forming galaxies (cSFGs) whose number densities, masses, sizes, and star formation rates qualify them as likely progenitors of compact, quiescent, massive galaxies (cQGs) at z = 1.5 - 3. At z > 2 most cSFGs have specific star-formation rates (sSFR = 10^-9 yr^-1) half that of typical, massive SFGs at the same epoch, and host X-ray luminous AGN 30 times (~30%) more frequently. These properties suggest that cSFGs are formed by gas-rich processes (mergers or disk-instabilities) that induce a compact starburst and feed an AGN, which, in turn, quench the star formation on dynamical timescales (few 10^8 yr). The cSFGs are continuously being formed at z = 2 - 3 and fade to cQGs by z = 1.5. After this epoch, cSFGs are r...

  8. The Evolving Structure of Galactic Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Martel, H; McGee, S; Gibson, B; Kawata, D; Martel, Hugo; Brook, Chris; Gee, Sean Mc; Gibson, Brad

    2005-01-01

    Observations suggest that the structural parameters of disk galaxies have not changed greatly since redshift 1. We examine whether these observations are consistent with a cosmology in which structures form hierarchically. We use SPH/N-body galaxy-scale simulations to simulate the formation and evolution of Milky-Way-like disk galaxies by fragmentation, followed by hierarchical merging. The simulated galaxies have a thick disk, that forms in a period of chaotic merging at high redshift, during which a large amount of alpha-elements are produced, and a thin disk, that forms later and has a higher metallicity. Our simulated disks settle down quickly and do not evolve much since redshift z~1, mostly because no major mergers take place between z=1 and z=0. During this period, the disk radius increases (inside-out growth) while its thickness remains constant. These results are consistent with observations of disk galaxies at low and high redshift.

  9. Magnetic interchange instability of accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisig, M.; Tajima, T.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    1992-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the magnetic interchange or buoyancy instability of a differentially rotating disk threaded by an ordered vertical magnetic field is investigated. A 2D ideal fluid in the equatorial plane of a central mass in the corotating frame of reference is considered as a model for the disk. If the rotation rate of the disk is Keplerian, the disk is found to be stable. If the vertical magnetic field is sufficiently strong, and the field strength decreases with distance from the central object, and thus the rotation of the disk deviates from Keplerian, if is found that an instability develops. The magnetic flux and disk matter expand outward in certain ranges of azimuth, while disk matter with less magnetic flux moves inward over the remaining range of azimuth, showing a characteristic development of an interchange instability.

  10. Directional Oscillations, Concentrations, and Compensated Compactness via Microlocal Compactness Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rindler, Filip

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces microlocal compactness forms (MCFs) as a new tool to study oscillations and concentrations in L p -bounded sequences of functions. Decisively, MCFs retain information about the location, value distribution, and direction of oscillations and concentrations, thus extending at the same time the theories of (generalized) Young measures and H-measures. In L p -spaces oscillations and concentrations precisely discriminate between weak and strong compactness, and thus MCFs allow one to quantify the difference in compactness. The definition of MCFs involves a Fourier variable, whereby differential constraints on the functions in the sequence can also be investigated easily—a distinct advantage over Young measure theory. Furthermore, pointwise restrictions are reflected in the MCF as well, paving the way for applications to Tartar's framework of compensated compactness; consequently, we establish a new weak-to-strong compactness theorem in a "geometric" way. After developing several aspects of the abstract theory, we consider three applications; for lamination microstructures, the hierarchy of oscillations is reflected in the MCF. The directional information retained in an MCF is harnessed in the relaxation theory for anisotropic integral functionals. Finally, we indicate how the theory pertains to the study of propagation of singularities in certain systems of PDEs. The proofs combine measure theory, Young measures, and harmonic analysis.

  11. Outward Motion of Porous Dust Aggregates by Stellar Radiation Pressure in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Tazaki, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    We study the dust motion at the surface layer of protoplanetary disks. Dust grains in surface layer migrate outward due to angular momentum transport via gas-drag force induced by the stellar radiation pressure. In this study, we calculate mass flux of the outward motion of compact grains and porous dust aggregates by the radiation pressure. The radiation pressure force for porous dust aggregates is calculated using the T-Matrix Method for the Clusters of Spheres. First, we confirm that porous dust aggregates are forced by strong radiation pressure even if they grow to be larger aggregates in contrast to homogeneous and spherical compact grains to which efficiency of radiation pressure becomes lower when their sizes increase. In addition, we find that the outward mass flux of porous dust aggregates with monomer size of 0.1 $\\mu$m is larger than that of compact grains by an order of magnitude at the disk radius of 1 AU, when their sizes are several microns. This implies that large compact grains like calcium-a...

  12. Dust Evolution in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, Leonardo; Ricci, Luca; Andrews, Sean; Blum, Juergen; Carpenter, John; Dominik, Carsten; Isella, Andrea; Natta, Antonella; Williams, Jonathan; Wilner, David

    2014-01-01

    (abridged) In the core accretion scenario for the formation of planetary rocky cores, the first step toward planet formation is the growth of dust grains into larger and larger aggregates and eventually planetesimals. Although dust grains are thought to grow from the submicron sizes typical of interstellar dust to micron size particles in the dense regions of molecular clouds and cores, the growth from micron size particles to pebbles and kilometre size bodies must occur in protoplanetary disks. This step in the formation of planetary systems is the last stage of solids evolution that can be observed directly in young extrasolar systems. In this chapter we review the constraints on the physics of grain-grain collisions as they have emerged from laboratory experiments and numerical computations. We then review the current theoretical understanding of the global processes governing the evolution of solids in protoplanetary disks, including dust settling, growth, and radial transport. The predicted observational...

  13. Secular evolution of disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2008-01-01

    Galaxy disks evolve through angular momentum transfers between sub-components, like gas, stars, or dark matter halos, through non axi-symmetric instabilities. The speed of this evolution is boosted in presence of a large fraction of cold and dissipative gas component. When the visible matter dominates over the whole disk, angular momentum is exchanged between gas and stars only. The gas is driven towards the center by bars, stalled transiently in resonance rings, and driven further by embedded bars, which it contributes to destroy. From a small-scale molecular torus, the gas can then inflow from viscous torques, dynamical friction, or m=1 perturbations. In the weakened bar phases, multiple-speed spiral patterns can develop and help the galaxy to accrete external gas flowing from cosmic filaments. The various phases of secular evolution are illustrated by numerical simulations.

  14. Mechanics of Forming Ring Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avakyan R.M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of forming ring disk of constant thickness in conditions of large plastic deformations taking into account the interconnected change of effective strain and deformation hardening is carried out. The analytical dependences characterizing the relative size of plastic area are obtained. The interrelation between the initial and final form of a product is established at maximum possible size of internal pressure.

  15. Parallel Readout of Optical Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    27, 2987-2992 (1988). 11. T. Yatagai, J. G. Camacho-Basilio, and H. Onda , "Recording of Computer-Generated Holograms on an Optical Disk Master...Multivariate Observations," Proceedings of the Fifth Berkeley Symposium on Math. Stat. and Prob I., L. M. LeCam and J. Neyman, eds. (University of...California Press, Berkeley and Los Angeles California, 1967), pp. 281-297. [9] R. Duda and P Hart, "Pattern Classification and Scene Analysis," (John

  16. A Supersymmetric Dark Disk Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fischler, Willy; Tangarife, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We present a model of partially interacting dark matter (PIDM) within the framework of supersymmetry with gauge mediated symmetry breaking. Dark sector atoms are produced through Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in the dark sector while avoiding the production of Q-ball relics. We discuss the astrophysical constraints relevant for this model and the possibility of dark galactic disk formation. In addition, jet emission from rotating black holes is discussed in the context of this class of models.

  17. Compactness in intuitionistic fuzzy topological spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Abbas

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We introduce fuzzy almost continuous mapping, fuzzy weakly continuous mapping, fuzzy compactness, fuzzy almost compactness, and fuzzy near compactness in intuitionistic fuzzy topological space in view of the definition of Å ostak, and study some of their properties. Also, we investigate the behavior of fuzzy compactness under several types of fuzzy continuous mappings.

