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Sample records for community-based outpatient parenteral

  1. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halilovic, Jenana; Christensen, Cinda L; Nguyen, Hien H

    2014-01-01

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues.

  2. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Hien; Halilovic,Jenana; Christensen,Cinda

    2014-01-01

    Jenana Halilovic,1 Cinda L Christensen,2 Hien H Nguyen31University of the Pacific Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy, Stockton, CA, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Services, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USA; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Section of Hospital Medicine, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USAAbstract: Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and hig...

  3. [Role of parenteral cephalosporins for outpatients treatment of infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, S; Mazzei, T; Novelli, A

    2001-12-01

    OPAT (Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy) arose in the early 1980s in the USA and later in many other countries from the primary consideration that outpatient treatment is more cost-effective than hospitalisation. Currently, several thousand patients undergo OPAT programmes all over the world and several different bacterial infections are included in the list of treatable diseases, especially those requiring long-term parenteral treatment such as osteomyelitis and soft tissue infections. All injectable antibiotics are suitable for OPAT according to their microbiological spectrum, although clearly some pharmacological properties make one antibiotic more preferable than another. Beta-lactams represent more than half of the antibiotic world market and two-thirds of them are cephalosporins. Such a widespread use of cephalosporins is certainly due to their wide antibacterial spectrum and good tolerability. Among third-generation cephalosporins, covering the majority of micro-organisms responsible for community-acquired infections, ceftriaxone is the only one with an 8-hour half-life, thereby permitting a single daily dose, which represents a great advantage when undertaking an OPAT programme. Analysis of antibiotic consumption used for OPAT therapies, based on data collected from the International OPAT Registry project, with the participation of many countries (USA, Canada, Britain, Argentina, etc.) including Italy, shows that ceftriaxone is the most widely used antibiotic for home therapy, clearly due to the above-mentioned properties.

  4. Managing an outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy team: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halilovic J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jenana Halilovic,1 Cinda L Christensen,2 Hien H Nguyen31University of the Pacific Thomas J Long School of Pharmacy, Stockton, CA, USA; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Services, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USA; 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Section of Hospital Medicine, University of California, Davis Health System, Sacramento, CA, USAAbstract: Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT programs should strive to deliver safe, cost effective, and high quality care. One of the keys to developing and sustaining a high quality OPAT program is to understand the common challenges or barriers to OPAT delivery. We review the most common challenges to starting and managing an OPAT program and give practical advice on addressing these issues.Keywords: OPAT, quality, safety, program management

  5. A Survey on Dementia Training Needs among Staff at Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

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    Adler, Geri; Lawrence, Briana M.; Ounpraseuth, Songthip T.; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a major public health concern. Educating health-care providers about dementia warning signs, diagnosis, and management is paramount to fostering clinical competence and improving patient outcomes. The objective of this project was to describe and identify educational and training needs of staff at community-based outpatient clinics…

  6. Patient Characteristics and Outcomes of Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy: A Retrospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT is a safe and effective alternative to hospitalization for many patients with infectious diseases. The objective of this study was to describe the OPAT experience at a Canadian tertiary academic centre in the absence of a formal OPAT program. This was achieved through a retrospective chart review of OPAT patients discharged from Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre within a one-year period. Between June 2012 and May 2013, 104 patients (median age 63 years were discharged home with parenteral antimicrobials. The most commonly treated syndromes included surgical site infections (33%, osteoarticular infections (28%, and bacteremia (21%. The most frequently prescribed antimicrobials were ceftriaxone (21% and cefazolin (20%. Only 56% of the patients received follow-up care from an infectious diseases specialist. In the 60 days following discharge, 43% of the patients returned to the emergency department, while 26% required readmission. Forty-eight percent of the return visits were due to infection relapse or treatment failure, and 23% could be attributed to OPAT-related complications. These results suggest that many OPAT patients have unplanned health care encounters because of issues related to their infection or treatment, and the creation of a formal OPAT clinic may help improve outcomes.

  7. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for orthopedic infections – a successful public healthcare experience in Brazil

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    Priscila Rosalba Oliveira

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of orthopedic infections usually requires prolonged antimicrobial therapy, ranging from 14 days up to 6 months. Nowadays, rising levels of antimicrobial resistance demands parenteral therapy for many patients. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT is a modality that allows treatment out of hospital in these situations. In Brazil, where a public universal healthcare system allows full coverage for all citizens, implantation and dissemination of OPAT programs would be beneficial for patients and for the system, because it would allow a better allocation of health resources. The Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (IOT started, in July 2013, a partnership with municipal health authorities in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to initiate an OPAT program in which patients discharged from that hospital would be able to continue antimicrobial therapy at primary care facilities. When necessary, patients could also receive their therapy at the day-hospital located at IOT. Primary care nursing and physician staff were trained about antimicrobial infusion and peripherally inserted central catheter manipulation. An OPAT specific antimicrobial protocol was designed and a special reference and counter-reference organized. As a result, 450 primary healthcare professionals were trained. In the first year of this program, 116 patients were discharged for OPAT. Chronic and acute osteomyelitis were most frequent diagnosis. Teicoplanin, ertapenem and tigecycline were the most used drugs. Duration of treatment varied from 10 to 180 days (average 101, median 42. Total sum of days in OPAT regimen was 11,698. Only 3 patients presented adverse effects. Partnership between services of different levels of complexity allowed implantation of a safe and effective public healthcare OPAT program for treatment of orthopedic infections. This program can serve as a model for developing similar strategies

  8. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillopharyngitis: efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety

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    Al Alawi S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Samah Al Alawi,1 Somaya Abdulkarim,1 Hazem Elhennawy,1 Anwar Al-Mansoor,2 Ahmed Al Ansari3,4,5 1Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, 3Training and Education Department, Bahrain Defence Force Hospital, Riffa, 4Arabian Gulf University, Manama, 5Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, Busaiteen, Kingdom of Bahrain Background: Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT is the administration of intravenous antimicrobial therapy to patients in an outpatient setting. It may be used for patients who have infections that require parenteral treatment but who are otherwise stable enough to not require admission as inpatients. Objective: We aimed to review the treatment of patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis at the OPAT health care clinic in the Bahrain Defense Force Royal Medical Services (BDF-RMS, with regard to efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety. Methods: A retrospective case notes review was conducted for all patients admitted to the OPAT clinic in the BDF-RMS with acute tonsillopharyngitis treated with ceftriaxone, between March 2012 and March 2014. Results: In the period between March 2012 and March 2014, 97 patients with acute tonsillopharyngitis were treated with ceftriaxone for a minimum of 3 days at the OPAT clinic. In total, 94.8% of patients completed the prescribed course of ceftriaxone. Total cure was achieved in 89.7% of patients. Usage of the OPAT clinic led to cost savings of 10,693 BD, while total bed days saved were 301 over the 2-year period examined by this study. Participants in the program expressed high satisfaction rates, and the average (± standard deviation score on a patient satisfaction survey was 4.41 (± 0.31 out of a total of 5. This study highlights the efficacy, patient satisfaction, cost effectiveness, and safety of the OPAT clinic service for the treatment of acute tonsillopharyngitis with ceftriaxone. We found a 45.5% drop in admission rate for acute

  9. Costs of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) administered by Hospital at Home units in Spain.

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    González-Ramallo, V J; Mirón-Rubio, M; Mujal, A; Estrada, O; Forné, C; Aragón, B; Rivera, A J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the direct healthcare costs of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) administered by Hospital at Home (HaH) units in Spain. An observational, multicentre, economic evaluation of retrospective cohorts was conducted. Patients were treated at home by the HaH units of three Spanish hospitals between January 2012 and December 2013. From the cost accounting of HaH OPAT (staff, pharmacy, transportation, diagnostic tests and structural), the cost of each outpatient course was obtained following a top-down strategy based on the use of resources. Costs associated with inpatient stay, if any, were estimated based on length of stay and ICD-9-CM diagnosis. There were 1324 HaH episodes in 1190 patients (median age 70 years). The median (interquartile range) stay at home was 10 days (7-15 days). Of the OPAT episodes, 91.5% resulted in cure or improvement on completion of intravenous therapy. The mean total cost of each infectious episode was €6707 [95% confidence interval (CI) €6189-7406]. The mean cost per OPAT episode was €1356 (95% CI €1247-1560), mainly distributed between healthcare staff costs (46%) and pharmacy costs (39%). The mean cost of inpatient hospitalisation of an infectious episode was €4357 (95% CI €3947-4977). The cost per day of inpatient hospitalisation was €519, whilst the cost per day of OPAT was €98, meaning a saving of 81%. This study shows that OPAT administered by HaH units resulted in lower costs compared with inpatient care in Spain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  10. A Comparison of Hospital Versus Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy at Home for Pyelonephritis and Meningitis.

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    Hensey, Conor C; Sett, Arun; Connell, Tom G; Bryant, Penelope A

    2017-09-01

    Despite the benefits of home treatment with outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), children with pyelonephritis and meningitis are rarely included. We aimed to compare clinical characteristics and outcomes between hospital and home treatment for these conditions and to identify factors influencing home treatment. Children admitted to the hospital with pyelonephritis or proven and presumed bacterial meningitis from January 1, 2012, to December 31, 2013 were identified retrospectively. Patients who received any OPAT (home group) received daily visits via our Hospital-in-the-Home (HITH) program; inpatients (hospital group) received standard care. Clinical and demographic features, length of stay, readmission rate and cost were compared between hospital and home groups. One hundred thirty-nine children with pyelonephritis and 70 with meningitis were identified, of which 127 and 44 were potentially suitable for OPAT, respectively. Of these, 12 (9%) with pyelonephritis received OPAT, contrasting with 29 (66%) with meningitis. Clinical features did not differ between hospital- and home-treated patients for either condition. Patients with meningitis in the hospital group were younger than those transferred to HITH (1 vs. 2 months; P = 0.01). All patients were afebrile before transfer to HITH. Admissions for pyelonephritis were brief with inpatients having a shorter length of stay than home patients (median: 3 vs. 4.5 days; P = 0.002). Unplanned readmission rates were comparable across all groups. Transfer to HITH resulted in a saving of AU$178,180. Children with pyelonephritis and meningitis can feasibly receive OPAT. Age, treatment duration and fever influence this decision. None of these should be barriers to OPAT, and the cost savings support change in practice.

  11. Implementation outcomes of evidence-based quality improvement for depression in VA community based outpatient clinics

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    Fortney John

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaborative-care management is an evidence-based practice for improving depression outcomes in primary care. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA has mandated the implementation of collaborative-care management in its satellite clinics, known as Community Based Outpatient Clinics (CBOCs. However, the organizational characteristics of CBOCs present added challenges to implementation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI as a strategy to facilitate the adoption of collaborative-care management in CBOCs. Methods This nonrandomized, small-scale, multisite evaluation of EBQI was conducted at three VA Medical Centers and 11 of their affiliated CBOCs. The Plan phase of the EBQI process involved the localized tailoring of the collaborative-care management program to each CBOC. Researchers ensured that the adaptations were evidence based. Clinical and administrative staff were responsible for adapting the collaborative-care management program for local needs, priorities, preferences and resources. Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles were used to refine the program over time. The evaluation was based on the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, Maintenance Framework and used data from multiple sources: administrative records, web-based decision-support systems, surveys, and key-informant interviews. Results Adoption: 69.0% (58/84 of primary care providers referred patients to the program. Reach: 9.0% (298/3,296 of primary care patients diagnosed with depression who were not already receiving specialty care were enrolled in the program. Fidelity: During baseline care manager encounters, education/activation was provided to 100% (298/298 of patients, barriers were assessed and addressed for 100% (298/298 of patients, and depression severity was monitored for 100% (298/298 of patients. Less than half (42.5%, 681/1603 of follow-up encounters during the acute

  12. An audit of hospital based outpatient infusions and a pilot program of community-based monoclonal antibody infusions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doran, J-P

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infliximab, a chimeric monoclonal antibody to tumour necrosis factor alpha, is administered as an intravenous infusion requiring a costly hospital day case or inpatient admission. METHODS: An audit of all current therapies given by intravenous infusions in an outpatient setting in St Vincent\\'s University Hospital (SVUH) was undertaken. Furthermore, in conjunction with TCP homecare, we established in a general practise health clinic, the first Irish community infusion centre for the administration of infliximab in August 2006. RESULTS: All outpatient departments indicated that they would favour a centralized hospital infusion unit. There were no adverse events and the mean global satisfaction improved in the community infliximab infusion pilot programme of seven patients. CONCLUSION: This study suggests efficiencies in providing centralized infusion facilities, while the community based infusion of infliximab is feasible and safe in this small cohort and identifies the community infusion unit as a viable and cost efficient alternative for administration of infliximab.

  13. Self-administered outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: a report of three years experience in the Irish healthcare setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kieran, J

    2012-02-01

    Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) was first reported in 1972. OPAT programmes are not well established in Ireland, with no reported outcomes in the literature. An OPAT programme was established at St. James Hospital in 2006. Demographics, diagnoses and outcomes of the first 60 courses are reported. A retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data was performed on patients treated from March 2006 to February 2009. The data was analysed using SPSS v.17. Sixty OPAT courses were administered to 56 patients, 57 percent of which were male. The median age was 50 years, the median inpatient stay was 19 days, the median duration of OPAT was 16 days and 1,289 inpatient bed days were saved. The additional cost per day of OPAT was 167.60 euros. Vancomycin was the most prescribed antimicrobial, administered to 35%. Musculoskeletal infection was the indication for treatment in 50%. Confirmatory microbiological diagnosis was identified in 72%, most frequently due to Staphylococcus aureus (68%). Only minor adverse events were recorded. Clinical cure was achieved in 92.8%. A patient satisfaction survey showed high satisfaction. OPAT is a safe and effective way of providing parenteral antibiotic therapy in the Irish healthcare system. Better integration of funding and the appointment of Infectious Diseases specialists will facilitate its expansion.

  14. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in children with febrile urinary tract infection: a prospective randomized clinical trial

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    Nasiri Kalmarzi R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acute pyelonephritis may lead to permanent renal scarring. The standard recommendation for treatment of febrile children with urinary tract infection (UTI is hospitalization for intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of outpatient intravenous ceftriaxone and cefixime versus inpatient of the same regimen for children with febrile UTI.   "nMethods: In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of administration two days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for eight days (as outpatient group versus four days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for six days (as inpatient group, in 203 children (99 cases in outpatient group and 104 cases in inpatient group 3 months to 15 years of age with febrile UTI, in terms of short-term clinical outcomes (sterilization of the urine and defeverescence and long-term morbidity (incidence of reinfection and renal scarring documented by DMSA scintigraphy. "nResults: Repeat urine cultures were sterile within 48 hours in all children, mean time to defeverescence was 27.58 (SD=±12.62 and 31.44 (SD=±17.06 hours for children in outpatient and inpatient groups, respectively (P=0.067. Reinfection occurred in 9.1% of outpatient and 13.4% of inpatient group (P=0.326. Renal scarring developed in 11% of children of outpatient and 7.6% of children of inpatient group (P=0.884. There was no significant difference between the two groups in respect of renal scarring. "nConclusions: Outpatient ceftriaxone for two days followed by cefixime to complete a 10 days course can be recommended as a safe and effective treatment for children with febrile UTI.

  15. Acute dental infections managed in an outpatient parenteral antibiotic program setting: prospective analysis and public health implications.

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    Connors, William J; Rabie, Heidi H; Figueiredo, Rafael L; Holton, Donna L; Parkins, Michael D

    2017-03-09

    The number of Acute Dental Infections (ADI) presenting for emergency department (ED) care are steadily increasing. Outpatient Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy (OPAT) programs are increasingly utilized as an alternative cost-effective approach to the management of serious infectious diseases but their role in the management of severe ADI is not established. This study aims to address this knowledge gap through evaluation of ADI referrals to a regional OPAT program in a large Canadian center. All adult ED and OPAT program ADI referrals from four acute care adult hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, were quantified using ICD diagnosis codes in a regional reporting system. Citywide OPAT program referrals were prospectively enrolled over a five-month period from February to June 2014. Participants completed a questionnaire and OPAT medical records were reviewed upon completion of care. Of 704 adults presenting to acute care facilities with dental infections during the study period 343 (49%) were referred to OPAT for ADI treatment and 110 were included in the study. Participant mean age was 44 years, 55% were women, and a majority of participants had dental insurance (65%), had seen a dentist in the past six months (65%) and reported prior dental infections (77%), 36% reporting the current ADI as a recurrence. Median length of parenteral antibiotic therapy was 3 days, average total course of antibiotics was 15-days, with a cumulative 1326 antibiotic days over the study period. There was no difference in total duration of antibiotics between broad and narrow spectrum regimes. Conservative cost estimate of OPAT care was $120,096, a cost savings of $597,434 (83%) compared with hospitalization. ADI represent a common preventable cause of recurrent morbidity. Although OPAT programs may offer short-term cost savings compared with hospitalization, risks associated with extended antibiotic exposures and delayed definitive dental management must also be gauged.

  16. Comparative outcomes of β-lactam antibiotics in outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy: treatment success, readmissions and antibiotic switches.

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    Lee, Boeun; Tam, Idy; Weigel, Bernard; Breeze, Janis L; Paulus, Jessica K; Nelson, Jason; Allison, Genève M

    2015-08-01

    β-Lactam antibiotics are commonly used in outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT), but data regarding outcomes of long-term therapy are limited. The purpose of this study was to compare treatment success, readmission and antibiotic switch rates in patients treated with β-lactam antibiotics as OPAT. We carried out a retrospective review of all patients, discharged from Tufts Medical Center with cefazolin, ceftriaxone, ertapenem or oxacillin, between January 2009 and June 2013. A competing risks analysis was used to compare the cumulative incidence of first occurrence of treatment success, antibiotic switch and 30 day readmission for each drug. Four hundred patients were identified (cefazolin n = 38, ceftriaxone n = 104, ertapenem n = 128 and oxacillin n = 130). Baseline demographics were similar. Treatment success rates were higher for ceftriaxone and ertapenem (cefazolin 61%, ceftriaxone 81%, ertapenem 73% and oxacillin 58%; P antibiotic switches were accomplished without readmission. Adverse drug events (ADEs) were the most common reason for outpatient antibiotic switches (31/37, 84%). The ADE rate was higher for the oxacillin group (cefazolin 2.0 versus ceftriaxone 1.5 versus ertapenem 2.9 versus oxacillin 8.4 per 1000 OPAT days; P antibiotics is effective, but antibiotic switches for adverse events were more frequent with oxacillin use. Clinicians should be cognizant of the risk of readmissions and ADEs in OPAT patients, as the value of OPAT lies in reducing patient morbidity and readmissions by managing ADEs and preventing clinical failures. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Good practice recommendations for paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) in the UK: a consensus statement.

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    Patel, Sanjay; Abrahamson, Ed; Goldring, Stephen; Green, Helen; Wickens, Hayley; Laundy, Matt

    2015-02-01

    There is compelling evidence to support the rationale for managing children on intravenous antimicrobial therapy at home whenever possible, including parent and patient satisfaction, psychological well-being, return to school/employment, reductions in healthcare-associated infection and cost savings. As a joint collaboration between the BSAC and the British Paediatric Allergy, Immunity and Infection Group, we have developed good practice recommendations to highlight good clinical practice and governance within paediatric outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (p-OPAT) services across the UK. These guidelines provide a practical approach for safely delivering a p-OPAT service in both secondary care and tertiary care settings, in terms of the roles and responsibilities of members of the p-OPAT team, the structure required to deliver the service, identifying patients and pathologies that are suitable for p-OPAT, ensuring appropriate vascular access, antimicrobial choice and delivery and the clinical governance aspects of delivering a p-OPAT service. The process of writing a business case to support the introduction of a p-OPAT service is also addressed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Antibiotic stability related to temperature variations in elastomeric pumps used for outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT).

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    Voumard, Rachel; Van Neyghem, Niklas; Cochet, Camille; Gardiol, Céline; Decosterd, Laurent; Buclin, Thierry; de Valliere, Serge

    2017-05-01

    Elastomeric pumps can be used for the continuous administration of antimicrobials in the outpatient setting. A potentially limiting factor in their use is the stability of antimicrobials. To investigate under real-life conditions the temperature variations of antibiotic solutions contained in elastomeric pumps, and to examine under such conditions the stability of five antibiotics. Healthy volunteers carried the elastomeric pumps in carry pouches during their daily activities. A thermologger measured the temperatures every 15 min over 24 h. Antibiotic concentrations were measured by HPLC coupled to tandem MS. During daytime, the temperature of solutions in the pumps increased steadily, warming to >30°C. During the night, when the pumps were kept attached to the waist, the temperatures reached up to 33°C. The use of white carry pouches avoided excessive temperature increases. Over seven experiments, cefazolin, cefepime, piperacillin and tazobactam were found to be stable over 24 h. Flucloxacillin showed a mean decrease in concentration of 11% ( P  = 0.001). Real-life situations can cause significant temperature rises in elastomeric pumps, thereby potentially increasing the risk of antibiotic degradation. Patients should be instructed to avoid situations causing excessive temperature increases. Despite these temperature variations, cefazolin, cefepime, piperacillin and tazobactam were found to be stable over 24 h. A moderate degradation was noticed for flucloxacillin, albeit most probably not to an extent that might impair anti-infective efficacy. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Utilizing a Post-discharge Telephone Call in Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapy (OPAT): Findings from a Quality Improvement Project

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    Felder, Kimberly; Vaz, Louise; Barnes, Penelope; Varley, Cara

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Transitions of care from hospitals to outpatient settings, especially for patients requiring outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) are complex. OPAT complications, such as adverse antimicrobial reactions, vascular access problems, and hospital readmissions are common. Data from transitions of care literature suggest that post-discharge telephone calls (TCs) may significantly decrease re-hospitalization but no studies have assessed the utility of post-discharge TCs as an OPAT program quality improvement process. Methods Adult OPAT patients discharged from our hospital between April 1, 2015 and May 31, 2016 were queried for post-discharge concerns. TCs to patients or their caregivers were administered by trained medical assistants within the Department of Infectious Diseases using a standardized script and documented in the electronic medical record (EMR). Feasibility was assessed using call completion rate. The type and frequency of reported issues were analyzed by retrospective chart review. Results 636 of 689 eligible adult OPAT patients or their caregivers received a TC with responses to scripted questions documented in the EMR (92% completion rate). 302 patients (47%) reported 319 issues, including 293 (92%) relevant to OPAT. Antimicrobial issues included diarrhea/stool changes (58; 9%); nausea/vomiting (27; 4%); and missed antimicrobial doses (22; 3%). Vascular access issues included line patency concerns (21; 3%); vascular access dressing problems (17; 2.6%) and arm pain/swelling (6; 1%). OPAT vendor issues included delays in lab or line care services (23; 4%) and OPAT orders reported as lost/not received (21; 3%). Other ID-related issues included fevers/chills/sweats (27; 4%), wound concerns (16; 2.5%), and pain (15; 2.5%). Conclusion Adding a post-discharge TC to an OPAT program was feasible and resulted in frequent and early identification of significant OPAT patient and caregiver concerns. Findings suggest potential high

  20. A pilot study on community-based outpatient treatment for patients with chronic psychotic disorders in Somalia: Change in symptoms, functioning and co-morbid khat use

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    Odenwald Michael

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Low and Middle Income Countries, mental health services are often poorly developed due to the lack of resources and trained personnel. In order to overcome these challenges, new ways of care have been suggested such as a focus on community-based services. In Somalia, the consumption of the natural stimulant khat is highly prevalent, aggravating mental illness. At the same time, mental health care is largely unavailable to the vast majority of the population. In a pilot project, we tested possibilities for effective measures in community-based out-patient mental health care. Methods Thirty-five male patients with chronic psychotic disorders and their carers were involved in a 10-months follow-up study. All of them abused khat. Seventeen outpatients experiencing acute psychotic episodes were recruited from the community and received an intensive six week home-based treatment package. Additionally eighteen patients with chronic psychotic disorders in remission were recruited either following hospital discharge or from the community. In a second phase of the study, both groups received community-based relapse prevention that differed in the degree of the family’s responsibility for the treatment. The treatment package was comprised of psycho-education, low-dose neuroleptic treatment, monthly home visits and counseling. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS was applied three times. Additionally, we assessed functioning, khat use and other outcomes. Results Of the 35 patients enrolled in the study, 33 participated in the 10-month follow-up. Outpatients improved significantly in the first six weeks of treatment and did not differ from remitted patients at the start of the second treatment phase. In the preventive treatment phase, we find heterogeneous outcomes that diverge between symptom and functioning domains. With the exception of depressive symptoms, symptoms in all patients tended to worsen. The outpatient group had

  1. Role of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy in the treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections in Singapore.

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    Chan, Monica; Ooi, Chee Kheong; Wong, Joshua; Zhong, Lihua; Lye, David

    2017-07-06

    Treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) is a common indication for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in USA, UK and Australasia, however data from Asia are lacking. OPAT is well established within the Singapore healthcare since 2002, however, systematic use of OPAT for the treatment of SSTIs remains infrequent. In this report, we describe the treatment and outcome of patients with SSTIs referred directly from Emergency Department (ED) to OPAT for continuation of intravenous (IV) antibiotics in Singapore, thus avoiding potential hospital admission. This is a single center university hospital retrospective study of patients with SSTIs presenting to ED who were assessed to require IV antibiotics and accepted to the OPAT clinic for continuation of IV treatment. Exclusion criteria were: haemodynamic instability, uncontrolled or serious underlying co-morbidities, necessity for inpatient surgical drainage, facial cellulitis and cephalosporin allergy. Patients returned daily to the hospital’s OPAT clinic for administration of IV antibiotics and review, then switched to oral antibiotics on improvement. From 7 February 2012 to 31 July 2015, 120 patients with SSTIs were treated in OPAT. Median age was 56 years and 63% were male. Lower limbs were affected in 91%. Diabetes was present in 20%. Sixty-seven (56%) had been treated with oral antibiotics for a median duration of 3 days prior to OPAT treatment. Common symptoms were erythema (100%), swelling (96%), pain (88%) and fever (55%). Antibiotics administered were IV cefazolin with oral probenecid (71%) or IV ceftriaxone (29%) for median 3 days then oral cloxacillin (85%) for median 7 days. Clinical improvement occurred in 90%. Twelve patients (10%) were hospitalized for worsening cellulitis, with 4 patients requiring surgical drainage of abscess. Microbiological cultures from 2 patients with drained abscess grew methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Klebsiella

  2. Utilizing a Modified Care Coordination Measurement Tool to Capture Value for a Pediatric Outpatient Parenteral and Prolonged Oral Antibiotic Therapy Program.

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    Vaz, Louise E; Farnstrom, Cindi L; Felder, Kimberly K; Guzman-Cottrill, Judith; Rosenberg, Hannah; Antonelli, Richard C

    2017-04-17

    Outpatient parenteral or prolonged oral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) programs reduce inpatient healthcare costs by shifting care to outpatient settings. Care coordination (CC) is a necessary component to successfully transition patients. Our objective was to assess outcomes of provider time spent on nonreimbursable CC activities in a pediatric OPAT program. We used a qualitative feasibility pilot design and modified the Care Coordination Measurement Tool. We captured nonreimbursable CC activity and associated outcome(s) among pediatric patients enrolled in OPAT from March 1 to April 30, 2015 (44 work days) at Doernbecher Children's Hospital. We generated summary statistics for this institutional review board-waived QI project. There were 154 nonreimbursable CC encounters conducted by 2 infectious diseases (ID) providers for 29 patients, ages 17 months-15 years, with complex infections. Total estimated time spent on CC was 54 hours, equivalent to at least 6 workdays. Five patients with complex social issues used 37% of total CC time. Of 129 phone events, 38% involved direct contact with families, pharmacies (13%), primary care providers (13%), and home health nursing (11%). Care coordination prevented 10 emergency room (ER) visits and 2 readmissions. Care coordination led to 16 additional, not previously scheduled subspecialist and 13 primary care visits. The OPAT providers billed for 32 clinic visits during the study period. Nonreimbursable CC work by OPAT providers prevented readmissions and ER visits and helped facilitate appropriate healthcare use. The value of pediatric OPAT involvement in patient care would have been underestimated based on reimbursable ID consultations and clinic visits alone. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Executive summary of outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy: Guidelines of the Spanish Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Domiciliary Hospitalisation Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Cortés, Luis Eduardo; Mujal Martínez, Abel; Fernández Martínez de Mandojana, Magdalena; Martín, Natalia; Gil Bermejo, Mercè; Solà Aznar, Joan; Villegas Bruguera, Eulalia; Peláez Cantero, Maria José; Retamar Gentil, Pilar; Delgado Vicente, Miriam; González-Ramallo, Víctor José; Ponce González, Miguel Ángel; Mirón Rubio, Manuel; Gómez Rodríguez de Mendarozqueta, M Montserrat; Goenaga Sánchez, Miguel Ángel; Sanroma Mendizábal, Pedro; Delgado Mejía, Elena; Pajarón Guerrero, Marcos

    2018-05-18

    Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) programmes make it possible to start or complete intravenous antimicrobial therapy for practically any type of infection at home, provided that patient selection is appropriate for the type of OPAT programme available. Although the clinical management of infections in the home setting is comparable in many respects to that offered in conventional hospitalization (selection of antibiotics, duration of treatment, etc.), there are many aspects that are specific to this care modality. It is essential to be aware of them so that OPAT continues to be as safe and effective as inpatient care. The objective of this clinical guideline is therefore to provide evidence- and expert-based recommendations with a view to standardizing clinical practice in this care modality and contribute to a progressive increase in the number of patients who can be cared for and receive intravenous therapy in their own homes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeblad, Annika; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Vestberg, Robert; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score <10). The dropout rate was significantly higher in CBT (40%; 19/47) compared to IPT (19%; 8/43). Statistically controlling for antidepressant medication use did not change the results. IPT was noninferior to CBT in a sample of depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Yield of Echocardiogram and Predictors of Positive Yield in Pediatric Patients: A Study in an Urban, Community-Based Outpatient Pediatric Cardiology Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billa, Ramya Deepthi; Szpunar, Susan; Zeinali, Lida; Anne, Premchand

    2018-01-01

    The yield of outpatient echocardiograms varies based on the indication for the echocardiogram and the age of the patient. The purpose of this study was to determine the cumulative yield of outpatient echocardiograms by age group and reason for the test. A secondary aim was to determine the predictors of a positive echocardiogram in an outpatient cardiology clinic at a large community teaching hospital. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of 891 patients who had a first-time echocardiogram between 2011 and 2015. Positive yield was defined as echocardiographic findings that explained the reason for the echocardiogram. The overall positive yield was 8.2%. Children between birth and 3 months of age had the highest yield (34.2%), and children between 12 and 18 years of age had the lowest yield (1%). Patients with murmurs (18.1%) had the highest yield compared with patients with other signs or symptoms. By age group and reason, the highest yields were as follows: 0 to 3 months of age, murmur (39.2%); 4 to 11 months of age, >1 symptom (50%); and 1 to 5 years of age, shortness of breath (66.7%). Based on our study, the overall yield of echocardiograms in the outpatient pediatric setting is low. Age and symptoms should be considered before ordering an echocardiogram.

  6. Parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inayet, N; Neild, P

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 50 years, parenteral nutrition has been recognised as an invaluable and potentially lifesaving tool in the physician's arsenal in the management of patients with intestinal failure or inaccessibility; however, it may also be associated with a number of potentially life-threatening complications. A recent NCEPOD report (2010) identified a number of inadequacies in the overall provision and management of parenteral nutrition and recommendations were made with the aim of improving clinical practice in the future. This paper focuses on the practical aspects relating to parenteral nutrition for adults, including important concepts, such as patient selection, as well as general management. We also explore the various pitfalls and potential complications and how these may be minimised.

  7. An integrated community-based outpatient therapeutic feeding programme for severe acute malnutrition in rural Southern Ethiopia: Recovery, fatality, and nutritional status after discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Elazar; Worku, Amare; Berhane, Yemane; Ekström, Eva-Charlotte

    2018-04-01

    A scaled up and integrated outpatient therapeutic feeding programme (OTP) brings the treatment of severely malnourished children closer to the community. This study assessed recovery from severe acute malnutrition (SAM), fatality, and acute malnutrition up to 14 weeks after admission to a programme integrated in the primary health care system. In this cohort study, 1,048 children admitted to 94 OTPs in Southern Ethiopia were followed for 14 weeks. Independent anthropometric measurements and information on treatment outcome were collected at four home visits. Only 32.7% (248/759) of children with SAM on admission fulfilled the programme recovery criteria at the time of discharge (i.e., gained 15% in weight, or oedema, if present at admission, was resolved at discharge). Of all children admitted to the programme for whom nutritional assessment was done 14 weeks later, 34.6% (321/928) were severely malnourished, and 37.5% (348/928) were moderately malnourished; thus, 72.1% were acutely malnourished. Of the children, 27/982 (2.7%) had died by 14 weeks, of whom all but one had SAM on admission. Children with severe oedema on admission had the highest fatality rate (12.0%, 9/75). The median length of admission to the programme was 6.6 weeks (interquartile range: 5.3, 8.4 weeks). Despite children participating for the recommended duration of the programme, many children with SAM were discharged still acutely malnourished and without reaching programme criteria for recovery. For better outcome of OTP, constraints in service provision by the health system as well as challenges of service utilization by the beneficiaries should be identified and addressed. © 2017 The Authors. Maternal and Child Nutrition Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Total parenteral nutrition - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007239.htm Total parenteral nutrition - infants To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  9. Total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000177.htm Total parenteral nutrition To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a method of feeding that bypasses ...

  10. Home parenteral nutrition in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalousova, J.; Rouskova, B.; Styblova, J.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition delivered at home presents a major improvement in the quality of life of children dependent on long term parenteral nutrition. Indications, technical conditions, logistics, complications, prognosis of home parenteral nutrition as well as some health-care issues to be addressed by pediatric practitioner are summarized. (author)

  11. Community-Based Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Community-Based Care Basic Facts & Information A variety of healthcare options ... day care centers are either in churches or community centers. Adult day care is commonly used to care for people who ...

  12. Anemia e insuficiência cardíaca na comunidade: comparação com um ambulatório especializado Anemia e insuficiencia cardiaca en la comunidad: comparación con un consultorio especializado Anemia and heart failure in a community-based cohort: comparison with a specialized outpatient clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Barcellos dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A anemia é comum em pacientes com insuficiência cardíaca (IC. Sua prevalência em pacientes com IC na comunidade é desconhecida em nosso meio. OBJETIVO: Avaliar a prevalência e características de pacientes com anemia em uma população não selecionada com IC na comunidade, comparando-a a uma população com IC atendida em um ambulatório especializado. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal, prospectivo, observacional, realizado de janeiro de 2006 a março de 2007. Os pacientes com IC preenchiam os critérios de Boston, com pontuação >8. Anemia foi definida pelos critérios da Organização Mundial de Saúde, como valores de hemoglobina FUNDAMENTO: La anemia es común en pacientes con insuficiencia cardiaca (IC. Su prevalencia en pacientes con IC en la comunidad es desconocida en nuestro medio. OBJETIVO: Evaluar la prevalencia y características de pacientes con anemia en una población con IC no seleccionada en la comunidad, comparándola a una población con IC atendida en un consultorio especializado. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal, prospectivo, observacional, realizado de enero de 2006 a marzo de 2007. Los pacientes con IC cumplían los criterios de Boston, con puntuación >8. La anemia fue definida por los criterios de la Organización Mundial de la Salud, como valores de hemoglobina BACKGROUND: Anemia is common in patients with heart failure (HF. Its prevalence in patients with HF from a community-based cohort is unknown in our country. OBJECTIVE: evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of patients with anemia in a non-selected population with HF from a community-based cohort, comparing it with that of a HF population treated at a specialized outpatient clinic. METHODS: This was a transversal, prospective, observational study, carried out from January 2006 to March 2007. The patients with HF met the Boston criteria, with a score > 8. Anemia was defined through the criteria of the World Health Organization as hemoglobin levels

  13. Combined enteral and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernerman, Jan

    2012-03-01

    To review and discuss the evidence and arguments to combine enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition in the ICU, in particular with reference to the Early Parenteral Nutrition Completing Enteral Nutrition in Adult Critically Ill Patients (EPaNIC) study. The EPaNIC study shows an advantage in terms of discharges alive from the ICU when parenteral nutrition is delayed to day 8 as compared with combining enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition from day 3 of ICU stay. The difference between the guidelines from the European Society of Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in Europe and American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition/Society of Critical Care Medicine in North America concerning the combination of enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition during the initial week of ICU stay was reviewed. The EPaNIC study clearly demonstrates that early parenteral nutrition in the ICU is not in the best interests of most patients. Exactly at what time point the combination of enteral nutrition and parenteral nutrition should be considered is still an open question.

  14. Retaining Participants in Outpatient and Community-Based Health Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna H. Odierna

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Loss to follow-up can introduce bias into research, making it difficult to develop inclusive evidence-based health policies and practice guidelines. We aimed to deepen understanding of reasons why participants leave or remain in longitudinal health studies. We interviewed 59 researchers and current and former research participants in six focus groups (n = 55 or interviews (n = 4 at three study centers in a large academic research institution. We used minimally structured interview guides and inductive thematic analysis to explore participant-level, study-level, and contextual participation barriers and facilitators. Four main themes emerged: transportation, incentives and motivation, caregiver concerns, and the social and physical environment. Themes shared crosscutting issues involving funding, flexibility, and relationships between researchers and research participants. Study-level and contextual factors appear to interact with participant characteristics, particularly socioeconomic status and disease severity to affect participant retention. Participants’ characteristics do not seem to be the main cause of study dropout. Researchers and funders might be able to address contextual and study factors in ways that reduce barriers to participation.

  15. Parenteral nutrition in radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glants, R.M.

    1985-01-01

    Basing on the results of experiments on mice and rats and their clinical use in oncological patients treatment recommendations are given on use of parenteral nutrition in treatment of radiation disease

  16. Parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichvarova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition became a routine therapeutic option in malnourished patients, if conventional nutritional enteral support is not effective. Cachexia and malnutrition prolong the wound healing, contribute to immunosuppression, increase morbidity and the cost of treatment. Using of a malnutrition protocol as a screening tool is necessary to sort out malnourished patients. Parenteral nutrition is therefore an important part of the multimodal therapy and from the medical and the ethical point of view is a great mistake not to feed a patient. (author)

  17. Advantages of enteral nutrition over parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Seres, David S.; Valcarcel, Monika; Guillaume, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    It is a strong and commonly held belief among nutrition clinicians that enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. We provide a narrative review of more recent studies and technical reviews comparing enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition. Despite significant weaknesses in the existing data, current literature continues to support the use of enteral nutrition in patients requiring nutrition support, over parenteral nutrition.

  18. Community-based recreational football

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Ditte Marie; Bjerre, Eik; Krustrup, Peter

    2014-01-01

    is limited and the majority of prostate cancer survivors remain sedentary. Hence, novel approaches to evaluate and promote physical activity are warranted. This paper presents the rationale behind the delivery and evaluation of community-based recreational football offered in existing football clubs under...... the Danish Football Association to promote quality of life and physical activity adherence in prostate cancer survivors. The RE-AIM framework will be applied to evaluate the impact of the intervention including outcomes both at the individual and organizational level. By introducing community-based sport...

  19. Reconsidering Community-based Retailing

    OpenAIRE

    Maughan, Rebecca; O'Driscoll, Aidan

    2012-01-01

    One of the areas with great potential for economic, social and environmental benefit is community-based retailing. The concept of community based retailing can incorporate a number of different tenets. We suggest that it is retailing that is based close to the community it serves, usually within the town or village centre rather than out-of-town locations, and which is composed of a diverse range of small and medium sized business that are often independently or co-operatively owned. These co...

  20. Formation of community-based hypertension practice networks: success, obstacles, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Richard A; Egan, Brent M

    2014-06-01

    Community-based practice networks for research and improving the quality of care are growing in size and number but have variable success rates. In this paper, the authors review recent efforts to initiate a community-based hypertension network modeled after the successful Outpatient Quality Improvement Network (O'QUIN) project, located at the Medical University of South Carolina. Key lessons learned and new directions to be explored are highlighted. ©2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Parenteral nutrition in intestinal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurkchubasche AG

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Arlet G Kurkchubasche,1 Thomas J Herron,2 Marion F Winkler31Department of Surgery and Pediatrics, 2Department of Surgery, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 3Department of Surgery/Nutritional Support Service, Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Intestinal failure is a consequence of extensive surgical resection resulting in anatomic loss and/or functional impairment in motility or absorptive capacity. The condition is clinically characterized by the inability to maintain fluid, energy, protein, electrolyte, or micronutrient balance when on a conventionally accepted, normal diet. Parenteral nutrition (PN is the cornerstone of management until intestinal adaptation returns the patient to a PN-independent state. Intestinal length, residual anatomic segments and motility determine the need for and duration of parenteral support. The goals of therapy are to provide sufficient nutrients to enable normal growth and development in children, and support a healthy functional status in adults. This review addresses indications for PN, the formulation of the PN solution, patient monitoring, and considerations for prevention of PN-associated complications. With the ultimate goal of achieving enteral autonomy, the important role of diet, pharmacologic interventions, and surgery is discussed.Keywords: intestinal failure, short-bowel syndrome, parenteral nutrition, home nutrition support, intestinal rehabilitation

  2. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: gastroenterology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A., Van Gossum; Cabre, E.; Hebuterne, X.

    2009-01-01

    . There is a lack of data supporting specific nutrients in these conditions. Parenteral nutrition is mandatory in case of intestinal failure, at least in the acute period. In patients with short bowel, specific attention should be paid to water and electrolyte supplementation. Currently, the use of growth hormone......-based recommendations for the indications, application and type of parenteral formula to be used in acute and chronic phases of illness. Parenteral nutrition is not recommended as a primary treatment in CD and UC. The use of parenteral nutrition is however reliable when oral/enteral feeding is not possible...

  3. Parenteral Nutrition in Liver Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Chiarla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Albeit a very large number of experiments have assessed the impact of various substrates on liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, a limited number of clinical studies have evaluated artificial nutrition in liver resection patients. This is a peculiar topic because many patients do not need artificial nutrition, while several patients need it because of malnutrition and/or prolonged inability to feeding caused by complications. The optimal nutritional regimen to support liver regeneration, within other postoperative problems or complications, is not yet exactly defined. This short review addresses relevant aspects and potential developments in the issue of postoperative parenteral nutrition after liver resection.

  4. Outpatient management of pediatric acute mastoiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Ahmed; Morin, Francis; Aziz, Haya; Manogaran, Mayuri; Guertin, William; Duval, Melanie

    2017-11-01

    Evaluate the Montreal Children's Hospital experience with outpatient management of uncomplicated acute mastoiditis with parenteral antibiotic therapy alone and determine if it is a safe alternative to inpatient management. A retrospective review of pediatric patients diagnosed with acute mastoiditis at a tertiary care pediatric hospital between 2013 and 2015 was performed. Patients with syndromes, immunodeficiency, cholesteatoma, chronic otitis media, cochlear implant in the affected ear, or incidental mastoid opacity were excluded. 56 children age 6 months to 15 years old were treated for acute mastoiditis, including 29 hospitalizations and 27 outpatients. Patients managed as outpatient with daily intravenous ceftriaxone had a 93% cure rate. Eighteen hospitalized and one outpatient had complications of acute mastoiditis. Children with complications were more likely to be febrile (p = 0.045). Two patients failed outpatient therapy and were admitted; one for myringotomy and piperacillin-tazobactam treatment and one required a mastoidectomy. 4/27 children treated as outpatient underwent myringotomy and tube insertion, 2 underwent myringotomy and tube along with admission and 21 did not require tube insertion. The average total duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy was respectively 4.9 and 18.9 days in the outpatient and hospitalized group. The average duration of admission was 5.9 days. Outpatient medical therapy of uncomplicated pediatric mastoiditis is safe, successful, and efficient. Benefits include efficient use of surgical beds, cost savings and patient and family convenience. Careful patient selection and close monitoring are keys for successful outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Parenteral nutrition in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, Jan; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-04-01

    Feeding guidelines have recommended early, full nutritional support in critically ill patients to prevent hypercatabolism and muscle weakness. Early enteral nutrition was suggested to be superior to early parenteral nutrition. When enteral nutrition fails to meet nutritional target, it was recommended to administer supplemental parenteral nutrition, albeit with a varying starting point. Sufficient amounts of amino acids were recommended, with addition of glutamine in subgroups. Recently, several large randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have yielded important new insights. This review summarizes recent evidence with regard to the indication, timing, and dosing of parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients. One large RCT revealed no difference between early enteral nutrition and early parenteral nutrition. Two large multicenter RCTs showed harm by early supplementation of insufficient enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition, which could be explained by feeding-induced suppression of autophagy. Several RCTs found either no benefit or harm with a higher amino acid or caloric intake, as well as harm by administration of glutamine. Although unanswered questions remain, current evidence supports accepting low macronutrient intake during the acute phase of critical illness and does not support use of early parenteral nutrition. The timing when parenteral nutrition can be initiated safely and effectively is unclear.

  6. 21 CFR 201.323 - Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals... for Specific Drug Products § 201.323 Aluminum in large and small volume parenterals used in total parenteral nutrition. (a) The aluminum content of large volume parenteral (LVP) drug products used in total...

  7. Pulmonary nodules secondary to total parenteral alimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landry, B.A.; Melhem, R.E.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-year-old male, who had a retroperitoneal alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and was on total parenteral alimentation (TPN) developed muliple pulmonary nodules, indistinguishable from metastases. These proved to be multiple lipid emboli on open biopsy. (orig.)

  8. Prolonged parenteral nutrition after neonatal gastrointestinal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Estmann, Anne; Qvist, Niels; Husby, Steffen

    2002-01-01

    to diagnosis and clinical course. METHODOLOGY: This study reviews the clinical course of infants with gastrointestinal disease (gastroschisis, intestinal atresia, omphalocele, volvulus, Hirschsprung's disease and necrotizing enterocolitis) with a prolonged need for parenteral nutrition in the Western part...

  9. Parenteral nutrition in the elderly cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrevall, Ylva

    2015-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition may be considered when oral intake and/or enteral nutrition are not sufficient to maintain nutritional status and the patient is likely to die sooner from starvation than from the cancer. A detailed assessment should be made prior to the decision about whether parenteral nutrition should be started. A follow up plan should be documented with objective and patient centred treatment goals as well as specific time points for evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Parenteral Nutrition and Intestinal Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielawska, Barbara; Allard, Johane P

    2017-05-06

    Severe short bowel syndrome (SBS) is a major cause of chronic (Type 3) intestinal failure (IF) where structural and functional changes contribute to malabsorption and risk of micronutrient deficiencies. Chronic IF may be reversible, depending on anatomy and intestinal adaptation, but most patients require long-term nutritional support, generally in the form of parenteral nutrition (PN). SBS management begins with dietary changes and pharmacologic therapies taking into account individual anatomy and physiology, but these are rarely sufficient to avoid PN. New hormonal therapies targeting intestinal adaptation hold promise. Surgical options for SBS including intestinal transplant are available, but have significant limitations. Home PN (HPN) is therefore the mainstay of treatment for severe SBS. HPN involves chronic administration of macronutrients, micronutrients, fluid, and electrolytes via central venous access in the patient's home. HPN requires careful clinical and biochemical monitoring. Main complications of HPN are related to venous access (infection, thrombosis) and metabolic complications including intestinal failure associated liver disease (IFALD). Although HPN significantly impacts quality of life, outcomes are generally good and survival is mostly determined by the underlying disease. As chronic intestinal failure is a rare disease, registries are a promising strategy for studying HPN patients to improve outcomes.

  11. Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral

    OpenAIRE

    J Salas Salvado; A Recaséns Garica

    1993-01-01

    Liver disorders induced by parenteral nutrition Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral Liver disorders induced by parenteral nutrition Alteraciones hepáticas inducidas por la nutrición parenteral

  12. Gender Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... Responsive Community Based Planning and Budgeting Tool for Local Governance ... in data collection, and another module that facilitates gender responsive and ... In partnership with UNESCO's Organization for Women in Science for the ...

  13. Total parenteral nutrition - Problems in compatibility and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroder, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Adding calcium, trace elements and vitamins could turn parenteral nutrition into a dangerous product, which could harm the patient. This article focuses on the major pharmaceutical problems of parenteral. nutrition when adding nutritional compounds Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  14. Community-based knowledge translation: unexplored opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong Rebecca

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge translation is an interactive process of knowledge exchange between health researchers and knowledge users. Given that the health system is broad in scope, it is important to reflect on how definitions and applications of knowledge translation might differ by setting and focus. Community-based organizations and their practitioners share common characteristics related to their setting, the evidence used in this setting, and anticipated outcomes that are not, in our experience, satisfactorily reflected in current knowledge translation approaches, frameworks, or tools. Discussion Community-based organizations face a distinctive set of challenges and concerns related to engaging in the knowledge translation process, suggesting a unique perspective on knowledge translation in these settings. Specifically, community-based organizations tend to value the process of working in collaboration with multi-sector stakeholders in order to achieve an outcome. A feature of such community-based collaborations is the way in which 'evidence' is conceptualized or defined by these partners, which may in turn influence the degree to which generalizable research evidence in particular is relevant and useful when balanced against more contextually-informed knowledge, such as tacit knowledge. Related to the issues of evidence and context is the desire for local information. For knowledge translation researchers, developing processes to assist community-based organizations to adapt research findings to local circumstances may be the most helpful way to advance decision making in this area. A final characteristic shared by community-based organizations is involvement in advocacy activities, a function that has been virtually ignored in traditional knowledge translation approaches. Summary This commentary is intended to stimulate further discussion in the area of community-based knowledge translation. Knowledge translation, and exchange

  15. Use of parenteral testosterone in hypospadias cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Satav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim was to evaluate the effect of parenteral testosterone on penile length, preputial hood, vascularity of dartos pedicle in patients with hypospadias. Materials and Methods: A total of 42 patients with hypospadias were included in this study. Injection aquaviron (oily solution each ml containing testosterone propionate 25 mg was given deep intramuscularly in three doses with an interval of 3 weeks before reconstructive surgery at the dose of 2 mg/kg body weight. Preoperatively penile length, transverse preputial width and diameter at the base of the penis were measured. Basal testosterone levels were obtained before the institution of therapy and on the day of operation. Results: Following parenteral testosterone administration, the mean increase in penile length, transverse preputial width and diameter at the base of penis was 1.01 ± 0.25 cm (P < 0.001, 1.250 ± 0.52 cm and 0.61 ± 0.35 cm, respectively, (P < 0.001. Serum testosterone level after injection was well within normal range for that age. Conclusion: Parenteral testosterone increased phallus size, diameter and prepuce hypertrophy without any adverse effects. However, due to lack of a control group we cannot make any inferences. Controlled studies are required to establish the benefits of parenteral testosterone.

  16. Solid lipid nanoparticles for parenteral drug delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wissing, S.A.; Kayser, Oliver; Muller, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    This review describes the use of nanoparticles based on solid lipids for the parenteral application of drugs. Firstly, different types of nanoparticles based on solid lipids such as "solid lipid nanoparticles" (SLN), "nanostructured lipid carriers" (NLC) and "lipid drug conjugate" (LDC)

  17. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stawny

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient’s energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them.

  18. Pharmaceutical Point of View on Parenteral Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawny, M.; Olijarczyk, R.; Jaroszkiewicz, E.; Jelińska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition—a form of administering nutrients, electrolytes, trace elements, vitamins, and water—is a widely used mode of therapy applied in many diseases, in patients of different ages both at home and in hospital. The success of nutritional therapy depends chiefly on proper determination of the patient's energetic and electrolytic needs as well as preparation and administration of a safe nutritional mixture. As a parenterally administered drug, it is expected to be microbiologically and physicochemically stable, with all of the components compatible with each other. It is very difficult to obtain a stable nutritional mixture due to the fact that it is a complex, two-phase drug. Also, the risk of incompatibility between mixture components and packaging should be taken into consideration and possibly eliminated. Since parenteral nutrition is a part of therapy, simultaneous use of drugs may cause pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions as well as those with the pharmaceutical phase. The aim of this paper is to discuss such aspects of parenteral nutrition as mixture stability, methodology, and methods for determining the stability of nutritional mixtures and drugs added to them. PMID:24453847

  19. Chemical Incompatibility of Parenteral Drug Admixtures

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-21

    Sep 21, 1974 ... made of a single drug injection at a separate locus. S. Afr. Med. J., 48, 1951 ... and nursing staff with the difficulties of administering safe parenteral ... needle and infusion bottle, but this practice is not common in South Africa.

