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Sample records for community-acquired acute gastroenteritis

  1. Incidence and risk factors for community-acquired acute gastroenteritis in north-west Germany in 2004

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    Karsten, C; Baumgarte, S; Friedrich, A W; von Eiff, C; Becker, K; Wosniok, W; Ammon, A; Bockemühl, J; Karch, H; Huppertz, H-I

    2009-01-01

    In developed countries, acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major source of morbidity. However, only a few studies have estimated its incidence and the associated medical burden. This population-based study determined the incidence of community-acquired AGE patients seeking medical care and the relativ

  2. Community-Acquired Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Compared with Adenovirus and Norovirus Gastroenteritis in Italian Children: A Pedianet Study

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    D. Donà

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rotavirus (RV is the commonest pathogen in the hospital and primary care settings, followed by Adenovirus (AV and Norovirus (NV. Only few studies that assess the burden of RV gastroenteritis at the community level have been carried out. Objectives. To estimate incidence, disease characteristics, seasonal distribution, and working days lost by parents of RV, AV, and NV gastroenteritis leading to a family pediatrician (FP visit among children < 5 years. Methods. 12-month, observational, prospective, FP-based study has been carried out using Pedianet database. Results. RVGE incidence was 1.04 per 100 person-years with the highest incidence in the first 2 years of life. Incidences of AVGEs (1.74 and NVGEs (1.51 were slightly higher with similar characteristics regarding age distribution and symptoms. Risk of hospitalisation, access to emergency room (ER, and workdays lost from parents were not significantly different in RVGEs compared to the other viral infections. Conclusions. Features of RVGE in terms of hospitalisation length and indirect cost are lower than those reported in previous studies. Results of the present study reflect the large variability of data present in the literature. This observation underlines the utility of primary care networks for AGE surveillance and further studies on community-acquired gastroenteritis in children.

  3. Impact of community-acquired paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis on family life: data from the REVEAL study

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    Talayero José MP

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus is the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE and the most frequent cause of severe diarrhoea in children aged less than 5 years. Although the epidemiology of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE is well documented, there are few data on the impact of RVGE on the families of affected children. Methods Data associated with the burden of RVGE, including number of working days lost, levels of parental stress, the need for alternative childcare arrangements and additional nappies used, were extracted from questionnaires completed by parents of children participating in a prospective, multicentre, observational study (Rotavirus gastroenteritis Epidemiology and Viral types in Europe Accounting for Losses in public health and society, REVEAL, conducted during 2004-2005 in selected areas of Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom to estimate the incidence of RVGE in children aged less than 5 years seeking medical care as a result of AGE. Results 1102 children with RVGE were included in the present analysis. The proportion of RVGE cases that required at least one parent or other person to be absent from work was 39%-91% in the hospital setting, 44%-64% in the emergency department, and 20%-64% in primary care. Self-reported levels of parental stress were generally high (mean stress levels, ≥ 5 on a 10-point visual analogue scale. Additional childcare arrangements were required in up to 21% of RVGE episodes. The mean number of nappies used per day during RVGE episodes was approximately double that used when the child was not ill. Conclusions Paediatric RVGE cases cause disruption to families and parental stress. The burden of RVGE on children and their families could be substantially reduced by routine rotavirus vaccination of infants.

  4. Community-acquired acute kidney injury in adults in Africa.

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    Adu, Dwomoa; Okyere, Perditer; Boima, Vincent; Matekole, Michael; Osafo, Charlotte

    We review recent published data on demographics, causes, diagnoses, treatment, and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) in Africa. A review of the incidence, etiology, diagnoses, and treatment of AKI in adults in Africa from studies published between the years 2000 and 2015. The incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients in Africa ranges from 0.3 to 1.9% in adults. Between 70 and 90% of cases of AKI are community acquired. Most patients with AKI are young with a weighted mean age of 41.3 standard deviation (SD) 9.3 years, and a male to female ratio of 1.2 : 1.0. Medical causes account for between 65 and 80% of causes of AKI. This is followed by obstetric causes in 5 - 27% of cases and surgical causes in 2 - 24% of cases. In the reported studies, between 17 and 94% of patients who needed dialysis received this. The mortality of AKI in adults in Africa ranged from 11.5 to 43.5%. Most reported cases of AKI in Africa originate in the community. The low incidence of hospital-acquired AKI is likely to be due to under ascertainment. Most patients with AKI in Africa are young and have a single precipitating cause. Prominent among these are infection, pregnancy complications and nephrotoxins. Early treatment can improve clinical outcomes.

  5. Burden of community-acquired and nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis in the pediatric population of Western Europe: a scoping review

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    Ogilvie Isla

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus affects 95% of children worldwide by age 5 years and is the leading cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea. The objective of this review was to estimate the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE in the Western European pediatric population. Methods A comprehensive literature search (1999-2010 was conducted in PubMed and other sources (CDC; WHO, others. Data on the epidemiology and burden of RVGE among children Results 76 studies from 16 countries were identified. The mean percentage of acute gastroenteritis (AGE cases caused by rotavirus ranged from 25.3%-63.5% in children Conclusions This review confirms that RVGE is a common disease associated with significant morbidity and costs across Western Europe. A vaccine protecting against multiple serotypes may decrease the epidemiological and cost burden of RVGE in Western Europe.

  6. Surveillance of acute community acquired urinary tract bacterial infections

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    Sibanarayan Rath; Rabindra N. Padhy

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To record the antibiotic resistance of community acquired uropathogens over a period of 24 months (May 2011-April 2012). Methods: Urine samples from patients of outpatient department (OPD) were used for isolating urinary tract infection (UTI)-causing bacteria that were cultured on suitable selective media and identified by biochemical tests. Their antibiograms were ascertained by Kirby-Bauer’s disc diffusion method, using 17 antibiotics of 5 different classes. Results: From 2137 urine samples 1332 strains of pathogenic bacteria belonging to 11 species were isolated. Two Gram-positives, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis and nine Gram-negatives, Acinetobacter baumannii, Citrobacter sp., Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated. Both S. aureus and E. faecalis were vancomycin resistant, and resistant-strains of all pathogens increased in each 6-month period of study. Particularly, all Gram-negatives were resistant to nitrofurantoin and co-trimoxazole, the most preferred antibiotics of empiric therapy for UTI, but were moderately resistant to gentamicin, ampicillin, amoxyclav, ofloxacin and gatifloxacin. Most Gram-negatives produced extended spectrum β-lactamase. Conclusions: It was concluded that periodic surveillance of pathogens is an essential corollary in effective health management in any country, as empiric therapy is a common/essential practice in effective clinical management.

  7. Dilemmas in the diagnosis of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

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    Brouwer, Matthijs C; Thwaites, Guy E; Tunkel, Allan R; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-11-10

    Rapid diagnosis and treatment of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis reduces mortality and neurological sequelae, but can be delayed by atypical presentation, assessment of lumbar puncture safety, and poor sensitivity of standard diagnostic microbiology. Thus, diagnostic dilemmas are common in patients with suspected acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis. History and physical examination alone are sometimes not sufficient to confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Lumbar puncture is an essential investigation, but can be delayed by brain imaging. Results of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination should be interpreted carefully, because CSF abnormalities vary according to the cause, patient's age and immune status, and previous treatment. Diagnostic prediction models that use a combination of clinical findings, with or without test results, can help to distinguish acute bacterial meningitis from other causes, but these models are not infallible. We review the dilemmas in the diagnosis of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, and focus on the roles of clinical assessment and CSF examination. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Community acquired bilateral upper lobe Pneumonia with acute adrenal insufficiency: A new face of Achromobacter xylosoxidans

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    Suman S Karanth

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractAchromobacter xylosoxidans is an uncommon pathogen of low virulence known to cause serious nosocomial infection in the immunocompromised. Its inherent multi-drug resistance makes treatment difficult. Community-acquired infections are rare despite its ubiquitous existence. We present a 50-year-old immunocompetent woman who presented with one-month history of coughing with expectoration who was subsequently diagnosed with bilateral upper lobe pneumonia and acute adrenal insufficiency. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage culture. The acute adrenal insufficiency recovered after appropriate antibiotic therapy. Amongst the myriad of presentations, we highlight the rarity of acute adrenal insufficiency triggered by the infection.

  9. Community acquired bilateral upper lobe pneumonia with acute adrenal insufficiency: A new face of Achromobacter Xylosoxidans.

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    Karanth, Suman S; Gupta, Anurag; Prabhu, Mukhyaprana

    2012-01-01

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an uncommon pathogen of low virulence known to cause serious nosocomial infection in the immunocompromised. Its inherent multi-drug resistance makes treatment difficult. Community-acquired infections are rare despite its ubiquitous existence. We present a 50-year-old immunocompetent woman who presented with one-month history of coughing with expectoration who was subsequently diagnosed with bilateral upper lobe pneumonia and acute adrenal insufficiency. Achromobacter xylosoxidans was isolated from sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage culture. The acute adrenal insufficiency recovered after appropriate antibiotic therapy. Amongst the myriad of presentations, we highlight the rarity of acute adrenal insufficiency triggered by the infection.

  10. Community-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury: A Nationwide Survey in China.

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    Wang, Yafang; Wang, Jinwei; Su, Tao; Qu, Zhen; Zhao, Minghui; Yang, Li

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the burden of community-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) in China based on a nationwide survey about AKI. Cross-sectional and retrospective study. A national sample of 2,223,230 hospitalized adult patients from 44 academic/local hospitals in Mainland China was used. AKI was defined according to the 2012 KDIGO AKI creatinine criteria or an increase or decrease in serum creatinine level of 50% during the hospital stay. Community-acquired AKI was identified when a patient had AKI that could be defined at hospital admission. The rate, cause, recognition, and treatment of community-acquired AKI were stratified according to hospital type, latitude, and economic development of the regions in which the patients were admitted. All-cause in-hospital mortality and recovery of kidney function at hospital discharge. 4,136 patients with community-acquired AKI were identified during the 2 single-month snapshots (January 2013 and July 2013). Of these, 2,020 (48.8%) had cases related to decreased kidney perfusion; 1,111 (26.9%), to intrinsic kidney disease; and 499 (12.1%), to urinary tract obstruction. In the north versus the south, more patients were exposed to nephrotoxins or had urinary tract obstructions. 536 (13.0%) patients with community-acquired AKI had indications for renal replacement therapy (RRT), but only 347 (64.7%) of them received RRT. Rates of timely diagnosis and appropriate use of RRT were higher in regions with higher per capita gross domestic product. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 7.3% (295 of 4,068). Delayed AKI recognition and being located in northern China were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality, and referral to nephrology providers was an independent protective factor. Possible misclassification of AKI and community-acquired AKI due to nonstandard definitions and missing data for serum creatinine. The features of community-acquired AKI varied substantially in different regions of China and were closely

  11. Persistent pathogens as risk factors of community-acquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis in children

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    O. V. Zhukova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between infection with “persistent” agents of children and the possibility of the development of inflammatory diseases of the respiratory tract such as community-acquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis on the basis of risk management concepts.Materials and methods. 701 children in age from 15 days to 16 years were examined in Nizhny Novgorod and the Nizhny Novgorod region with clinically and radiologically confirmed diagnosis: community-acquired pneumonia, acute bronchitis. This study was performed in the period from 2005 to 2014. The control group consisted of 127 healthy children of different ages. The detection of M. pneumoniae, Сytomegalovirus, Herpes simplex I/II C. pneumoniae was performed by PCR. The concept of risk determination was based on the determination of the absolute risk in the exposed and the no exposed groups, attributable risk, relative risk, the population attributable risk, as well as determining the standard errors for each type of risk and confidence interval.Results. Attributable risk, relative risk, population-attributable risk are statistically significant figures. Attributable risk of development of community-acquired pneumonia was 29,26%; 27,37%; 25,70%; 20,21% for the M. pneumoniae, C. pneumoniae, CMV, HSV I / II respectively. The relative risk was 1,43 for the M. pneumoniae; 1,38 – for C. pneumoniae and CMV; 1,28- for HSV I / II. The presence of persistent pathogens is resulting in increased incidence of communityacquired pneumonia throughout the population (population attributable risk: 4,75% for M. pneumoniae, 0,23% for C. pneumoniae, 5,59% for the CMV and 1,08% for the HSV I/II. Similar calculations were performed for patients with acute bronchitis. The statistical analysis allowed to exclude C. pneumoniae and HSV I / II of the risk factors for communityacquired pneumonia and acute bronchitis.Conclusion. The findings suggest the influence of M

  12. Mucosal Immunity and acute viral gastroenteritis.

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    Rose, Markus A

    2014-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major killer of the very young worldwide. Rotavirus is the most common intestinal virus, causing acute gastroenteritis and extra-intestinal complications especially in young and chronically ill subjects. As early as 1991, the WHO recommended as high priority the development of a vaccine against rotavirus, the major pathogen causing enteric infections. Since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines for infant immunization programmes in different parts of the world in 2006, vaccination against rotavirus has resulted in substantial declines in severe gastroenteritis. The oral rotavirus vaccines RotaTeq(®) and Rotarix(®) are excellent examples for their unique features and principles of mucosal immunization. We elaborate on rotavirus immunity and the success of rotavirus vaccination and aspects also beyond infants' acute gastroenteritis.

  13. Acute gastroenteritis: from guidelines to real life

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    Chung M Chow

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Chung M Chow1, Alexander KC Leung2, Kam L Hon11Department of Paediatrics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, PR China; 2Department of Pediatrics, The University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: Acute gastroenteritis is a very common disease. It causes significant mortality in developing countries and significant economic burden to developed countries. Viruses are ­responsible for approximately 70% of episodes of acute gastroenteritis in children and rotavirus is one of the best studied of these viruses. Oral rehydration therapy is as effective as i­ntravenous therapy in treating mild to moderate dehydration in acute gastroenteritis and is strongly r­ecommended as the first line therapy. However, the oral rehydration solution is described as an underused simple solution. Vomiting is one of the main reasons to explain the underuse of oral rehydration therapy. Antiemetics are not routinely recommended in treating acute gastroenteritis, though they are still commonly prescribed. Ondansetron is one of the best studied antiemetics and its role in enhancing the compliance of oral rehydration therapy and decreasing the rate of hospitalization has been proved recently. The guidelines regarding the recommendation on antiemetics have been changed according to the evidence of these recent studies.Keywords: gastroenteritis, vomiting, antiemetic, ondansetron, rotavirus, oral rehydration therapy, intravenous therapy, guideline

  14. Clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired urinary tract infections in adult hospitalised patients.

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    Piljic, Dilista; Piljic, Dragan; Ahmetagic, Sead; Ljuca, Farid; Porobic Jahic, Humera

    2010-02-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) cause a great number of morbidity and mortality. These infections are serious complications in pregnancy, patients with diabetes, polycystic kidneys disease, sickle cell anaemia, kidney transplant and in patients with functional or structural anomalies of the urinary tract. The aim of this investigation was to determine a dominant causative agents of UTI and some of the clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired UTI in adult hospitalised patients. We studied 200 adult patients with acute community-acquired UTI hospitalised in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases Tuzla from January 2006 to December 2007. The patients were divided into two groups: a group of patients with E. coli UTI (147) and a group of patients with non-E. coli UTI (53). In these two groups, the symptoms and signs of illness, blood test and urine analysis results were analysed. Our results have shown that the patients with E. coli UTI frequently had fever higher than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001), chills (p=0,0349), headache (p=0,0499), cloudy urine (p<0,0001), proteinuria (p=0,0011) and positive nitrite-test (p=0,0002). The patients with non-E. coli UTI frequently had fever lower than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001) and urine specific gravity <1015 (p=0,0012). There was no significant difference in blood test results between patients with E. coli and non-E. coli UTI. These clinical and laboratory findings can lead us to early etiological diagnosis of these UTI before urine culture detection of causative agents, which takes several days. Early etiological diagnosis of the E. coli and non-E. coli UTI is necessary for an urgent administration of appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. This is very important in prevention of irreversible kidney damage, prolonged treatment, complications, as well as recidives and chronicity of the illness.

  15. Rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae complicated with acute myocarditis and accelerated idioventricular rhythm.

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    Chuang, Tzu-Yi; Lin, Chou-Jui; Lee, Shih-Wei; Chuang, Chun-Pin; Jong, Yuh-Shiun; Chen, Wen-Jone; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-08-01

    We describe a previously healthy 52-year-old man with rapidly fatal community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient developed acute renal dysfunction, accelerated idioventricular rhythm (acute myocarditis), lactic acidosis and septic shock. He died within 15 hours after admission despite intravenous levofloxacin (750 mg daily) and aggressive medical treatment.

  16. High creatinine clearance in critically ill patients with community-acquired acute infectious meningitis

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    Lautrette Alexandre

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high dose of anti-infective agents is recommended when treating infectious meningitis. High creatinine clearance (CrCl may affect the pharmacokinetic / pharmacodynamic relationships of anti-infective drugs eliminated by the kidneys. We recorded the incidence of high CrCl in intensive care unit (ICU patients admitted with meningitis and assessed the diagnostic accuracy of two common methods used to identify high CrCl. Methods Observational study performed in consecutive patients admitted with community-acquired acute infectious meningitis (defined by >7 white blood cells/mm3 in cerebral spinal fluid between January 2006 and December 2009 to one medical ICU. During the first 7 days following ICU admission, CrCl was measured from 24-hr urine samples (24-hr-UV/P creatinine and estimated according to Cockcroft-Gault formula and the simplified Modification of Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD equation. High CrCl was defined as CrCl >140 ml/min/1.73 m2 by 24-hr-UV/P creatinine. Diagnostic accuracy was performed with ROC curves analysis. Results Thirty two patients were included. High CrCl was present in 8 patients (25% on ICU admission and in 15 patients (47% during the first 7 ICU days for a median duration of 3 (1-4 days. For the Cockcroft-Gault formula, the best threshold to predict high CrCl was 101 ml/min/1.73 m2 (sensitivity: 0.96, specificity: 0.75, AUC = 0.90 ± 0.03 with a negative likelihood ratio of 0.06. For the simplified MDRD equation, the best threshold to predict high CrCl was 108 ml/min/1.73 m2 (sensitivity: 0.91, specificity: 0.80, AUC = 0.88 ± 0.03 with a negative likelihood ratio of 0.11. There was no difference between the estimated methods in the diagnostic accuracy of identifying high CrCl (p = 0.30. Conclusions High CrCl is frequently observed in ICU patients admitted with community-acquired acute infectious meningitis. The estimated methods of CrCl could be used as a screening tool to

  17. Acute myocardial infarction versus other cardiovascular events in community-acquired pneumonia

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    Stefano Aliberti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to define the prevalence, characteristics, risk factors and impact on clinical outcomes of acute myocardial infarction (AMI versus other cardiovascular events (CVEs in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. This was an international, multicentre, observational, prospective study of CAP patients hospitalised in eight hospitals in Italy and Switzerland. Three groups were identified: those without CVEs, those with AMI and those with other CVEs. Among 905 patients, 21 (2.3% patients experienced at least one AMI, while 107 (11.7% patients experienced at least one other CVE. Patients with CAP and either AMI or other CVEs showed a higher severity of the disease than patients with CAP alone. Female sex, liver disease and the presence of severe sepsis were independent predictors for the occurrence of AMI, while female sex, age >65 years, neurological disease and the presence of pleural effusion predicted other CVEs. In-hospital mortality was significantly higher among those who experienced AMI in comparison to those experiencing other CVEs (43% versus 21%, p=0.039. The presence of AMI showed an adjusted odds ratio for in-hospital mortality of 3.57 (p=0.012 and for other CVEs of 2.63 (p=0.002. These findings on AMI versus other CVEs as complications of CAP may be important when planning interventional studies on cardioprotective medications.

  18. Acute Renal Failure in Association with Community-Acquired Clostridium difficile Infection and McKittrick-Wheelock Syndrome

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    Robert M. Learney

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 65-year-old Caucasian woman who experienced two separate episodes of acute renal failure within an 18-month period, both requiring emergency admission and complicated treatment. Each episode was precipitated by hypovolaemia from intestinal fluid losses, but from two rare and independent pathologies. Her first admission was attributed to community-acquired Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea (CDAD and was treated in the intensive therapy unit. She returned 18 months later with volume depletion and electrolyte disturbances, but on this occasion a giant hypersecretory villous adenoma of the rectum (McKittrick-Wheelock syndrome was diagnosed following initial abnormal findings on digital rectal examination by a junior physician. Unlike hospital-acquired C. difficile, community-acquired infection is not common, although increasing numbers are being reported. Whilst community-acquired CDAD can be severe, it rarely causes acute renal failure. This case report highlights the pathological mechanisms whereby C. difficile toxin and hypersecretory villous adenoma of the rectum can predispose to acute renal failure, as well as the values of thorough clinical examination in the emergency room, and early communication with intensivist colleagues in dire situations.

  19. [The mode of differential diagnostic of and acute alcoholic gastroenteritis].

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    Makarov, V K; Makarov, P V

    2014-12-01

    The study was carried out to develop mode of differential diagnostic of salmonella and acute alcoholic gastroenteritis on the basis of phospholipid specter of blood serum. The indicators of phospholipid fractions of blood serum were analyzed in 50 healthy persons, 50 patients with acute alcoholic gastroenteritis and 50 patients with salmonella gastroenteritis were analyzed. The relative content of following fractions of whole phospholipids were analyzed--total lysophospholipids, sphyngomiyelin, phosphatidcholine, phosphatidyletanolamin. The phospholipid spectrum of blood serum can be applied in differential diagnostic of salmonella gastroenteritis and acute alcoholic gastroenteritis. The disorders of metabolism of lipids under given pathological conditions have a multidirectional character. The salmonella gastroenteritis is characterized by decreasing of relative content of total lysophospholipids and increasing of phosphatidcholine as compared with standard conditions. The acute alcoholic gastroenteritis is characterized by increasing of relative content of total lysophospholipids and phosphatidcholine and decreasing of level of phosphatidcholine. The content of total Iysophospholipids in blood serum is lower on 35% or 30.0 mg% permits diagnosing acute alcoholic gastroenteritis. The content of phosphaltidcholine in blood serum higher than 40% or 50 mg% permits diagnosing salmonella gastroenteritis.