  18. Compact Intracloud Discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, David A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1998-11-01

    In November of 1993, mysterious signals recorded by a satellite-borne broadband VHF radio science experiment called Blackboard led to a completely unexpected discovery. Prior to launch of the ALEXIS satellite, it was thought that its secondary payload, Blackboard, would most often detect the radio emissions from lightning when its receiver was not overwhelmed by noise from narrowband communication carriers. Instead, the vast majority of events that triggered the instrument were isolated pairs of pulses that were one hundred times more energetic than normal thunderstorm electrical emissions. The events, which came to be known as TIPPs (for transionospheric pulse pairs), presented a true mystery to the geophysics community. At the time, it was not even known whether the events had natural or anthropogenic origins. After two and one half years of research into the unique signals, two ground-based receiver arrays in New Mexico first began to detect and record thunderstorm radio emissions that were consistent with the Blackboard observations. On two occasions, the ground-based systems and Blackboard even recorded emissions that were produced by the same exact events. From the ground based observations, it has been determined that TIPP events areproduced by brief, singular, isolated, intracloud electrical discharges that occur in intense regions of thunderstorms. These discharges have been dubbed CIDS, an acronym for compact intracloud discharges. During the summer of 1996, ground-based receiver arrays were used to record the electric field change signals and broadband HF emissions from hundreds of CIDS. Event timing that was accurate to within a few microseconds made possible the determination of source locations using methods of differential time of arrival. Ionospheric reflections of signals were recorded in addition to groundwave/line-of-sight signals and were used to determine accurate altitudes for the discharges. Twenty-four CIDS were recorded from three

  19. A Pulsar and a Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  20. Regression of lumbar disk herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu Evzikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the spinal nerve root, giving rise to pain and sensory and motor disorders in the area of its innervation is the most vivid manifestation of herniated intervertebral disk. Different treatment modalities, including neurosurgery, for evolving these conditions are discussed. There has been recent evidence that spontaneous regression of disk herniation can regress. The paper describes a female patient with large lateralized disc extrusion that has caused compression of the nerve root S1, leading to obvious myotonic and radicular syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the clinical manifestations of discogenic radiculopathy, as well myotonic syndrome and morphological changes completely regressed 8 months later. The likely mechanism is inflammation-induced resorption of a large herniated disk fragment, which agrees with the data available in the literature. A decision to perform neurosurgery for which the patient had indications was made during her first consultation. After regression of discogenic radiculopathy, there was only moderate pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases (facet syndrome, piriformis syndrome that were successfully eliminated by minimally invasive techniques. 

  1. Heating and Cooling Protostellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirose, S

    2011-01-01

    We examine heating and cooling in protostellar disks using 3-D radiation-MHD calculations of a patch of the Solar nebula at 1 AU, employing the shearing-box and flux-limited radiation diffusion approximations. The disk atmosphere is ionized by stellar X-rays, well-coupled to magnetic fields, and sustains a turbulent accretion flow driven by magneto-rotational instability, while the interior is resistive and magnetically dead. The turbulent layers heat by absorbing the light from the central star and by dissipating the magnetic fields. They are optically-thin to their own radiation and cool inefficiently. The optically-thick interior in contrast is heated only weakly, by re-emission from the atmosphere. The interior is colder than a classical viscous model, and isothermal. The magnetic fields support an extended atmosphere that absorbs the starlight 1.5 times higher than the hydrostatic viscous model. The disk thickness thus measures not the internal temperature, but the magnetic field strength. Fluctuations i...

  2. Disk Detective Follow-Up Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    As new data on exoplanets and young stellar associations arrive, we will want to know: which of these planetary systems and young stars have circumstellar disks? The vast allsky database of 747 million infrared sources from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission can supply answers. WISE is a discovery tool intended to find targets for JWST, sensitive enough to detect circumstellar disks as far away as 3000 light years. The vast WISE archive already serves us as a roadmap to guide exoplanet searches, provide information on disk properties as new planets are discovered, and teach us about the many hotly debated connections between disks and exoplanets. However, because of the challenges of utilizing the WISE data, this resource remains underutilized as a tool for disk and planet hunters. Attempts to use WISE to find disks around Kepler planet hosts were nearly scuttled by confusion noise. Moreover, since most of the stars with WISE infrared excesses were too red for Hipparcos photometry, most of the disks sensed by WISE remain obscure, orbiting stars unlisted in the usual star databases. To remedy the confusion noise problem, we have begun a massive project to scour the WISE data archive for new circumstellar disks. The Disk Detective project (Kuchner et al. 2016) engages layperson volunteers to examine images from WISE, NASA's Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS) and optical surveys to search for new circumstellar disk candidates via the citizen science website DiskDetective.org. Fueled by the efforts of > 28,000 citizen scientists, Disk Detective is the largest survey for debris disks with WISE. It has already uncovered 4000 disk candidates worthy of follow-up. However, most host stars of the new Disk Detective disk candidates have no known spectral type or distance, especially those with red colors: K and M stars and Young Stellar Objects. Others require further observations to check for false positives. The Disk Detective project is supported by

  3. The Construction of Finer Compact Topologies

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that each locally compact strongly sober topology is contained in a compact Hausdorff topology; just take the supremum of its topology with its dual topology. On the other hand, examples of compact topologies are known that do not have a finer compact Hausdorff topology. This led to the question (first explicitly formulated by D.E. Cameron) whether each compact topology is contained in a compact topology with respect to which all compact sets are closed. (For the obvious r...

  4. Compactly convex sets in linear topological spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Banakh, T; Ravsky, O

    2012-01-01

    A convex subset X of a linear topological space is called compactly convex if there is a continuous compact-valued map $\\Phi:X\\to exp(X)$ such that $[x,y]\\subset\\Phi(x)\\cup \\Phi(y)$ for all $x,y\\in X$. We prove that each convex subset of the plane is compactly convex. On the other hand, the space $R^3$ contains a convex set that is not compactly convex. Each compactly convex subset $X$ of a linear topological space $L$ has locally compact closure $\\bar X$ which is metrizable if and only if each compact subset of $X$ is metrizable.

  5. Connecting the shadows: probing inner disk geometries using shadows in transitional disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, M.; Stolker, T.; Dominik, C.; Benisty, M.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: Shadows in transitional disks are generally interpreted as signs of a misaligned inner disk. This disk is usually beyond the reach of current day high contrast imaging facilities. However, the location and morphology of the shadow features allow us to reconstruct the inner disk geometry. Methods: We derive analytic equations of the locations of the shadow features as a function of the orientation of the inner and outer disk and the height of the outer disk wall. In contrast to previous claims in the literature, we show that the position angle of the line connecting the shadows cannot be directly related to the position angle of the inner disk. Results: We show how the analytic framework derived here can be applied to transitional disks with shadow features. We use estimates of the outer disk height to put constraints on the inner disk orientation. In contrast with the results from Long et al. (2017, ApJ, 838, 62), we derive that for the disk surrounding HD 100453 the analytic estimates and interferometric observations result in a consistent picture of the orientation of the inner disk. Conclusions: The elegant consistency in our analytic framework between observation and theory strongly support both the interpretation of the shadow features as coming from a misaligned inner disk as well as the diagnostic value of near infrared interferometry for inner disk geometry.

  6. Compact magnetic confinement fusion: Spherical torus and compact torus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Gao

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The spherical torus (ST and compact torus (CT are two kinds of alternative magnetic confinement fusion concepts with compact geometry. The ST is actually a sub-category of tokamak with a low aspect ratio; while the CT is a toroidal magnetic configuration with a simply-connected geometry including spheromak and field reversed pinch. The ST and CT have potential advantages for ultimate fusion reactor; while at present they can also provide unique fusion science and technology contributions for mainstream fusion research. However, some critical scientific and technology issues should be extensively investigated.

  7. Viral RNAs are unusually compact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajaykumar Gopal

    Full Text Available A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly.

  8. Simulations of the Poynting--Robertson Cosmic Battery in Resistive Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulou, Dimitris M; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2007-01-01

    We describe the results of numerical "2.5--dimensional" MHD simulations of an initially unmagnetized disk model orbiting a central point--mass and responding to the continual generation of poloidal magnetic field due to a secular source that emulates the Poynting--Robertson (PR) drag on electrons in the vicinity of a luminous stellar or compact accreting object. The fluid in the disk and in the surrounding hotter atmosphere has finite electrical conductivity and allows for the magnetic field to diffuse freely out of the areas where it is generated, while at the same time, the differential rotation of the disk twists the poloidal field and quickly induces a substantial toroidal--field component. The secular PR term has dual purpose in these simulations as the source of the magnetic field and the trigger of a magnetorotational instability (MRI) in the disk. The MRI is especially mild and does not destroy the disk because a small amount of resistivity dampens the instability efficiently. In simulations with mode...