  20. Early versus Late Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivez, Tom; Kerklaan, Dorian; Mesotten, Dieter; Verbruggen, Sascha; Wouters, Pieter J; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Debaveye, Yves; Vlasselaers, Dirk; Desmet, Lars; Casaer, Michael P; Garcia Guerra, Gonzalo; Hanot, Jan; Joffe, Ari; Tibboel, Dick; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2016-03-24

    Recent trials have questioned the benefit of early parenteral nutrition in adults. The effect of early parenteral nutrition on clinical outcomes in critically ill children is unclear. We conducted a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial involving 1440 critically ill children to investigate whether withholding parenteral nutrition for 1 week (i.e., providing late parenteral nutrition) in the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) is clinically superior to providing early parenteral nutrition. Fluid loading was similar in the two groups. The two primary end points were new infection acquired during the ICU stay and the adjusted duration of ICU dependency, as assessed by the number of days in the ICU and as time to discharge alive from ICU. For the 723 patients receiving early parenteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition was initiated within 24 hours after ICU admission, whereas for the 717 patients receiving late parenteral nutrition, parenteral nutrition was not provided until the morning of the 8th day in the ICU. In both groups, enteral nutrition was attempted early and intravenous micronutrients were provided. Although mortality was similar in the two groups, the percentage of patients with a new infection was 10.7% in the group receiving late parenteral nutrition, as compared with 18.5% in the group receiving early parenteral nutrition (adjusted odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.66). The mean (±SE) duration of ICU stay was 6.5±0.4 days in the group receiving late parenteral nutrition, as compared with 9.2±0.8 days in the group receiving early parenteral nutrition; there was also a higher likelihood of an earlier live discharge from the ICU at any time in the late-parenteral-nutrition group (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.37). Late parenteral nutrition was associated with a shorter duration of mechanical ventilatory support than was early parenteral nutrition (P=0.001), as well as a smaller proportion of patients

  1. [Domiciliary parenteral antibiotic therapy: a prospective analysis of the last 12 years].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez Cantero, M J; Madrid Rodríguez, A; Urda Cardona, A L; Jurado Ortiz, A

    2014-08-01

    Parenteral antibiotic treatment has been classically developed in hospitals and is considered as a hospital procedure. The development of Hospital at Home Units (HHU) has led to an increase in outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in paediatrics patients. The objective of this study is to describe our experience, as an HHU integrated within a Paediatric Department, in home antimicrobial therapy over a period of 12 years. This prospective and descriptive study included every patient with a disease requiring parenteral antimicrobial therapy who was admitted to our HHU from January 2000 to December 2012. During the study there were 163 cases on OPAT. The mean age of the patients was 11.1 years, and the sample group was comprised of 33 males and 22 feamales. The main sources of the treated infections were respiratory tract (76%), catheter-related bloodstream (9.2%), and urinary tract infections (5.5%). Amikacin was the most widely used antibiotic. Almost all treatments (96.6%) were via an intravenous route. Catheter-associated complications were more common than drug-associated complications. Successful at-home treatment was observed in 90.2% of cases. OPAT is a good and safe alternative in many paediatric diseases. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Community-based natural resource management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treue, Thorsten; Nathan, Iben

    that deliver credible and easily accessible information. Checks and balances can be supported through civil society as well as the media. Finally, the private sector plays a key and potentially beneficial role in the harvest, transport and marketing of CBNRM products. Thus, dialogue partners should include......This technical note is the product of a long process of consultation with a wide range of resource persons who have over the years been involved in the Danish support to Community Based Natural Resource Management. It gives a brief introduction to community-based natural resource management (CBNRM...... from CBNRM will be useful when designing community-based climate adaptation strategies. Thus, this note is a contribution to an ongoing debate as well as a product of the long-standing experiences of Danida's environmental portfolio. CBNRM is not a stand-alone solution to secure poverty reduction...

  3. Community Based Networks and 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Idongesit

    2016-01-01

    The deployment of previous wireless standards has provided more benefits for urban dwellers than rural dwellers. 5G deployment may not be different. This paper identifies that Community Based Networks as carriers that deserve recognition as potential 5G providers may change this. The argument....... The findings indicate that 5G connectivity can be extended to rural areas by these networks, via heterogenous networks. Hence the delivery of 5G data rates delivery via Wireless WAN in rural areas can be achieved by utilizing the causal factors of the identified models for Community Based Networks....

  4. Community-based health insurance knowledge, concern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-based health insurance knowledge, concern, preferences, and financial planning for health care among informal sector workers in a health district of Douala, Cameroon. ... This is mainly due to the lack of awareness and limited knowledge on the basic concepts of a CBHI by this target population. Solidarity ...

  5. Facilitating community-based interprofessional education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Facilitating community-based interprofessional education and collaborative practice in a health sciences faculty: Student perceptions and experiences. ... It became apparent that students need to be prepared to work in interprofessional groups. The overall intervention was perceived positively, allowing students to become ...

  6. Participation in community based natural resource management ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was on participation in Community Based Natural Resource Management Programme (CBNRMP) and its socio-economic effect on rural families in Ikwerre Area, Rivers State Nigeria. A structured questionnaire was administered to 60 beneficiaries of the programme. Data collected were subjected to descriptive ...

  7. MRI in children receiving total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaghebeur, G.; Taylor, W.J.; Kingsley, D.P.E.; Fell, J.M.E.; Reynolds, A.P.; Milla, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Cranial MRI was obtained in 13 of a group of 57 children receiving long-term parenteral nutrition, who were being investigated for hypermanganasaemia. Increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images has been reported in adult patients on long-term parenteral nutrition and with encephalopathy following chronic manganese exposure in arc welding. It has been postulated that these changes are due to deposition of the paramagnetic trace element manganese. In excess manganese is hepato- and neurotoxic and we present the correlation of whole blood manganese levels with imaging findings. The age range of our patients was 6 months to 10 years, and the duration of therapy 3 months to 10 years. In 7 children we found characteristic increased signal intensity on T1-weighted images, with no abnormality on T2-weighted images. All patients had elevated whole blood manganese levels, suggesting that the basis for this abnormality is indeed deposition of manganese within the tissues. (orig.). With 3 figs

  8. Taurolidine in Pediatric Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulshof, Emma Claire; Hanff, Lidwien Marieke; Olieman, Joanne; de Vette, Susanna; Driessen, Gert-Jan; Meeussen, Conny; Escher, Johanna Caroline

    2017-02-01

    To reduce the incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infections in home parenteral nutrition patients, the use of taurolidine was introduced in the Sophia Children's Hospital in 2011. This introduction led to a reduction in catheter-related bloodstream infections: 12.7/1000 catheter days before the use of taurolidine, compared with 4.3/1000 catheter days afterwards (n = 7) [relative risk = 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.20-0.65 (P = 0.018)].

  9. Plasma trace metals during total parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, N W; Layden, T J; Rosenberg, I H; Vo-Khactu, K; Sandstead, H H

    1976-06-01

    The plasma concentrations of the trace metals zinc and copper were studied prospectively in 13 patients with gastrointestinal diseases treated with parenteral alimentation (TPA) for periods of from 8 days to 7 1/2 weeks. Plasma copper levels fell rapidly and consistently in all patients, with an overall rate of - 11 mug per 100 ml per week. Zinc concentrations declined in 10 of 13 patients at a more gradual rate. Analysis of the standard parenteral alimentation fluids revealed zinc content equivalent to 50% of the daily requirement and a negligible content of copper. From combined analysis of plasma zinc, hair zinc, and taste acuity, there is evidence that increased utilization or redistribution within the body may effect plasma concentrations in some patients. Neither an increase in urinary excretion nor a primary decrease in plasma binding proteins appeared to be a major factor in lowering plasma trace metal concentrations. These findings indicate that a marked decrease in plasma copper is regular and a decline in plasma zinc is common during TPA using fluids unsupplemented with trace metals. Supplementation of parenteral alimentation fluids with the trace metals zinc and copper is recommended.

  10. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A.; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P.; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2012-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction. PMID:23016123

  11. Steroidal compounds in commercial parenteral lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhidong; Harvey, Kevin A; Pavlina, Thomas; Dutot, Guy; Hise, Mary; Zaloga, Gary P; Siddiqui, Rafat A

    2012-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn(®) II, Liposyn(®) III, Lipofundin(®) MCT, Lipofundin(®) N, Structolipid(®), Intralipid(®), Ivelip(®) and ClinOleic(®). Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  12. Steroidal Compounds in Commercial Parenteral Lipid Emulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat A. Siddiqui

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions made from various plant oils contain steroidal compounds, called phytosterols. During parenteral administration of lipid emulsions, phytosterols can reach levels in the blood that are many fold higher than during enteral administration. The elevated phytosterol levels have been associated with the development of liver dysfunction and the rare development of liver failure. There is limited information available in the literature related to phytosterol concentrations in lipid emulsions. The objective of the current study was to validate an assay for steroidal compounds found in lipid emulsions and to compare their concentrations in the most commonly used parenteral nutrition lipid emulsions: Liposyn® II, Liposyn® III, Lipofundin® MCT, Lipofundin® N, Structolipid®, Intralipid®, Ivelip® and ClinOleic®. Our data demonstrates that concentrations of the various steroidal compounds varied greatly between the eight lipid emulsions, with the olive oil-based lipid emulsion containing the lowest levels of phytosterols and cholesterol, and the highest concentration of squalene. The clinical impression of greater incidences of liver dysfunction with soybean versus MCT/LCT and olive/soy lipid emulsions may be reflective of the levels of phytosterols in these emulsions. This information may help guide future studies and clinical care of patients with lipid emulsion-associated liver dysfunction.

  13. Total parenteral nutrition in diabetic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norcross, E.D.; Stein, T.P.

    1986-01-01

    Parenteral Nutrition with hypertonic glucose is frequently given to diabetic patients. Large amounts of insulin can be required. The purpose of this investigation was to develop a totally parenterally nourished diabetic rat model. 200 g Female Sprague Dawley rats were made diabetic by i.v. injection of streptozotocin (50 mg/kg). Rats were then allowed to recover for at least 1 week before undergoing surgical insertion of a central venous catheter for parenteral feeding. TPN was begun 3 days after surgery. Prior to this they were allowed unlimited access to food and water. Control (non-streptozotocin treated) rats were run at the same time. Protein turnover was investigated by using 15 N glycine. Preliminary results: diabetic rats given mostly fat as a calorie source survived well in the absence of exogenous insulin whereas those that were given glucose only as their non-protein calorie source showed poor survival even with exogenous insulin. N balance and protein turnover in the lipid treated diabetic rats were comparable to the non-diabetic control rats

  14. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Prescribing: The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenter, Peggi; Boullata, Joseph I; Ayers, Phil; Gervasio, Jane; Malone, Ainsley; Raymond, Erica; Holcombe, Beverly; Kraft, Michael; Sacks, Gordon; Seres, David

    2015-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provision is complex, as it is a high-alert medication and prone to a variety of potential errors. With changes in clinical practice models and recent federal rulings, the number of PN prescribers may be increasing. Safe prescribing of this therapy requires that competency for prescribers from all disciplines be demonstrated using a standardized process. A standardized model for PN prescribing competency is proposed based on a competency framework, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.)-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines. This framework will guide institutions and agencies in developing and maintaining competency for safe PN prescription by their staff. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Impact of Early Parenteral Nutrition on Metabolism and Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Gunst, Jan; Vanhorebeek, Ilse; Casaer, Michaël P.; Hermans, Greet; Wouters, Pieter J.; Dubois, Jasperina; Claes, Kathleen; Schetz, Miet; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2013-01-01

    A poor nutritional state and a caloric deficit associate with increased morbidity and mortality, but a recent multicenter, randomized controlled trial found that early parenteral nutrition to supplement insufficient enteral nutrition increases morbidity in the intensive care unit, including prolonging the duration of renal replacement therapy, compared with withholding parenteral nutrition for 1 week. Whether early versus late parenteral nutrition impacts the incidence and recovery of AKI is ...

  17. Community-based wetland comanagement in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood, D.B.

    2009-01-01

    Metadata only record This chapter explains new solutions to problems resulting from top-down approaches to resource conservation and sustainability. The management of natural resources - in this case, wetlands - is complicated and risky. To address the risks involved with resource management, a case study was done in Bangladesh to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based comanagement. Using multidisciplinary approaches and adaptive management strategies, the Management of Aquatic Ecos...

  18. Functional outcomes of community-based brain injury rehabilitation clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Christine; Dorstyn, Diana; Polychronis, Con; Denson, Linley

    2015-01-01

    Community-based rehabilitation can help to maximize function following acquired brain injury (ABI); however, data on treatment outcome is limited in quantity. To describe and evaluate client outcomes of an outpatient programme for adults with moderate-to-severe traumatic and non-traumatic ABI. Two phase design involving retrospective and longitudinal study of programme completers with ABI (n = 47). Changes in functioning were measured with the Mayo-Portland Inventory (MPAI-4), administered pre- and immediately post-rehabilitation and at 3 years follow-up. Self-ratings were supplemented with MPAI-4 data from significant others (n = 32) and staff (n = 32). Injured individuals and informants reported improved physical and psychosocial functioning immediately following the completion of community rehabilitation, with medium-to-large and significant treatment gains noted on the MPAI-4 ability, adjustment and participation sub-scales (Cohen's d range = 0.31-1.10). A deterioration in individuals' adjustment was further reported at follow-up, although this was based on limited data. Issues with longer-term rehabilitation service provision were additionally noted. The data support the need for continuity of care, including ongoing emotional support, to cater to the complex and dynamic needs of the ABI population. However, these results need to be considered in the context of a small sample size and quasi-experimental design.

  19. Amino acid composition in parenteral nutrition: what is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarandi, Shadi S.; Zhao, Vivian M.; Hebbar, Gautam; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review Complete parenteral nutrition solutions contain mixed amino acid products providing all nine essential amino acids and a varying composition of nonessential amino acids. Relatively little rigorous comparative efficacy research on altered parenteral nutrition amino acid composition has been published in recent years. Recent findings Limited data from randomized, double-blind, adequately powered clinical trials to define optimal doses of total or individual amino acids in parenteral nutrition are available. An exception is the growing number of studies on the efficacy of glutamine supplementation of parenteral nutrition or given as a single parenteral agent. Parenteral glutamine appears to confer benefit in selected patients; however, additional data to define optimal glutamine dosing and the patient subgroups who may most benefit from this amino acid are needed. Although some promising studies have been published, little data are available in the current era of nutrition support on the clinical efficacy of altered doses of arginine, branched chain amino acids, cysteine, or taurine supplementation of parenteral nutrition. Summary Despite routine use of parenteral nutrition, surprisingly little clinical efficacy data are available to guide total or specific amino acid dosing in adult and pediatric patients requiring this therapy. This warrants increased attention by the research community and funding agencies to better define optimal amino acid administration strategies in patient subgroups requiring parenteral nutrition. PMID:21076291

  20. Severe Hypothyroidism From Iodine Deficiency Associated With Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golekoh, Marjorie C; Cole, Conrad R; Jones, Nana-Hawa Yayah

    2016-11-01

    Parenteral nutrition is crucial for supply of nutrients in children who cannot tolerate a full enteral diet. In the United States, it is not standard of care to give iodine to children dependent on parenteral nutrition, hence iodine is not routinely included in the micronutrient package. Herein, we present a case of a boy with hypothyroidism secondary to iodine deficiency after prolonged exclusive use of parenteral nutrition. Our case highlights the importance of screening for iodine deficiency and administering timely iodine supplementation in these at-risk children to prevent iatrogenic hypothyroidism. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. Improving information for community-based adaptation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huq, Saleemul

    2011-10-15

    Community-based adaptation aims to empower local people to cope with and plan for the impacts of climate change. In a world where knowledge equals power, you could be forgiven for thinking that enabling this type of adaptation boils down to providing local people with information. Conventional approaches to planning adaptation rely on 'expert' advice and credible 'science' from authoritative information providers such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. But to truly support the needs of local communities, this information needs to be more site-specific, more user-friendly and more inclusive of traditional knowledge and existing coping practices.

  2. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - national data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical...

  3. Outpatient Imaging Efficiency - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Use of medical imaging - state data. These measures give you information about hospitals' use of medical imaging tests for outpatients. Examples of medical imaging...

  4. Community-based faculty: motivation and rewards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulkerson, P K; Wang-Cheng, R

    1997-02-01

    The reasons why practicing physicians precept students in their offices, and the rewards they wish to receive for this work, have not been clearly elucidated. This study determined the reasons for precepting and the rewards expected among a network of preceptors in Milwaukee. A questionnaire was mailed to 120 community-based physician preceptors in a required, third-year ambulatory care clerkship. Respondents were asked to identify why they volunteered and what they considered appropriate recognition or reward. The personal satisfaction derived from the student-teacher interaction was, by far, the most important motivator for preceptors (84%). The most preferred rewards for teaching included clinical faculty appointment, CME and bookstore discounts, computer networking, and workshops for improving skills in clinical teaching. Community-based private physicians who participate in medical student education programs are primarily motivated by the personal satisfaction that they derive from the teaching encounter. An effective preceptor recognition/reward program can be developed using input from the preceptors themselves.

  5. Social capital, community-based governance and resilience in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the Mozambique government policy promotes community-based fisheries management in artisanal fisheries, we argue that under current conditions of ineffective community-based governance, a strong focus on reconstruction of social capital will be required before a community-based resource management process ...

  6. Zinc: physiology, deficiency, and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Callum

    2015-06-01

    The essential trace element zinc (Zn) has a large number of physiologic roles, in particular being required for growth and functioning of the immune system. Adaptive mechanisms enable the body to maintain normal total body Zn status over a wide range of intakes, but deficiency can occur because of reduced absorption or increased gastrointestinal losses. Deficiency impairs physiologic processes, leading to clinical consequences that include failure to thrive, skin rash, and impaired wound healing. Mild deficiency that is not clinically overt may still cause nonspecific consequences, such as susceptibility to infection and poor growth. The plasma Zn concentration has poor sensitivity and specificity as a test of deficiency. Consequently, diagnosis of deficiency requires a combination of clinical assessment and biochemical tests. Patients receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) are susceptible to Zn deficiency and its consequences. Nutrition support teams should have a strategy for assessing Zn status and optimizing this by appropriate supplementation. Nutrition guidelines recommend generous Zn provision from the start of PN. This review covers the physiology of Zn, the consequences of its deficiency, and the assessment of its status, before discussing its role in PN. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  7. Home parenteral nutrition in children: the Polish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksiazyk, J; Lyszkowska, M; Kierkus, J; Bogucki, K; Ratyńska, A; Tondys, B; Socha, J

    1999-02-01

    Home parenteral nutrition has become routine for management of intestinal failure in patients. In Poland the main obstacle to widespread use of home parenteral nutrition is the lack of interest of commercial companies in delivering feedings and ancillaries to patients. Twenty-five home parenteral nutrition patients aged from 4 months to more than 13 years were reviewed. The mother or both parents were trained in home parenteral nutrition techniques for 4 to 6 weeks and compounded the nutrients themselves at home. The mean duration of home parenteral nutrition was 10,117 patient days. Hospital stays of patients receiving parenteral feedings were significantly shorter than the duration of administration of home parenteral nutrition (p rate of catheter occlusion decreased within the observation period, and in 1997 not one case of occlusion was observed. In 1997 only three catheters were removed during 7.8 patient years, and the overall incidence of catheter-related complications was 0.38 per patient year. The overall occurrence of septicemia was one case in 516 days and of catheter infection was one in 459 days. In 1997 a catheter was infected on average of once every 1419 days. There was significant improvement in the z score for weight during therapy. The average monthly cost of nutrients and ancillary items was approximately $1200 (4200 Polish zlotys [PLN]). These costs are 1.6 to 3 times lower than those recorded in other studies. Home parenteral nutrition in children with nutrients mixed by caregivers in the home setting is a safe and appropriate method of treatment that can be used in countries where home parenteral nutrition solutions are not manufactured or where commercial home parenteral nutrition is not economically feasible.

  8. The cost of assisted outpatient treatment: can it save states money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jeffrey W; Van Dorn, Richard A; Swartz, Marvin S; Robbins, Pamela Clark; Steadman, Henry J; McGuire, Thomas G; Monahan, John

    2013-12-01

    The authors assessed a state's net costs for assisted outpatient treatment, a controversial court-ordered program of community-based mental health services designed to improve outcomes for persons with serious mental illness and a history of repeated hospitalizations attributable to nonadherence with outpatient treatment. A comprehensive cost analysis was conducted using 36 months of observational data for 634 assisted outpatient treatment participants and 255 voluntary recipients of intensive community-based treatment in New York City and in five counties elsewhere in New York State. Administrative, budgetary, and service claims data were used to calculate and summarize costs for program administration, legal and court services, mental health and other medical treatment, and criminal justice involvement. Adjusted effects of assisted outpatient treatment and voluntary intensive services on total service costs were examined using multivariate time-series regression analysis. In the New York City sample, net costs declined 43% in the first year after assisted outpatient treatment began and an additional 13% in the second year. In the five-county sample, costs declined 49% in the first year and an additional 27% in the second year. Psychotropic drug costs increased during the first year after initiation of assisted outpatient treatment, by 40% and 44% in the city and five-county samples, respectively. Regression analyses revealed significant declines in costs associated with both assisted outpatient treatment and voluntary participation in intensive services, although the cost declines associated with assisted outpatient treatment were about twice as large as those seen for voluntary services. Assisted outpatient treatment requires a substantial investment of state resources but can reduce overall service costs for persons with serious mental illness. For those who do not qualify for assisted outpatient treatment, voluntary participation in intensive community-based

  9. Effectiveness and tolerability of parenteral testosterone undecanoate: a post-marketing surveillance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Jan; Keipert, Dieter; Motazedi, Heiko; Ernst, Michael; Nettleship, Joanne; Gooren, Louis

    2017-12-01

    This observational post-marketing study of parenteral testosterone undecanoate (TU) in a non-selected population aimed to: examine the effectiveness of TU as treatment of hypogonadism; record adverse drug reactions (ADR) quantitatively particularly regarding polycythemia, prostate safety and cardiovascular-related metabolic risk factors; and verify whether recommended injection intervals apply to routine clinical practice. Eight hundred and seventy subjects from 259 outpatient units scheduled to visit the clinic six times were included. Effectiveness and tolerability of TU administration were assessed on a 4-point scale. Body weight, waist girth, blood pressure, hemoglobin levels, hematocrit, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), and digital rectal prostate examination were assessed. Over 90% of subjects completed the observational duration of 52.8 ± 9.7 weeks (mean ± SD) and 56% judged effectiveness as very good, 30.8% as good. 63.1% judged tolerability as very good, and 24.4% as good. No adverse effects on indicators of cardiovascular risk were observed. Polycythemia occurred in one subject and a supranormal hematocrit in one subject. Four subjects developed supranormal PSA levels. Prostate carcinoma was found in one subject, one subject had recurrence of a previously surgically treated prostate carcinoma, and the other two showed no indication of malignancy. Parenteral TU is safe, effective, and well-tolerated in clinical practice proving a good therapeutic option for hypogonadism.

  10. COMMUNITY BASED HOME ENERGY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Adnan Aziz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In a Smart Grid (SG scenario, domestic consumers can gain cost reduction benefit by scheduling their Appliance Activation Time (AAT towards the slots of low charge. Minimization in cost is essential in Home Energy Management Systems (HEMS to induce consumers acceptance for power scheduling to accommodate for a Demand Response (DR at peak hours. Despite the fact that many algorithms address the power scheduling for HEMS, community based optimization has not been the focus. This paper presents an algorithm that targets the minimization of energy costs of whole community while keeping a low Peak to Average Ratio (PAR and smooth Power Usage Pattern (PUP. Objective of cost reduction is accomplished by finding most favorable AAT by Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO in conjunction with Inclined Block Rate (IBR approach and Circular Price Shift (CPS. Simulated numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of CPS to assist the merger of PSO & IBR to enhance the reduction/stability of PAR and cost reduction.

  11. 21 CFR 310.509 - Parenteral drug products in plastic containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Parenteral drug products in plastic containers... Parenteral drug products in plastic containers. (a) Any parenteral drug product packaged in a plastic... parenteral drug product for intravenous use in humans that is packaged in a plastic immediate container on or...

  12. Mental Retardation, Poverty and Community Based Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einar Helander

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A person with moderate mental retardation would, in a western country, be "diagnosed" early on in life. Consequently, such a child is likely to be sent for special education. Given the high level of job requirements, such a person is unlikely to be employed in the open market later in life. Mental retardation is one of the most frequent disabilities in most studies, mental retardation is found in about three percent of the population. Persons even with mild mental retardation have very large difficulties finding employment and are for this reason often deprived of opportunities for suitable and productive income generation this is why most stay poor. But disability does not only cause poverty poverty itself causes disability. This study follows an analysis, based on a review of the Swedish programme for mental retardation during the period 1930-2000. It is concluded that in Sweden a very large proportion of mild and moderate mental retardation has been eliminated though the combination of poverty alleviation with a community-based rehabilitation programme. For these situations a pro-active programme analysing and meeting the needs of the target groups should be useful as a means to achieve poverty alleviation.

  13. DESA WISATA SEBAGAI COMMUNITY BASED TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhimas Setyo Nugroho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of community-based tourism in the dome house tourism village has succeeded in becoming a tool to trigger the development of the dome house resident and its environment. All of the development can be obviously seen from the economic, social, cultural, environmental and political aspects with a very enthusiastic participation of the resident. The rapid development of the resident and their high participation can emerge a strategy to make the tourist village survive from the tourism industry competition. In this case, the author found that there is a connection between the high level of community participation and the rapid development as the result of it. Therefore, the more the resident willing to participate, the more it will affect the development of the resident and its environment. This research uses qualitative method. The data were obtained by conducting interview, observation, and documentation. After those steps, the data were processed by interactive and SWOT analysis. Then, questionnaire was used to validate the data towards 21 residents.

  14. Parenteral nutrition in malnourished patients; Parenteralna vyziva u malnutricnych pacientov

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lichvarova, I. [OAIM, Narodny onkologicky ustav, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-07-01

    Parenteral nutrition became a routine therapeutic option in malnourished patients, if conventional nutritional enteral support is not effective. Cachexia and malnutrition prolong the wound healing, contribute to immunosuppression, increase morbidity and the cost of treatment. Using of a malnutrition protocol as a screening tool is necessary to sort out malnourished patients. Parenteral nutrition is therefore an important part of the multimodal therapy and from the medical and the ethical point of view is a great mistake not to feed a patient. (author)

  15. Hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia among preterm infants receiving aggressive parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener Dik, Pablo H; Galletti, María F; Bacigalupo, Leticia T; Fernández Jonusas, Silvia; L Mariani, Gonzalo

    2018-06-01

    Aggressive parenteral nutrition is the standard of care among very-low-birth weight preterm infants. However, in recent studies, its impact on short-term outcomes, has been evaluated. The objective was to compare the prevalence of hypercalcemia and hypophosphatemia among preterm infants receiving aggressive or standard parenteral nutrition. Observational, retrospective study comparing a group of preterm infants weighing less than 1250 grams who received aggressive parenteral nutrition with a historical control group. The prevalence of hypercalcemia was estimated and its association with aggressive parenteral nutrition was searched adjusting by confounders. The mean phosphate level was estimated for the control group by linear regression and was compared to the value in the other group. Forty patients per group were included. The prevalence of hypercalcemia was higher in the group who received aggressive parenteral nutrition (87.5% versus 35%, p= 0.001). Aggressive parenteral nutrition was associated with hypercalcemia when adjusting by birth weight, intrauterine growth restriction, amino acid, and calorie intake (adjusted odds ratio: 21.8, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.7-128). The mean calcium level was different between both groups (p= 0.002). Infants who received aggressive parenteral nutrition had more sepsis without reaching statistical significance and the mean phosphate level was lower than that estimated for the control group (p= 0.04). The prevalence of hypophosphatemia in this group was 90% (95% CI: 76-97%). Our data show an association between hypercalcemia/hypophosphatemia and aggressive parenteral nutrition. It is recommended to frequently monitor calcium and phosphate levels since they might be associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  16. Copper and Zinc Deficiency in a Patient Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition During a Shortage of Parenteral Trace Element Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm, Eric; Dotson, Bryan

    2015-11-01

    Drug shortages in the United States, including parenteral nutrition (PN) components, have been common in recent years and can adversely affect patient care. Here we report a case of copper and zinc deficiency in a patient receiving PN during a shortage of parenteral trace element products. The management of the patient's deficiencies, including the use of an imported parenteral multi-trace element product, is described. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  17. Community Based Networks and 5G Wi-Fi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Idongesit

    2018-01-01

    This paper argues on why Community Based Networks should be recognized as potential 5G providers using 5G Wi-Fi. The argument is hinged on findings in a research to understand why Community Based Networks deploy telecom and Broadband infrastructure. The study was a qualitative study carried out...... inductively using Grounded Theory. Six cases were investigated. Two Community Based Network Mobilization Models were identified. The findings indicate that 5G Wi-Fi deployment by Community Based Networks is possible if policy initiatives and the 5G Wi-Fi standards are developed to facilitate the causal...

  18. Diazepam parenteral no tratamento de epilepsias graves Treatment of severe epilepsies with parenteral diazepam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Geraldo Speciali

    1971-09-01

    Full Text Available As modificações dos quadros clínico e EEG foram estudadas em 9 pacientes com manifestações epilépticas rebeldes às medicações anticonvulsivantes habituais, quando submetidos à administração parenteral diária de diazepam (Valium e após sua interrupção. Houve diminuição do número e da duração das crises, superior a 75%, em três pacientes. Esses resultados são satisfatórios, considerando a gravidade dos quadros epilépticos e foram obtidos em pacientes com predomínio de alterações EEG lentas antes de iniciar o esquema terapêutico. Não se verificaram efeitos colaterais relevantes na época da administração parenteral. Em dois pacientes foi observado o aparecimento de crises tônicas coincidindo com o aumento de elementos EEG paroxísticos rápidos, localizados ou difusos.Changes of the clinical pictures and electroencephalographic patterns were studied in 9 patients suffering from epileptic seizures non responsive to common anticonvulsivants, when submitted to daily parenteral administration of diazepam (Valium and after its interruption. There was decrease of the number and duration of seizures, over to 75%, in 3 patients. These results can be considered as satisfatory, considering the intensity of the seizures. The best results were obtained in those patients which showed predominance of slow waves in the EEGs prior to the begin of the treatment. No side effects were observed during the treatment. Two patients developed tonic seizures coincident with the increasing of fast paroxistic EEG patterns, of localized or diffuse type.

  19. ESPEN Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition: home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in adult patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, M.; Pironi, L.; Bozzetti, F.

    2009-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) was introduced as a treatment modality in the early 1970s primarily for the treatment of chronic intestinal failure in patients with benign disease. The relatively low morbidity and mortality associated with HPN has encouraged its widespread use in western countries....... Thus there is huge clinical experience, but there are still few controlled clinical studies of treatment effects and management of complications. The purpose of these guidelines is to highlight areas of good practice and promote the use of standardized treatment protocols between centers...

  20. A new glass option for parenteral packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaut, Robert A; Peanasky, John S; DeMartino, Steven E; Schiefelbein, Susan L

    2014-01-01

    Glass is the ideal material for parenteral packaging because of its chemical durability, hermeticity, strength, cleanliness, and transparency. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time, but they do have some issues relating to breakage, delamination, and variation in hydrolytic performance. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the compendial requirements, and to have similar thermal, optical, and mechanical attributes as the current alkali borosilicate glasses. In addition, the alkali aluminosilicate performed as well or better than the current alkali borosilicates in extractables tests and stability studies, which suggests that it would be suitable for use with the studied liquid product formulation. The physical, mechanical, and optical properties of glass make it an ideal material for packaging injectable drugs and biologics. Alkali borosilicate glasses have been used successfully for a long time for these applications, but there are some issues. In this paper, alkali aluminosilicate glasses are introduced as a possible alternative to alkali borosilicate glasses. An example alkali aluminosilicate glass is shown to meet the requirements for packaging injectable drugs and biologics, and to be suitable for use with a particular liquid drug. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  1. [Should pediatric parenteral nutrition be individualized?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Renata Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento; Nogueira, Roberto José Negrão; Saron, Margareth Lopes Galvão; Lima, Alexandre Esteves Souza; Hessel, Gabriel

    2014-12-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations are commonly individualized, since their standardization seem inadequate for the pediatric population. This study aimed to evaluate the nutritional state and the reasons for PN individualization in pediatric patients using PN hospitalized in a tertiary hospital in Campinas, São Paulo. This longitudinal study comprised patients using PN followed by up to 67 days. Nutritional status was classified according to the criteria established by the World Health Organization (WHO) (2006) and WHO (2007). The levels of the following elements on blood were analyzed: sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, chloride, magnesium, inorganic phosphorus and triglycerides (TGL). Among the criteria for individualization, were considered undeniable: significant reduction in blood levels of potassium (nutritional state of patients was considered critical in most cases. Thus, the individualization performed in the beginning of PN for energy protein adequacy was indispensable. In addition, the individualized PN was indispensable in at least 29.2% of PN for correction of alterations found in biochemical parameters. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  2. Community-Based Wildlife Management In Tanzania: The Policy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-based wildlife management (CWM) approach – known to others as community-based conservation – was first introduced in Tanzania in 1987/88. The approach intends to reconcile wildlife conservation and rural economic development. In the 1990s Tanzanians witnessed a rush by government Ministries and ...

  3. Comparison Between Premixed and Compounded Parenteral Nutrition Solutions in Hospitalized Patients Requiring Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Colleen; Allard, Johane; Raman, Maitreyi

    2016-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) may be provided through compounded or premixed solutions. To determine the proportion of stable custom-compounded PN prescriptions that would fit within a 20% deviance of an existing premixed PN solution. A retrospective study design was used. Inpatients who received PN in non-critical care units in the preceding year were screened for eligibility. Results are reported descriptively as means (95% confidence intervals) and proportions. We reviewed 97 PN prescriptions that met inclusion criteria. Stable hospital PN prescriptions compared with the reference premixed prescription provided 1838 (1777-1898) vs 1843 (1781-1905) kcal/d, P = .43; dextrose, 266 (254-277) vs 225 (216-234) g/d, P magnesium, 5.4 (4.8-5.4) vs 7.6 (7.4-7.9) mmol/L. Calories and protein were remarkably similar, but dextrose, lipid, and electrolytes differed between hospital PN and the reference premixed prescription. We believe that there may be a role for premixed solutions in quaternary centers in stable non-critically ill patients. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Safety of home parenteral nutrition during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilla, Miriam; Ławiński, Michał; Cohen, Jonathan; Hadar, Eran; Kagan, Ilya; Perkewick, Marek; Singer, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Few studies have examined the effect of total parenteral nutrition which is lipid-based given throughout pregnancy to patients unable to obtain adequate nutrition by the oral route. In this study we examined the use of lipid-based home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in 7 pregnant women, commenced either before or during pregnancy, and their intra-pregnant course as well as a 2-year follow-up of their offspring is described. HPN was formulated on an individual basis and protein administered in a dose of 0.8-1.1 g/kg during the three trimesters. Lipid emulsions included long chain triglycerides or olive-oil based formulae and all patients received trace elements. Data were collected during the course of pregnancy and at birth while infants were followed for a period of between 6 months and 2 years using medical records and questionnaires. In total, we studied 9 pregnancies (in 7 women). HPN was administered for a median of 9 months (range 3-9 months). The mean energy provided during the 1st, 2nd and 3rd trimester was 9297 ± 2797 kcal/week, 9148 ± 2629 kcal/week and 8564 ± 4059 kcal/week resp. The mean increase in weight during the pregnancy was 9 ± 5 Kg. The only complications noted during the pregnancy consisted of 3 episodes of catheter-related infections which were successfully treated by antibiotics. The infants were born after a mean of 38.00 ± 1.55 weeks of gestation, with a mean first minute Apgar score of 8.7 ± 1.8 which increased to 9.8 ± 0.4 after 10 min. The mean infant birth weight was 2.45 ± 0.37 kg. No complications were noted at birth apart from one infant who suffered from torticollis which resolved spontaneously. During follow up, a decrease in hemoglobin related to low iron levels was noted in 1 infant, 2 infants were noted to be allergic to pollen and one underwent a scrotal hernia reduction. No developmental problems have been observed, neither physiological nor psychomotor, over the 2-year follow-up period. The authors

  5. Phytosterols, Lipid Administration, and Liver Disease During Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaloga, Gary P

    2015-09-01

    Phytosterols are plant-derived sterols that are structurally and functionally analogous to cholesterol in vertebrate animals. Phytosterols are found in many foods and are part of the normal human diet. However, absorption of phytosterols from the diet is minimal. Most lipid emulsions used for parenteral nutrition are based on vegetable oils. As a result, phytosterol administration occurs during intravenous administration of lipid. Levels of phytosterols in the blood and tissues may reach high levels during parenteral lipid administration and may be toxic to cells. Phytosterols are not fully metabolized by the human body and must be excreted through the hepatobiliary system. Accumulating scientific evidence suggests that administration of high doses of intravenous lipids that are high in phytosterols contributes to the development of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease. In this review, mechanisms by which lipids and phytosterols may cause cholestasis are discussed. Human studies of the association of phytosterols with liver disease are reviewed. In addition, clinical studies of lipid/phytosterol reduction for reversing and/or preventing parenteral nutrition associated liver disease are discussed. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  6. Building a community-based culture of evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janzen, Rich; Ochocka, Joanna; Turner, Leanne; Cook, Tabitha; Franklin, Michelle; Deichert, Debbie

    2017-12-01

    In this article we argue for a community-based approach as a means of promoting a culture of evaluation. We do this by linking two bodies of knowledge - the 70-year theoretical tradition of community-based research and the trans-discipline of program evaluation - that are seldom intersected within the evaluation capacity building literature. We use the three hallmarks of a community-based research approach (community-determined; equitable participation; action and change) as a conceptual lens to reflect on a case example of an evaluation capacity building program led by the Ontario Brian Institute. This program involved two community-based groups (Epilepsy Southwestern Ontarioand the South West Alzheimer Society Alliance) who were supported by evaluators from the Centre for Community Based Research to conduct their own internal evaluation. The article provides an overview of a community-based research approach and its link to evaluation. It then describes the featured evaluation capacity building initiative, including reflections by the participating organizations themselves. We end by discussing lessons learned and their implications for future evaluation capacity building. Our main argument is that organizations that strive towards a community-based approach to evaluation are well placed to build and sustain a culture of evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Outpatient Physical Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artandi, Maja K; Stewart, Rosalyn W

    2018-05-01

    The physical examination in the outpatient setting is a valuable tool. Even in settings where there is lack of evidence, such as the annual physical examination of an asymptomatic adult, the physical examination is beneficial for the physician-patient relationship. When a patient has specific symptoms, the physical examination-in addition to a thorough history-can help narrow down, or in many cases establish, a diagnosis. In a time where imaging and laboratory tests are easily available, but are expensive and can be invasive, a skilled physical examination remains an important component of patient evaluation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outpatient management of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R L

    1991-03-01

    As effective antipsychotic pharmacotherapy has become available, patients with schizophrenia are increasingly managed in an outpatient setting by primary care physicians. Pharmacotherapy is generally effective in treating "positive," or psychotic, symptoms and lessening the risks of relapse, but ineffective in improving "negative," or deficit, symptoms. Aggressive attempts to totally control positive symptoms and to ameliorate negative symptoms tend to increase side effects and may be detrimental to the patient. Intensive psychotherapeutic and rehabilitative approaches are generally unproductive. Attempting to obtain a cure is unrealistic. A moderate approach is recommended, taking into consideration the limitations of existing treatments, achieving control of extreme symptoms and minimizing social and occupational limitations.

  9. Clinical significance of changes of serum TBA, CG, HA levels in neonate with parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Weiliang; Zhou Jiongying; Zhang Xiaoyi; Lv Weihua; Ma Yunbao; He Qizhi

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of changes of serum levels of TBA, CG, HA in neonate with parenteral nutrition. Methods: Serum total bile acid (TBA, with biochemistry) and CG, HA (with RIA) contents were measured in 52 neonates (full-term 32, preterm 20) with parenteral nutrition and 28 neonates (full-term 16, preterm 12) without parenteral nutrition (as controls). Results: Before parenteral nutrition,the serum TBA, CG and HA levels in full-term neonates were not significantly different from those in the controls (P>0.05). After parenteral nutrition,serum levels were significantly higher than those before parenteral nutrition (P<0.01). The levels in pre-term neonates were significantly higher after parenteral nutrition than those in full-term neonates (P<0.05). Conclusion: Long term parenteral nutrition might be harmful to hepatic and gall bladder function in neonates especially in premature ones. (authors)

  10. Management of Hyperglycemia During Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    Hyperglycemia is a frequent complication of enteral and parenteral nutrition in hospitalized patients. Extensive evidence from observational studies indicates that the development of hyperglycemia during parenteral and enteral nutrition is associated with an increased risk of death and infectious complications. There are no specific guidelines recommending glycemic targets and effective strategies for the management of hyperglycemia during specialized nutritional support. Managing hyperglycemia in these patients should include optimization of carbohydrate content and administration of intravenous or subcutaneous insulin therapy. The administration of continuous insulin infusion and insulin addition to nutrition bag are efficient approaches to control hyperglycemia during parenteral nutrition. Subcutaneous administration of long-acting insulin with scheduled or corrective doses of short-acting insulin is superior to the sliding scale insulin strategy in patients receiving enteral feedings. Randomized controlled studies are needed to evaluate safe and effective therapeutic strategies for the management of hyperglycemia in patients receiving nutritional support. PMID:23065369

  11. Iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy: The role of parenteral iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, Umo I

    2017-01-01

    Maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality remain major challenges in the delivery of safe maternity care worldwide. Anaemia in pregnancy is an important contributor to this dismal picture, especially where blood transfusion services are poorly developed. An early diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency anaemia in pregnancy using the new generation dextran-free parenteral iron preparations can save lives and reduce morbidity in selected pregnancies. It is time to cast aside the fears associated with the use of the old parenteral iron preparations which were associated a high incidence of anaphylaxis, and embrace the use of new parenteral iron products which have better side effect profiles and can deliver total dose infusions without the need for test dosing. In selected women, the benefits of this treatment far outweigh any disadvantages.

  12. Unmet needs for comprehensive services in outpatient addiction treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Janice L; Emptage, Nicholas P; Hubbard, Robert L

    2006-04-01

    Many addiction treatment patients suffer from health and psychosocial problems in addition to substance misuse at the time of their treatment entry. Outpatient treatment programs have attempted to address these problems by providing or facilitating access to comprehensive health and social services. Nevertheless, previous research have suggested high levels of unmet needs for these services in the addiction treatment population. Using data from a large study on community-based outpatient addiction treatment, this article provides additional information on levels of unmet service needs and the relationship between need and receipt of services during treatment. Our results suggest extremely high levels of unmet needs for a wide variety of health and psychosocial services. Specifically, the data suggest that unmet service needs may be far more prevalent than previous estimates and that addiction treatment populations in rural areas may be particularly disadvantaged.

  13. Parenteral nutrition in childhood and consequences for dentition and gingivae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczak-Kowalczyk, D; Danko, M; Banaś, E; Gozdowski, D; Popińska, K; Krasuska-Sławińska, E; Książyk, J

    2017-03-01

    Assessment of dentition in children under parenteral nutrition, risk factors for caries, and dental developmental abnormalities. The study involved 63 patients (aged 2.25-16.6 years), i.e. 32 subjects receiving parenteral nutrition for a mean period of 5.6±2.94 years, and 31 healthy control subjects. Oral hygiene (OHI-S, PL-I), gingival (GI), and dentition status (caries, DMFT/dmft, enamel defects, shape alterations), frequency of oral meals and frequency of cariogenic snacks consumption were evaluated. Medical records provided information on parenteral meals per week, age parenteral nutrition started, birth body mass, Apgar score, weight deficiency, and antibiotic therapy until aged 1 year. The Mann-Whitney test, chi-squared test, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient were used (p≤0.05). Dental developmental abnormalities occurred more often in PN subjects (71.87% vs. 25.80%). The prevalence of caries in PN (56.25% vs. 90.32%) and dmft (2.00±3.30 vs. 4.21±3.33) and DMFT (2.47±4.08 vs. 3.33±3.50) were lower. Positive caries Spearman's rank correlation coefficients: frequency of oral meals and frequency of cariogenic snacks consumption, and GI. Negative correlation coefficients: low birth body mass, antibiotic therapy, and low body mass in the first year of life. Positive dental developmental abnormality Spearman's coefficients: low birth body mass, Apgar score parenteral nutrition duration, low body mass and antibiotic therapy in the first year of life. Beta- lactam, aminoglycoside, glycopeptide and nitroimidazole treatments were related to enamel hypoplasia. Parenteral nutrition in childhood is related to the risk of dental developmental abnormalities, promoted by malnutrition and antibiotic therapy in infancy. Limiting the number of meals and cariogenic snacks, and most probably administration of antibiotics, decreases the risk of caries.

  14. Sterilization of solutions for parenterals products. Problem analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanelys Montes-González

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The solutions for the formulation of parenteral products must be sterile before the aseptic formulation process. For this reason, different methods of sterilization referred in the literature are analyzed. Thermodynamic criteria that rule the sterilization are presented. Furthermore, previous experiences in the sterilization of solutions for the formulation of parental products in an autoclave are analyzed, that take large time of processing and only low volumes of solution can be handled. Using jacketed stirred tanks for the sterilization may solve the problem and, therefore, criteria for the design of the later that allow to process high volumes of solution for the formulation of parenteral products are shown.

  15. Home parenteral nutrition in treatment of severe radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.G.; Ivey, M.; Young, J.

    1979-01-01

    Ten patients with radiation enteritis unresponsive to conventional medical and surgical therapy were put on long-term parenteral nutrition at home. Six of the patients are alive at home; four patients died, two from recurrent cancer. Some of the patients have been able to resume oral intake, but none have been able to discontinue parenteral nutrition. Fistulas healed or had a marked decrease in output. Two patients in our series were given prednisone and sulfasalazine without significant benefit, in contrast to previously reported clinical improvement of radiation enteritis with this therapy

  16. The Situation and Solutions of Institutional and Community-Based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Institutional and Community-Based Rehabilitation for Persons With Mental and ... regardless of the country and the model, reveals a litany of constraints and ... involvement of all stakeholders in decision making and execution and finally, ...

  17. Devising a Community-based Security Regime to Combat Drug ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    economic and political structures, has resulted in the perpetuation of crime and the ... community-based organizations and relevant government ministries. A ...... These changes included collecting equipment from local petrol garages rather.

  18. Community Based Ecological Monitoring of Non Timber Forest ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Community Based Ecological Monitoring of Non Timber Forest Products in the Nilgiri ... This project will allow Keystone Foundation to design, implement and test a ... traders, forest department officials and other stakeholders in the process.

  19. Volume of Home and Community Based Services and...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Volume of Home- and Community-Based Services and Time to Nursing-Home Placement The purpose of this study was to determine whether the volume of Home and Community...

  20. Fighting Poverty with Facts: Community-Based Monitoring Systems

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2009-01-01

    Jan 1, 2009 ... Documents and Articles: ... This book presents the Community-Based Monitoring System ( CBMS ) ... Drawing from CBMS experience in Africa and Asia, the authors present recommendations for policymakers, donor agencies ...

  1. Assessing the contribution of Community-Based Natural Resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adisa, B.O.

    2013-09-20

    Sep 20, 2013 ... environmental sustainability in Ondo State, Nigeria. Adisa, Banji O. ... Key words: Assessment, community-based, natural resources, socio-environmental sustainability, ... Natural resources occur within environments that are.

  2. Renewal strategy and community based organisations in community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renewal strategy and community based organisations in community ... the local population and resources to do that which the governments had failed to do. ... country with a view to reducing poverty and developmental imbalance in Nigeria.

  3. Tribal Community-Based Social Marketing Training Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Community-Based Social Marketing (CBSM) Training Guide and recycling toolkit provides an overview of how to increase the adoption of sustainable behaviors and recycling practices with a community.

  4. Community Based Organizations in HIV/AIDS Prevention, Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Based Organizations in HIV/AIDS Prevention, Patient. ... behavioral change communication methods that may contribute significantly to overcoming ... Towards that objective, CBOs need both internal strengthening of programs and ...

  5. Exploring the scope of community-based rehabilitation in ensuring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the scope of community-based rehabilitation in ensuring the holistic ... Rehabilitation is defined as the process of combined ... psychological measures for enabling individuals to at- ... inclusion, meeting basic needs and facilitating access to.

  6. CSC Tip Sheets: Community-Based Social Marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use community-based social marketing (CBSM) to facilitate direct neighbor-to-neighbor communication and influence to promote behavior change. In-person communications are often complemented by electronic social media tools.

  7. Community Based Health Insurance Knowledge and Willingness to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Based Health Insurance Knowledge and Willingness to Pay; A Survey of a Rural Community in ... Journal Home > Vol 6, No 1 (2012) > ... and is the most appropriate insurance model for rural areas where incomes are unstable.

  8. The ASEAN community-based tourism standards: looking beyond certification

    OpenAIRE

    Novelli, M.; Klatte, N.; Dolezal, C.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an opportunity study on the appropriateness of implementing community-based tourism standards (CBTS) certification through the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) criteria, as a way to improve sustainable tourism provision in the region. Framed by critical reflections on community-based tourism (CBT) literature and existing sustainable tourism standards (STS) practices, qualitative research consisting of interviews with six key industry experts prov...

  9. A review of studies on community based early warning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macherera

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Community-based early warning systems involve community driven collection and analysis of information that enable warning messages to help a community to react to a hazard and reduce the resulting loss or harm. Most early warning systems are designed at the national or global level. Local communities’ capacity to predict weather conditions using indigenous knowledge has been demonstrated in studies focusing on climate change and agriculture in some African countries. This review was motivated by successes made in non-disease specific community-based early warning systems with a view to identify opportunities for developing similar systems for malaria. This article reviewed the existing community-based early warning systems documented in literature. The types of disasters that are addressed by these systems and the methodologies utilised in the development of the systems were identified. The review showed that most of the documented community-based early warning systems focus on natural disasters such as floods, drought, and landslides. Community-based early warning systems for human diseases are very few, even though such systems exist at national and regional and global levels. There is a clear gap in terms of community-based malaria early warning systems. The methodologies for the development of the community-based early warning systems reviewed mainly derive from the four elements of early warning systems; namely risk knowledge, monitoring, warning communication and response capability. The review indicated the need for the development of community based early warning systems for human diseases. Keywords: community; early warning; disaster; hazards

  10. Community-based Rehabilitation Intervention for people with Schizophrenia in Ethiopia (RISE): study protocol for a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Laura; De Silva, Mary; Hanlon, Charlotte; Weiss, Helen A; Birhane, Rahel; Ejigu, Dawit A; Medhin, Girmay; Patel, Vikram; Fekadu, Abebaw

    2016-06-24

    Care for most people with schizophrenia is best delivered in the community and evidence-based guidelines recommend combining both medication and a psychosocial intervention, such as community-based rehabilitation. There is emerging evidence that community-based rehabilitation for schizophrenia is effective at reducing disability in middle-income country settings, yet there is no published evidence on the effectiveness in settings with fewer mental health resources. This paper describes the protocol of a study that aims to evaluate the effectiveness of community-based rehabilitation as an adjunct to health facility-based care in rural Ethiopia. This is a cluster randomised trial set in a rural district in Ethiopia, with sub-district as the unit of randomisation. Participants will be recruited from an existing cohort of people with schizophrenia receiving treatment in primary care. Fifty-four sub-districts will be randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to facility-based care plus community-based rehabilitation (intervention arm) or facility-based care alone (control arm). Facility-based care consists of treatment by a nurse or health officer in primary care (antipsychotic medication, basic psychoeducation and follow-up) with referral to a psychiatric nurse-led outpatient clinic or psychiatric hospital when required. Trained community-based rehabilitation workers will deliver a manualised community-based rehabilitation intervention, with regular individual and group supervision. We aim to recruit 182 people with schizophrenia and their caregivers. Potential participants will be screened for eligibility, including enduring or disabling illness. Participants will be recruited after providing informed consent or, for participants without decision-making capacity, after the primary caregiver gives permission on behalf of the participant. The primary outcome is disability measured with the 36-item WHO Disability Assessment Schedule (WHODAS) version 2.0 at 12 months. The sample

  11. Minimizing systemic infection during complete parenteral alimentation of small infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A regimen of parenteral alimentation for infants was designed to eliminate as many factors responsible for infection as possible. The most important features of the feeding regimen were as follows. (1) Infants were fed via indwelling silastic catheters inserted into the superior vena cava or the right atrium by a cutdown operation. (2) The parenteral feeding was fat free to simplify the administration system. Y connectors and 2- or 3-way taps were avoided. (3) Extreme care was taken of junctions within the infusion system. Only certain members of the hospital staff were allowed to break such junctions, e.g. during the changing of packs of solution or of the giving sets. These junctions were sprayed with antibacterial aerosols. (4) The hypertonic solutions of nutrients were prepared in plastic packs, which do not require ventilation. The infusion system was therefore not contaminated by the entry of unsterile outside air. (5) The infused solutions were passed through 0·22 μm millipore filters before entering the patient's blood stream. There was an infection rate of 9% which was less than the 25 to 45% infection rate previously reported during parenteral feeding through indwelling venous catheters, and is also less than that associated with ventriculoatrial shunts for hydrocephalus. There was no case of systemic candidiasis, which is the most frequent and most serious infection associated with parenteral feeding. PMID:4206445

  12. Nutritional requirements and parenteral nutrition in preterm infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Provision of appropriate nutritional requirements soon after birth is critical for normal development and growth of preterm infants. Preterm infants are often not able to tolerate volumes of oral feeds that will provide adequate daily requirements for growth within the first week or two of life, therefore parenteral nutrition is often ...

  13. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition: does one size fits all ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dietary lipids significantly contribute to preserve the efficiency of human metabolism and restore it during disease. Therefore, in the absence of absolute contraindications, it would not appear reasonable to exclude lipid emulsions when prescribing parenteral nutrition (PN). The metabolic role of lipids has been elucidated, ...

  14. Complications relating to enteral and parenteral nutrition in trauma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to compare the incidence of complications in patients receiving enteral and parenteral nutrition (PN), and review how the early initiation of enteral feeding and early achievement of caloric goal would affect the incidence of complications. Design: The design was a retrospective audit of ...

  15. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients With Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Tribler, Siri; Hvistendahl, Mark

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Catheter-related complications (CRCs) cause mortality and morbidity in patients dependent on parenteral support at home (HPN) due to intestinal failure (IF). This study describes the incidences of CRCs in an adult IF cohort over 40 years. It illustrates the evolution and conseque...