  20. Evaluation of empirical antibiotherapy for acute community-acquired pneumonia prescribed in emergency departments.

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    Fraisse, T; Fayad, G; Jardy, C; Sotto, A

    2012-01-01

    The authors assessed the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and empirical antibiotic prescription in a primary care center. A retrospective study was made on medical charts of patients admitted to the emergency department for CAP. Seventy-six patients were included. Their mean age was 65years for a sex ratio of 1.81. Fever (83%) and cough (72%) were the most common symptoms. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 86%. The median CRP value was 138mg/L (58-235). The median Fine's score was 85.5 (60-127). Blood cultures were sterile for 82.5% of samples. Pneumococcal and legionella antigenuria were performed for 70% of patients, only one was positive for legionella. Antibiotherapy was prescribed to 18 patients before hospitalization. Amoxicillin-clavulanic acid was the most frequently prescribed empirical treatment (48.5%), followed by ceftriaxone (15%). The therapeutic adequation index was calculated at a median of 1.7 by three investigators (0-3.7). Kendall's concordance coefficient for the three investigators was good at 0.86 (P<0.0001). Close to 39% of antibiotic prescription had a bad therapeutic adequation index more than three. Our clinical, radiological, and microbiological data was quite similar to reported data from teaching hospital series except for severity that seemed lower in primary care centers. The therapeutic adequation index is a useful tool to assess the adequacy of antibiotic prescription. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Case report: Löffler's syndrome due to Ascaris lumbricoides mimicking acute bacterial community--acquired pneumonia].

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    Acar, Ali; Oncül, Oral; Cavuşlu, Saban; Okutan, Oğuzhan; Kartaloğlu, Zafer

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present a patient with Loeffler's syndrome caused by Ascaris lumbricoides who presented with the clinical findings of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Our patient, who was twenty-five years old, and who had had symptoms such as coughing, expectorating, dyspnea and fever for approximately ten days, was hospitalized. We auscultated polyphonic rhonchuses at the both hemithoraxes. A chest X-ray revealed bilateral lower zone patch consolidation. Acute bacterial community acquired pneumonia (CAP) was diagnosed due to these findings and empirical antibiotic treatment was begun. Repeated sputum Gram stains were negative, and both sputum and blood cultures were sterile. A sputum smear was negative for acid-fast bacilli. The patient's fever and respiratory complaint did not respond to the empirical antibiotics therapy. During the course of advanced investigations, we measured peripheric eosinophilia, and high levels of total Eo and total IgE, and observed Ascaris lumbricoides eggs during stool examination. The patient was given a diagnosis of Loeffler's syndrome. Thereupon the patient was treated successfully with one dose of albendazol 400 mg. In conclusion, we suggest that Loeffler's syndrome must be considered early in the differential diagnosis for CAP when peripheric eosinophilia is seen in patients if they live in an endemic area for parasitic disease.

  2. Community-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury in Critically Ill Children as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... The factors contributing to this varying prevalence include lack of .... kidney, Failure of renal function, Loss of renal function, and End stage ..... Prevalence of acute renal failure due to exogenous nephrotoxins in Ilorin. Trop J ...

  3. Fatal case of acute gastroenteritis with multiple viral coinfections.

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    Lupo, Julien; Morel-Baccard, Christine; Michard-Lenoir, Anne-Pascale; Germi, Raphaële; Pothier, Pierre; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Morand, Patrice

    2016-01-01

    We report a fatal case of acute gastroenteritis in a child with autism spectrum disorder. Multiple viral coinfections were detected by PCR in the patient's stool and digestive biopsy specimens. As viral detection is not necessarily associated with symptomatic disease, a semi-quantitative approach using cycle treshold values was proposed for the clinical interpretation of PCR. We discuss whether concomitant viral infections could be a risk factor for severe outcome in gastroenteritis cases. Individual risk factors are also addressed.

  4. Acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections in community-acquired pneumonia and exacerbations of COPD or asthma: therapeutic considerations.

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    Meloni, F; Paschetto, E; Mangiarotti, P; Crepaldi, M; Morosini, M; Bulgheroni, A; Fietta, A

    2004-02-01

    Rates of acute Chlamydia pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections were determined in 115 adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), purulent exacerbations of COPD and acute exacerbations of bronchial asthma, by means of serology and molecular methods. Results were compared with those obtained in a matched control group. Common respiratory pathogens were isolated by cultures in 22.5% and 22.2% of CAP and exacerbated COPD patients, respectively. Cultures from exacerbated asthma patients were always negative. Serological and molecular evidence of current C. pneumoniae infection was obtained in 10.0%, 8.9% and 3.3% of CAP, COPD and asthma cases. The corresponding rates of acute M. pneumoniae infection were 17.5%, 6.7% and 3.3%, respectively. Finally, no difference was found between typical and atypical pathogen rates. These findings highlight the importance of taking into account C. pneumoniae and M. pneumoniae infections in guiding the choice of empirical antibacterial treatment for CAP and purulent exacerbations of COPD.

  5. [Diagnosis and management of ENT conditions responsible for acute community acquired bacterial meningitis].

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    Klossek, J-M

    2009-01-01

    Only few epidemiological studies evaluate the role of ENT infections in meningitis. A retrospective review of data shows that the frequency of ENT infections is estimated at 25% in adults and children. Meningitis may occur during otological and nasosinusal infections. Acute otitis media and mastoiditis are the most common ear infections responsible for meningitis. Chronic otitis (cholesteatoma) are rarely involved. In case of acute rhinosinusitis, frequently responsible frontal and ethmoidal locations are investigated by nasal endoscopy and CT scan. A CSF leak originating mostly from anterior skull base or middle ear, either posttraumatic or spontaneous, may also be associated with meningitis. The management of ENT infections begins with antibiotics. Drainage may be discussed when identification of the bacteria is needed or if the medical treatment seems inefficient. In case of a CSF leak, closure of the defect is performed according to its location and size after evaluation by imaging (CT scan, MRI).

  6. Acute Gastroenteritis on Cruise Ships - United States, 2008-2014.

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    Freeland, Amy L; Vaughan, George H; Banerjee, Shailendra N

    2016-01-15

    From 1990 to 2004, the reported rates of diarrheal disease (three or more loose stools or a greater than normal frequency in a 24-hour period) on cruise ships decreased 2.4%, from 29.2 cases per 100,000 travel days to 28.5 cases (1,2). Increased rates of acute gastroenteritis illness (diarrhea or vomiting that is associated with loose stools, bloody stools, abdominal cramps, headache, muscle aches, or fever) occurred in years that novel strains of norovirus, the most common etiologic agent in cruise ship outbreaks, emerged (3). To determine recent rates of acute gastroenteritis on cruise ships, CDC analyzed combined data for the period 2008-2014 that were submitted by cruise ships sailing in U.S. jurisdiction (defined as passenger vessels carrying ≥13 passengers and within 15 days of arriving in the United States) (4). CDC also reviewed laboratory data to ascertain the causes of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks and examined trends over time. During the study period, the rates of acute gastroenteritis per 100,000 travel days decreased among passengers from 27.2 cases in 2008 to 22.3 in 2014. Rates for crew members remained essentially unchanged (21.3 cases in 2008 and 21.6 in 2014). However, the rate of acute gastroenteritis was significantly higher in 2012 than in 2011 or 2013 for both passengers and crew members, likely related to the emergence of a novel strain of norovirus, GII.4 Sydney (5). During 2008-2014, a total of 133 cruise ship acute gastroenteritis outbreaks were reported, 95 (71%) of which had specimens available for testing. Among these, 92 (97%) were caused by norovirus, and among 80 norovirus specimens for which a genotype was identified, 59 (73.8%) were GII.4 strains. Cruise ship travelers experiencing diarrhea or vomiting should report to the ship medical center promptly so that symptoms can be assessed, proper treatment provided, and control measures implemented.

  7. Community-acquired pneumonia and survival of critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD patients in respiratory intensive care units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhiwei; Cheng, Yusheng; Tu, Xiongwen; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Jinyan; Zhang, Liqin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to appraise the effect of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) on inhospital mortality in critically ill acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit. Patients and methods A retrospective observational study was performed. Consecutive critically ill AECOPD patients receiving treatment in a respiratory intensive care unit were reviewed from September 1, 2012, to August 31, 2015. Categorical variables were analyzed using chi-square tests, and continuous variables were analyzed by Mann–Whitney U-test. Kaplan–Meier analysis was used to assess the association of CAP with survival of critically ill AECOPD patients for univariate analysis. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was performed to identify risk factors for multivariate analysis. Results A total of 80 consecutive eligible individuals were reviewed. These included 38 patients with CAP and 42 patients without CAP. Patients with CAP had a higher inhospital rate of mortality than patients without CAP (42% vs 33.3%, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients (CAP: hazard ratio, 5.29; 95% CI, 1.50–18.47, Pcritically ill AECOPD patients. PMID:27563239

  8. Clinical and Microbiological Features and Factors Associated with Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Men with Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Gu; Cho, Min Chul; Cho, Sung Yong; Lee, Jeong Woo

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and microbiological features in the patients with community-acquired acute bacterial prostatitis (CA-ABP), as well as factors that affect fluoroquinolone resistance. A retrospective analysis was performed of 209 patients hospitalized for antibiotic treatment of CA-ABP. We investigated patient age, body mass index, underlying diseases, recurrence, prostate-related factors and results of urine culture examination and antibiotic sensitivity tests. Seventeen patients (8.1%) had fluoroquinolone-resistant bacterial colonies. When we divided the subjects into groups according to the fluoroquinolone resistance, the group with resistant bacteria was significantly older, had larger prostates and had greater residual urine volumes. Bacteria were identified in 127 of 209 patients (60.8%), and the most commonly cultured included Escherichia coli (43.5%). The sensitivity of the cultured bacteria to fluoroquinolones was high compared to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and gentamicin, but similar to cefotaxime. The bacteria were more sensitive to amikacin and imipenem than to fluoroquinolone. The multivariate analysis revealed that prostate volume ≥40 ml (p = 0.024) and residual urine volume >100 ml (p = 0.004) were independent predictive factors for fluoroquinolone resistance. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy might be an effective treatment in CA-ABP. However, combination antibiotic therapy is recommended in cases with prostate volume ≥40 ml or residual urine volume >100 ml, because fluoroquinolone resistance can occur. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP.

  10. Community acquired acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults: an 11-year survey in a community hospital in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishal, J; Embon, A; Darawshe, A; Kidon, M; Magen, E

    2008-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the association between the presenting clinical manifestations of bacterial meningitis and the duration of time elapsed before lumbar puncture and start of antibiotic treatment. Retrospective epidemiologic study using the clinical records in Barzilai Medical Center Emergency Department between 1988 and 1999. 97 patients, 72 children and 25 adults with ABM were identified. 30 of 97 (31%) were diagnosed by the primary physicians at primary care units. Acute meningitis was suspected by emergency department (ED) physicians in 51% of the referred patients. Patients with a scarce clinical picture at hospital arrival (those without fever, headache or nuchal rigidity) showed a trend toward a longer median delay until a diagnostic lumbar puncture was performed and antibiotic therapy was started (median of 14.7 h compared with 2.1 h for those with severe clinical picture) (ptreatment initiation (p>0.3). The interval before diagnosis of community acquired ABM in both children and adults is longer for those patients who present to the emergency department with an atypical clinical picture, mostly, without fever and without nuchal rigidity. Until bacterial meningitis can be effectively prevented, we can expect this life-threatening infection to continue to cause diagnostic and medical difficulties.

  11. Association between Hypoalbuminaemia and Mortality in Patients with Community-Acquired Bacteraemia Is Primarily Related to Acute Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnussen, Bjarne; Oren Gradel, Kim; Gorm Jensen, Thøger; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Pedersen, Court; Just Vinholt, Pernille; Touborg Lassen, Annmarie

    2016-01-01

    We sought to investigate whether hypoalbuminaemia was mainly caused by acute or chronic factors in patients with community-acquired bacteraemia. In this population-based study, we considered 1844 adult cases of community-acquired bacteraemia that occurred in Funen, Denmark between 2000 and 2008. We used a stepwise prognostic predisposition-insult-response-organ dysfunction (PIRO) logistic regression model by initially including age and comorbidity, then added bacterial species, and finally sepsis severity. The models were furthermore analysed using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Outcomes comprised mortality incidence on days 0–30 and 31–365 after the bacteraemia episode. Each step was performed with and without baseline albumin level measured on the date of bacteraemia. In 422 patients, their latest albumin measurement taken 8–30 days before the date of bacteraemia was also used in the analysis together with the baseline albumin level. For each decrease of 1g/L in plasma albumin level, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) of mortality in the period of 0–30 days after bacteraemia were 0.86 (0.84–0.88) in both predisposition (P) and predisposition-insult (PI) models and 0.87 (0.85–0.89) in the full PIRO-model. The AUC values were 0.78 and 0.66 for mortality in the period of 0–30 days in the model comprising only predisposition factors with and without albumin levels added as a factor, respectively. The AUC values in the full PIRO-model were 0.81 and 0.73 with and without consideration of albumin levels, respectively. A higher proportion of patients died within 30 days if there was a decrease in the albumin level between days 8 and 30 before bacteraemia and the actual bacteraemia date. A single plasma albumin measurement on the bacteraemia date was a better prognostic predictor of short-term mortality than the sepsis severity score. PMID:27611431

  12. Saffold Cardiovirus in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis, Beijing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Lili; Gonzalez, Richard; Xiao, Yan; Xu, Xiwei; Chen, Lan; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    To understand Saffold cardiovirus (SAFV) distribution, prevalence, and clinical relevance in China, we retrospectively studied SAFV in children with acute gastroenteritis and found SAFV in 12 (3.2%) of 373. Sequence homology of virus protein 1 genes suggested these strains belong to the SAFV-1 sublineage. SAFVs were found in samples positive for other diarrhea-causing viruses.

  13. Saffold Cardiovirus in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis, Beijing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Lili; Gonzalez, Richard; Xiao, Yan; Xu, Xiwei; Chen, Lan; Vernet, Guy; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia; Jin, Qi; Wang, Jianwei

    2009-01-01

    To understand Saffold cardiovirus (SAFV) distribution, prevalence, and clinical relevance in China, we retrospectively studied SAFV in children with acute gastroenteritis and found SAFV in 12 (3.2%) of 373. Sequence homology of virus protein 1 genes suggested these strains belong to the SAFV-1 sublineage. SAFVs were found in samples positive for other diarrhea-causing viruses.

  14. Rifampin use in acute community-acquired meningitis in intensive care units: the French retrospective cohort ACAM-ICU study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretonnière, Cédric; Jozwiak, Mathieu; Girault, Christophe; Beuret, Pascal; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Anguel, Nadia; Caillon, Jocelyne; Potel, Gilles; Villers, Daniel; Boutoille, David; Guitton, Christophe

    2015-08-26

    Bacterial meningitis among critically ill adult patients remains associated with both high mortality and frequent, persistent disability. Vancomycin was added to treatment with a third-generation cephalosporin as recommended by French national guidelines. Because animal model studies had suggested interest in the use of rifampin for treatment of bacterial meningitis, and after the introduction of early corticosteroid therapy (in 2002), there was a trend toward increasing rifampin use for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this article is to report on this practice. Five ICUs participated in the study. Baseline characteristics and treatment data were retrospectively collected from charts of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis during a 5-year period (2004-2008). The ICU mortality was the main outcome measure; Glasgow Outcome Scale and 3-month mortality were also assessed. One hundred fifty-seven patients were included. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis were the most prevalent causative microorganisms. The ICU mortality rate was 15%. High doses of a cephalosporin were the most prevalent initial antimicrobial treatment. The delay between admission and administration of the first antibiotic dose was correlated with ICU mortality. Rifampin was used with a cephalosporin for 32 patients (ranging from 8% of the cohort for 2004 to 30% in 2008). Administration of rifampin within the first 24 h of hospitalization could be associated with a lower ICU survival. Statistical association between such an early rifampin treatment and ICU mortality reached significance only for patients with pneumococcal meningitis (p=0.031) in univariate analysis, but not in the logistic model. We report on the role of rifampin use for patients with community-acquired meningitis, and the results of this study suggest that this practice may be associated with lower mortality in the ICU. Nevertheless, the only independent predictors of ICU

  15. Human bocavirus in acute gastroenteritis in children in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Gubio Soares; Silva Sampaio, Madina Lyve; Menezes, Aline Dorea Luz; Tigre, Dellane Martins; Moura Costa, Lilia Ferreira; Chinalia, Fabio Alexandre; Sardi, Silvia Ines

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological surveillance for Human Bocavirus (HBoV) was conducted on 105 fecal specimens from children with acute gastroenteritis in Bahia, Brazil. Among of a total 105 stool samples, 44 samples were positive for HBoV as detected by nested-PCR. Of the 44 positive samples, co-infections with other enteric viruses (Norovirus, Adenovirus, and Rotavirus) were found in 12 pediatric patients. Mixed infections among HBoV with Norovirus were frequently observed in this population. The phylogenetic analysis identified the presence of HBoV-1, and HBoV 2A species. This study shows that HBoV is another viral pathogen in the etiology of acute gastroenteritis in children in Bahia, Brazil.

  16. Rotavirus is frequent among adults hospitalised for acute gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausch, Karen Rokkedal; Westh, Lena; Kristensen, Lena Hagelskjær;

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Rotavirus infection is the most common aetiology of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) among young children. In adults, diagnostics focus mainly on bacterial causes, though recent studies suggest that rotavirus is a frequent agent. The aim of this study was to examine the proportion...... culture for bacterial pathogens. RESULTS: A total of 265 adult patients were included. 9.4% tested positive for rotavirus. Enteropathogenic bacteria were found in 24.5% of the cases. In the majority of cases (62.3%), no pathogen was found. Overall, rotavirus was the second-most frequent pathogen, exceeded...... only by Campylobacter spp. Immunosuppression and a C-reactive protein (CRP) below 50 mg/l (0-8 mg/l) were associated with rotavirus. The seasonality of rotavirus differed markedly from that of bacterial gastroenteritis. CONCLUSION: Rotavirus is the second-most frequently identified pathogen in adults...

  17. Incidence Rate of Community-Acquired Sepsis Among Hospitalized Acute Medical Patients-A Population-Based Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Laursen, Christian B; Jensen, Thøger Gorm

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: Sepsis is a frequent cause of admission, but incidence rates based on administrative data have previously produced large differences in estimates. The aim of the study was to estimate the incidence of community-acquired sepsis based on patients' symptoms and clinical findings at arrival...... to the hospital. DESIGN:: Population-based survey. SETTING:: Medical emergency department from September 1, 2010, to August 31, 2011. PATIENTS:: All patients were manually reviewed using a structured protocol in order to identify the presence of infection. Vital signs and laboratory values were collected...

  18. Clinical, Paraclinical, and Antimicrobial Resistance Features of Community-Acquired Acute Bacterial Meningitis at a Large Infectious Diseases Ward in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Behrooz; Khalili, Hossein; Karimzadeh, Iman; Emadi-Kochak, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    In this study demographic, clinical, paraclinical, microbiological, and therapeutic features of patients with community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to a referral center for infectious diseases in Iran, have been evaluated. Medical records of adult (> 18 years) individuals with confirmed diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. All required data were obtained from patients' medical charts. Available findings about antimicrobial susceptibility of isolated bacteria from CSF and/or blood were also collected. Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method was used to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility profile. Details of medical management including antibiotic regimen, duration, patients' outcome, and possible sequelae of meningitis were recorded. The most commonly isolated microorganism from CSF or blood of patients was Streptococcus pneumonia (33.33%) followed by Neisseria meningitidis (27.78%) and Haemophilus influenza (16.67%). The most common antimicrobial regimen was ceftriaxone plus vancomycin (69.44%) followed by ceftriaxone plus vancomycin plus ampicillin (11.11%). Neurological sequelae of meningitis including cranial nerve palsy, deafness, and hemiparesis were identified in 4 (11.11%), 2 (5.56%), and 1 (2.78%) subjects, respectively. Regarding mortality, only 3 (8.33%) patients died from bacterial meningitis and the remaining 33 individuals discharged from the hospital. In conclusion, findings of the current study demonstrated that the mean incidence of acute bacterial meningitis in a referral infectious diseases ward in Iran was 9 episodes per year. The majority cases of community-acquired acute bacterial meningitis admitted to our center had negative CSF culture and classic triad of meningitis was absent in them.

  19. [THE ROLE OF BIOLOGICAL MEMBRANES IN DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF SALMONELLA AND ACUTE ALCOHOL GASTROENTERITIS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, V K; Makarov, P V

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of Salmonella infection and alcohol on biological membranes from the content of serum phospholipid fraction known to be a component ofenterocyte membranes. Any change of membrane phospholipid content leads to a change of their blood level. The study included 50 patients with acute alcohol gastroenteritis, 50 ones with salmonella gastroenteritis, and 50 healthy subjects. Both salmonellosis and alcohol caused differently directed changes in biological membranes. The mechanism of diarrhea in patients with salmonella and acute alcohol gastroenteritis is different. Diarrhea associated with alcohol gastroenteritis is due to enhanced viscosity of biomembranes that decreases in salmonella gastroenteritis. It suggests different approaches to the treatment of these conditions. The membrane destruction coefficient below 2 is an additional proof of alcoholic etiology of gastroenteritis whereas its value above 3 confirms the involvement of salmonellosis in pathogenesis of gastroenteritis.