  9. ALMA detection of the rotating molecular disk wind drom the young star HD 163296

    CERN Document Server

    Klaassen, P D; Mathews, G S; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, J C Mottram I; van Dishoeck, E F; Takahashi, S; Akiyama, E; Chapillon, E; Espada, D; Hales, A; Hogerheijde, M R; Rawlings, M; Schmalzl, M; Testi, L

    2013-01-01

    Disk winds have been postulated as a mechanism for angular momentum release in protostellar systems for decades. HD 163296 is a Herbig Ae star surrounded by a disk and has been shown to host a series of HH knots (HH 409) with bow shocks associated with the farthest knots. Here we present ALMA Science Verification data of CO J=2-1 and J=3-2 emission which are spatially coincident with the blue shifted jet of HH knots, and offset from the disk by -18.6 km/s. The emission has a double corkscrew morphology and extends more than 10" from the disk with embedded emission clumps coincident with jet knots. We interpret this double corkscrew as emission from material in a molecular disk wind, and that the compact emission near the jet knots is being heated by the jet which is moving at much higher velocities. We show that the J=3-2 emission is likely heavily filtered by the interferometer, but the J=2-1 emission suffers less due to the larger beam and measurable angular scales. Excitation analysis suggests temperatures...

  10. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  11. Accretion Disks and Dynamos: Toward a Unified Mean Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Eric G

    2012-01-01

    Conversion of gravitational energy into radiation near stars and compact objects in accretion disks the origin of large scale magnetic fields in astrophysical rotators have long been distinct topics of active research in astrophysics. In semi-analytic work on both problems it has been useful to presume large scale symmetries, which necessarily results in mean field theories; magnetohydrodynamic turbulence makes the underlying systems locally asymmetric and highly nonlinear. Synergy between theory and simulations should aim for the development of practical, semi-analytic mean field models that capture the essential physics and can be used for observational modeling. Mean field dynamo (MFD) theory and alpha-viscosity accretion disc theory have exemplified such distinct pursuits. Both are presently incomplete, but 21st century MFD theory has nonlinear predictive power compared to 20th century MFD. in contrast, alpha-viscosity accretion theory is still in a 20th century state. In fact, insights from MFD theory ar...

  12. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Marek A; Fragile, P Chris

    2013-01-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks), Shakura-Sunyaev (thin) disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs). After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs).

  13. Ring shaped dust accumulation in transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pinilla, P; Birnstiel, T

    2012-01-01

    Context.Transition disks are believed to be the final stages of protoplanetary disks, during which a forming planetary system or photoevaporation processes open a gap in the inner disk, drastically changing the disk structure. From theoretical arguments it is expected that dust growth, fragmentation and radial drift are strongly influenced by gas disk structure, and pressure bumps in disks have been suggested as key features that may allow grains to converge and grow efficiently. Aims. We want to study how the presence of a large planet in a disk influences the growth and radial distribution of dust grains, and how observable properties are linked to the mass of the planet. Methods. We combine two-dimensional hydrodynamical disk simulations of disk-planet interactions with state-of-the-art coagulation/fragmentation models to simulate the evolution of dust in a disk which has a gap created by a massive planet. We compute images at different wavelengths and illustrate our results using the example of the transi...

  14. The early evolution of protostellar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, Steven W.; Korycansky, D. G.; Brothers, Maxwell J.; Touma, Jihad

    1994-01-01

    We consider the origin and intital growth of the disks that form around protostars during the collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores. These disks are assumed to be inviscid and pressure free, and to have masses small compared to those of their central stars. We find that there exist three distinct components-an outer disk, in which shocked gas moves with comparable azimuthal and radical velocities; and inner disk, where material follows nearly circular orbits, but spirals slowly toward the star because of the drag exerted by adjacent onfalling matter, and a turbulent ring adjoining the first two regions. Early in the evolution, i.e., soon after infalling matter begins to miss the star, only the outer disk is present, and the total mass acceration rate onto the protostar is undiminished. Once the outer disk boundary grows to more than 2.9 times the stellar radius, first the ring, and then the inner disk appear. Thereafter, the radii of all three components expand as t(exp 3). The mass of the ring increase with time and is always 13% of the total mass that has fallen from the cloud. Concurrently with the buildup of the inner disk and ring, the accretion rate onto the star falls off. However, the protostellar mass continue to rise, asymptotically as t(exp 1/4). We calculated the radiated flux from the inner and outer disk components due to the release of gravitational potential energy. The flux from the inner disk is dominant and rises steeply toward the stellar surface. We also determine the surface temperature of the inner disk as a function of radius. The total disk luminosity decreases slowly with time, while the contributions from the ring and inner disk both fall as t(exp -2).

  15. Generalized Similarity for Accretion/Decretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-10-01

    Decretion (or external) disks are gas disks freely expanding to large radii due to their internal stresses. They are expected to naturally arise in tidal disruption events, around Be stars, in mass-losing post-main-sequence binaries, as a result of supernova fallback, etc. Their evolution is theoretically understood in two regimes: when the central object does not exert torque on the disk (a standard assumption for conventional accretion disks) or when no mass inflow (or outflow) occurs at the disk center. However, many astrophysical objects—circumbinary disks, Be stars, neutron stars accreting in a propeller regime, etc.—feature non-zero torque simultaneously with the non-zero accretion (or ejection of mass) at the disk center. We provide a general description for the evolution of such disks (both linear and nonlinear) in the self-similar regime, to which the disk should asymptotically converge with time. We identify a similarity parameter λ, which is uniquely related to the degree, to which the central mass accretion is suppressed by the non-zero central torque. The known decretion disk solutions correspond to the two discrete values of λ, while our new solutions cover a continuum of its physically allowed values, corresponding to either accretion or mass ejection by the central object. A direct relationship between λ and central \\dot{M} and torque is also established. We describe the time evolution of the various disk characteristics for different λ, and show that the observable properties (spectrum and luminosity evolution) of the decretion disks, in general, are different from the standard accretion disks with no central torque.

  16. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W [Homer Glen, IL

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  17. PROBING THE GASEOUS DISK OF T Tau N WITH CN 5-4 LINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podio, L.; Codella, C. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125, Florence (Italy); Kamp, I.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Nisini, B. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via di Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Aresu, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047, Selargius (Italy); Brittain, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 118 Kinard Laboratory, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Cabrit, S.; Dougados, C.; Thi, W.-F. [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Grady, C. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); Sandell, G. [SOFIA-USRA, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232-12, Building N232, Rm. 146, P.O. Box 1, Moffett Field, CA 94035-0001 (United States); White, G. J. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Woitke, P. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-10

    We present spectrally resolved observations of the young multiple system T Tau in atomic and molecular lines obtained with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared on board Herschel. While CO, H{sub 2}O, [C II], and SO lines trace the envelope and the outflowing gas up to velocities of 33 km s{sup –1} with respect to systemic, the CN 5-4 hyperfine structure lines at 566.7, 566.9 GHz show a narrow double-peaked profile centered at systemic velocity, consistent with an origin in the outer region of the compact disk of T Tau N. Disk modeling of the T Tau N disk with the thermo-chemical code ProDiMo produces CN line fluxes and profiles consistent with the observed ones and constrain the size of the gaseous disk (R{sub out}=110{sub −20}{sup +10} AU) and its inclination (i = 25°± 5°). The model indicates that the CN lines originate in a disk upper layer at 40-110 AU from the star, which is irradiated by the stellar UV field and heated up to temperatures of 50-700 K. With respect to previously observed CN 2-1 millimeter lines, the CN 5-4 lines appear to be less affected by envelope emission, due to their larger critical density and excitation temperature. Hence, high-J CN lines are a unique confusion-free tracer of embedded disks, such as the disk of T Tau N.

  18. Detection of Prominent Stellar Disks in the Progenitors of Present-day Massive Elliptical Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Roozbeh H.; Ho, Luis C.; Mobasher, Bahram; Canalizo, Gabriela

    2017-02-01

    Massive galaxies at high redshifts (z > 2) show different characteristics from their local counterparts: they are compact and most likely have a disk. In this study, we trace the evolution of local massive galaxies by performing a detailed morphological analysis, namely, fitting single Sérsic profiles and performing bulge+disk decompositions. We analyze ∼250 massive galaxies selected from all CANDELS fields (COSMOS, UDS, EGS, GOODS-South, and GOODS-North). We confirm that both star-forming and quiescent galaxies increase their sizes significantly from z ≈ 2.5 to the present day. The global Sérsic index of quiescent galaxies increases over time (from n ≈ 2.5 to n > 4), while that of star-forming galaxies remains roughly constant (n ≈ 2.5). By decomposing galaxy profiles into bulge+disk components, we find that massive galaxies at high redshift have prominent stellar disks, which are also evident from visual inspection of the images. By z ≈ 0.5, the majority of the disks disappear and massive quiescent galaxies begin to resemble the local elliptical galaxies. Star-forming galaxies have lower bulge-to-total ratios (B/T) than their quiescent counterparts in each redshift bin. The bulges of star-forming and quiescent galaxies follow different evolutionary histories, while their disks evolve similarly. Based on our morphological analysis and previous cosmological simulations, we argue that major mergers, along with minor mergers, have played a crucial role in the significant increase in size of high-z galaxies and the destruction of their massive and large-scale disks.