  16. Gluconeogenesis continues in premature infants receiving total parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    To determine the contribution of total gluconeogenesis, to glucose production in preterm infants receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN) providing glucose exceeding normal infant glucose turnover rate, eight infants (0.955 +/- 0.066 kg, 26.5 - 0.5 wks, 4-1 d) were studied while receiving routine ...

  17. IODINE CONTENT OF ENTERAL AND PARENTERAL NUTRITION SOLUTIONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willard, Devina L; Young, Lorraine S; He, Xuemei; Braverman, Lewis E; Pearce, Elizabeth N

    2017-07-01

    Iodine is essential for thyroid hormone synthesis, and iodine deficiency may result in thyroid disorders including goiter and hypothyroidism. Patients on long-term enteral nutrition (EN) or parenteral nutrition (PN) may be at risk for micronutrient deficiencies. The recommended daily allowance for iodine intake is 150 μg for nonpregnant adults. However, there is no current consensus among scientific societies regarding the quantity of iodine to be added in adult EN and PN formulations. The objective of this study was to determine the iodine content of U.S. adult enteral and parenteral nutrition solutions. This study also aimed to determine whether adult patients in the United States who are receiving long-term artificial nutrition may be at risk for iodine deficiency. Ten enteral nutrition solutions and 4 parenteral nutrition solutions were evaluated. The iodine contents of these solutions were measured spectrophotometrically and compared to the labeled contents. Measured and labeled EN iodine contents were similar (range 131-176 μg/L and 106-160 μg/L, respectively). In contrast, PN formulas were found to contain small, unlabeled amounts of iodine, averaging 27 μg/L. Typical fluid requirements are 30 to 40 mL/kg/day for adults receiving either total EN (TEN) or total PN (TPN). Adults on long-term TEN likely consume enough servings to meet their daily iodine requirements. However, patients on long-term TPN would require on average 5.6 L PN/day to meet the recommended daily allowance of iodine. This volume of PN is far in excess of typical consumption. Thus, U.S. patients requiring long-term TPN may be at risk for iodine deficiency. EN = enteral nutrition; PN = parenteral nutrition; TEN = total enteral nutrition; TPN = total parenteral nutrition; UIC = urinary iodine concentration.

  18. Stage III Community-based Efficacy Trial for Mothering From the Inside Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    Addiction; Substance Abuse Drug Chronic; Child Neglect; Child Neglect Emotional; Child Abuse; Parenting; Parent-Child Problem; Parent-Child Relations; Parent / Child Problem; Parenteral Drug Abuse; Parents

  19. Using community-based interventions to improve disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Community Health and Primary Care, College of Medicine, University ..... Gove S. Integrated management of childhood illness by outpatient ... management guidelines for asthma and chronic heart failure, other common chronic.

  20. Medicare Provider Utilization and Payment Data - Outpatient

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Outpatient Utilization and Payment Public Use File (Outpatient PUF) presents information on common outpatient services provided to Medicare fee-for-service...

  1. Adaptive capacity and community-based natural resource management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Derek

    2005-06-01

    Why do some community-based natural resource management strategies perform better than others? Commons theorists have approached this question by developing institutional design principles to address collective choice situations, while other analysts have critiqued the underlying assumptions of community-based resource management. However, efforts to enhance community-based natural resource management performance also require an analysis of exogenous and endogenous variables that influence how social actors not only act collectively but do so in ways that respond to changing circumstances, foster learning, and build capacity for management adaptation. Drawing on examples from northern Canada and Southeast Asia, this article examines the relationship among adaptive capacity, community-based resource management performance, and the socio-institutional determinants of collective action, such as technical, financial, and legal constraints, and complex issues of politics, scale, knowledge, community and culture. An emphasis on adaptive capacity responds to a conceptual weakness in community-based natural resource management and highlights an emerging research and policy discourse that builds upon static design principles and the contested concepts in current management practice.

  2. Temporal Trends in the Use of Parenteral Nutrition in Critically Ill Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Jeremy M.; Wunsch, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice guidelines recommend enteral over parenteral nutrition in critical illness and do not recommend early initiation. Few data are available on parenteral nutrition use or timing of initiation in the ICU or how this use may have changed over time. Methods: We used the Project IMPACT database to evaluate temporal trends in parenteral nutrition use (total and partial parenteral nutrition and lipid supplementation) and timing of initiation in adult ICU admissions from 2001 to 2008. We used χ2 tests and analysis of variance to examine characteristics of patients receiving parenteral nutrition and multilevel multivariate logistic regression models to assess parenteral nutrition use over time, in all patients and in specific subgroups. Results: Of 337,442 patients, 20,913 (6.2%) received parenteral nutrition. Adjusting for patient characteristics, the use of parenteral nutrition decreased modestly over time (adjusted probability, 7.2% in 2001-2002 vs 5.5% in 2007-2008, P nutrition use increased simultaneously (adjusted probability, 11.5% in 2001-2002 vs 15.3% in 2007-2008, P parenteral nutrition declined most rapidly in emergent surgical patients, patients with moderate illness severity, patients in the surgical ICU, and patients admitted to an academic facility (P ≤ .01 for all interactions with year). When used, parenteral nutrition was initiated a median of 2 days (interquartile range, 1-3), after ICU admission and > 90% of patients had parenteral nutrition initiated within 7 days; timing of initiation of parenteral nutrition did not change from 2001 to 2008. Conclusions: Use of parenteral nutrition in US ICUs declined from 2001 through 2008 in all patients and in all examined subgroups, with the majority of parenteral nutrition initiated within the first 7 days in ICU; enteral nutrition use coincidently increased over the same time period. PMID:24233390

  3. Features of liver tissue remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutanen, Annika; Lohi, Jouko; Sorsa, Timo; Jalanko, Hannu; Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2016-09-01

    Intestinal failure is associated frequently with liver injury, which persists after weaning off parenteral nutrition. We compared features of liver remodeling in intestinal failure during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Liver biopsies and serum samples were obtained from 25 intestinal failure patients at a median age of 9.7 years (interquartile range: 4.6-18) and from age-matched control patients. Seven patients had been receiving parenteral nutrition for 53 months (22-160), and 18 patients had been weaned off parenteral nutrition 6.3 years (2.4-17) earlier, after having received parenteral nutrition for 10 months (3.3-34). Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, collagen 1, proinflammatory cytokines, growth factors, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was measured. Significant increases in immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen 1 were observed predominantly in portal areas and were similar to increases seen in patients currently receiving parenteral nutrition and in patients weaned off parenteral nutrition. Gene and protein expressions of alpha-smooth muscle actin and collagen were interrelated. Gene expression of ACTA2, encoding alpha-smooth muscle actin, was increased only in patients who were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Comparable upregulation of interleukin-1 (α and ß), epidermal growth factor, integrin-ß6, and MMP9 gene expression was observed in both patient groups, irrespective of whether they were receiving parenteral nutrition currently. Liver expression and serum levels of TIMP1 and MMP7 were increased only in the patients on parenteral nutrition currently but were not increased after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Intestinal failure is characterized by abnormal activation of hepatic myofibroblast and accumulation of collagen both during and after weaning off parenteral nutrition. Persistent transcriptional upregulation of proinflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines after weaning off

  4. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bischoff, S. C.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious. Long-term (>7–10 days parenteral nutrition (PN requires central venous access whereas for PN 3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7–10 days, a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site.

  5. Access technique and its problems in parenteral nutrition - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, K W; Schregel, W; Stanga, Z; Bischoff, S C; Brass, P; Hartl, W; Muehlebach, S; Pscheidl, E; Thul, P; Volk, O

    2009-11-18

    Catheter type, access technique, and the catheter position should be selected considering to the anticipated duration of PN aiming at the lowest complication risks (infectious and non-infectious). Long-term (>7-10 days) parenteral nutrition (PN) requires central venous access whereas for PN 3 weeks subcutaneous tunnelled catheters or port systems are appropriate. CVC (central venous catheter) should be flushed with isotonic NaCl solution before and after PN application and during CVC occlusions. Strict indications are required for central venous access placement and the catheter should be removed as soon as possible if not required any more. Blood samples should not to be taken from the CVC. If catheter infection is suspected, peripheral blood-culture samples and culture samples from each catheter lumen should be taken simultaneously. Removal of the CVC should be carried out immediately if there are pronounced signs of local infection at the insertion site and/or clinical suspicion of catheter-induced sepsis. In case PN is indicated for a short period (max. 7-10 days), a peripheral venous access can be used if no hyperosmolar solutions (>800 mosm/L) or solutions with a high titration acidity or alkalinity are used. A peripheral venous catheter (PVC) can remain in situ for as long as it is clinically required unless there are signs of inflammation at the insertion site.

  6. Ethical and legal points of view in parenteral nutrition – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 12

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothaermel, S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Adequate nutrition is a part of medical treatment and is influenced by ethical and legal considerations. Patients, who cannot be sufficiently fed via the gastrointestinal tract, have the fundamental right to receive PN (parenteral nutrition even so patients who are unable to give their consent. General objectives in nutrition support are to supply adequate nutrition with regards to the prevention of malnutrition and its consequences (increased morbidity and mortality, and thereby promoting improved outcome and/or quality of life for the patient considering always the patient’s needs and wishes. The requests of the patient to renounce PN should be respected where a signed living will is helpful. During the course of a terminal illness the nutrition has to be adapted individually according to the needs and wishes of a patient in the corresponding phase. Capability of consent should be checked in each individual case and for each measure on an individual basis. Consent should only be accepted if the patient is capable of recognizing the nature, meaning and importance of the intervention as well as the consequences of relinquishment of such an intervention, and is capable to make a self-determined decision. If the patient is not capable of consenting, the patient’s living will is the most important document when determining their assumed will and legally binding. Otherwise a guardian appointed by the patient, or the representative appointed by the court (if the patient has made no provisions can make the decision.

  7. Parenteral nutrition in patients with renal failure – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druml, W.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Partial EN (enteral nutrition should always be aimed for in patients with renal failure that require nutritional support. Nevertheless PN (parenteral nutrition may be necessary in renal failure in patient groups with acute or chronic renal failure (ARF or CRF and additional acute diseases but without extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, or in patients with ARF or CRF with additional acute diseases on extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, haemodialysis therapy (HD, peritoneal dialysis (PD or continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT, or in patients on HD therapy with intradialytic PN. Patients with renal failure who show marked metabolic derangements and changes in nutritional requirements require the use of specifically adapted nutrient solutions. The substrate requirements of acutely ill, non-hypercatabolic patients with CRF correspond to those of patients with ARF who are not receiving any renal replacement patients therapy (utilisation of the administered nutrients has to be monitored carefully. In ARF patients and acutely ill CRF patients on renal replacement therapy, substrate requirements depend on disease severity, type and extent/frequency of extracorporeal renal replacement therapy, nutritional status, underlying disease and complications occurring during the course of the disease. Patients under HD have a higher risk of developing malnutrition. Intradialytic PN (IDPN should be used if causes of malnutrition cannot be eliminated and other interventions fail. IDPN should only be carried out when modifiable causes of malnutrition are excluded and enhanced oral (like i.e. additional energy drinks or enteral supply is unsuccessful or cannot be carried out.

  8. Ethical and legal points of view in parenteral nutrition - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothaermel, S; Bischoff, S C; Bockenheimer-Lucius, G; Frewer, A; Wehkamp, K H; Zuercher, G

    2009-11-18

    Adequate nutrition is a part of medical treatment and is influenced by ethical and legal considerations. Patients, who cannot be sufficiently fed via the gastrointestinal tract, have the fundamental right to receive PN (parenteral nutrition) even so patients who are unable to give their consent. General objectives in nutrition support are to supply adequate nutrition with regards to the prevention of malnutrition and its consequences (increased morbidity and mortality), and thereby promoting improved outcome and/or quality of life for the patient considering always the patient's needs and wishes. The requests of the patient to renounce PN should be respected where a signed living will is helpful. During the course of a terminal illness the nutrition has to be adapted individually according to the needs and wishes of a patient in the corresponding phase. Capability of consent should be checked in each individual case and for each measure on an individual basis. Consent should only be accepted if the patient is capable of recognizing the nature, meaning and importance of the intervention as well as the consequences of relinquishment of such an intervention, and is capable to make a self-determined decision. If the patient is not capable of consenting, the patient's living will is the most important document when determining their assumed will and legally binding. Otherwise a guardian appointed by the patient, or the representative appointed by the court (if the patient has made no provisions) can make the decision.

  9. Monitoring Outpatient Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Each year, health care costs for managing chronically ill patients increase as the life expectancy of Americans continues to grow. To handle this situation, many hospitals, doctors practices, and home care providers are turning to disease management, a system of coordinated health care interventions and communications, to improve outpatient care. By participating in daily monitoring programs, patients with congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions requiring significant self-care are facing fewer emergency situations and hospitalizations. Cybernet Medical, a division of Ann Arbor, Michigan-based Cybernet Systems Corporation, is using the latest communications technology to augment the ways health care professionals monitor and assess patients with chronic diseases, while at the same time simplifying the patients interaction with technology. Cybernet s newest commercial product for this purpose evolved from research funded by NASA, the National Institute of Mental Health, and the Advanced Research Projects Agency. The research focused on the physiological assessment of astronauts and soldiers, human performance evaluation, and human-computer interaction. Cybernet Medical's MedStar Disease Management Data Collection System is an affordable, widely deployable solution for improving in-home-patient chronic disease management. The system's battery-powered and portable interface device collects physiological data from off-the-shelf instruments.

  10. Osteoarthrosis in outpatient practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Andreyevna Galushko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elucidate the awareness of osteoarthrosis - OA (the most common location and treatment methods among primary care physicians. Subjects and methods. The questionnaire developed at the Research Institute of Rheumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, was used to interview 1912 specialists (therapists, rheumatologists, neurologists, and surgeons who made a primary outpatient reception in the local polyclinics of 25 Russian Federation’s cities with a population of more than 500,000. Results. In the opinion of the physicians of all specialties, knee joints turned out to be the most location of OA. In practice, the rheumatologists encountered knee, hip, and hand joint lesions in OA in 92, 42, and 38%, respectively. Analysis of therapeutic preferences has shown that virtually all the physicians prescribe nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and only two thirds do structure-modifying drugs (chondroprotectors for OA patients. When treating OA, only the rheumatologists use slow-acting drugs in practically 100% of cases, by preferring chondroitin sulfate. The physicians of all specialties use topical glucocorticoid therapy extensively. The rheumatologists use this therapy most probably due to the fact that patients with severe polyarticular OA come to see them. Notwithstanding the fact that new guidelines for the treatment of OA were published in 2008, most physicians are oriented to the 1995 guidelines, frequently giving rise to therapeutic errors and wrong treatment.

  11. Negotiation of values as driver in community-based PD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronvall, Erik; Malmborg, Lone; Messeter, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Community-based PD projects are often characterized by the meeting of conflicting values among stakeholder groups, but in research there is no uncontested account of the relation between design and conflicting values. Through analysis of three community-based PD cases in Denmark and South Africa......, this paper identifies and discusses challenges for community-based PD that exist in these settings based on the emergence of contrasting and often conflicting values among participants and stakeholders. Discussions of participation are shaped through two theoretical perspectives: the notion of thinging...... and design things; and different accounts of values in design. Inspired by the concept of design things, and as a consequence of the need for continuous negotiation of values observed in all three cases, we suggest the concept of thinging as fruitful for creating productive agonistic spaces with a stronger...

  12. Determinants of dropout in a community-based mental health crisis centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henzen, Alexandre; Moeglin, Clotilde; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon; Sentissi, Othman

    2016-04-19

    Dropping out during the course of medical follow up is defined as an early therapy withdrawal without the agreement of the therapist. In a psychiatric crisis unit in Geneva, we empirically observed that almost 50% of the patients were not showing up to their first appointments, which were scheduled for 3 to 7 days post discharge. The aim of this naturalistic descriptive cohort study is to identify the demographic, patient and care-related predictive factors of dropout in a community-based psychiatric crisis centre. We included 245 consecutive outpatients followed-up for 4 to 6 weeks of intensive outpatient psychiatric treatment. Logistic regression models were built to examine the association between dropout and demographic, care and patient-related variables. Among the 245 outpatients, dropout occurred in 37.5% of cases, and it most frequently occurred (81.8%) in the first 2 days of follow-up. Among care-related variables, referral by hospital units or private psychiatrists led to significantly lower levels of dropout compared to patients referred by the psychiatric emergency unit (respectively: OR = .32; p = .04; 95% CI [.10, .93]; OR = .36; p = .04; 95% CI [.13, .96]; OR = .22; p = .002; 95% CI [.08, .58]). Among patient-related variables, younger age increased the risk of dropout (OR = .96; 95%; p = .002; 95% CI [.94, .99]). Anxiety and personality but not mood disorders were also related to higher rates of dropout (respectively: OR = 2.40; p = .02; 95% CI [1.14, 4.99]; and OR = 1.98; p = .02; 95% CI [1.09, 3.59]). Unipolar depression (72.2%; OR = 1.47; p = .48; 95% CI [.34, 1.21]) was the most frequent primary diagnosis in this sample. This study makes clear the need for increased efforts to improve care adherence in young patients with anxious or personality disorders seen in emergency rooms because they are prone to early discontinuation of treatments. Future studies in this field are warranted to gain

  13. Parenteral Antibiotics Reduce Bifidobacteria Colonization and Diversity in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séamus Hussey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the impact of parenteral antibiotic treatment in the early neonatal period on the evolution of bifidobacteria in the newborn. Nine babies treated with intravenous ampicillin/gentamicin in the first week of life and nine controls (no antibiotic treatment were studied. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to investigate the composition of Bifidobacterium in stool samples taken at four and eight weeks. Bifidobacteria were detected in all control infants at both four and eight weeks, while only six of nine antibiotic-treated infants had detectable bifidobacteria at four weeks and eight of nine at eight weeks. Moreover, stool samples of controls showed greater diversity of Bifidobacterium spp. compared with antibiotic-treated infants. In conclusion, short-term parenteral antibiotic treatment of neonates causes a disturbance in the expected colonization pattern of bifidobacteria in the first months of life. Further studies are required to probiotic determine if supplementation is necessary in this patient group.

  14. Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease and lipid emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugasti Murillo, Ana; Petrina Jáuregui, Estrella; Elizondo Armendáriz, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) is a particularly important problem in patients who need this type of nutritional support for a long time. Prevalence of the condition is highly variable depending on the series, and its clinical presentation is different in adults and children. The etiology of PNALD is not well defined, and participation of several factors at the same time has been suggested. When a bilirubin level >2 mg/dl is detected for a long time, other causes of liver disease should be ruled out and risk factors should be minimized. The composition of lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition is one of the factors related to PNALD. This article reviews the different types of lipid emulsions and the potential benefits of emulsions enriched with omega-3 fatty acids. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Introduction and methodology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jauch, K. W.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Guidelines for Parenteral Nutrition were prepared by the German Society for Nutritional Medicine (http://www.dgem.de/, in collaboration with other medical associations to provide guidance for quality assurance for parenteral nutrition (PN practice, and to promoting health and quality of life of patients concerned. A coordination team proposed topics, working group leaders who along with working group members performed systematic literatur searches and drafted recommendations in a nominal group process. Recommendations were discussed and agreed upon in a structured consensus conference process, followed by a Delphi consensus. The current English version of the guidelines was written and updated during the period between the last quarter of 2007 and the first quarter of 2009. The recommendations of the guidelines should be reviewed, and if necessary updated five years after publication.

  16. Nutrición parenteral precoz en el neonato grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina González Mustelier

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio descriptivo en el Servicio de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal del Hospital Ginecoobstétrico "Ramón González Coro" de Ciudad de La Habana, desde enero del 2000 hasta enero del 2002, con el objetivo de valorar las ventajas del uso de nutrición parenteral (NP precoz en los neonatos críticamente enfermos, durante la primera semana de vida. Se compararon 2 grupos de 23 recién nacidos críticos, uno de ellos recibió alimentación parenteral (grupo I y el otro no (grupo II. Se encontró homogeneidad en ambos grupos en cuanto a peso, edad gestacional, valoración nutricional al nacer, sexo y morbilidad inicial. La nutrición parenteral se caracterizó por su uso precoz (menos de 72 horas, conjuntamente con alimentación enteral mínima. La media del aporte máximo de macronutrientes fue de 16 g/kg/d de dextrosa, 1,2 g/kg/d de lípidos y 2 g/kg/d de proteínas. El desarrollo nutricional fue más favorable en el grupo con NP, porque le disminuyó a la mitad el tanto por ciento de peso perdido en la primera semana de vida, le sostuvo mayor aporte energético durante ese período y recupó 7 días antes su peso del nacimiento en relación con el grupo II. Las complicaciones fueron similares en ambos grupos, para concluir en que estas no estuvieron relacionadas con el uso de NP.A descriptive study was conducted at the Neonatal Intensive Therapy Service of "Ramón Gonzalez Coro" Gynecoobstetric Hospital, in Havana City, from January 2000, to January 2002, aimed at assessing the advantages of the use of early parenteral nutrition in the critically ill neonates during the first week of life. 2 groups of 23 critical newborn infants each were compared. One of them recieved parenteral nutrition (group 1 and the other one did not (group II. Homogeneity was found in both groups as regards weight, gestational age, nutritional assessment at birth and initial morbidity. The parenteral nutrition was characterized by its early use (less than 72

  17. The challenge of assessing MTech community-based-visual arts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article explores specific challenges in supervising, accommodating and evaluating diverse candidates who pursue an action-led and community-based research approach rooted within the visual arts. I contend that there is a specific challenge in the field of postgraduate supervision of engaging evaluation strategies.

  18. Community-based survey versus sentinel site sampling in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rural children. Implications for nutritional surveillance and the development of nutritional programmes. G. c. Solarsh, D. M. Sanders, C. A. Gibson, E. Gouws. A study of the anthropometric status of under-5-year-olds was conducted in the Nqutu district of Kwazulu by means of a representative community-based sample and.

  19. Community Based Health Insurance Schemes and Protection of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objectives of this study are two folds: firstly to explore the magnitude of catastrophic expenditure, and secondly to determine its contributing factor,s including the protective impact of the voluntary community based health insurance schemes in Tanzania. The study covered 274 respondents. Study findings have shown ...

  20. Risk assessment and model for community-based construction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It, therefore, becomes necessary to systematically manage uncertainty in community-based construction in order to increase the likelihood of meeting project objectives using necessary risk management strategies. Risk management, which is an iterative process due to the dynamic nature of many risks, follows three main ...

  1. Community-based co-design in Okomakuara

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapuire, Gereon Koch; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike; Chivuno-Kuria, Shilumbe

    2014-01-01

    Although the wider motivation and principles of Participatory Design (PD) are universal its concepts and techniques are highly contextual. Community-based codesign is a variation of PD, where processes are negotiated within the interaction. Thus this workshop gives participants the opportunity...

  2. Changes in smoking during a community-based cardiovascular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in smoking during a community-based cardiovascular disease intervention programme - The Coronary Risk Factor Study. ... South African Medical Journal ... Smoking quit rates were strongly " associated with initial smoking level, with light smokers being significanty more successful quitters than heavy smokers.

  3. Barriers and Strategies to Engaging Our Community-Based Preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Scott C; McKenzie, Margaret L; Abbott, Jodi F; Buery-Joyner, Samantha D; Craig, LaTasha B; Dalrymple, John L; Forstein, David A; Hampton, Brittany S; Page-Ramsey, Sarah M; Pradhan, Archana; Wolf, Abigail; Hopkins, Laura

    2018-03-26

    This article, from the "To the Point" series that is prepared by the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics Undergraduate Medical Education Committee, is a review of commonly cited barriers to recruiting and retaining community-based preceptors in undergraduate medical education and potential strategies to overcome them. Community-based preceptors have traditionally served as volunteer, nonsalaried faculty, with academic institutions relying on intrinsic teaching rewards to sustain this model. However, increasing numbers of learners, the burdens of incorporating the electronic medical record in practice, and increasing demands for clinical productivity are making recruitment and retention of community-based preceptors more challenging. General challenges to engaging preceptors, as well as those unique to women's health, are discussed. Potential solutions are reviewed, including alternative recruitment strategies, faculty development to emphasize efficient teaching practices in the ambulatory setting, offers of online educational resources, and opportunities to incorporate students in value-added roles. Through examples cited in this review, clerkship directors and medical school administrators should have a solid foundation to actively engage their community-based preceptors.

  4. Reducing carbon transaction costs in community based forest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skutsch, Margaret

    The paper considers the potential for community based forest management (of existing forests) in developing countries, as a future CDM strategy, to sequester carbon and claim credits in future commitment periods. This kind of forestry is cost effective, and should bring many more benefits to local

  5. Community Based Distribution of Child Spacing Methods at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uses volunteer CBD agents. Mrs. E.F. Pelekamoyo. Service Delivery Officer. National Family Welfare Council of Malawi. Private Bag 308. Lilongwe 3. Malawi. Community Based Distribution of. Child Spacing Methods ... than us at the Hospital; male motivators by talking to their male counterparts help them to accept that their ...

  6. Connect: An Effective Community-Based Youth Suicide Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Gretchen; Baber, Kristine M.

    2011-01-01

    Youth suicide prevention is an important public health issue. However, few prevention programs are theory driven or systematically evaluated. This study evaluated Connect, a community-based youth suicide prevention program. Analysis of pre and posttraining questionnaires from 648 adults and 204 high school students revealed significant changes in…

  7. Teaching Community-Based Learning Course in Retailing Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Eddie

    2018-01-01

    This study outlines the use of a community-based learning (CBL) applied to a Retailing Management course conducted in a 16-week semester in a private institution in the East Coast. The study addresses the case method of teaching and its potential weaknesses, and discusses experiential learning for a real-world application. It further addresses CBL…

  8. Evaluation of community-based surveillance for Guinea worm, South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-08-03

    Aug 3, 2012 ... deleted at the Data Manager Level in Loki. Conclusion. Community-based surveillance for guinea worm is a good example of a surveillance system on which an integrated disease surveillance system can be based in countries with poor surveillance like South Sudan. This makes its potential value to ...

  9. Calibration of Community-based Coral Reef Monitoring Protocols ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coral reef monitoring (CRM) has been recognised as an important management tool and has consequently been incorporated in Integrated Coastal Area Management (ICAM) programmes in the Western Indian Ocean (WIO). Community-based coral reef monitoring (CB-CRM), which uses simplified procedures suitable for ...

  10. Assessing the contribution of Community-Based Natural Resources ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed Community-Based Natural Resources Management Programme (CBNRMP) for environmental sustainability in Ondo State, Nigeria. Data were gathered through a structured interview schedule from 120 rural dwellers participating in CBNRMP. Data collected were described with descriptive statistical ...

  11. Reflective learning in community-based dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deogade, Suryakant C; Naitam, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Community-based dental education (CBDE) is the implementation of dental education in a specific social context, which shifts a substantial part of dental clinical education from dental teaching institutional clinics to mainly public health settings. Dental students gain additional value from CBDE when they are guided through a reflective process of learning. We propose some key elements to the existing CBDE program that support meaningful personal learning experiences. Dental rotations of 'externships' in community-based clinical settings (CBCS) are year-long community-based placements and have proven to be strong learning environments where students develop good communication skills and better clinical reasoning and management skills. We look at the characteristics of CBDE and how the social and personal context provided in communities enhances dental education. Meaningfulness is created by the authentic context, which develops over a period of time. Structured reflection assignments and methods are suggested as key elements in the existing CBDE program. Strategies to enrich community-based learning experiences for dental students include: Photographic documentation; written narratives; critical incident reports; and mentored post-experiential small group discussions. A directed process of reflection is suggested as a way to increase the impact of the community learning experiences. We suggest key elements to the existing CBDE module so that the context-rich environment of CBDE allows for meaningful relations and experiences for dental students and enhanced learning.

  12. An Honors Interdisciplinary Community-Based Research Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, David; Terlecki, Melissa; Watterson, Nancy; Ratmansky, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    This article describes how two faculty members at Cabrini College--one from biology and the other from psychology--incorporated interdisciplinary community-based research in an honors course on environmental watershed issues. The course, Environmental Psychology, was team-taught in partnership with a local watershed organization, the Valley Creek…

  13. Community-Based Solid Waste Management: A Training Facilitator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Urban environmental management and environmental health issues are of increasing concern worldwide. The need for urban environmental management work at the local level where the Peace Corps works most effectively is significant, but training materials dedicated specifically to community-based solid waste management work in urban areas are lacking.…

  14. Economic performance of community based bean seed production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Limited access to seed of improved varieties is an impediment to agricultural productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Researchers in the national and international agricultural research systems have been piloting a community based seed multiplication and marketing enterprises (CBSME) model, as an alternative to the formal ...

  15. Community based monitoring: engaging and empowering Alberta ranchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Quinn; Jennifer E. Dubois

    2005-01-01

    Community based monitoring (CBM), a form of citizen science, is presented as a potential contributor to ecosystem management and sustainable development. A conceptual model for CBM and lessons learned from a Canadian national pilot program, the Canadian Community Monitoring Network, are summarized along with a description of the European university-based “science shop...

  16. Design implications for a community-based social recipe system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, V.; Yalvac, F.; Funk, M.; Hu, J.; Rauterberg, G.W.M.; Regazzoni, C.S.; Marcenaro, L.

    2014-01-01

    We introduced the concept of a community-based social recipe system which suggests recipes to groups of users based on available ingredients from these users (i.e. who can be from the same household or different households). In this paper we discuss the relevance and desirability of such a system

  17. Heterogeneous Community-based mobility model for human opportunistic network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Liang; Dittmann, Lars

    2009-01-01

    a heterogeneous community-based random way-point (HC-RWP) mobility model that captures the four important properties of real human mobility. These properties are based on both intuitive observations of daily human mobility and analysis of empirical mobility traces. By discrete event simulation, we show HC...

  18. Community-based conservation of critical sites: Uganda's experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of natural resources, first and foremost for their own good, and then for national and global benefit. Ecotourism and adding value to locally produced materials in communities can translate into support for conservation. This paper highlights the importance of community-based conservation for important biodiversity sites.

  19. Water, sanitation and hygiene in community based care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of the HIV/AIDS patients in South Africa receive health care services at home. However, limited studies have been conducted to examine the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) situation in the homes of the care receivers and its impact on community-based care. The main objective of this study was to explore ...

  20. A community-based framework for aquatic ecosystem models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trolle, D.; Hamilton, D.P.; Hipsey, M.R.; Bolding, K.; Bruggeman, J.; Mooij, W.M.; Janse, J.H.; Nielsen, A.; Jeppesen, E.; Elliott, J.A.; Makler-Pick, V.; Petzoldt, T.; Rinke, K.; Flindt, M.R.; Arhonditsis, G.B.; Gal, G.; Bjerring, R.; Tominaga, K.; Hoen, 't J.; Downing, A.S.; Marques, D.M.; Fragoso, C.R.; Sondergaard, M.; Hanson, P.C.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we communicate a point of departure in the development of aquatic ecosystem models, namely a new community-based framework, which supports an enhanced and transparent union between the collective expertise that exists in the communities of traditional ecologists and model developers. Through a

  1. Implementing and managing community-based education and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A current challenge in the training of healthcare professionals is to produce socially responsive graduates who are prepared for work in community settings. Community-based education (CBE) and service learning (SL) are teaching approaches used in the Faculty of Health Sciences at the University of the Free ...

  2. From Campuses to Communities: Community-Based Cultism and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Due to the criminal activities of the cult groups in the NDR and ineptitude of the police, communities have responded by creating vigilante groups but this has only promoted cycle of violence. The paper recommended that government should tackle community-based cultism and also strengthen the Nigeria Police Force to be ...

  3. Frameworks: A Community-Based Approach to Preventing Youth Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, Kristine; Bean, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    Few youth suicide prevention programs are theory based and systematically evaluated. This study evaluated the pilot implementation of a community-based youth suicide prevention project guided by an ecological perspective. One hundred fifty-seven adults representing various constituencies from educators to health care providers and 131 ninth-grade…

  4. Renewal Strategy and Community Based Organisations in Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FBL

    organisations in the study areas and Community-Based Poverty Reduction. Programme ... regions or areas. In Nigeria, for ... industries in the growing and developing urban areas. ..... Security network is also provided by the community. To ..... Development Efforts in Nigeria: Case Study of Anambra and Oyo State, NISER.

  5. Capacity of Community-Based Organisations to disseminate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the capacity of established community based organisations (CBOs) to disseminate information on sleeping sickness control. Design: Participatory interview process administered to randomly selected CBOs in a tsetse and trypanosomosis endemic area. Setting: Busia district, Western, Kenya. Results: ...

  6. Whose forests, whose voices? Mining and community- based nature ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores local experiences of private - sector led community - based nature conservation near Fort Dauphin, southeastern Madagascar through the analysis of a conservation zone managed in partnership between the Rio Tinto mining corporation, local government and local communities. The article assesses ...

  7. The operational challenges of community-based tourism ventures in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-based tourism is increasingly being developed and promoted as a means of reducing poverty in developing countries, assisting local communities to meet their needs through the offering of a tourism product. The Swaziland Tourism Authority with the support of the European Union Fund has made significant ...

  8. How to move towards community based service delivery?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuwissen, L.; Voorham, T.; Bakker, D. de

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Community based primary health care offers in potential the opportunity to tailor health service delivery to the needs and demands of the local population. Up to now, there is no clear cut method to do this. In a pilot benchmark for general practices, data were collected on demand and

  9. Three Initiatives for Community-Based Art Education Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Maria; Chang, EunJung; Song, Borim

    2013-01-01

    Art educators should be concerned with teaching their students to make critical connections between the classroom and the outside world. One effective way to make these critical connections is to provide students with the opportunity to engage in community-based art endeavors. In this article, three university art educators discuss engaging…

  10. Local natural and cultural heritage assets and community based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community based tourism (CBT) is seen as an opportunity which mass tourism does not offer for, especially, rural communities to develop their natural and cultural assets into tourism activities for the benefit of the community. The point of CBT is that the community, collectively and individually, gains a livelihood from ...

  11. Community-based Natural Resource Management of the Jozani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) is an approach that has generally .... rules in use across a broad range of CPR user- communities .... identified these social clusters and vocational groupings as ..... satisfied with the agreement and the villagers .... protection measures for the red colobus monkey ...

  12. Participatory land use planning for community based forest ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participatory land use planning for community based forest management in South-Eastern Nigeria. FE Bisong, A Animashaun. Abstract. No Abstract. Lwati: A Journal of Contemporary Research Vol. 4 () 2007: pp.329-347. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  13. [Routine comparison of trace element deficiencies during parenteral alimentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Cailar, J; Mathieu-Daudé, J C; Kienlen, J; Béssou, D; Griffe, O; Bélé-Binda

    1977-01-01

    In 50 patients aged between 3 and 84 years treated in a multidisciplinary Intensive Care Unit and receiving parenteral alimentation, deficiency in certain trace elements or electrolytes (Cu++, Zn++, Mn++, Co++, PO-4, Mg++) was prevented or treated by the administration of a glucose solution (MB 147 G) enriched in trace elements. The aim of the present study was to demonstrate, on the basis of assay of serum levels of the trace elements involved, with the exception of Mn and Co, the effectiveness of treatment. Reference values were determined on the one hand in healthy individuals for normal figures and secondly on subjects included in the study, already on parenteral alimentation for several days, before treatment with MB 147 G, in order to demonstrate the existence of a deficiency (patient control values). In the case of PO--4, however, the patient control values concerned at one and the same time subjects in the study before treatment with MB 147 G and other patients receiving parenteral alimentation who were not part of the trial. MB 147 G solution was presented in units of 500 ml associated with glucose of varying concentrations (15 p. 100, 30 p. 100, 50 p. 100). The average daily amount administered, over a period of 236 days, was 3 unites per 24 hours, corresponding to an intake of copper of 3.78 mg, 3.90 mg of zinc, 0.20 mg of manganese, 0.24 mg of cobalt, 363 mg of magnesium, 240 mg of calcium and 15 mEz of phosphates. The results show that levels of copper, zinc, magnesium and phosphates were low during parenteral alimentation. The administration of MB 147 G resulted in a significant increase in these values, without there being any evidence of accumulation.

  14. Parenteral nutrition including polyamine under experimental irradiation of the abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moroz, B.B.; Fedorovskij, L.L.; Lyashchenko, Yu.N.

    1982-01-01

    White rats-males were used in experiments. Irradiation dose of abdomen area is 13.5 Gy (1400 R). Parenteral nutrition using aminoacid preparation of polyamine affects favourably during radiation damage resulted from local irradiation of abdomen area. This was manifested in weakening of gastroenteric syndrom, reduction of 3.5 day death of animals and increase of their 30 day survival rate, intensification of recovery processes in small intestine, decrease of cell devastation in bone marrow

  15. Characteristics of medication errors with parenteral cytotoxic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Fyhr, A; Akselsson, R

    2012-01-01

    Errors involving cytotoxic drugs have the potential of being fatal and should therefore be prevented. The objective of this article is to identify the characteristics of medication errors involving parenteral cytotoxic drugs in Sweden. A total of 60 cases reported to the national error reporting systems from 1996 to 2008 were reviewed. Classification was made to identify cytotoxic drugs involved, type of error, where the error occurred, error detection mechanism, and consequences for the pati...

  16. Product quality of parenteral vancomycin products in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, S; Madurawe, R D; Zuk, S M; Khan, S R; Ellison, C D; Faustino, P J; Mans, D J; Trehy, M L; Hadwiger, M E; Boyne, M T; Biswas, K; Cox, E M

    2012-06-01

    In response to concerns raised about the quality of parenteral vancomycin products, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is investigating the product quality of all FDA-approved parenteral vancomycin products available in the United States. Product quality was evaluated independently at two FDA Office of Testing and Research (FDA-OTR) sites. In the next phase of the investigation, being done in collaboration with the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, the in vivo activity of these products will be evaluated in an appropriate animal model. This paper summarizes results of the FDA investigation completed thus far. One site used a validated ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography method (OTR-UPLC), and the second site used the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for related substances provided in the British Pharmacopeia (BP) monograph for vancomycin intravenous infusion. Similar results were obtained by the two FDA-OTR laboratories using two different analytical methods. The products tested had 90 to 95% vancomycin B (active component of vancomycin) by the BP-HPLC method and 89 to 94% vancomycin by OTR-UPLC methods. Total impurities were 5 to 10% by BP-HPLC and 6 to 11% by OTR-UPLC methods. No single impurity was >2.0%, and the CDP-1 level was ≤ 2.0% across all products. Some variability in impurity profiles of the various products was observed. No adverse product quality issues were identified with the six U.S. vancomycin parenteral products. The quality parameters of all parenteral vancomycin products tested surpassed the United States Pharmacopeia acceptance criteria. Additional testing will characterize in vivo performance characteristics of these products.

  17. Delivery of vitamins E and C from parenteral alimentation solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenai, J P; Borum, P R; Duke, E A

    1982-01-01

    We have previously shown that substantial losses of fat-soluble (FS) vitamin A from parenteral alimentation solution occur due to adsorption in the intravenous tubing and photodegradation in the bottle. This study assessed the delivery of other vitamins, viz, FS vitamin E and water-soluble (WS) vitamin C, from parenteral alimentation solution. The solution containing 2.0 ml/L of an aqueous multivitamin infusion was infused at a constant rate of 10 ml/h using a standard intravenous administration set. Multiple aliquots of the solution from the bottle and the effluent obtained sequentially in a 24-h period were analyzed for concentrations of vitamins E and C. Both vitamins remained relatively stable in the bottle. A significant amount (12%) of vitamin E was lost in the intravenous tubing. No losses of vitamin C were incurred in the intravenous tubing. The data suggest that delivery of FS vitamin E from parenteral alimentation solutions is less than optimum because of adsorptive losses. Similar losses are not encountered with WS vitamin C.

  18. Compatibility of 5-fluorouracil and total parenteral nutrition solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, T C; Clibon, U; Page, C P; Cruz, A B

    1982-01-01

    The physicochemical stability and availability of 0.1% 5-fluorouracil solutions in D5W and a typical total parenteral nutrition solution (hypertonic dextrose and crystalline amino acids) were studied in both glass and Viaflex delivery systems. Serial samples collected over a 48-hour period were assayed for 5-fluorouracil concentration using a high performance liquid chromatographic technique. Changes in the pH as well as precipitate formation were also investigated. There was no reduction in the amount of 5-fluorouracil at 48 hours in either the glass or plastic system, regardless of whether the drug was added to D5W or to the total parenteral nutrition solution. No pH changes or precipitates were observed. These findings indicate that 5-fluorouracil is compatible with and available from total parenteral solutions of hypertonic dextrose and amino acid in both plastic and glass containers. Use of such a system would allow for (1) a reduction in vascular access in patients receiving both treatments and (2) continued administration of nutritional support without the requirement for additional fluid volume.

  19. Intensive medicine - Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreymann, G; Adolph, M; Druml, W; Jauch, K W

    2009-11-18

    In intensive care patients parenteral nutrition (PN) should not be carried out when adequate oral or enteral nutrition is possible. Critically ill patients without symptoms of malnutrition, who probably cannot be adequately nourished enterally for a period of <5 days, do not require full PN but should be given at least a basal supply of glucose. Critically ill patients should be nourished parenterally from the beginning of intensive care if they are unlikely to be adequately nourished orally or enterally even after 5-7 days. Critically ill and malnourished patients should, in addition to a possible partial enteral nutrition, be nourished parenterally. Energy supply should not be constant, but should be adapted to the stage, the disease has reached. Hyperalimentation should be avoided at an acute stage of disease in any case. Critically ill patients should be given, as PN, a mixture consisting of amino acids (between 0.8 and 1.5 g/kg/day), carbohydrates (around 60% of the non-protein energy) and fat (around 40% of the non-protein energy) as well as electrolytes and micronutrients.

  20. Surgery and transplantation – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holland-Cunz, S.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In surgery, indications for artificial nutrition comprise prevention and treatment of catabolism and malnutrition. Thus in general, food intake should not be interrupted postoperatively and the re-establishing of oral (e.g. after anastomosis of the colon and rectum, kidney transplantation or enteral food intake (e.g. after an anastomosis in the upper gastrointestinal tract, liver transplantation is recommended within 24 h post surgery. To avoid increased mortality an indication for an immediate postoperatively artificial nutrition (enteral or parenteral nutrition (PN also exists in patients with no signs of malnutrition, but who will not receive oral food intake for more than 7 days perioperatively or whose oral food intake does not meet their needs (e.g. less than 60–80% for more than 14 days. In cases of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, there is an indication for total PN (TPN such as in chronic intestinal obstruction with a relevant passage obstruction e.g. a peritoneal carcinoma. If energy and nutrient requirements cannot be met by oral and enteral intake alone, a combination of enteral and parenteral nutrition is indicated. Delaying surgery for a systematic nutrition therapy (enteral and parenteral is only indicated if severe malnutrition is present. Preoperative nutrition therapy should preferably be conducted prior to hospital admission to lower the risk of nosocomial infections. The recommendations of early postoperative re-establishing oral feeding, generally apply also to paediatric patients. Standardised operative procedures should be established in order to guarantee an effective nutrition therapy.

  1. Intensive medicine – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 14

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreymann, G.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In intensive care patients parenteral nutrition (PN should not be carried out when adequate oral or enteral nutrition is possible. Critically ill patients without symptoms of malnutrition, who probably cannot be adequately nourished enterally for a period of <5 days, do not require full PN but should be given at least a basal supply of glucose. Critically ill patients should be nourished parenterally from the beginning of intensive care if they are unlikely to be adequately nourished orally or enterally even after 5–7 days. Critically ill and malnourished patients should, in addition to a possible partial enteral nutrition, be nourished parenterally. Energy supply should not be constant, but should be adapted to the stage, the disease has reached. Hyperalimentation should be avoided at an acute stage of disease in any case. Critically ill patients should be given, as PN, a mixture consisting of amino acids (between 0.8 and 1.5 g/kg/day, carbohydrates (around 60% of the non-protein energy and fat (around 40% of the non-protein energy as well as electrolytes and micronutrients.

  2. [Staff accreditation in parenteral nutrition production in hospital pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrignaud, S; Le Pêcheur, V; Jouan, G; Valy, S; Clerc, M-A

    2016-09-01

    This work aims to provide staff accreditation methodology to harmonize and secure practices for parenteral nutrition bags preparation. The methodology used in the present study is inspired from project management and quality approach. Existing training supports were used to produce accreditation procedure and evaluation supports. We first defined abilities levels, from level 1, corresponding to accredited learning agent to level 3, corresponding to expert accredited agent. Elements assessed for accreditation are: clothing assessment either by practices audit or by microbiologic test, test bags preparation and handling assessment, bag production to assess aseptic filling for both manual or automatized method, practices audit, number of days of production, and non-conformity following. At Angers Hospital, in 2014, production staff is composed of 12 agents. Staff accreditation reveals that 2 agents achieve level 3, 8 agents achieve level 2 and 2 agents are level 1. We noted that non-conformity decreased as accreditation took place from 81 in 2009 to 0 in 2014. To date, there is no incident due to parenteral bag produced by Angers hospital for neonatal resuscitation children. Such a consistent study is essential to insure a secured nutrition parenteral production. This also provides a satisfying quality care for patients. Copyright © 2016 Académie Nationale de Pharmacie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Iron Deficiency in Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Yi L; Rashtak, Shahrooz; Kelly, Darlene G; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-08-01

    Iron is not routinely added to parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations in the United States because of the risk of anaphylaxis and concerns about incompatibilities. Studies have shown that iron dextran in non-lipid-containing PN solutions is safe. Data are limited on iron status, prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA), and efficacy of intravenous iron infusion in long-term home PN (HPN). We aimed to determine the incidence of IDA and to examine the effectiveness of parenteral iron replacement in patients receiving HPN. Medical records of patients receiving HPN at the Mayo Clinic from 1977 to 2010 were reviewed. Diagnoses, time to IDA development, and hemoglobin, ferritin, and mean corpuscular volume (MCV) values were extracted. Response of iron indices to intravenous iron replacement was investigated. Of 185 patients (122 women), 60 (32.4%) were iron deficient. Five patients were iron deficient, and 18 had unknown iron status before HPN. Of 93 patients who had sufficient iron storage, 37 had IDA development after a mean of 27.2 months (range, 2-149 months) of therapy. Iron was replaced by adding maintenance iron dextran to PN or by therapeutic iron infusion. Patients with both replacement methods had significant improvement in iron status. With intravenous iron replacement, mean ferritin increased from 10.9 to 107.6 mcg/L (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Tratamento da endometrite puerperal com antibioticoterapia parenteral exclusiva Treatment of puerperal endometritis using a regimen with exclusive parenteral antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Duarte

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar a efetividade e segurança da antibioticoterapia parenteral hospitalar exclusiva para tratamento da endometrite puerperal, em população de baixo nível socioeconômico. MÉTODOS: estudo clínico prospectivo, que avaliou 21 puérperas com diagnóstico de endometrite puerperal, cujas gestações foram resolvidas em hospital universitário por cesárea (52,4% ou parto normal (47,6. A amostra caracterizou-se por baixo nível socioeconômico e de escolaridade. Foram submetidas ao regime de antibioticoterapia parenteral exclusiva, apenas durante o período de internação (grupo ATP-EX. Os resultados foram comparados com aqueles obtidos de série histórica do mesmo serviço (20 casos submetidas a antibioticoterapia parenteral hospitalar, complementada por terapia via oral ambulatorial (grupo ATP+VO. As pacientes foram avaliadas clinicamente em retornos periódicos visando identificar casos de recidivas e complicações infecciosas. RESULTADOS: uma paciente do grupo ATP+VO necessitou de reinternação no 6º dia após a alta por recrudescência da endometrite. Não foi observada nenhuma complicação entre as pacientes do grupo ATP-EX. CONCLUSÃO: para o tratamento de endometrite puerperal, não foi observado benefício adicional com a adição da antibioticoterapia oral complementar após a alta. Os resultados com o uso da antibioticoterapia parenteral exclusiva durante a internação indicam que esse esquema pode ser utilizado com segurança em população de baixo nível socioeconômico.PURPOSE: to analyze the effectiveness and safety of exclusive hospital parenteral antibiotic therapy to treat puerperal endometritis in a population of low socioeconomic level. METHODS: a prospective clinical trial evaluated 21 puerperae with a diagnosis of postpartum endometritis, whose deliveries occurred at a university hospital by cesarean section (52.4% or normal delivery (47.6%. The sample was characterized by low socioeconomic and

  5. Parenteral nutrition support for patients with pancreatic cancer. Results of a phase II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riess Hanno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cachexia is a common problem in patients (pts suffering from upper gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, most of these patients suffer from malabsorption and stenosis of the gastrointestinal tract due to their illness. Various methods of supplementary nutrition (enteral, parenteral are practised. In patients with advanced pancreatic cancer (APC, phase angle, determined by bio-electrical impedance analysis (BIA, seems to be a survival predictor. The positive influence of BIA determinate predictors by additional nutrition is currently under discussion. Methods To examine the impact of additional parenteral nutrition (APN we assessed outpatients suffering from APC and progressive cachexia. The assessment based on the BIA method. Assessment parameters were phase angle, ECM/BCM index (ratio of extracellular mass to body cell mass, and BMI (body mass index. Patients suffering from progressive weight loss in spite of additional enteral nutritional support were eligible for the study. Results Median treatment duration in 32 pts was 18 [8-35] weeks. Response evaluation showed a benefit in 27 pts (84% in at least one parameter. 14 pts (43.7% improved or stabilised in all three parameters. The median ECM/BCM index was 1.7 [1.11-3.14] at start of APN and improved down to 1.5 [1.12-3.36] during therapy. The median BMI increased from 19.7 [14.4-25.9] to 20.5 [15.4-25.0]. The median phase angle improved by 10% from 3.6 [2.3-5.1] to 3.9 [2.2-5.1]. Conclusions We demonstrated the positive impact of APN on the assessed parameters, first of all the phase angle, and we observed at least a temporary benefit or stabilisation of the nutritional status in the majority of the investigated patients. Based on these findings we are currently investigating the impact of APN on survival in a larger patient cohort. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00919659

  6. Peripheral parenteral nutrition: an option for patients with an indication for short-term parenteral nutrition La nutrición parenteral periférica, alternativa para los pacientes con indicación de nutrición parenteral durante poco tiempo

    OpenAIRE

    M. I. T. D. Correia; J. Guimarâes; L. Cirino de Mattos; K. C. Araújo Gurgel; E. B. Cabral

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to examine and describe our experience with the use of peripheral parenteral nutrition (PPN). Methods: Patients with an indication for parenteral nutrition for less than 15 days received it via a peripheral vein via a short, 20 or 22 gauge French polyurethane catheter. Parenteral nutrition had a final osmolality of 993 mOsm/l and was administered by infusion pump. The nutritional status of patients was assessed by the Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) tec...

  7. Comparison of student learning in the out-patient clinic and ward round.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M H; Dent, J A

    1994-05-01

    In undergraduate medical education there is a trend away from ward-based teaching towards out-patient and community-based teaching. To study the potential effects of this altered emphasis on student learning, a pilot group of final-year medical students at the University of Dundee was asked to keep individual structured log-books. These contained details of patients seen during their 3-week orthopaedic attachment in both a ward and out-patient setting. A comparison of perceived learning in the two settings showed that students learned more from attending an out-patient clinic than a ward round, but did not make full use of the learning potential of either. The setting did not particularly influence the balance of learning as categorized here but only the ward round supplied experience of surgical complications. The amount of learning taking place in an out-patient clinic was influenced by student ability, measured by examination performance, but not by clinic work-load. The implications of increased use of out-patient clinics and the advantages and disadvantages of the approach employed are discussed. It is concluded that in the situation studied student learning in the outpatient setting is as good as or superior to the ward setting but should not totally replace it.

  8. Timing of the initiation of parenteral nutrition in critically ill children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, Lissette; Mehta, Nilesh M; Duggan, Christopher P

    2017-05-01

    To review the current literature evaluating clinical outcomes of early and delayed parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children. Nutritional management remains an important aspect of care among the critically ill, with enteral nutrition generally preferred. However, inability to advance enteral feeds to caloric goals and contraindications to enteral nutrition often leads to reliance on parenteral nutrition. The timing of parenteral nutrition initiation is varied among critically ill children, and derives from an assessment of nutritional status, energy requirements, and physiologic differences between adults and children, including higher nutrient needs and lower body reserves. A recent randomized control study among critically ill children suggests improved clinical outcomes with avoiding initiation of parenteral nutrition on day 1 of admission to the pediatric ICU. Although there is no consensus on the optimal timing of parenteral nutrition initiation among critically ill children, recent literature does not support the immediate initiation of parenteral nutrition on pediatric ICU admission. A common theme in the reviewed literature highlights the importance of accurate assessment of nutritional status and energy expenditure in deciding when to initiate parenteral nutrition. As with all medical interventions, the initiation of parenteral nutrition should be considered in light of the known benefits of judiciously provided nutritional support with the known risks of artificial, parenteral feeding.

  9. Community based rehabilitation: a strategy for peace-building

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson Jennifer; Koros Michael; Boyce William

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Certain features of peace-building distinguish it from peacekeeping, and make it an appropriate strategy in dealing with vertical conflict and low intensity conflict. However, some theorists suggest that attempts, through peace-building, to impose liberal values upon non-democratic cultures are misguided and lack an ethical basis. Discussion We have been investigating the peace-building properties of community based approaches to disability in a number of countries. This p...

  10. "Psychological Boarding" and Community-Based Behavioral Health Crisis Stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Dhrubodhi; Saxon, Verletta

    2018-01-27

    This exploratory paper presents a case study where a community based mental health organization forging a partnership with a local hospital system to establish a crisis stabilization unit (CSU) to address behavioral health emergency care. The study takes a mixed methods case study approach to address two research questions; (a) did this approach reduce the overall length of stay in the hospital emergency departments? (b) What challenges did the taskforce face in implementing this CSU model? The paper shares recommendation from the findings.