  20. Socio-demographic, Epidemiological and Environmental Determinants of Acute Gastroenteritis in Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihir Prafulbhai Rupani

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Socio-demographic factors (higher socio-economic status, epidemiological correlates (change in taste of water, another family member been affected with acute gastroenteritis and eating outside food and environmental determinants (waste disposal in a common dump and waste accumulation around house significantly determines the occurrence of cases of acute gastroenteritis. Keywords: case-control studies;diarrhea; epidemiologic determinants; gastroenteritis; social determinants of health. | PubMed

  1. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanoa Amreeta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin, hlg (hemolysin and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein. Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue

  2. Socio-demographic, Epidemiological and Environmental Determinants of Acute Gastroenteritis in Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupani, M P; Tridevi, A V; Singh, M P; Tundia, M N; Patel, K N; Parikh, K D; Parmar, V B

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis had occurred in Rajpara village of Bhavnagar district. The objective of this study was to find out the socio-demographic, epidemiological and environmental determinants of this outbreak. A case-control study was conducted in Rajpara village among 238 cases of acute gastroenteritis and an equal number of controls in January 2015. Multiple logistic regression was used for identifying the variables independently predicting acute gastroenteritis. Upper socio-economic status, occupation requiring travel outside village, source of drinking water from well of 'new' Rajpara village, change in taste of water, use of chlorine tablets, travel outside village in last week, another family member affected with acute gastroenteritis, using common utensil for hand washing, hand washing before eating, ate food from outside in last week, having sanitary latrine at house, waste disposal in a common dump (instead of at house), waste accumulation around house and flies inside house were significantly associated with occurrence of acute gastroenteritis. On multiple logistic regression, change in taste of water (Psocio-economic status (P=0.002) and eating outside food (P=0.011) made a significant contribution to prediction. Socio-demographic factors (higher socio-economic status), epidemiological correlates (change in taste of water, another family member been affected with acute gastroenteritis and eating outside food) and environmental determinants (waste disposal in a common dump and waste accumulation around house) significantly determines the occurrence of cases of acute gastroenteritis.

  3. Influence of HIV infection on the clinical presentation and outcome of adults with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde, Cameroon: a retrospective hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yone Eric Walter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of HIV infection on the evolution of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in the clinical presentation and in-hospital outcomes of patients with CAP with and without HIV infection in a specialised service in Yaounde. Methods Medical files of 106 patients (51 men aged 15 years and above, admitted to the Pneumology service of the Yaounde Jamot Hospital between January 2008 and May 2012, were retrospectively studied. Results Sixty-two (58.5% patients were HIV infected. The median age of all patients was 40 years (interquartile range: 31.75-53 and there was no difference in the clinical and radiological profile of patients with and without HIV infection. The median leukocyte count (interquartile range was 14,600/mm3 (10,900-20,600 and 10,450/mm3 (6,400-16,850 respectively in HIV negative and HIV positive patients (p = 0.002. Median haemoglobin level (interquartile range was 10.8 g/dl (8.9-12 in HIV negative and 9.7 g/dl (8–11.6 in HIV positive patients (p = 0.025. In-hospital treatment failure on third day (39.5% vs. 25.5.1%, p = 0.137 and mortality rates (9% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.401 were similar between HIV negative and HIV positive patients. Conclusion Clinical and radiological features as well as response to treatment and in hospital fatal outcomes are similar in adult patients hospitalised with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde. In contrast, HIV infected patients tend to be more anaemic and have lower white cell counts than HIV negative patients. Larger prospective studies are needed to consolidate these findings.

  4. Rifampin use in acute community-acquired meningitis in intensive care units: the French retrospective cohort ACAM-ICU study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bretonnière, Cédric; Jozwiak, Mathieu; Girault, Christophe; Beuret, Pascal; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Anguel, Nadia; Caillon, Jocelyne; Potel, Gilles; Villers, Daniel; Boutoille, David; Guitton, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    .... Five ICUs participated in the study. Baseline characteristics and treatment data were retrospectively collected from charts of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis during a 5-year period (2004-2008...

  5. Intermediate-term and long-term mortality among acute medical patients hospitalized with community-acquired sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel P; Pottegård, Anton; Laursen, Christian B

    2017-01-01

    : This was a population-based study of all adults admitted to an acute medical admission unit, Odense University Hospital, Denmark, from September 2010 to August 2011, identified by symptoms and clinical findings. We categorized the mortality periods into intermediate-term (31-180 days) and long-term (181-365, 366...

  6. Xyloglucan for the Treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Cătălin Pleșea Condratovici; Vladimir Bacarea; Núria Piqué

    2016-01-01

    Background. Xyloglucan, a film-forming agent, improves intestinal mucosa resistance to pathologic damage. The efficacy, safety, and time of onset of the antidiarrheal effect of xyloglucan were assessed in children with acute gastroenteritis receiving oral rehydration solution (ORS). Methods. This randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter, clinical trial included children (3 months–12 years) with acute gastroenteritis of infectious origin. Children were randomized to xylo...

  7. Community acquired pneumonia in the elderly: the Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE study protocol by the Italian Society of Hospital and Community Geriatrics (SIGOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Luca Fimognari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is a frequent cause of hospital admission in elderly patients. Diagnosis of pneumonia in elderly persons with comorbidity may be challenging, due to atypical presentation and complex clinical scenarios. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP arises out-of-hospital in subjects without previous contact with the healthcare system. Healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP occurs in patients who have frequent contacts with the healthcare system and should be treated with empiric broad spectrum antibiotic therapy also covering multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Recent findings, however, have questioned this approach, because the worse prognosis of HCAP compared to CAP may better reflect increased level of comorbidity and frailty (poor functional status, older age of HCAP patients, as well as poorer quality of hospital care provided to such patients, rather than pneumonia etiology by MDR pathogens. The Pneumonia in Italian Acute Care for Elderly units (PIACE Study, promoted by the Società Italiana di Geriatria Ospedale e Territorio (SIGOT, is an observational prospective cohort study of patients consecutively admitted because of pneumonia to hospital acute care units of Geriatrics throughout Italy. Detailed information regarding clinical presentation, diagnosis, etiology, comprehensive geriatric assessment, antibiotic therapy, possible complications and comorbidities was recorded to identify factors potentially predicting in-hospital mortality (primary endpoint, 3-month mortality, length of hospital stay, postdischarge rate of institutionalization and other secondary endpoints. This paper describes the rationale and method of PIACE Study and reviews the main evidence on pneumonia in the elderly.

  8. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Chih Lai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED, since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods: We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results: Viruses (41.3% were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2% being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8% and Giardia lamblia (12.4%. Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53, household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96, attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20, dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54, and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94 were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05, those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62, or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62 or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77 were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41, abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41, and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98 were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05, winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74, frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83, and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23 were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63. Conclusions: Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with

  9. [Campylobacter and Salmonella acute gastroenteritis: epidemiology and health care utilization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala Farré, Maria Rosa; Osorio Sánchez, Dimelza; Arias Varela, Cesar; Simó Sanahuja, Maria; Recasens Recasens, Assumpta; Pérez Jové, Josefa

    2015-10-05

    In Catalonia the current surveillance systems do not allow to know the true incidence or the health care utilization of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) caused by Campylobacter and Salmonella infections. The aim of this study is to analyze these characteristics. Descriptive study of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections reported in 2002 and 2012 in Catalonia, Spain. We included cases isolated and reported by the laboratory to a regional Surveillance Unit. The estimated incidence of Salmonella and Campylobacter AGE decreased by almost 50% and 20% respectively in 2012. Children between one and 4 years old were the most affected in both years. Significant differences in the clinical characteristics and disease duration were observed between Campylobacter and Salmonella. Visits to the Emergency Department and hospitalization rates were 63.7% and 15%, being more frequent among salmonellosis cases. The estimated incidence of Campylobacter and Salmonella infections has decreased, however rates are still important, as well as it is the health care utilization in both diseases. Current surveillance systems need appropriateness improvements to reach a better control of these infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacteriological profile of community acquired acute bacterial meningitis: A ten-year retrospective study in a tertiary neurocare centre in South India

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    Mani R

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Ten years retrospective study to evaluate the bacteriological spectrum of community acquired acute bacterial meningitis (CAABM. Methods: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples from 385 clinically suspected cases of pyogenic meningitis were processed for cell counts, cytospin Gram stain, culture, antigen detection by latex agglutination (LAT and antibiotic susceptibility test. Eighteen of these CSF samples were also subjected to a polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay for detection of pneumococcal DNA. Results: The etiological agent could be identified in 284 (73.8% of the total 385 cases by culture and/or smear and /or LAT. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the predominant pathogen accounting for 238 (61.8% cases. Haemophilus influenzae and Neisseria meningitidis accounted for 7 (1.8% and 4 (1% cases respectively. Other gram negative bacilli, Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from 19 (4.9%, 9 (2.3% and 7 (1.8% cases respectively. Conclusions: Streptococcus pneumoniae remains the major aetiological agent of CAABM both in adults and children in our set-up. No penicillin resistance was detected among the isolates. Further research should focus on preventable aspects of CAABM, especially pneumococcal vaccines, to help reduce the disease burden.

  11. Molecular surveillance of non-polio enterovirus infections in patients with acute gastroenteritis in Western India: 2004-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Pooja R; Chitambar, Shobha D; Gopalkrishna, V

    2015-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide. Rotavirus (RV) and Norovirus (NoV) are the leading cause of the disease. Despite the use of improved diagnostic methods a significant proportion of gastroenteritis cases remained undiagnosed. Though nonpolio enteroviruses (NPEVs) have been reported frequently in children with acute gastroenteritis, their etiologic role has not been established. To investigate the epidemiology of NPEVs in gastroenteritis cases which remained negative for leading causative agents, 955 RV and NoV negative stool specimens from children hospitalized for acute gastroenteritis were included in the study. A case control study was conducted which includes stool specimens from 450 children with gastroenteritis and 162 asymptomatic control subjects to determine the association of NPEVs with the disease. NPEV detection and typing was carried out by RT-PCR and sequencing. Presence of RV, NoV, Adenovirus, and Astrovirus was confirmed by ELISA or PCR/RT-PCR. Overall 14% NPEV prevalence was noted. The percentage of children with NPEV infection differed significantly between gastroenteritis and non-gastroenteritis patients (13.7% vs. 4.9%). NPEV was more prevalent among patients with gastroenteritis of undetectable etiology as compared to those detected positive for other viruses (17.9% vs. 7%) (P gastroenteritis and highlights the clinical and epidemiological features of NPEV infections in patients with acute gastroenteritis from western India.

  12. FilmArray™ GI panel performance for the diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis or hemorragic diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralla, Antonio; Lunghi, Giovanna; Ardissino, Gianluigi; Girello, Alessia; Premoli, Marta; Bava, Erika; Arghittu, Milena; Colombo, Maria Rosaria; Cognetto, Alessandra; Bono, Patrizia; Campanini, Giulia; Marone, Piero; Baldanti, Fausto

    2017-05-12

    Acute gastroenteritis is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in humans worldwide. The rapid and specific identification of infectious agents is crucial for correct patient management. However, diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis is usually performed with diagnostic panels that include only a few pathogens. In the present bicentric study, the diagnostic value of FilmArray™ GI panels was assessed in unformed stool samples of patients with acute gastroenteritis and in a series of samples collected from pediatric patients with heamorragic diarrhea. The clinical performance of the FilmArray™ gastrointestinal (GI) panel was assessed in 168 stool samples collected from patients with either acute gastroenteritis or hemorragic diarrhea. Samples showing discordant results between FilmArray and routine methods were further analyzed with an additional assay. Overall, the FilmArray™ GI panel detected at least one potential pathogen in 92/168 (54.8%) specimens. In 66/92 (71.8%) samples, only one pathogen was detected, while in 26/92 (28.2%) multiple pathogens were detected. The most frequent pathogens were rotavirus 13.9% (22/168), Campylobacter 10.7% (18/168), Clostridium difficile 9.5% (16/168), and norovirus 8.9% (15/168). Clostridium difficile was identified only in patients with acute gastroenteritis (p GI panel has proved to be a valuable new diagnostic tool for improving the diagnostic efficiency of GI pathogens.

  13. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination, lower respiratory infections in children, bacterial infections, and acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, P L; Bachman, D T; Shapiro, E D; Baron, M A

    1995-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practice. Paul McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. David Bachman reviews recent literature about lower respiratory tract infection in children and focuses on community-acquired lower respiratory infections and respiratory syncytial virus. Eugene Shapiro discusses literature concerning several infectious diseases commonly seen in office settings and concerning which recent developments are of interest: the hemolytic-uremic syndrome and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to penicillin, infections in day care centers, and new antimicrobial drugs. Michael Baron reviews recent literature about gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood and discusses diagnosis, complications, pathogenesis and physiology, epidemiology, and treatment.

  14. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

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    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  15. Gemifloxacin for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lei; WANG Rui; Falagas E. Matthew; CHEN Liang-an; LIU You-ning

    2012-01-01

    Background Gemifloxacin is a fluoroquinolone antibiotic with broad spectrum of antibacterial activity.The aim of the study was to evaluate the comparative effectiveness and safety of gemifloxacin for the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AECB).Methods We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing gemifloxacin with other approved antibiotics.The PubMed,EMBASE,Chinese Biomedical Literature Database and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched,with no language restrictions.Results Ten RCTs,comparing gemifloxacin with other quinolones (in 5 RCTs) and β-lactams and/or macrolides (in 5 RCTs),involving 3940 patients,were included in this meta-analysis.Overall,the treatment success was higher for gemifloxacin when compared with other antibiotics (odds ratio 1.39,95% confidence interval 1.15-1.68 in intention-to-treat patients,and 1.33,1.02-1.73 in clinically evaluable patients).There was no significant difference between the compared antibiotics regarding microbiological success (1.19,0.84-1.68) or all-cause mortality (0.82,0.41-1.63).The total drug related adverse events were similar for gemifloxacin when compared with other quinolones (0.89,0.56-1.41),while lower when compared with β-lactams and/or macrolides (0.71,0.57-0.89).In subgroup analyses,administration of gemifloxacin was associated with fewer cases of diarrhoea and more rashes compared with other antibiotics (0.66,0.48-0.91,and 2.36,1.18-4.74,respectively).Conclusions The available evidence suggests that gemifloxacin 320 mg oral daily is equivalent or superior to other approved antibiotics in effectiveness and safety for CAP and AECB.The development of rash represents potential limitation of gemifloxacin.

  16. TREATMENT OF 70 CASES OF ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS WITH ELECTROACUPUNCTURE OF MAIN ACUPOINT NEIGUAN AND GONGSUN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟鸿

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe clinical therapeutic effect of electro-acupuncture (EA) of Neiguan (PC 6), Gongsun (SP 4), etc.In the treatment of acute gastroenteritis.Methods: A total of acute gastroenteritis patients observed were randomized into two groups, I.e.70 cases in the treatment group receiving EA of main acupoint Neiguan (PC 6) and Gongsun (SP 4) and acupuncture of supplementary acupoint Guanyuan (CV 4), Zusanli (ST 36), Pishu (BL 20) and 50 cases in the control group treated by oral administration of Norfloxacin capsules.Results: Statistically, the therapeutic results of the 2 groups were not significantly different (P>0.05), showing that EA of Neiguan (PC6) and Gongsun (SP 4) is an effective therapeutic method for acute gastroenteritis.

  17. Genetic characterization of sapovirus detected in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sanghun; Oh, Seah; Cho, Seokju; Lee, Jibho; Ryu, Seunghee; Song, Miok; Jung, Hyowon; Park, Sunhee; Park, Gunyong; Choi, Sungmin; Chae, Youngzoo; Kim, Hyunsoo

    2012-01-01

    Human Caliciviruses, including sapovirus, are important causes of gastroenteritis in children and adults. The present study determined the detection rate of sapovirus (SaV) with acute gastroenteritis in hospitalized children and describes the molecular epidemiology of SaV circulating in Seoul, Korea. In total, 4,583 stool specimens from hospitalized patients with acute gastroenteritis were collected (2,058 females and 2,525 males) in Seoul and were tested for SaVs. SaV GI was classified further into two genotypes and GI-1 strains were responsible for two of the cases and GI-2 constituted a further three of the SaV gastroenteritis cases in this study. A phylogenetic analysis of these SaV cases revealed that the GI-1 and GI-2 strains tend to be closely associated with each other and were classified into Asian and European strains. This is the first molecular characterization report of SaV detected in Korea. The GI-1 and GI-2 strains were detected from hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis.

  18. Molecular characteristics of noroviruses genogroup I and genogroup II detected in patients with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Heejin; Oh, Seah; Seung, Hyunjung; Jo, Sukju

    2015-03-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis, including foodborne outbreak, in Korea. The prevalence of human noroviruses was studied in diarrheal stool samples of patients with acute gastroenteritis by conventional duplex reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Diarrheal stool samples were collected from 1,685 patients from the local hospitals in Seoul. The prevalence of the noroviruses was 22.8% (222/972 patients) in 2012 and 11.2% (80/713 patients) in 2013, with a total of 17.9% (302/1,685 patients). Genotyping was performed on 302 norovirus-positive stool samples to reveal 5.6% prevalence of genogroup I (GI) (17/302) and 94.4% prevalence of genogroup II (GII) (285/302). The patients with norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis mostly showed prevalence of GII norovirus, especially GII.4 (64.6%; 195/302).

  19. Acute gastroenteritis in infants under 6 months old.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, R; Leen, C L; Dunbar, E M; Ellis, M E; Mandal, B K

    1990-01-01

    Sixty two babies under the age of 6 months who were admitted with gastroenteritis completed a study of gradual refeeding compared with abrupt refeeding after a period of rehydration. There was no difference in the incidence of recurrence of diarrhoea due to lactose intolerance, effect on weight, or duration of hospital stay. Twenty six babies (42%) had recurrence of diarrhoea after refeeding, all of whom settled with the introduction of a lactose free soya based formula. Well nourished babies...

  20. Investigations of two oral rehydration solutions in treatment of piglets with acute gastroenteritis

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    Vukavić Tamara D.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic disorder in acute gastroenteritis is the disrupted transport of water and electrolytes, to a different degree. The objective of these investigations was to evaluate the efficacy of two oral rehydration solutions (ORS in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in suckling piglets. Fifty piglets, 20 with acute gastroenteritis and 30 healthy controls aged 10 days were chosen at random upon the incidence of diarrhea, for one of two ORS treatments (ORS-1 and ORS-2. The piglets with diarrhea were administered a probiotic per os on the first day and an antibiotic parenterally, until the diarrhea disappeared. All the piglets were followed clinically from days 1-6 of the investigations. Faeces samples were taken for bacteriological culture on the first day. Clinical signs of hydration were better, as well as the difference in body mass of piglets with diarrhea under the ORS-2 treatment which was significantly higher (p=0.036 in comparison with the difference in piglets under the ORS-1 treatment. All piglets with diarrhea had normally formed faeces on the sixth day. Escherichia coli was isolated from faeces of 48 piglets. Piglets with acute gastroenteritis, treated with ORS with a higher osmolarity and which contained instead of citrate, bicarbonates in higher concentrations, with less potassium, more sodium and more chlorine had a better state of hydration, with a significantly bigger difference in body mass, and the results of their control group were not significantly different against those of piglets treated with ORS of a different composition.

  1. Effect of Oral Dimenhydrinate in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis: A Clinical Trial

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    Simin Gheini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: One of the major causes of mortality in children is acute gastroenteritis. Vomiting is common in early stages of the disease. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of oral dimenhydrinate (DH in the control of vomiting in cases of acute gastroenteritis in children. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, clinical trial was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital in a western province of Iran. Two hundred children aged one to 12 years old were randomly assigned to either drug or placebo groups. Children in the drug group received oral DH as four doses of 1 mg/kg every six hours (maximum 200 mg, and children in the placebo group received a placebo drug. The patients variables were compared 24 hours after receiving the first dose and at seven and 14 days after discharge. Results: The mean number of episodes of vomiting was 4.4±2.5 in the drug group versus 4.4±2.1 in the placebo group, which was not statistically significant (p0.050. Conclusions: Oral DH in children with acute gastroenteritis does not reduce the number and duration of vomiting. However, our results showed that consumption of DH in acute gastroenteritis patients was effective in reducing the frequency and duration of diarrhea and further investigation into this is warranted.