  19. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  20. Design of Compact Photoelectrochemical Cells for Water Splitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosserez Tom

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Solar driven water splitting can be achieved by coupling electrolyzers with PhotoVoltaics (PV. Integration of both functions in a compact PhotoElectroChemical (PEC cell is an attractive option but presents significant scientific challenges. In this work, the design of single- and dual-compartment PEC cells for research purposes is discussed. The fabrication of separator-electrode assemblies is an important aspect, and upscaling of these architectures even to centimeter scale is not trivial. The layout of a new dual-compartment compact PEC cell with in-situ monitoring of pH, temperatures, and oxygen and hydrogen evolution for research purposes is presented. Finally, a prospect of future PEC cells for practical applications is presented.

  1. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  2. Professional Windows Embedded Compact 7

    CERN Document Server

    Phung, Samuel; Joubert, Thierry; Hall, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Learn to program an array of customized devices and solutions As a compact, highly efficient, scalable operating system, Windows Embedded Compact 7 (WEC7) is one of the best options for developing a new generation of network-enabled, media-rich, and service-oriented devices. This in-depth resource takes you through the benefits and capabilities of WEC7 so that you can start using this performance development platform today. Divided into several major sections, the book begins with an introduction and then moves on to coverage of OS design, application development, advanced application developm

  3. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  4. Net Shape Manufacturing of Accelerator Components by High Pressure Combustion Driven Powder Compaction

    CERN Document Server

    Nagarathnam, Karthik

    2005-01-01

    We present an overview of the net shape and cost-effective manufacturing aspects of high density accelerator (normal and superconducting) components (e.g., NLC Copper disks) and materials behavior of copper, stainless steel, refractory materials (W, Mo and TZM), niobium and SiC by innovative high pressure Combustion Driven Compaction (CDC) technology. Some of the unique process advantages include high densities, net-shaping, improved surface finish/quality, suitability for simple/complex geometries, synthesis of single as well as multilayered materials, milliseconds of compaction process time, little or no post-machining, and process flexibility. Some of the key results of CDC fabricated sample geometries, process optimization, sintering responses and structure/property characteristics such as physical properties, surface roughness/quality, electrical conductivity, select microstructures and mechanical properties will be presented. Anticipated applications of CDC compaction include advanced x-ray targets, vac...

  5. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  6. ISO spectroscopy of compact HII regions in the Galaxy - II. Ionization and elemental abundances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin-Hernandez, NL; Peeters, E; Morisset, C; Tielens, AGGM; Cox, P; Roelfsema, PR; Baluteau, JP; Schaerer, D; Mathis, JS; Damour, F; Churchwell, E; Kessler, MF

    2002-01-01

    Based on the ISO spectral catalogue of compact H II regions by Peeters et al. (2002), we present a first analysis of the hydrogen recombination and atomic fine-structure lines originated in the ionized gas. The sample consists of 34 H II regions located at galactocentric distances between R-Gal = 0

  7. Progress in kW-class picosecond thin-disk lasers development at the HiLASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrž, Martin; Mužík, Jiří; Novák, Ondřej; Chyla, Michal; Turčičová, Hana; Nagisetty, Siva S.; Huynh, Jaroslav; Miura, Taisuke; Linnemann, Jens; Severová, Patricie; Sikocinski, Pawel; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-03-01

    High average power picosecond Yb:YAG thin-disk lasers are being developed at Hilase. A compact 1 mJ/100 kHz and 4 mJ/100 kHz zero-phonon-line-pumped regenerative amplifiers PERLA C with a CVBG compressor provide high conversion efficiency. High energy, QCW-pumped beamline PERLA B is operated at 45mJ/1kHz in fundamental spatial mode and pulse length < 2ps. Its second stage amplifier is being assembled and 1.8 J was extracted. The latest development status of all thin-disk beamlines at the Hilase center is reported.

  8. Thin-disk laser multi-pass amplifier

    CERN Document Server

    Schuhmann, K; Graf, T; Hänsch, T W; Kirch, K; Kottmann, F; Pohl, R; Taqqu, D; Voß, A; Weichelt, B; Antognini, A

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the Lamb shift measurement in muonic helium we developed a thin-disk laser composed of a Q-switched oscillator and a multi-pass amplifier delivering pulses of 150 mJ at a pulse duration of 100 ns. Its peculiar requirements are stochastic trigger and short delay time (< 500 ns) between trigger and optical output. The concept of the thin-disk laser allows for energy and power scaling with high efficiency. However the single pass gain is small (about 1.2). Hence a multi-pass scheme with precise mode matching for large beam waists (w = 2 mm) is required. Instead of using the standard 4f design, we have developed a multi-pass amplifier with a beam propagation insensitive to thermal lens effects and misalignments. The beam propagation is equivalent to multiple roundtrips in an optically stable resonator. To support the propagation we used an array of 2 x 8 individually adjustable plane mirrors. Astigmatism has been minimized by a compact mirror placement. Precise alignment of the kinematic arra...

  9. On the X-ray heated skin of Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, S

    1999-01-01

    We present a simple analytical formula for the Thomson depth of the X-rayheated skin of accretion disks valid at any radius and for a broad range ofspectral indices of the incident X-rays, accretion rates and black hole masses.We expect that this formula may find useful applications in studies of geometryof the inner part of accretion flows around compact objects, and in severalother astrophysically important problems, such as the recently observed X-ray``Baldwin'' effect (i.e., monotonic decrease of Fe line's equivalent width withthe X-ray luminosity of AGN), the problem of missing Lyman edge in AGN, andline and continuum variability studies in accretion disks around compactobjects. We compute the reflected X-ray spectra for several representativecases and show that for hard X-ray spectra and large ionizing fluxes the skinrepresents a perfect mirror that does not produce any Fe lines or absorptionfeatures. At the same time, for soft X-ray spectra or small ionizing fluxes,the skin produces very strong ionized...

  10. On the generation of asymmetric warps in disk galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, K; Saha, Kanak; Jog, Chanda J.

    2005-01-01

    The warps in many spiral galaxies are now known to asymmetric. Recent sensitive observations have revealed that asymmetry of warps may be the norm rather than exception. However there exists no generic mechanism to generate these asymmetries in warps. We have derived the dispersion relation in a compact form for the S-shaped warps(described by the m=1 mode) and the bowl-shaped distribution(described by the m=0 mode) in galactic disk embedded in a dark matter halo. We then performed the numerical modal analysis and used the linear and time-dependent superposition principle to generate asymmetric warps in the disk. On doing the modal analysis we find the frequency of the $m=0$ mode is much larger than that of the $m=1$ mode. The linear and time-dependent superposition of these modes with their unmodulated amplitudes(that is, the coefficients of superposition being unity) results in an asymmetry in warps of ~ 20 - 40 %, whereas a smaller coefficient for the m=0 mode results in a smaller asymmetry. The resulting ...

  11. Imaging the dust sublimation front of a circumbinary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Hillen, M; Bouquin, J -B Le; Van Winckel, H; Berger, J -P; Kamath, D; Bujarrabal, V

    2016-01-01

    We present the first near-IR milli-arcsecond-scale image of a post-AGB binary that is surrounded by hot circumbinary dust. A very rich interferometric data set in six spectral channels was acquired of IRAS08544-4431 with the new RAPID camera on the PIONIER beam combiner at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). A broadband image in the \\textit{H} band was reconstructed by combining the data of all spectral channels using the SPARCO method. We spatially separate all the building blocks of the IRAS08544-4431 system in our milliarcsecond-resolution image. Our dissection reveals a dust sublimation front that is strikingly similar to that expected in early-stage protoplanetary disks, as well as an unexpected flux signal of $\\sim$4\\% from the secondary star. The energy output from this companion indicates the presence of a compact circum-companion accretion disk, which is likely the origin of the fast outflow detected in H$\\alpha$. Our image provides the most detailed view into the heart of a dusty circums...

  12. The hydrogen emission of young stellar objects : Key science for next-generation instruments and facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garcia, Paulo J. V.; Benisty, Myriam; Rajabi, Samira; Dougados, Catherine; Massi, Fabrizzio; Bacciotti, Francesca; Le Bouquin, Jean-Baptiste; Malbet, Fabien; Podio, Linda; Renard, Stephanie; Whelan, Emma

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen emission line is a defining characteristic of young stellar objects probing the planet forming regions of the disks. The limiting sensitivity of current interferometers has precluded it's detailed study. We'll review our current understanding of hydrogen emission, recent results and pro

  13. The effect of ammonia upon the electrocatalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction on polycrystalline platinum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Hernandez-Fernandez, Patricia; Stephens, Ifan E.L.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ammonium ions on the catalysis of hydrogen oxidation and oxygen reduction is studied by means of rotating ring-disk electrode experiments on polycrystalline platinum in perchloric acid. While ammonium does not affect the hydrogen oxidation reaction, the oxygen reduction reaction ...