  11. Community-based tourism in Cape Verde - a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas Lopez-Guzman; Osvaldo Borges; Ana Maria Castillo-Canalejo

    2011-01-01

    Community-based tourism is taking its place in the world as an alternative to traditional tourist destinations, especially in developing countries. This form of tourism allows for greater contact with the local community and for the tourist to experience new sensations while enabling the economic and social development of the geographic area. In this paper, the results of fieldwork carried out in the island of Fogo (Cape Verde) are presented, assessing the opinion and perception tourists visi...

  12. A review of studies on community based early warning systems

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret Macherera; Moses J. Chimbari

    2016-01-01

    Community-based early warning systems involve community driven collection and analysis of information that enable warning messages to help a community to react to a hazard and reduce the resulting loss or harm. Most early warning systems are designed at the national or global level. Local communities’ capacity to predict weather conditions using indigenous knowledge has been demonstrated in studies focusing on climate change and agriculture in some African countries. This review was motivated...

  13. Future Scope of Community Based Tourism in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Gurung, Sunita

    2015-01-01

    This Bachelor’s thesis is based on the tourism and community based tourism in Nepal. The purpose of selecting tourism as a main topic is to find out the future scope of CBT in Nepal. Despite having small size, Nepal holds many attractive and adventurous tourist destinations. Nepal is famous from its cultural and traditional diversity, natural beauty, trekking trails, moun-taineering and warm and welcoming hospitality. Tourism in Nepal is undoubtedly the most important source for the econo...

  14. Efficient community-based control strategies in adaptive networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hui; Tang Ming; Zhang Haifeng

    2012-01-01

    Most studies on adaptive networks concentrate on the properties of steady state, but neglect transient dynamics. In this study, we pay attention to the emergence of community structure in the transient process and the effects of community-based control strategies on epidemic spreading. First, by normalizing the modularity, we investigate the evolution of community structure during the transient process, and find that a strong community structure is induced by the rewiring mechanism in the early stage of epidemic dynamics, which, remarkably, delays the outbreak of disease. We then study the effects of control strategies started at different stages on the prevalence. Both immunization and quarantine strategies indicate that it is not ‘the earlier, the better’ for the implementation of control measures. And the optimal control effect is obtained if control measures can be efficiently implemented in the period of a strong community structure. For the immunization strategy, immunizing the susceptible nodes on susceptible–infected links and immunizing susceptible nodes randomly have similar control effects. However, for the quarantine strategy, quarantining the infected nodes on susceptible–infected links can yield a far better result than quarantining infected nodes randomly. More significantly, the community-based quarantine strategy performs better than the community-based immunization strategy. This study may shed new light on the forecast and the prevention of epidemics among humans. (paper)

  15. Community Based Nutrition Rehabilitation in Tanzania: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urio, Elisaphinate Moses; Jeje, Benedict; Ndossi, Godwin

    2014-01-01

    Full text: Malnutrition among children under the age of five continues to be a significant public health problem in Tanzania. Despite numerous nutritional interventions that have been implemented, the country still experiences high rates of malnutrition. According to Tanzania Demographic and Health Survey of 2010 the prevalence of underweight was estimated to be 16%, wasting 5% and stunting 42 %. Factors contributing to causes of malnutrition include immediate, underlying and basic causes. All these factors are interlinked and operate synergistically and not independently. Approaches for managing malnourished children in Tanzania evolved from facility based Nutrition Rehabilitation Units (NURU) in the late 1960s to Community Based Nutrition Rehabilitation (CBNR) in late 1980s. In the latter approach, malnourished children are rehabilitated in the same environment (village, home) that precipitated the condition, using resources and infrastructures available in the community. Mothers are taught about child feeding using family foods to make good food mixtures and of the importance of feeding frequency for the young child. Limitations for this approach include inadequate advocacy to leaders from districts down to the community level, few trained health providers and community health workers on knowledge and skills on community based nutrition rehabilitation, inadequate equipment and supplies for identification and categorization of malnutrition, low awareness of parents, care givers and community leaders on home rehabilitation of malnourished children. Nonetheless, Community Based Nutrition Rehabilitation approach has the potential to address malnutrition in children given political will and resources. (author)

  16. Cost Effective Community Based Dementia Screening: A Markov Model Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Saito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Given the dementia epidemic and the increasing cost of healthcare, there is a need to assess the economic benefit of community based dementia screening programs. Materials and Methods. Markov model simulations were generated using data obtained from a community based dementia screening program over a one-year period. The models simulated yearly costs of caring for patients based on clinical transitions beginning in pre dementia and extending for 10 years. Results. A total of 93 individuals (74 female, 19 male were screened for dementia and 12 meeting clinical criteria for either mild cognitive impairment (n=7 or dementia (n=5 were identified. Assuming early therapeutic intervention beginning during the year of dementia detection, Markov model simulations demonstrated 9.8% reduction in cost of dementia care over a ten-year simulation period, primarily through increased duration in mild stages and reduced time in more costly moderate and severe stages. Discussion. Community based dementia screening can reduce healthcare costs associated with caring for demented individuals through earlier detection and treatment, resulting in proportionately reduced time in more costly advanced stages.

  17. Lessons Learned From Community-Based Approaches to Sodium Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Heather; Strazza, Karen; Losby PhD, Jan L.; Lane, Rashon; Mugavero, Kristy; Anater, Andrea S.; Frost, Corey; Margolis, Marjorie; Hersey, James

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This article describes lessons from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative encompassing sodium reduction interventions in six communities. Design A multiple case study design was used. Setting This evaluation examined data from programs implemented in six communities located in New York (Broome County, Schenectady County, and New York City); California (Los Angeles County and Shasta County); and Kansas (Shawnee County). Subjects Participants (n = 80) included program staff, program directors, state-level staff, and partners. Measures Measures for this evaluation included challenges, facilitators, and lessons learned from implementing sodium reduction strategies. Analysis The project team conducted a document review of program materials and semi structured interviews 12 to 14 months after implementation. The team coded and analyzed data deductively and inductively. Results Five lessons for implementing community-based sodium reduction approaches emerged: (1) build relationships with partners to understand their concerns, (2) involve individuals knowledgeable about specific venues early, (3) incorporate sodium reduction efforts and messaging into broader nutrition efforts, (4) design the program to reduce sodium gradually to take into account consumer preferences and taste transitions, and (5) identify ways to address the cost of lower-sodium products. Conclusion The experiences of the six communities may assist practitioners in planning community-based sodium reduction interventions. Addressing sodium reduction using a community-based approach can foster meaningful change in dietary sodium consumption. PMID:24575726

  18. Lessons learned from community-based approaches to sodium reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Heather; Strazza, Karen; Losby, Jan L; Lane, Rashon; Mugavero, Kristy; Anater, Andrea S; Frost, Corey; Margolis, Marjorie; Hersey, James

    2015-01-01

    This article describes lessons from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiative encompassing sodium reduction interventions in six communities. A multiple case study design was used. This evaluation examined data from programs implemented in six communities located in New York (Broome County, Schenectady County, and New York City); California (Los Angeles County and Shasta County); and Kansas (Shawnee County). Participants (n = 80) included program staff, program directors, state-level staff, and partners. Measures for this evaluation included challenges, facilitators, and lessons learned from implementing sodium reduction strategies. The project team conducted a document review of program materials and semistructured interviews 12 to 14 months after implementation. The team coded and analyzed data deductively and inductively. Five lessons for implementing community-based sodium reduction approaches emerged: (1) build relationships with partners to understand their concerns, (2) involve individuals knowledgeable about specific venues early, (3) incorporate sodium reduction efforts and messaging into broader nutrition efforts, (4) design the program to reduce sodium gradually to take into account consumer preferences and taste transitions, and (5) identify ways to address the cost of lower-sodium products. The experiences of the six communities may assist practitioners in planning community-based sodium reduction interventions. Addressing sodium reduction using a community-based approach can foster meaningful change in dietary sodium consumption.

  19. Preferences for benefit packages for community-based health insurance: an exploratory study in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nnenna Tasie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is important that community-based health insurance (CBHI schemes are designed in such a way as to ensure the relevance of the benefit packages to potential clients. Hence, this paper provides an understanding of the preferred benefit packages by different economic status groups as well as urban and rural dwellers for CBHI in Southeast Nigeria. Methods The study took place in rural, urban and semi-urban communities of south-east Nigeria. A questionnaire was used to collect information from 3070 randomly picked household heads. Focus group discussions were used to collect qualitative data. Data was examined for links between preferences for benefit packages with SES and geographic residence of the respondents. Results Respondents in the rural areas and in the lower SES preferred a comprehensive benefit package which includes all inpatient, outpatient and emergencies services, while those in urban areas as well as those in the higher SES group showed a preference for benefit packages which will cover only basic disease control interventions. Conclusion Equity concerns in preferences for services to be offered by the CBHI scheme should be addressed for CBHI to succeed in different contexts.

  20. Preferences for benefit packages for community-based health insurance: an exploratory study in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwujekwe, Obinna; Onoka, Chima; Uguru, Nkoli; Nnenna, Tasie; Uzochukwu, Benjamin; Eze, Soludo; Kirigia, Joses; Petu, Amos

    2010-06-12

    It is important that community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes are designed in such a way as to ensure the relevance of the benefit packages to potential clients. Hence, this paper provides an understanding of the preferred benefit packages by different economic status groups as well as urban and rural dwellers for CBHI in Southeast Nigeria. The study took place in rural, urban and semi-urban communities of south-east Nigeria. A questionnaire was used to collect information from 3070 randomly picked household heads. Focus group discussions were used to collect qualitative data. Data was examined for links between preferences for benefit packages with SES and geographic residence of the respondents. Respondents in the rural areas and in the lower SES preferred a comprehensive benefit package which includes all inpatient, outpatient and emergencies services, while those in urban areas as well as those in the higher SES group showed a preference for benefit packages which will cover only basic disease control interventions. Equity concerns in preferences for services to be offered by the CBHI scheme should be addressed for CBHI to succeed in different contexts.

  1. Organizational capacity for service integration in community-based addiction health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Aarons, Gregory A; Palinkas, Lawrence A

    2014-04-01

    We examined factors associated with readiness to coordinate mental health, public health, and HIV testing among community-based addiction health services programs. We analyzed client and program data collected in 2011 from publicly funded addiction health services treatment programs in Los Angeles County, California. We analyzed a sample of 14 379 clients nested in 104 programs by using logistic regressions examining odds of service coordination with mental health and public health providers. We conducted a separate analysis to examine the percentage of clients receiving HIV testing in each program. Motivational readiness and organizational climate for change were associated with higher odds of coordination with mental health and public health services. Programs with professional accreditation had higher odds of coordinating with mental health services, whereas programs receiving public funding and methadone and residential programs (compared with outpatient) had a higher percentage of clients receiving coordinated HIV testing. These findings provide an evidentiary base for the role of motivational readiness, organizational climate, and external regulation and funding in improving the capacity of addiction health services programs to develop integrated care.

  2. Conjugated hyperbilirubinemia in infancy associated with parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, J; Chang, C H; Brough, A J; Heidelberger, K P

    1977-03-01

    Liver biopsy was performed to exclude anatomic obstruction of the biliary tract in five prematurely born infants who had developed conjugated hyperbilirubinemia during intravenous alimentation with a protein hydrolysate. Each was being treated after having undergone a segmental intestinal resection for necrotizing enterocolitis. Bacterial and viral infections, metabolic disorders, and isoimmune hemolytic disease were excluded as possible causes of jaundice. Light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis disclosed cholestasis and hepatocellular injury without significant inflammatory reaction. Jaundice abated following permanent discontinuation of parenteral alimentation. The jaundice and cholestasis are interpreted to be hepatotoxic effects because of (1) their temporal relationship to the treatment and (2) the presence of hepatocellular damage.

  3. Home Parenteral Nutrition in Adult Patients with Chronic Intestinal Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christopher Filtenborg; Hvistendahl, Mark; Naimi, Rahim M.

    2017-01-01

    in treating IF with home parenteral nutrition (HPN), this study documents the HPN evolution and describes the demographics and outcome in one of the world's largest single-center cohorts. Methods: We included patients with IF discharged with HPN from 1970-2010. Data were extracted according to European...... Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism classifications from the Copenhagen IF database. Results: Over the decades, we observed an exponential increase in the number of HPN patients. The 508 patients with IF collectively received HPN for 1751 years. While receiving HPN, 211 patients with IF (42...

  4. Preventing errors in administration of parenteral drugs: the results of a four-year national patient safety program.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C. de; Schilp, J.; Wagner, C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the implementation of a four-year national patient safety program concerning the parenteral drug administration process in the Netherlands. Methods: Structuring the preparation and administration process of parenteral drugs reduces the number of medication errors. A

  5. Clostridium difficile Infection in Outpatients

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-07

    Dr. Jon Mark Hirshon, Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, discusses Clostridium difficile infection in outpatients.  Created: 11/7/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/21/2011.

  6. Elderly alcoholics in outpatient treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bent; Nielsen, Anette Søgaard; Lolk, Anette

    2010-01-01

    In Denmark, the treatment of alcoholics is provided by public outpatient alcohol clinics. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether elderly patients differ from younger patients with regards to sociodemographic data, drinking pattern and psychiatric comorbidity which may affect...

  7. Hidrotórax secundário à nutrição parenteral: relato de caso Hydrothorax due to parenteral nutrition: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Henrique Silvah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Hidrotórax secundário à infusão de nutrição parenteral é uma condição rara, embora se apresente cada vez mais comum. Neste relato de caso, uma paciente com síndrome do intestino curto desenvolveu instabilidade hemodinâmica e insuficiência respiratória algumas horas após o início da infusão de nutrição parenteral. Ressaltamos também as manobras para evitar e tratar tal complicação.Hydrothorax due to parenteral nutrition infusion is a rare, although increasingly common event. This report shows a short bowel patient who developed hemodynamic instability and respiratory failure few hours after parenteral nutrition infusion's start. We also emphasize the maneuvers to avoid and treat such complication.

  8. 76 FR 50741 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Joint Public Conference; Quality and...: Notice of public conference. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), in cosponsorship with Parenteral...

  9. Parenteral nutrition facilitates activation of coagulation but not of fibrinolysis during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Poll, T.; Levi, M. [=Marcel M.; Braxton, C. C.; Coyle, S. M.; Roth, M.; ten Cate, J. W.; Lowry, S. F.

    1998-01-01

    Venous thrombosis and bacterial infections are common complications of parenteral nutrition. To test the hypothesis that infection facilitates activation of coagulation during parenteral nutrition, healthy subjects were intravenously injected with endotoxin (2 ng/kg) after they had received either 1

  10. Ceramide in lipid emulsions used in parenteral nutrition: an innocent bystander?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groener, Johanna E.; Serlie, Mireille J.; Poppema, Aldi; Mirzaian, Mina; Aerts, Johannes M.

    2011-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease is a prevalent and severe complication of long term parenteral nutrition. We present here for the first time data on the presence of ceramide, a bioactive compound involved in a variety of metabolic processes, in different lipid emulsions used in

  11. Vaginal hysterectomy, an outpatient procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engh, Marie Ellström; Hauso, Wenche

    2012-11-01

    To report our experience of treating women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy in an outpatient setting and to identify risk factors for hospital admission and women dissatisfied with care. Prospective observational report. department of obstetrics and gynecology, university hospital in Norway. 150 women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy at the outpatient clinic from February 2009 to April 2010. Perioperative data were collected prospectively and case notes were searched for complications. On the first postoperative day all women were contacted by telephone by a nurse. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to monitor pain and nausea during the stay at the outpatient clinic and the day after surgery. VAS was also used to specify the women's degree of satisfaction with care the day after surgery. The number of women who could be discharged from the outpatient unit and had a satisfaction score of ≥7 the day after surgery. Of the 150 women, 84% could be discharged after a mean observation period of 276 min (SD ± 80 min). The mean satisfaction score was 9.0, SD ± 1.4, and 92.6% of the women reported ≥7 points in the satisfaction score. No women with serious complications were sent home. Using a multivariable logistic regression model only pain at discharge was found as significant (p= 0.009) for admittance to hospital. Vaginal hysterectomy is a feasible outpatient procedure and the majority of women were satisfied with the care they received. © 2012 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica© 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. Antibioticoterapia parenteral en la infección urinaria neonatal Parenteral antibiotic therapy in neonatal urinary infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Díaz Álvarez

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio analítico, retrospectivo, en el que se conformaron dos grupos según el régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral (TAP: corto y largo. Éste fue seguido de antibioticoterapia oral, lo cual generó un ciclo de tratamiento parenteral-oral secuencial al menos de 10 días de duración. Se determinó la tasa de curación de la infección del tracto urinario, las reinfecciones en los primeros 3 meses de edad y la presencia de cicatrices renales. El objetivo fue evaluar la efectividad de un régimen de tratamiento antibiótico parenteral de corta duración (3 días en recién nacidos con infección del tracto urinario alta, de evolución inicial favorable. La tasa de curación de la infección con el TAP corto fue de 93,9 % y con el largo de 97,0 % (p = 0,32. En 5 pacientes del grupo de TAP corto ocurrió reinfección dentro de los 3 meses de edad, mientras que sólo ocurrió en 3 de los que llevaron TAP largo (p = 0,49. En los casos estudiados con gammagrafía con DMSA renal, se constató la presencia de cicatrices renales en 3 de 32 (9,4 % del grupo de TAP corto y en 7 de 33 (21,2 % en los pacientes de TAP largo (p = 0,30. Ambos regímenes de TAP tuvieron similar efectividad.

  13. Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Lim...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Limited Data Set This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 hospital outpatient PPS...

  14. Do Medicaid home and community based service waivers save money?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Charlene; Ng, Terence; Kitchener, Martin

    2011-10-01

    This article estimates the potential savings to the Medicaid program of using 1915c Home and Community Based Services (HCBS) waivers rather than institutional care. For Medicaid HCBS waiver expenditures of $25 billion in 2006, we estimate the national savings to be over $57 billion, or $57,338 per waiver participant in 2006 compared with the cost of Medicaid institutional care (for which all waiver participants are eligible). When taking into account a potential 50% "woodwork effect" (for people who might have refused institutional services), the saving would be $21 billion. This analysis demonstrates that HCBS waiver programs present significant direct financial savings to Medicaid long-term care (LTC) programs.

  15. Planning for Community Based Tourism in a Remote Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Harwood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Remote areas are difficult to access, tend to lack critical infrastructure, are highly susceptible to shocks in the marketplace, and are perceived by industry to possess limited development opportunities. Accordingly a community orientated and territorial approach to development planning in a remote area will be more successful than a top down industry based approach [1]. Given the limitations of being remote, the case study community examined in this research manages and sustains a bird watching tourism product within a global market place. This paper examines how a remotely located community in the Arfak Mountains of West Papua overcomes these difficulties and plans for community based tourism (CBT in their locale.

  16. Beyond vertical integration--Community based medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Emma Margaret

    2006-11-01

    The term 'vertical integration' is used broadly in medical education, sometimes when discussing community based medical education (CBME). This article examines the relevance of the term 'vertical integration' and provides an alternative perspective on the complexities of facilitating the CBME process. The principles of learner centredness, patient centredness and flexibility are fundamental to learning in the diverse contexts of 'community'. Vertical integration as a structural concept is helpful for academic organisations but has less application to education in the community setting; a different approach illuminates the strengths and challenges of CBME that need consideration by these organisations.

  17. Community-based dental education: history, current status, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formicola, Allan J; Bailit, Howard L

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the history, current status, and future direction of community-based dental education (CBDE). The key issues addressed include the reasons that dentistry developed a different clinical education model than the other health professions; how government programs, private medical foundations, and early adopter schools influenced the development of CBDE; the societal and financial factors that are leading more schools to increase the time that senior dental students spend in community programs; the impact of CBDE on school finances and faculty and student perceptions; and the reasons that CBDE is likely to become a core part of the clinical education of all dental graduates.

  18. Recent developments in protein and peptide parenteral delivery approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashaben; Cholkar, Kishore; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of insulin in the early 1900s initiated the research and development to improve the means of therapeutic protein delivery in patients. In the past decade, great emphasis has been placed on bringing protein and peptide therapeutics to market. Despite tremendous efforts, parenteral delivery still remains the major mode of administration for protein and peptide therapeutics. Other routes such as oral, nasal, pulmonary and buccal are considered more opportunistic rather than routine application. Improving biological half-life, stability and therapeutic efficacy is central to protein and peptide delivery. Several approaches have been tried in the past to improve protein and peptide in vitro/in vivo stability and performance. Approaches may be broadly categorized as chemical modification and colloidal delivery systems. In this review we have discussed various chemical approaches such as PEGylation, hyperglycosylation, mannosylation, and colloidal carriers including microparticles, nanoparticles, liposomes, carbon nanotubes and micelles for improving protein and peptide delivery. Recent developments on in situ thermosensitive gel-based protein and peptide delivery have also been described. This review summarizes recent developments on some currently existing approaches to improve stability, bioavailability and bioactivity of peptide and protein therapeutics following parenteral administration. PMID:24592957

  19. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  20. Studies with a safflower oil emulsion in total parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K. H.; Deitel, M.

    1981-01-01

    The prevention of essential fatty acid deficiency and the provision of adequate amounts of energy are two major concerns in total parenteral nutrition. Since earlier preparations of fat emulsion used to supplement the usual regimen of hypertonic glucose and amino acids have widely varying clinical acceptability, a new product, a safflower oil emulsion available in two concentrations (Liposyn), was evaluated. In four clinical trials the emulsion was used as a supplement to total parenteral nutrition. In five surgical patients 500 ml of the 10% emulsion infused every third day prevented or corrected essential fatty acid deficiency; however, in some cases in infusion every other day may be necessary. In 40 patients in severe catabolic states the emulsion provided 30% to 50% of the energy required daily: 10 patients received the 10% emulsion for 14 to 42 days, 9 patients received each emulsion in turn for 7 days, and 21 patient received the 20% emulsion for 14 to 28 days. All the patients survived and tolerated the lipid well; no adverse clinical effects were attributable to the lipid infusions. Transient mild, apparently clinically insignificant abnormalities in the results of one or more liver function tests and eosinophilia were observed in some patients. Thus, the safflower oil emulsion, at both concentrations, was safe and effective as a source of 30% to 50% of the energy required daily by seriously ill patients. PMID:6799182

  1. Hepatology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 16

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plauth, M.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral nutrition (PN is indicated in alcoholic steatohepatitis (ASH and in cirrhotic patients with moderate or severe malnutrition. PN should be started immediately when sufficientl oral or enteral feeding is not possible. ASH and cirrhosis patients who can be sufficiently fed either orally or enterally, but who have to abstain from food over a period of more than 12 hours (including nocturnal fasting should receive basal glucose infusion (2–3 g/kg/d. Total PN is required if such fasting periods last longer than 72 h. PN in patients with higher-grade hepatic encephalopathy (HE; particularly in HE IV° with malfunction of swallowing and cough reflexes, and unprotected airways. Cirrhotic patients or patients after liver transplantation should receive early postoperative PN after surgery if they cannot be sufficiently rally or enterally nourished. No recommendation can be made on donor or organ conditioning by parenteral administration of glutamine and arginine, aiming at minimising ischemia/reperfusion damage. In acute liver failure artificial nutrition should be considered irrespective of the nutritional state and should be commenced when oral nutrition cannot be restarted within 5 to 7 days. Whenever feasible, enteral nutrition should be administered via a nasoduodenal feeding tube.

  2. Nitrogen sparing by 2-ketoisocaproate in parenterally fed rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, M.; Matthews, D.E.; Walser, M.

    1990-01-01

    In rats receiving total parenteral nutrition with or without sodium 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC; 2.48 g.kg-1.day-1), L-[1- 13 C]leucine and [1- 14 C]KIC were constantly infused for 6 h. CO 2 production, 14 CO 2 production, 13 CO 2 enrichment, urinary urea nitrogen (N) plus ammonia N and total urinary N were measured. Whole body protein synthesis (S) was calculated in non-KIC-infused rats and also in unfed rats infused with [1- 14 C]leucine from fractional oxidation of labeled leucine (1-F), where F is fractional utilization for protein synthesis, and urea N plus ammonia N excretion (C) as S = C x F/(1-F). Addition of KIC caused a significant reduction in N excretion and a significant improvement in N balance. Fractional oxidation of labeled KIC increased, whereas fractional utilization of labeled KIC for protein synthesis decreased, but the extent of incorporation of infused KIC into newly synthesized protein (as leucine) amounted to at least 40% of the total rate of leucine incorporation into newly synthesized whole body protein. We conclude that addition of KIC spares N in parenterally fed rats and becomes a major source of leucine for protein synthesis

  3. Validation of cold chain during distribution of parenteral nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Tuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: this study aims to demonstrate the suitability of the process used to condition the extemporaneous mixtures of parenteral nutrition for distribution, considering the objective of preserving the cold chain during transport until it reaches the patient, necessary to ensure stability, effectiveness and safety of these mixtures. Method: concurrent validation, design and implementation of a protocol for evaluating the process of packaging and distribution of MNPE developed by a pharmaceutical laboratory. Running tests, according to predefined acceptance criteria. It is performed twice, in summer and on routes that require longer transfer time. Evaluation of conservation of temperature by monitoring the internal temperature values of each type of packaging, recorded by data loggers calibrated equipment. Results: the different tests meet the established criteria. The collected data ensure the maintenance of the cold chain for longer than the transfer time to the most distant points. Conclusions: this study establishes the suitability of the processes to maintaining the cold chain for transfer from the laboratory to the patient pharmacist. Whereas the breaking of cold chain can cause changes of compatibility and stability of parenteral nutrition and failures nutritional support, this study contributes to patient safety, one of the relevant dimensions of quality of care the health.

  4. The effect of community-based health management on the health of the elderly: a randomized controlled trial from China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Jianqian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An aging population poses significant challenges to health care in China. Health management has been implemented to reduce the costs of care, raise health service utilization, increase health knowledge and improve quality of life. Several studies have tried to verify the effectiveness of health management in achieving these goals worldwide. However, there have been insufficient randomized control trials (RCTs to draw reliable conclusions. The few small-scale studies conducted in China include mostly the general population rather than the elderly. Our study is designed to evaluate the impact of community-based health management on the health of the elderly through an RCT in Nanjing, China. Methods Two thousand four hundred participants, aged 60 or older and who gave informed consent, were randomly allocated 1:1 into management and control groups, the randomization schedule was concealed from community health service center staff until allocation. Community-based health management was applied in the former while the latter was only given usual care. After 18 months, three categories of variables (subjective grading health indices, objective health indices and health service utilization were measured based on a questionnaire, clinical monitoring and diagnostic measurements. Differences between the two groups were assessed before and after the intervention and analyzed with t-test, χ2-test, and multiple regression analysis. Results Compared with the control group, the management group demonstrated improvement on the following variables (P Conclusion Community-based health management improved both subjective grading health indices, objective health indices and decreased the number of outpatient clinic visits, demonstrating effectiveness in improving elderly health. Trial registration ChiCTR-OCH-11001716

  5. Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program: Hospital-Based Stroke Outpatient Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Danielle; Janzen, Shannon; McIntyre, Amanda; Vermeer, Julianne; Britt, Eileen; Teasell, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Few studies have considered the effectiveness of outpatient rehabilitation programs for stroke patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a hospital-based interdisciplinary outpatient stroke rehabilitation program with respect to physical functioning, mobility, and balance. The Comprehensive Outpatient Rehabilitation Program provides a hospital-based interdisciplinary approach to stroke rehabilitation in Southwestern Ontario. Outcome measures from physiotherapy and occupational therapy sessions were available at intake and discharge from the program. A series of paired sample t-tests were performed to assess patient changes between time points for each outcome measure. A total of 271 patients met the inclusion criteria for analysis (56.1% male; mean age = 62.9 ± 13.9 years). Significant improvements were found between admission and discharge for the Functional Independence Measure, grip strength, Chedoke-McMaster Stroke Assessment, two-minute walk test, maximum walk test, Timed Up and Go, Berg Balance Scale, and one-legged stance (P rehabilitation program was effective at improving the physical functioning, mobility, and balance of individuals after a stroke. A hospital-based, stroke-specific rehabilitation program should be considered when patients continue to experience deficits after inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Outpatient invasive radiologic procedures - Diagnostic and therapeutic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublin, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book is a ''how-to'' book for radiologists who are planning to, or considering whether to establish outpatient practice in response to DRGs. It provides practical, expert advice on both the administrative and clinical sides of outpatient radiology. It focuses on the essentials of clinical practice in the outpatient setting - and how it differs from inpatient practice

  7. A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for medical ... The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS), Harare, which ... of community-based activities and the availability of a large teaching platform, ...

  8. Involuntary Outpatient Commitment and the Elusive Pursuit of Violence Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Marvin S; Bhattacharya, Sayanti; Robertson, Allison G; Swanson, Jeffrey W

    2017-02-01

    Involuntary outpatient commitment (OPC)-also referred to as 'assisted outpatient treatment' or 'community treatment orders'-are civil court orders whereby persons with serious mental illness and repeated hospitalisations are ordered to adhere to community-based treatment. Increasingly, in the United States, OPC is promoted to policy makers as a means to prevent violence committed by persons with mental illness. This article reviews the background and context for promotion of OPC for violence prevention and the empirical evidence for the use of OPC for this goal. Relevant publications were identified for review in PubMed, Ovid Medline, PsycINFO, personal communications, and relevant Internet searches of advocacy and policy-related publications. Most research on OPC has focussed on outcomes such as community functioning and hospital recidivism and not on interpersonal violence. As a result, research on violence towards others has been limited but suggests that low-level acts of interpersonal violence such as minor, noninjurious altercations without weapon use and arrests can be reduced by OPC, but there is no evidence that OPC can reduce major acts of violence resulting in injury or weapon use. The impact of OPC on major violence, including mass shootings, is difficult to assess because of their low base rates. Effective implementation of OPC, when combined with intensive community services and applied for an adequate duration to take effect, can improve treatment adherence and related outcomes, but its promise as an effective means to reduce serious acts of violence is unknown.

  9. Evaluation of complex community-based childhood obesity prevention interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karacabeyli, D; Allender, S; Pinkney, S; Amed, S

    2018-05-16

    Multi-setting, multi-component community-based interventions have shown promise in preventing childhood obesity; however, evaluation of these complex interventions remains a challenge. The objective of the study is to systematically review published methodological approaches to outcome evaluation for multi-setting community-based childhood obesity prevention interventions and synthesize a set of pragmatic recommendations. MEDLINE, CINAHL and PsycINFO were searched from inception to 6 July 2017. Papers were included if the intervention targeted children ≤18 years, engaged at least two community sectors and described their outcome evaluation methodology. A single reviewer conducted title and abstract scans, full article review and data abstraction. Directed content analysis was performed by three reviewers to identify prevailing themes. Thirty-three studies were included, and of these, 26 employed a quasi-experimental design; the remaining were randomized control trials. Body mass index was the most commonly measured outcome, followed by health behaviour change and psychosocial outcomes. Six themes emerged, highlighting advantages and disadvantages of active vs. passive consent, quasi-experimental vs. randomized control trials, longitudinal vs. repeat cross-sectional designs and the roles of process evaluation and methodological flexibility in evaluating complex interventions. Selection of study designs and outcome measures compatible with community infrastructure, accompanied by process evaluation, may facilitate successful outcome evaluation. © 2018 World Obesity Federation.

  10. Stylized facts in social networks: Community-based static modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Murase, Yohsuke; Török, János; Kertész, János; Kaski, Kimmo

    2018-06-01

    The past analyses of datasets of social networks have enabled us to make empirical findings of a number of aspects of human society, which are commonly featured as stylized facts of social networks, such as broad distributions of network quantities, existence of communities, assortative mixing, and intensity-topology correlations. Since the understanding of the structure of these complex social networks is far from complete, for deeper insight into human society more comprehensive datasets and modeling of the stylized facts are needed. Although the existing dynamical and static models can generate some stylized facts, here we take an alternative approach by devising a community-based static model with heterogeneous community sizes and larger communities having smaller link density and weight. With these few assumptions we are able to generate realistic social networks that show most stylized facts for a wide range of parameters, as demonstrated numerically and analytically. Since our community-based static model is simple to implement and easily scalable, it can be used as a reference system, benchmark, or testbed for further applications.

  11. Scoping study into community-based renewable energy projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This scoping study has been carried out by the Centre for Sustainable Energy (CSE), a charity which promotes energy efficiency and renewable energy. CSE have used their involvement in the development of the Energy Club (the first energy service company for householders in the UK) and the Bristol Environment and Energy Trust (a cross-sector organisation initiating environmental projects) as the basis of the study. This study is the first phase of a long term project to set up two small-scale renewable energy schemes to demonstrate the benefits of a community based approach. Specific objectives of the study were: to identify, quantify and cost, renewable energy resources for interested community organisations; to evaluate two routes for developing community based projects - Environment Trusts and Energy Clubs'; to organise a seminar with the objective of bringing together community interest groups with experts in renewable energy; to identify two communities with viable renewable projects for the next phase - full feasibility studies/pilot projects. (author)

  12. A rural, community-based suicide awareness and intervention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sharon; Walker, Coralanne; Miles, Alison C J; De Silva, Eve; Zimitat, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Suicide is a prominent public health issue in rural Australia and specifically in Tasmania, which has one of the highest suicide rates in the country. The Community Response to Eliminating Suicide (CORES) program was developed in rural Tasmania in response to a significant number of suicides over a short period of time. CORES is unique in that it is both a community-based and gatekeeper education model. CORES aims to build and empower communities to take ownership of suicide prevention strategies. It also aims to increase the individual community member's interpersonal skills and awareness of suicide risks, while building peer support and awareness of suicide prevention support services within the community itself. Pre- and post-test surveys after the CORES 1-day suicide awareness and intervention program (SAIP) showed significant increases in levels of comfort and confidence in discussing suicide with those who may be contemplating that action. CORES builds community capital through establishing new connections within communities. Establishment of local executive groups, funding and SAIP are key activities of successful CORES programs in communities around Australia. Over half of the initial leaders are still actively involved after a decade, which reflects positively on the quality and outcomes of the program. This study supports CORES as a beneficial and feasible community-based suicide intervention program for rural communities.

  13. Management initiatives in a community-based health insurance scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Tara; Ranson, M Kent; Chatterjee, Mirai; Mills, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes have developed in response to inadequacies of alternate systems for protecting the poor against health care expenditures. Some of these schemes have arisen within community-based organizations (CBOs), which have strong links with poor communities, and are therefore well situated to offer CBHI. However, the managerial capacities of many such CBOs are limited. This paper describes management initiatives undertaken in a CBHI scheme in India, in the course of an action-research project. The existing structures and systems at the CBHI had several strengths, but fell short on some counts, which became apparent in the course of planning for two interventions under the research project. Management initiatives were introduced that addressed four features of the CBHI, viz. human resources, organizational structure, implementation systems, and data management. Trained personnel were hired and given clear roles and responsibilities. Lines of reporting and accountability were spelt out, and supportive supervision was provided to team members. The data resources of the organization were strengthened for greater utilization of this information. While the changes that were introduced took some time to be accepted by team members, the commitment of the CBHI's leadership to these initiatives was critical to their success. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Community-Based Multidisciplinary Computed Tomography Screening Program Improves Lung Cancer Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Daniel L; Mayfield, William R; Luu, Theresa D; Helms, Gerald A; Muster, Alan R; Beckler, Vickie J; Cann, Aaron

    2016-05-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Overall survival is less than 20%, with the majority of patients presenting with advanced disease. The National Lung Screening Trial, performed mainly in academic medical centers, showed that cancer mortality can be reduced with computed tomography (CT) screening compared with chest radiography in high-risk patients. To determine whether this survival advantage can be duplicated in a community-based multidisciplinary thoracic oncology program, we initiated a CT scan screening program for lung cancer within an established health care system. In 2008, we launched a lung cancer CT screening program within the WellStar Health System (WHS) consisting of five hospitals, three health parks, 140 outpatient medical offices, and 12 imaging centers that provide care in a five-county area of approximately 1.4 million people in Metro-Atlanta. Screening criteria incorporated were the International Early Lung Cancer Action Program (2008 to 2010) and National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines (2011 to 2013) for moderate- and high-risk patients. A total of 1,267 persons underwent CT lung cancer screening in WHS from 2008 through 2013; 53% were men, 87% were 50 years of age or older, and 83% were current or former smokers. Noncalcified indeterminate pulmonary nodules were found in 518 patients (41%). Thirty-six patients (2.8%) underwent a diagnostic procedure for positive findings on their CT scan; 30 proved to have cancer, 28 (2.2%) primary lung cancer and 2 metastatic cancer, and 6 had benign disease. Fourteen patients (50%) had their lung cancer discovered on their initial CT scan, 11 on subsequent scans associated with indeterminate pulmonary nodules growth and 3 patients who had a new indeterminate pulmonary nodules. Only 15 (54%) of these 28 patients would have qualified as a National Lung Screening Trial high-risk patient; 75% had stage I or II disease. Overall 5-year survival was 64% and 5-year

  15. 75 FR 67751 - Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ...] Medicare Program: Community-Based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) Meeting AGENCY: Centers for Medicare... guidance and ask questions about the upcoming Community-based Care Transitions Program. The meeting is open... conference will also provide an overview of the Community-based Care Transitions Program (CCTP) and provide...

  16. 76 FR 21372 - Medicare Program; Solicitation for Proposals for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ...] Medicare Program; Solicitation for Proposals for the Medicare Community-Based Care Transitions Program... interested parties of an opportunity to apply to participate in the Medicare Community-based Care Transitions.... 111-148, enacted on March 23, 2010) (Affordable Care Act) authorized the Medicare Community-based Care...

  17. Identifying and Assessing Community-Based Social Behavior of Adolescents and Young Adults with EBD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Michael; And Others

    1994-01-01

    A battery of three measures for assessing the community-based social behavior of adolescents and young adults with emotional and behavioral disorders is described. The measures, in male and female forms, are "Test of Community-Based Social Skill Knowledge,""Scale of Community-Based Social Skill Performance," and "Behaviors That Are Undesirable for…

  18. Philadelphia's community based drug abuse program: broader medical and social concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schut, J

    1975-06-01

    The rehabilitation of drug dependent people has undergone drastic changes since first attempts were made to curb the abuse of illegal drugs. The isolated law-enforcement model proved to be of no use in this area. So, too, the medical model, the psychological model and the public health model proved disappointingly low in their results. During the last ten years, a so-called "metabolic replacement model" has had its upsurge, creating a controversy still under discussion. The Drug Abuse Rehabilitation Programs of the West Philadelphia Community Mental Health Consortium, Inc. have been in the forefront with its treatment models. Established in 1968 as a purely methadone maintenance program, it has evolved into becoming a model, applying community mental health principles. This paper will explore this model further, describing the mechanics of its changes. From a municipal hospital-based methadone dispensing station, the program has developed into a multi-modality project. Three decentralized drug-free outpatient services are located in the midst of the community where the drug abuse problem is more accute. Outreach is emphasized and case-funding is applied. A possibly unique river-front motel was just acquired for the development of a community-based treatment modality. The 94 rooms were converted into a first-floor alcoholism program which also has a "highway safety program" and an intermediate care facility for alcoholics. The second floor of this facility contains outpatient services for the treatment of drug addicts, including a methadone maintenance program, counselling, family therapy and group therapy. The place where most of the emphasis has been placed is the Work Rehabilitation Center (a novel approach whereby patients will spend up to six hours in "partial hospitalization"). Clients will be tested for vocational aptitude and four workshops will be developed on the premises - carpentry, automotive, electricity and clerical. A huge cafeteria with a semi

  19. Parenteral nutrition in the ICU setting: need for a shift in utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Taku; Hiesmayr, Michael; Pichard, Claude

    2016-03-01

    The difficulties to feed the patients adequately with enteral nutrition alone have drawn the attention of the clinicians toward the use of parenteral nutrition, although recommendations by the recent guidelines are conflicting. This review focuses on the intrinsic role of parenteral nutrition, its new indication, and modalities of use for the critically ill patients. A recent trial demonstrated that selecting either parenteral nutrition or enteral nutrition for early nutrition has no impact on clinical outcomes. However, it must be acknowledged that the risk of relative overfeeding is greater when using parenteral nutrition and the risk of underfeeding is greater when using enteral nutrition because of gastrointestinal intolerance. Both overfeeding and underfeeding in the critically ill patients are associated with deleterious outcomes. Thus, early and adequate feeding according to the specific energy needs can be recommended as the optimal feeding strategy. Parenteral nutrition can be used to substitute or supplement enteral nutrition, if adequately prescribed. Testing for enteral nutrition tolerance during 2-3 days after ICU admission provides the perfect timing to start parenteral nutrition, if needed. In case of absolute contraindication for enteral nutrition, consider starting parenteral nutrition carefully to avoid overfeeding.

  20. Parenteral nutrition in patients with inborn errors of metabolism - a therapeutic problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaluzny, L; Szczepanik, M; Siwinska-Mrozek, Z; Borkowska-Klos, M; Cichy, W; Walkowiak, J

    2014-06-01

    Parenteral nutrition is now a standard part of supportive treatment in pediatric departments. We describe four cases in which parenteral nutrition was extremely difficult due to coincidence with inborn errors of metabolism. The first two cases was fatty acid beta-oxidation disorders associated with necrotizing enterocolitis and congenital heart disease. Thus, limitations of intravenous lipid intake made it difficult to maintain a good nutritional status. The third case was phenylketonuria associated with a facial region tumour (rhabdomyosarcoma), in which parenteral nutrition was complicated because of a high phenylalanine content in the amino acid formulas for parenteral nutrition. The fourth patient was a child with late-diagnosed tyrosinemia type 1, complicated with encephalopathy - during intensive care treatment the patient needed nutritional support, including parenteral nutrition - we observed amino acid formula problems similar to those in the phenylketonuria patient. Parenteral nutrition in children with inborn errors of metabolism is a rare, but very important therapeutic problem. Total parenteral nutrition formulas are not prepared for this group of diseases.

  1. Parenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizari, Letícia; da Silva Santos, Andressa Feijó; Foss, Norma Tiraboschi; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio; Suen, Vivian Marques Miguel

    2016-07-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a severe malabsorption disorder, and prolonged parenteral nutrition is essential for survival in some cases. Among the undesirable effects of long-term parenteral nutrition is an increase in proinflammatory cytokines. The aim of the present study was to measure the serum levels of interleukin-6, interleukin-10, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and transforming growth factor beta, in patients with short bowel syndrome on cyclic parenteral nutrition and patients who had previously received but no longer require parenteral nutrition. The study was cross-sectional and observational. Three groups were studied as follows: Parenteral nutrition group, 9 patients with short bowel syndrome that receive cyclic parenteral nutrition; Oral nutrition group, 10 patients with the same syndrome who had been weaned off parenteral nutrition for at least 1 year prior to the study; Control group, 13 healthy adults, matched for age and sex to parenteral and oral groups. The following data were collected: age, tobacco use, drug therapies, dietary intake, body weight, height, blood collection. All interleukins were significantly higher in the parenteral group compared with the control group as follows: interleukin-6: 22 ± 19 vs 1.5 ± 1.4 pg/mL, P= .0002; transforming growth factor β: 854 ± 204 vs 607 ± 280 pg/mL, P= .04; interleukin-10: 8 ± 37 vs 0.6 ± 4, P= .03; tumor necrosis factor α: 20 ± 8 vs 8 ± 4 pg/mL, Pparenteral nutrition in short bowel syndrome patients, regardless of its duration, increases serum proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics of phytosterol metabolism in neonates receiving parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem-Rao, T Hang; Tunc, Ilker; Mavis, Alisha M; Cao, Yumei; Polzin, Elizabeth M; Firary, Mary F; Wang, Xujing; Simpson, Pippa M; Patel, Shailendra B

    2015-08-01

    Phytosterols in soybean oil (SO) lipids likely contribute to parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD) in infants. No characterization of phytosterol metabolism has been done in infants receiving SO lipids. In a prospective cohort study, 45 neonates (36 SO lipid vs. 9 control) underwent serial blood sample measurements of sitosterol, campesterol, and stigmasterol. Mathematical modeling was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters of phytosterol metabolism and phytosterol exposure. Compared to controls, SO lipid-exposed infants had significantly higher levels of sitosterol and campesterol (P Phytosterols in SO lipid accumulate rapidly in neonates. Very preterm infants receiving SO lipid have higher sitosterol exposure, and may have poorly developed mechanisms of eliminating phytosterols that may contribute to their vulnerability to PNALD.

  3. Trace Elements in Parenteral Nutrition: Considerations for the Prescribing Clinician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jennifer; Mulesa, Leanne; Carrilero Rouillet, Mariana

    2017-04-28

    Trace elements (TEs) are an essential component of parenteral nutrition (PN). Over the last few decades, there has been increased experience with PN, and with this knowledge more information about the management of trace elements has become available. There is increasing awareness of the effects of deficiencies and toxicities of certain trace elements. Despite this heightened awareness, much is still unknown in terms of trace element monitoring, the accuracy of different assays, and current TE contamination of solutions. The supplementation of TEs is a complex and important part of the PN prescription. Understanding the role of different disease states and the need for reduced or increased doses is essential. Given the heterogeneity of the PN patients, supplementation should be individualized.

  4. A community-based program evaluation of community competency trainings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssmann, Christoph; Morrison, Darius; Russian, Ellery; Shiu-Thornton, Sharyne; Bowen, Deborah

    2010-01-01

    Transgender and gender-nonconforming individuals encounter a multitude of barriers to accessing clinically and culturally competent health care. One strategy to increase the quality and competence of care delivery is workplace trainings. This study describes a community-based program for the evaluation of this type of training. Using a mixed-methods approach, the research team assessed the effectiveness of three competency trainings administered by a local nonprofit organization in the Northwest United States. Quantitative data indicated a significant shift in self-assessed knowledge associated with completion of the training. Qualitative data confirmed this result and revealed a number of important themes about the effect of the trainings on providers and their ability to implement knowledge and skills in practice. Clinical considerations are proposed for providers who seek similar trainings and who aim to increase clinical and cultural competency in delivering care to transgender and gender-nonconforming patients and clients.

  5. Integrated community-based dementia care: the Geriant model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludo Glimmerveen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article gives an in-depth description of the service delivery model of Geriant, a Dutch organization providing community-based care services for people suffering from dementia. Core to its model is the provision of clinical case management, embedded in multidisciplinary dementia care teams. As Geriant's client group includes people from the first presumption of dementia until they can no longer live at home, its care model provides valuable lessons about how different mechanisms of integration are flexibly put to use if the complexity of clients” care needs increases. It showcases how the integration of services for a specific sub-population is combined with alignment of these services with generalist network partners. After a detailed description of the programme and its results, this article builds on the work of Walter Leutz for a conceptual discussion of Geriant's approach to care integration. 

  6. A community-based, interdisciplinary rehabilitation engineering course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy, Mary; Aceros, Juan

    2016-08-01

    A novel, community-based course was created through collaboration between the School of Engineering and the Physical Therapy program at the University of North Florida. This course offers a hands-on, interdisciplinary training experience for undergraduate engineering students through team-based design projects where engineering students are partnered with physical therapy students. Students learn the process of design, fabrication and testing of low-tech and high-tech rehabilitation technology for children with disabilities, and are exposed to a clinical experience under the guidance of licensed therapists. This course was taught in two consecutive years and pre-test/post-test data evaluating the impact of this interprofessional education experience on the students is presented using the Public Service Motivation Scale, Civic Actions Scale, Civic Attitudes Scale, and the Interprofessional Socialization and Valuing Scale.

  7. Community-Based Rural Tourism: A Proposed Sustainability Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayat Kalsom

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many tourism projects run by community in the rural areas are labelled as Community-based Rural Tourism (CBRT, a type of a more ‘responsible’ tourism that contributes to sustainable development. However, a framework is needed to enable planners and managers to understand its criteria thus ensuring that the CBRTs fulfil the sustainability requirement. This paper presents findings from a literature review on previous writings in this topic. Findings from an analysis on the criteria of a sustainable CBRT product are discussed. It is found that in order for it to play a role in sustainable development, a CBRT product must focus on competitive management, resource conservation, and benefit creation to the community. The three elements need to be supported, in turn, by community involvement and commitment. As the proposed conceptual framework of sustainable CBRT product can be a basis for further research in CBRT, it offers producing theoretical and practical implications.

  8. Penerapan Corporate Social Responsibility dengan Konsep Community Based Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Suriany

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Business is not only economic institution, but social institution too. As social institution, business has responsibility to help society in solving social problem. This responsibility called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. CSR pays attention about social problem and environment, so CSR support continuous development to help government role. Nowadays, our government has national development’s agenda. One of them is tourism sector (Visit Indonesia Year 2008 programmed. But tourism sector has challenge in human resources. In this case, business role in practice CSR is needed to help tourism sector. With CSR activities, the quality of local community will increase to participate in tourism activities. CSR activities include training that based on research. When the quality of local community increase, local community can practice the concept of community based tourism (CBT. In the future, Indonesia has a power to compete with other countries.

  9. Public participatory GIS in community-based disaster risk reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randall B. Kemp

    2008-12-01

    Introducing PPGIS tools into community-based DRR is not a neutral effort. The information and communication technologies (ICT embedded in GIS can both aid the DRR efforts as well as impact the community in unintended ways. ICTs may be common in communities engaged in DRR efforts so the introduction of PPGIS may have minimal impact. What are the societal ramifications, however, of PPGIS methods in DRR efforts when ICTs are a relatively new aspect of a given community?  What are the communication methods pertinent to PPGIS in the DRR context?  How does the ICT literature address PPGIS methods?  The paper addresses these and other influences of ICT on societies prone to natural hazards.

  10. A community-based framework for aquatic ecosystem models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Didde; Hamilton, D. P.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2012-01-01

    Here, we communicate a point of departure in the development of aquatic ecosystem models, namely a new community-based framework, which supports an enhanced and transparent union between the collective expertise that exists in the communities of traditional ecologists and model developers. Through...... a literature survey, we document the growing importance of numerical aquatic ecosystem models while also noting the difficulties, up until now, of the aquatic scientific community to make significant advances in these models during the past two decades. Through a common forum for aquatic ecosystem modellers we...... aim to (i) advance collaboration within the aquatic ecosystem modelling community, (ii) enable increased use of models for research, policy and ecosystem-based management, (iii) facilitate a collective framework using common (standardised) code to ensure that model development is incremental, (iv...

  11. Community-based adaptation to climate change: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Jessica; Huq, Saleemul

    2009-06-15

    Over a billion people - the world's poorest and most bulnerable communities – will bear the brunt of climate change. For them, building local capacity to cope is a vital step towards resilience. Community-based adaptation (CBA) is emerging as a key response to this challenge. Tailored to local cultures and conditions, CBA supports and builds on autonomous adaptations to climate variability, such as the traditional baira or floating gardens of Bangladesh, which help small farmers' crops survive climate-driven floods. Above all, CBA is participatory – a process involving both local stakeholders, and development and disaster risk reduction practitioners. As such, it builds on existing cultural norms while addressing local development issues that contribute to climate vulnerability. CBA is now gaining ground in many regions, and is ripe for the reassessment offered here.

  12. Standardization and Scaling of a Community-Based Palliative Care Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Janet; Kamal, Arif H; Harker, Matthew; Taylor, Donald H; Bonsignore, Lindsay; Morris, John; Massie, Lisa; Singh Bhullar, Parampal; Howell, Mary; Hendrix, Mark; Bennett, Deeana; Abernethy, Amy

    2017-11-01

    Although limited, the descriptions of Community-Based Palliative Care (CBPC) demonstrates variability in team structures, eligibility, and standardization across care settings. In 2014, Four Seasons Compassion for Life, a nonprofit hospice and palliative care (PC) organization in Western North Carolina (WNC), was awarded a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Health Care Innovation (CMMI) Award to expand upon their existing innovative model to implement, evaluate, and demonstrate CBPC in the United States. The objective of this article is to describe the processes and challenges of scaling and standardizing the CBPC model. Four Season's CBPC model serves patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings using an interdisciplinary team to address symptom management, psychosocial/spiritual care, advance care planning, and patient/family education. Medicare beneficiaries who are ≥65 years of age with a life-limiting illness were eligible for the CMMI project. The CBPC model was scaled across numerous counties in WNC and Upstate South Carolina. Over the first two years of the project, scaling occurred into 21 counties with the addition of 2 large hospitals, 52 nursing facilities, and 2 new clinics. To improve efficiency and effectiveness, a PC screening referral guide and a risk stratification approach were developed and implemented. Care processes, including patient referral and initial visit, were mapped. This article describes an interdisciplinary CBPC model in all care settings to individuals with life-limiting illness and offers guidance for risk stratification assessments and mapping care processes that may help PC programs as they develop and work to improve efficiencies.

  13. The role of community-based and philanthropic organizations in meeting cancer patient and caregiver needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Rebecca A; Taylor, Kathryn L; Kerner, Jon F; Coleman, Ellen; Blum, Diane

    2002-01-01

    We examined information from community-based and philanthropic organizations to document the cancer-related services that are currently available, establish which services are still needed, and determine who utilizes these formal support networks. In Phase I, 32 of 41 eligible organizations participated in a survey conducted from December 1999 to March 2000. The most common mission focus among participating organizations was information/referral-centered. The most common services provided were referrals to information resources and provision of cancer-related information. Only two of the organizations in Phase I provided client demographic information and both indicated that client populations were predominantly white, female, and over age 40. Phase II of the study involved analyzing patient data from Cancer Care, Inc., a national service organizations for cancer patients. Between 1983 and 1997, there were 2,714 prostate cancer patients and 9,451 breast cancer patients included in the Cancer Care database. Their most commonly reported problems were related to personal adjustment to illness, financial, home care, and transportation needs. There were significant differences in problems reported depending upon age and disease status. In addition, the results of this study support the idea that those at highest risk for developing and dying of cancer are the least likely to utilize formal support networks. Further, a gap in service provision for assistance with practical needs (e.g., transportation, home care, child care, psychosocial support) was identified. Due to the increasing use of outpatient care for cancer patients, a greater demand for practical assistance can be expected in the future. The availability of practical services will need to be increased in order to effectively meet cancer patient needs.