  2. Analysis of Aichi virus and Saffold virus association with pediatric acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Li; Liu, Na; Yu, Jei-Mei; Ao, Yuan-Yun; Li, Shan; Stine, O Colin; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2017-02-01

    Aichi virus (AiV) and Saffold virus (SAFV) have been reported in children with acute gastroenteritis and respiratory disease worldwide; however, their causative role in acute gastroenteritis remains ambiguous. To assess the clinical association of AiV and SAFV with acute gastroenteritis in the pediatric population. A case-control study involving 461 paired stool samples from pediatric cases with diarrhea and healthy controls was conducted in China. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to screen AiV and SAFV. In the 461 paired samples, AiV and SAFV were more prevalent among asymptomatic children than children with acute gastroenteritis (0.87% vs. 0.43% and 2.8% vs. 1.5%, respectively), with no significant differences between groups (p=0.142 and p=0.478, respectively). Cox regression model analysis revealed no correlation between AiV (odds ratio, OR=2.24; 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.76-6.54) or SAFV infection (OR=1.36; 95% CI, 0.86-2.15) and diarrhea. High viral loads were found in both AiV- and SAFV-positive groups, with no significant difference in viral load between the groups (p=0.507 and p=0.677, respectively). No other known enteric pathogens were found in the AiV-positive samples but common in SAFV-positive cases. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all 6 AiV subjects clustered with genotype B. All 7 SAFV-positive cases and 8 of 13 SAFV-positive controls were genotyped successfully; the genotypes identified included SAFV-1, SAFV-2 SAFV-3, and SAFV-6. Our study revealed no association of these viruses in acute gastroenteritis in children. These viruses may have the ability to replicate in humans; however, the infections are usually asymptomatic. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jie-Mei; Ao, Yuan-Yun; Liu, Na; Li, Li-Li; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

  4. Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

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    Jie-Mei Yu

    Full Text Available Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1 was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5% and 13 (2.8% of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571 or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400 were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774. The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

  5. Prevalence of sapovirus infection among infant and adult patients with acute gastroenteritis in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Sara; Azimzadeh, Pedram; Bozorgi, Sajad Majidizadeh; Zali, Narges; Jadali, Farzaneh

    2012-01-01

    Aim This study investigated the prevalence of sapovirus infections in patient with acute gastroenteritis in Tehran, Iran. Background Sapovirus, a member of the family Caliciviridae is one of the major causative agents of viral gastroenteritis affecting both children and adult individuals. There isn't enough data about prevalence and genotypes of sapovirus infection in Tehran, the capital city of Iran. Patients and methods A total of 42 fecal samples were collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis from May to July 2009. RT nested- PCR was performed for screening. To genotype the sapovirus isolates, some positive samples were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by sequencing of fragments of viral capsid gene region. Results Sapovirus was detected in 5 of 42 stool specimens from patients with acute gastroenteritis. Sapovirus detected in this study was clustered into only one distinct genogroup I/2. Sapovirus GI/2 was predominant. Conclusion Our results show that among the studied viruses responsible for this disease, sapovirus was a major viral isolate virus. PMID:24834197

  6. Detection of caliciviruses associated with acute infantile gastroenteritis in Salvador, an urban center in Northeast Brazil

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    M.P.T.P. Xavier

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute gastroenteritis caused by viruses is one of the leading causes of infantile morbidity. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of human caliciviruses of the genera norovirus and sapovirus in children up to 3 years of age with acute gastroenteritis from low-income communities in the city of Salvador, Brazil. This study is an extension of previous work carried out to establish the profile of the most prevalent enteric pathogens present in these communities. In this report, 139 fecal samples, collected from July 2001 to January 2002 were analyzed by RT-PCR and 13 (9% were positive for human caliciviruses. By sequencing, seven isolates were characterized as norovirus genogroup GII and one as sapovirus genotype GII/1. Sequencing of the previously detected group-A rotaviruses and human astroviruses was also performed and revealed the circulation of rotavirus group A genotypes G1P[8] and G9P[8], and human astrovirus genotypes 6, 7, and 8. No mixed infection was observed. Community-based studies provide geographically representative information on disease burden. However, there are only a few reports in developing countries concerning the genotypes of the most important gastroenteric viruses detected in such communities. The present findings demonstrate the wide diversity of genotypes of the most important viruses responsible for acute gastroenteritis circulating in low-income communities.

  7. Clinical Presentation of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children With Functional Abdominal Pain Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, Miguel; Mintjens, Stijn; Pusatcioglu, Cenk K; Cohen, Daniel M; Sternberg, Petra

    2017-08-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity and abnormal coping are common in children with functional abdominal pain disorders (FAPDs). Thus, it would be expected that children with visceral hypersensitivity would report more pain if their gut is acutely inflamed. The aim of the study was to compare clinical symptoms and somatization of children with and without FAPDs at time of an episode of acute gastroenteritis. Seventy children with acute gastroenteritis and their parents completed the Rome III Diagnostic Questionnaire for Pediatric Functional GI Disorders and the Children's Somatization Inventory. Twenty-one percent of children were diagnosed with an FAPD. Children with FAPDs showed significantly more nongastrointestinal somatic symptoms than children without FAPDs. There were no significant differences in abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, or school absenteeism between both groups at time of consultation.

  8. Prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj, 2011

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    P Khodadadi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & Aim: Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of dehydrating and gastroenteritis among children worldwide. . The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of rotavirus in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Imam Sajjad Hospital of Yasuj. Methods: This cross sectional – descriptive study was done on 184 stool samples of children younger than 7 years of age hospitalized at Imam Sajjad hospital of Yasuj in 2011 due to acute gastroenteritis. All samples were routinely analyzed for detection of rotavirus by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA test. Data was analyzed by SPSS version 16, Chi-square test and Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 184 samples analyzed, 52(28.26% were positive.The Results showed significant relationship between the seasonal distribution and virus detection (p=0/001. The highest incidence of rotavirus was seen in autumn with frequency of (48.08% and the lowest in spring (5.77%. Conclusions: According to high prevalence of rotavirus infection, continual surveillance is necessary to provide useful data for formulating effective vaccines and perform diarrhea prevention programs. Key words: Rotavirus, Gastroenteritis, Prevalence, Elisa

  9. Molecular detection and characterization of sapovirus in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in the Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofang; Yamamoto, Dai; Saito, Mariko; Imagawa, Toshifumi; Ablola, Adrianne; Tandoc, Amado O; Segubre-Mercado, Edelwisa; Lupisan, Socorro P; Okamoto, Michiko; Furuse, Yuki; Saito, Mayuko; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2015-07-01

    Human sapovirus (SaV) is a causative agent of acute gastroenteritis. Recently, SaV detection has been increasing worldwide due to the emerging SaV genotype I.2. However, SaV infection has not been reported in the Philippines. To evaluate the prevalence and genetic diversity of SaV in hospitalized children aged less than 5 years with acute gastroenteritis. Stool samples were collected from children with acute gastroenteritis at three hospitals in the Philippines from June 2012 to August 2013. SaV was detected by reverse transcription real-time PCR, and the polymerase and capsid gene sequences were analyzed. Full genome sequencing and recombination analysis were performed on possible recombinant viruses. SaV was detected in 7.0% of the tested stool samples (29/417). In 10 SaV-positive cases, other viruses were also detected, including rotavirus (n=6), norovirus (n=2), and human astrovirus (n=2). Four known SaV genotypes (GI.1 [7], GI.2 [2], GII.1 [12], and GV [2]) and one novel recombinant (n=3) were identified by polymerase and capsid gene sequence analysis. Full genome sequencing revealed that the 5' nontranslated region (NTR) and nonstructural protein region of the novel recombinant were closely related to the GII.1 Bristol/98/UK variant, whereas the structural protein region and 3' NTR were closely related to the GII.4 Kumamoto6/Mar2003/JPN variant. SaV was regularly detected in hospitalized children due to acute gastroenteritis during the study period. A novel recombinant, SaV GII.1/GII.4, was identified in three cases at two different study sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Societal Burden and Correlates of Acute Gastroenteritis in Families with Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Lapo Mughini-Gras; Roan Pijnacker; Moniek Heusinkveld; Remko Enserink; Rody Zuidema; Erwin Duizer; Titia Kortbeek; Wilfrid van Pelt

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal infection morbidity remains high amongst preschool children in developed countries. We investigated the societal burden (incidence, healthcare utilization, and productivity loss) and correlates of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in families with preschoolers. Monthly for 25 months, 2000 families reported AGE symptoms and related care, productivity loss, and risk exposures for one preschooler and one parent. Amongst 8768 child-parent pairs enrolled, 7.3% parents and 17.4% children...

  11. Acute community-acquired meningoencephalitis with Morganella morganii – a case report / Meningoencefalită acută comunitară cu Morganella morganii – prezentare de caz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilea Brindusa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Morganella morganii (M. morganii este un bacil Gram negativ aerob, facultativ anaerob ce aparține familiei Enterobacteriaceae, prezent atât în mediul ambiant cât și în flora saprofită intestinală. Este considerat un agent patogen rar întâlnit în infecțiile comunitare, fiind mai frecvent identificat în infecții nozocomiale postoperatorii și infecțiile de tract urinar. Afectarea sistemului nervos central este rară. Prezentăm cazul unui pacient în vârstă de 66 ani cu neoplasm de colon operat, chimio și radio tratat, cu anus iliac stâng, diabet zaharat tip II, care a dezvoltat o meningoencefalită acută cu M. morganii. Examenul lichidului cefalorahidian a relevat o citologie crescută constând din polimorfonucleare neutrofile, biochimie modificată și cultură bogată de M. morganii, o tulpină secretoare de AmpC beta- lactamază. După instituirea tratamentului antibiotic, inițial empiric cu meropenem și vancomicină, ulterior conform sensibilității germenului, meropenem și ciprofloxacină, evoluția pacientului a fost favorabilă chiar și în condițiile existenței celor două afecțiuni imunodeprimante.

  12. Hyperuricemia in acute gastroenteritis is caused by decreased urate excretion via ABCG2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hirotaka; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Ooyama, Keiko; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Takada, Tappei; Nakashima, Akio; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Higashino, Toshihide; Wakai, Kenji; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Hokari, Ryota; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ichida, Kimiyoshi; Inui, Ayano; Fujimori, Shin; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-01-01

    To clarify the physiological and pathophysiological roles of intestinal urate excretion via ABCG2 in humans, we genotyped ABCG2 dysfunctional common variants, Q126X (rs72552713) and Q141K (rs2231142), in end-stage renal disease (hemodialysis) and acute gastroenteritis patients, respectively. ABCG2 dysfunction markedly increased serum uric acid (SUA) levels in 106 hemodialysis patients (P = 1.1 × 10−4), which demonstrated the physiological role of ABCG2 for intestinal urate excretion because their urate excretion almost depends on intestinal excretion via ABCG2. Also, ABCG2 dysfunction significantly elevated SUA in 67 acute gastroenteritis patients (P = 6.3 × 10−3) regardless of the degree of dehydration, which demonstrated the pathophysiological role of ABCG2 in acute gastroenteritis. These findings for the first time show ABCG2-mediated intestinal urate excretion in humans, and indicates the physiological and pathophysiological importance of intestinal epithelium as an excretion pathway besides an absorption pathway. Furthermore, increased SUA could be a useful marker not only for dehydration but also epithelial impairment of intestine. PMID:27571712

  13. Xyloglucan for the Treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis in Children: Results of a Randomized, Controlled, Clinical Trial

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    Cătălin Pleșea Condratovici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Xyloglucan, a film-forming agent, improves intestinal mucosa resistance to pathologic damage. The efficacy, safety, and time of onset of the antidiarrheal effect of xyloglucan were assessed in children with acute gastroenteritis receiving oral rehydration solution (ORS. Methods. This randomized, controlled, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter, clinical trial included children (3 months–12 years with acute gastroenteritis of infectious origin. Children were randomized to xyloglucan and ORS, or ORS only, for 5 days. Diarrheal symptoms, including stool number/characteristics, and safety were assessed at baseline and after 2 and 5 days and by fulfillment of a parent diary card. Results. Thirty-six patients (58.33% girls were included (n=18/group. Patients receiving xyloglucan and ORS had better symptom evolution than ORS-only recipients, with a faster onset of action. At 6 hours, xyloglucan produced a significantly greater decrease in the number of type 7 stools (0.11 versus 0.44; P=0.027. At days 3 and 5, xyloglucan also produced a significantly greater reduction in types 6 and 7 stools compared with ORS alone. Xyloglucan plus ORS was safe and well tolerated. Conclusions. Xyloglucan is an efficacious and safe option for the treatment of acute gastroenteritis in children, with a rapid onset of action in reducing diarrheal symptoms. This study is registered with ISRCTN number 65893282.

  14. Human bocavirus in hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis in Russia from 2010 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymentsev, Alexander; Tikunov, Artem; Zhirakovskaia, Elena; Kurilschikov, Alexander; Babkin, Igor; Klemesheva, Vera; Netesov, Sergei; Tikunova, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Human bocavirus (HBoV) can cause respiratory diseases and is detectable in the stool samples of patients with gastroenteritis. To assess the prevalence of HBoV in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Novosibirsk, Russia, as well as its genetic diversity and the potential role in the etiology of gastroenteritis in this region, a total of 5502 stool samples from children hospitalized with gastroenteritis from 2010 to 2012, n=5250, and healthy children, n=252, were assayed for the presence of HBoV DNA by semi-nested PCR. The HBoV DNA was found in 1.2% of stool samples from children, with gastroenteritis varying from 0.5% in 2012 to 1.7% in 2011. The prevalence of HBoV in healthy children was 0.3%. HBoV strains were detected throughout the year with an increase in the fall-winter season. In 87% of cases, HBoV was detected in children before 1 year of age. All known HBoV genetic variants have been detected in Novosibirsk, although with different prevalences: HBoV2>HBoV1>HBoV4>HBoV3. At the beginning of 2011, HBoV2 replaced HBoV1 as the most prevalent variant. The median age of children with detected HBoV1 was 8.3months, and that with HBoV2 was 8.0 months. All HBoV-positive samples were assayed for the presence of the rotaviruses A and C, norovirus GII, astrovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus F, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp., Shigella spp., and EIEC. HBoV1 and HBoV2 as single agents were found in 45.8% and 60% samples, respectively, although this difference was not statistically significant. In the case of co-infections, HBoV was most frequently recorded with rotavirus A and norovirus GII. This study demonstrated that the detection rate of HBoV in stool samples from children with gastroenteritis was low, although both HBoV1 and HBoV2 could be found as the sole agents in children with gastroenteritis in Novosibirsk.

  15. ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS INFECTION IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN TEHRAN

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    F. Jam-Afzon S. Modarres

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are one of the most important etiological agents of serious gastroenteritis among infants and young children. Fecal specimens from patients with an acute gastroenteritis were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus (Ad40, 41 from April 2002 to February 2004. During the study, 1052 samples were collected from children under the age of 5 years in six educational and therapeutic pediatric centers. The specimens were tested for adenovirus (Ad40, 41 by EIA technique in the Virology Department of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Adenoviruses (Ad40, 41 were detected from 27(2.6% samples, but were not detected in 150 samples of healthy control group. In this study the highest rate of adenovirus was found in children aged 6 to 12 months (40.7%, but the male to female ratio inpatients was approximately equal. Adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infections peaked in the winter as 48.1% was detected from December to March. There were a statistically significant difference between age and infection (P < 0.001, also between season with adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection (P = 0.005. Breast-feeding had a protective action against adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection. This study revealed that enteric adenovirus (Ad40, 41 is an etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis among children in Tehran.

  16. Antiemetics for reducing vomiting related to acute gastroenteritis in children and adolescents

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    Zbys Fedorowicz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vomiting is a common manifestation of acute gastroenteritis in children and adolescents. When untreated, it can be a hindrance to oral rehydration therapy, which is the cornerstone in the management of acute gastroenteritis. Evidence is needed concerning the safety and efficacy of antiemetic use for vomiting in acute gastroenteritis in children. OBJECTIVES: To assess the safety and effectiveness of antiemetics on gastroenteritis induced vomiting in children and adolescents. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Upper Gastrointestinal and Pancreatic Diseases Group Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and hand searches of relevant journals and abstract books of conferences. The search was re-run and is up to date as on 20 July 2010. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials comparing antiemetics with placebo or no treatment, in children and adolescents under the age of 18, for vomiting due to gastroenteritis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS: We included seven trials involving 1,020 participants. Mean time to cessation of vomiting in one study was 0.34 days less with dimenhydrinate suppository compared to placebo (P value = 0.036. Pooled data from three studies comparing oral ondansetron with placebo showed: a reduction in the immediate hospital admission rate (RR 0.40, NNT 17, 95% CI 10 to 100 but no difference between the hospitalization rates at 72 hours after discharge from the Emergency Department (ED; a reduction in IV rehydration rates both during the ED stay (RR 0.41, NNT 5, 95% CI 4 to 8, and in follow-up to 72 hours after discharge from the ED stay (worst-best scenario for ondansetron RR 0.57, NNT 6, 95% CI 4 to 13 and an increase in the proportion of patients with cessation of vomiting (RR 1.34, NNT 5, 95% CI 3 to 7. No significant difference was noted in the revisit

  17. [Acute renal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis in an infant with congenital solitary kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Taiki; Hamano, Atsushi; Kawamura, Hideki

    2014-10-01

    We report a 35 month-old boy with acute renal failure caused by an obstructive ureteral stone associated with norovirus gastroenteritis. He visited his family physician because of fever, abdominal pain and vomiting. He was diagnosed as acute gastroenteritis. The symptoms relieved once, but abdominal pain and vomiting recurred two days after the visit and the volume of urine decreased. He was diagnosed as norovirus gastoenteritis and acute renal failure which was unresponsive to fluid replacement. Ultrasound study of the abdomen showed a solitary kidney with mild hydronephrosis. He was then admitted to our hospital. He was finally diagnosed as acute postrenal failure due to obstructive ureteral stone with left solitary kidney by abdominal computer tomography (CT). We performed transurethral catheterization immediately. The creatinine and blood urea nitrogen returned to normal level in 2 days. The CT performed on the 28th day post operation showed disappearance of the stone after uric alkalization. Recently, some cases of postrenal failure due to bilateral obstructive ureteral stones, mainly ammonium acid urate stones, associated with viral gastroenteritis were reported. As clinical features, they are common in boys three years or younger after an episode of rotavirus gastroenteritis with high uric acid concentration. By far, the most common cause of acute renal failure in patients with severe gastroenteritis is prerenal failure resulting from hypovolemia. But postrenal cause due to bilateral obstructive stones should be taken in a consideration.

  18. HUMAN CALICIVIRUS OUTBREAK OF ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN AN AGED-CARE FACILITY

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    Iztok Štrumbelj

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. Human caliciviruses represent a genetically and antigenetically diverse group of single-stranded RNA viruses associated with acute gastroenteritis in humans. In last two years the number of notified gastroenteric cases in Slovenia is increasing. From January till November 2002 already 574 calicivirus cases have been confirmed. Majority of cases were observed in preschool and school children but no cases were described in the aged-care facility.Methods. An outbreak of gastroenteritis in an aged-care facility occured. After onset of the outbreak an epidemiological questionnaire and inspection of local conditions were realized. Stool samples from home residents were analysed to find out bacteriological and/or viral aetiology. Direct electron microscopy and RT-PCR assay was performed to detect caliciviruses. Viral RNA was amplified using specific primers and PCR products were identified in hybridisation test.Results. The outbreak started suddenly on the second floor, where the attack rate was the highest. On the other floors the illness started later and the attack rate was lower. Sixty-one (40,1% residents from 152 became ill and additionally 15 (22,4% employees from 67. The outbreak ended after ten days. Electron microscopy or/and RT-PCR revealed Norovirus members of family Caliciviridae in 9 of 10 stool specimens. As determined by RT-PCR and hybridisation assay viruses corresponded to genogroup II, genetic cluster 1 (closely related to the Hawaii virus and genetic cluster 4 (closely related to the Lordsdale virus.Conclusions. Presented data support a significant role for caliciviruses as causative agents of gastroenteritis in elderly persons in Slovenia.

  19. Enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative E. coli in stools of children with acute gastroenteritis in Davidson County, Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Monique A; Iqbal, Junaid; Zhang, Chengxian; McHenry, Rendie; Cleveland, Brent E; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia; Fonnesbeck, Chris; Payne, Daniel C; Chappell, James D; Halasa, Natasha; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G

    2015-11-01

    This prospective acute gastroenteritis (AGE) surveillance was conducted in the inpatient and emergency room settings at a referral pediatric hospital to determine the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in children E. coli. A total of 12 (5.8%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE were positive for a DEC. Eight (67%) out of these 12 were positive for enteropathogenic E. coli, and the remaining 4 were positive for enteroaggregative E. coli. DEC clinical isolates clustered with known E. coli enteropathogens according to multilocus sequencing typing.

  20. Clinical information on admission is insufficient to determine the appropriate isolation regimen for acute gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Florence; Abed, Osama Karim; Backer Mogensen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The number of admissions for acute gastroenteritis (GE) is increasing. The majority of patients pass through a single high-flow emergency department (ED) area which increases the risk of spreading GE. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and aetiology of GE for acutely...... admitted patients and to analyse their clinical information focusing on risk indicators of contagious aetiology and on the chosen isolation regime to determine if the GE required a contact precaution isolation regime. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This study included patients above 16 years of age who were...... admitted acutely within a one-year study period to a Danish hospital with a catchment population of 231,000 persons. The following items were analysed: information from the referring doctor, diarrhoea, nausea and vomiting and fever history, abdominal pain, prior antibiotics, co-morbidity, drugs, travel...

  1. SAPOVIRUSES IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS FROM MANAUS , AMAZON REGION, BRAZIL, 2010-2011

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    Tammy Kathlyn Amaral REYMÃO

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Sapoviruses (SaVs are responsible for acute gastroenteritis in humans, especially children and the elderly. In Brazil, data on SaVs infections are very limited, especially in Northern Brazil. Here, we investigated the occurrence of SaVs in samples from hospitalized children under ten years old that presented acute gastroenteritis. Positive samples were genotyped and phylogenetic analysis was performed using prototype strains sequences obtained from GenBank database. In total, 156 fecal samples were screened by RT-PCR for SaVs. A positivity rate of 3.8% (6/156 was found in children under three years of age. Four genotypes were detected: GI.I, GI.2 and GII.2?-GII.4?/GII.4, suggesting a possible inter-genotypes recombination. Most infections (83.3% occurred between August and September. The positivity was similar to that found in other countries and genotyping demonstrated the presence of distinct genotypes. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the circulation of SaVs in Manaus, state of Amazonas, Amazon region, Brazil.