  14. Astrophysical disks Collective and Stochastic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Fridman, Alexei M; Kovalenko, Ilya G

    2006-01-01

    The book deals with collective and stochastic processes in astrophysical discs involving theory, observations, and the results of modelling. Among others, it examines the spiral-vortex structure in galactic and accretion disks , stochastic and ordered structures in the developed turbulence. It also describes sources of turbulence in the accretion disks, internal structure of disk in the vicinity of a black hole, numerical modelling of Be envelopes in binaries, gaseous disks in spiral galaxies with shock waves formation, observation of accretion disks in a binary system and mass distribution of luminous matter in disk galaxies. The editors adaptly brought together collective and stochastic phenomena in the modern field of astrophysical discs, their formation, structure, and evolution involving the methodology to deal with, the results of observation and modelling, thereby advancing the study in this important branch of astrophysics and benefiting Professional Researchers, Lecturers, and Graduate Students.

  15. Counterrotating Stars in Simulated Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Algorry, David G; Abadi, Mario G; Sales, Laura V; Steinmetz, Matthias; Piontek, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Counterrotating stars in disk galaxies are a puzzling dynamical feature whose origin has been ascribed to either satellite accretion events or to disk instabilities triggered by deviations from axisymmetry. We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of a disk galaxy to show that counterrotating stellar disk components may arise naturally in hierarchically-clustering scenarios even in the absence of merging. The simulated disk galaxy consists of two coplanar, overlapping stellar components with opposite spins: an inner counterrotating bar-like structure made up mostly of old stars surrounded by an extended, rotationally-supported disk of younger stars. The opposite-spin components originate from material accreted from two distinct filamentary structures which at turn around, when their net spin is acquired, intersect delineating a "V"-like structure. Each filament torques the other in opposite directions; the filament that first drains into the galaxy forms the inner counterrotating bar, while material ...

  16. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moór, Attila; Kóspál, Ágnes; Ábrahám, Péter; Juhász, Attila; Apai, Dániel; Csengeri, Timea; Grady, Carol; Henning, Thomas; Kiss, Csaba; Pascucci, Ilaria

    2013-07-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. So far only a very few debris disks with measurable gas component have been known. We carried out a survey with the APEX radio telescope to detect molecular gas at millimeter wavelengths in 28 infrared-luminous young debris disks, and discovered two new systems with substantial amount of CO. Motivated to understand the origin, physics, and evolutionary status of the gas in these systems we observed one of them, HD 21997, with ALMA and Herschel. Our results suggest that HD 21997 may be a hybrid system where secondary debris dust and residual primordial gas coexist. This poses a serious question to the current paradigm, since the age of the system (30 Myr) significantly exceeds model predictions for disk clearing and the ages of the oldest transitional disks.

  17. Erasing Data and Recycling of Optical Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Fujita

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Optical disks, DVDs and CDs, are convenient recording media on which to safely store data for a long period of time. However, the complete data erasure from recorded media is also important for the security of the data. After erasure of data from optical disks, recycling the material is needed in order to recover the valuable components of the optical disks. Here, data erasure methods for optical disks are discussed in the view of material recycling. The main finding of the study is that the explosion of optical disks in water is a very suitable method for complete erasure of data on the disks as well as recycling of their materials.

  18. Non-isothermal effects on Be disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Rodrigo G; Bjorkman, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the viscous decretion disk model has emerged as the new paradigm for Be star disks. In this contribution, we propose a simple analytical model to estimate the continuum infrared excess arising from these circumstellar disks, in the light of the currently accepted scenario. We demonstrate that the disk can be satisfactorily described by a two component system: an inner optically thick region, which we call the pseudo-photosphere, and a diffuse outer part. In particular, a direct connexion between the disk brightness profile and the thermal structure is derived, and then confronted to realistic numerical simulations. This result quantifies how the non-isothermality of the disk ultimately affects both infrared measured fluxes and visibilities.

  19. Dusty Disks around White Dwarfs I: Origin of Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Ruobing; Lin, D N C; Liu, X -W

    2010-01-01

    A significant fraction of the mature FGK stars have cool dusty disks at least an orders of magnitudes brighter than the solar system's outer zodiacal light. Since such dusts must be continually replenished, they are generally assumed to be the collisional fragments of residual planetesimals analogous to the Kuiper Belt objects. At least 10% of solar type stars also bear gas giant planets. The fraction of stars with known gas giants or detectable debris disks (or both) appears to increase with the stellar mass. Here, we examine the dynamical evolution of systems of long-period gas giant planets and residual planetesimals as their host stars evolve off the main sequence, lose mass, and form planetary nebula around remnant white dwarf cores. The orbits of distant gas giant planets and super-km-size planetesimals expand adiabatically. During the most intense AGB mass loss phase, sub-meter-size particles migrate toward their host stars due to the strong hydrodynamical drag by the intense stellar wind. Along their ...

  20. Compaction dynamics of crunchy granular material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillard François

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Compaction of brittle porous material leads to a wide variety of densification patterns. Static compaction bands occurs naturally in rocks or bones, and have important consequences in industry for the manufacturing of powder tablets or metallic foams for example. Recently, oscillatory compaction bands have been observed in brittle porous media like snow or cereals. We will discuss the great variety of densification patterns arising during the compaction of puffed rice, including erratic compaction at low velocity, one or several travelling compaction bands at medium velocity and homogeneous compaction at larger velocity. The conditions of existence of each pattern are studied thanks to a numerical spring lattice model undergoing breakage and is mapped to the phase diagram of the patterns based on dimensionless characteristic quantities. This also allows to rationalise the evolution of the compaction behaviour during a single test. Finally, the localisation of compaction bands is linked to the strain rate sensitivity of the material.

  1. M82 AS A GALAXY: MORPHOLOGY AND STELLAR CONTENT OF THE DISK AND HALO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. D. Mayya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, the nuclear starburst has taken all the limelight in M82 with very little discussion on M82 as a galaxy. The situation is changing over the last decade, with the publication of some important results on the morphology and stellar content of its disk and halo. In this review, we discuss these recent ndings in the framework of M82 as a galaxy. It is known for almost half a century that M82 as a galaxy doesn't follow the trends expected for normal galaxies that had prompted the morphologists to introduce a separate morphological type under the name Irr II or amorphous. It is now being understood that the main reasons behind its apparently distinct morphological appearance are its peculiar star formation history, radial distribution of gas density and the form of the rotation curve. The disk formed almost all of its stars through a burst mode around 500 Myr ago, with the disk star formation completely quenched around 100 Myr ago. The fossil record of the disk-wide burst lies in the form of hundreds of compact star clusters, similar in mass to that of the globular clusters in the Milky Way, but an order of magnitude younger. The present star formation is restricted entirely to the central 500 pc zone, that contains more than 200 young compact star clusters. The disk contains a non-star-forming spiral arm, hidden from the optical view by a combination of extinction and high inclination to the line of sight. The halo of M82 is also unusual in its stellar content, with evidence for star formation, albeit at low levels, occurring continuously for over a gigayear. We carefully examine each of the observed abnormality to investigate the overall e ect of interaction on the evolution of M82.

  2. Room temperature micro-hydrogen-generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasio, Don; Tasic, Sonja; Zenhausern, Frederic

    A new compact and cost-effective hydrogen-gas generator has been made that is well suited for supplying hydrogen to a fuel-cell for providing base electrical power to hand-carried appliances. This hydrogen-generator operates at room temperature, ambient pressure and is orientation-independent. The hydrogen-gas is generated by the heterogeneous catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous alkaline borohydride solution as it flows into a micro-reactor. This reactor has a membrane as one wall. Using the membrane keeps the liquid in the reactor, but allows the hydrogen-gas to pass out of the reactor to a fuel-cell anode. Aqueous alkaline 30 wt% borohydride solution is safe and promotes long application life, because this solution is non-toxic, non-flammable, and is a high energy-density (≥2200 W-h per liter or per kilogram) hydrogen-storage solution. The hydrogen is released from this storage-solution only when it passes over the solid catalyst surface in the reactor, so controlling the flow of the solution over the catalyst controls the rate of hydrogen-gas generation. This allows hydrogen generation to be matched to hydrogen consumption in the fuel-cell, so there is virtually no free hydrogen-gas during power generation. A hydrogen-generator scaled for a system to provide about 10 W electrical power is described here. However, the technology is expected to be scalable for systems providing power spanning from 1 W to kW levels.