  14. Strategy Development of Community Base Tourism in Tidung Island, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhian Tyas Untari

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of thus study is to establish a community-based tourism development strategy in Tidung Island. Researcher use Strategy Management matrix, In this research, tourist entrepreneurs and tourist as an observation unit and is determined as an analysis unit of the company that is the decision makers are very influential in the company itself, including related Human Resources, Finance, Production, and Marketing. Eigen Factor score is use ase the weighting input data from the results of questionnaires. From the questionnaire, a score is obtained from the average given by the respondents at each key success factors, where in the input process the researcher used IFAS / IFAS Matrix, and in the process of strategy formulation, the researcher used the recommendation from the Grand Matrix Strategy output. The results of the output recommendations, which will then be implemented in the development of community-based tourism on the island of Tidung. Based on the Grand Matrix Strategy chart seen that the outline of Tidung Island tourism into the weak category, where the quadrant Challenges and Weaknesses is much greater than the strength and opportunities. Thus the strategy that can be done is with; improve tourism governance by maximizing the function of tourism development programs of DKI Jakarta Province, encouraging the Provincial Government of DKI Jakarta to allocate funds and attention to alternative tourism such as marine tourism located in Kepulauan Seribu, maximizing Community Service Activities of Higher Education as a medium of knowladge community transfer Tidung Island, improving the mode of transportation and increasing the frequency of ship felling Jakarta - Pulau Tidung.

  15. Evaluating community-based public health leadership training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraso, Marion; Gruebling, Kirsten; Layde, Peter; Remington, Patrick; Hill, Barbara; Morzinski, Jeffrey; Ore, Peggy

    2011-01-01

    Addressing the nation's increasingly complex public health challenges will require more effective multisector collaboration and stronger public health leadership. In 2005, the Healthy Wisconsin Leadership Institute launched an annual, year-long intensive "community teams" program. The goal of this program is to develop collaborative leadership and public health skills among Wisconsin-based multisectoral teams mobilizing their communities to improve public health. To measure the scope of participation and program impacts on individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge and collective achievements of teams on coalition and short-term community outcomes. End-of-year participant program evaluations and follow-up telephone interviews with participants 20 months after program completion. Community-based public health leadership training program. Sixty-eight participants in the Community Teams Program during the years 2006 to 2007 and 2007 to 2008. Professional diversity of program participants; individual learning and practice, including application of new knowledge; and collective achievements of teams, including coalition and short-term community outcomes. Participants in the Community Teams Program represent a diversity of sectors, including nonprofit, governmental, academic, business, and local public health. Participation increased knowledge across all public health and leadership competency areas covered in the program. Participating teams reported outcomes, including increased engagement of community leadership, expansion of preventive services, increased media coverage, strengthened community coalitions, and increased grant funding. Evaluation of this community-based approach to public health leadership training has shown it to be a promising model for building collaborative and public health leadership skills and initiating sustained community change for health improvement.

  16. Variability in ADHD care in community-based pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jeffery N; Kelleher, Kelly J; Baum, Rebecca; Brinkman, William B; Peugh, James; Gardner, William; Lichtenstein, Phil; Langberg, Joshua

    2014-12-01

    Although many efforts have been made to improve the quality of care delivered to children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in community-based pediatric settings, little is known about typical ADHD care in these settings other than rates garnered through pediatrician self-report. Rates of evidence-based ADHD care and sources of variability (practice-level, pediatrician-level, patient-level) were determined by chart reviews of a random sample of 1594 patient charts across 188 pediatricians at 50 different practices. In addition, the associations of Medicaid-status and practice setting (ie, urban, suburban, and rural) with the quality of ADHD care were examined. Parent- and teacher-rating scales were used during ADHD assessment with approximately half of patients. The use of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria was documented in 70.4% of patients. The vast majority (93.4%) of patients with ADHD were receiving medication and only 13.0% were receiving psychosocial treatment. Parent- and teacher-ratings were rarely collected to monitor treatment response or side effects. Further, fewer than half (47.4%) of children prescribed medication had contact with their pediatrician within the first month of prescribing. Most variability in pediatrician-delivered ADHD care was accounted for at the patient level; however, pediatricians and practices also accounted for significant variability on specific ADHD care behaviors. There is great need to improve the quality of ADHD care received by children in community-based pediatric settings. Improvements will likely require systematic interventions at the practice and policy levels to promote change. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Redefining community based on place attachment in a connected world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurney, Georgina G; Blythe, Jessica; Adams, Helen; Adger, W Neil; Curnock, Matthew; Faulkner, Lucy; James, Thomas; Marshall, Nadine A

    2017-09-19

    The concept of community is often used in environmental policy to foster environmental stewardship and public participation, crucial prerequisites of effective management. However, prevailing conceptualizations of community based on residential location or resource use are limited with respect to their utility as surrogates for communities of shared environment-related interests, and because of the localist perspective they entail. Thus, addressing contemporary sustainability challenges, which tend to involve transnational social and environmental interactions, urgently requires additional approaches to conceptualizing community that are compatible with current globalization. We propose a framing for redefining community based on place attachment (i.e., the bonds people form with places) in the context of Australia's Great Barrier Reef, a World Heritage Area threatened by drivers requiring management and political action at scales beyond the local. Using data on place attachment from 5,403 respondents residing locally, nationally, and internationally, we identified four communities that each shared a type of attachment to the reef and that spanned conventional location and use communities. We suggest that as human-environment interactions change with increasing mobility (both corporeal and that mediated by communication and information technology), new types of people-place relations that transcend geographic and social boundaries and do not require ongoing direct experience to form are emerging. We propose that adopting a place attachment framing to community provides a means to capture the neglected nonmaterial bonds people form with the environment, and could be leveraged to foster transnational environmental stewardship, critical to advancing global sustainability in our increasingly connected world.

  18. Systematic Review of Community-Based Childhood Obesity Prevention Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Jodi; Wu, Yang; Wilson, Renee; Wang, Youfa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study systematically reviewed community-based childhood obesity prevention programs in the United States and high-income countries. METHODS: We searched Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, CINAHL, clinicaltrials.gov, and the Cochrane Library for relevant English-language studies. Studies were eligible if the intervention was primarily implemented in the community setting; had at least 1 year of follow-up after baseline; and compared results from an intervention to a comparison group. Two independent reviewers conducted title scans and abstract reviews and reviewed the full articles to assess eligibility. Each article received a double review for data abstraction. The second reviewer confirmed the first reviewer’s data abstraction for completeness and accuracy. RESULTS: Nine community-based studies were included; 5 randomized controlled trials and 4 non–randomized controlled trials. One study was conducted only in the community setting, 3 were conducted in the community and school setting, and 5 were conducted in the community setting in combination with at least 1 other setting such as the home. Desirable changes in BMI or BMI z-score were found in 4 of the 9 studies. Two studies reported significant improvements in behavioral outcomes (1 in physical activity and 1 in vegetable intake). CONCLUSIONS: The strength of evidence is moderate that a combined diet and physical activity intervention conducted in the community with a school component is more effective at preventing obesity or overweight. More research and consistent methods are needed to understand the comparative effectiveness of childhood obesity prevention programs in the community setting. PMID:23753099

  19. Safety of parenteral nutrition in newborns: Results from a nationwide prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, Alexandre; Berleur, Marie-Pierre; Brasseur, Yvette; Calvez, Sophie

    2018-04-01

    Limited or delayed availability of parenteral nutrition (PN) solutions, as well as difficulties in ordering are often identified as reasons for non-compliance with international guidelines in newborns. This study aims at assessing the modality of use and safety of premixed standardized PN solutions in a nationwide prospective cohort of newborns treated in clinical practice. Two premixed fixed formulations with respective osmolarity of 715 and 790 mOsm/L specifically designed for neonates were made available throughout the country for clinical use from birth onwards. Descriptive data and modality of use were prospectively collected in a case report form, whereas all related and unrelated adverse events were recorded on a separate adverse event form. A total of 14,167 infants were prospectively included and 16,640 parenteral nutrition periods were analyzed. Mean age was 33 weeks of gestation, and mean weight was 2086 g. The majority of infants (81%) started the parenteral nutrition the first day of life or the day after. The route of parenteral nutrition delivery was peripheral in 47% of the parenteral nutrition periods. During the whole study, a total of 72 adverse events occurring in 68 infants were reported. Of these adverse events, 59 (0.37% of the nutrition periods), among which 19 serious adverse events, were reported as related to the parenteral nutrition solutions. The events related to parenteral nutrition solutions were general disorders and administration site conditions (n = 42 including 9 cases of cutaneous necrosis), and nutrition and metabolism disorders (n = 17). There was no case of thrombophlebitis. Six of the 19 serious events related to the parenteral nutrition solutions (32%) were due to the misuse of the infusion bag. These data support the concept that ready-to-use parenteral nutrition formulations can safely provide parenteral nutrition from birth onwards. They further support that parenteral solutions with an osmolarity up to 800

  20. Development of cyclosporine A microemulsion for parenteral delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yue; Che, Xin; Zhao, Mingyi; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yajun; Schwendeman, Anna; Li, Sanming

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a parenteral microemulsion formulation of cyclosporine A (CyA). The CyA solubility in caprylic capric triglyceride (GTCC), ethyl oleate and soybean oil were determined. The pseudo-ternary diagrams of oil (GTCC), surfactant (Solutol® HS-15), cosurfactants (ethanol/polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400] mixture) and water were constructed to identify boundaries for microemulsion existence. The CyA was added at 3, 6 and 9% w/w to the optimal microemulsion composition. Microemulsion particle size, solution viscosity and conductivity were examined. The microemulsion stability and haemolytic potential were examined after dilution in 5% dextrose solution for injection to 1 mg/mL CyA. Microemulsion stability was examined after a three-month storage at 4 and 25 °C. The GTCC was selected as an oil phase for CyA microemulsion based on solubility results. The optimum CyA microemulsion formulation consisted of 2.5% CyA, 9% GTCC, 24% Solutol® HS 15, 8% PEG 400, 4% ethanol and 52.5% water based on weight percent. The average particle sizes of the optimized blank and drug-loaded microemulsions were 68.7 nm and 71.6 nm, respectively and remained unchanged upon 25-fold dextrose dilution. The results of microemulsion physical and CyA chemical were confirmed by a three-month stability study at 4 and 25 °C. In vitro haemolysis studies indicated that CyA microemulsions were well tolerated by erythrocytes. The novel microemulsion formulation of CyA was developed that is suitable for parenteral administration. This new formulation could potentially have less vehicle-associated side effects that current commercial formulation of CyA based on Cremophor® EL and ethanol solution.

  1. Patients' experiences with home parenteral nutrition: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christina; Lucas, Beverley; Wood, Diana

    2018-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provides nourishment and hydration as an intravenous infusion to patients with intestinal failure (IF). The aim of the study is to generate theory that explains the experiences of adult patients living with home parenteral nutrition (HPN) and complex medication regimens. A grounded theory methodology was used to explore the experiences of twelve patients receiving HPN. A semi-structured interview was conducted and recorded in each participant's home setting. Each interview was transcribed verbatim. The simultaneous process of data collection and analysis was followed reflecting the principles of the constant comparative approach. A total of 15 patients gave written consent, with 12 of them agreeing to be interviewed. All the participants had previously undergone surgery as a result of chronic ill health or sudden illness. Analysis revealed two core categories: stoma and HPN, and these were supported by the subcategories: maintaining stoma output, access to toilets, managing dietary changes, maintaining the HPN infusion routine, access to technical help to set up an HPN infusion, mobility with HPN equipment and general health changes. The strategy of living with loss was demonstrated by all the participants, and this was supported by the action strategies of maintaining daily activities and social interactions. This study generates new understanding and insight into the views and experiences of patients receiving HPN in the UK. The findings from these participants have been shown to resonate with the Kubler-Ross Model [1] of the five stages of grief. The theory of living with loss was generated by the use of a grounded theory methodology. This small scale exploratory study reveals opportunities for improvements in practice to be considered by the nutrition support team (NST) and other healthcare professionals involved in the patient's hospital stay prior to discharge on HPN. Copyright © 2018 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and

  2. Amino acids – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein catabolism should be reduced and protein synthesis promoted with parenteral nutrion (PN. Amino acid (AA solutions should always be infused with PN. Standard AA solutions are generally used, whereas specially adapted AA solutions may be required in certain conditions such as severe disorders of AA utilisation or in inborn errors of AA metabolism. An AA intake of 0.8 g/kg/day is generally recommended for adult patients with a normal metabolism, which may be increased to 1.2–1.5 g/kg/day, or to 2.0 or 2.5 g/kg/day in exceptional cases. Sufficient non-nitrogen energy sources should be added in order to assure adequate utilisation of AA. A nitrogen calorie ratio of 1:130 to 1:170 (g N/kcal or 1:21 to 1:27 (g AA/kcal is recommended under normal metabolic conditions. In critically ill patients glutamine should be administered parenterally if indicated in the form of peptides, for example 0.3–0.4 g glutamine dipeptide/kg body weight/day (=0.2–0.26 g glutamine/kg body weight/day. No recommendation can be made for glutamine supplementation in PN for patients with acute pancreatitis or after bone marrow transplantation (BMT, and in newborns. The application of arginine is currently not warranted as a supplement in PN in adults. N-acetyl AA are only of limited use as alternative AA sources. There is currently no indication for use of AA solutions with an increased content of glycine, branched-chain AAs (BCAA and ornithine-α-ketoglutarate (OKG in all patients receiving PN. AA solutions with an increased proportion of BCAA are recommended in the treatment of hepatic encephalopathy (III–IV.

  3. Tuberculosis and parenteral viral hepatitides: incidence of mixed forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Asratyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate the frequency of parenteral viral hepatitides (HB and HC (PVH in patients with tuberculosis in Moscow in relation to data on their incidence in the aggregate population of the capital.Materials and methods. The authors analyzed the incidence of (acute, chronic HB and HC (carriage and tuberculosis in Moscow in 2009. A total of 24,220 cards for infectious patients (No. 089/y and federal statistical follow-up forms (No. 2 were first processed to compare and search for personal data among the patients with tuberculosis and all forms of PVH and to establish the evidence of PVH and tuberculosis comorbidity.Results. The infection of tuberculosis patients with parenteral hepatitis B and C viruses was ascertained to be 5.5 to 284.9 times higher (in relation to the form of a hepatitis course than that in the aggregation population of Moscow, which suggests that PVH is of high significance for the tuberculosis patients and that it is necessary to improve a PVH prevention program among this cohort patients. Analysis of the sex-age structure shows that male tuberculosis patients in the 20-39-year-old group should be considered to be a special risk group that should attract special attention when implementing preventive measures. The tuberculosis mortality rate among mixed infected patients was 1.8-fold higher than among those who had PVH-uncomplicated tuberculosis.Conclusion. The results of the investigations are suggestive of the evidence of PVH and tuberculosis comorbidity. The mixed forms of these infections in different combinations have been established to be accompanied by their severer clinical course and high death rates. 

  4. PROTEIN NEEDS OF CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS RECEIVING PARENTERAL NUTRITION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano Borges de Oliveira Nascimento Freitas, Renata; Negrão Nogueira, Roberto José; Hessel, Gabriel

    2015-07-01

    assess whether the current protein intake recommendations may improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients receiving parenteral nutrition. longitudinal study with three evaluations made (during the first 72 hours, on the 7th and the 14th days of PN). The following tests were applied: albumin, C-reactive protein, prealbumin, total cholesterol, HDL, triglycerides, lymphocytes, and glutathione peroxidase. The severity was determined by SOFA. The statistical analysis included the Spearman and Mann-Whitney tests, as well as ANOVA (analysis of variance). among the 53 patients evaluated, 20 (37.74%) died. The mean calorie was 24.68 ± 9.78 kcal/kg (beginning of PN), 26.49 ± 8.89 kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN), and 30.9 ± 12.19 kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). The mean protein was 1.19 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (first 72 hours of PN), 1.29 ± 0.44 g/kcal/kg (3rd to 7th days of PN) and 1.49 ± 0.69 g/kcal/kg (7th to 14th days of PN). Prealbumin, albumin, total cholesterol and HDL were below the reference values, while the CRP levels were high. Throughout the three evaluation times, there was no a significant improvement on the levels of laboratory examinations. A strong and negative correlation was found between SOFA and prealbumin (r = -0.64, p = 0.05). the protein offer, according to the traditional recommendations, was not enough to improve the biochemical parameters of critical patients undergoing parenteral nutrition. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  5. Parenteral nutrition dysregulates bile salt homeostasis in a rat model of parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfat, Kiran V K; Schaap, Frank G; Hodin, Caroline M J M; Visschers, Ruben G J; Svavarsson, Björn I; Lenicek, Martin; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit; Lenaerts, Kaatje; Olde Damink, Steven W M

    2017-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN), a lifesaving therapy in patients with intestinal failure, has been associated with hepatobiliary complications including steatosis, cholestasis and fibrosis, collectively known as parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). To date, the pathogenesis of PNALD is poorly understood and therapeutic options are limited. Impaired bile salt homeostasis has been proposed to contribute PNALD. The objective of this study was to establish a PNALD model in rats and to evaluate the effects of continuous parenteral nutrition (PN) on bile salt homeostasis. Rats received either PN via the jugular vein or received normal diet for 3, 7 or 14 days. Serum biochemistry, hepatic triglycerides, circulating bile salts and C4, IL-6 and TNF-alpha, and lipogenic and bile salt homeostatic gene expression in liver and ileum were assessed. PN increased hepatic triglycerides already after 3 days of administration, and resulted in conjugated bilirubin elevation after 7 or more days. This indicates PN-induced steatosis and impaired canalicular secretion of bilirubin, the latter which is in line with reduced hepatic expression of Mrp2 mRNA. There was no histological evidence for liver inflammation after PN administration, and circulating levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α, were comparable in all groups. Hepatic expression of Fxr mRNA was decreased after 7 days of PN, without apparent effect on expression of Fxr targets Bsep and Shp. Nonetheless, Cyp7a1 expression was reduced after 7 days of PN, indicative for lowered bile salt synthesis. Circulating levels of C4 (marker of bile salt synthesis) were also decreased after 3, 7 and 14 days of PN. Levels of circulating bile salts were not affected by PN. This study showed that PN in rats caused early mild steatosis and cholestasis, while hepatic and systemic inflammation were not present. The onset of these abnormalities was associated with alterations in bile salt synthesis and transport. This

  6. Effects of Rural Mutual Health Care on outpatient service utilization in Chinese village medical institutions: evidence from panel data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhongliang; Gao, Jianmin; Xue, Qinxiang; Yang, Xiaowei; Yan, Ju'e

    2009-07-01

    To solve the problem of 'Kan bing nan, kan bing gui' (medical treatment is difficult to access and expensive), a Harvard-led research team implemented a community-based health insurance scheme known as Rural Mutual Health Care (RMHC) in Chinese rural areas from 2004 to 2006. Two major policies adopted by RMHC included insurance coverage of outpatient services (demand-side policy) and drug policy (supply-side policy). This paper focuses on the effects of these two policies on outpatient service utilization in Chinese village clinics. The data used in this study are from 3-year household follow-up surveys. A generalized negative binomial regression model and a Heckman selection model were constructed using panel data from 2005 to 2007. The results indicate that the price elasticities of demand for outpatient visits and per-visit outpatient expenses were -1.5 and -0.553, respectively. After implementing the supply-side policy, outpatient visits and per-visit outpatient expenses decreased by 94.7 and 55.9%, respectively, controlling for insurance coverage. These findings can be used to make recommendations to the Chinese government on improving the health care system.

  7. PIPIDA scintigraphy for cholecystitis: false positives in alcoholism and total parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuman, W.P.; Gibbs, P.; Rudd, T.G.; Mack, L.A.

    1982-01-01

    A review of gallbladder scintigraphy in patients with potentially compromised hepatobiliary function revealed two groups in whom cholecystitis might be mistakenly diagnosed. In 200 consecutive hospitalized patients studied with technetium-99m-PIPIDA for acute cholecystitis or cholestasis, there were 41 alcoholics and 17 patients on total parenteral nutrition. In 60% of the alcoholics and 92% of those on parenteral nutrition, absent or delayed visualization of the gallbladder occurred without physical or clinical evidence of cholecystitis. A cholecystagogue, sincalide, did not prevent the false-positive features which presumably are due to altered bile flow kinetics related to alcoholism and parenteral nutrition. Four patients on parenteral nutrition undergoing cholecystectomy for suspected cholecystitis had normal gallbladders filled with jellylike viscous thick bile. A positive (nonvisualized or delayed visualized) gallbladder PIPIDA scintigram in these two populations should not be interpreted as indicating a need for cholecystectomy

  8. Phylodynamic and Phylogeographic Patterns of the HIV Type 1 Subtype F1 Parenteral Epidemic in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hué, Stéphane; Buckton, Andrew J.; Myers, Richard E.; Duiculescu, Dan; Ene, Luminita; Oprea, Cristiana; Tardei, Gratiela; Rugina, Sorin; Mardarescu, Mariana; Floch, Corinne; Notheis, Gundula; Zöhrer, Bettina; Cane, Patricia A.; Pillay, Deenan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the late 1980s an HIV-1 epidemic emerged in Romania that was dominated by subtype F1. The main route of infection is believed to be parenteral transmission in children. We sequenced partial pol coding regions of 70 subtype F1 samples from children and adolescents from the PENTA-EPPICC network of which 67 were from Romania. Phylogenetic reconstruction using the sequences and other publically available global subtype F sequences showed that 79% of Romanian F1 sequences formed a statistically robust monophyletic cluster. The monophyletic cluster was epidemiologically linked to parenteral transmission in children. Coalescent-based analysis dated the origins of the parenteral epidemic to 1983 [1981–1987; 95% HPD]. The analysis also shows that the epidemic's effective population size has remained fairly constant since the early 1990s suggesting limited onward spread of the virus within the population. Furthermore, phylogeographic analysis suggests that the root location of the parenteral epidemic was Bucharest. PMID:22251065

  9. Parenteral nutrition versus enteral nutrition in severe acute pancreatitis Nutrição parenteral versus enteral em pacientes com pancreatite aguda grave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josiel Paiva Vieira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare the effect of parenteral versus enteral nutritional support in severe acute pancreatitis, with respect to efficacy, safety, morbidity, mortality and length of hospitalization. METHODS: The study was comprised of 31 patients, divided into a parenteral group (n=16 and an enteral group (n=15, who met severity criteria for abdominal tomography (Balthazar classes C, D, and E. The patients were compared by demographics, disease etiology, antibiotic prophylaxis, use or not of somatostatin, nutritional support, complications and disease progression. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference in the average duration of nutritional support, somatostatin, or antibiotics in the two groups. Imipenem was the drug of choice for prophylaxis of pancreatic infections in both groups. More complications occurred in the parenteral group, although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.10. Infectious complications, such as catheter sepsis and infections of the pancreatic tissue, were significantly more frequent in the parenteral group (p=0.006. There was no difference in average length of hospitalization in the two groups. There were three deaths in the parenteral group and none in the enteral group. CONCLUSION: Enteral nutritional support is associated with fewer septic complications compared to parenteral nutritional support.OBJETIVO: Comparar o efeito do suporte nutricional parenteral versus enteral, em pancreatite aguda grave, com relação à eficácia, à segurança, à morbi-mortalidade e ao tempo de internação. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 31 pacientes distribuídos em grupo parenteral (n=16, no período de 1995 a 1998 e grupo enteral (n=15, no período de 1999 a 2002, que preencheram os critérios de gravidade pela tomografia de abdome (Balthazar C,D,E. Os pacientes foram comparados quanto aos dados demográficos, etiologia, antibioticoprofilaxia, somatostatina, suporte nutricional, complicações e evolução. RESULTADOS

  10. Intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira De Godoy, J M; Amador Franco Brigidio, P; Buzato, E; Fátima Guerreiro De Godoy, M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper was to report on a novel approach to the intensive outpatient treatment of elephantiasis of an underprivileged population. Prospective, random study, the diagnosis of lymphedema was clinical and the inclusion of patients was by order of arrival in the treatment center where all were invited to participate in the study. Intensive outpatient therapy was performed for 6 to 8 hours daily over a period of four weeks. Eleven legs with grade III elephantiasis of 8 patients were evaluated in a random prospective study. Three patients were men and five were women with ages ranging between 28 and 66 years old. Treatment included mechanical lymph drainage using the RAGodoy® apparatus for a period of 6 to 8 hours daily and the Godoy & Godoy cervical stimulation technique for 20 minutes per day, both associated to the use of a home-made medical compression stocking using a low-stretch cotton-polyester material. Additionally, manual lymph drainage using the Godoy & Godoy technique was performed for one hour. Perimetry was used to compare measurements made before and after treatment, of the three points of the limb with the largest circumferences. The paired t-test was utilized for statistical analysis with an alpha error greater than 5% (P-value elephantiasis.

  11. Dysfluent Handwriting in Schizophrenic Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawda, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Taking into account findings in the literature, the author aimed to test whether specific graphical characteristics of handwriting can distinguish patients diagnosed with schizophrenic disorders from healthy controls. Handwriting samples (one sample from each person) from 60 outpatients (29 women, 31 men; age M = 28.5, SD = 5.4) with paranoid schizophrenia were analyzed by three documents examiners and were compared to samples from 60 controls (30 men, 30 women, age M = 28.0, SD = 3.0) without psychiatric disorders. Document examiners assessed 32 graphical features potentially related to schizophrenia. The comparisons between groups revealed that only 7 out of 32 handwriting properties were significantly different in the handwriting of schizophrenic outpatients from controls: the calligraphic forms of letters, loops in ovals, lacking of dots, tremor, sinusoidal baseline, and irregularities size of lower zone. These findings are discussed in terms of motor disturbances in schizophrenia and in relation to the previous research on handwriting of other mental disorders. Similarities between the graphical patterns of handwriting of schizophrenic patients and those of other mental disorders and/or other mental states have been demonstrated. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Fatigue Experiences Among OCD Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquini, Massimo; Piacentino, Daria; Berardelli, Isabella; Roselli, Valentina; Maraone, Annalisa; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Biondi, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Patients with OCD are impaired in multiple domains of functioning and quality of life. While associated psychopathology complaints and neuropsychological deficits were reported, the subjective experience of general fatigue and mental fatigue was scarcely investigated. In this single-center case-control study we compared 50 non-depressed OCD outpatients consecutively recruited and 50 panic disorder (PD) outpatients, to determine whether they experienced fatigue differently. Assessment consisted of structured clinical interview for DSM-IV criteria by using the SCID-I and the SCID-II. Symptom severity was assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale, the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Clinical Global Impressions Scale, severity and the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale. Fatigue was assessed by using the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI). Regarding MFI physical fatigue, an OR of 0.196 (95 % CI 0.080-0.478) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD compared to PD. The same can be said for MFI mental fatigue, as an OR of 0.138 (95 % CI 0.049-0.326) was found, suggesting that its presence is associated with lower odds of OCD. Notably, OCD patients with OCDP co-morbidity reported higher scores of mental fatigue. In this study fatigue, including mental fatigue, seems not to be a prominent experience among adult non-depressed OCD patients.

  13. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Arwa Y

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. Methods The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010 for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. Results There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. Conclusions There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This

  14. Quality assessment of total parenteral nutrition admixtures by the use of fractional factorial design

    OpenAIRE

    Mirković, Dušica; Ibrić, Svetlana; Antunović, Mirjana

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim. Parenteral nutrition as a specific aspect of providing nutritients still remains a permanent topic of both theoretical and experimental research. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) admixtures have complex contents making difficult to maintain their stability. The most critical parameter is the diameter of a lipid droplet, i.e. droplet size distribution. It is recommended that droplet size should not be more than 5 m and that the presence of greater droplets should not exceed th...

  15. Home parenteral nutrition in management of patients with severe radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavery, I.C.; Steiger, E.; Fazio, V.W.

    1980-01-01

    Five patients who would have been unable to survive because of intestinal complications of radiation therapy were able to lead an otherwise normal life with the use of parenteral nutrition administered at home. One patient died of recurrent carcinoma of the cervix after 14 months. Another patient died as the result of a totally avoidable pharmaceutical error after 2 1/2 years. The remaining three are still disease free without morbidity relating to the parenteral nutrition

  16. A Review of the Parenteral Nutrition Supply Service in an Irish Neonatal Unit

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smith, A

    2018-06-01

    Neonatal Intensive Care (NICU) patients have individual nutritional requirements often requiring Patient Specific Parenteral Nutrition (PSPN). From October 2015, the national PSPN compounding service availability changed from 7 days per week service to 5 days per week (i.e. no weekend and limited bank holiday ordering available). The aim of this study was to examine the introduction of a 5 day only PSPN supply on neonatal patient parenteral nutrition availability in a tertiary NICU.

  17. Selected pharmacokinetic issues of the use of antiepileptic drugs and parenteral nutrition in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Muhannad R M; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Abd, Arwa Y

    2010-12-31

    To conduct a systematic review for the evidence supporting or disproving the reality of parenteral nutrition- antiepileptic drugs interaction, especially with respect to the plasma protein-binding of the drug. The articles related to the topic were identified through Medline and PubMed search (1968-Feburary 2010) for English language on the interaction between parenteral nutrition and antiepileptic drugs; the search terms used were anti-epileptic drugs, parenteral nutrition, and/or interaction, and/or in vitro. The search looked for prospective randomized and nonrandomized controlled studies; prospective nonrandomized uncontrolled studies; retrospective studies; case reports; and in vitro studies. Full text of the articles were then traced from the Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) library subscribed databases, including Wiley-Blackwell Library, Cochrane Library, EBSCOHost, OVID, ScienceDirect, SAGE Premier, Scopus, SpringerLINK, and Wiley InterScience. The articles from journals not listed by USM library were traced through inter library loan. There were interactions between parenteral nutrition and drugs, including antiepileptics. Several guidelines were designed for the management of illnesses such as traumatic brain injuries or cancer patients, involving the use of parenteral nutrition and antiepileptics. Moreover, many studies demonstrated the in vitro and in vivo parenteral nutrition -drugs interactions, especially with antiepileptics. There was no evidence supporting the existence of parenteral nutrition-antiepileptic drugs interaction. The issue has not been studied in formal researches, but several case reports and anecdotes demonstrate this drug-nutrition interaction. However, alteration in the drug-free fraction result from parenteral nutrition-drug (i.e. antiepileptics) interactions may necessitate scrupulous reassessment of drug dosages in patients receiving these therapies. This reassessment may be particularly imperative in certain clinical situations

  18. Reconciling divergent results of the latest parenteral nutrition studies in the ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Pierre; Pichard, Claude

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies on the optimal modalities to feed patients during the ICU stay show divergent results. The level and the timing of energy provision is a critical issue, associated with the clinical outcome. These results questioned the clinical relevance of the recent guidelines issued by American, Canadian and European academic societies. Four recent prospective randomized studies enrolled critically ill patients who received various nutritional regimens and tested the effect of nutritional support on outcome. The Tight Calorie balance Control Study (TICACOS) targeted on calorie administration according to measured energy expenditure and found increased ICU morbidity but improved hospital mortality. The large EpaNIC study compared 'early' with 'late' (parenteral nutrition) nutrition, mostly in patients after cardiac surgery, and found an increased morbidity associated with early parenteral nutrition. The supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) study randomized the patients after 3 days and targeted the calories administered by parenteral nutrition as a complement to unsuccessful enteral nutrition using indirect calorimetry. The SPN resulted in less nosocomial infections and shorter duration of mechanical ventilation. Finally, a recent Australian study enrolled patients unable to be early fed enterally to receive, or not, parenteral nutrition targeted at 1500 kcal. No complications were noted in the parenteral nutrition group. Lessons from all these studies are summarized and should help in designing better studies and guidelines. The critical analysis of recent prospective studies comparing various levels of calorie administration, enteral versus parenteral nutrition and enteral versus SPN confirms the recommendations to avoid underfeeding and overfeeding. Parenteral nutrition, required if enteral feeding is failing, and if adjusted up to a measured optimal level, may improve outcome. More studies on the optimal level of energy and protein administration to

  19. ROLE OF PARENTERAL NUTRITION IN ONCOLOGIC PATIENTS WITH INTESTINAL OCCLUSION AND PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aría Guerra, Eva; Cortés-Salgado, Alfonso; Mateo-Lobo, Raquel; Nattero, Lía; Riveiro, Javier; Vega-Piñero, Belén; Valbuena, Beatriz; Carabaña, Fátima; Carrero, Carmen; Grande, Enrique; Carrato, Alfredo; Botella-Carretero, José Ignacio

    2015-09-01

    the precise role of parenteral nutrition in the management of oncologic patients with intestinal occlusion is not well defined yet. We aimed to identify the effects of parenteral nutrition in these patients regarding prognosis. 55 patients with intestinal occlusion and peritoneal carcinomatosis were included. Parenteral nutrition aimed at 20-35 kcal/Kg/day, and 1.0 g/kg/day of amino-acids. Weight, body mass index, type of tumor, type of chemotherapy, and ECOG among others were recorded and analyzed. 69.1% of the patients had gastrointestinal tumors, 18.2% gynecologic and 12.7% others. Age was 60 ± 13y, baseline ECOG 1.5 ± 0.5 and body mass index 21.6 ± 4.3. Malnutrition was present in 85%. Survival from the start of parenteral nutrition was not significant when considering baseline ECOG (log rank = 0.593, p = 0.743), previous lines of chemotherapy (log rank = 2.117, p = 0.548), baseline BMI (log rank = 2.686, p = 0.261), or type of tumor (log rank = 2.066, p = 0.356). Survival in patients who received home parenteral nutrition after hospital discharge was higher than those who stayed in-hospital (log rank = 7.090, p = 0.008). Survival in patients who started chemotherapy during or after parenteral nutrition was higher than those who did not so (log rank = 17.316, p Parenteral nutrition in patients with advanced cancer and intestinal occlusion is safe, and in tho se who respond to chemotherapy, further administration of home parenteral nutrition together with chemotherapy may enhance prolonged survival. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  20. Quality assessment of total parenteral nutrition admixtures by the use of fractional factorial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Dušica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Parenteral nutrition as a specific aspect of providing nutritients still remains a permanent topic of both theoretical and experimental research. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN admixtures have complex contents making difficult to maintain their stability. The most critical parameter is the diameter of a lipid droplet, i.e. droplet size distribution. It is recommended that droplet size should not be more than 5

  1. Potential of polymeric particles as future vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants for parenteral and non-parenteral immunization against tuberculosis: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Khademi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Production of effective tuberculosis (TB vaccine is necessity. However, the development of new subunit vaccines is faced with concerns about their weak immunogenicity. To overcome such problems, polymers-based vaccine delivery systems have been proposed to be used via various routes. The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of polymeric particles as future vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants for parenteral and non-parenteral immunization against TB. Materials and Methods: PubMed, Scopus, Science-Direct, and the ISI web of knowledge databases were searched for related keywords. A total of 420 articles, written up to June 25, 2016, were collected on the potential of polymeric particles as TB vaccine delivery systems after parenteral and non-parenteral immunization. Thirty-one relevant articles were selected by applying inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: It was shown that the immunogenicity of TB vaccines had been improved by using biodegradable and non-biodegradable synthetic polymers as well as natural polymers and they are better able to enhance the humoral and cellular immune responses, compared to TB vaccines alone. The present study revealed that various polymeric particles, after M. tuberculosis challenge in animal models, provide long-lasting protection against TB. PLGA (poly (lactide-co-glycolide and chitosan polymers were widely used as TB vaccine delivery systems/adjuvants. Conclusion: It seems that PLGA and chitosan polymers are well-suited particles for the parenteral and non-parenteral administration of TB vaccines, respectively. Non-biodegradable synthetic polymers in comparison with biodegradable synthetic and natural polymers have been used less frequently. Therefore, further study on this category of polymers is required.

  2. Changes in intestinal absorption of nutrients and brush border glycoproteins after total parenteral nutrition in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S; Tanaka, S; Yoshioka, M; Serizawa, H; Tashiro, H; Shiozaki, H; Imaeda, H; Tsuchiya, M

    1992-01-01

    The effect of total parenteral nutrition on nutrients absorption and glycoprotein changes of brush border membrane was examined in rat small intestine. In total parenteral nutrition rats, a marked decrease in activity of brush border enzymes was observed mainly in the proximal and middle segments of the intestine. Galactose perfusion of jejunal segment showed that hexose absorption was significantly inhibited, while intestinal absorption of glycine or dipeptide, glycylglycine was not significantly affected by total parenteral nutrition treatment. When brush border membrane glycoprotein profile was examined by [3H]-glucosamine or [3H]-fucose incorporation into jejunal loops, significant changes were observed in the glycoprotein pattern of brush border membrane especially in the high molecular weight range over 120 kDa after total parenteral nutrition treatment, suggesting strong dependency of glycoprotein synthesis on luminal substances. Molecular weight of sucrase isomaltase in brush border membrane detected by specific antibody showed no significant difference, however, in total parenteral nutrition and control rats. Also, molecular weight of specific sodium glucose cotransporter of intestinal brush border membrane detected by selective photoaffinity labelling was not altered in total parenteral nutrition rats. It may be that prolonged absence of oral food intake may produce significant biochemical changes in brush border membrane glycoprotein and absorptive capacity of small intestine, but these changes were not observed in all brush border membrane glycoproteins. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:1582592

  3. Quality of Life and Nutrition Condition of Patients Improve Under Home Parenteral Nutrition: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girke, Jutta; Seipt, Claudia; Markowski, Andrea; Luettig, Birgit; Schettler, Anika; Momma, Michael; Schneider, Andrea S

    2016-10-01

    Patients with end-stage cancer and advanced chronic bowel disease are often malnourished, which has a negative effect on patients' outcome, well-being, and activity. It is inconclusive whether these patients benefit from home parenteral nutrition. This prospective exploratory study investigates its influence on nutrition state, muscle strength, mobility, and quality of life. Patients ≥18 years old with an indication for home parenteral nutrition were included and followed for 2-24 months. Nutrition parameters, activity, and quality of life were assessed. Forty-eight patients participated (mean age 11.5 years), and 85% were severely malnourished (subjective global assessment score, class C). Four weeks after parenteral nutrition, patients with tumors demonstrated a deterioration in phase angle (from 3.9 to 3.4) and extracellular mass:body cell mass ratio (from 1.6 to 2.1), while patients with bowel disease improved (from 3.4 to 4.0 and 2.1 to 1.6, respectively); grip strength remained constant in both groups (difference: 1.11 and -2.11, respectively). Activity improved in patients with bowel disease but stayed the same in the tumor group (P = .02 and P = .33, respectively). When the groups were pooled, emotional and social functioning domain scores (P parenteral nutrition. Both groups seem to benefit from home parenteral nutrition without harmful side effects. If the indication is determined early, the patients' disease course could perhaps be improved. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Accountability for Community-Based Programs for the Seriously Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Montgomery, Russ; Valuck, Tom; Corrigan, Janet; Meier, Diane E; Kelley, Amy; Curtis, J Randall; Engelberg, Ruth

    2018-03-01

    Innovation is needed to improve care of the seriously ill, and there are important opportunities as we transition from a volume- to value-based payment system. Not all seriously ill are dying; some recover, while others are persistently functionally impaired. While we innovate in service delivery and payment models for the seriously ill, it is important that we concurrently develop accountability that ensures a focus on high-quality care rather than narrowly focusing on cost containment. The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation convened a meeting of 45 experts to arrive at guiding principles for measurement, create a starter measurement set, specify a proposed definition of the denominator and its refinement, and identify research priorities for future implementation of the accountability system. A series of articles written by experts provided the basis for debate and guidance in formulating a path forward to develop an accountability system for community-based programs for the seriously ill, outlined in this article. As we innovate in existing population-based payment programs such as Medicare Advantage and develop new alternative payment models, it is important and urgent that we develop the foundation for accountability along with actionable measures so that the healthcare system ensures high-quality person- and family-centered care for persons who are seriously ill.

  5. Restricted grouper reproductive migrations support community-based management

    KAUST Repository

    Waldie, Peter A.

    2016-03-09

    Conservation commonly requires trade-offs between social and ecological goals. For tropical small-scale fisheries, spatial scales of socially appropriate management are generally small—the median no-take locally managed marine area (LMMA) area throughout the Pacific is less than 1 km2. This is of particular concern for large coral reef fishes, such as many species of grouper, which migrate to aggregations to spawn. Current data suggest that the catchment areas (i.e. total area from which individuals are drawn) of such aggregations are at spatial scales that preclude effective community-based management with no-take LMMAs. We used acoustic telemetry and tag-returns to examine reproductive migrations and catchment areas of the grouper Epinephelus fuscoguttatus at a spawning aggregation in Papua New Guinea. Protection of the resultant catchment area of approximately 16 km2 using a no-take LMMA is socially untenable here and throughout much of the Pacific region. However, we found that spawning migrations were skewed towards shorter distances. Consequently, expanding the current 0.2 km2 no-take LMMA to 1–2 km2 would protect approximately 30–50% of the spawning population throughout the non-spawning season. Contrasting with current knowledge, our results demonstrate that species with moderate reproductive migrations can be managed at scales congruous with spatially restricted management tools.

  6. Community-based research as a mechanism to reduce ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racial and ethnic minority communities, including American Indian and Alaska Natives, have been disproportionately impacted by environmental pollution and contamination. This includes siting and location of point sources of pollution, legacies of contamination of drinking and recreational water, and mining, military and agricultural impacts. As a result, both quantity and quality of culturally important subsistence resources are diminished, contributing to poor nutrition and obesity, and overall reductions in quality of life and life expectancy. Climate change is adding to these impacts on Native American communities (Wildcat 2013), variably causing drought, increased flooding and forced relocation (Maldonado et al. 2013), affecting Tribal water resources (Cozzetto et al. 2013), traditional foods (Lynn et al. 2013; Gautam et al. 2013), forests and forest resources (Voggesser et al. 2013) and Tribal health (Donatuto et al 2014; Doyle et al. 2013). This article will highlight several extramural research projects supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science to Achieve Results (STAR) Tribal environmental research grants as a mechanism to address the environmental health inequities and disparities faced by Tribal communities (USEPA, 2014a, www.epa.gov/ncer/tribalresearch). The Tribal Research portfolio has focused on addressing tribal environmental health risks through community based participatory research. Specifically, the STA

  7. Partnership readiness for community-based participatory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jeannette O; Newman, Susan D; Meadows, Otha; Cox, Melissa J; Bunting, Shelia

    2012-08-01

    The use of a dyadic lens to assess and leverage academic and community partners' readiness to conduct community-based participatory research (CBPR) has not been systematically investigated. With a lack of readiness to conduct CBPR, the partnership and its products are vulnerable. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the dimensions and key indicators necessary for academic and community partnership readiness to conduct CBPR. Key informant interviews and focus groups (n = 36 participants) were conducted with academic and community participants who had experiences with CBPR partnerships. A 'framework analysis' approach was used to analyze the data and generate a new model, CBPR Partnership Readiness Model. Antecedents of CBPR partnership readiness are a catalyst and mutual interest. The major dimensions of the CBPR Partnership Readiness Model are (i) goodness of fit, (ii) capacity, and (iii) operations. Preferred outcomes are sustainable partnership and product, mutual growth, policy and social and health impact on the community. CBPR partnership readiness is an iterative and dynamic process, partnership and issue specific, influenced by a range of environmental and contextual factors, amenable to change and essential for sustainability and promotion of health and social change in the community.

  8. Community Based Educational Model on Water Conservation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudiajeng, L.; Parwita, I. G. L.; Wiraga, I. W.; Mudhina, M.

    2018-01-01

    The previous research showed that there were indicators of water crisis in the northern and eastern part of Denpasar city and most of coastal area experienced on seawater intrusion. The recommended water conservation programs were rainwater harvesting and educate the community to develop a water saving and environmentally conscious culture. This research was conducted to built the community based educational model on water conservation program through ergonomics SHIP approach which placed the human aspect as the first consideration, besides the economic and technically aspects. The stakeholders involved in the program started from the problem analyses to the implementation and the maintenance as well. The model was built through three main steps, included determination of accepted design; building the recharge wells by involving local communities; guidance and assistance in developing a water saving and environmentally conscious culture for early childhood, elementary and junior high school students, community and industry. The program was implemented based on the “TRIHITA KARANA” concept, which means the relationship between human to God, human-to-human, and human to environment. Through the development of the model, it is expected to grow a sense of belonging and awareness from the community to maintain the sustainability of the program.

  9. A Community Based Systems Diagram of Obesity Causes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Allender

    Full Text Available Application of system thinking to the development, implementation and evaluation of childhood obesity prevention efforts represents the cutting edge of community-based prevention. We report on an approach to developing a system oriented community perspective on the causes of obesity.Group model building sessions were conducted in a rural Australian community to address increasing childhood obesity. Stakeholders (n = 12 built a community model that progressed from connection circles to causal loop diagrams using scripts from the system dynamics literature. Participants began this work in identifying change over time in causes and effects of childhood obesity within their community. The initial causal loop diagram was then reviewed and elaborated by 50 community leaders over a full day session.The process created a causal loop diagram representing community perceptions of determinants and causes of obesity. The causal loop diagram can be broken down into four separate domains; social influences; fast food and junk food; participation in sport; and general physical activity.This causal loop diagram can provide the basis for community led planning of a prevention response that engages with multiple levels of existing settings and systems.

  10. Community-Based Ecotourism: The Transformation of Local Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookhao Nantira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-based ecotourism (CBET is considered a sustainable form of tourism that improves the quality of life of hosts at the tourist destination. Scholars have yet to explore the long-term operation of CBET in relation to its effects on the local way of life. Consequently, the purpose of this paper is to examine the transformation of a local community due to the operation of CBET in relation to sociocultural, economic and environmental aspects. The findings reveal that the community encounters both positive and negative impacts of transformation. However, unintended impacts of the CBET operation lay embedded in the transformation of relationships among the community members. The study identifies that close relationships among the villagers has been initially transformed to loose relationships due to forgotten communal goals; CBET has transformed from being a conservation tool to being a business-oriented goal which causes conflicts of interest among local people and alters traditional social structure. The study also agrees with the notion of social exchange theory for villagers to enhance environmental sustainability, and proposes that slight inequalities of benefits received from CBET causes social transformation at the local level.

  11. Developing a theoretical framework for complex community-based interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeles, Ricardo N; Dolovich, Lisa; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Thabane, Lehana

    2014-01-01

    Applying existing theories to research, in the form of a theoretical framework, is necessary to advance knowledge from what is already known toward the next steps to be taken. This article proposes a guide on how to develop a theoretical framework for complex community-based interventions using the Cardiovascular Health Awareness Program as an example. Developing a theoretical framework starts with identifying the intervention's essential elements. Subsequent steps include the following: (a) identifying and defining the different variables (independent, dependent, mediating/intervening, moderating, and control); (b) postulating mechanisms how the independent variables will lead to the dependent variables; (c) identifying existing theoretical models supporting the theoretical framework under development; (d) scripting the theoretical framework into a figure or sets of statements as a series of hypotheses, if/then logic statements, or a visual model; (e) content and face validation of the theoretical framework; and (f) revising the theoretical framework. In our example, we combined the "diffusion of innovation theory" and the "health belief model" to develop our framework. Using the Cardiovascular Health Awareness Program as the model, we demonstrated a stepwise process of developing a theoretical framework. The challenges encountered are described, and an overview of the strategies employed to overcome these challenges is presented.

  12. Community-based livestock breeding programmes: essentials and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J P; Rischkowsky, B; Haile, A; Philipsson, J; Mwai, O; Besbes, B; Valle Zárate, A; Tibbo, M; Mirkena, T; Duguma, G; Sölkner, J; Wurzinger, M

    2015-04-01

    Breeding programmes described as community-based (CBBP) typically relate to low-input systems with farmers having a common interest to improve and share their genetic resources. CBBPs are more frequent with keepers of small ruminants, in particular smallholders of local breeds, than with cattle, pigs or chickens with which farmers may have easier access to alternative programmes. Constraints that limit the adoption of conventional breeding technologies in low-input systems cover a range of organizational and technical aspects. The analysis of 8 CBBPs located in countries of Latin-America, Africa and Asia highlights the importance of bottom-up approaches and involvement of local institutions in the planning and implementation stages. The analysis also reveals a high dependence of these programmes on organizational, technical and financial support. Completely self-sustained CBBPs seem to be difficult to realize. There is a need to implement and document formal socio-economic evaluations of CBBPs to provide governments and other development agencies with the information necessary for creating sustainable CBBPs at larger scales. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Comprendiendo el community-based tourism desde la comunidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Ruiz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available El creciente impulso del Community-based tourism (CBT como vía para un turismo sostenible y estrategia para el desarrollo social nos obliga a profundizar en su comprensión. En este artículo proponemos como táctica teórico-metodológica la focalización analítica en la comunidad. El referente empírico de la investigación es el turismo comunitario (TC en Ecuador, donde se han seleccionado cinco comunidades para llevar a cabo un estudio etnográfico en profundidad. Como conclusión planteamos un marco comprensivo del TC que tiene tres pilares básicos: la centralidad analítica de las comunidades, la consideración del TC como `traducción´ antes que como `adaptación´ al mercado, y el carácter fortalecedor —antes que debilitador— del TC para las comunidades. De aquí se derivan una serie de indicadores cualitativos que sirven para encarar, desde el punto de vista teórico, la comprensión general del CBT y asimismo son útiles para la evaluación de la sostenibilidad de proyectos y experiencias de CBT

  14. A Community-Based Surveillance on Determinants of Rodent Infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Hua Pai

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rodent infestation is an important factor in the transmission of infectious diseases of public health importance. From October to November 1998, surveillance stations were established in 110 boroughs of Kaohsiung City in southern Taiwan. Boroughs were chosen by random sampling 10 boroughs from each of 11 districts (464 boroughs in the city. The extent of rodent infestation was determined by cage trapping. The possibility of applying a community-based control program was evaluated by investigating associated demographic and environmental factors as well as related knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. A total of 90 rodents were trapped in 41% of the 110 boroughs. Using univariate analyses, 17 factors were significantly associated with rodent infestation. A lack of knowledge that rodent control relies on community cooperation was the most important factor among the seven variables associated with the extent of rodent infestation (OR 3.1 by logistic multiple regression. This revealed the importance of community cooperation in controlling rodent infestation. Moreover, improvement of environmental hygiene associated with garbage problems, such as cleanliness of storage rooms and closets, and the hygiene of empty space and resource recycling stations should not be ignored.

  15. What would Mary Douglas do? A commentary on Kahan et al., "Cultural cognition and public policy: the case of outpatient commitment laws".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    Involuntary outpatient commitment is a highly controversial issue in mental health law. Strong supporters of outpatient commitment see it as a form of access to community-based mental health care and a less restrictive alternative to hospitalization for people with severe mental illness; vocal opponents see it as an instrument of social control and an unwarranted deprivation of individual liberty. Kahan and colleagues apply the theory of "cultural cognition" in an empirical study of how cultural worldviews influence support for outpatient commitment laws among the general public and shape perceptions of evidence for these laws' effectiveness. This article critiques Kahan et al. and offers an alternative perspective on the controversy, emphasizing particular social facts underlying stakeholders' positions on outpatient commitment laws.

  16. 42 CFR 419.21 - Hospital outpatient services subject to the outpatient prospective payment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... outpatient prospective payment system. 419.21 Section 419.21 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM PROSPECTIVE PAYMENT SYSTEM... Excluded From the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System § 419.21 Hospital outpatient services...

  17. Studi evaluasi penerapan Community Based Tourism (CBT) sebagai pendukung agrowisata berkelanjutan

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Endah Nurhidayati

    2015-01-01

    The role of government in the development of Community Based Tourism (CBT) is very important to strengthen communities around the tourism destination. Government has significant role to ensure that the community has accesses, opportunities and an important power in the development of tourism. The objectives of this research are: (1) describe the government's perception of the  Community Based Tourism (CBT) development, (2) identifying government policies to support the Community Based Tourism...

  18. Studi Evaluasi Penerapan Community Based Tourism (CBT) Sebagai Pendukung Agrowisata Berkelanjutan

    OpenAIRE

    Nurhidayati, Sri Endah

    2015-01-01

    The role of government in the development of Community Based Tourism (CBT) is very important to strengthen communities around the tourism destination. Government has significant role to ensure that the community has accesses, opportunities and an important power in the development of tourism. The objectives of this research are: (1) describe the government's perception of the Community Based Tourism (CBT) development, (2) identifying government policies to support the Community Based Tourism...

  19. Aspiration Curettage and its Outpatient Usage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspiration Curettage and its Outpatient Usage. D. A. G. BARFORD, M, NOTELOVITZ. SUMMARY ... its use on a number of outpatients without anaesthesia is discussed. S. Afr. Med. l., 48, 22 (1974). In order to ... plastic aspiration chamber and suction is applied centrally at the base of the chamber, a cylindrical filter within the.