  2. Prospective evaluation of indirect costs due to acute rotavirus gastroenteritis in Spain: the ROTACOST study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzón-Alejandro, Marta; Redondo-Collazo, Lorenzo; Sánchez-Lastres, Juan Manuel; Martinón-Torres, Nazareth; Martinón-Sánchez, José María; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2011-09-14

    The effect of rotavirus in developed countries is mainly economic. This study aimed to assess the indirect costs induced by rotavirus acute gastroenteritis (RVAGE) in Spain. A prospective observational study was conducted from October 2008 to June 2009. It included 682 children up to 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis (AGE) who attended primary care (n = 18) and emergency room/hospital settings (n = 10), covering the regions of Galicia and Asturias (North-west Spain). All non-medical expenses incurred throughout the episode were recorded in detail using personal interviews and telephone contact. Among the 682 enrolled children, 207 (30.4%) were rotavirus positive and 170 (25%) had received at least one dose of rotavirus vaccine. The mean (standard deviation) indirect cost caused by an episode of AGE was estimated at 135.17 (182.70) Euros. Costs were 1.74-fold higher when AGE was caused by rotavirus compared with other etiologies: 192.7 (219.8) Euros vs. 111.6 (163.5) Euros (p purchase of material. Patients with RVAGE were admitted to hospital more frequently than those with other etiologies (47.8% vs 14%, p decision-making process of the eventual inclusion of rotavirus vaccine in the national immunization schedule of well developed countries.

  3. [Mean Platelet Volume in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis Caused by Entamoeba histolytica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Tanju; Güler, Ekrem; Berksoy, Emel Ataş; Sorguç, Yelda; Arslan, Nur

    2015-09-01

    Mean platelet volume (MPV) is a marker of platelet activation, which is a determinant of inflammation. The first aim of the present study was to investigate the MPV levels in children with amebiasis and compare the MPV levels with healthy controls. The second aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between MPV and other acute phase reactants. Seventy six patients with amebic gastroenteritis (mean age 2.64 ± 0.23 years) and 53 healthy controls (mean age 2.35 ± 0.28 years) were enrolled in the study. Entamoeba histolytica was determined in stool using rapid antigen test. Complete blood count and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were assessed for all children. MPV levels of patients with amebiasis were significantly higher than those of control children (8.79 ± 0.09 vs. 7.87 ± 0.09 fL, p = 0.000). Leukocyte and eosinophil counts, C-reactive protein and creatinine levels of the patients were higher than controls. Leukocyte count was positively correlated with MPV (r = 0.192, p amebiasis compared to controls. MPV can be used as an acute phase reactant in children with Entamoeba histolytica gastroenteritis.

  4. Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

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    Saira H Zaidi

    Full Text Available This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

  5. Diapers in war zones: ethnomedical factors in acute childhood gastroenteritis in Peshawar, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Saira H; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    This article considers ethnomedical knowledge and practices among parents related to contraction of acute gastroenteritis among children in Peshawar, Pakistan. Research methods included analysis of the Emergency Pediatric Services' admission register, a structured interview administered to 47 parents of patients seen in the Khyber Medical College Teaching Hospital, semi-structured interviews of 12 staff, and four home visits among families with children treated at the hospital. The use of native research assistants and participant observation contributed to the reliability of the findings, though the ethnographic, home-visit sample is small. Our research indicated that infection rates are exacerbated in homes through two culturally salient practices and one socioeconomic condition. Various misconceptions propagate the recurrence or perserverance of acute gastroenteritis including assumptions about teething leading to poor knowledge of disease etiology, rehydration solutions leading to increased severity of disease, and diaper usage leading to the spread of disease. In our Discussion, we suggest how hospital structures of authority and gender hierarchy may impact hospital interactions, the flow of information, and its respective importance to the patient's parents leading to possible propagation of disease. These ethnographic data offer a relatively brief but targeted course of action to improve the effectiveness of prevention and treatment efforts.

  6. An oral electrolyte solution (Pedialyte) in the treatment of acute infantile gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunoto; Pioh, H; Wiharta, A S; Suharyono

    1978-01-01

    During a 3-month period, 35 pediatric patients with infantile acute gastroenteritis were treated with a premixed oral glucose electrolyte solution. The study group consisted of 17 boys and 18 girls with a mean age of 12.4 months (range of 5.5-20 months). 13 patients (37%) had mild dehydration, 16 (46%) had moderate dehydration, and 6 (17%) had normal hydration. 29 (83%( had isotonic dehydration and only 6 (17%) presented with hypotonic dehydration. Almost all of the patients were admitted for a hospital stay of 3 days and on discharge, all were in good condition. None developed severe dehydration or needed intravenous fluid treatment. The mean weight gain during hospitalization was 147 gm with a range of 100-400 gm. Unexpectedly, pathogenic bacteria organisms were discovered in 24 (68.7%) of the total cases, but all the children recovered very well with the oral electrolyte solution only without the need for antibiotics. From clinical, chemical, and other observations, it could be concluded that this ready-to-feed oral electrolyte solution can be used safely and effectively for the treatment of acute infantile gastroenteritis both with or without mild or moderate dehydration. No complications were observed in this study.

  7. Cases of acute gastroenteritis due to calicivirus in outbreaks: clinical differences by age and aetiological agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, M R; Broner, S; Moreno, A; Arias, C; Godoy, P; Minguell, S; Martínez, A; Torner, N; Bartolomé, R; de Simón, M; Guix, S; Domínguez, A

    2014-08-01

    The Caliciviridae family includes norovirus and sapovirus, which both cause acute gastroenteritis (AGE). Currently, norovirus is the most common cause of AGE in all age groups in many countries. We analysed clinical differences in reported cases of acute gastroenteritis caused by caliciviruses (AGC) by age group and agent involved. We conducted a descriptive study of AGE outbreaks reported to the Public Health Agency of Catalonia (Spain) in 2010 and 2011. The odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to estimate the association between clinical symptoms and age. Clinical differences between the clinical manifestations of sapovirus and norovirus infection in children aged cases caused by norovirus more frequently presented with vomiting and fever (p cases caused by sapovirus more frequently presented with diarrhoea (p 0.013). Determination of the clinical differences associated with cases in outbreaks according to the age of the majority of cases and the symptoms most frequently detected may aid decision making and guide aetiological investigations and the adoption of prevention and control measures.

  8. Unexpectedly high burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in very young infants

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    Reilly Megan

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highest incidence of rotavirus gastroenteritis has generally been reported in children 6-24 months of age. Young infants are thought to be partially protected by maternal antibodies acquired transplacentally or via breast milk. The purpose of our study was to assess the age distribution of children with confirmed community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis presenting to an urban referral hospital. Methods Children presenting to The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia with acute gastroenteritis have been monitored for the presence of rotavirus antigen in the stool by ELISA (followed by genotyping if ELISA-positive since the 1994-95 epidemic season. Results Over the last 12 rotavirus seasons prior to the introduction of the pentavalent rotavirus vaccine in 2006, stool specimens from 1646 patients tested positive for community-acquired rotavirus infection. Gender or age was not recorded in 6 and 5 cases, respectively. Overall, 58% of the cases occurred in boys. G1 was the predominant VP7 serotype, accounting for 72% of cases. The median (IQR age was 11 (5-21 months. A total of 790 (48% cases occurred in children outside the commonly quoted peak age range, with 27% in infants 24 months of age. A total of 220 (13% cases occurred during the first 3 months of life, and the highest number of episodes per month of age [97 (6%] was observed during the second month of life. Conclusions The incidence of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis monitored over 12 seasons in the prevaccine era at a major university hospital was nearly constant for each month of age during the first year of life, revealing an unexpectedly high incidence of symptomatic rotavirus disease in infants

  9. BEC, a novel enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens found in human clinical isolates from acute gastroenteritis outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonogi, Shinya; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kawai, Takao; Yoda, Tomoko; Harada, Tetsuya; Kumeda, Yuko; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Hiyoshi, Hirotaka; Nakamura, Shota; Kodama, Toshio; Iida, Tetsuya

    2014-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a causative agent of food-borne gastroenteritis for which C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) has been considered an essential factor. Recently, we experienced two outbreaks of food-borne gastroenteritis in which non-CPE producers of C. perfringens were strongly suspected to be the cause. Here, we report a novel enterotoxin produced by C. perfringens isolates, BEC (binary enterotoxin of C. perfringens). Culture supernatants of the C. perfringens strains showed fluid-accumulating activity in rabbit ileal loop and suckling mouse assays. Purification of the enterotoxic substance in the supernatants and high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA of the strains revealed BEC, composed of BECa and BECb. BECa and BECb displayed limited amino acid sequence similarity to other binary toxin family members, such as the C. perfringens iota toxin. The becAB genes were located on 54.5-kb pCP13-like plasmids. Recombinant BECb (rBECb) alone had fluid-accumulating activity in the suckling mouse assay. Although rBECa alone did not show enterotoxic activity, rBECa enhanced the enterotoxicity of rBECb when simultaneously administered in suckling mice. The entertoxicity of the mutant in which the becB gene was disrupted was dramatically decreased compared to that of the parental strain. rBECa showed an ADP-ribosylating activity on purified actin. Although we have not directly evaluated whether BECb delivers BECa into cells, rounding of Vero cells occurred only when cells were treated with both rBECa and rBECb. These results suggest that BEC is a novel enterotoxin of C. perfringens distinct from CPE, and that BEC-producing C. perfringens strains can be causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans. Additionally, the presence of becAB on nearly identical plasmids in distinct lineages of C. perfringens isolates suggests the involvement of horizontal gene transfer in the acquisition of the toxin genes.

  10. Burden of acute gastroenteritis, norovirus and rotavirus in a managed care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karve, Sudeep; Krishnarajah, Girishanthy; Korsnes, Jennifer S; Cassidy, Adrian; Candrilli, Sean D

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed and described the episode rate, duration of illness, and health care utilization and costs associated with acute gastroenteritis (AGE), norovirus gastroenteritis (NVGE), and rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) in physician office, emergency department (ED), and inpatient care settings in the United States (US). The retrospective analysis was conducted using an administrative insurance claims database (2006-2011). AGE episode rates were assessed using medical (ICD-9-CM) codes for AGE; whereas a previously published "indirect" method was used in assessing estimated episode rates of NVGE and RVGE. We calculated per-patient, per-episode and total costs incurred in three care settings for the three diseases over five seasons. For each season, we extrapolated the total economic burden associated with the diseases to the US population. The overall AGE episode rate in the physician office care setting declined by 15% during the study period; whereas the AGE episode rate remained stable in the inpatient care setting. AGE-related total costs (inflation-adjusted) per 100 000 plan members increased by 28% during the 2010-2011 season, compared with the 2006-2007 season ($832,849 vs. $1 068 116) primarily due to increase in AGE-related inpatient costs. On average, the duration of illness for NVGE and RVGE was 1 day longer than the duration of illness for AGE (mean: 2 days). Nationally, the average AGE-related estimated total cost was $3.88 billion; NVGE and RVGE each accounted for 7% of this total. The episodes of RVGE among pediatric populations have declined; however, NVGE, RVGE and AGE continue to pose a substantial burden among managed care enrollees. In conclusion, the study further reaffirms that RVGE has continued to decline in pediatric population post-launch of the rotavirus vaccination program and provides RVGE- and NVGE-related costs and utilization estimates which can serve as a resource for researchers and policy makers to conduct cost

  11. Molecular detection of genogroup I sapovirus in Tunisian children suffering from acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sdiri-Loulizi, Khira; Hassine, Mouna; Gharbi-Khelifi, Hakima; Aouni, Zaidoun; Chouchane, Slaheddine; Sakly, Nabil; Neji-Guédiche, Mohamed; Pothier, Pierre; Ambert-Balay, Katia; Aouni, Mahjoub

    2011-08-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of sapovirus infections in children with acute gastroenteritis in Monastir region, Tunisia, from January 2003 to April 2007. Sapovirus was characterized by sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the partial polymerase gene. From 788 fecal specimens tested, 6 (0.8%) were positive for sapovirus, of these, 4 (66.7%) were monoinfections. All sapovirus positive samples were detected in outpatient, contrary to norovirus which was significantly more frequent in hospitalized children than in outpatients (14.5 vs. 9.5%, P = 0.03). The mean age of children with sapovirus infections was 11 ± 5.56 months (range 6-19 months). Sapovirus isolates were detected in March and between September and December 2003. Fever, vomiting, abdominal pain, and dehydration were not observed in patients with sapovirus infections. Analysis of nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed that all 6 Tunisian sapovirus strains clustered in the GGI/1 genotype and strains were identical in the region sequenced, sharing 90.2% nucleotide identity with the reference strain Sapporo/82/JP (U65427). This represents the first finding of sapovirus infections in North Africa and especially in Tunisia. The data indicate that, contrary to norovirus which can cause severe diarrhea and is an important etiologic agent in hospitalized cases, sapovirus causes mild gastroenteritis in Tunisian children.

  12. Intestinal Amebiasis: A Concerning Cause of Acute Gastroenteritis Among Hospitalized Lebanese Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naous, Amal; Naja, Ziad; Zaatari, Nour; Kamel, Raymond; Rajab, Mariam

    2013-01-01

    Background: Intestinal amebiasis is an important public health problem worldwide. More severe disease is associated with young age, malnutrition and immunosuppression. Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence and characteristic nature of intestinal amebiasis among pediatric population, and compare it with other causes of gastroenteritis. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective comparative study conducted at Makassed General Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012, including all pediatric patients between birth and 15 years of age, who presented with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis. Results: One thousand three hundred ninety-five patients were included in the study, and were divided into four groups: Group I (Entameba histolytica group = 311 cases, 22.3%), group II (Rotavirus group = 427 cases, 30.6%), group III (bacterial group = 107 cases, 7.7%), group IV (unidentified group = 550 cases, 39.4%). Significant leukocytosis, neutrophilia and positive C-reactive protein were found among more than 50% of admitted Entemaba histolytica cases with a picture of severe invasive disease in young infants. Conclusion: Entameba histolytica can be an emerging serious infection, especially when it finds suitable environmental conditions and host factors, so we should be ready to face it with effective preventive measures. PMID:24404551

  13. Genetic diversity of sapovirus in non-hospitalized adults with sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Shen, Zhen; Qian, Fangxing; Li, Yang; Yuan, Zhenghong; Zhang, Jun

    2014-04-01

    Sapovirus has been accepted as a major cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. It can affect all age groups, ranging from young adults to the elderly, while little is known about the epidemiological patterns and genetic characteristics of sapovirus infections in China. To investigate the prevalence of sapovirus infections among adult outpatients suffering from acute gastroenteritis in Shanghai, China. From April 2011 to March 2013, fecal specimens from 1125 adult outpatients (≥16 years of age) with acute gastroenteritis were collected. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was employed for detection of sapovirus, and 5' end of capsid gene were sequenced for genotyping and phylogenetic analysis. The overall occurrence of sapovirus infection in adult outpatients was 3.73% (42 in 1125) through the two-year surveillance period, and sapovirus diarrhea is more common in spring and winter. The highest sapovirus positive rate was observed in adults of ≥56 years old, and statistically significant relationship was observed when compared with other age groups (pSapovirus was commonly found in adults with acute gastroenteritis in Shanghai, China, while no specific seasonal variation of sapovirus diarrhea could be distinguished. GI.2 strains established themselves in a short time span as the predominant genotype in Shanghai, China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficacy of intravenous ondansetron to prevent vomiting episodes in acute gastroenteritis: a randomized, double blind, and controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanguansak Rerksuppaphol

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute gastroenteritis is one of the most common infectious diseases of childhood. Its symptoms are vomiting, diarrhea, and dehydration. In the emergency ward, intravenous rather than oral rehydration is usually preferred because of the high likelihood of emesis. Treatments to reduce emesis are of value in improving the rehydration procedure. Our study is a double-blind randomized trial and proposes the use of ondansetron as an anti-emetic drug to treat children with acute gastroenteritis. Seventy-four in-patients, aged 3 months to 15 years, were enrolled and randomly assigned to an ondansetron or placebo group. Inclusion criteria were the diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis and the absence of other diseases or allergies to drugs. A single bolus (0.15 mg/kg of ondansetron was injected intravenously; normal 0.9% saline solution was used as a placebo. This treatment induced vomiting cessation in the ondansetron group significantly in comparison to the placebo group. The length of the hospital stay and the oral rehydration fluid volume were similar in the two groups and no adverse effects were noticed. Thus, safety, low cost, and overall bene­fit of ondansetron treatment suggests that this drug can be administered successfully to children with acute gastroenteritis.

  15. Potential causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in households with preschool children : prevalence, risk factors, clinical relevance and household transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, M.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Pijnacker, R.; Vennema, H.; Scholts, R.; van Huisstede-Vlaanderen, K. W.; Kortbeek, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; van Pelt, W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) morbidity remains high amongst preschool children, posing a significant societal burden. Empirical data on AGE-causing agents is needed to gauge their clinical relevance and identify agent-specific targets for control. We assessed the prevalence, risk factors and associat

  16. Molecular detection of human calicivirus in young children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Melbourne, Australia, during 1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, C D; Bishop, R F

    2001-07-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analysis identified calciviruses in 32 of 60 stool specimens (negative for other enteric pathogens) obtained from children admitted to our hospital with acute gastroenteritis. The overall annual incidence rate for calcivirus was 9% (32 of 354 children). Molecular analysis identified 30 "Norwalk-like virus" genogroup II (predominantly Lordsdale cluster) and 2 "Sapporo-like virus" strains.

  17. Potential causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in households with preschool children : prevalence, risk factors, clinical relevance and household transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, M.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Pijnacker, R.; Vennema, H.; Scholts, R.; van Huisstede-Vlaanderen, K. W.; Kortbeek, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; van Pelt, W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) morbidity remains high amongst preschool children, posing a significant societal burden. Empirical data on AGE-causing agents is needed to gauge their clinical relevance and identify agent-specific targets for control. We assessed the prevalence, risk factors and

  18. Potential causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in households with preschool children : prevalence, risk factors, clinical relevance and household transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusinkveld, M.; Mughini-Gras, L.; Pijnacker, R.; Vennema, H.; Scholts, R.; van Huisstede-Vlaanderen, K. W.; Kortbeek, T.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; van Pelt, W.

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) morbidity remains high amongst preschool children, posing a significant societal burden. Empirical data on AGE-causing agents is needed to gauge their clinical relevance and identify agent-specific targets for control. We assessed the prevalence, risk factors and associat

  19. Measuring the Impact of Rotavirus Acute Gastroenteritis Episodes (MIRAGE: A prospective Community-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Sénécal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current assessments of the burden of rotavirus (RV-related gastroenteritis are needed to evaluate the potential benefits of RV immunization interventions. The objective of the present study was to characterize the burden of RV gastroenteritis among children presenting in outpatient settings with gastroenteritis.

  20. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess Presenting as Acute Urinary Retention: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naboush, Ali; Abou Yassine, Ali; Yasmin, Mohamad; Mobarakai, Neville

    2013-01-01

    Background. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains have emerged as a substantial cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the healthcare system. Prostatic abscess is an uncommon disease. To date, there are only 6 published reports of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA. Case Description. A 52-year-old diabetic Caucasian presented to the emergency department with severe lower abdominal pain of few hours duration, urinary frequency, and dribbling over the last 3 weeks. Physical examination was remarkable for an enlarged nontender prostate. A urine analysis showed pyuria while urine cultures grew CA-MRSA. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed multiple prostate abscesses and a thickened urinary bladder wall. A TURP was performed by the urology team and pathology showed severe acute and chronic prostatitis with abscess formation and necrotic tissue. Our treatment regimen included IV vancomycin followed by oral trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and rifampin. Eradication of CA-MRSA was confirmed by follow-up cultures 2 months following discharge. Conclusion. This case illustrates the successful identification, diagnosis, and prompt treatment of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA in a diabetic patient without recent hospitalization. Early treatment with antibiotics and transurethral resection of the prostate abscess led to a shortened hospital stay and decreased morbidity.

  1. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Prostatic Abscess Presenting as Acute Urinary Retention: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naboush

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA strains have emerged as a substantial cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the healthcare system. Prostatic abscess is an uncommon disease. To date, there are only 6 published reports of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA. Case Description. A 52-year-old diabetic Caucasian presented to the emergency department with severe lower abdominal pain of few hours duration, urinary frequency, and dribbling over the last 3 weeks. Physical examination was remarkable for an enlarged nontender prostate. A urine analysis showed pyuria while urine cultures grew CA-MRSA. Computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed multiple prostate abscesses and a thickened urinary bladder wall. A TURP was performed by the urology team and pathology showed severe acute and chronic prostatitis with abscess formation and necrotic tissue. Our treatment regimen included IV vancomycin followed by oral trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and rifampin. Eradication of CA-MRSA was confirmed by follow-up cultures 2 months following discharge. Conclusion. This case illustrates the successful identification, diagnosis, and prompt treatment of a prostatic abscess secondary to CA-MRSA in a diabetic patient without recent hospitalization. Early treatment with antibiotics and transurethral resection of the prostate abscess led to a shortened hospital stay and decreased morbidity.

  2. Adenovirus, calicivirus and astrovirus detection in fecal samples of hospitalized children with acute gastroenteritis from Campo Grande, MS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Sueli Assis Andreasi

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed fecal samples from hospitalized children up to three years of age with acute gastroenteritis at Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, from May 2000-January 2004. Astrovirus and calicivirus were detected by Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction and adenovirus was detected using the Rotavirus and Adenovirus combined immunoenzyme assay. Astrovirus, adenovirus and calicivirus were detected at rates of 3.1%, 3.6% and 7.6%, respectively. These results re-emphasize the need for the establishment of regional vigilance systems to evaluate the impact of enteric viruses on viral gastroenteritis.