  3. ON THE FORMATION OF GALACTIC THICK DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minchev, I.; Streich, D.; Scannapieco, C.; De Jong, R. S.; Steinmetz, M. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Martig, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations in the Milky Way suggest that the chemically defined thick disk (stars that have high [α/Fe] ratios and are thus old) has a significantly smaller scale-length than the thin disk. This is in apparent contradiction with observations of external edge-on galaxies, where the thin and thick components have comparable scale-lengths. Moreover, while observed disks do not flare (scale-height does not increase with radius), numerical simulations suggest that disk flaring is unavoidable, resulting from both environmental effects and secular evolution. Here we address these problems by studying two different suites of simulated galactic disks formed in the cosmological context. We show that the scale-heights of coeval populations always increase with radius. However, the total population can be decomposed morphologically into thin and thick disks, which do not flare. We relate this to the disk inside-out formation, where younger populations have increasingly larger scale-lengths and flare at progressively larger radii. In this new picture, thick disks are composed of the imbedded flares of mono-age stellar populations. Assuming that disks form inside out, we predict that morphologically defined thick disks must show a decrease in age (or [α/Fe] ratios) with radius and that coeval populations should always flare. This also explains the observed inversion in the metallicity and [α/Fe] gradients for stars away from the disk midplane in the Milky Way. The results of this work are directly linked to, and can be seen as evidence of, inside-out disk growth.

  4. Theory of Disk Accretion onto Magnetic Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disk accretion onto magnetic stars occurs in a variety of systems, including accreting neutron stars (with both high and low magnetic fields, white dwarfs, and protostars. We review some of the key physical processes in magnetosphere-disk interaction, highlighting the theoretical uncertainties. We also discuss some applications to the observations of accreting neutron star and protostellar systems, as well as possible connections to protoplanetary disks and exoplanets.

  5. Theory of Disk Accretion onto Magnetic Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Dong

    2014-01-01

    Disk accretion onto magnetic stars occurs in a variety of systems, including accreting neutron stars (with both high and low magnetic fields), white dwarfs, and protostars. We review some of the key physical processes in magnetosphere-disk interaction, highlighting the theoretical uncertainties. We also discuss some applications to the observations of accreting neutron stars and protostellar systems, as well as possible connections to protoplanetary disks and exoplanets.

  6. IMPROVEMENT OF ELECTROCHEMICAL PROCESSES IN HYDROGEN POWER ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covaliova O.V.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The possibility is studied of using the three-dimensional voluminous-porous electrodes made of the carbonic-fibrous materials and foamy metals, which surface is covered with Ni-Re alloy, for hydrogen electrochemical generation. Electrode surface modification makes it possible to obtain high reactive surface with low overvoltage of hydrogen evolution. The design is given of the developed compact electrochemical reactors for hydrogen power engineering. The method is described of oxygen-hydrogen mixture separation in the water electrolysis processes.

  7. Reprocessing of Ices in Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks: Carbon and Nitrogen Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r < 30 AU, because warm dust temperature prohibits their reformation on grain surfaces. This reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) are two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The fo...

  8. HI Imaging Observations of Superthin Galaxies. II. IC2233 and the Blue Compact Dwarf NGC2537

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Lynn D

    2007-01-01

    We have used the VLA to image the HI 21-cm line emission in the edge-on Sd galaxy IC2233 and the blue compact dwarf NGC2537. We also present new optical B,R, and H alpha imaging of IC2233 obtained with the WIYN telescope. Despite evidence of localized massive star formation, IC2233 has a low surface brightness disk with a low global star formation rate (~0.05 M_sun/yr), and no significant 21-cm radio continuum emission. The HI and ionized gas disks of IC2233 are clumpy and vertically distended, with scale heights comparable to the young stars. Both the stellar and HI disks of IC2233 appear flared, and we also find a vertically extended, rotationally anomalous HI component extending to z~2.4 kpc. The HI disk exhibits a mild lopsidedness as well as a global corrugation pattern with a period of ~7 kpc and an amplitude of ~150 pc. To our knowledge, this is the first time corrugations of the gas disk have been reported in an external galaxy; these undulations may be linked to bending instabilities or to underlying...

  9. Protoplanetary Disks in Multiple Star Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Robert J.

    Most stars are born in multiple systems, so the presence of a stellar companion may commonly influence planet formation. Theory indicates that companions may inhibit planet formation in two ways. First, dynamical interactions can tidally truncate circumstellar disks. Truncation reduces disk lifetimes and masses, leaving less time and material for planet formation. Second, these interactions might reduce grain-coagulation efficiency, slowing planet formation in its earliest stages. I present three observational studies investigating these issues. First is a spatially resolved Submillimeter Array (SMA) census of disks in young multiple systems in the Taurus-Auriga star-forming region to study their bulk properties. With this survey, I confirmed that disk lifetimes are preferentially decreased in multiples: single stars have detectable millimeter-wave continuum emission twice as often as components of multiples. I also verified that millimeter luminosity (proportional to disk mass) declines with decreasing stellar separation. Furthermore, by measuring resolved-disk radii, I quantitatively tested tidal-truncation theories: results were mixed, with a few disks much larger than expected. I then switch focus to the grain-growth properties of disks in multiple star systems. By combining SMA, Combined Array for Research in Millimeter Astronomy (CARMA), and Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the circumbinary disk in the UZ Tau quadruple system, I detected radial variations in the grain-size distribution: large particles preferentially inhabit the inner disk. Detections of these theoretically predicted variations have been rare. I related this to models of grain coagulation in gas disks and find that our results are consistent with growth limited by radial drift. I then present a study of grain growth in the disks of the AS 205 and UX Tau multiple systems. By combining SMA, Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), and VLA observations, I detected radial

  10. Structure, mass and stability of galactic disks

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kruit, P C

    2010-01-01

    In this review I concentrate on three areas related to structure of disks in spiral galaxies. First I will review the work on structure, kinematics and dynamics of stellar disks. Next I will review the progress in the area of flaring of HI layers. These subjects are relevant for the presence of dark matter and lead to the conclusion that disk are in general not `maximal', have lower M/L ratios than previously suspected and are locally stable w.r.t. Toomre's Q criterion for local stability. I will end with a few words on `truncations' in stellar disks.

  11. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  12. Circumstellar Debris Disks: Diagnosing the Unseen Perturber

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvold, Erika R; Vican, Laura; Farr, Will M

    2016-01-01

    The first indication of the presence of a circumstellar debris disk is usually the detection of excess infrared emission from the population of small dust grains orbiting the star. This dust is short-lived, requiring continual replenishment, and indicating that the disk must be excited by an unseen perturber. Previous theoretical studies have demonstrated that an eccentric planet orbiting interior to the disk will stir the larger bodies in the belt and produce dust via interparticle collisions. However, motivated by recent observations, we explore another possible mechanism for heating a debris disk: a stellar-mass perturber orbiting exterior to and inclined to the disk and exciting the disk particles' eccentricities and inclinations via the Kozai-Lidov mechanism. We explore the consequences of an exterior perturber on the evolution of a debris disk using secular analysis and collisional N-body simulations. We demonstrate that a Kozai-Lidov excited disk can generate a dust disk via collisions and we compare t...

  13. Modeling the Circumstellar Disk of $\\zeta$ Tauri

    OpenAIRE

    Carciofi, A. C.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    2004-01-01

    We present a model for the disk of the classical Be star $\\zeta$ Tauri. The model consists of a Keplerian rotating disk with a power-law surface density and a vertical density distribution that follows from the balance between the thermal gas pressure and the z-component of the stellar gravitation. The opening angle of such a disk is not a fixed value but increases with the distance to the star (flared disk). We use a Monte Carlo code that solves simultaneously the thermal equilibrium, the st...

  14. Strength of Cracked Reinforced Concrete Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with models, based on the theory of plasticity, to be used in strength assessments of reinforced concrete disks suffering from different kinds of cracking. Based on the assumption that the sliding strength of concrete is reduced in sections where cracks are located, solutions...... for the shear strength of disks with initial cracks and disks suffering from isotropic cracking are presented. Furthermore, in the case of isotropicly cracked disks subjected to arbitrary in-plane loading, a general yield condition is derived....

  15. Generalized Similarity for Accretion/Decretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, Roman R

    2016-01-01

    Decretion (or external) disks are gas disks freely expanding to large radii due to their internal stresses. They are expected to naturally arise in tidal disruption events, around Be stars, in mass-losing post main sequence binaries, as a result of supernova fallback, etc. Their evolution is theoretically understood in two regimes: when the central object does not exert torque on the disk (a standard assumption for conventional accretion disks) or when no mass inflow (or outflow) occurs at the disk center. However, many astrophysical objects - circumbinary disks, Be stars, neutron stars accreting in a propeller regime, etc. - feature non-zero torque simultaneously with the non-zero accretion (or ejection of mass) at the disk center. We provide a general description for the evolution of such disks (both linear and non-linear) in the self-similar regime, to which the disk should asymptotically converge with time. We identify a similarity parameter $\\lambda$, which is uniquely related to the degree, to which the...