  20. Outpatient treatment for acute uncomplicated diverticulitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ünlü, Çagdas; Gunadi, Patrick M.; Gerhards, Michael F.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Vrouenraets, Bart C.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, treatment of acute diverticulitis has mostly been based on inpatient care. The question arises whether these patients can be treated on an outpatient basis as the admissions for diverticular disease have been shown to be increasing every year. We studied whether outpatient treatment

  1. Standardised versus Individualised Parenteral Nutrition. Further Food for Thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, R; Segurado, R; Crealey, M; Twomey, A

    2016-04-11

    Parenteral Nutrition may be prescribed as a standard PN (SPN) formulation or as an individualised PN (IPN) formulation. SPN may have advantages in terms of rapid availability, less prescription errors, decreased risk of infection and cost savings but IPN, specifically tailored to an infants needs, may achieve better outcomes in terms of nutrient intake and weight gain. The aim of our study was to determine if VLBW infants in our NICU benefited from receiving IPN over currently available SPN solutions. Our findings were that VLBW infants prescribed IPN received significantly more amino acid (28%), glucose (6%), energy (11%) and calcium (8%) from the aqueous phase of PN than had they received a similar volume of SPN. The benefits were seen over all the days for which PN was administered. In conclusion, IPN was found to offer significant benefits to our VLBW infants. Modifications to currently available SPN would result in better SPN formulations. Our study also supported the recent recommendation to reduce the calcium:phosphate ratio in PN solutions to avoid early hypophosphataemia.

  2. Hematologic disorders in trauma patients during parenteral alimentation with lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faintuch, J; Machado, F K; Freire, A N; Reis, J R; Machado, M; Pinto, L P; Ramos, S M; Loebens, M; Jovchelevich, V; Pinotti, H W

    1996-01-01

    Total parenteral nutrition with lipids is a well-accepted modality of metabolic support in seriously ill trauma patients. Intolerance to lipid administration is unusual when dosage limits are not exceeded, and few hematologic disturbances have been recorded with modern fat emulsions. In the course of intravenous alimentation of six adults admitted for traumatic lesions, eosinophilia with or without leukocytopenia was noticed after periods of four days to five weeks. Principal clinical events and hematologic derangements were documented in this population. Sepsis was not always present in the patients by the time of the complication, and in those that did require antibiotics and other drugs, the prescription remained unchanged along the episode. Discontinuation of the nutritional regimen with lipids was followed by normalization of the hematologic profile, suggesting that an acute or sub-acute allergic reaction was responsible. The appearance of skin rash in two occasions reinforces this hypothesis, and the possibility of hemophagocytosis merits consideration in two of the cases who displayed reversible acute leukocytopenia. It is concluded that blood cell aberrations are possible during intravenous feeding with lipids in trauma subjects, but tend to respond to suppression of the lipid-containing nutritional prescription.

  3. Prediction of parenteral nutrition osmolarity by digital refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Kuo; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2011-05-01

    Infusion of high-osmolarity parenteral nutrition (PN) formulations into a peripheral vein will damage the vessel. In this study, the authors developed a refractometric method to predict PN formulation osmolarity for patients receiving PN. Nutrients in PN formulations were prepared for Brix value and osmolality measurement. Brix value and osmolality measurement of the dextrose, amino acids, and electrolytes were used to evaluate the limiting factor of PN osmolarity prediction. A best-fit equation was generated to predict PN osmolarity (mOsm/L): 81.05 × Brix value--116.33 (R(2) > 0.99). To validate the PN osmolarity prediction by these 4 equations, a total of 500 PN admixtures were tested. The authors found strong linear relationships between the Brix values and the osmolality measurement of dextrose (R(2) = 0.97), amino acids (R(2) = 0.99), and electrolytes (R(2) > 0.96). When PN-measured osmolality was between 600 and 900 mOsm/kg, approximately 43%, 29%, 43%, and 0% of the predicted osmolarity obtained by equations 1, 2, 3, and 4 were outside the acceptable 90% to 110% confidence interval range, respectively. When measured osmolality was between 900 and 1,500 mOsm/kg, 31%, 100%, 85%, and 15% of the predicted osmolarity by equations 1, 2, 3, and 4 were outside the acceptable 90% to 110% confidence interval range, respectively. The refractive method permits accurate PN osmolarity prediction and reasonable quality assurance before PN formulation administration.

  4. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min. In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important.

  5. Carbohydrates – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolder, U.; Ebener, C.; Hauner, H.; Jauch, K. W.; Kreymann, G.; Ockenga, J.; Traeger, K.

    2009-01-01

    The main role of carbohydrates in the human body is to provide energy. Carbohydrates should always be infused with PN (parenteral nutrition) in combination with amino acids and lipid emulsions to improve nitrogen balance. Glucose should be provided as a standard carbohydrate for PN, whereas the use of xylite is not generally recommended. Fructose solutions should not be used for PN. Approximately 60% of non-protein energy should be supplied as glucose with an intake of 3.0–3.5 g/kg body weight/day (2.1–2.4 mg/kg body weight/min). In patients with a high risk of hyperglycaemia (critically ill, diabetes, sepsis, or steroid therapy) an lower initial carbohydrate infusion rate of 1–2 g/kg body weight/day is recommended to achieve normoglycaemia. One should aim at reaching a blood glucose level of 80–110 mg/dL, and at least a glucose level <145 mg/dL should be achieved to reduce morbidity and mortality. Hyperglycaemia may require addition of an insulin infusion or a reduction (2.0–3.0 g/kg body weight/day) or even a temporary interruption of glucose infusion. Close monitoring of blood glucose levels is highly important. PMID:20049080

  6. [Home parenteral nutrition for terminal stage of cancer patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, S; Sakuyama, T; Nakamura, Y; Takahashi, N; Hattori, M

    1997-12-01

    In the last 6 years, we have experienced 20 cancer patients who received home parenteral nutrition for terminal stage. The patients had 13 gastric cancers, 3 esophageal cancers and 5 others. The prognosis of upper G-I cancer is known to be poorer than that of colon cancer. The home care of our cases, the gastric cancer lasted 25 days on average, which was shorter than others. So the home care for patients in the terminal stage of gastric cancer is very short. Therefore we decide the home care for the terminal stage of gastric cancer as soon as possible. We conducted a questionnaire survey of our cases and family. We finally found that the most important thing is the safety of patient for the maintenance of home care. Our home care system is made up of a 3-way relationship among the patient, support system and doctor. The doctor is on call for the problems of the patient for 24 hours. Therefore, we believe that this system is comfortable for both the patient and family.

  7. A parenteral nutrition use survey with gap analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Guenter, Peggi; Mirtallo, Jay M

    2013-03-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication for which safe practice guidelines are available. Recent adverse events associated with PN have been widely reported. A survey of current practices was indicated as new guidelines are being considered. A web-based survey consisting of 70 items was made available for the month of August 2011. Respondents provided answers to questions that addressed all aspects of the PN use process. There were a total of 895 respondents to the survey, including dietitians, nurses, pharmacists, and physicians. They predominantly represented hospital settings (89%), with 44% from academic institutions. Most organizations use a once-daily PN admixture with 21% outsourcing preparation. Electronic PN order entry is available in one-third of organizations, and the use of standardized order sets prevails. Unfortunately, electronic interfaces between computer systems remain infrequent, meaning that at least one transcription step is required by most in the PN use process. There are a wide variety of methods for ordering PN components, many of which are inconsistent with safe practices. Most organizations dedicate a pharmacist to review the PN orders, many of which require clarifications. Documentation at each step of the PN use process with oversight to identify deviations from best practice recommendations is infrequent. A significant proportion (44%) does not track PN-related medication errors. The survey data are a valuable snapshot of current practices with PN. Poor compliance with some of the safe practice guidelines continues. This will help guide new safety initiatives for the PN use process.

  8. Nutritional intake of gut failure patients on home parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DiCecco, S.; Nelson, J.; Burnes, J.; Fleming, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Nutrient intake patterns were analyzed in 23 patients with gut failure who were receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN). All patients had stable weights without changes in intravenous calories or protein for 3 consecutive months. Our objectives were to assess oral intake of calories, carbohydrates, fat, and protein, to examine relationships between oral nutrient intakes and disease categories, and to compare oral and intravenous intakes to calculated resting energy expenditure (REE). Two patterns of oral nutrient intake were identified among the patients. Patients with short bowel syndrome, regardless of the underlying disease, consumed calories by mouth that clearly exceeded calculated resting energy expenditure (short bowel, non-Crohn's, 170% of REE; short bowel, Crohn's, 200 of REE); however, calories approximating the REE had to be given via HPN, suggesting that efficiency of absorption was at a very low level. Patients with diffuse gut diseases (radiation enteritis or pseudo-obstruction syndromes) had very low intakes of oral nutrients. The distribution of oral calories among carbohydrate, protein, and fat did not differ among the disease categories

  9. Standardised versus Individualised Parenteral Nutrition. Further Food for Thought

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, R

    2016-04-01

    Parenteral Nutrition may be prescribed as a standard PN (SPN) formulation or as an individualised PN (IPN) formulation. SPN may have advantages in terms of rapid availability, less prescription errors, decreased risk of infection and cost savings but IPN, specifically tailored to an infant’s needs, may achieve better outcomes in terms of nutrient intake and weight gain. The aim of our study was to determine if VLBW infants in our NICU benefited from receiving IPN over currently available SPN solutions. Our findings were that VLBW infants prescribed IPN received significantly more amino acid (28%), glucose (6%), energy (11%) and calcium (8%) from the aqueous phase of PN than had they received a similar volume of SPN. The benefits were seen over all the days for which PN was administered. In conclusion, IPN was found to offer significant benefits to our VLBW infants. Modifications to currently available SPN would result in better SPN formulations. Our study also supported the recent recommendation to reduce the calcium:phosphate ratio in PN solutions to avoid early hypophosphataemia

  10. Organization of managed clinical networking for home parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Janet P; McKee, Ruth F

    2006-05-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is an established treatment for intestinal failure, and organization of HPN is variable throughout the UK and Europe. Managed clinical networking is the single most important feature of the UK National Health Service strategy for acute services in Scotland and has the potential to improve the management of HPN patients. This review addresses the role of managed clinical networking in HPN and compares outcome data between centres. The Scottish HPN Managed Clinical Network has published the main body of the current literature supporting the concept of managed clinical networking in this context. The Network is responsible for the organization and quality assurance of HPN provision in Scotland, and has been established for 5 years. It has captured significant patient data for the purpose of clinical audit and illustrates that this is an effective model for the management of this patient population. This review provides advice for other areas wishing to improve equity of access, and to smooth the patient journey between primary, secondary and tertiary health care in the context of artificial nutrition support.

  11. Neonatology/Paediatrics – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusch, C.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available There are special challenges in implementing parenteral nutrition (PN in paediatric patients, which arises from the wide range of patients, ranging from extremely premature infants up to teenagers weighing up to and over 100 kg, and their varying substrate requirements. Age and maturity-related changes of the metabolism and fluid and nutrient requirements must be taken into consideration along with the clinical situation during which PN is applied. The indication, the procedure as well as the intake of fluid and substrates are very different to that known in PN-practice in adult patients, e.g. the fluid, nutrient and energy needs of premature infants and newborns per kg body weight are markedly higher than of older paediatric and adult patients. Premature infants <35 weeks of pregnancy and most sick term infants usually require full or partial PN. In neonates the actual amount of PN administered must be calculated (not estimated. Enteral nutrition should be gradually introduced and should replace PN as quickly as possible in order to minimise any side-effects from exposure to PN. Inadequate substrate intake in early infancy can cause long-term detrimental effects in terms of metabolic programming of the risk of illness in later life. If energy and nutrient demands in children and adolescents cannot be met through enteral nutrition, partial or total PN should be considered within 7 days or less depending on the nutritional state and clinical conditions.

  12. Parenteral opioids for maternal pain management in labour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lesley A; Burns, Ethel; Cuthbert, Anna

    2018-06-05

    Parenteral opioids (intramuscular and intravenous drugs including patient-controlled analgesia) are used for pain relief in labour in many countries throughout the world. This review is an update of a review first published in 2010. To assess the effectiveness, safety and acceptability to women of different types, doses and modes of administration of parenteral opioid analgesia in labour. A second objective is to assess the effects of opioids in labour on the baby in terms of safety, condition at birth and early feeding. We searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (11 May 2017) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We included randomised controlled trials examining the use of intramuscular or intravenous opioids (including patient-controlled analgesia) for women in labour. Cluster-randomised trials were also eligible for inclusion, although none were identified. We did not include quasi-randomised trials. We looked at studies comparing an opioid with another opioid, placebo, no treatment, other non-pharmacological interventions (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS)) or inhaled analgesia. Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and risk of bias, extracted data and checked them for accuracy. We assessed the quality of each evidence synthesis using the GRADE approach. We included 70 studies that compared an opioid with placebo or no treatment, another opioid administered intramuscularly or intravenously or compared with TENS applied to the back. Sixty-one studies involving more than 8000 women contributed data to the review and these studies reported on 34 different comparisons; for many comparisons and outcomes only one study contributed data. All of the studies were conducted in hospital settings, on healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies at 37 to 42 weeks' gestation. We excluded studies focusing on women with pre

  13. Complications and Monitoring – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Working group for developing the guidelines for parenteral nutrition of The German Association for Nutritional Medicine

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Compared to enteral or hypocaloric oral nutrition, the use of PN (parenteral nutrition is not associated with increased mortality, overall frequency of complications, or longer length of hospital stay (LOS. The risk of PN complications (e.g. refeeding-syndrome, hyperglycaemia, bone demineralisation, catheter infections can be minimised by carefully monitoring patients and the use of nutrition support teams particularly during long-term PN. Occuring complications are e.g. the refeeding-syndrome in patients suffering from severe malnutrition with the initiation of refeeding or metabolic, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperglycaemia, osteomalacia and osteoporosis, and hepatic complications including fatty liver, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, cholestasis, cholecystitis, and cholelithiasis. Efficient monitoring in all types of PN can result in reduced PN-associated complications and reduced costs. Water and electrolyte balance, blood sugar, and cardiovascular function should regularly be monitored during PN. Regular checks of serum electrolytes and triglycerides as well as additional monitoring measures are necessary in patients with altered renal function, electrolyte-free substrate intake, lipid infusions, and in intensive care patients. The metabolic monitoring of patients under long-term PN should be carried out according to standardised procedures. Monitoring metabolic determinants of bone metabolism is particularly important in patients receiving long-term PN. Markers of intermediary, electrolyte and trace element metabolism require regular checks.

  14. Developing accreditation for community based surgery: the Irish experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Riain, Ailís; Collins, Claire; O'Sullivan, Tony

    2018-02-05

    Purpose Carrying out minor surgery procedures in the primary care setting is popular with patients, cost effective and delivers at least as good outcomes as those performed in the hospital setting. This paper aims to describe the central role of clinical leadership in developing an accreditation system for general practitioners (GPs) undertaking community-based surgery in the Irish national setting where no mandatory accreditation process currently exists. Design/methodology/approach In all, 24 GPs were recruited to the GP network. Ten pilot standards were developed addressing GPs' experience and training, clinical activity and practice supporting infrastructure and tested, using information and document review, prospective collection of clinical data and a practice inspection visit. Two additional components were incorporated into the project (patient satisfaction survey and self-audit). A multi-modal evaluation was undertaken. A majority of GPs was included at all stages of the project, in line with the principles of action learning. The steering group had a majority of GPs with relevant expertise and representation of all other actors in the minor surgery arena. The GP research network contributed to each stage of the project. The project lead was a GP with minor surgery experience. Quantitative data collected were analysed using Predictive Analytic SoftWare. Krueger's framework analysis approach was used to analyse the qualitative data. Findings A total of 9 GPs achieved all standards at initial review, 14 successfully completed corrective actions and 1 GP did not achieve the required standard. Standards were then amended to reflect findings and a supporting framework was developed. Originality/value The flexibility of the action-learning approach and the clinical leadership design allowed for the development of robust quality standards in a short timeframe.

  15. Team sponsors in community-based health leadership programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Tracy Enright; Dinkin, Donna R; Champion, Heather

    2017-05-02

    Purpose The purpose of this article is to share the lessons learned about the role of team sponsors in action-learning teams as part of community-based health leadership development programs. Design/methodology/approach This case study uses program survey results from fellow participants, action learning coaches and team sponsors to understand the value of sponsors to the teams, the roles they most often filled and the challenges they faced as team sponsors. Findings The extent to which the sponsors were perceived as having contributed to the work of the action learning teams varied greatly from team to team. Most sponsors agreed that they were well informed about their role. The roles sponsors most frequently played were to provide the teams with input and support, serve as a liaison to the community and serve as a sounding board, motivator and cheerleader. The most common challenges or barriers team sponsors faced in this role were keeping engaged in the process, adjusting to the role and feeling disconnected from the program. Practical implications This work provides insights for program developers and community foundations who are interested in building the capacity for health leadership by linking community sponsors with emerging leaders engaged in an action learning experience. Originality/value This work begins to fill a gap in the literature. The role of team sponsors has been studied for single organization work teams but there is a void of understanding about the role of sponsors with multi-organizational teams working to improve health while also learning about leadership.

  16. A community based study of failure to thrive in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilensky, D S; Ginsberg, G; Altman, M; Tulchinsky, T H; Ben Yishay, F; Auerbach, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the characteristics of infants suffering from failure to thrive in a community based cohort in Israel and to ascertain the effect of failure to thrive on their cognitive development. METHODS: By review of records maintained at maternal and child health clinics in Jerusalem and the two of Beit Shemesh, epidemiological data were obtained at age 15 months on a cohort of all babies born in 1991. For each case of failure to thrive, a matched control was selected from the same maternal and child health clinic. At age 20 months, cognitive development was measured, and at 25 months a home visit was carried out to assess maternal psychiatric status by questionnaire, and the HOME assessment was performed to assess the home environment. RESULTS: 3.9% of infants were found to have fallen below the third centile in weight for at least three months during the first year of life. Infants with failure to thrive did not differ from the general population in terms of obstetric or neonatal complications, birth order, or parents' ethnic origin, age, or years of education. The infants with failure to thrive did have lower birthweights and marginally smaller head circumferences at birth. Developmental assessment at 20 months of age showed a DQ of 99.7 v 107.2 in the matched controls, with 11.5% having a DQ below 80, as opposed to only 4.6% of the controls. No differences were found in maternal psychiatric problems as measured by a self report questionnaire. There were, however, significant differences in subscales of the HOME scale. CONCLUSIONS: (1) Infants who suffered from failure to thrive had some physiological predispositions that put them at risk; (2) failure to thrive may be an early marker of families providing suboptimal developmental stimulation. PMID:8869197

  17. Vitamin E in new-generation lipid emulsions protects against parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease in parenteral nutrition-fed preterm pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) in preterm infants leads to PN-associated liver disease (PNALD). PNALD has been linked to serum accumulation of phytosterols that are abundant in plant oil but absent in fish oil emulsions. Whether modifying the phytosterol and vitamin E composition of soy and fish oil lipi...

  18. Parenteral nutrition following intensive cytotoxic therapy: an exploratory study on the need for parenteral nutrition after various treatment approaches for haematological malignancies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iestra, J. A.; Fibbe, W. E.; Zwinderman, A. H.; Romijn, J. A.; Kromhout, D.

    1999-01-01

    Patients receiving intensive cytotoxic therapy are traditionally supported with parenteral nutrition (PN), although it is unclear whether all patients benefit from PN. This study aimed to identify regimen-associated differences in PN requirements, to reveal discrepancies between the number of PN

  19. Parenteral Opioid Analgesics Utilization Pattern in Amir-al-Momenin Hospital, Zabol-IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Vatanpour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opioids are the most available medicines to get rid of any general severe pain and avoiding of any deleterious sequential that can worsen patient outcomes. Rational prescription of opioid analgesics with respect to the possibility of abuse is a big concern in the medical care costs. Zabol, where is located in eastern part of Iran and has common border with Afghanistanhas the most opioid traffic in the region. In this study the rational prescription of parenteral opioid in Amir-al-Momenin general hospital was investigated. A retrospective drug utilization review was performed on 509 in-patients who received parenteral opioids including Morphine, Pethidin, Pentazocin, Fentanyl, Alfentanil, Sufentanil and Methadone from March 21sttoSeptember 23rd, 2011. Multivariate conditional regression modeling was used to determine independent predictors for daily parenteral opioid consumption. Total daily parenteral opioid consumption was 38.63 DDDs/100bed-days for Morphine, Pethidine and Pentazocin and 84564.78 PFEQs/100bed-days for Fentanyl, Alfentanil and Sufentanil and 766 mg for Methadone. Pethidine was the most frequently prescribed parenteral opioid. Most patients who were prescribed by the intramuscular routes, ordered PRN. Daily parenteral opioid consumption was the highest in the emergency ward whereas it was considered as the lowest in the intensive care unit[ICU]. According to our findings, total daily parenteral opioid consumption was almost high in Amir-al-Momenin Hospital. Unlike to some relevant factors that can effect on the consumption of analgesic opioids like gender, age, drug-drug interaction and etc, we found no rational prescription and consumption in the mentioned hospital.

  20. Evidence for the use of parenteral nutrition in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fivez, Tom; Kerklaan, Dorian; Mesotten, Dieter; Verbruggen, Sascha; Joosten, Koen; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2017-02-01

    During hospitalization in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), critically ill children are fed artificially. Administered via the preferred enteral route, caloric targets are often not reached. Hence, parenteral nutrition is given to this patient population. In this review we analyzed the available evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that supports the use of parenteral nutrition in children during critical illness. A search strategy in Ovid MEDLINE and Ovid EMBASE was created and trial registries were screened to identify the relevant RCTs. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials, involved pediatric patients admitted to PICU, and compared different dosing/compositions of parenteral nutrition. Descriptive studies and reviews were excluded. Of the 584 articles identified by the search strategy, only 114 articles were retained after title screening. Further abstract and full text screening identified 6 small RCTs that compared two dosing/composition strategies of parenteral nutrition. These trials reported differences in surrogate endpoints without an effect on hard clinical endpoints. The RCTs observed improvements in these surrogate endpoints with the use of more calories or when parenteral glutamine or fish oil was added. The few RCTs suggest that surrogate endpoints can be affected by providing parenteral nutrition to critically ill children, but the studies were not statistically powered to draw meaningful clinical conclusions. Large RCTs with clinically relevant outcome measures are urgently needed to support the current nutritional guidelines that advise the use of parenteral nutrition in the PICU. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. The Girlfriends Project: Evaluating a Promising Community-Based Intervention from a Bottom-Up Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials are the gold standard in research but may not fully explain or predict outcome variations in community-based interventions. Demonstrating efficacy of externally driven programs in well-controlled environments may not translate to community-based implementation where resources and priorities vary. A bottom-up evaluation…

  2. Community-Based Research: From Practice to Theory and Back Again.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoecker, Randy

    2003-01-01

    Explores the theoretical strands being combined in community-based research--charity service learning, social justice service learning, action research, and participatory research. Shows how different models of community-based research, based in different theories of society and different approaches to community work, may combine or conflict. (EV)

  3. Community-Based Programming: An Opportunity and Imperative for the Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Edgar J.

    1992-01-01

    Defines community-based programing as a cooperative process in which the community college serves as leader and catalyst in effecting collaboration among community members, leaders, and groups. Recommends 15 tasks for community college leaders involved in community-based programing, including environmental scanning and coalition building. (DMM)

  4. Community-Based Field Experiences in Teacher Education: Possibilities for a Pedagogical Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Heidi L.

    2012-01-01

    The present article discusses the importance of community-based field experiences as a feature of teacher education programs. Through a qualitative case study, prospective teachers' work with homeless youth in an after-school initiative is presented. Framing community-based field experiences in teacher education through "third space" theory, the…

  5. O significado da nutrição parenteral para o cliente no contexto hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Consuelo Helena Aires de Freitas Lopes

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A necessidade de compreender o significado da nutrição parenteral para o cliente no contexto hospitalar surgiu das nossas inquietações diante do cuidado de enfermagem. Realizaram-se observações participantes, entrevistas e anotações de campo junto a sete clientes hospitalizados, que se encontravam sob nutrição parenteral. O sentido das investigações foi centrado na indagação: como você está se sentindo com a nutrição parenteral? Os dados foram analisados numa abordagem interacionista, mostrando as dificuldades enfrentadas pelos clientes na assistência hospitalar, como percebiam eles a nutrição parenteral e que significados eram atribuídos a essa terapêutica. O estudo revelou os sentimentos, comportamentos e atitudes relacionados aos aspectos biológico, emocional e sócio-cultural do cliente, ligados à nutrição parenteral, demonstrando, também as limitações impostas ao cliente sob esse tratamento, bem como as dificuldades na assistência de enfermagem.

  6. Reversal of growth arrest in adolescents with Crohn's disease after parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, T; Rosenberg, F; Nemchausky, G; Elson, C; Rosenberg, I

    1976-06-01

    Growth arrest and delayed onset of puberty often complicate childhood onset Crohn's disease of the small bowel (granulomatous enteritis). Nutritional deficits arising from inadequate dietary intake, malabsorption, and increased caloric needs may contribute to growth retardation. To assess whether a sustained high caloric and nitrogen intake could reestablish growth, 4 children with extensive Crohn's disease of the small bowel were studied before and after parenteral alimentation which was instituted for symtomatic disease control. Weight gain, positive nitrogen balance, and improved nutritional status were achieved during parenteral alimentation in each patient. In 2 patients weight gain was sustained using oral nutritional supplements, and a substantial increase in linear skeletal growth continued in the ensuing months. One patient entered puberty within 4 months of parenteral alimentation and another had the onset of menarche and the development of secondary sex characteristics 4 months after parenteral alimentation and resection of diseased bowel. Growth may be reestablished in some growth-arrested children if intake is sufficient to establish a sustained positive caloric and nitrogen balance. Nutritional requirements imposed by the demands of growth and active disease and often compounded by the catabolic effects of corticosteroids may be excessive; growth may occur only if these needs are met orally and/or parenterally.

  7. Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in the Perioperative Period: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Sanchez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Nutritional support of surgical and critically ill patients has undergone significant advances since 1936 when Studley demonstrated a direct relationship between pre-operative weight loss and operative mortality. The advent of total parenteral nutrition followed by the extraordinary progress in parenteral and enteral feedings, in addition to the increased knowledge of cellular biology and biochemistry, have allowed clinicians to treat malnutrition and improve surgical patient’s outcomes. We reviewed the literature for the current status of perioperative nutrition comparing parenteral nutrition with enteral nutrition. In a surgical patient with established malnutrition, nutritional support should begin at least 7–10 days prior to surgery. Those patients in whom eating is not anticipated beyond the first five days following surgery should receive the benefits of early enteral or parenteral feeding depending on whether the gut can be used. Compared to parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition is associated with fewer complications, a decrease in the length of hospital stay, and a favorable cost-benefit analysis. In addition, many patients may benefit from newer enteral formulations such as Immunonutrition as well as disease-specific formulations.

  8. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods for extended-release parenteral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J

    2012-07-01

    This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in-vitro drug release testing of extended-release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in-situ depot-forming systems and implants. Extended-release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, 'real-time' in-vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in-vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in-vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended-release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in-vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Accelerated in-vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended-release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in-vitro-in-vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable; however, for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. © 2012 The Authors. JPP © 2012 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  9. Accelerated in vitro release testing methods for extended release parenteral dosage forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Burgess, Diane J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This review highlights current methods and strategies for accelerated in vitro drug release testing of extended release parenteral dosage forms such as polymeric microparticulate systems, lipid microparticulate systems, in situ depot-forming systems, and implants. Key findings Extended release parenteral dosage forms are typically designed to maintain the effective drug concentration over periods of weeks, months or even years. Consequently, “real-time” in vitro release tests for these dosage forms are often run over a long time period. Accelerated in vitro release methods can provide rapid evaluation and therefore are desirable for quality control purposes. To this end, different accelerated in vitro release methods using United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) apparatus have been developed. Different mechanisms of accelerating drug release from extended release parenteral dosage forms, along with the accelerated in vitro release testing methods currently employed are discussed. Conclusions Accelerated in vitro release testing methods with good discriminatory ability are critical for quality control of extended release parenteral products. Methods that can be used in the development of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) are desirable, however for complex parenteral products this may not always be achievable. PMID:22686344

  10. [Clinical outcomes of parenterally administered shuxuetong--analysis of hospital information system data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Ying-Jie; Zhang, Hui; Xie, Yan-Ming; Yang, Wei; Yang, Hu; Zhuang, Yan

    2013-09-01

    Hospital information system data of cerebral infaction patients who received parenterally administered Shuxuetong was analyzed. This provided frequency data regarding patients' conditions and related information in order to provide a clinical reference guide. In this study, HIS data from 18 hospitals was analyzed. Patients receiving parenterally administered Shuxuetong for the treatment of cerebral infarction were included. Information on age, gender, costsand route of administration were collated. The average age of patients was 66 years old. Days of hospitalization ranged from 15 to 28 days. The majority of patients were classified as having phlegm and blood stasis syndrome, which is inaccordance with the indications for this drug. The most commonly used drugs used in combination with parenterally administered Shuxuetong were: aspirin, insulin and heparin. Patients with cerebral infarction crowd using parenterally administered Shuxuetong were a mostly elderly population, with an average age of 66. Although generally use was in accordance with indications, dosage, and route of administration, there were however some discrepancies. Therefore, doctors need to pay close attention to guidelines and closely observe patients when using parenterally administered Shuxuetong and to consider both the clinical benefits and risks.

  11. Enteral and Parenteral Nutrition in the Perioperative Period: State of the Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abunnaja, Salim; Cuviello, Andrea; Sanchez, Juan A.

    2013-01-01

    Nutritional support of surgical and critically ill patients has undergone significant advances since 1936 when Studley demonstrated a direct relationship between pre-operative weight loss and operative mortality. The advent of total parenteral nutrition followed by the extraordinary progress in parenteral and enteral feedings, in addition to the increased knowledge of cellular biology and biochemistry, have allowed clinicians to treat malnutrition and improve surgical patient’s outcomes. We reviewed the literature for the current status of perioperative nutrition comparing parenteral nutrition with enteral nutrition. In a surgical patient with established malnutrition, nutritional support should begin at least 7–10 days prior to surgery. Those patients in whom eating is not anticipated beyond the first five days following surgery should receive the benefits of early enteral or parenteral feeding depending on whether the gut can be used. Compared to parenteral nutrition, enteral nutrition is associated with fewer complications, a decrease in the length of hospital stay, and a favorable cost-benefit analysis. In addition, many patients may benefit from newer enteral formulations such as Immunonutrition as well as disease-specific formulations. PMID:23429491

  12. Intestine, immunity, and parenteral nutrition in an era of preferred enteral feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Meredith; Demehri, Farokh R; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2015-09-01

    To review the benefits of enteral nutrition in contrast to the inflammatory consequences of administration of parenteral nutrition and enteral deprivation. To present the most recent evidence for the mechanisms of these immunologic changes and discuss potential areas for modification to decrease infectious complications of its administration. There is significant data supporting the early initiation of enteral nutrition in both medical and surgical patients unable to meet their caloric goals via oral intake alone. Despite the preference for enteral nutrition, some patients are unable to utilize their gut for nutritious gain and therefore require parenteral nutrition administration, along with its infectious complications. The mechanisms behind these complications are multifactorial and have yet to be fully elucidated. Recent study utilizing both animal and human models has provided further information regarding parenteral nutrition's deleterious effect on intestinal epithelial barrier function along with the complications associated with enterocyte deprivation. Changes associated with parenteral nutrition administration and enteral deprivation are complex with multiple potential areas for modification to allow for safer administration. Recent discovery of the mechanisms behind these changes present exciting areas for future study as to make parenteral nutrition administration in the enterally deprived patient safer.

  13. Clinical relevance of trace element measurement in patients on initiation of parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salota, Rashim; Omar, Sohail; Sherwood, Roy A; Raja, Kishor; Vincent, Royce P

    2016-11-01

    Background and Aims Serum zinc, copper and selenium are measured in patients prior to commencing on parenteral nutrition; however, their interpretation can be difficult due to acute phase reactions. We assessed (i) the relationship of raised C-reactive protein with trace elements and albumin (ii) benefits of measuring trace elements when C-reactive protein is raised in patients requiring short-term parenteral nutrition. Methods Samples were collected for zinc, copper, selenium and albumin at baseline and then every two weeks and correlated with C-reactive protein results in patients on parenteral nutrition. Results were categorized into four groups based on the C-reactive protein concentrations: (i)  0.05), whereas selenium and albumin were lower in the group with C-reactive protein > 40 mg/L ( P parenteral nutrition, measurement of C-reactive protein is essential when interpreting zinc and selenium but not copper results. Routine measurement of trace elements prior to commencing parenteral nutrition has to be considered on an individual basis in patients with inflammation.

  14. Glycemic Variation in Tumor Patients with Total Parenteral Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cheng Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor clinical outcomes and mortality in several patients. However, studies evaluating hyperglycemia variation in tumor patients receiving total parenteral nutrition (TPN are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between glycemia and tumor kinds with TPN by monitoring glycemic variation in tumor patients. Methods: This retrospective clinical trial selected 312 patients with various cancer types, whose unique nutrition treatment was TPN during the monitoring period. All patients had blood glucose (BG values assessed at least six times daily during the TPN infusion. The glycemic variation before and after TPN was set as the indicator to evaluate the factors influencing BG. Results: The clinical trial lasted 7.5 ± 3.0 days adjusted for age, gender, family cancer history and blood types. There were six cancer types: Hepatic carcinoma (HC, 21.8%, rectal carcinoma (17.3%, colon carcinoma (CC, 14.7%, gastric carcinoma (29.8%, pancreatic carcinoma (11.5%, and duodenal carcinoma (DC, 4.8%. The patients were divided into diabetes and nondiabetes groups. No statistical differences in TPN glucose content between diabetes and nondiabetes groups were found; however, the tumor types affected by BG values were obvious. With increasing BG values, DC, HC and CC were more represented than other tumor types in this sequence in diabetic individuals, as well as in the nondiabetic group. BG was inclined to be more easily influenced in the nondiabetes group. Other factors did not impact BG values, including gender, body mass index, and TPN infusion duration time. Conclusions: When tumor patients are treated with TPN, BG levels should be monitored according to different types of tumors, besides differentiating diabetes or nondiabetes patients. Special BG control is needed for DC, HC and CC in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients. If BG overtly increases, positive measurements are needed to control BG

  15. Refeeding syndrome: screening, incidence, and treatment during parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, Russell S

    2013-12-01

    The possible deleterious effects of feeding after a period of prolonged starvation have been known for over 60 years. The resultant biochemical disturbance, symptoms, and signs have been termed the refeeding syndrome (RS). The key to the pathophysiology is the stimulation of insulin release resulting in anabolic activity. Depleted electrolyte and micronutrient stores are overwhelmed and cellular function disrupted. A concise definition of RS is not agreed and hampers interpretation of clinical data. Hypophosphatemia and appearance of tissue edema/pathological fluid shifts are the most often agreed diagnostic criteria. The characteristics of particular patient groups at risk have been recognized for some time, and there are guidelines from the National Institute for Clinical Excellence in the UK to aid recognition of individuals at high risk along with protocols for initiating nutrition. Using loose diagnostic criteria, RS appears to occur in 4% of cases of parenteral nutrition (PN) when case records were reviewed by experts in a large study into PN care in the UK. Disappointingly, prescribers recognized only 50% of at risk cases. Early data from a similar study in New Zealand appear to show a similar pattern. Prospective series looking at patients receiving nutrition support in institutions with Nutrition Support Teams have found an incidence of 1-5%. RS is still underrecognized. Patients receiving PN should be counted as being in a high-risk category and feeding protocols to avoid RS applied. Low rates of RS then occur and death from this cause be avoided. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. [Suppression of cycling activity in sheep using parenteral progestagen treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janett, F; Camponovo, L; Lanker, U; Hässig, M; Thun, R

    2004-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of two synthetic progestagen preparations Chlormadinone acetate (CAP, Chronosyn, Veterinaria AG Zürich) and Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, Nadigest, G Streuli & Co. Uznach) on cycling activity and fertility in sheep. A flock of 28 non pregnant white alpine sheep was randomly divided into three groups, A (n = 10), B (n = 9) and C (n = 9). During a period of 4 weeks the cycling activity was confirmed by blood progesterone analysis. Thereafter, the animals of group A were treated with 50 mg CAP, those of group B with 140 mg MPA and those of group C with physiological saline solution. All injections were given intramuscularly. Suppression of endogenous progesterone secretion lasted from 28 to 49 days (mean = 39 days) in group A and from 42 to 70 days (mean = 50 days) in group B. The synchronization effect of both preparations was unsatisfactory as the occurrence of first estrus was distributed over a period of 3 weeks in group A and 4 weeks in group B. These findings could also be confirmed by the lambing period which lasted 52 days in group A and 36 days in group B. Control animals lambed within 9 days due to the synchronizing effect of the ram. The first fertile estrus was observed 36 days (group A) and 45 days (group B) after the treatment. In group A all 10 animals and in groups B and C 8 of 9 ewes each became pregnant. Parenteral progestagen application with CAP and MPA is a simple, safe and reversible method of estrus suppression in the sheep. The minimal suppressive duration of 4 (CAP) and 5 weeks (MPA) is not sufficient when a period of 3 months (alpine pasture period) is desired.

  17. Enteral and parenteral lipid requirements of preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapillonne, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Lipids provide infants with most of their energy needs. The major portion of the fat in human milk is found in the form of triglycerides, the phospholipids and cholesterol contributing for only a small proportion of the total fat. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs) are crucial for normal development of the central nervous system and have potential for long-lasting effects that extend beyond the period of dietary insufficiency. Given the limited and highly variable formation of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from α-linolenic acid, and because DHA is critical for normal retinal and brain development in the human, DHA should be considered to be conditionally essential during early development. In early enteral studies, the amount of LC-PUFAs administered in formula was chosen to produce the same concentration of arachidonic acid and DHA as in term breast milk. Recent studies report outcome data in preterm infants fed formula with DHA content 2-3 times higher than the current concentration. Overall, these studies show that providing larger amounts of DHA supplements is associated with better neurological outcomes and may provide other health benefits. One study further suggests that the smallest babies are the most vulnerable to DHA deficiency and likely to reap the greatest benefit from high-dose DHA supplementation. Current nutritional management may not provide sufficient amounts of preformed DHA during the parenteral and enteral nutrition periods and in very preterm/very low birth weight infants until due date and higher amounts than those routinely used are likely to be necessary to compensate for intestinal malabsorption, DHA oxidation, and early deficit. Recommendations for the healthcare provider are made in order to prevent lipid and more specifically LC-PUFA deficit. Research should be continued to fill the gaps in knowledge and to further refine the adequate intake for each group of preterm infants. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Gastroenterology – Guidelines on Parenteral Nutrition, Chapter 15

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz, R. J.

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis parenteral nutrition (PN is indicated when enteral nutrition is not possible or should be avoided for medical reasons. In Crohn's patients PN is indicated when there are signs/symptoms of ileus or subileus in the small intestine, scars or intestinal fistulae. PN requires no specific compounding for chronic inflammatory bowel diseases. In both diseases it should be composed of 55–60% carbohydrates, 25–30% lipids and 10–15% amino acids. PN helps in the correction of malnutrition, particularly the intake of energy, minerals, trace elements, deficiency of calcium, vitamin D, folic acid, vitamin B12, and zinc. Enteral nutrition is clearly superior to PN in severe, acute pancreatitis. An intolerance to enteral nutrition results in an indication for total PN in complications such as pseudocysts, intestinal and pancreatic fistulae, and pancreatic abscesses or pancreatic ascites. If enteral nutrition is not possible, PN is recommended, at the earliest, 5 days after admission to the hospital. TPN should not be routinely administered in mild acute pancreatitis or nil by moth status <7 days, due to high costs and an increased risk of infection. The energy requirements are between 25 and 35 kcal/kg body weight/day. A standard solution including lipids (monitoring triglyceride levels! can be administered in acute pancreatitis. Glucose (max. 4–5 g/kg body weight/day and amino acids (about 1.2–1.5 g/kg body weight/day should be administered and the additional enrichment of TPN with glutamine should be considered in severe, progressive forms of pancreatitis.

  19. Enteral versus parenteral nutrition in cancer patients: evidences and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotogni, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The debate over the use of enteral nutrition (EN) and parenteral nutrition (PN) is an old but evergreen and hot topic. Since many years, studies comparing EN and PN have been a pivotal 'leitmotif' in the published literature on artificial nutrition (AN). Actually, there is a background misunderstanding in this debate; specifically, that EN and PN are competitors in the choice of the route for delivering nutrition support in cancer patients. Conversely, EN and PN have specific indications and contraindications. This review has the purpose to discuss the indications and complications as well as pros and cons of EN and PN in cancer patients, the crucial role of nutrition support in oncology patients during anticancer treatments and throughout the course of disease, and, finally, the role of AN in advanced cancer patients. In summary, we have no evidence-based data able to definitively indicate the optimal method for delivering AN in cancer patients. EN and PN have to be considered equally effective in maintaining or improving nutritional status in cancer patients. Besides, this review strongly supports the recommendation that a baseline nutritional assessment should be carried out by a healthcare professional expert in AN for all cancer patients at the time of diagnosis or anticancer treatment plan, taking the nutritional status, estimated duration of AN, AN-related potential benefits and possible complications into consideration on an individual basis. Moreover, the patient symptoms, performance status, estimated life expectancy, and mainly, will or preferences have to be evaluated and incorporated into the nutrition support plan before the definitive choice of the route for delivering nutrients is decided. Finally, applying a decision-making process tailored to patient needs-regardless of whether receiving or not anticancer treatment-allows to choose reasonably the optimal nutritional support strategy.

  20. Adult classical homocystinuria requiring parenteral nutrition: Pitfalls and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Christel; Bonafé, Luisa; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Rieger, Julie; Berger, Mette M

    2017-07-25

    Homocystinuria due to cystathionine beta synthase (CBS) deficiency presents with a wide clinical spectrum. Treatment by the enteral route aims at reducing homocysteine levels by using vitamin B6, possibly methionine-restricted diet, betaine and/or folate and vitamin B 12 supplementation. Currently no nutritional guidelines exist regarding parenteral nutrition (PN) under acute conditions. Exhaustive literature search was performed, in order to identify the relevant studies describing the pathogenesis and nutritional intervention of adult classical homocystinuria requiring PN. Description of an illustrative case of an adult female with CBS deficiency and intestinal perforation, who required total PN due to contraindication to enteral nutrition. Nutritional management of decompensated classical homocystinuria is complex and currently no recommendation exists regarding PN composition. Amino acid profile and monitoring of total homocysteine concentration are the main tools enabling a precise assessment of the severity of metabolic alterations. In case of contraindication to enteral nutrition, compounded PN will be required, as described in this paper, to ensure adequate low amounts of methionine and others essential amino acids and avoid potentially fatal toxic hypermethioninemia. By reviewing the literature and reporting successful nutritional management of a decompensated CBS deficiency using tailored PN with limited methionine intake and n-3 PUFA addition, we would like to underscore the fact that standard PN solutions are not adapted for CBS deficient critical ill patients: new solutions are required. High methionine levels (>800 μmol/L) being potentially neurotoxic, there is an urgent need to improve our knowledge of acute nutritional therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  1. Assessment of parenteral nutrition prescription in Canadian acute care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjemian, Daniela; Arendt, Bianca M; Allard, Johane P

    2018-05-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) prescription can be challenging in patients with complex conditions and has potential complications. To assess PN prescription, monitoring, and PN-related complications in a Canadian acute care setting. This was a prospective cohort study in which patients receiving PN were assessed by an auditor for nutritional status, PN-related prescription, monitoring, and complications. In addition, length of stay and mortality were recorded. 147 patients (mean ± SD 56.1 ± 16.4 y) with complex diseases (Charlson comorbidity index, median [p25-p75] 2 [1-4]) were enrolled. Before starting PN, 18.6%, 63.9%, and 17.5% of patients were classified as subjective global assessment A, B, and C, respectively. Body mass index remained unchanged during the period on PN. On average, 89% and 73% of patients received <90% of their energy and protein requirements, respectively, but 65% received oral or enteral nutrition at some point during PN. The average daily energy provided by PN increased and stabilized on day 10, reaching 87.2 ± 20.1% of the requirements. Line sepsis (6.8% of patients) and hyperglycemia (6.9%) were the most common complications. The overall mortality was 15.6%. For those alive, length of stay was 30 (range: 4-268) d. PN was discontinued because of transitioning to an oral diet (56.6%), enteral nutrition (17.6%), home PN (14.7%), palliative care (5.1%), death (4.4%), or other (1.5%). Most patients were malnourished at the start of PN. Energy and protein provided from PN were less than requirements, and the goals were reached with delay. Mortality was high, possibly as a result of complex diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia in the Middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Observational study of outpatients with schizophrenia in the Middle East and Africa — 3- and 6-month efficacy and safety results. The Intercontinental Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes Study.

  3. Eating disorders: a hidden phenomenon in outpatient mental health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursland, Anthea; Watson, Hunna J

    2014-05-01

    Eating disorders are common but underdiagnosed illnesses. Help-seeking for co-occurring issues, such as anxiety and depression, are common. To identify the prevalence of eating problems, using the SCOFF, and eating disorders when screening positive on the SCOFF (i.e., ≥2), among patients seeking help for anxiety and depression at a community-based mental health service. Patients (N = 260) consecutively referred and assessed for anxiety and depression treatment were administered the SCOFF screening questionnaire and a semi-structured standardized diagnostic interview during routine intake. 18.5% (48/260) scored ≥2 on the SCOFF, indicating eating problems. Of these, 41% (19/48) met criteria for an eating disorder. Thus, overall, 7.3% (19/260) of the sample met criteria for a DSM-IV eating disorder. Those scoring ≥2 on the SCOFF were more likely to: be female (p = 0.001), younger (p = 0.003), and have a history of self-harm (p eating disorders are a hidden phenomenon in general outpatient mental health. By using a standardized diagnostic interview to establish diagnosis rather than self- or staff-report, the study builds on limited previous findings. The naturalistic study setting shows that screening for eating disorders can be easily built into routine intake practice, and successfully identifies treatment need. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Independence From Parenteral Nutrition and Intravenous Fluid Support During Treatment With Teduglutide Among Patients With Intestinal Failure Associated With Short Bowel Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iyer, Kishore R; Kunecki, Marek; Boullata, Joseph I

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In phase III clinical studies, treatment with teduglutide was associated with clinically meaningful reductions (≥20% from baseline) in parenteral support (PS; parenteral nutrition and/or intravenous fluids) requirements in adult patients with intestinal failure associated with short...

  5. Developing a community-based flood resilience measurement standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Adriana; Szoenyi, Michael; Chaplowe, Scott; McQuistan, Colin; Campbell, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Given the increased attention to resilience-strengthening in international humanitarian and development work, there has been concurrent interest in its measurement and the overall accountability of "resilience strengthening" initiatives. The literature is reaching beyond the polemic of defining resilience to its measurement. Similarly, donors are increasingly expecting organizations to go beyond claiming resilience programing to measuring and showing it. However, key questions must be asked, in particular "Resilience of whom and to what?". There is no one-size-fits-all solution. The approach to measuring resilience is dependent on the audience and the purpose of the measurement exercise. Deriving a resilience measurement system needs to be based on the question it seeks to answer and needs to be specific. This session highlights key lessons from the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance approach to develop a flood resilience measurement standard to measure and assess the impact of community based flood resilience interventions, and to inform decision-making to enhance the effectiveness of these interventions. We draw on experience in methodology development to-date, together with lessons from application in two case study sites in Latin America. Attention will be given to the use of a consistent measurement methodology for community resilience to floods over time and place; challenges to measuring a complex and dynamic phenomenon such as community resilience; methodological implications of measuring community resilience versus impact on and contribution to this goal; and using measurement and tools such as cost-benefit analysis to prioritize and inform strategic decision making for resilience interventions. The measurement tool follows the five categories of the Sustainable Livelihoods Framework and the 4Rs of complex adaptive systems - robustness, rapidity, redundancy and resourcefulness -5C-4R. A recent white paper by the Zurich Flood Resilience Alliance traces the

  6. Hospital Outpatient PPS Partial Hospitalization Program LDS

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) Partial Hospitalization Program LDS This file contains select claim level data and is derived from 2010 claims...

  7. The quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malo, Sara; Bjerrum, Lars; Feja, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse and compare the quality of outpatient antimicrobial prescribing in Denmark and Aragón (in northeastern Spain), with the objective of assessing inappropriate prescribing....

  8. Verbal and visual memory improve after choline supplementation in long-term total parenteral nutrition: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchman, A L; Sohel, M; Brown, M; Jenden, D J; Ahn, C; Roch, M; Brawley, T L

    2001-01-01

    Previous investigations have demonstrated that choline deficiency, manifested in low plasma-free choline concentration and hepatic injury, may develop in patients who require long-term total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Preliminary studies have suggested lecithin or choline supplementation might lead to improved visual memory in the elderly and reverse abnormal neuropsychological development in children. We sought to determine if choline-supplemented TPN would lead to improvement in neuropsychological test scores in a group of adult, choline-deficient outpatients receiving TPN. Eleven subjects (8 males, 3 females) who received nightly TPN for more than 80% of their nutritional needs for at least 12 weeks before entry in the study were enrolled. Exclusion criteria included active drug abuse, mental retardation, cerebral vascular accident, head trauma, hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis, (prothrombin time [PT] >2x control), or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Patients were randomly assigned to receive their usual TPN regimen (n = 6, aged 34.0 +/- 12.6 years) over a 12-hour nightly infusion or their usual TPN regimen plus choline chloride (2 g) (n = 5, aged 37.3 +/- 7.3 years). The following neuropsychological tests were administered at baseline and after 24 weeks of choline supplementation (or placebo): Weschler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R, intellectual functioning), Weschler Memory Scale-Revised (WMS-R, two subtests, verbal and visual memory), Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test (visuospatial functioning and perceptual organization), Controlled Oral Word Association Test (verbal fluency), Grooved Pegboard (manual dexterity and motor speed), California Verbal Learning Test (CVLT, rote verbal learning ability), and Trail Making Parts A & B (visual scanning, psychomotor speed and set shifting). Scores were reported in terms of standard scores including z scores and percentile ranks. Mean absolute changes in raw scores were compared between groups

  9. Use of parenteral glucocorticoids and the risk of new onset type 2 diabetes mellitus : A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keyany, Ala; Nielen, Johannes T H; Souverein, Patrick C.; de Vries, Frank; van den Bemt, Bart

    2018-01-01

    Background: Use of oral glucocorticoids (GCs) has been associated with hyperglycaemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, unlike oral GCs, there is minimal or no data on the effect of parenteral GC use on T2DM. Objective: To assess the association between use of parenteral GCs and the risk

  10. Protocol compliance of administering parenteral medication in Dutch hospitals: an evaluation and cost-estimation of the implementation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilp, J.; Boot, S.; Blok, C. de; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wagner, C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Preventable adverse drug events (ADEs) are closely related to administration processes of parenteral medication. The Dutch Patient Safety Program provided a protocol for administering parenteral medication to reduce the amount of ADEs. The execution of the protocol was evaluated and a

  11. Long-term follow-up of patients on home parenteral nutrition in Europe: implications for intestinal transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pironi, Loris; Joly, Francisca; Forbes, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions.......The indications for intestinal transplantation (ITx) are still debated. Knowing survival rates and causes of death on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) will improve decisions....

  12. Parenteral and oral antibiotic duration for treatment of pediatric osteomyelitis: a systematic review protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pediatric osteomyelitis is a bacterial infection of bones requiring prolonged antibiotic treatment using parenteral followed by enteral agents. Major complications of pediatric osteomyelitis include transition to chronic osteomyelitis, formation of subperiosteal abscesses, extension of infection into the joint, and permanent bony deformity or limb shortening. Historically, osteomyelitis has been treated with long durations of antibiotics to avoid these complications. However, with improvements in management and antibiotic treatment, standard of care is moving towards short durations of intravenous antibiotics prior to enteral antibiotics. Methods/Design The authors will perform a systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines in order to evaluate the literature, looking for evidence to support the optimal duration of parenteral and enteral therapy. The main goals are to see if literature supports shorter durations of either parenteral antibiotics and/or enteral antibiotics. Multiple databases will be investigated using a thorough search strategy. Databases include Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, SCOPUS, Dissertation Abstracts, CINAHL, Web of Science, African Index Medicus and LILACS. Search stream will include medical subject heading for pediatric patients with osteomyelitis and antibiotic therapy. We will search for published or unpublished randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials. Two authors will independently select articles, extract data and assess risk of bias by standard Cochrane methodologies. We will analyze comparisons between dichotomous outcomes using risk ratios and continuous outcomes using mean differences. 95% confidence intervals will be computed. Discussion One of the major dilemmas of management of this disease is the duration of parenteral therapy. Long parenteral therapy has increased risk of serious complications and the necessity for long therapy has been called into question. Our study aims to review the currently available

  13. Place-power-prognosis: Community-based conservation, partnerships, and ecotourism enterprises in Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Frederick Hoole

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Namibia’s community-based natural resource management program (CBRNM and communal conservancies have gained international acclaim for rural poverty alleviation and wildlife conservation on the commons. Community-based ecotourism enterprise development has played a central role in the generation of community revenues, employment and additional benefits. The place of community-based ecotourism enterprises in the evolution of Namibia’s conservancies is examined. A participatory rural appraisal (PRA approach was conducted in Namibia as part of recent doctoral research in 2006 and 2007, featuring participant observation, semi-structured key informant interviews and structured communal villager interviews. Findings demonstrate some tangible successes of community-based ecotourism enterprise development, as well as emerging issues in related benefits distribution and power brokering. The case of the Torra Conservancy is profiled as a leading model for success in partnerships between conservancies, as community-based conservation institutions, and tourism enterprises. The experience of Ehi-rovipuka Conservancy is also detailed, to illuminate challenges and prospects for replicating the Torra model. Power relationships between and among private enterprise, community, and the state are elucidated. Ecotourism enterprise development can contribute successfully to community-based conservation. But, issues of power sharing, governance and competition necessitate the further evolution of commons institutions to capture future, sustainable benefits from community-based conservation premised on wildlife and related ecotourism development.