  3. Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 265. Bhutta ZA. Acute gastroenteritis in ... Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 340. Dupont HL. Acute infectious diarrhea ...

  4. Enteropathogenic and enteroaggregative E. coli in stools of children with acute gastroenteritis in Davidson County, Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Monique A.; Iqbal, Junaid; Zhang, Chengxian; McHenry, Rendie; Cleveland, Brent E.; Romero-Herazo, Yesenia; Fonnesbeck, Chris; Payne, Daniel C.; Chappell, James D.; Halasa, Natasha; Gómez-Duarte, Oscar G.

    2015-01-01

    This prospective acute gastroenteritis (AGE) surveillance was conducted in the inpatient and emergency room settings at a referral pediatric hospital to determine the prevalence of diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) in children<12 years of age with AGE in Davidson County, Tennessee. Subjects 15 days to 11 years of age, who presented with diarrhea and/or vomiting, were enrolled. Stool specimens were processed for detection of DEC using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. From December 1, 2011, to June 30, 2012, a total of 79 (38%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE tested positive for E. coli. A total of 12 (5.8%) out of 206 stool specimens from children with AGE were positive for a DEC. Eight (67%) out of these 12 were positive for enteropathogenic E. coli, and the remaining 4 were positive for enteroaggregative E. coli. DEC clinical isolates clustered with known E. coli enteropathogens according to multilocus sequencing typing. PMID:26298817

  5. Acute gastroenteritis and video camera surveillance: a cruise ship case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diskin, Arthur L; Caro, Gina M; Dahl, Eilif

    2014-01-01

    A 'faecal accident' was discovered in front of a passenger cabin of a cruise ship. After proper cleaning of the area the passenger was approached, but denied having any gastrointestinal symptoms. However, when confronted with surveillance camera evidence, she admitted having the accident and even bringing the towel stained with diarrhoea back to the pool towels bin. She was isolated until the next port where she was disembarked. Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) caused by Norovirus is very contagious and easily transmitted from person to person on cruise ships. The main purpose of isolation is to avoid public vomiting and faecal accidents. To quickly identify and isolate contagious passengers and crew and ensure their compliance are key elements in outbreak prevention and control, but this is difficult if ill persons deny symptoms. All passenger ships visiting US ports now have surveillance video cameras, which under certain circumstances can assist in finding potential index cases for AGE outbreaks.

  6. Clinical features of endemic community-acquired psittacosis

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    J.M. Branley

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a large outbreak of community-acquired psittacosis in 2002 in residents of the Blue Mountains, New South Wales, Australia, we reviewed new cases in this area over a 7-year period from 2003 to 2009. Using the 2010 criteria from the Centers for Disease Control National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, 85 patients with possible psittacosis were identified, of which 48 were identified as definite or probable infection. Clinical features of these cases are summarized. In addition to Chlamydia-specific serology, specimens, where available, underwent nucleic acid testing for chlamydial DNA using real-time PCR. Chlamydophila psittaci DNA was detected in samples from 23 patients. Four of 18 specimens were culture positive. This is the first description of endemic psittacosis, and is characterized in this location by community-acquired psittacosis resulting from inadvertent exposure to birds. The disease is likely to be under-diagnosed, and may often be mistaken for gastroenteritis or meningitis given the frequency of non-respiratory symptoms, particularly without a history of contact with birds. Clinical characteristics of endemic and outbreak-associated cases were similar. The nature of exposure, risk factors and reasons for the occurrence of outbreaks of psittacosis require further investigation.

  7. Clinical characteristics and genetic diversity of noroviruses in adults with acute gastroenteritis in Beijing, China in 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Geng; Jin, Miao; Li, Huiying; Li, Quanrui; Wang, Jing; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) infections that cause acute gastroenteritis are commonly observed during colder months. This study was conducted to investigate the clinical features and molecular epidemiology of NoVs in adult outpatients with acute gastroenteritis in Beijing, China from August 2008 to July 2009. Five hundred nineteen patients were enrolled, their stool specimens were collected, and 136 (26.2%) were positive for NoV. The elderly were found to be more susceptible to NoVs than other age groups. The greatest number of gastroenteritis cases associated with occurred in October. Six GI and eleven GII NoV genotypes were isolated; among these, the GII.4 genotype was most prevalent (70/140 and 50% were the 2006b variant). The elderly were more susceptible to the GII.4 genotype than to other genotypes. Greater numbers of neutrophils in the peripheral blood were observed in the NoV infected group than in uninfected control group. However, the levels of neutrophils and leukocytes in the non-GII.4 patients infected with NoV were higher than those of the GII.4-infected patients. The data highlight the role of NoV as a primary agent responsible for gastroenteritis in adults in Beijing, China.

  8. Detection of rotavirus and other enteropathogens in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Havana, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, María de Los Angeles; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; de Los Angeles León, María; Rodriguez, Misladys; Perez-Lastre, Jorge; Triana, Thelma; Guerra, Mabel; Ayllón, Lucía; Escalante, Gladys; Hadad, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to diagnose infections with rotavirus and other enteric pathogens in children under five years old with acute gastroenteritis and to identify the most common epidemiological and clinical characteristics of these pathogens. The study was conducted using 110 stool samples from the same number of children under five years old who were inpatients at three paediatric hospitals in Havana, Cuba, between October and December 2011. The samples were tested for rotavirus and other enteric pathogens using traditional and molecular microbiological methods. Pathogens were detected in 85 (77.3 %) of the children. Rotavirus was the most commonly found, appearing in 54.5 % of the children, followed by bacteria (29 %) and parasites (10.9 %). Other viral pathogens detected included adenovirus (6.4 %) and astrovirus (3.6 %). In rotavirus-positives cases, at least one other pathogen was detected, usually a bacterium (26.6 %). More than three episodes of watery diarrhea in 24 hours were observed in 78.3 % of the cases. Dehydration was found in 30 (50 %) rotavirus-positive children, of whom seven (11.6 %) were transferred to an intensive care unit due to complications of metabolic acidosis. Rotavirus was most commonly observed among children under 12 months old (65 %). The highest incidence of infection occurred in children who were under the care of a relative at home (78.3 %), had not been breastfed (65 %), or had been breastfed for less than six months (28.3 %). The genotype combinations most frequently found were G9P8 (28.3 %) and G1P8 (10 %). This study demonstrates the presence of rotavirus and other enteric pathogens as causes of gastroenteritis in hospitalized infants and young children in Cuba.

  9. Norovirus GII.4 variant 2006b caused epidemics of acute gastroenteritis in Australia during 2007 and 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eden, John-Sebastian; Bull, Rowena A; Tu, Elise; McIver, Christopher J; Lyon, Michael J; Marshall, John A; Smith, David W; Musto, Jennie; Rawlinson, William D; White, Peter A

    2010-12-01

    Over the last decade, four epidemics of norovirus-associated gastroenteritis have been reported in Australia. These epidemics were characterized by numerous outbreaks in institutional settings such as hospitals and nursing homes, as well as increases in requests for NoV testing in diagnostic centers. During 2007 and 2008, widespread outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis were once again seen across Australia, peaking during the winter months. The primary objective of this study was to characterize two winter epidemics of NoV-associated gastroenteritis in 2007 and 2008 in Australia. Following this, we aimed to determine if these epidemics were caused by a new GII.4 variant or a previously circulating NoV strain. NoV-positive fecal samples (n=219) were collected over a 2-year period, December 2006 to December 2008, from cases of acute gastroenteritis in Australia. NoV RNA was amplified from these samples using a nested RT-PCR approach targeting the 5' end of the capsid gene, termed region C. Further, characterization was performed by sequence analysis of the RdRp and capsid genes and recombination was identified using SimPlot. From 2004 to 2008, peaks in the numbers of NoV-positive EIA tests from the Prince of Wales Hospital Laboratory correlated with the overall number of gastroenteritis outbreaks reported to NSW Health, thereby supporting recent studies showing that NoV is the major cause of outbreak gastroenteritis. The predominant NoV GII variant identified during the 2007-2008 period was the GII.4 pandemic variant, 2006b (71.51%, 128/179), which replaced the 2006a variant identified in the previous Australian epidemic of 2006. Four novel GII variants were also identified including the three GII.4 variants: NoV 2008, NoV Osaka 2007 and NoV Cairo 2007, and one novel recombinant NoV designated GII.e/GII.12. The increase in acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in 2007 and 2008 were associated with the spread of the NoV GII.4 variant 2006b. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All

  10. What is new on the term probiotics and the role of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajewska, H

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in probiotics, and evidence of the effectiveness of probiotics in preventing or treating diarrhoeal diseases is also advancing. The purpose of this short opinion paper is to summarise two aspects of current development in regard to probiotics. First, it discusses what is new with regard to some key questions related to the term 'probiotic'. Second, recent, evidence-based, clinical practice guidelines on the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis in children are presented.

  11. Molecular Detection of Human Calicivirus in Young Children Hospitalized with Acute Gastroenteritis in Melbourne, Australia, during 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkwood, Carl D; Bishop, Ruth F.

    2001-01-01

    Reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analysis identified calciviruses in 32 of 60 stool specimens (negative for other enteric pathogens) obtained from children admitted to our hospital with acute gastroenteritis. The overall annual incidence rate for calcivirus was 9% (32 of 354 children). Molecular analysis identified 30 “Norwalk-like virus” genogroup II (predominantly Lordsdale cluster) and 2 “Sapporo-like virus” strains.

  12. Gestational age, mode of birth and breastmilk feeding all influence acute early childhood gastroenteritis: a record-linkage cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Bentley, Jason P; Simpson, Judy M; Bowen, Jenny R.; Morris, Jonathan M.; Roberts, Christine L; Nassar, Natasha

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a leading cause of infectious morbidity in childhood. Clinical studies have implicated caesarean section, early birth and formula feeding in modifying normal gut microbiota development and immune system homeostasis in early life. Rates of early birth and cesarean delivery are also increasing worldwide. This study aimed to investigate the independent and combined associations of the mode and timing of birth and breastmilk feeding with AGE hospitalisati...

  13. Outbreak of sapovirus infection among infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in Osaka City, Japan during 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Tung Gia; Trinh, Quang Duy; Yagyu, Fumihiro; Sugita, Kumiko; Okitsu, Shoko; Müller, Werner E G; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2006-06-01

    One hundred and twenty five fecal specimens were collected from sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis in a pediatric clinic in Osaka City, Japan from July 2004 to June 2005 and tested for the presence of rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, and adenovirus by RT-multiplex PCR. Among diarrheal viruses detected, norovirus was the most prevalent (19.2%, 24 of 125), followed by group A rotavirus (18.4%, 23 of 125), astrovirus (1.6%, 2 of 125), and adenovirus (0.8%, 1 of 125), respectively. Interestingly, sapovirus infection was identified with high incidence of 17.6% (22 of 125). Sapovirus was subjected to molecular genetic analysis by sequencing. It was found that sapovirus detected in this study was classified into four genotypes (GI/1, GI/4, GI/6, and GI/8), and sapovirus GI/6 was predominant, followed by GI/8 and accounted for 81.8% (18 of 22) and 9.1% (2 of 22), respectively. It was noteworthy that sapovirus GI/6 infection was apparently confined within the period of 5 months (August 2004 through December 2004). This pattern of infection implied the outbreak of sapovirus GI/6 in these patients, which was the first outbreak of acute gastroenteritis attributed to sapovirus in Osaka City. Another interesting feature of the study was the appearance of two novel, naturally occurring recombinant sapoviruses circulating in the Japanese population studied. This report confirmed the presence as well as the importance of sapovirus causing acute gastroenteritis among Japanese infants and children.

  14. Outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in a rural population, spread person to person contact

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    Diego Almagro Nievas

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in the population, occurred in June and July 2002.Design: A descriptive, case-control study.Location: Rural population of 1.323 inhabitants, living in Granada.Population and sample: It affected about 200 persons. 32 cases and 32 controls were selected.Intervention: An epidemiological survey was run, taking into account variables of time and person (age, sex, drinking water intake and clinical pattern of the disease antecedent. We investigated the different independents variables. A contingency tables, hypothesis X2 test, calculation of the unprocessed and subsequently adjusted Odds Ratio (IC 95% were carried out using logic regression.Results: No significant differences were found in the sex variable and consumption of water. The epidemic curve no showed a rapid onset. In the adjusted Odds Ratio calculation the clinical pattern of disease antecedent showed causal relationship values (adjusted Odds Ratio=5,32; IC-95% 1,23-22,93; p=0,025. The inspection of the water network no showed deficient. Patient stool samples no were sent for analysis.Conclusions: This study has not detected disease-causing agent, however, it’s spread through person-to-person contact.

  15. Emergence of rare sapovirus genotype among infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, T G; Trinh, Q D; Yagyu, F; Okitsu, S; Ushijima, H

    2007-01-01

    A total of 1,154 fecal specimens from infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in five cities in Japan (Maizuru, Tokyo, Sapporo, Saga, and Osaka), collected from July 2003 to June 2005, were tested for the presence of diarrheal viruses by reverse transcriptase multiplex PCR. Overall, 469 of 1,154 (40.6%) were positive for diarrheal viruses, of which 49 (10.4%) were positive for sapovirus. The peak of sapovirus infection shifted from April-June in 2003-2004 to October-December in 2004-2005. The observations show that maximum sapovirus prevalence can occur during warmer seasons. Sapovirus was subjected to molecular genetic analysis by sequencing. The results indicated that sapovirus genogroup I was a dominant group (100%). Sapovirus strains detected in this study were further classified into four genotypes (GI/1, GI/4, GI/6, and GI/8). Of these, sapovirus GI/1 was the most predominant, followed by sapovirus GI/6; these accounted for 93% (13 of 14) and 7% (1 of 14), respectively, in 2003-2004. However, it was noteworthy that sapovirus GI/6 suddenly emerged to become the leading genotype, accounting for 77% (27 of 35) of isolates in 2004-2005. This is believed to be the first report of the changing distribution of sapovirus genotypes and of the emergence of the rare sapovirus GI/6.

  16. Detection of Rotavirus in children with acute gastroenteritis in Zagazig University Hospitals in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Salwa Badrelsabbah; El-Bialy, Abdallah Abdelkader; Mohammed, Mervat Soliman; El-Sheikh, Azza Omar; Elhewala, Ahmed; Bahgat, Shereen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Rotavirus is the major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in infants and young children all over the world. The objective of the study was to compare different methods for detecting rotavirus and to assess the burden of rotavirus as a causative agent for AGE in children younger than five. Methods: This case control study included 65 children with AGE and 35 healthy control children. They were chosen from the Pediatric Department of Zagazig University Hospitals from October 2014 to March 2015. Stool samples were obtained and assayed for rotavirus by the immunochromatography test (ICT), enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real time RT-PCR (qr RT-PCR). Results: Fifty out of the 65 patients (76.9%) were positive for qr RT-PCR. Forty-five (69.2%) and 44 (67.7%) were positive for ICT and ELISA, respectively. There was a significant association between the severity of the disease as determined by the Vesikari score and rotavirus infection. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that ICT is a useful method for the rapid screening of group A rotavirus in fecal specimens, because it is rapid, inexpensive, easy to perform, and requires very little equipment. In addition, this study highlights the substantial health burden of rotavirus AGE among children less than five. PMID:26435821

  17. Effectiveness of a multifactorial handwashing program to reduce school absenteeism due to acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor-Martínez, Ernestina; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco; Martínez-López, Jose Miguel; Garrido-Fernández, Pablo; Santisteban-Martínez, Joaquin; Seijas-Vazquez, Maria Luisa; Campos-Fernandez, Maria Amparo; Bonillo-Perales, Antonio

    2014-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is one of the most common diseases among children and an important cause of school absenteeism. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a handwashing program using hand sanitizers for the prevention of school absenteeism due to AGE. A randomized, controlled and open study of a sample of 1341 children between 4 and 12 years of age, attending 5 state schools in Almería (Spain), with an 8-month follow up (academic year). The experimental group (EG) washed their hands with soap and water, complementing this with the use of a hand sanitizer, and the control group (CG) followed the usual handwashing procedure. Absenteeism rates due GI were compared between the 2 groups through the multivariate Poisson regression analysis. Percent days absent in both groups were compared with a Z-test. 446 cases of school absenteeism due to AGE were registered. The school children from the EG had a 36% lower risk of absenteeism due to AGE (IRR: 0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.52-0.78) and a decrease in absenteeism of 0.13 episodes/child/academic year (0.27 of EG vs 0.40 CG/episodes/child/academic year, P soap is an efficient measure to reduce absent days and the number of school absenteeism cases due to AGE.

  18. Outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in an air force base in Western Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolokotronis Theodoros

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background On the 20th September 2005, soldiers and staff at the Air Force base in Western Greece experienced an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis. The purpose of this study was to identify the agent and the source of the outbreak in order to develop control measures and to avoid similar outbreaks in the future. Methods A case-control analytical approach was employed with 100 randomly selected cases and 66 controls. Patients completed standardized questionnaires, odds ratios were calculated and statistical significance was determined using χ2 test. In addition, to identify the source of the infection, we performed bacteriological examination of food samples (included raw beef, cooked minced meat, grated cheese and grated cheese in sealed package collected from the cuisine of the military unit. Results More than 600 out of the 1,050 individuals who ate lunch that day, became ill. The overall attack rate, as the military doctor of the unit estimated it, was at least 60%. The overall odds ratio of gastroenteritis among those who had lunch was 370 (95% CI: 48–7700 as compared to those who didn't eat lunch. Among the symptoms the most prominent were watery diarrhoea (96% and abdominal pain (73%. The mean incubation period was 9 h and the median duration of the symptoms was 21 h. In the bacteriological examination, Staphylococcus aureus was detected in a sample of raw beef (2,000 cfu per g and in two samples of grated cheese; leftover cheese from lunch (7,800 cfu per g and an unopened package purchased from the market (3,000 cfu per g. Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that the aetiological agent of this outbreak was S. aureus. The food vehicle was the grated cheese, which was mixed with the beef and served for lunch in the military unit. This outbreak highlights the capacity of enterotoxin-producing bacteria to cause short term, moderately-severe illness in a young and healthy population. It underscores the need for proper

  19. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Farida (Helmia)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ __Background:__ Knowledge about the etiology and management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Indonesia is lacking. __Methods:__ Hospital-based and a population-based cohort studies were carried out during 2007-2011 in Semarang, Indonesia. __Results:__

  20. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory respon

  1. [National consensus for management of community acquired pneumonia in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldías P, Fernando; Pérez C, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an acute respiratory infection that affects pulmonary parenchyma, and is caused by community acquired microorganisms. In Chile, pneumonia represents the main cause of death due to infectious diseases and is the third specific cause of mortality in adults. In 1999, an experts committee in representation of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias", presented the first National Guidelines for the Treatment of Adult Community Acquired Pneumonia, mainly based in foreign experience and documents, and adapted it to our National Health System Organization. During the last decade, impressive epidemiological and technological changes have occurred, making the update of guidelines for treatment of NAC by several international scientific societies, necessary. These changes include: new respiratory pathogens that are being identified in CAP and affect adult patients (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila); the increasing senescent adult population that carries multiple co-morbidities; the emergence of antimicrobial resistance among respiratory pathogens associated to massive antibiotic prescription; the development by the pharmaceutical industry of new drugs that are effective for pneumonia treatment (macrolides, ketolides and respiratory fluorquinolones); and the development of new diagnostic techniques for detection of antigens, antibodies, and bacterial DNA by molecular biology, useful in respiratory infections. Based on these antecedents, an Advisory Committee of "Sociedad Chilena de Enfermedades Respiratorias" and "Sociedad Chilena de Infectología" has reviewed the national and international evidence about CAP management in adults in order to update clinical recommendations for our country.

  2. Prevalence of sapovirus infection among infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in Dhaka City, Bangladesh during 2004-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Shuvra Kanti; Phan, Tung Gia; Nguyen, Tuan Anh; Nishio, Osamu; Salim, Abul Faiz Mohammad; Yagyu, Fumihiro; Okitsu, Shoko; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2007-05-01

    Sapovirus, a member of the family Caliciviridae is one of the major causative agents of viral gastroenteritis affecting all age group. Sapovirus was detected in 25 of 917 stool specimens from infants and children with acute gastroenteritis in a Children Hospital in Dhaka City, Bangladesh during 2004-2005. All fecal specimens were examined for sapovirus by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Molecular analysis of sapovirus was carried out by sequencing methods. Sapovirus detected in this study was clustered into only one distinct genogroup I. Sapovirus GI/1 was predominant, followed by GI/2 and accounted for 92% (23 of 25) and 8% (2 of 25), respectively. The results clearly indicated that sapovirus infections were observed most commonly in the autumn to winter seasons (September to January) in Dhaka City. The common clinical symptoms of sapovirus infected patients were dehydration (88%), vomiting (76%), and abdominal pain (60%). This is the first report of sapovirus in Bangladesh.