  16. Sub-Keplerian accretion onto circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, R

    2010-01-01

    Models of the formation, evolution and photoevaporation of circumstellar disks are an essential ingredient in many theories of the formation of planetary systems. The ratio of disk mass over stellar mass in the circumstellar phase of a disk is largely determined by the angular momentum of the original cloud core from which the system was formed. While full 3D or 2D axisymmetric hydrodynamical models of accretion onto the disk automatically treat all aspects of angular momentum, this is not so trivial for 1D and semi-2D viscous disk models. Since 1D and semi-2D disk models are still very useful for long-term evolutionary modelling of disks with relatively little numerical effort, we investigate how the 2D nature of accretion affects the formation and evolution of the disk in such models. A proper treatment of this problem requires a correction for the sub-Keplerian velocity at which accretion takes place. We develop an update of our semi-2D time-dependent disk evolution model to properly treat the effects of s...

  17. The Compact Project: Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Alliance of Business, Inc., Washington, DC.

    The National Alliance of Business (NAB) surveyed the 12 sites that participated in the Compact Project to develop and implement programs of business-education collaboration. NAB studied start-up activities, key players, conditions for collaboration, accomplishments, challenges, and future plans. Program outcomes indicated that building successful…

  18. JACKSON'S THEOREM FOR COMPACT GROUPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Vaezi; S. F. Rzaev

    2002-01-01

    In this article we consider the generalized shift operator defined by(Sh.f)(g) = ∫Gf (tut-1g)dton compact group G and by help of this operator we define "Spherical" modulus of continuity. So we proveStechkin and Jackson type theorems.

  19. Compact Photon Source Conceptual Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degtyarenko, Pavel V. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan B. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    We describe options for the production of an intense photon beam at the CEBAF Hall D Tagger facility, needed for creating a high-quality secondary K 0 L delivered to the Hall D detector. The conceptual design for the Compact Photon Source apparatus is presented.

  20. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very

  1. Dynamics of a compact operator

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Teck-Cheong

    2010-01-01

    Let $T:X\\to X$ be a compact linear (or more generally affine) operator from a Banach space into itself. For each $x\\in X$, the sequence of iterates $T^nx, n=0,1,...$ and its averages $\\frac{1}{k}\\sum_{k=0}^nT^{k-1}x, n=0,1,...$ are either bounded or approach infinity.

  2. DNA compaction by nonbinding macromolecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Compaction of DNA by nonbinding macromolecules such as uncharged flexible polymer chains and negatively charged globular proteins is thought to have various applications in biophysics, for example in the formation of a nucleoid structure in bacteria. A simple experimental model that has been very we

  3. Fuzzy Soft Compact Topological Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have studied compactness in fuzzy soft topological spaces which is a generalization of the corresponding concept by R. Lowen in the case of fuzzy topological spaces. Several basic desirable results have been established. In particular, we have proved the counterparts of Alexander’s subbase lemma and Tychonoff theorem for fuzzy soft topological spaces.

  4. Diffusion Welding of Compact Heat Exchangers for Nuclear Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis Clark; Ron Mizia; Dr. Michael V. Glazoff; Mr. Michael W. Patterson

    2012-06-01

    The next-­-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is designed to be a flexible source of energy, producing various mixes of electrical energy and process heat (for example, for hydrogen generation) on demand. Compact heat exchangers provide an attractive way to move energy from the helium primary reactor coolant to process heat uses. For process heat efficiency, reactor outlet temperatures of 750-­-900°C are desirable. There are minor but deleterious components in the primary coolant; the number of alloys that can handle this environment is small. The present work concentrates on Alloys 800H and 617.

  5. On sequential countably compact topological semigroups

    CERN Document Server

    Gutik, Oleg V; Repovš, Dušan

    2008-01-01

    We study topological and algebraic properties of sequential countably compact topological semigroups similar to compact topological semigroups. We prove that a sequential countably compact topological semigroup does not contain the bicyclic semigroup. Also we show that the closure of a subgroup in a sequential countably compact topological semigroup is a topological group, that the inversion in a Clifford sequential countably compact topological semigroup is continuous and we prove the analogue of the Rees-Suschkewitsch Theorem for simple regular sequential countably compact topological semigroups.

  6. Compaction and relaxation of biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Valladares Linares, R.

    2015-06-18

    Operation of membrane systems for water treatment can be seriously hampered by biofouling. A better characterization of biofilms in membrane systems and their impact on membrane performance may help to develop effective biofouling control strategies. The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence, extent and timescale of biofilm compaction and relaxation (decompaction), caused by permeate flux variations. The impact of permeate flux changes on biofilm thickness, structure and stiffness was investigated in situ and non-destructively with optical coherence tomography using membrane fouling monitors operated at a constant crossflow velocity of 0.1 m s−1 with permeate production. The permeate flux was varied sequentially from 20 to 60 and back to 20 L m−2 h−1. The study showed that the average biofilm thickness on the membrane decreased after elevating the permeate flux from 20 to 60 L m−2 h−1 while the biofilm thickness increased again after restoring the original flux of 20 L m−2 h−1, indicating the occurrence of biofilm compaction and relaxation. Within a few seconds after the flux change, the biofilm thickness was changed and stabilized, biofilm compaction occurred faster than the relaxation after restoring the original permeate flux. The initial biofilm parameters were not fully reinstated: the biofilm thickness was reduced by 21%, biofilm stiffness had increased and the hydraulic biofilm resistance was elevated by 16%. Biofilm thickness was related to the hydraulic biofilm resistance. Membrane performance losses are related to the biofilm thickness, density and morphology, which are influenced by (variations in) hydraulic conditions. A (temporarily) permeate flux increase caused biofilm compaction, together with membrane performance losses. The impact of biofilms on membrane performance can be influenced (increased and reduced) by operational parameters. The article shows that a (temporary) pressure increase leads to more

  7. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  8. The molecular circumnuclear disk (CND) in Centaurus A. A multi-transition CO and [CI] survey with Herschel, APEX, JCMT, and SEST

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Israel, F. P.; Güsten, R.; Meijerink, R.; Loenen, A. F.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Stutzki, J.; van der Werf, P.; Harris, A.; Kramer, C.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Weiss, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents emission line intensities of CO and C° from the compact circumnuclear disk in the center of NGC 5128 (Centaurus A) obtained with the Herschel Space Observatory in the 400-1000 GHz range as well as previously unpublished measurements obtained with the ground-based observatories SE

  9. Dust amorphization in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Glauser, Adrian M; Watson, Dan M; Henning, Thomas; Schegerer, Alexander A; Wolf, Sebastian; Audard, Marc; Baldovin-Saavedra, Carla

    2009-01-01

    High-energy irradiation of the circumstellar material might impact the structure and the composition of a protoplanetary disk and hence the process of planet formation. In this paper, we present a study on the possible influence of the stellar irradiation, indicated by X-ray emission, on the crystalline structure of the circumstellar dust. The dust crystallinity is measured for 42 class II T Tauri stars in the Taurus star-forming region using a decomposition fit of the 10 micron silicate feature, measured with the Spitzer IRS instrument. Since the sample includes objects with disks of various evolutionary stages, we further confine the target selection, using the age of the objects as a selection parameter. We correlate the X-ray luminosity and the X-ray hardness of the central object with the crystalline mass fraction of the circumstellar dust and find a significant anti-correlation for 20 objects within an age range of approx. 1 to 4.5 Myr. We postulate that X-rays represent the stellar activity and consequ...

  10. Hard disks with SCSI interface

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, O Yu

    1999-01-01

    The testing of 20 models of hard SCSI-disks is carried out: the Fujitsu MAE3091LP; the IBM DDRS-39130, DGHS-318220, DNES-318350, DRHS-36V and DRVS-18V; the Quantum Atlas VI 18.2; the Viking 11 9.1; the Seagate ST118202LW, ST118273LW, ST118273W, ST318203LW, ST318275LW, ST34520W, ST39140LW and ST39173W; and the Western Digital WDE9100-0007, WDE9100-AV0016, WDE9100-AV0030 and WDE9180-0048. All tests ran under the Windows NT 4.0 workstation operating system with Service Pack 4, under video mode with 1024*768 pixel resolution, 32- bit colour depth and V-frequency equal to 85 Hz. The detailed description and characteristics of SCSI stores are presented. Test results (ZD Winstone 99 and ZD WinBench 99 tests) are given in both table and diagram (disk transfer rate) forms. (0 refs).