  14. [Vitreoretinal outpatient surgery: clinical and financial considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creuzot-Garcher, C; Aubé, H; Candé, F; Dupont, G; Guillaubey, A; Malvitte, L; Arnavielle, S; Bron, A

    2008-11-01

    Vitreoretinal surgery has benefited from great advances opening the opportunity for outpatient management. We report on the 6-month experience of outpatient surgery for vitreoretinal diseases. From November 2007 to April 2008, 270 patients benefited from a vitreoretinal surgery, with 173 retinal detachments, 63 epiretinal membranes, and 34 other procedures. Only 8.5% (n=23) of the patients had to stay at the hospital one or two nights. The main reasons were the distance from the hospital and surgery on a single-eye patient. The questionnaire given after the surgery showed that almost all the patients were satisfied with the outpatient setting. In contrast, the financial results showed a loss of income of around 400,000 euros due to the low level of payment of outpatient surgery in France by the national health insurance system. Vitreoretinal surgery can be achieved in outpatient surgery with an improvement in the information given to the patients and the overall organization of the hospitalization. However, the current income provided with vitreoretinal outpatient surgery is highly disadvantageous in France, preventing this method from being generalized.

  15. Assessment of patient satisfaction with pain management in small community inpatient and outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corizzo, C C; Baker, M C; Henkelmann, G C

    2000-09-01

    To describe patient outcomes (e.g., pain intensity and relief, satisfaction, expectations) and analgesic practices of healthcare providers for inpatients and outpatients in community hospital settings. Descriptive, correlational, and random sampling. Three community-based institutions in southeast Louisiana. 114 inpatients and outpatients with cancer-related or acute postoperative pain. Inpatients (n = 68) mostly were women and younger than 60 years of age. Outpatients (n = 46) mostly were men and older than 60 years of age. Both groups were predominantly well-educated and Caucasian. Subjects completed a modified version of the American Pain Society's Patient Satisfaction Survey. Researchers completed a chart audit tool reviewing analgesic prescriptive and administrative practices. Weak to moderately strong correlations existed for the relationships between the satisfaction variables and the pain intensity, pain relief, and expectation variables for all subjects. Satisfaction with current pain intensity was correlated most strongly with pain intensity and relief scores. Higher pain intensity and relief were related to lower satisfaction with current pain intensity. Regardless of setting or pain type, subjects experienced significant amounts of pain during a 24-hour period. Patient expectations for experiencing high levels of pain were realized, but expectations for significant pain relief were not. Institutional pain management programs that approach pain from a multidimensional perspective need to be developed. Continued education for healthcare professionals and patients is a vital part of this process.

  16. Standardised neonatal parenteral nutrition formulations – an Australasian group consensus 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Standardised parenteral nutrition formulations are routinely used in the neonatal intensive care units in Australia and New Zealand. In 2010, a multidisciplinary group was formed to achieve a consensus on the formulations acceptable to majority of the neonatal intensive care units. Literature review was undertaken for each nutrient and recommendations were developed in a series of meetings held between November 2010 and April 2011. Three standard and 2 optional amino acid/dextrose formulations and one lipid emulsion were agreed by majority participants in the consensus. This has a potential to standardise neonatal parenteral nutrition guidelines, reduce costs and prescription errors. PMID:24548745

  17. Parenteral Nutrition Basics for the Clinician Caring for the Adult Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derenski, Karrie; Catlin, Jennifer; Allen, Livia

    2016-10-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-sustaining therapy providing nutrients to individuals with impaired intestinal tract function and enteral access challenges. It is one of the most complex prescriptions written routinely in the hospital and home care settings. This article is to aid the nutrition support clinician in the safe provision of PN, including selecting appropriate patients for PN, vascular access, development of a PN admixture, appropriate therapy monitoring, recognition of preparation options, and awareness of preparation and stability concerns. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. Identification of Particles in Parenteral Drug Raw Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathryn; Lankers, Markus; Valet, Oliver

    2018-04-18

    complementarity of the techniques provides the advantage of identifying various chemical and molecular components, as well as elemental and image analyses. Correct interpretation of the results from these techniques is also very important. Copyright © 2018, Parenteral Drug Association.

  19. Formulation and pharmacokinetics of diclofenac lipid nanoemulsions for parenteral application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramreddy, Srividya; Kandadi, Prabhakar; Veerabrahma, Kishan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to formulate and determine the pharmacokinetics of stable o/w parenteral lipid nanoemulsions (LNEs) of diclofenac acid used to treat arthritic conditions. The LNEs of diclofenac acid with a mean size ranging from 200 to 240 nm and a zeta potential of -29.4 ± 1.04 mV (negatively charged LNEs) and 62.1 ± 3.5 (positively charged LNEs) emulsions were prepared by hot homogenization and ultrasonication process. The influence of formulation variables, such as the change in proportion of cholesterol, was studied, and optimized formulations were developed. The optimized formulations were relatively stable during centrifugal stress, dilution stress, and storage. The drug content and entrapment efficiency were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. The in vitro drug release was carried out in phosphate-buffered saline pH 7.4 and cumulative amount of drug released was estimated using a UV-visible spectro-photometer. During in vivo pharmacokinetic studies in male Wistar rats, diclofenac serum concentration from LNEs was higher than that of Voveran injection and was detectable up to 12 h. Diclofenac in LNEs showed improved pharmacokinetic profile with increase in area under the curve, elimination half-life and mean residence time in comparison to Voveran. Our aim was to prepare and determine the pharmacokinetics of injectable lipid nanoemulsions of diclofenac acid for treating arthritic conditions by reducing the frequency of dosing and pain at site of injection. The nanoemulsions of diclofenac acid were prepared by homogenization and ultrasonication process. The sizes and charges of oil globules were determined. The effect of cholesterol on stability of emulsion was studied, and an optimized preparation was developed. The optimized formulations were stable during centrifugation, dilution, and storage. The total amount of drug in emulsion and percentage amount of drug present in emulsion globules were determined using

  20. Anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related thrombosis in adults and children on parenteral nutrition: a systematic review and critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barco, Stefano; Atema, Jasper J.; Coppens, Michiel; Serlie, Mireille J.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Patients on parenteral nutrition require a central venous access and are at risk of catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and vena cava syndrome. Parenteral nutrition guidelines suggest anticoagulation for the primary prevention of catheter-related thrombosis during long-term parenteral

  1. Central venous catheter infections in home parenteral nutrition patients: Outcomes from Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Vicki M; Guenter, Peggi; Corrigan, Mandy L; Kovacevich, Debra; Winkler, Marion F; Resnick, Helaine E; Norris, Tina L; Robinson, Lawrence; Steiger, Ezra

    2016-12-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a high-cost, complex nutrition support therapy that requires the use of central venous catheters. Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are among the most serious risks of this therapy. Sustain: American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition's National Patient Registry for Nutrition Care (Sustain registry) provides the most current and comprehensive data for studying CLABSI among a national cohort of HPN patients in the United States. This is the first Sustain registry report detailing longitudinal data on CLABSI among HPN patients. To describe CLABSI rates for HPN patients followed in the Sustain registry from 2011-2014. Descriptive, χ 2 , and t tests were used to analyze data from the Sustain registry. Of the 1,046 HPN patients from 29 sites across the United States, 112 (10.7%) experienced 194 CLABSI events during 223,493 days of HPN exposure, for an overall CLABSI rate of 0.87 episodes/1,000 parenteral nutrition-days. Although the majority of patients were female (59%), adult (87%), white (75%), and with private insurance or Medicare (69%), CLABSI episodes per 1,000 parenteral nutrition-days were higher for men (0.69 vs 0.38), children (1.17 vs 0.35), blacks (0.91 vs 0.41), and Medicaid recipients (1.0 vs 0.38 or 0.39). Patients with implanted ports or double-lumen catheters also had more CLABSIs than those with peripherally inserted or central catheters or single-lumen catheters. Staphylococci were the most commonly reported pathogens. These data support findings of smaller studies about CLABSI risk for children and by catheter type and identify new potential risk factors, including gender, race, and insurance type. Additional studies are needed to determine effective interventions that will reduce HPN-associated CLABSI. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A student-facilitated community-based support group initiative for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A student-facilitated community-based support group initiative for Mental Health ... was a collaborative partnership between a local University Psychology Department ... users, Rehabilitation, Primary Health Care, Social support, Stigmatisation ...

  3. Community Based Social Audit of Health Services in Two Districts of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Community Based Social Audit of Health Services in Two Districts of ... The health system in Afghanistan has been chronically neglected during decades of war ... Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD), IDRC is ...

  4. Indonesia - Green Prosperity: Community-Based Off-Grid Renewable Energy Grant Portfolio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — Taken as a whole, this evaluation aims, to the extent possible, to validate the program logic underlying the portfolio of community-based off-grid renewable energy...

  5. Effectiveness of community-based mangrove management for sustainable resource use and livelihood support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damastuti, Ekaningrum; Groot, de Dolf

    2017-01-01

    Community-Based Mangrove Management (CBMM) is implemented with different approaches and outcomes. This study examined the effectiveness of various CBMM practices to achieve sustainable management of mangrove resources. We analyzed local mangrove resource management strategies in four coastal

  6. Community-based organizations in the health sector: A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Michael G

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Community-based organizations are important health system stakeholders as they provide numerous, often highly valued programs and services to the members of their community. However, community-based organizations are described using diverse terminology and concepts from across a range of disciplines. To better understand the literature related to community-based organizations in the health sector (i.e., those working in health systems or more broadly to address population or public health issues, we conducted a scoping review by using an iterative process to identify existing literature, conceptually map it, and identify gaps and areas for future inquiry. We searched 18 databases and conducted citation searches using 15 articles to identify relevant literature. All search results were reviewed in duplicate and were included if they addressed the key characteristics of community-based organizations or networks of community-based organizations. We then coded all included articles based on the country focus, type of literature, source of literature, academic discipline, disease sector, terminology used to describe organizations and topics discussed. We identified 186 articles addressing topics related to the key characteristics of community-based organizations and/or networks of community-based organizations. The literature is largely focused on high-income countries and on mental health and addictions, HIV/AIDS or general/unspecified populations. A large number of different terms have been used in the literature to describe community-based organizations and the literature addresses a range of topics about them (mandate, structure, revenue sources and type and skills or skill mix of staff, the involvement of community members in organizations, how organizations contribute to community organizing and development and how they function in networks with each other and with government (e.g., in policy networks. Given the range of terms used to

  7. Mind the Gap - Building Profitable Community Based Businesses on the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Krieger,Bernhard; Müller,Philipp

    2001-01-01

    Building Internet communities will become a strategic tool both as a stand-alone model and as a supplement to sustain competitive advantage for "normal" businesses. Community based business models aim to profit from the value, which is created when Internet communities solve problems of collective action, by controlling access, aggregating data, or realizing side-payments. The current literature on community based business models refers to rational choices by individuals to explain why member...

  8. Learning from disaster: Community-based marine protected areas in Fiji

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshito Takasaki

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically examines whether and how experiencing climate-related disasters can improve the rural poor fs adaptation to climate change through community-based resource management. Original household survey data in Fiji capture the unique sequence of a tropical cyclone and the establishment of community-based marine protected areas as a natural experiment. The analysis reveals that household disaster victimization increases its support for establishing marine protected areas for fut...

  9. Applying community-based participatory research to better understand and improve kinship care practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chukwudozie, Oge; Feinstein, Clare; Jensen, Celina

    2015-01-01

    While the principles behind community-based participatory research are firmly established, the process of taking community-based participatory research with children and youth to scale and integrating it into the programming of non-governmental organizations has been scarcely documented. This art...... and highlights how the research process enabled action and advocacy initiatives at different levels-leading to an increase in support and policy attention for children living in kinship care....

  10. Community-based population-level interventions for promoting child oral health.

    OpenAIRE

    de Silva, AM; Hegde, S; Akudo Nwagbara, B; Calache, H; Gussy, MG; Nasser, M; Morrice, HR; Riggs, E; Leong, PM; Meyenn, LK; Yousefi-Nooraie, R

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dental caries and gingival and periodontal disease are commonly occurring, preventable chronic conditions. Even though much is known about how to treat oral disease, currently we do not know which community-based population-level interventions are most effective and equitable in preventing poor oral health. OBJECTIVES: Primary • To determine the effectiveness of community-based population-level oral health promotion interventions in preventing dental caries and gingival and period...

  11. Models of Community-Based Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Screening Programs in the U.S. and Their Estimated Outcomes and Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rein, David B.; Lesesne, Sarah B.; Smith, Bryce D.; Weinbaum, Cindy M.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Information on the process and method of service delivery is sparse for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) testing, and no systematic study has evaluated the relative effectiveness or cost-effectiveness of different HBsAg screening models. To address this need, we compared five specific community-based screening programs. Methods We funded five HBsAg screening programs to collect information on their design, costs, and outcomes of participants during a six-month observation period. We categorized programs into four types of models. For each model, we calculated the number screened, the number screened as per Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations, and the cost per screening. Results The models varied by cost per person screened and total number of people screened, but they did not differ meaningfully in the proportion of people screened following CDC recommendations, the proportion of those screened who tested positive, or the proportion of those who newly tested positive. Conclusions Integrating screening into outpatient service settings is the most cost-effective method but may not reach all people needing to be screened. Future research should examine cost-effective methods that expand the reach of screening into communities in outpatient settings. PMID:21800750

  12. ROLE OF PARENTERAL AMINO ACIDS SUPPLEMENATION IN OLIGOHYDRAMNIOS & IUGR COMPLICATED PREGNANCIES

    OpenAIRE

    Anuradha; Malini; Sumit

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To see whether parenteral nutritional supplementation of women with oligohydramnios/IUGR can improve the amount of liquor and to evaluate the role of pareneral therapy in improving maternal and perinatal outcome and to correlate between the occurrence of oligohydramnios and IUGR among women of different age, parity, education and socioe...

  13. Refeeding syndrome in a small-for-dates micro-preemie receiving early parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, Hiroshi; Mikami, Masamitsu; Oda, Hirotsugu; Hata, Daisuke

    2012-10-01

    This report describes a small-for-date extremely low birth weight infant who manifested bradycardic events, respiratory failure, and hemolytic jaundice during her first week of life. These complications were attributed to severe hypophosphatemia and hypokalemia. Inadequate supply and refeeding syndrome triggered by early aggressive parenteral nutrition were responsible for electrolyte abnormalities. © 2012 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2012 Japan Pediatric Society.

  14. Responses of Preterm Pigs to an Oral Fluid Supplement During Parenteral Nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berding, Kirsten; Makarem, Patty; Hance, Brittany

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nutrients and electrolytes in amniotic fluid swallowed by fetuses are important for growth and development. Yet, preterm infants requiring parenteral nutrition (PN) receive minimal or no oral inputs. With the limited availability of amniotic fluid, we evaluated the responses of preterm...

  15. Chronic parenteral nutrition induces hepatic inflammation, steatosis and insulin resistance in neonatal pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prematurity and overfeeding in infants are associated with insulin resistance in childhood and may increase the risk of adult disease. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) is a major source of infant nutrition support and may influence neonatal metabolic function. Our aim was to test the hypothesis that...

  16. [Treatment of children with intestinal failure: intestinal rehabilitation, home parenteral nutrition or small intestine transplantation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neelis, E.G.; Oers, H.A. van; Escher, J.C.; Damen, G.M.; Rings, E.H.; Tabbers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal failure is characterised by inadequate absorption of food or fluids, which is caused by insufficient bowel surface area or functioning. Children with chronic intestinal failure are dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN), which can be provided at home (HPN). In the Netherlands, HPN for

  17. Continuous intravenous infusion of ampicillin and gentamicin during parenteral nutrition in 88 newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colding, H; Møller, S; Andersen, G E

    1982-01-01

    Ampicillin and gentamicin were dissolved once a day in an L-amino acid solution especially prepared for parenteral nutrition of newborn infants and infused continuously to 88 infants in whom septicaemia was suspected or had been proved. The mean dosages were 162 and 5.3 mg/kg per 24 hours...

  18. Essential fatty acid deficiency in patients receiving home parenteral nutrition 1,2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, P. B.; Høy, Carl-Erik; Mortensen, Per B

    1998-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition (HPN), initiated in patients with severe malabsorption or decreased oral intake, may exhaust stores of essential fatty acids and cause clinical manifestations, mainly dermatitis. Plasma fatty acid profiles were measured by gas-liquid chromatography in 37 healthy control...

  19. New perspective for nutritional support of cancer patients: Enteral/parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Gamze

    2011-07-01

    Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of quality of life (QoL). Cancer-related malnutrition may evolve into cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and the host metabolism. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative), the clinical condition of the patient and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counseling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Nutritional support has been widely advocated as adjunctive therapy for a variety of underlying illnesses, including surgery and medical oncotherapy (radiation or chemotherapy for cancer). Glutamine, n-3 fatty acids and probiotics/prebiotics are therapeutic factors that potentially modulate gastrointestinal toxicity related to cancer treatments. Enteral and parenteral nutrition may help improve patient survival, functional status and QoL, yet the benefits appear to be primarily limited to patients with good functional status and with gastrointestinal disease affecting nutritional intake. Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increased or maintenance of the nutrient intake in patients for whom normal food intake is inadequate and for whom enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. This article reviews evidence on issues relevant to enteral and parenteral nutrition in patients with cancer.

  20. The prognosis of incurable cachectic cancer patients on home parenteral nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozzetti, F; Santarpia, L; Pironi, L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of home parenteral nutrition (HPN) in incurable cachectic cancer patients unable to eat is extremely controversial. The aim of this study is to analyse which factors can influence the outcome. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We studied prospectively 414 incurable cachectic (sub)obstruc...

  1. 76 FR 25358 - 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2011-N-0002] 2011 Parenteral Drug Association/Food and Drug Administration Glass Quality Conference; Public Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food...

  2. Continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition induces metabolic dysfunction in neonatal pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoll, Barbara; Puiman, Patrycja Jolanta; Cui, Liwei

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that parenteral nutrition (PN) compared with formula feeding results in hepatic insulin resistance and steatosis in neonatal pigs. The current aim was to test whether the route of feeding (intravenous [IV] vs enteral) rather than other feeding modalities (diet, pattern) had...

  3. Review of macronutrients in parenteral nutrition for neonatal intensive care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Patricia J

    2014-01-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) has become essential in the management of sick and growing newborn populations in the NICU. In the past few decades, PN has become fundamental in the nutritional management of the very low birth weight infant (macronutrients in PN, including carbohydrates, protein, and fat. A subsequent article will review the micronutrients in PN, including electrolytes, minerals, and vitamins.

  4. Alanine turnover in the postabsorptive state and during parenteral hyperalimentation before and after surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sauerwein, H. P.; Michels, R. P.; Cejka, V.

    1981-01-01

    Influence of total parenteral nutrition and operation on alanine turnover and venous alanine concentration was determined in 5 patients with stomach carcinoma using single technique of U-14C alanine. Every patient served at his own control. In the postabsorptive state alanine turnover was 1.63 +/-

  5. Nutrition quality control in the prescription and administration of parenteral nutrition therapy for hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroma, Glaucia Midori; Horie, Lilian Mika; Castro, Melina Gouveia; Martins, Juliana R; Bittencourt, Amanda F; Logullo, Luciana; Teixeira da Silva, Maria de Lourdes; Waitzberg, Dan L

    2015-06-01

    Nutrition quality control in parenteral nutrition therapy (PNT) allows the identification of inadequate processes in parenteral nutrition (PN). The objective of this study was to assess the quality of PNT at a hospital with an established nutrition support team (NST). This observational, longitudinal, analytical, and prospective study examined 100 hospitalized PNT adult patients under the care of an NST for 21 days or until death/hospital discharge. The American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.) 2007 guidelines for PNT prescription were followed. PNT indications were not in accordance with the A.S.P.E.N. 2007 guidelines in 15 patients. Among the remaining 85 patients, 48 (56.5%) did not receive adequate PNT (≥80% of the total volume prescribed). Non-NST medical orders, progression to and from enteral nutrition, changes in the central venous catheter, unknown causes, and operational errors (eg, medical prescription loss, PN nondelivery, pharmacy delays, inadequate PN bag temperature) were associated with PNT inadequacy (P nutrition therapy related to estimated energy expenditure and protein requirements and glycemia levels reached the expected targets; however, the central venous catheter infection rate was higher than 6 per 1000 catheters/d and did not meet the expected targets. Despite an established NST, there was a moderate level of PNT inadequacy in indications, administration, and monitoring. It is important to establish periodic meetings among different health professionals who prescribe and deliver PNT to define responsibilities and protocols. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  6. New perspective for nutritional support of cancer patients: Enteral/parenteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    AKBULUT, GAMZE

    2011-01-01

    Cancer and its treatment result in severe biochemical and physiological alterations associated with a deterioration of quality of life (QoL). Cancer-related malnutrition may evolve into cancer cachexia due to complex interactions between pro-inflammatory cytokines and the host metabolism. Depending on the type of cancer treatment (either curative or palliative), the clinical condition of the patient and nutritional status, adequate and patient-tailored nutritional intervention should be prescribed (diet counseling, oral supplementation, enteral or total parenteral nutrition). Nutritional support has been widely advocated as adjunctive therapy for a variety of underlying illnesses, including surgery and medical oncotherapy (radiation or chemotherapy for cancer). Glutamine, n-3 fatty acids and probiotics/prebiotics are therapeutic factors that potentially modulate gastrointestinal toxicity related to cancer treatments. Enteral and parenteral nutrition may help improve patient survival, functional status and QoL, yet the benefits appear to be primarily limited to patients with good functional status and with gastrointestinal disease affecting nutritional intake. Parenteral nutrition offers the possibility of increased or maintenance of the nutrient intake in patients for whom normal food intake is inadequate and for whom enteral nutrition is not feasible, is contraindicated or is not accepted by the patient. This article reviews evidence on issues relevant to enteral and parenteral nutrition in patients with cancer. PMID:22977559

  7. The parenteral nutritional regimen in pigs for basic studies in physiology of nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matkowitz, R.; Harting, W.; Souffrant, W.B.; Junghans, P.; Boerner, P.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental studies concerning a parenteral nutritional regimen were performed in pigs aiming at comparative metabolic investigations to evaluate clinically relevant problems within nutritional research. By means of the 15 N tracer technique the evaluation of the postoperative protein turnover was rendered possible by this animal model

  8. A Community-Based Randomized Trial of Hepatitis B Screening Among High-Risk Vietnamese Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Grace X; Fang, Carolyn Y; Seals, Brenda; Feng, Ziding; Tan, Yin; Siu, Philip; Yeh, Ming Chin; Golub, Sarit A; Nguyen, Minhhuyen T; Tran, Tam; Wang, Minqi

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a community-based liver cancer prevention program on hepatitis B virus (HBV) screening among low-income, underserved Vietnamese Americans at high risk. We conducted a cluster randomized trial involving 36 Vietnamese community-based organizations and 2337 participants in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York City between 2009 and 2014. We randomly assigned 18 community-based organizations to a community-based multilevel HBV screening intervention (n = 1131). We randomly assigned the remaining 18 community-based organizations to a general cancer education program (n = 1206), which included information about HBV-related liver cancer prevention. We assessed HBV screening rates at 6-month follow-up. Intervention participants were significantly more likely to have undergone HBV screening (88.1%) than were control group participants (4.6%). In a Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel analysis, the intervention effect on screening outcomes remained statistically significant after adjustment for demographic and health care access variables, including income, having health insurance, having a regular health provider, and English proficiency. A community-based, culturally appropriate, multilevel HBV screening intervention effectively increases screening rates in a high-risk, hard-to-reach Vietnamese American population.

  9. Embracing a competency-based specialty curriculum for community-based nursing roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Pamela F; Swider, Susan M; Breakwell, Susan; Cowell, Julia M; Reising, Virginia

    2013-01-01

    The Quad Council competencies for public health nursing (PHN) provide guidance in developing curricula at both the generalist and specialist level. However, these competencies are based on nursing roles in traditional public health agencies and community/public health is defined more broadly than official agency practice. The question arises as to whether community-based specialties require largely the same knowledge and skill set as PHN. The purpose of the competency cross-mapping project reported here was to (a) assess the intersection of the Quad Council competencies with four community-based specialties and (b) ensure the appropriateness of a Quad Council-based curriculum to prepare graduates across these four specialties (home health, occupational health, environmental health, and school nursing). This article details the multistep cross-mapping process, including validation with practice leaders. Results indicate strong alignment of community-based specialty competencies with Quad Council competencies. Community-based specialty-specific content that did not align well is identified, along with examples of didactic and clinical strategies to address gaps. This work indicates that a Quad Council-based curriculum is appropriate to prepare graduates in community-based specialties when attention to the specialty-specific competencies in the clinical setting is included. This work guides the development of a doctorate of nursing practice curriculum in PHN, encompassing the four additional community-based specialties. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Billing for outpatient transplant pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Angela Q; Seiger, Todd C; Urann, Christina L; McCleary, Jo Ann; Goroski, Angela L; Ojogho, Okechukwu N

    2012-01-15

    The economic impact of out-patient pharmacy services in a transplant program was evaluated. Full-time kidney transplant pharmacy services were implemented at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center (PSHMC) in the fall of 2008, with two pharmacists combining hours to provide one full-time-equivalent position. At PSHMC, posttransplantation patients are seen three times per week. The number of patient visits with pharmacists for 2010 was compared with the total number of patient visits. The face-to-face time spent with the patient was translated to a level of billing that was associated with a set reimbursement schedule. For each patient encounter in which a pharmacist was involved, the incremental difference between the nursing and pharmacy levels of billing was examined, as were the levels most often billed by pharmacists. The difference in billing levels between pharmacists and nurses for the same patient encounter was also evaluated. Overall, pharmacist visits accounted for 208 (22%) of the 994 out-patient kidney transplant visits in 2010, with pharmacists billing at a higher level of acuity compared with nursing for the same patient encounter 48% of the time. This translated to an approximate increase of $100 per patient visit. For the one-year study period, pharmacists utilizing facility- fee billing increased out-patient reimbursement by approximately $10,000. By utilizing outpatient facility-fee billing for pharmacy services, the transplant program at PSHMC increased reimbursement in the outpatient setting.

  11. Stability of furosemide and aminophylline in parenteral solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alves dos Santos

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Parenteral solutions (PS are one of the most commonly used drug delivery vehicles. Interactions among the drug, components in the drug's formulation, and the PS can result in the formation of inactive complexes that limit efficacy or increase side effects. The aim of this work was to evaluate possible interactions between the drugs and PS, assess drug stability and to identify degradation products after 20 h at room temperature. Furosemide (FSM and Aminophylline (APN were added to PS containing either 20% mannitol or 0.9% NaCl at pH 6.5-7.5 and 10-11. Their behavior was studied individually and as an admixture, after 1 h oxidation with H2O2, using a spectrophotometer and HPLC. Individually, FSM and APN added to 20% mannitol and 0.9% NaCl solutions had the highest stability at pH 10-11. When FSM and APN were combined, the behavior of FSM was similar to the behavior observed for the drug individually in the same solutions. With the drugs combined in 20% mannitol pH 10-11, HPLC showed that both drugs were stable after a 20 h period yielding two distinct peaks; in oxidized samples, the elution profile showed four peaks with retention times unrelated to the untreated samples.Soluções parenterais de grande volume são frequentemente utilizadas no ambiente hospitalar para a veiculação de fármacos. No entanto, possíveis incompatibilidades entre as estruturas dos fármacos, em diferentes veículos de administração, podem gerar possíveis associações antagônicas ou sinérgicas, resultando em alterações das propriedades físico-químicas, consequentemente, dos efeitos farmacológicos e das respostas clínicas esperadas. Este artigo avaliou a estabilidade e a possível formação de produtos de degradação entre os fármacos furosemida e aminofilina quando estes foram veiculados em soluções parenterais, após o preparo e após o período de 20 h. Furosemida e aminofilina foram adicionadas às soluções de 20% manitol e 0,9% NaCl nos valores

  12. 45 CFR 2517.600 - How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How are funds for community-based service-learning... (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMUNITY-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Distribution of Funds § 2517.600 How are funds for community-based service-learning programs distributed? All...

  13. Early Post Operative Enteral Versus Parenteral Feeding after Esophageal Cancer Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadtaghi Rajabi Mashhadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The incidence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients is reported to be high. In particular, patients with esophageal cancer are prone to malnutrition, due to preoperative digestive system dysfunctions and short-term non-oral feeding postoperatively. Selection of an appropriate method for feeding in the postoperative period is important in these patients.   Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 40 patients with esophageal cancer who had undergone esophagectomy between September 2008 and October 2009 were randomly assigned into either enteral feeding or parenteral feeding groups, with the same calorie intake in each group. The level of serum total protein, albumin, prealbumin, transferrin, C3, C4 and hs-C-reactive protein          (hs-CRP, as well as the rate of surgical complications, restoration of bowel movements and cost was assessed in each group.   Results: Our results showed that there was no significant difference between the groups in terms of serum albumin, prealbumin or transferrin. However, C3 and C4 levels were significantly higher in the enteral feeding group compared with the parenteral group, while hs-CRP level was significantly lower in the enteral feeding group. Bowel movements were restored sooner and costs of treatment were lower in the enteral group. Postoperative complications did not differ significantly between the groups. There was one death in the parenteral group 10 days after surgery due to myocardial infarction.   Conclusion:  The results of our study showed that enteral feeding can be used effectively in the first days after surgery, with few early complications and similar nutritional outcomes compared with the parenteral method. Enteral feeding was associated with reduced inflammation and was associated with an improvement in immunological responses, quicker return of bowel movements, and reduced costs in comparison with parenteral feeding.

  14. Brief Parenteral Nutrition Accelerates Weight Gain, Head Growth Even in Healthy VLBWs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Naho; Belfort, Mandy B.; McCormick, Marie C.; Mori, Rintaro; Noma, Hisashi; Kusuda, Satoshi; Fujimura, Masanori

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Whether parenteral nutrition benefits growth of very low birth weight (VLBW) preterm infants in the setting of rapid enteral feeding advancement is unclear. Our aim was to examine this issue using data from Japan, where enteral feeding typically advances at a rapid rate. Methods We studied 4005 hospitalized VLBW, very preterm (23–32 weeks' gestation) infants who reached full enteral feeding (100 ml/kg/day) by day 14, from 75 institutions in the Neonatal Research Network Japan (2003–2007). Main outcomes were weight gain, head growth, and extra-uterine growth restriction (EUGR, measurement parenteral nutrition. Adjusting for maternal, infant, and institutional characteristics, infants who received parenteral nutrition had greater weight gain [0.09 standard deviation (SD), 95% CI: 0.02, 0.16] and head growth (0.16 SD, 95% CI: 0.05, 0.28); lower odds of EUGR by head circumference (OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.49, 0.88). No statistically significant difference was seen in the proportion of infants with EUGR at discharge. SGA infants and infants who took more than a week until full feeding had larger estimates. Discussion Even in infants who are able to establish enteral nutrition within 2 weeks, deprivation of parenteral nutrition in the first weeks of life could lead to under nutrition, but infants who reached full feeding within one week benefit least. It is important to predict which infants are likely or not likely to advance on enteral feedings within a week and balance enteral and parenteral nutrition for these infants. PMID:24586323

  15. Short or Long End of the Lever? Associations between Provider Communication of the "Asthma-Action Plan" and Outpatient Revisits for Pediatric Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Pavani; Mehta, Renuka; Rethemeyer, R Karl; Ferrang, Carole; Dennis, Clifton; Redd, Vickie

    2015-10-01

    At the Children's Hospital of Georgia (CHOG), we found that outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma were significantly above national norms. According to the NIH, costly hospital revisits for asthma can be prevented through guidelines-based self-management of asthma, central to which, is the use of a written Asthma-Action Plan (AAP). The asthma services literature has emphasized the role of the healthcare provider in promoting asthma self-management using the AAP, to prevent hospital revisits. On the other hand, the asthma policy literature has emphasized the need for community-based interventions to promote asthma self-management. A gap remains in understanding the extent of leverage that healthcare providers may have in preventing hospital revisits for asthma, through effective communication of AAP in the outpatient setting. Our study sought to address this gap. We conducted a 6-month intervention to implement "patient-and-family-centered communication of the AAP" in CHOG outpatient clinics, based on the "change-management" theoretical framework. Provider communication of AAP was assessed through a survey of "Parent Understanding of the Child's AAP." A quasi-experimental approach was used to measure outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma, pre- and post-intervention. Survey results showed that provider communication of the AAP was unanimously perceived highly positively by parents of pediatric asthma patients, across various metrics of patient-centered care. However, there were no statistically significant differences in outpatient "revisit behavior" for pediatric asthma between pre- and post-intervention periods after controlling for several demographic variables. Additionally, revisits remained significantly above national norms. Results suggest limited potential of "effective provider communication of AAP," in reducing outpatient revisits for pediatric asthma; and indicate need for broader community-based interventions to address patient life variables

  16. Managing outpatient consultations: from referral to discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rachael; Jacob, Hannah; Morrissey, Benita; Macaulay, Chloe; Gomez, Kumudini; Fertleman, Caroline

    2017-08-01

    Although a great deal of paediatric consultations are not urgent, doctors in training spend so much time providing service for acute conditions that they spend little time focusing on outpatient work before they become a consultant. Engaging clinicians in the managerial aspects of providing clinical care is a key to improving outcomes, and this article addresses these aspects of the outpatient consultation from referral to discharge. We aim to provide doctors in training with a tool to use during their training and their first few years as a consultant, to think about how outpatient work is organised and how it can be improved to maximise patient experience. The non-urgent consultation varies across the world; this article is aimed to be relevant to an international audience. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Continuous Intravenous Milrinone Therapy in Pediatric Outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Michelle; Liebers, Jill; Maynard, Roy

    Milrinone is a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor with both positive inotropic and vasodilator properties. Administered as a continuous infusion, milrinone is indicated for the short-term treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Despite limited data supporting long-term milrinone therapy in adults with congestive heart failure, children managed as outpatients may benefit from continuous milrinone as a treatment for cardiac dysfunction, as a destination therapy for cardiac transplant, or as palliative therapy for cardiomyopathy. The aim of this article is to review the medical literature and describe a home infusion company's experience with pediatric outpatient milrinone therapy.

  18. Behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations in two premature infants after parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, K N; Henkin, R I

    1978-11-01

    Two premature infants were observed to develop behavioral and dermatologic changes and low serum zinc and copper concentrations following cessation of prolonged parenteral alimentation, while being fed exclusively with human milk. Following treatment with exogenous oral zinc supplementation, prompt relief of symptoms and increases of serum zinc and copper concentrations were observed in both infants. These patients comprise about 5% of our premature infants who are treated with parenteral alimentation for more than two weeks. We recommend that premature infants on prolonged parenteral alimentation should be monitored for changes in serum zinc and copper concentrations and, if a marked fall is observed, supplementation should be considered.

  19. Conclusions to the first Baxter-Senpe workshop on: ready-to-use (RTU) products for parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    García de Lorenzo Mateos, A.; Bermejo Vicedo, T.; Gómez Candela, C.; Planas Vila, M.

    2005-01-01

    Conclusiones de la Mesa de Trabajo sobre productos listos para su uso (RTU) en nutrición parenteral. Se efectúa una aproximación a la definición y a las ventajas en comparación con otros modelos de nutrición parenteral. Destacan los aspectos relacionados con la gestión, composición de la RTU e indicaciones tanto intrahospitalarias como domiciliarias.Conclusions to the workshop on ready-to use (RTU) products for parenteral nutrition. An approximation is done to the definition and advantages in...

  20. Developing a vision and strategic action plan for future community-based residency training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelton, Jann B; Owen, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Community Pharmacy Residency Program (CPRP) Planning Committee convened to develop a vision and a strategic action plan for the advancement of community pharmacy residency training. Aligned with the profession's efforts to achieve provider status and expand access to care, the Future Vision and Action Plan for Community-based Residency Training will provide guidance, direction, and a strategic action plan for community-based residency training to ensure that the future needs of community-based pharmacist practitioners are met. National thought leaders, selected because of their leadership in pharmacy practice, academia, and residency training, served on the planning committee. The committee conducted a series of conference calls and an in-person strategic planning meeting held on January 13-14, 2015. Outcomes from the discussions were supplemented with related information from the literature. Results of a survey of CPRP directors and preceptors also informed the planning process. The vision and strategic action plan for community-based residency training is intended to advance training to meet the emerging needs of patients in communities that are served by the pharmacy profession. The group anticipated the advanced skills required of pharmacists serving as community-based pharmacist practitioners and the likely education, training and competencies required by future residency graduates in order to deliver these services. The vision reflects a transformation of community residency training, from CPRPs to community-based residency training, and embodies the concept that residency training should be primarily focused on training the individual pharmacist practitioner based on the needs of patients served within the community, and not on the physical location where pharmacy services are provided. The development of a vision statement, core values statements, and strategic action plan will provide support, guidance, and direction to the profession of pharmacy to

  1. Functional outcomes in community-based adults with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaras, Kristin N; Zanarini, Mary C; Hudson, James I; Greenfield, Shelly F; Gunderson, John G

    2017-06-01

    Many individuals in clinical samples with borderline personality disorder (BPD) experience high levels of functional impairment. However, little is known about the levels of functional impairment experienced by individuals with BPD in the general community. To address this issue, we compared overall and domain-specific (educational/occupational; social; recreational) functioning in a sample of community-based individuals with BPD (n = 164); community-based individuals without BPD (n = 901); and clinically-ascertained individuals with BPD (n = 61). BPD diagnoses and functional outcomes were based on well-accepted, semi-structured interviews. Community-based individuals with BPD were significantly less likely to experience good overall functioning (steady, consistent employment and ≥1 good relationship) compared to community-based individuals without BPD (BPD: 47.4%; Non- BPD: 74.5%; risk difference -27.1%; p < 0.001), even when compared directly to their own non-BPD siblings (risk difference -35.5%; p < 0.001). Community-based individuals with BPD versus those without BPD did not differ significantly on most domain-specific outcomes, but the former group experienced poorer educational/occupational performance and lower quality relationships with parents, partners, and friends. However, community-based individuals with BPD were significantly more likely to experience good overall functioning than clinically-based individuals with BPD (risk difference -35.2%; p < 0.001), with the latter group more likely to experience reduced employment status, very poor quality relationships with partners, and social isolation. In conclusion, community-based individuals with BPD experienced marked functional impairment, especially in the social domain, but were less likely to experience the more extreme occupational and social impairments seen among patients with BPD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Pilot Initiative to Deliver Community-based Psychiatric Services in Rural Haiti After the 2010 Earthquake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelotti, David J; Lee, Amy C; Fils-Aimé, Joseph Reginald; Jean, Jacques Solon; Therosmé, Tatiana; Petit-Homme, Handy; Oswald, Catherine M; Raviola, Giuseppe; Eustache, Eddy

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, there is a gap between the burden of mental distress and disorder and access to mental health care. This gap is particularly large in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). After the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, the international health care organizations Partners in Health and Zanmi Lasante worked to expand local mental health services in rural Haiti. The aims of this study are to describe clinical characteristics of the patients served during a pilot project to deliver community-based psychiatric services in rural Haiti and to show how this experience complements the Mental Health Gap Action Programme ("mhGAP"), a tool developed by the World Health Organization to support mental health care delivery by nonspecialists in LMICs. The pilot was conducted in March 2011. A visiting psychiatrist traveled to rural Haiti and paired with local clinicians to evaluate patients and to support quality improvement practices in psychiatric care. Patients received a standard neuropsychiatric evaluation. mhGAP was an important clinical reference. To assess the experience, we conducted a retrospective chart review of outpatient encounters. Sixty-five patients presented with a wide range of common psychiatric, neurologic, and general medical conditions. Forty-nine of these patients (75%) reported primary problems subsumed by an mhGAP module. Fifteen patients (23%) reported headache as their chief complain, a condition that is not currently covered by mhGAP. Surprisingly, only 3 patients (5%), reported earthquake-related distress. Our clinical data reinforce the need for provision of standard psychiatric and neurologic services in LMICs. Such services ought to accompany interventions targeted specifically at disaster-related problems. Clinical situations falling outside existing mhGAP modules inspired the development of supplemental treatment protocols. These observations informed coordinated efforts at Zanmi Lasante to build a sustainable, integrated mental health system

  3. Impact of community-based health insurance in rural India on self-medication & financial protection of the insured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Dror

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: The evidence-base of the impact of community-based health insurance (CBHI on access to healthcare and financial protection in India is weak. We investigated the impact of CBHI in rural Uttar Pradesh and Bihar s0 tates of India on insured households′ self-medication and financial position. Methods: Data originated from (i household surveys, and (ii the Management Information System of each CBHI. Study design was "staggered implementation" cluster randomized controlled trial with enrollment of one-third of the treatment group in each of the years 2011, 2012 and 2013. Around 40-50 per cent of the households that were offered to enroll joined. The benefits-packages covered outpatient care in all three locations and in-patient care in two locations. To overcome self-selection enrollment bias, we constructed comparable control and treatment groups using Kernel Propensity Score Matching (K-PSM. To quantify impact, both difference-in-difference (DiD, and conditional-DiD (combined K-PSM with DiD were used to assess robustness of results. Results: Post-intervention (2013, self-medication was less practiced by insured HHs. Fewer insured households than uninsured households reported borrowing to finance care for non-hospitalization events. Being insured for two years also improved the HH′s location along the income distribution, namely insured HHs were more likely to experience income quintile-upgrade in one location, and less likely to experience a quintile-downgrade in two locations. Interpretation & conclusions: The realized benefits of insurance included better access to healthcare, reduced financial risks and improved economic mobility, suggesting that in our context health insurance creates welfare gains. These findings have implications for theoretical, ethical, policy and practice considerations.

  4. An activity-based cost analysis of the Honduras community-based, integrated child care (AIN-C) programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, John L; Villalobos, Carlos A; De Mattos, Annette C

    2008-11-01

    The Honduras AIN-C programme is a preventive health and nutrition programme of the Honduras Ministry of Health (MOH) that relies on volunteers to help mothers monitor and maintain the adequate growth of young children. A quasi-experimental, design-based evaluation found that the programme achieved near-universal coverage and was effective in improving mothers' child-rearing knowledge, attitudes and practices, including feeding and appropriate care-giving and care-seeking practices for children with diarrhoea and acute respiratory illness. The programme is widely regarded as a model. This study was undertaken to provide the first comprehensive estimates of the cost of the AIN-C programme, with the goal of providing a programme and financial planning tool for Honduras. An additional comparison of study findings was also undertaken to determine the cost of the AIN-C programme's community-based services relative to a similar facility-based service. Expressed in mid-2005 US dollars, the study found that after the programme is phased-in: (1) the annual, recurrent cost per child under 2 years participating in the programme is $6.43; (2) the annual, incremental budget requirements per child under 2 years participating in the programme are $3.90; (3) the cost of an AIN-C monthly growth monitoring and counselling session per child is 11% of the cost of a traditional MOH, facility-based growth and development consultation per child; and (4) the effect of mothers substituting AIN-C monitor care for MOH facility-based care 'saves' 203 000 outpatient visits a year, with a potential cost saving of $1.66 million, the equivalent of 60% of the recurrent cost of the programme and roughly equal to the annual incremental budget requirements of the programme. Sensitivity analysis of the cost estimates is performed to provide insight, for countries considering introducing a similar programme, into how modifications of key characteristics of the programme affect its costs.

  5. Maximizing profitability in a hospital outpatient pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, J A; Kilarski, J W; Malatestinic, W N; Rudy, T A

    1989-07-01

    This paper describes the strategies employed to increase the profitability of an existing ambulatory pharmacy operated by the hospital. Methods to generate new revenue including implementation of a home parenteral therapy program, a home enteral therapy program, a durable medical equipment service, and home care disposable sales are described. Programs to maximize existing revenue sources such as increasing the capture rate on discharge prescriptions, increasing "walk-in" prescription traffic and increasing HMO prescription volumes are discussed. A method utilized to reduce drug expenditures is also presented. By minimizing expenses and increasing the revenues for the ambulatory pharmacy operation, net profit increased from +26,000 to over +140,000 in one year.

  6. Adaptive Management and Social Learning in Collaborative and Community-Based Monitoring: a Study of Five Community-Based Forestry Organizations in the western USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Fernandez-Gimenez

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative and community-based monitoring are becoming more frequent, yet few studies have examined the process and outcomes of these monitoring approaches. We studied 18 collaborative or community-based ecological assessment or monitoring projects undertaken by five community-based forestry organizations (CBFs, to investigate the objectives, process, and outcomes of collaborative ecological monitoring by CBF organizations. We found that collaborative monitoring can lead to shared ecological understanding among diverse participants, build trust internally and credibility externally, foster social learning and community-building, and advance adaptive management. The CBFs experienced challenges in recruiting and sustaining community participation in monitoring, building needed technical capacity for monitoring, and communicating monitoring results back to the broader community. Our results suggest that involving diverse and sometimes adversarial interests at key points in the monitoring process can help resolve conflicts and advance social learning, while also strengthening the link between social and ecological systems by improving the information base for management and increasing collective awareness of the interdependence of human and natural forest communities.

  7. Exploring the Position of Community-Based Nursing in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heshmatolah Heydari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-based nursing focuses on providing health services to families and communities in the second and third levels of prevention and this can improve the individuals, families and communities’ quality of life, and reduce the healthcare costs. The aim of this study was to explore the status of community-based nursing in Iran. Methods: This qualitative study was conducted from March to November 2015, in Tehran, Iran, using the content analysis approach. The study setting consisted of Iran and Tehran Faculties of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran, Iran. The purposive sampling method was used. Twenty faculty members and Master’s and PhD students were interviewed by using the face-to-face semi-structured interview method. Moreover, two focus groups were conducted for complementing and enriching the study data. The data were analyzed using the Graneheim and Lundman’s approach to content analysis. The trustworthiness of the study findings was maintained by employing the Lincoln and Guba’s criteria of credibility, dependability, and confirmability. Results: In total, 580 codes were generated and categorized into three main categories of conventional services, the necessity for creating infrastructures, and multidimensional outcomes of community-based nursing. Conclusion: Introducing community-based nursing into nursing education curricula and creating ample job opportunities for community-based nurses seem clearly essential.

  8. Exploring the Position of Community-Based Nursing in Iran: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Heshmatolah; Rahnavard, Zahra; Ghaffari, Fatemeh

    2017-10-01

    Community-based nursing focuses on providing health services to families and communities in the second and third levels of prevention and this can improve the individuals, families and communities' quality of life, and reduce the healthcare costs. The aim of this study was to explore the status of community-based nursing in Iran. This qualitative study was conducted from March to November 2015, in Tehran, Iran, using the content analysis approach. The study setting consisted of Iran and Tehran Faculties of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran, Iran. The purposive sampling method was used. Twenty faculty members and Master's and PhD students were interviewed by using the face-to-face semi-structured interview method. Moreover, two focus groups were conducted for complementing and enriching the study data. The data were analyzed using the Graneheim and Lundman's approach to content analysis. The trustworthiness of the study findings was maintained by employing the Lincoln and Guba's criteria of credibility, dependability, and confirmability. In total, 580 codes were generated and categorized into three main categories of conventional services, the necessity for creating infrastructures, and multidimensional outcomes of community-based nursing. Introducing community-based nursing into nursing education curricula and creating ample job opportunities for community-based nurses seem clearly essential.

  9. Employing continuous quality improvement in community-based substance abuse programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinman, Matthew; Hunter, Sarah B; Ebener, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to describe continuous quality improvement (CQI) for substance abuse prevention and treatment programs in a community-based organization setting. CQI (e.g., plan-do-study-act cycles (PDSA)) applied in healthcare and industry was adapted for substance abuse prevention and treatment programs in a community setting. The authors assessed the resources needed, acceptability and CQI feasibility for ten programs by evaluating CQI training workshops with program staff and a series of three qualitative interviews over a nine-month implementation period with program participants. The CQI activities, PDSA cycle progress, effort, enthusiasm, benefits and challenges were examined. Results indicated that CQI was feasible and acceptable for community-based substance abuse prevention and treatment programs; however, some notable resource challenges remain. Future studies should examine CQI impact on service quality and intended program outcomes. The study was conducted on a small number of programs. It did not assess CQI impact on service quality and intended program outcomes. Practical implications- This project shows that it is feasible to adapt CQI techniques and processes for community-based programs substance abuse prevention and treatment programs. These techniques may help community-based program managers to improve service quality and achieve program outcomes. This is one of the first studies to adapt traditional CQI techniques for community-based settings delivering substance abuse prevention and treatment programs.

  10. The development of a network for community-based obesity prevention: the CO-OPS Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Community-based interventions are a promising approach and an important component of a comprehensive response to obesity. In this paper we describe the Collaboration of COmmunity-based Obesity Prevention Sites (CO-OPS Collaboration) in Australia as an example of a collaborative network to enhance the quality and quantity of obesity prevention action at the community level. The core aims of the CO-OPS Collaboration are to: identify and analyse the lessons learned from a range of community-based initiatives aimed at tackling obesity, and; to identify the elements that make community-based obesity prevention initiatives successful and share the knowledge gained with other communities. Methods Key activities of the collaboration to date have included the development of a set of Best Practice Principles and knowledge translation and exchange activities to promote the application (or use) of evidence, evaluation and analysis in practice. Results The establishment of the CO-OPS Collaboration is a significant step toward strengthening action in this area, by bringing together research, practice and policy expertise to promote best practice, high quality evaluation and knowledge translation and exchange. Future development of the network should include facilitation of further evidence generation and translation drawing from process, impact and outcome evaluation of existing community-based interventions. Conclusions The lessons presented in this paper may help other networks like CO-OPS as they emerge around the globe. It is important that networks integrate with each other and share the experience of creating these networks. PMID:21349185

  11. Implementing community-based education in basic nursing education programs in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtshali, N G

    2009-03-01

    Education of health professionals using principles of community-based education is the recommended national policy in South Africa. A paradigm shift to community-based education is reported in a number of nursing education institutions in South Africa. Reviewed literature however revealed that in some educational institutions planning, implementation and evaluation of Community-based Educational (CBE) programmes tended to be haphazard, uncoordinated and ineffective, resulting in poor student motivation. Therefore the purpose of this study was to analyse the implementation of community-based education in basic nursing education programmes in South Africa. Strauss and Corbin's (1990) grounded theory approach guided the research process. Data were collected by means of observation, interviews and document analysis. The findings revealed that collaborative decision-making involving all stakeholders was crucial especially during the curriculum planning phase. Furthermore, special criteria should be used when selecting community learning sites to ensure that the selected sites are able to facilitate the development of required graduate competencies. Collaborative effort, true partnership between academic institutions and communities, as well as government support and involvement emerged as necessary conditions for the successful implementation of community-based education programmes.

  12. Implementing community-based education in basic nursing education programs in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Mtshali

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Education of health professionals using principles of community-based education is the recommended national policy in South Africa. A paradigm shift to community based education is reported in a number of nursing education institutions in South Africa. Reviewed literature however revealed that in some educational institutions planning, implementation and evaluation of Community-based Educational (CBE programmes tended to be haphazard, uncoordinated and ineffective, resulting in poor student motivation. Therefore the purpose of this study was to analyse the implementation of community-based education in basic nursing education programmes in South Africa. Strauss and Corbin’s (1990 grounded theory approach guided the research process. Data were collected by means of observation, interviews and document analysis. The findings revealed that collaborative decision-making involving all stakeholders was crucial especially during the curriculum planning phase. Furthermore, special criteria should be used when selecting community learning sites to ensure that the selected sites are able to facilitate the development of required graduate competencies. Collaborative effort, true partnership between academic institutions and communities, as well as government support and involvement emerged as necessary conditions for the successful implementation of community-based education programmes.

  13. Tobacco Smoking in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditchburn, K. Marie; Sellman, J. Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Three main aims of this study were to ascertain the prevalence rate of smoking among adolescent psychiatric outpatients; estimate smokers' degree of nicotine dependence; and investigate the relationship between smoking and common mental health disorders. Face-to-face interviews were conducted on 93 patients ages 13-18 presenting to an adolescent…

  14. Ethnic diversity outpatient clinic in paediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahhan, Nordin; Meijssen, Dominique; Chegary, Malika; Bosman, Diederik; Wolf, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Background: The health status of chronic sick ethnic minority children in the Netherlands is unequal compared with indigenous Dutch children. In order to optimize the health care for these children a specific patient-oriented clinic in ethnic-cultural diversity: the Mosaic Outpatient Clinic (MOC)

  15. Outpatient total hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vehmeijer, Stephan B.W.; Husted, Henrik; Kehlet, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    , but efforts to control undesirable pathophysiological responses will be a prerequisite to improve the success rate of an outpatient setting. Also, care must be taken to avoid extra activities or investments solely to enable discharge on the day of surgery. Further cost analyses will have to be performed...

  16. Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-14

    May 14, 2003 ... Pain management in the outpatient surgical setting. Robert S. Wolf MD. American Sports Medicine Institute. Birmingham, AL USA emptive and post-operative setting. These medications inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, promote analgesia, and consequently decrease the post-operative demand for opioids.