  3. Acute Gastroenteritis and Campylobacteriosis in Swiss Primary Care: The Viewpoint of General Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bless, Philipp J.; Muela Ribera, Joan; Schmutz, Claudia; Zeller, Andreas; Mäusezahl, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AG) is frequently caused by infectious intestinal diseases (IID) including food- and waterborne pathogens of public health importance. Among these pathogens, Campylobacter spp. plays a major role. Many European countries monitor selected IIDs within disease surveillance systems. In Switzerland, the information on IIDs is restricted to limited surveillance data, while no data is available for AG. We conducted a qualitative study among Swiss general practitioners (GPs) to investigate the case management of AG and campylobacteriosis patients, the associated disease burden and the determinants leading to registration in the National Notification System for Infectious Diseases (NNSID). Interviews were conducted with a semi-structured questionnaire and underwent inductive content analysis based on Grounded Theory. The questionnaire was repeatedly adapted to capture emerging themes until the point of theoretical saturation. GPs perceived AG and campylobacteriosis of little relevance to their daily work and public health in general. According to GP self-estimates each consults about two cases of AG per week and diagnoses a median of five campylobacteriosis cases per year. A large proportion of AG cases receives telephone consultations only and gets medical advice from the practice nurse. Antibiotic therapy is considered useful and stool diagnostics are performed for about a fifth of consulting AG patients. Stool diagnostics (“test”) and antibiotic therapy (“treat”) are interrelated and follow four strategies: “Wait & See”, “Treat & See”, “Treat & Test”, and “Test & See”. AG case management is diverse and includes different triage steps. A small proportion of AG patients have stool diagnostics performed and only positive tested patients are reported to the NNSID. As a result severe cases and cases with a history of travel abroad are overrepresented in the NNSID. The use of multiplex PCR panels in routine diagnostics likely

  4. Recognising and managing community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Vanessa

    2015-11-18

    Pneumonia remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK and yet the seriousness of the disease is underestimated. Pneumonia can be life-threatening because the delicate tissues of the alveoli and pulmonary capillaries are susceptible to damage from the inflammatory response. This damage leads to consolidation that prevents the diffusion of oxygen and carbon dioxide, and this in turn can lead to respiratory failure. This article summarises guidance on the diagnosis and management of community-acquired pneumonia, and also includes information on the prevention of pneumonia. This information should be valuable to nurses working in a variety of clinical areas since patients with community-acquired pneumonia are encountered in primary, intermediate, secondary and critical care.

  5. Norovirus gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodgame, Richard

    2007-03-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that norovirus is one of the most frequent causes of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and nucleotide sequencing are the means by which the hundreds of norovirus strains have been identified, named, and classified into genogroups and genetic clusters. They are also the means by which a particular strain is traced from the source of an outbreak throughout its spread. These molecular techniques have been combined with classic epidemiology to investigate norovirus outbreaks in diverse settings, including hospitals, nursing homes, dining locations, schools, daycare centers, and vacation venues. Outbreaks are difficult to control because of the apparent ease of transmission through food, water, person-to-person contact, and environmental surfaces. Almost all patients with norovirus gastroenteritis recover completely, but hospital and nursing home outbreaks have been associated with morbidity and mortality. The diagnostic and management approach to an individual patient is to use clinical and epidemiologic findings to rule out "not norovirus." At the first sign that there is an outbreak, strict compliance with cleaning, disinfection, and work release guidelines is important to prevent further spread.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of enteric viruses in patients with acute gastroenteritis in Aichi prefecture, Japan, 2008/09-2013/14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Noriko; Kobayashi, Shinichi; Minagawa, Hiroko; Matsushita, Tadashi; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-07-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a critical infectious disease that affects infants and young children throughout the world, including Japan. This retrospective study was conducted from September 2008 to August 2014 (six seasons: 2008/09-2013/14) to investigate the incidence of enteric viruses responsible for 1,871 cases of acute gastroenteritis in Aichi prefecture, Japan. Of the 1,871 cases, 1,100 enteric viruses were detected in 978 samples, of which strains from norovirus (NoV) genogroup II (60.9%) were the most commonly detected, followed by strains of rotavirus A (RVA) (23.2%), adenovirus (AdV) type 41 (8.2%), sapovirus (SaV) (3.6%), human astrovirus (HAstV) (2.8%), and NoV genogroup I (1.3%). Sequencing of the NoV genogroup II (GII) strains revealed that GII.4 was the most common genotype, although four different GII.4 variants were also identified. The most common G-genotype of RVA was G1 (63.9%), followed by G3 (27.1%), G2 (4.7%) and G9 (4.3%). Three genogroups of SaV strains were found: GI (80.0%), GII (15.0%), and GV (5.0%). HAstV strains were genotyped as HAstV-1 (80.6%), HAstV-8 (16.1%), and HAstV-3 (3.2%). These results show that NoV GII was the leading cause of sporadic acute viral gastroenteritis, although a variety of enteric viruses were detected during the six-season surveillance period.

  7. An outbreak of norovirus-associated acute gastroenteritis associated with contaminated barrelled water in many schools in Zhejiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Minyang; Song, Jianqiang; He, Fan; Qiu, Yinwei; Wu, Haocheng; Lu, Qinbao; Feng, Yan; Lin, Junfen; Chen, Enfu; Chai, Chengliang

    2017-01-01

    Objectives More than 900 students and teachers at many schools in Jiaxing city developed acute gastroenteritis in February 2014. An immediate epidemiological investigation was conducted to identify the pathogen, infection sources and route of transmission. Methods The probable cases and confirmed cases were defined as students or teachers with diarrhoea or vomiting present since the term began in February 2014. An active search was conducted for undiagnosed cases among students and teachers. Details such as demographic characteristics, gastrointestinal symptoms, and drinking water preference and frequency were collected via a uniform epidemiological questionnaire. A case-control study was implemented, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. Rectal swabs from several patients, food handlers and barrelled water factory workers, as well as water and food samples, were collected to test for potential bacteria and viruses. Results A total of 924 cases fit the definition of the probable case, including 8 cases of laboratory-confirmed norovirus infection at 13 schools in Jiaxing city between February 12 and February 21, 2014. The case-control study demonstrated that barrelled water was a risk factor (OR: 20.15, 95% CI: 2.59–156.76) and that bottled water and boiled barrelled water were protective factors (OR: 0.31, 95% CI: 0.13–0.70, and OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.16–0.77). A total of 11 rectal samples and 8 barrelled water samples were detected as norovirus-positive, and the genotypes of viral strains were the same (GII). The norovirus that contaminated the barrelled water largely came from the asymptomatic workers. Conclusions This acute gastroenteritis outbreak was caused by barrelled water contaminated by norovirus. The outbreak was controlled after stopping the supply of barrelled water. The barrelled water supply in China represents a potential source of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks due to the lack of surveillance and supervision

  8. Evaluation of the results of acute viral gastroenteritis data in Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory in 2009

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    Nurhan ALBAYRAK

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Norovirus, Rotavirus, Adenovirus and Astrovirus are responsible for most non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis. The incidence of these viral agents in Turkey is not well known. In this study, it was aimed to document the viral etiology of the stool samples which were send to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency (RSNPHA, Virology Reference and Research Laboratory for investigation of viral acute gastroenteritis agents. Method: A total of 147 stool samples from 11 different provinces were send to the Virology Laboratory for Reference and Research of RSNPHA in 2009. Samples were collected from patients admitted because of acute gastroenteritis and from the cases with the signs of illness at different times of the year and sent by the Provincial Health Directorates to our laboratory. The samples were examined in the laboratory using the commercial multiplex real-time PCR kit for norovirus genotype I, norovirus genotype II, rotavirus, adenovirus and astrovirus. Results: 65 (44.2 % samples were found to be positive at least for one viral agent and 10 (6.8 % samples for more than one viral agent. Norovirus (particularly genotype II infections were detected as the most prevalent viral agent in acute gastroenteritis patients in this period. Rotavirus infections were determined as the second most common infection after norovirus infections. Adenovirus infections have been found to be the least prevalent agent in the laboratory. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that norovirus genotype II has been more commonly responsible for acute diarrhea than the other viral pathogens. The viral agents we have studied should be considered as pathogens that can be seen in all seasons. Viral factors should not be underestimated as the cause of acute gastroenteritis; additionally it should be noted that acute gastroenteritis could be caused by coinfection of viral agents.

  9. Iatrogenic Dysnatremias in Children with Acute Gastroenteritis in High-Income Countries: A Systematic Review

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    Silviu Grisaru

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAcute gastroenteritis (AGE causing dehydration with or without dysnatremias is a common childhood health challenge. While it is accepted that oral rehydration therapy is preferred, clinical factors or parent and healthcare provider preferences may lead to intravenous rehydration (IVR. Isotonic solutions are increasingly recommended in most scenarios requiring IVR. Nevertheless, children with AGE, having ongoing losses of water and electrolytes, represent a unique population.ObjectivesTo evaluate the association between acquired dysnatremias and IVR in children with AGE.MethodsA systematic search of MEDLINE database was conducted through September 14, 2016. Observational studies and clinical trials conducted in high-income countries were included. The Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach was used to evaluate the overall quality of evidence for each outcome.Results603 papers were identified of which 6 were included (3 randomized controlled trials and 3 observational studies. Pooling of patient data was not possible due to significantly different interventions or exposures. Single studies results demonstrated that within 24 h, administration of isotonic saline was not associated with a significant decline in serum sodium while hypotonic solutions (0.2–0.45% saline were associated, in one study, with mean serum sodium declines from 1.3 mEq/L (139.2, SD 2.9–137.9, SD 2.5 in 133 young infants (aged 1–28 months, to 5.7 (SD 3.1 mEq/L in a subgroup of 18 older children (age mean 5.8, SD 2.7 years. Both isotonic and hypotonic saline were shown to be associated with improvement of baseline hyponatremia in different studies. Baseline hypernatremia was corrected within 4–24 h in 81/83 (99.6% children using hypotonic saline IVR.ConclusionThere is a paucity of publications assessing the risk for acquired dysnatremias associated with IVR in children with AGE. Current high-quality evidence

  10. High prevalence of norovirus in children with sporadic acute gastroenteritis in Manaus, Amazon Region, northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Samya Thalita Picanço da; Fumian, Tulio Machado; Lima, Ian Carlos Gomes de; Siqueira, Jones Anderson Monteiro; Silva, Luciana Damascena da; Hernández, Juliana das Mercês; Lucena, Maria Silvia Souza de; Reymão, Tammy Kathlyn Amaral; Soares, Luana da Silva; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc Pereira; Gabbay, Yvone Benchimol

    2017-06-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) worldwide, especially in children under five years. Studies involving the detection and molecular characterisation of NoV have been performed in Brazil, demonstrating its importance as an etiological agent of AGE. The objectives of this study were to investigate the frequency of human NoV and to genotype the strains isolated from 0-14-year-old patients of AGE in Manaus, Brazil, over a period of two years. A total of 426 faecal samples were collected between January 2010 and December 2011. All samples were tested for the presence of NoV antigens using a commercial enzyme immunoassay kit. RNA was extracted from all faecal suspensions and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the NoV-polymerase partial region was performed as a trial test. Positive samples were then subjected to PCR with specific primers for partial capsid genes, which were then sequenced. NoV was detected in 150 (35.2%) faecal samples, for at least one of the two techniques used. NoV was detected in children from all age groups, with the highest positivity observed among the group of 1-2 years old. Clinically, fever was verified in 43% of the positive cases and 46.3% of the negative cases, and vomiting was observed in 75.8% and 70.8% cases in these groups, respectively. Monthly distribution showed that the highest positivity was observed in January 2010 (81.2%), followed by February and April 2010 and March 2011, when the positivity rate reached almost 50%. Phylogenetic analyses performed with 65 positive strains demonstrated that 58 (89.2%) cases of NoV belonged to genotype GII.4, five (7.7%) to GII.6, and one (1.5%) each to GII.7 and GII.3. This research revealed a high circulation of NoV GII.4 in Manaus and contributed to the understanding of the importance of this virus in the aetiology of AGE cases, especially in a region with such few studies available.

  11. Acute Gastroenteritis and Recreational Water: Highest Burden Among Young US Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECT I VES : To provide summary estimates of gastroenteritis risks and illness burden associated with recreational water exposure and determine whether children have higher risks and burden.METHODS: We combined individual participant data from 13 prospective cohorts at marine a...

  12. Burden of acute gastroenteritis among children younger than 5 years of age – a survey among parents in the United Arab Emirates

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    Howidi Mohammad

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its high incidence among children under the age of five, little is known about the burden of pediatric gastroenteritis outside the medical setting. The objective of this study was to describe the burden of acute gastroenteritis among children residing in the United Arab Emirates, including those not receiving medical care. Methods A quantitative cross-sectional survey of 500 parents of children under 5 years of age who had suffered from acute gastroenteritis the preceding three months was conducted in the cities of Abu Dhabi and Al Ain. Data collected included respondent characteristics, disease symptoms, medical care sought, and parental expenditures and work loss. Data were analyzed using parametric and non-parametric statistical methods. Results Vomiting and diarrhea episodes lasted on average between 3 and 4 days. Overall, 87% of parents sought medical care for their children; 10% of these cases required hospitalization with an average length of stay of 2.6 days. When medical care was sought, the average parental cost per gastroenteritis episode was US$64, 4.5 times higher than with home care only (US$14. Nearly 60% of this difference was attributable to co-payments and medication use: 69% of children used oral rehydration solution, 68% antiemetics, 65% antibiotics and 64% antidiarrheals. Overall, 38 parents missed work per 100 gastroenteritis episodes for an average of 1.4 days. Conclusions Given its high incidence, pediatric gastroenteritis has an important financial and productivity impact on parents in the United Arab Emirates. To reduce this impact, efforts should be made both to prevent acute gastroenteritis and to optimize its treatment.

  13. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  14. Pulmonary Embolism Mimicking Community Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report

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    Ibrahim Koc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute pulmonary trombo embolism is a form of venous thromboembolism that is common and sometimes even may be fatal. Patients might present with variable clinical presentation and often have non-specific complaints which make the diagnosis challenging. Here we aimed to report a thirty years old male who was diagnosed with community acquired pneumonia but further investigations revealed pulmonary embolism. A thirty years old male presented to our clinic with right sided chest pain and shortness of breath. Chest radiograph revealed right sided consolidations and pleural effusion. His physical examination revealed high body temperature (38 C° and oxygen saturation on room air was 85 %. The patient did not respond to the antibiotherapy and oxygen supply. Computed tomography angiography of the chest revealed right sided pulmonary embolism with pneumonia. Blood and sputum cultures revealed no bacteria. Cardiovascular disease panel revealed heterozygous mutation in prothrombine G20210A and metilentetrahidrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T. In conclusion pulmonary embolism may mimic community acquired pneumonia thus clinicians must be carefull during the diagnostic process.

  15. [ANEMIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnevsky, A V; Esaulenko, I E; Ovsyannikov, E S; Labzhaniya, N B; Voronina, E V; Chernov, A V

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia remains a most widespread acute infectious disease of socio-economic significance all over the world. Up to 30% of the patients present with anemia responsible for the unfavourable prognosis and elevated mortality. Not infrequently, anemia is not diagnosed during the hospital stay und therefore remains uncorrected. Severe anemia results in enhanced hypercapnia and slowed maturation of red blood cells in the bone marrow which facilitates the development of ischemic syndrome. Hepcidin, a mediator of inflammation and iron-regulatory hormone, plays an important role in the clinical course of community-acquired pneumonia. Hepsidin production increases during inflammation; it suppresses erythtropoiesis and depletes the iron depot leading to so-called anemia of inflammation. Hypoxia and anemia activate erythtropoiesis, and the released erythropoietin inhibits hepsidin production. During pneumonia resolution, hepsidin promotes recovery from anemia by activating iron absorption. The curreni literature contains few data on the use of hepcidin as a diagnostic marker of anemia. The necessity oftreating anemia in patients with pneumonia under hospital conditions is a matter of discussion. Direct involvement of hepcidin in iron metabolism creates a prerequisite for the treatment of anemia. Medicamental suppression of its activity by stimulating erythtropoiesis can facilitate normalization of iron metabolism and restoration of hemoglobin level.

  16. A Case Control Study of Incident Rheumatological Conditions Following Acute Gastroenteritis During Military Deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    commonly caused by diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp ., Shigella spp . and non- typhoidal Salmonella spp ., although viral and parasitic...and coli, non-typhoidal Salmonella spp , Shigella spp and Yersinia enterocolitica.9–13 Reports of ReA following bacterial gastroenteritis are most...significantly with age. In a prospective study of culture-confirmed Campylobacter, E coli O157, Salmonella , Shigella and Yersinia infections among

  17. Guidelines on acute gastroenteritis in children : a critical appraisal of their quality and applicability in primary care Epidemiology and research methodology in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Jose; Berger, Marjolein Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reasons for poor guideline adherence in acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children in high-income countries are unclear, but may be due to inconsistency between guideline recommendations, lack of evidence, and lack of generalizability of the recommendations to general practice. The aim of t

  18. Isolation of NDM-1-producing multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas putida from a paediatric case of acute gastroenteritis, India

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    D. Bhattacharya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida is an uncommon opportunistic pathogen, usually susceptible to antimicrobial agents. Data concerning resistance to antimicrobial agents in clinical P. putida isolates are limited. To the best of our knowledge we report for the first time the isolation of NDM-1-producing multidrug-resistant P. putida from a case of acute gastroenteritis. The isolate showed resistance to a wide range of antimicrobials, including fluoroquinolones, third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems. The isolate also exhibited multiple mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region and showed the presence of qepA, blaTEM, blaOXA1 and blaOXA7 genes. The present study highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that do not yield common pathogens.

  19. A cluster of salivirus A1 (Picornaviridae) infections in newborn babies with acute gastroenteritis in a neonatal hospital unit in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boros, Ákos; Raáb, Margit; Károly, Éva; Karai, Adrienn; Kátai, Andrea; Bolba, Nóra; Pankovics, Péter; Reuter, Gábor

    2016-06-01

    Salivirus (family Picornaviridae) may be associated with acute gastroenteritis in humans, but there have been no reports of salivirus outbreaks. Salivirus A1 infection with faecal virus concentrations of 2.1-2.6 × 10(9)/g were identified retrospectively in newborn babies, between the ages of 1.5 and 5 days, with apparent clinical symptoms of diarrhea (100 %), fever (40 %), vomiting (40 %), and loss of appetite (40 %) in a neonatal hospital unit in Hungary in July 2013. The complete genome sequence of the salivirus (including the 5'-terminal end) was determined. Salivirus mono-infection may be associated with gastroenteritis in babies who are a few days old. Salivirus testing should be done in public health laboratories in gastroenteritis outbreaks with unknown etiology.

  20. Genetic diversity of norovirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus isolated from children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasao, Rungnapa; Maneekarn, Niwat; Khamrin, Pattara; Pantip, Chansom; Tonusin, Supin; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Peerakome, Supatra

    2008-10-01

    Norovirus (NV), sapovirus (SV), and human astrovirus (HAstV) are important causes of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children. This study investigated the prevalence of NV, SV, and HAstV infections in children hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand from May 2000 to March 2002. Fecal specimens were tested for NV, SV, and HAstV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using degenerate specific primers. These viruses were characterized further by sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the partial capsid gene. From 296 fecal specimens tested, 13.5% (40 of 296) were positive for NV, SV, and HAstV. Of these, NV most predominant, with a prevalence of 60% (24 of 40), of which 17.5% were NVGI and 42.5% were NVGII. Of note, one specimen was positive for both NVGI and SV. SV was detected in 25%, while HAstV was detected in 17.5%. Analysis of nucleotide and amino acid sequences revealed that NVGI strains comprised GI/3, GI/4, GI/6, GI/7, and GI/13 genotypes. Among NVGII strains, approximately half of them belonged to genotype GII/4 (Lordsdale virus cluster), followed by GII/3, GII/10, GII/1, GII/6, GII/8, and GII/15. Analysis of SV sequences revealed that SVGI (Manchester virus) was more common than SVGII (London virus). The SV genotypes detected in this study belonged to SVGI/1, SVGI/4, SVGI/5, SVGII/1, and SVGII/2, whereas the HAstV belonged to genotypes HAstV-1, HAstV-2, HAstV-3, and HAstV-5. The findings suggest that NV, SV, and HAstV are important enteric viruses cocirculating among hospitalized children in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

  1. Diversity of human astrovirus genotypes circulating in children with acute gastroenteritis in Thailand during 2000-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malasao, Rungnapa; Khamrin, Pattara; Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2012-11-01

    Human astrovirus (HAstV) is one of the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in children worldwide. The objective of this study was to elucidate the molecular epidemiology and genotypic diversity of HAstV circulating in pediatric patients admitted to hospital with diarrhea in Thailand during the year 2000-2011, except for 2004, 2006, and 2009. A total of 1,022 fecal specimens were tested for HAstV by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). HAstV was detected at 1.4% (14 of 1,022). All HAstV strains detected in this study were characterized further by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Analysis of 348 bp partial capsid nucleotide sequences revealed that HAstV strains detected were HAstV-1 (1a, 1b, and 1d) (8 strains), HAstV-2 (2c) (3 strains), HAstV-3 (1 strain), and HAstV-5 (2 strains). HAstV-1, the most predominant genotype was detected initially in 2002 and circulated continuously up to 2011. HAstV-2 was detected in year 2001, and 2007 and grouped into a 2c lineage. HAstV-3 was found only in 2000 and HAstV-5 was found in the year 2001. The findings indicate that a wide variety of HAstV strains continue to circulate in children admitted to hospital with acute gastroenteritis in Thailand over a decade. The data provide an epidemiological overview of HAstV infection and HAstV genotype distribution in Thailand.