  11. Turbulent dynamo in a disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruzmaikin, A.A.; Sokolov, D.D.; Turchaninov, V.I.

    1980-03-01

    The large-scale magnetic field in a rotating, turbulent gaseous disk will be generated by a dynamo process (the ..cap alpha omega..-dynamo) determined by the differential rotation ..omega..(r) and the spirality function ..cap alpha..(z). The generation is best described by a difference approximation to the dynamo equations, using a step greater than the turbulence correlation length and a smooth function ..cap alpha..(z). The critical dynamo-number for exciting the lowest even quadrupole mode is D/sub q/ = -8. The odd dipole mode will be excited only for large dynamo-numberabsolute value (D/sub d/) > or approx. = 500. When absolute value (D) > or approx. = 20, all modes other than the lowest quadrupole mode (for which the threshold Dapprox. =-500) are oscillatory. The results are applied to the Galaxy (D approx. = -10; characteristic growth time, 3 x 10/sup 8/ yr) and to accretion disks in binary systems containing a black hole, where several oscillatory modes can be excited.

  12. Circumplanetary disk or circumplanetary envelope?

    CERN Document Server

    Szulágyi, J; Lega, E; Crida, A; Morbidelli, A; Guillot, T

    2016-01-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution ($80\\%$ of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche-lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000 K, 1500 K, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary disks (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a circumplanetary disk is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Inste...

  13. Thick-disk Evolution Induced by the Growth of an Embedded Thin Disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villalobos, Álvaro; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Helmi, Amina

    2010-01-01

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the structural and kinematical properties of simulated thick disks induced by the growth of an embedded thin disk. The thick disks used in the present study originate from cosmologically common 5:1 encounters between initial

  14. The physical and chemical evolution of protostellar disks. The growth of protostellar disks: Progress to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1993-01-01

    This study constitutes one part of our multi-disciplinary approach to the evolution of planet-forming disks. The goal is to establish the disks' thermal and mechanical properties as they grow by the infall of their parent interstellar clouds. Thus far, significant advances toward establishing the evolving surface density of such disks was made.

  15. Uncertainties in water chemistry in disks: An application to TW Hydrae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, I.; Thi, W.-F.; Meeus, G.; Woitke, P.; Pinte, C.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.; Pascucci, I.; Aresu, G.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2013-11-01

    Context. This paper discusses the sensitivity of water lines to chemical processes and radiative transfer for the protoplanetary disk around TW Hya. The study focuses on the Herschel spectral range in the context of new line detections with the PACS instrument from the Gas in Protoplanetary Systems project (GASPS). Aims: The paper presents an overview of the chemistry in the main water reservoirs in the disk around TW Hya. It discusses the limitations in the interpretation of observed water line fluxes. Methods: We use a previously published thermo-chemical Protoplanetary Disk Model (ProDiMo) of the disk around TW Hya and study a range of chemical modeling uncertainties: metallicity, C/O ratio, and reaction pathways and rates leading to the formation of water. We provide results for the simplified assumption of Tgas = Tdust to quantify uncertainties arising for the complex heating/cooling processes of the gas and elaborate on limitations due to water line radiative transfer. Results: We report new line detections of p-H2O (322-211) at 89.99 μm and CO J = 18-17 at 144.78 μm for the disk around TW Hya. Disk modeling shows that the far-IR fine structure lines ([O i], [C ii]) and molecular submm lines are very robust to uncertainties in the chemistry, while the water line fluxes can change by factors of a few. The water lines are optically thick, sub-thermally excited and can couple to the background continuum radiation field. The low-excitation water lines are also sensitive to uncertainties in the collision rates, e.g. with neutral hydrogen. The gas temperature plays an important role for the [O i] fine structure line fluxes, the water line fluxes originating from the inner disk as well as the high excitation CO, CH+ and OH lines. Conclusions: Due to their sensitivity on chemical input data and radiative transfer, water lines have to be used cautiously for understanding details of the disk structure. Water lines covering a wide range of excitation energies provide

  16. Explosive compact-coating of tungsten–copper alloy to a copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Li, Xiaojie; Yan, Honghao; Wang, Xiaohong; Miao, Yusong

    2017-03-01

    This study proposed a new method for coating tungsten–copper alloy to copper surface. First, the tungsten–copper alloy powder was pre-compacted to the copper surface. Then, the powder in the hydrogen atmosphere was sintered, and the pre-compacted powder was compacted by explosive compact-coating. Finally, diffusion sintering was conducted to improve the density of the coating layer. The theoretical density of the coating reached 99.3%. Microstructure characteristics indicated that tungsten and copper powders were well mixed. Tungsten particles were larger than copper particles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) fracture surface analysis was different from the traditional fracture of metals. Coating and substrate joint surfaces, which were analyzed by SEM, indicated that the tungsten–copper alloy was sintered on the copper surface. The hardness of the coating layer was 197.6–245.2 HV, and the hardness of the substrate was approximately 55 HV.

  17. Circumnuclear molecular gas in megamaser disk galaxies NGC 4388 and NGC 1194

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Jenny E. [Department of Astrophysics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Seth, Anil [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Lyubenova, Mariya; Van de Ven, Glenn; Läsker, Ronald [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Walsh, Jonelle [Department of Astronomy, The University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States)

    2014-06-20

    We explore the warm molecular and ionized gas in the centers of two megamaser disk galaxies using K-band spectroscopy. Our ultimate goal is to determine how gas is funneled onto the accretion disk, here traced by megamaser spots on sub-parsec scales. We present NIR IFU data with a resolution of ∼50 pc for two galaxies: NGC 4388 with VLT/SINFONI and NGC 1194 with Keck/OSIRIS+AO. The high spatial resolution and rich spectral diagnostics allow us to study both the stellar and gas kinematics as well as gas excitation on scales only an order of magnitude larger than the maser disk. We find a drop in the stellar velocity dispersion in the inner ∼100 pc of NGC 4388, a common signature of a dynamically cold central component seen in many active nuclei. We also see evidence for noncircular gas motions in the molecular hydrogen on similar scales, with the gas kinematics on 100 parsec scales aligned with the megamaser disk. In contrast, the high ionization lines and Brγ trace outflow along the 100 parsec-scale jet. In NGC 1194, the continuum from the accreting black hole is very strong, making it difficult to measure robust two-dimensional kinematics, but the spatial distribution and line ratios of the molecular hydrogen and Brγ have consistent properties between the two galaxies.

  18. Time-Variable Accretion in the TW Hya Star/Disk System

    CERN Document Server

    Eisner, J A; Najita, J R; McCarthy, D; Kulesa, C; Swift, B J; Teske, J

    2010-01-01

    We present two epochs of observations of TW Hya from the high-dispersion near-IR spectrograph ARIES at the MMT. We detect strong emission from the Brackett gamma transition of hydrogen, indicating an accretion rate substantially larger than previously estimated using hydrogen line emission. The Brackett gamma line-strength varies across our two observed epochs. We also measure circumstellar-to-stellar flux ratios (i.e., veilings) that appear close to zero in both epochs. These findings suggest that TW Hya experiences episodes of enhanced accretion while the inner disk remains largely devoid of dust. We discuss several physical mechanisms that may explain these observations.

  19. Achieve both multiwavelength and multilevel optical storage on compact disk by diarylethene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuedong; Pu, Shouzhi; Zhao, Fuqun; Qi, Guosheng; Zhang, Fushi

    2005-01-01

    The novel photochromism, diarylethene derivatives, 1,2-bis(2,5-dimethyl-thien-3-yl)perfluoro cyclopentene (1a) and 1,2-bis(2-methyl-5-carbonylphenyl)-thien-3-yl) perfluorocyclo pentene(2a) were synthesized. And the PC discs of these two diarylethenes were prepared by spin-coating and vacuum evaporating method. To some extent, the high density recording was carried out the multi-wavelength and multi-level optical storage system. On the PC disc, single-wavelength and eight-level recording was realized by 2a, and two laser beams of 532nm and 650nm were used in two-wavelength eight-level recording and readout simultaneously. The results show that the reflectivity differences between the recording region and unrecording region is greater than 50%. The creation is that the two-wavelength and four-step optical recording on the PC disc achieved first time.

  20. Approximation by Complex Baskakov-Sz ´asz-Durrmeyer Operators in Compact Disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sorin G Gal; Vijay Gupta

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we deal with the complex Baskakov-Sz ´asz-Durrmeyer mixed operators and study Voronovskaja type results with quantitative estimates for these operators attached to analytic functions of exponential growth in DR={z∈C;|z|