  17. Parenteral treatment of episodic tension-type headache: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, Danielle; Nicastro, Olivia; Akala, Olabiyi; Friedman, Benjamin W

    2014-02-01

    Tension-type headache is highly prevalent in the general population and is a consistent if not frequent cause of visits to acute care settings. Analgesics such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetaminophen, and salicylates are considered first-line therapy for treatment of tension-type headache. For patients who present to an acute care setting with persistent tension-type headache despite analgesic therapy, it is not clear which parenteral agent should be administered. We performed a systematic review of the medical literature to determine whether parenteral therapies other than salicylates or nonsteroidals are efficacious for acute tension-type headache. We performed a systematic review of Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, Google scholar, and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials from inception through August, 2012 using the search terms "tension-type headache" and "parenteral or subcutaneous or intramuscular or intravenous." Our goal was to identify randomized trials in which one parenteral treatment was compared to another active comparator or to placebo for the acute relief of tension-type headache. Parenteral was defined as intravenous, intramuscular, or subcutaneous administration. We only included studies that distinguished tension-type headache from other primary headache disorders, such as migraine. The primary outcome for this review was measures of efficacy one hour after medication administration. Data abstraction was performed by two authors. Disagreements were resolved by a third author. We assessed the internal validity of trials using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias tool. Because of the small number of trials identified, and the substantial heterogeneity among study design and medications, we decided that combining data and reporting summary statistics would serve no useful function. The results of individual studies are presented using Number Needed to Treat (NNT) with 95%CI when dichotomous outcomes were available and

  18. Mobile information and communication in the hospital outpatient service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Wen-Yuan; Chao, Chia-Chen; Hung, Ming-Chien; Li, Yu-Chuan; Chi, Y P

    2007-08-01

    Most healthcare providers provide mobile service for their medical staff; however, few healthcare providers provide mobile service as part of their outpatient service. The mobile outpatient service system (MOSS) focuses on illness treatment, illness prevention and patient relation management for outpatient service users. Initiated in a local hospital in Taiwan, the MOSS pilot project was developed to improve outpatient service quality and pursue higher patient safety. This study focuses on the development of the MOSS. The workflow, architecture and target users of the MOSS are delineated. In addition, there were two surveys conducted as part of this study. After a focus group of medical staff identified areas in which outpatient services might be improved by the MOSS, the first survey was administered to outpatients to confirm the focus group's intuitions. The second administration of the survey explored outpatient satisfaction after they used the MOSS service. With regard to outpatient attitudes, about 93% of participants agreed that the mobile outpatient service improved outpatient service quality. In the area of outpatient satisfaction, about 89% of participants indicated they were satisfied with the mobile outpatient service. Supported by our study finding, we propose that more diverse mobile outpatient services can be provided in the future.

  19. Indicaciones no quirúrgicas de la nutrición parenteral periférica Parenteral periferic nutrition: non surgical indications

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ayúcar Ruiz de Galarreta; F. Pita Gutiérrez; F. Mosteiro Pereira; L. Cordero Lorenzana; S. Gómez Canosa; C. Seco Vilariño

    2011-01-01

    Introducción: La Nutrición Parenteral Perif��rica, definida como la mezcla de macronutrientes, vitaminas y minerales con osmolaridad menor de 800 mOsm/L, permite evitar los riesgos del catéter central. Clásicamente ha sido utilizada en postoperados, pero actualmente la patología médica también puede beneficiarse de ella, bien como única fuente de nutrientes, ya que un alto porcentaje de pacientes precisan menor aporte calórico de lo que se creía, o como complementaria. Objetivo: Evaluación de...

  20. Differences in essential fatty acid requirements by enteral and parenteral routes of administration in patients with fat malabsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle B; Høy, Carl-Erik; Mortensen, Per B

    1999-01-01

    Background: Essential fatty acid (EFA) requirements of patients receiving home parenteral nutrition (HPN) are uncertain. Objective: The objective was to evaluate the influence of the route of administration (enteral compared with parenteral) on plasma phospholipid EFA concentrations. Design......: Intestinal absorption, parenteral supplement of EFAs, and plasma phospholipid EFA concentrations were investigated in balance studies in 4 groups (A, B, C, and D) of 10 patients with short-bowel syndrome and a fecal loss of >2000 kJ/d. Groups A (fat malabsorption 50%) did...... absorption was negligible in groups C and D. Thus, intestinal absorption of EFAs in group A. corresponded to parenteral EFA supplements in group C, whereas group D was almost totally deprived of EFAs. The median plasma phospholipid concentration of linoleic acid decreased by 21.9%, > 16.3%, >13.8%, 11...

  1. Volume, structure and funding of specialized outpatient care at the outpatient Advisory Department of Mariinskaya hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Kutyrev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of technologies, and discovery of new methods of diagnostics and treatment of diseases, a shift of the disease towards chronic disease is observed. Growth in prosperity will increase average life expectancy and mean age of population. Year after year, the elderly sector grows, with several chronic diseases per person. This is especially true for St. Petersburg, where 25 % of the populations of over working age. Thus, the demand for specialized medical care, particularly outpatient, will increase. Given that outpatient care is more profitable than hospital care, particular attention should be paid to its organization and expansion (increase in area, number of personnel, logistics, and so on. The article attempts to analyze changes in the volume of specialized outpatient medical care delivered at the outpatient Advisory Department of St. Petersburg state establishment of healthcare Mariinsky hospital in the period from 2008 through 2013.

  2. Developing community based rehabilitation for cancer survivors: Organizing for coordination and coherence in practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Karen; Cutchin, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Background. Increasing incidence of cancer combined with prolonged survival have raised the need for developing community based rehabilitation. The objectives of the analysis were to describe and interpret the key issues related to coordination and coherence of community-based cancer rehabilitation......-based organization, and informal relationships were fundamental for developing coordination and coherence. Conclusions. Coordination and coherence in community-based rehabilitation relies on increased collaboration, which may best be optimized by use of shared frameworks within and across systems. Results highlight...... in Denmark and to provide insights relevant for other contexts. Methods. Twenty-seven rehabilitation managers across 15 municipalities in Denmark comprised the sample. The study was designed with a combination of data collection methods including questionnaires, individual interviews, and focus groups...

  3. Recommendations for scale-up of community-based misoprostol distribution programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Nuriya; Kapungu, Chisina; Carnahan, Leslie; Geller, Stacie

    2014-06-01

    Community-based distribution of misoprostol for prevention of postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in resource-poor settings has been shown to be safe and effective. However, global recommendations for prenatal distribution and monitoring within a community setting are not yet available. In order to successfully translate misoprostol and PPH research into policy and practice, several critical points must be considered. A focus on engaging the community, emphasizing the safe nature of community-based misoprostol distribution, supply chain management, effective distribution, coverage, and monitoring plans are essential elements to community-based misoprostol program introduction, expansion, or scale-up. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Extension of health coverage and community based health insurance schemes in Africa: Myths and realities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boidin, B

    2015-02-01

    This article tackles the perspectives and limits of the extension of health coverage based on community based health insurance schemes in Africa. Despite their strong potential contribution to the extension of health coverage, their weaknesses challenge their ability to play an important role in this extension. Three limits are distinguished: financial fragility; insufficient adaptation to characteristics and needs of poor people; organizational and institutional failures. Therefore lessons can be learnt from the limits of the institutionalization of community based health insurance schemes. At first, community based health insurance schemes are to be considered as a transitional but insufficient solution. There is also a stronger role to be played by public actors in improving financial support, strengthening health services and coordinating coverage programs.

  5. Using Analysis of Governance to Unpack Community-Based Conservation: A Case Study from Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lance W; Makupa, Enock

    2015-11-01

    Community-based conservation policies and programs are often hollow with little real devolution. But to pass a judgment of community-based or not community-based on such initiatives and programs obscures what is actually a suite of attributes. In this paper, we analyze governance around a specific case of what is nominally community-based conservation-Ikona Wildlife Management Area (WMA) in Tanzania-using two complementary sets of criteria. The first relates to governance "powers": planning powers, regulatory powers, spending powers, revenue-generating powers, and the power to enter into agreements. The second set of criteria derive from the understanding of governance as a set of social functions: social coordination, shaping power, setting direction, and building community. The analysis helps to detail ways in which the Tanzanian state through policy and regulations has constrained the potential for Ikona WMA to empower communities and community actors. Although it has some features of community-based conservation, community input into how the governance social functions would be carried out in the WMA was constrained from the start and is now largely out of community hands. The two governance powers that have any significant community-based flavor-spending powers and revenue-generating powers-relate to the WMA's tourism activities, but even here the picture is equivocal at best. The unpacking of governance that we have done, however, reveals that community empowerment through the processes associated with creating and recognizing indigenous and community-conserved areas is something that can be pursued through multiple channels, some of which might be more strategic than others.

  6. IMPACT OF SOCIAL CAPITAL CHARACTERISTICS ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF COMMUNITY-BASED APPROACH TO LOCAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Grazhevska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the impact of social capital characteristics of local communities on the effectiveness of the community-based approach to economic development. The conclusion that such social capital characteristics as (antipaternalism, solidarity and cooperation have the greatest importance for the economic development is made based on the analysis of UNDP and the European Union project “Community-based approach to local development”. It was hypothesized that the creation of community organizations could be an effective mechanism to actualize the existing social capital of rural communities in Ukraine.

  7. The community-based participatory intervention effect of "HIV-RAAP".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Elleen M; Mayberry, Robert; Armstrong-Mensah, Elizabeth; Collins, David; Goodin, Lisa; Cureton, Shava; Trammell, Ella H; Yuan, Keming

    2012-07-01

    To design and test HIV-RAAP (HIV/AIDS Risk Reduction Among Heterosexually Active African American Men and Women: A Risk Reduction Prevention Intervention) a coeducational, culture- and gender-sensitive community-based participatory HIV risk reduction intervention. A community-based participatory research process included intervention development and implementation of a 7-session coeducational curriculum conducted over 7 consecutive weeks. The results indicated a significant intervention effect on reducing sexual behavior risk (P=0.02), improving HIV risk knowledge (P=0.006), and increasing sexual partner conversations about HIV risk reduction (P= 0.001). The HIV-RAAP intervention impacts key domains of heterosexual HIV transmission.

  8. Establishment of a Community-Based Mental Health Center in Yazd: A Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golrasteh Kholasehzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available About 40 years ago, the mental health services providing strategies have been dramatically changed worldwide. As well as, it is considered as a new revolution in mental health and named as community-based mental health movement. Moreover, mental health centers in Iran have been established in order to make a change in urban community-based mental health (CMHC. The first CMHC was founded in Tehran 16th district in 2010. In Yazd, it was established in 2010. In this article, the steps for establishment of the first CMHC were described.

  9. Quality of life of lung cancer patients receiving outpatient chemotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    MATSUDA, AYAKO; KOBAYASHI, MIKA; SAKAKIBARA, YUMI; TAMAOKA, MEIYO; FURUIYE, MASASHI; INASE, NAOHIKO; MATSUSHIMA, EISUKE

    2011-01-01

    An increasing number of cancer patients receive outpatient chemotherapy as an alternative to inpatient chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether quality of life (QOL) during outpatient chemotherapy was better than QOL prior to hospital discharge, and to explore possible related factors prior to hospital discharge that affected the QOL of lung cancer patients who received outpatient chemotherapy. Lung cancer inpatients who were scheduled for outpatient chemotherapy were as...

  10. Principles of feeding cancer patients via enteral or parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fietkau, R.

    1998-01-01

    Background: The nutritional status of cancer patients is frequently impaired already before any therapy starts and may deteriorate even more by radio(chemo)therapy. Methods: This review describes the possibilities and risks of enteral and parenteral nutrition during radiotherapy. The indications of enteral nutrition will be derived from own results. Results: Enteral nutrition is the most preferable way of artificial long-term nutrition. In a prospective non-randomized trial we demonstrated that enteral nutrition via percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) not only improves the anthropometric and biochemical parameters during radio(chemo)therapy but also the quality of life of patients with advanced cancers of the head and neck. Moreover supportive use of megestrolacetate can improve the nutritional status. Parenteral nutrition is only recommended if enteral nutrition is not possible e.g. during radio(chemo)therapy of tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. Conclusions: Today adequate nutritional support is feasible during intensive radio(chemo)therapy. (orig.) [de

  11. A case of organophosphate poisoning presenting with seizure and unavailable history of parenteral suicide attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit Vinay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphate (OP poisoning is common in India. Only few case reports of parenteral OP poisoning have been described. We report a case of self-injected methyl parathion poisoning, presenting after four days with seizure, altered sensorium, and respiratory distress which posed a diagnostic and therapeutic dilemma. Despite nonavailability of history of OP poisoning, he was treated based on suspicion and showed a good clinical response to treatment trial with atropine and pralidoxime, and had a successful recovery. Atypical presentations may be encountered following parenteral administration of OP poison, and even a slight suspicion of this warrants proper investigations and treatment for a favorable outcome. Persistently low plasma cholinesterase level is a useful marker for making the diagnosis.

  12. Recent advances in polymeric microspheres for parenteral drug delivery--part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shirui; Guo, Chunqiang; Shi, Yi; Li, Luk Chiu

    2012-09-01

    Polymeric microspheres have been established as a valuable parenteral drug delivery system for sustained release of therapeutic agents via subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. Biodegradable polymers which are either synthetic or from natural sources are reviewed with respect to recent advances in exploring their applications for microsphere fabrications. New information on the impact of formulation variables on the properties of microspheres formed by an emulsion method was also presented. The characterization of microspheres using advanced physical analytical techniques was also reviewed and the utilization of the information in assessing in vivo performance of the product was also highlighted. The broad clinical use of microspheres for delivery of therapeutic agents in particular biologics such as proteins has not been realized commercially. The limited availability of biodegradable polymers with a long history of regulatory approval and the challenges in gaining regulatory approval of a new polymer have hindered the development of microspheres for parenteral drug delivery.

  13. Safety, cost, and clinical considerations for the use of premixed parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Jacob W

    2015-06-01

    Premixed parenteral nutrition (PN) can be used for PN therapy in place of traditional compounded or customized PN. Premixed PN may have a number of advantages over compounded PN such as decreased costs, decreased compounding time, reduced chance for error, and reduced incidence of bloodstream infections. However, premixed PN may not be appropriate for all patients and may have other additional costs associated with its use. This article discusses the data available with regard to the use of premixed PN, focusing on the potential advantages and disadvantages of using premixed PN, and also discusses the implementation of premixed PN in a large tertiary cancer center. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  14. Parenteral nutrition in radiation therapy and combined treatment of patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudzhyan, A.V.; Buzovkina, L.P.; Biletov, B.V.; Breusenko, E.Ya.; Krasnova, A.I.; Tsaryuk, V.F.

    1980-01-01

    Results obtained while studying 165 patients with esophageal cancer are presented. It is shown that radiation therapy and combined treatment result in the body mass loss, in the increase of katabolic processes in organism, in the negative nitrogen balance. Weaken patients, being under starvation conditions, are subjected more often to reaction changes and complications developing during the treatment. A comparison characteristics of two methods providing the organism with nutrition is given, i.e. gastrostomy and parenteral nutrition. Shown is the advantage of the adequate parenteral nutrition preventing the appearence of reaction changes and complications, improving the subjective state of patients, homeostasis indices, promoting the elimination of esophagitis phenomena, general radiation response and reaction to chemical preparations; resulting in the increase of quantity of leucocytes at leukopenia

  15. Alterations in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in response to parenteral and enteral alimentation in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knodell, R G; Spector, M H; Brooks, D A; Keller, F X; Kyner, W T

    1980-12-01

    Recent in vitro observations suggest that the intestine, in addition to the liver, may be an important organ of first-pass drug metabolism. While a variety of changes in intestinal morphology and function in response to continuous parenteral and enteral nutrition have been documented, the effect of different routes of alimentation on intestinal drug metabolism has not been previously investigated. Objectives of this study were to assess the contribution of intestinal pentobarbital metabolism to overall in vivo pentobarbital pharmacokinetics in the rat and to determine if differences in pentobarbital pharmacokinetics were seen between parenterally and enterally nourished animals. After 7 days of continuous infusion of amino acid-glucose mixture via a gastric or jugular vein catheter, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined after 40 mg/kg of pentobarbital was given orally or into the portal or femoral vein. Reduced systemic availability of pentobarbital after oral administration as compared to portal vein injection was seen in both alimentation groups indicating that significant intestinal metabolism of pentobarbital occurred in vivo. Total area under the pentobarbital plasma concentration-time curve was significantly greater in parenterally nourished animals as compared with enterally alimented animals after oral, portal vein and systemic vein drug administration. Differences in pentobarbital, pharmacokinetics between the two alimentation groups appeared to be primarly due to effects on hepatic pentobarbital metabolism. While the mechanism producing these changes has not been defined, differences in gut hormones release and/or pancreatic secretion in response to the two routes of alimentation may be contributory. The widespread use of enteral and parenteral alimentation in clinical medicine suggests that studies to determine if nutrition route of administration similarly influences drug metabolism in humans may be indicated.

  16. Concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathologic nutrients metabolism presents a severe problem in metastatic colorectal cancer patients, especially those with canceromatosis. A hypermetabolism-catabolism syndrome frequently develops in in patients with progressing canceromatosis. This leads to cachexia anorexia syndrome, which significantly impedes available treatment options. Artificial nutrition allows to improve available treatment in such patients. We present a successful case of concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patient with peritoneal canceromatosis.

  17. Adverse effects of parenteral dexamethasone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jamal Uddin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus vulgaris is associated with high morbidity as well as significant mortality rate. Today the risk of death in pemphigus from the side effect of oral prednisolone is greater than risk of death from the disease itself. Objec­tive: To observe the adverse effects of parenteral dexamethasone compared with oral prednisolone in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris. Methods: An interventional study was carried out in the department of Dermatology and Venereol­ogy, Bangabandu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Total number of patients was thirty and among them fifteen patients were treated with parenteral dexamethasone (Group-A and other fifteen were treated with oral prednisolone (Group-B. Results: The study showed statistically significant differences of skin lesion as well as mucosal lesion of pemphigus after 6 weeks of therapy between of two groups (P<0.05. The most common adverse effects were increased body weight(40%, increased appetite(40%, and puffy face(40% in dexamethasone group. In prednisolone group, these side effects were 60% of the subjects. Other side effects in dexamethasone group were hyperglycemia (33.33%, hypertension (26.66%, and sleep disturbance (13.33%. In prednisolone group, other side effects were hyperglycemia(33.33%, hypertension(40%, gastritis (33.33%, nausea, vomiting (13.33% in each , reactivation of tuberculosis, herpes zoster infection, sleep disturbance, and mood change were 6.66% in each group. Conclusion: In the light of the findings of the study, we conclude that each of the treatment of dexamethasone group and prednisolone group is individually effective and safe in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris but adverse effects are less in parenteral dexamethasone group than oral prednisolone group. So parenteral dexamethasone can be used as an alternative drug in the treatment of pemphigus vulgaris.

  18. [Studies on calf salmonellosis. 4. Oral and parenteral immunization with live (Smd) and killed antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, H; Steinbach, G; Hartmann, H; Hauke, H; Koch, H; Stelzner, A; Linde, K; Schmerbauch, A; Kiupel, H

    1977-01-01

    Reported are results obtained from studies into oral and parenteral immunisation of calf. The approaches had included the use of live (Smd) or dead antigen from Salmonella (S.) dublin and a combination of the two immunisation methods. Live antigen (Smd) was superior to thermally activated dead antigen, when the oral route was used to prevent S.-dublin injection of calves. The above findings were supported by results from analogous studies in which S. typhimurium and S. dublin or live antigen (Smd) or dead antigen, made of the two, had been applied to mice. (One single subcutaneous) parenteral administration did hardly reveal any difference in favour of live vaccine (Smd). Parenteral administration of live or dead antigen proved to be less effective than repeated oral immunisation, particularly when live vaccine (Smd) was used. Immunity not less than up to six months of age against S. dublin wild strain infection can be provided for young calves by oral immunisation, with Smd vaccine (5. 1010 to 1. 1011 live germs/d) being given on ten consecutive days. Calves orally immunised with live antigen (ten repetitive applications of Smd mutants) are likely to develop an antibody titre (H-agglutinins) against S. dublin. Parenteral boostering,using live antigen, has been accompanied by sensitisation due to oral live antigen administration as well as by dose dependence, as was seen from the bactericidal values. Sensitisation was established from orally immunised calves up to three months old (typical booster reaction). Some of it was attributabale to confrontation with wild strains of Salmonella. The H-agglutinin titres of animals aged threemonths in a calf herd with salmonelloses in which all animals had been orally Smd-immunised were close to those recorded from calves in stocks with no salmonellosis occurrence. Under the conditions of oral immunisation, there had obviously been no action of the wild strain which might have triggered intensive antibody formation.

  19. Hyperintense brain lesions on T1-weighted MRI after parenteral nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitoh, Yoshiaki; Kimura, Seiji; Nezu, Atsuo; Ohtsuki, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Takuya; Osaka, Hitoshi; Uehara, Saori

    1996-01-01

    We experienced five children having T 1 -shortening lesions in basal ganglia or thalami on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which were supposed to be caused by manganese (Mn) overdoses. Instead of the presence of above-mentioned lesions, no neurological manifestations corresponding to them had developed in all patients. This observation suggests that MRI is useful for detecting side effects caused by overdoses of Mn in patients having parenteral nutrition. (author)

  20. 77 FR 5317 - Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... for Medicare & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Part 447 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs; Proposed... Part 447 [CMS-2345-P] RIN 0938-AQ41 Medicaid Program; Covered Outpatient Drugs AGENCY: Centers for... requirements pertaining to Medicaid reimbursement for covered outpatient drugs to implement provisions of the...

  1. Utilisation of outpatient services at Red Cross War Memorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The demand for outpatient services continues to grow at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RCCH). To determine current utilisation patterns, we conducted a 2-week survey in the outpatient department (OPD). In addition, we reviewed the RCCH Annual Reports for the period 1961 - 1988. Annual outpatient ...

  2. Comparison between Total Parenteral Nutrition Vs. Partial Parenteral Nutrition on Serum Lipids Among Chronic Ventilator Dependent Patients; A Multi Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radpay, Rojan; Poor Zamany Nejat Kermany, Mahtab; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Malnutrition is very common among chronically hospitalized patients, especially those in the intensive care unit (ICU). Identifying the patients at risk and providing suitable nutritional support can prevent and/or overcome malnutrition in them. Total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN) are two common routes to deliver nutrition to hospitalized patients. We conducted a multicenter, prospective double blind randomized controlled trial to evaluate the benefits and compare their adverse effects of each method. 97 patients were enrolled and divided into two groups based on the inclusion criteria. Serum protein, serum albumin, serum transferrin, and total lymphocyte count were measured on days 7 and 14. We did not find any statistically significant differences in clinical status or laboratory values between the two groups but there were significant improvements in measured lab values between days 7 and 14 (pnutritional status in each groups. This study shows that both TPN and PPN can be used safely in chronic ICU patients to provide nutritional support and prevent catabolic state among chronic critically ill patients. We need to develop precise selection criteria in order to choose the patients who would benefit the most from TPN and PPN. In addition, appropriate laboratory markers are needed to monitor the metabolic requirements of the patients and assess their progress.

  3. Comparison of prevalence of metabolic syndrome in hospital and community-based Japanese patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Hakuei

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lifestyle factors, such as an unbalanced diet and lack of physical activity, may affect the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS in schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study was to compare the MetS prevalence between inpatients and outpatients among schizophrenic population in Japan. Methods We recruited inpatients (n = 759 and outpatients (n = 427 with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition (DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder from 7 psychiatric hospitals using a cross-sectional design. MetS prevalence was assessed using three different definitions, including the adapted National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III-A. Results The overall MetS prevalences based on the ATP III-A definition were 15.8% in inpatients and 48.1% in outpatients. In a logistic regression model with age and body mass index as covariates, being a schizophrenic outpatient, compared to being a schizophrenic inpatient, was a significant independent factor (odds ratio = 3.66 for males, 2.48 for females in the development of MetS under the ATP III-A definition. The difference in MetS prevalence between inpatients and outpatients was observed for all age groups in males and for females over 40 years of age. Conclusions Outpatients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder in Japan had a high prevalence of MetS compared to inpatients. MetS in schizophrenic outpatients should be carefully monitored to minimize the risks. A change of lifestyle might improve MetS in schizophrenic patients.

  4. Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS) survey for hospital outpatient departments - Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital outpatient department ratings for the Outpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (OAS CAHPS)...

  5. Effects of parenteral administration of enrofloxacin on electrocardiographic parameters in hospitalized dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fernando Agudelo Ramírez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of enrofloxacin on the QT interval of the electrocardiogram was studied in 30 hospitalized dogs. The experimental group (n = 15 received enrofloxacin parenterally (subcutaneously at a dose of 5 mg/kg twice daily and amoxicillin-clavulanate intravenously at a dose of 22 mg/kg three times daily. The control group (n = 15 received only amoxicillin-clavulanate. Electrocardiography was carried out for 5 min once daily for 6 days. The QT interval was corrected by four different formulae. No differences were found between the two groups or within each group for the duration of the study. On the last day of the study the average QT interval for the control and experimental groups was 213.2 ms and 202.9 ms, respectively. Enrofloxacin did not cause prolongation of the QT or corrected QT intervals. We can conclude that the parenteral administration of enrofloxacin in non-cardiac dogs does not adversely affect the electrocardiographic indicators (no prolongation of the QT or corrected QT interval and does not induce ventricular arrhythmias. Parenteral use of enrofloxacin is thus safe and effective in non-cardiac dogs.

  6. Parenteral corticosteroids followed by early surgical resection of large amblyogenic eyelid hemangiomas in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Essawy R

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Rania El Essawy,1 Rasha Essameldin Galal21Department of Ophthalmology, 2Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, EgyptBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results and complications of early surgical resection of large amblyogenic subdermal eyelid hemangiomas in infants after prior short-term parenteral administration of corticosteroids.Methods: Sixteen infants were given dexamethasone 2 mg/kg/day in two divided doses for three consecutive days prior to scheduled surgical excision of large eyelid hemangiomas. The lesions were accessed via an upper eyelid crease, subeyebrow incision, or a lower eyelid subciliary incision.Results: In all cases, surgical excision of the entire lesion was possible with no significant intraoperative or postoperative complications. The levator muscle/aponeurosis complex was involved in 31.25% of cases and was managed by reinsertion or repositioning without resection. A satisfactory lid position and contour with immediate clearing of the visual axis was achieved in all but one case (93.8%.Conclusion: Parenteral corticosteroids helped in reducing volume and blood flow from the hemangiomas, allowing for very early total excision of large subdermal infantile hemangiomas without significant intraoperative hemorrhage. This resulted in immediate elimination of any reason for occlusion amblyopia. Long-term follow-up of visual development in these patients would help to demonstrate the effectiveness of this strategy compared with more conservative measures.Keywords: large eyelid hemangiomas, early surgical resection, parenteral corticosteroids

  7. Impact of Complete Parenteral Nutrition on Metabolic Processes in Cancer Patients in the Early Postoperative Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Obukhova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to estimate blood glucose levels during complete parenteral nutrition (CPN, by using the three-in-one system with a high glucose level. Subjects and methods. Thirty adult patients without diabetes mellitus (including 18 men were examined. Twelve and 18 patients were operated on for colonic and gastric cancers, respectively. CPN (Oliclinomel No. 7 — 1000, 1500 ml; glucose, 240 g in 1500 ml, Baxter, Belgium was carried out at the Surgery Department in the early postoperative period (3-5 postoperative days with stable hemodynamics and no organ dysfunction (acute respiratory, renal, hepatic failure. The preparation was administered at a rate of about 83 ml/h over 18 hours. Insulin was not used. Serum glucose concentrations were measured before the study and then for 24 hours at an interval of 6 hours. Results. Glucose concentrations were not found to exceed the allowable values in the majority of patients during CPN at the given rate. In 5 (16.7% patients, short-term glucose increases up to 13.3 mmol/l were corrected, by decreasing the infusion rate. There was no hypoglycemia or other complications during CPN. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that three-in-one parenteral feeding is safe and causes no metabolic disturbances if simple principles are followed, the basic ones of which are to observe the intake of an adequate total dose and the rate of administration of nutrients. Key words: parenteral feeding, hyperglycemia, metabolic disturbances.

  8. An Overview of Chitosan Nanoparticles and Its Application in Non-Parenteral Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munawar A. Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this review is to provide an overview of the chitosan based nanoparticles for various non-parenteral applications and also to put a spotlight on current research including sustained release and mucoadhesive chitosan dosage forms. Chitosan is a biodegradable, biocompatible polymer regarded as safe for human dietary use and approved for wound dressing applications. Chitosan has been used as a carrier in polymeric nanoparticles for drug delivery through various routes of administration. Chitosan has chemical functional groups that can be modified to achieve specific goals, making it a polymer with a tremendous range of potential applications. Nanoparticles (NP prepared with chitosan and chitosan derivatives typically possess a positive surface charge and mucoadhesive properties such that can adhere to mucus membranes and release the drug payload in a sustained release manner. Chitosan-based NP have various applications in non-parenteral drug delivery for the treatment of cancer, gastrointestinal diseases, pulmonary diseases, drug delivery to the brain and ocular infections which will be exemplified in this review. Chitosan shows low toxicity both in vitro and some in vivo models. This review explores recent research on chitosan based NP for non-parenteral drug delivery, chitosan properties, modification, toxicity, pharmacokinetics and preclinical studies.

  9. Validation of the aseptic filling at the Parenteral Products Plant 3 in BioCen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Álvarez-González

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the continuous improvement process, a new parenterals production plant (PPP3 was constructed at the National Center for Bioproducts. The validation of the aseptic filling process is a key element to carry out before manufacturing products. Therefore, the aim of this work was to obtain documented evidence that all the operations were carried out according the regulations of Good Manufacturing Practices for liquid and lyophilized sterile products during the aseptic filling at the Parenterals Product Plant 3. The study was designed for lyophilized products connected to the manifold of the peristaltic pump and to the four rotary piston pumps. Besides, during the filling operation four interventions were planned. The validation was carried out with three consecutive batches of media fill. In the first processed lot no vial was contaminated, but in the second and third lots there was one contaminated vial. For that reason, an investigation was performed in order to know the cause of the contamination. Finally, with this wok the validated condition was obtained, following the regulations of Good Manufacturing Practices for sterile liquids and lyophilizes products during the aseptic filling process at the Parenterals Products Plant 3.

  10. Nitrite and nitrate concentrations and metabolism in breast milk, infant formula, and parenteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jesica A; Ninnis, Janet R; Hopper, Andrew O; Ibrahim, Yomna; Merritt, T Allen; Wan, Kim-Wah; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2014-09-01

    Dietary nitrate and nitrite are sources of gastric NO, which modulates blood flow, mucus production, and microbial flora. However, the intake and importance of these anions in infants is largely unknown. Nitrate and nitrite levels were measured in breast milk of mothers of preterm and term infants, infant formulas, and parenteral nutrition. Nitrite metabolism in breast milk was measured after freeze-thawing, at different temperatures, varying oxygen tensions, and after inhibition of potential nitrite-metabolizing enzymes. Nitrite concentrations averaged 0.07 ± 0.01 μM in milk of mothers of preterm infants, less than that of term infants (0.13 ± 0.02 μM) (P milk. Concentrations in parenteral nutrition were equivalent to or lower than those of breast milk. Freeze-thawing decreased nitrite concentration ~64%, falling with a half-life of 32 minutes at 37°C. The disappearance of nitrite was oxygen-dependent and prevented by ferricyanide and 3 inhibitors of lactoperoxidase. Nitrite concentrations in breast milk decrease with storage and freeze-thawing, a decline likely mediated by lactoperoxidase. Compared to adults, infants ingest relatively little nitrite and nitrate, which may be of importance in the modulation of blood flow and the bacterial flora of the infant GI tract, especially given the protective effects of swallowed nitrite. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. Induration at Injection or Infusion Site May Reduce Bioavailability of Parenteral Phenobarbital Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hirokazu; Echizen, Hirotoshi; Ogawa, Ryuichi; Akabane, Atsuya; Kato, Toshiaki; Orii, Takao

    2017-06-01

    Phenobarbital is well tolerated and effective for controlling agitation or preventing convulsion at the end of life. No information is available concerning parenteral bioavailability of phenobarbital when induration develops at the injection or infusion site. We investigated whether induration at injection or infusion site is related to phenobarbital bioavailability via parenteral routes of continuous subcutaneous infusion and intermittent subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. A retrospective analysis was conducted on the medical data obtained from 18 patients who received chronic subcutaneous or intramuscular injections of phenobarbital for the prevention of convulsions and underwent plasma concentration monitoring of the drug. Patients whose concomitant medications were altered during the observation periods were excluded from the analysis. Comparisons were performed for concentration/dose (C/D) ratios obtained from patients with induration at injection or infusion sites (induration group, n = 6) and those without induration (noninduration group, n = 12). P phenobarbital may be reduced when induration develops at the injection or infusion site in patients treated parenterally by continuous subcutaneous infusion or intramuscular injection.

  12. Cost analysis of premixed multichamber bags versus compounded parenteral nutrition: breakeven point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozat, Erkut; Korubuk, Gamze; Onar, Pelin; Abbasoglu, Osman

    2014-02-01

    Industrially premixed multichamber bags or hospital-manufactured compounded products can be used for parenteral nutrition. The aim of this study was to compare the cost of these 2 approaches. Costs of compounded parenteral nutrition bags in an university hospital were calculated. A total of 600 bags that were administered during 34 days between December 10, 2009 and February 17, 2010 were included in the analysis. For quality control, specific gravity evaluation of the filled bags was performed. It was calculated that the variable cost of a hospital compounded bag was $26.15. If we take the annual fixed costs into consideration, the production cost reaches $36.09 for each unit. It was estimated that the cost for the corresponding multichamber bag was $37.79. Taking the fixed and the variable costs into account, the breakeven point of the hospital compounded and the premixed multichamber bags was seen at 5,404 units per year. In specific gravity evaluation, it was observed that the mean and interval values were inside the upper and lower control margins. In this analysis, usage of hospital-compounded parenteral nutrition bags showed a cost advantage in hospitals that treat more than 15 patients per day. In small volume hospitals, premixed multichamber bags may be more beneficial.

  13. Lipid emulsions in parenteral nutrition of intensive care patients: current thinking and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Gordon L.; Koletzko, Berthold V.; Singer, Pierre; Wanten, Geert J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Energy deficit is a common and serious problem in intensive care units and is associated with increased rates of complications, length of stay, and mortality. Parenteral nutrition (PN), either alone or in combination with enteral nutrition, can improve nutrient delivery to critically ill patients. Lipids provide a key source of calories within PN formulations, preventing or correcting energy deficits and improving outcomes. Discussion In this article, we review the role of parenteral lipid emulsions (LEs) in the management of critically ill patients and highlight important biologic activities associated with lipids. Soybean-oil-based LEs with high contents of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) were the first widely used formulations in the intensive care setting. However, they may be associated with increased rates of infection and lipid peroxidation, which can exacerbate oxidative stress. More recently developed parenteral LEs employ partial substitution of soybean oil with oils providing medium-chain triglycerides, ω-9 monounsaturated fatty acids or ω-3 PUFA. Many of these LEs have demonstrated reduced effects on oxidative stress, immune responses, and inflammation. However, the effects of these LEs on clinical outcomes have not been extensively evaluated. Conclusions Ongoing research using adequately designed and well-controlled studies that characterize the biologic properties of LEs should assist clinicians in selecting LEs within the critical care setting. Prescription of PN containing LEs should be based on available clinical data, while considering the individual patient’s physiologic profile and therapeutic requirements. PMID:20072779

  14. Plasma Aluminum Concentrations in Pediatric Patients Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney-Martin, Glenda; Kosar, Christina; Campbell, Alison; Avitzur, Yaron; Wales, Paul W; Steinberg, Karen; Harrison, Debra; Chambers, Kathryn

    2015-07-01

    Patients receiving long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) are at increased risk of aluminium (Al) toxicity because of bypass of the gastrointestinal tract during PN infusion. Complications of Al toxicity include metabolic bone disease (MBD), Al-associated encephalopathy in adults, and impaired neurological development in preterm infants. Unlike the United States, there are no regulations regarding Al content of large- and small-volume parenterals in Canada. We, therefore, aimed to present our data on plasma Al concentration and Al intake from our cohort of pediatric patients receiving long-term PN. Plasma Al concentration was retrospectively gathered from the patient charts of all 27 patients with intestinal failure (IF) receiving long-term PN at The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada, and compared with age- and sex-matched controls recruited for comparison. In addition, Al concentration was measured in PN samples collected from 10 randomly selected patients with IF and used to determine their Al intake. The plasma Al concentration of patients with IF receiving long-term PN was significantly higher than that of control participants (1195 ± 710 vs 142 ± 63 nmol/L; P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Parenteral Nutrition-Associated Liver Disease: The Role of the Gut Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahova, Monika; Bratova, Miriam; Wohl, Petr

    2017-09-07

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) provides life-saving nutritional support in situations where caloric supply via the enteral route cannot cover the necessary needs of the organism. However, it does have serious adverse effects, including parenteral nutrition-associated liver disease (PNALD). The development of liver injury associated with PN is multifactorial, including non-specific intestine inflammation, compromised intestinal permeability, and barrier function associated with increased bacterial translocation, primary and secondary cholangitis, cholelithiasis, short bowel syndrome, disturbance of hepatobiliary circulation, lack of enteral nutrition, shortage of some nutrients (proteins, essential fatty acids, choline, glycine, taurine, carnitine, etc.), and toxicity of components within the nutrition mixture itself (glucose, phytosterols, manganese, aluminium, etc.). Recently, an increasing number of studies have provided evidence that some of these factors are directly or indirectly associated with microbial dysbiosis in the intestine. In this review, we focus on PN-induced changes in the taxonomic and functional composition of the microbiome. We also discuss immune cell and microbial crosstalk during parenteral nutrition, and the implications for the onset and progression of PNALD. Finally, we provide an overview of recent advances in the therapeutic utilisation of pro- and prebiotics for the mitigation of PN-associated liver complications.

  16. Iodine Supplementation for Pediatric Patients Receiving Long-Term Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Jonathan D; Nespor, Colleen; Poole, Robert L; Kerner, John A

    2016-04-01

    Patients dependent on parenteral nutrition (PN) are among a group at risk of developing iodine deficiency. Supplementation with iodine in this population has been debated in a number of studies, resulting in variable clinical practices. The Committee on Clinical Practice Issues of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition recommends a dose of 1 mcg/kg/d of parenteral iodine for patients receiving PN. At our institution, PN trace elements do not include iodine, although this is not the case internationally. Our study sought to assess iodine levels and thyroid function in a cohort of PN-dependent pediatric patients. A retrospective analysis studied 32 pediatric patients with a variety of medical diagnoses who received PN as a primary means of nutrition for 6 months or longer. Patients received variable proportions of their total caloric intake as PN, which ranged from 14%-100%. Iodine and thyroid function levels were obtained by serum sampling. No patient in our cohort of 32 demonstrated thyroid dysfunction or developed iodine deficiency. The length of time on PN and the percentage of total nutrition intake as PN were not associated with iodine levels (P Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  17. Management of Ready-to-Use Parenteral Nutrition in Newborns: Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Karen Daniela Romero; Espitia, Olga Lucia Pinzón; Vergara, José Alejandro Daza

    2018-04-27

    Parenteral support has increased the possibility of neonatal recovery. However, complications associated with its use have been documented. One commercial method developed to decrease the complications of this type of support is the ready-to-use parenteral nutrition (PN), a 3-chamber bag that provides a complete nutrient mix. This systematic review seeks, through the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology, to establish the benefits in newborns. Seven databases and gray literature were used. The search was limited to publications from 2007-2017 and to articles written in English, Spanish, and Portuguese. Articles that did not meet the inclusion criteria and studies with low quality evaluated with the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines, which were without information about the study or analytical methods, were excluded. A total of 24,193 articles were obtained, which were initially evaluated by title and abstract according to the inclusion criteria. A total of 24,167 articles were discarded, obtaining 27 eligible for follow-up evaluation. After a detailed evaluation of the full text, 13 articles were selected. It was found that ready-to-use PN has the potential benefit to reduce the risks for infections, provide an adequate supply of nutrients, generate growth within the expected range, provide ease of use, decrease prescription errors, and potentially reduce costs. It is necessary to evaluate the short- and long-term impact of its use. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  18. Investigation of Possible Maillard Reaction Between Acyclovir and Dextrose upon Dilution Prior to Parenteral Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahi Shadbad, Mohammad Reza; Ghaderi, Faranak; Hatami, Leila; Monajjemzadeh, Farnaz

    2016-12-01

    In this study the stability of parenteral acyclovir (ACV) when diluted in dextrose (DEX) as large volume intravenous fluid preparation (LVIF) was evaluated and the possible Maillard reaction adducts were monitored in the recommended infusion time. Different physicochemical methods were used to evaluate the Maillard reaction of dextrose with ACV to track the reaction in real infusion condition. Other large volume intravenous fluids were checked regarding the diluted drug stability profile. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and mass data proved the reaction of glucose with dextrose. A Maillard-specific high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was used to track the reaction in real infusion condition in vitro. The nucleophilic reaction occurred in diluted parenteral preparations of acyclovir in 5% dextrose solutions. The best diluent solution was also selected as sodium chloride and introduced based on drug stability and also its adsorption onto different infusion sets (PVC or non PVC) to provide an acceptable administration protocol in clinical practices. Although, the Maillard reaction was proved and successfully tracked in diluted solutions, and the level of drug loss when diluted in dextrose was reported to be between 0.27 up to 1.03% of the initial content. There was no drug adsorption to common infusion sets. The best diluent for parenteral acyclovir is sodium chloride large volume intravenous fluid.

  19. Self-Screening for Malnutrition Risk in Outpatient Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Using the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Amindeep; Mosli, Mahmoud; Yan, Brian; Wu, Thomas; Gregor, Jamie; Chande, Nilesh; Ponich, Terry; Beaton, Melanie; Rahman, Adam

    2016-05-01

    Malnutrition is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and is associated with poor outcomes. Our aim is to determine if patient self-administered malnutrition screening using the malnutrition universal screening tool (MUST) is reliable by comparing patient scores with those derived from the healthcare practitioner (HCP), the gold standard. We conducted a prospective validation study at a tertiary Canadian academic center that included 154 adult outpatients with IBD. All patients with IBD completed a self-administered nutrition screening assessment using the MUST score followed by an independent MUST assessment performed by HCPs. The main outcome measure was chance-corrected agreement (κ) of malnutrition risk categorization. For patient-administered MUST, the chance-corrected agreement κ (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 0.83 (0.74-0.92) when comparing low-risk and combined medium- and high-risk patients with HCP screening. Weighted κ analysis comparing all 3 risks groups yielded a κ (95% CI) of 0.85 (0.77-0.93) between patient and HCP screening. All patients were able to screen themselves. Overall, 96% of patients reported the MUST questionnaire as either very easy or easy to understand and to complete. Self-administered nutrition screening in outpatients with IBD is valid using the MUST screening tool and is easy to use. If adopted, this tool will increase utilization of malnutrition screening in hectic outpatient clinic settings and will help HCPs determine which patients require additional nutrition support. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  20. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86...... were included and screened for mental disorder with the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD), Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) psychosis screening, the Clock Drawing Test, and the WHO-5 Well-being Index. The cardiologists were asked to rate the severity of somatic...... and mental problems in each patient on visual analogue scales (VAS-som and VAS-men). The current treatments, including psychiatric and psychological treatments, were noted, and the survival was followed for 3 years. Of the 86 patients included, 34 (40%) had a diagnosis of mental disorder. Eleven (12.8%) had...

  1. Primary epiploic appendagitis and successful outpatient management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnedl, Wolfgang J.; Krause, Robert; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra J.; Tafeit, Erwin; Mangge, Harald; Tillich, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Primary epiploic appendagitis (PEA) is a rare cause of abdominal acute or subacute complaints. Diagnosis of PEA is made with ultrasonography (US) or when computed tomography (CT) reveals a characteristic lesion. Case Report We report on two patients with PEA. In one patient PEA was first seen with US and confirmed with contrast enhanced CT, and in the second patient CT without contrast enhancement demonstrated PEA. In both patients an outpatient recovery with conservative non-surgical treatment is described. Conclusions Medical personnel should be aware of this rare disease, which mimics many other intra-abdominal acute and subacute conditions. A correct diagnosis of PEA with imaging procedures enables conservative and successful outpatient management avoiding unnecessary surgical intervention and additional costs. PMID:22648258

  2. Dexamethasone for pain after outpatient shoulder surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnholdt, K. T.; Mønsted, P. N.; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Background Dexamethasone has analgesic properties when given intravenously before surgery, but the optimal dose has not been determined. We hypothesised that a dose of 40 mg dexamethasone would improve analgesia after outpatient shoulder surgery compared with 8 mg. Methods A randomised, double...... a dose–response relationship, increasing the dexamethasone dose from 8 to 40 mg did not improve analgesia significantly after outpatient shoulder surgery.......) or placebo (D0) before surgery. The primary outcome was pain intensity 8 h after surgery rated on a numeric rating scale of 0 to 10. Secondary outcomes were pain intensity, analgesic consumption and side effects during the first 3 days after surgery. Results Data from 73 patients were available for analysis...

  3. Platelet activation in outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagripanti, A.; Polloni, A.; Materazzi, F.; Ferdeghini, M.; Pinori, E.; Bianchi, R.

    1989-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of emotional stress on platelet function mesured by radioimmunoassay in plasma two platelet factor 4, in a series of outpatients undergoing esophagogastroduodenoscopy for upper digestive complaints has been measured. The plasma levels of β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4, determined just before the instrumental examination, were significantly more elevated as compared to basal values, checked a week later. These results provide evidence of enhanced in vivo platelet release reaction during emotional stress

  4. Continuous Intravenous Milrinone Therapy in Pediatric Outpatients

    OpenAIRE

    Curley, Michelle; Liebers, Jill; Maynard, Roy

    2017-01-01

    Milrinone is a phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor with both positive inotropic and vasodilator properties. Administered as a continuous infusion, milrinone is indicated for the short-term treatment of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Despite limited data supporting long-term milrinone therapy in adults with congestive heart failure, children managed as outpatients may benefit from continuous milrinone as a treatment for cardiac dysfunction, as a destination therapy for cardiac tran...

  5. Myelography conducted on an outpatient basis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kausch, W

    1981-03-01

    The introduction of the non-ionogenic product metrizamide made lumbosacral myelography a low-risk, invasive diagnostic procedure. Examination carried out on an outpatient basis does not involve greater risks or side effects than examination on a inpatient basis. However, it is essential that - apart from informing the patient properly - the patient shows discipline and remains available for the examining physician during a period of 36 hours.

  6. The formation of community-based organizations : an analysis of a quasi-experiment in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barr, A.; Dekker, M.; Fafchamps, M.

    2015-01-01

    Previous analyses of the formation and composition of community-based organizations (CBOs) have used cross section data. So, causal inference has been compromised. We obviate this problem by using data from a quasi-experiment in which villages were formed by government officials selecting and

  7. Community-Based Organisations and How to Support Their Use of Systematic Reviews: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael G.; Lavis, John N.

    2011-01-01

    Unlike for other health system stakeholders, there have been few visible efforts to support the use of research evidence in community-based organisations (CBOs). To begin to address this gap, we conducted focus groups and interviews with executive directors and programme managers of CBOs from the HIV/AIDS, diabetes and mental health and addictions…

  8. Essays on evaluating a community based health insurance scheme in rural Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D. Mebratie (Anagaw)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Since the late 1990s, in a move away from user fees for health care and with the aim of creating universal access, several low and middle income countries have set up community-based health insurance (CBHI) schemes. Following this approach, in June 2011, with the

  9. Nesting, Subsidiarity, and Community-based environmental Governance beyond the Local Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Marshall

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-based approaches to environmental management have become widely adopted over the last two decades. From their origins in grassroots frustrations with governmental inabilities to solve local environmental problems, these approaches are now sponsored frequently by governments as a way of dealing with such problems at much higher spatial levels. However, this 'up-scaling' of community-based approaches has run well ahead of knowledge about how they might work. This article explores how Elinor Ostrom's 'nesting principle' for robust common property governance of large-scale common-pool resources might inform future up-scaling efforts. In particular, I consider how the design of nested governance systems for large-scale environmental problems might be guided by the principle of subsidiarity. The challenges of applying this principle are illustrated by Australia's experience in up-scaling community-based natural resource management from local groups comprising 20-30 members to regional bodies representing hundreds of thousands of people. Seven lessons are distilled for fostering community-based environmental governance as a multi-level system of nested enterprises.

  10. Public health impact of community-based nutrition and lifestyle interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheijden, M.W.; Kok, F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Community-based interventions have increasingly received attention since researchers and public health professionals have come to acknowledge the importance of an environment that makes the healthy choice the easy choice. All stakeholders including the target community are involved to achieve

  11. Multiple Methodologies: Using Community-Based Participatory Research and Decolonizing Methodologies in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Brent C.; Odoyo, Kenneth O.

    2018-01-01

    In this project, we examined the development of a sustainable inclusive education system in western Kenya by combining community-based participatory research (CBPR) and decolonizing methodologies. Through three cycles of qualitative interviews with stakeholders in inclusive education, participants explained what they saw as foundational components…

  12. Renewing membership in three community-based health insurance schemes in rural India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Panda (Pradeep); A. Chakraborty (Arpita); W.A. Raza (Wameq); A.S. Bedi (Arjun Singh)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractLow renewal rate is a key challenge facing the sustainability of Community-based Health Insurance (CBHI) schemes. While there is a large literature on initial enrolment into such schemes, there is limited evidence on the factors that impede renewal. This paper uses longitudinal data to

  13. Preparing Teachers for Diversity: A Literature Review and Implications from Community-Based Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Huanshu

    2018-01-01

    This study reviewed current issues in preparing qualified teachers for increasing diverse student populations in the U.S. and in other multicultural and multiethnic countries. Based on the framework of community-based and multicultural teacher education, this literature review paper analyzed issues and problems existed in the current curriculum,…

  14. Environmental entitlements: Dynamics and institutions in community-based natural resource management

    OpenAIRE

    Leach, M.; Mearns, R.; Scoones, I.

    1999-01-01

    Metadata only record While community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) now attracts widespread international attention, its practical implementation frequently falls short of expectations. This paper contributes to emerging critiques by focusing on the implications of intracommunity dynamics and ecological heterogeneity. It builds a conceptual framework highlighting the central role of institutions - regularized patterns of behavior between individuals and groups in society - in me...

  15. [Creation of a medical work station for use in community-based care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Samuel; Desauty, Fabrice; Lamache, Christophe; Lefort, Hugues

    2017-03-01

    In community-based care, the teams must adapt to the environment and perform a number of technical procedures. Foldable medical equipment has been developed and patented, enabling the care provision to approach hospital standards and improving working conditions in this context. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. An ethnography of clinic "noise" in a community-based, promotora-centered mental health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getrich, Christina; Heying, Shirley; Willging, Cathleen; Waitzkin, Howard

    2007-07-01

    Community-based health interventions have emerged as a growing focus for anthropological research. The application of ethnographic approaches in clinical practice settings reveals that community-based interventions must grapple with "noise," or unanticipated factors such as patients' own perceptions of illness and treatment, primary care providers' non-adherence to guidelines-based treatment, the social dynamics of the clinic site itself, and incomplete understanding and acceptance of an intervention by a clinic's staff members. Such noise can influence the implementation and quality of treatment. Thus, identifying clinic-based noise is critical in assessments of fidelity to intervention protocols as well as outcomes of community-based interventions. This paper highlights findings from an evaluation of a mental health intervention focusing on the role of promotoras (briefly trained, non-professional community health workers) as mental health practitioners in two urban New Mexico, USA, community health centers. Our research identified three areas of clinic-based noise: the clinics' physical ability to "absorb" the intervention, the challenges of co-worker instability and interpersonal relationships, and balancing extra workplace demands. The findings demonstrate the value of ethnographic approaches in community-based intervention research.

  17. Evaluation of a Community-Based Parenting Program with the Parents of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Viktor; Nicholson, Bonnie C.; Fox, Robert A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluated effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioral parenting program for parents of children ages 1 to 5 years offered through community-based family resource centers. Found that participants showed significant decreases in use of verbal and corporal punishment, and increases in nurturing behaviors as measured by the Parent Behavior Checklist.…

  18. Preventing Parolees from Returning to Prison through Community-Based Reintegration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheldon X.; Roberts, Robert E. L.; Callanan, Valerie J.

    2006-01-01

    In the late 1990s, California legislators funded a statewide, community-based correctional program intended to reduce parolee recidivism. Overseen by the California Department of Corrections, the Preventing Parolee Crime Program (PPCP) provided literacy training, employment services, housing assistance, and substance abuse treatment to tens of…

  19. Feasibility of pulse oximetry for assessment of infants born in community based midwifery care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Ganzeboom, A.; Dawson, J.A.; Walther, F.J.; Bustraan, J.; van Roosmalen, Jos; te Pas, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using pulse oximetry (PO) for evaluating infants born in community-based midwifery care. Design: a prospective, observational study of infants born after midwifery supervised (home) births. Setting: 27 midwives from seven practices providing primary care in (home)

  20. Community-based dental education and the importance of faculty development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Maureen

    2010-09-01

    Community-based dental education offers a variety of positive learning experiences for students while providing needed dental services for the underserved. More dental students are being instructed by a growing body of largely volunteer community-based faculty who practice in a wide range of community settings including community hospitals and clinics, nursing homes, and private practices. These geographically dispersed instructors may have little experience as educators. Their practice styles and their motivation to improve teaching effectiveness are likely to differ from the styles and motivation of school-based faculty members. Moreover, many dental schools have begun to emphasize practices that may be unfamiliar to community-based faculty such as evidence-based practice. Providing faculty development for them is challenging, yet crucial to the success of these programs and dental education in general. Fundamental elements that must be considered for effective community faculty development programming include fostering a culture of respect between school-based and community faculty members, basing programs on the actual needs of these educators, integrating principles of adult learning theory, and establishing ongoing institutional support. This article provides background on this movement, reviews the literature for faculty development programs geared specifically to community-based educators, makes recommendations for development programs for these dental educators, and includes suggestions for future research.