  2. Infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina en un hospital de agudos Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in a hospital for acute diseases

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    S. Palombarani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina (SAMR es uno de los principales agentes asociados a infecciones intrahospitalarias; sin embargo, en los últimos años ha surgido como un patógeno emergente de la comunidad, causando infecciones graves, principalmente en jóvenes. Se describen 33 casos de infecciones por SAMR de origen comunitario, diagnosticadas entre mayo de 2005 y junio de 2006 en el HIGA "Eva Perón". Se estudiaron retrospectivamente los aislamientos; se confirmó la resistencia a meticilina mediante la detección del gen mecA, se investigó la presencia de genes que codifican dos factores de virulencia (leucocidina de Panton-Valentine -LPV- y g-hemolisina y el tipo de casete mec mediante PCR. Todos los pacientes se encontraban sanos previamente. Cuatro pacientes menores de 12 años presentaron bacteriemia, uno con neumonía grave y los 3 restantes con infección osteoarticular; todos los pacientes mayores de 12 años presentaron infecciones de piel y partes blandas sin compromiso sistémico. Se constató la presencia de casete mec tipo IV en todos los aislamientos; la resistencia a meticilina no se acompañó de resistencia a otros antimicrobianos; los aislamientos fueron portadores de genes que codifican para LPV y para g-hemolisina. Es importante considerar la presencia de estas cepas de origen comunitario a fin de elaborar estrategias para su correcto tratamiento.Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most prevalent pathogens associated with nosocomial infections. However, most recently, MRSA has arisen as an emerging community pathogen, causing serious infections, mainly among young patients. We herein describe 33 cases of infections caused by community-acquired MRSA (CMRSA, diagnosed between May 2005 and June 2006, at "Eva Perón" Hospital. The isolations were retrospectively studied. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by means of the detection of the mecA gene, and the genes for two virulence

  3. Nontyphoidal salmonella infection in children with acute gastroenteritis: prevalence, serotypes, and antimicrobial resistance in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuefang; Xie, Xinbao; Xu, Xuebing; Wang, Xiangshi; Chang, Hailing; Wang, Chuanqing; Wang, Aiming; He, Yanlei; Yu, Hui; Wang, Xiaohong; Zeng, Mei

    2014-03-01

    Information about nontyphoidal Salmonella (NTS) infection in children is limited in mainland China. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence, serotypes, and antibiotic resistance patterns of NTS infection in children in Shanghai. All cases with probable bacterial diarrhea were enrolled from the enteric clinic of a tertiary pediatric hospital between July 2010 and December 2011. Salmonella isolation, serotyping, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were conducted by the microbiological laboratory. NTS were recovered from 316 (17.2%) of 1833 cases with isolation rate exceeding Campylobacter (7.1%) and Shigella (5.7%). NTS infection was prevalent year-round with a seasonal peak during summer and autumn. The median age of children with NTS gastroenteritis was 18 months. Fever and blood-in-stool were reported in 52.5% and 42.7% of cases, respectively. Salmonella Enteritidis (38.9%) and Salmonella Typhimurium (29.7%) were the most common serovars. Antimicrobial susceptibility showed 60.5% of isolates resistant to ≥1 clinically important antibiotics. Resistance to ciprofloxacin and the third-generation cephalosporins was detected in 5.5% and 7.1%-11.7% of isolates, respectively. NTS is a major enteropathogen responsible for bacterial gastroenteritis in children in Shanghai. Resistance to the current first-line antibiotics is of concern. Ongoing surveillance for NTS infection and antibiotic resistance is needed to control this pathogen in Shanghai.

  4. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

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    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  5. Molecular epidemiology and clinical severity of Human Bocavirus (HBoV) 1-4 in children with acute gastroenteritis from Pune, Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasure, Neha; Gopalkrishna, Varanasi

    2017-01-01

    Although acute gastroenteritis is a major public health problem worldwide, ∼40% of the cases remain undiagnosed for any etiological agent. Human Bocavirus (HBoV) has been detected frequently in feces of diarrhoeic children suggesting its possible etiological involvement in the disease. HBoV has not been reported in association with acute gastroenteritis from India. Fecal samples (n = 418) collected from children (age ≤5 years) hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis, between January 2009 and December 2011, from three local hospitals were examined for presence of HBoV using PCR targeting the partial VP1/VP2 capsid region (∼575 bp) followed by phylogenetic analysis. HBoV was detected in 24/418 (5.7%) cases. Co-infection was observed in 5/24 (21%) cases. HBoV infections occurred in children ≤12 months of age. Peak HBoV activity was observed in monsoon and post monsoon season. All four HBoV genotypes were detected in the study region. Major clinical symptoms of HBoV mono infections included diarrhoea (100%), fever (90%), dehydration (74%), and vomiting (58%). Dehydration was observed in all of the HBoV2-4 cases and in 50% of the HBoV1 cases. Clinical severity varied with genotype (HBoV2 > HBoV1 > HBoV3 > HBoV4). HBoV2 cases recorded severe and very severe infections. The study illustrates prevalence and vast genetic diversity of HBoVs in acute gastroenteritis. It highlights the clinical features of HBoV1-4 infections and sheds light on clinical impact of HBoV genotypes in gastroenteritis. J. Med. Virol. 89:17-23, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Failure of levofloxacin treatment in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia

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    Grossi Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. High global incidence of macrolide and penicillin resistance has been reported, whereas fluoroquinolone resistance is uncommon. Current guidelines for suspected CAP in patients with co-morbidity factors and recent antibiotic therapy recommend initial empiric therapy using one fluoroquinolone or one macrolide associated to other drugs (amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Resistance to fluoroquinolones is determined by efflux mechanisms and/or mutations in the parC and parE genes coding for topoisomerase IV and/or gyrA and gyrB genes coding for DNA gyrase. No clinical cases due to fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae strains have been yet reported from Italy. Case presentation A 72-year-old patient with long history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and multiple fluoroquinolone treatments for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections developed fever, increased sputum production, and dyspnea. He was treated with oral levofloxacin (500 mg bid. Three days later, because of acute respiratory insufficiency, the patient was hospitalized. Levofloxacin treatment was supplemented with piperacillin/tazobactam. Microbiological tests detected a S. pneumoniae strain intermediate to penicillin (MIC, 1 mg/L and resistant to macrolides (MIC >256 mg/L and fluoroquinolones (MIC >32 mg/L. Point mutations were detected in gyrA (Ser81-Phe, parE (Ile460-Val, and parC gene (Ser79-Phe; Lys137-Asn. Complete clinical response followed treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion This is the first Italian case of community-acquired pneumonia due to a fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate where treatment failure of levofloxacin was documented. Molecular analysis showed a group of mutations that have not yet been reported from Italy and has been detected only twice in Europe. Treatment with piperacillin

  8. Bacterial gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common types of bacterial gastroenteritis in a couple of days. The goal is to make you feel better and avoid dehydration. Drinking enough fluids and learning what to eat will help ease symptoms. You ...

  9. Burden, duration and costs of hospital bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis in England per winter, 2010/11-2015/16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, F G; Jit, M; Robotham, J V; Deeny, S R

    2017-09-01

    Bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis put hospitals under pressure each winter. In England, the National Health Service (NHS) has monitored the winter situation for all acute trusts since 2010/11. To estimate the burden, duration and costs of hospital bed closures due to acute gastroenteritis in winter. A retrospective analysis of routinely collected time-series data of bed closures due to diarrhoea and vomiting was conducted for the winters 2010/11 to 2015/16. Two key issues were addressed by imputing non-randomly missing values at provider level, and filtering observations to a range of dates recorded in all six winters. The lowest and highest values imputed were taken to represent the best- and worst-case scenarios. Bed-days were costed using NHS reference costs, and potential staff absence costs were based on previous studies. In the best-to-worst case, a median of 88,000-113,000 beds were closed due to gastroenteritis each winter. Of these, 19.6-20.4% were unoccupied. On average, 80% of providers were affected, and had closed beds for a median of 15-21 days each winter. Hospital costs of closed beds were £5.7-£7.5 million, which increased to £6.9-£10.0 million when including staff absence costs due to illness. The median number of hospital beds closed due to acute gastroenteritis per winter was equivalent to all general and acute hospital beds in England being unavailable for a median of 0.88-1.12 days. Costs for hospitals are high but vary with closures each winter. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. [Acute bacterial gastroenteritis: 729 cases recruited by a Primary Care national network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Vera, César; García Ventura, María; Del Castillo Aguas, Guadalupe; Domínguez Aurrecoechea, Begoña; Esparza Olcina, María Jesús; Martínez Rubio, Ana; Mengual Gil, José María

    2017-09-01

    To determine the main clinical and epidemiological features of bacterial gastroenteritis in our environment. An observational study of a Spanish population in 17 Autonomous Communities. Questionnaires of children with a stool positive culture to bacteria were collected over a one year period. A bivariate analysis was performed on the variables involved, as well as two multivariate models (for antibiotic treatment variables, and comparison Campylobacter/Salmonella). A total of 729 bacterial gastroenteritis episodes were recorded in the 17 Spanish autonomous regions, of which 41.2% were girls and 58.8% boys. The median age was 3.41 years old (interquartile range 1.55 to 6.72). The bacteria isolated were 59.9% Campylobacter, 31.8% non-Typhi Salmonella, 2.7% Aeromonas, 2.4% Yersinia, and 1.5% had more than one strain. Most infections (70%) were direct contacts, and food poisoning was less probable (25.9%). Salmonella is significantly less frequent than Campylobacter in children under the age of 3 years (adjusted OR 0.61; 95%CI: 0.43 to 0.86; P=.005), and Campylobacter is more frequent in rural areas (adjusted OR 1.48; 95%CI: 1.07 to 2.07; P=.012). Antibiotic was prescribed in 33.2% of cases. There was a greater significant difference if stools contained blood or mucus (adjusted OR 1.53; 95%CI: 1.04 to 2.27; P=.031), if the symptoms lasted more than 7days (adjusted OR 2.81; 95%CI: 2.01 to 3.93; P<.000), or if the child was admitted to hospital (adjusted OR 1.95; 95%CI: 1.08 to 3.52; P=.027). The aetiology of bacterial diarrhoea in paediatrics is typical of that of a developed country. The transmission mechanism is mainly direct, and more cases than appropriate are treated with antibiotics. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Impact of genotype-specific herd immunity on the circulatory dynamism of norovirus: a 10-year longitudinal study of viral acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakon, Naomi; Yamazaki, Kenji; Nakata, Keiko; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Yoda, Tomoko; Mantani, Masanobu; Kase, Tetsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo; Komano, Jun

    2015-03-15

    Human norovirus is a major cause of viral acute gastroenteritis worldwide. However, the transition of endemic norovirus genotypes remains poorly understood. The characteristics of natural immunity against norovirus are unclear because few studies have been performed in the natural infection setting. This prospective 10-year surveillance study of acute gastroenteritis in the province of Osaka, Japan, revealed that norovirus spread shows temporal, geographic, and age group-specific features in the humans. Genogroup II genotype 4 (GII.4) was detected in most sporadic pediatric cases, as well as in foodborne and nursing home outbreaks, respectively. The dominant genotypes in outbreaks at childcare facilities and schools shifted every season and involved GI, GII.2, GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6. Evidence at both the facility and individual levels indicated that genotype-specific herd immunity lasted long enough to influence the endemic norovirus genotype in the next season. Thus, norovirus circulates through human populations in a uniquely dynamic fashion.

  12. Molecular detection and sequence analysis of human caliciviruses from acute gastroenteritis outbreaks in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, T; Berke, T; Reuter, G; Szûcs, G; Matson, D O; Jiang, X

    2002-08-01

    Three viral gastroenteritis (VGE) outbreaks that occurred in 1998-1999, in Hungary were investigated for the presence of human caliciviruses (HuCVs). HuCVs in stool specimens were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primer pair 289/290, which was designed based on the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) sequence. RT-PCR results were confirmed by sequencing showing that all three outbreak strains belonged to genogroup II of "Norwalk-like viruses" (NLVs). Two strains had high sequence identity with strains in known genetic clusters (Hawaii and Lordsdale clusters). The third strain (MOH) had distinct RdRp sequence, sharing 77/86% (nt/aa) identity with Snow Mountain virus (SMV), the closest genogroup II virus. To characterize MOH further, we cloned, sequenced, and expressed in baculovirus its capsid gene. It had 75/79% (nt/aa) identity with SMV, but 97/98% (nt/aa) identity with NLV/Hillingdon/90/UK, a recently identified genetic cluster of HuCVs. The recombinant MOH (rMOH) capsid protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), which is antigenically distinct from other recombinant HuCV capsid antigens available in our laboratory. Further study of this VLP will have important applications in antigenic characterization and diagnosis of HuCVs.

  13. [Clinical features and characteristics of community-acquired pneumonia associated with iron deficiency anemia in children of pre-school age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiian, O I; Romanova, T O; Vasylyshyn, Kh I; Bynda, T P; Popov, S V; Vasyl'ieva, O H; Lypovs'ka, V V

    2014-01-01

    The most common clinical signs of community-acquired pneumonia associated with iron deficiency anemia in children of pre-preschool age are defined. Indicators of immunity cellular link in children with community-acquired pneumonia are studied. It is established that acute illness is characterized by disturbances in cellular immunity that are more expressed in patients with concomitant iron deficiency anemia.

  14. Evaluating outcomes associated with a discharge action plan employing single-dose home use of ondansetron in patients with acute gastroenteritis

    OpenAIRE

    Birkhahn R; Wen W; Gaeta T; Haines E; van Amerongen R

    2012-01-01

    Elizabeth Haines1, Robert van Amerongen2, Robert Birkhahn1, Wendy Wen1, Theodore Gaeta11Department of Emergency Medicine, 2Pediatric Emergency Services, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY, USAAbstract: Acute gastroenteritis accounts for 1–2 million annual pediatric emergency department visits in the US. The current literature supports the use of antiemetics, such as ondansetron, in the emergency department, reporting improved oral rehydration, cessation of vomiting, and reduc...

  15. Vaccines for viral and bacterial pathogens causing acute gastroenteritis: Part I: Overview, vaccines for enteric viruses and Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Vidal, Roberto; del Canto, Felipe; Salazar, Juan Carlos; Montero, David

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to develop vaccines for prevention of acute diarrhea have been going on for more than 40 y with partial success. The myriad of pathogens, more than 20, that have been identified as a cause of acute diarrhea throughout the years pose a significant challenge for selecting and further developing the most relevant vaccine candidates. Based on pathogen distribution as identified in epidemiological studies performed mostly in low-resource countries, rotavirus, Cryptosporidium, Shigella, diarrheogenic E. coli and V. cholerae are predominant, and thus the main targets for vaccine development and implementation. Vaccination against norovirus is most relevant in middle/high-income countries and possibly in resource-deprived countries, pending a more precise characterization of disease impact. Only a few licensed vaccines are currently available, of which rotavirus vaccines have been the most outstanding in demonstrating a significant impact in a short time period. This is a comprehensive review, divided into 2 articles, of nearly 50 vaccine candidates against the most relevant viral and bacterial pathogens that cause acute gastroenteritis. In order to facilitate reading, sections for each pathogen are organized as follows: i) a discussion of the main epidemiological and pathogenic features; and ii) a discussion of vaccines based on their stage of development, moving from current licensed vaccines to vaccines in advanced stage of development (in phase IIb or III trials) to vaccines in early stages of clinical development (in phase I/II) or preclinical development in animal models. In this first article we discuss rotavirus, norovirus and Vibrio cholerae. In the following article we will discuss Shigella, Salmonella (non-typhoidal), diarrheogenic E. coli (enterotoxigenic and enterohemorragic), and Campylobacter jejuni.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Genogroup II Noroviruses Infection in Outpatients with Acute Gastroenteritis in Nanjing, China (2010–2013

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    Zhang Hong-ying

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Human noroviruses (NoVs of genogroup II are the most common strains detected in sporadic cases of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in outpatients in Nanjing. To gain insight into the molecular epidemiology of GII strains, we analyzed 75 positive NoV cases from 2010 to 2013. Methods. The sporadic cases were detected by real-time PCR with specific primers and probes to human NoVs of genogroup I or II, human sapovirus, human rotavirus, human astrovirus, and human enteric adenovirus. Human NoVs of genogroup II were further studied by VP1 amplification (RT- PCR, cloning, sequencing, and phylogenetic analysis. Results. Rotavirus and human NoVs were more frequently detected in all the cases from 2010 to 2013. Human NoVs infection was more frequent since 2011 and more frequent than rotavirus infection after 2012. Out of the 75 NoV cases of genogroup II, there were 5 GII.6, 11 GII.3, and 59 GII.4. Of the 59 GII.4, 27 cases were previous GII.4.2006b strains that circulated between 2010 and 2012; while 32 cases were the newly emerging GII.4 strains GII.4.2012 from 2011 to 2013. Conclusion. Our data confirm other studies on the rapid emergence and displacement of highly virulent GII.4 strains.

  17. Is acute idiopathic pericarditis associated with recent upper respiratory tract infection or gastroenteritis? A case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Florian; Delhumeau-Cartier, Cecile; Meyer, Philippe; Genne, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of acute idiopathic pericarditis (AIP), and a reported upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) or gastroenteritis (GE) in the preceding month. Design Patients who were hospitalised with a first diagnosis of AIP were retrospectively compared with a control group of patients admitted with deep vein thrombosis (DVT), matched by gender and age. Setting Primary and secondary care level; one hospital serving a population of about 170 000. Participants A total of 51 patients with AIP were included, of whom 46 could be matched with 46 patients with control DVT. Only patients with a complete review of systems on the admission note were included in the study. Main outcome measure Conditional logistic regression was used to assess the association of a clinical diagnosis of AIP and an infectious episode (URTI or GE) in the month preceding AIP diagnosis. Results Patients with AIP had more often experienced a recent episode of URTI or GE than patients with DVT (39.1% vs 10.9%, p=0.002). The multivariate conditional regression showed that AIP was independently associated with URTI or GE in the last month preceding diagnosis (OR=37.18, 95% CI=1.91 to 724.98, p=0.017). Conclusions This is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study demonstrating an association between a recent episode of URTI or GE and a clinical diagnosis of AIP. PMID:26603247

  18. Importance of ICD-10 coding directive change for acute gastroenteritis (unspecified) for rotavirus vaccine impact studies: illustration from a population-based cohort study from Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sarah E; Deeks, Shelley L; Rosella, Laura C

    2015-09-15

    In Ontario, Canada, we conducted an evaluation of rotavirus (RV) vaccine on hospitalizations and Emergency Department (ED) visitations for acute gastroenteritis (AGE). In our original analysis, any one of the International Classification of Disease, Version 10 (ICD-10) codes was used for outcome ascertainment: RV-specific- (A08.0), viral- (A08.3, A08. 4, A08.5), and unspecified infectious- gastroenteritis (A09). Annual age-specific rates per 10,000 population were calculated. The average monthly rate of AGE hospitalization for children under age two increased from 0.82 per 10,000 from January 2003 to March 2009, to 2.35 over the period of April 2009 to March 31, 2013. Similar trends were found for ED consultations and in other age groups. A rise in events corresponding to the A09 code was found when the outcome definition was disaggregated by ICD-10 code. Documentation obtained from the World Health Organization confirmed that a change in directive for the classification of unspecified gastroenteritis occurred with the release of ICD-10 in April 2009. AGE events previously classified under the code K52.9, are now classified under code A09.9. Based on change in the classification of unspecified gastroenteritis we modified our outcome definition to also include unspecified non-infectious-gastroenteritis (K52.9). We recommend other investigators consider using both A09.9 and K52.9 ICD-10 codes for outcome ascertainment in future rotavirus vaccine impact studies to ensure that all unspecified cases of AGE are captured, especially if the study period spans 2009.

  19. Steroids for community-acquired pneumonia? not in my house!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuberski T

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. In response to the paper by PR Bauer and VN Iyer (1 entitled “Corticosteroids and Influenza A Associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome” published in the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care (SWJPCC on November 18, 2016. That paper presents a single case report of a patient with community-acquired pneumonia in Arizona attributed to influenza A. The patient was treated with steroids and improved. For a variety of reasons, a case report like this should not be published unless accompanied by a note pointing out the implications of such a report. The audience of SWJPCC is generally going to be made up of two groups, mainly from Arizona. Those with experience who would say that the treating physicians were lucky (but in the back of their minds this case might give them a reason to use steroids in similar circumstances and those with little or no experience, who will say …

  20. Diarrhoeagenic microbes by real-time PCR in Rwandan children under 5 years of age with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabayiza, J-C; Andersson, M E; Nilsson, S; Baribwira, C; Muhirwa, G; Bergström, T; Lindh, M

    2014-12-01

    Acute gastroenteritis is a main cause of disease and death among children in low-income countries. The causality rates and pathogenic characteristics of putative aetiological agents remain insufficiently known. We used real-time PCR targeting 16 diarrhoeagenic agents to analyse stool samples from children ≤5.0 years old with acute diarrhoea in Rwanda. Among the 880 children (median age 14.2 months; 41% female) at least one pathogen was detected in 92% and two or more agents in 63% of cases. Rotavirus was detected in 36.9%, adenovirus in 39.7%, enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) with genes for labile (eltB) or stable (estA) toxin in 31.3% and 19.0%, E. coli with eae or bfpA genes in 25.2% and 14.2%, Shigella in 17.5% and Cryptosporidium in 7.8%. Rotavirus and ETEC-estA were associated with more severe dehydration than diarrhoea due to other causes. Shigella was associated with bloody stools and higher CRP. Microbial loads (Ct values) of rotavirus, ETEC-estA and Shigella were associated with severity of symptoms. Rotavirus, ETEC-estA and E. coli with bfpA were associated with younger age, Shigella with older age. Antibiotic treatment was given to 42% and was associated with dehydration, fever and CRP, but not with pathogen. We conclude that rotavirus and ETEC-estA were the most important causes of diarrhoea with dehydration, that Shigella caused bloody diarrhoea but less severe dehydration, that microbial loads of rotavirus, ETEC-estA and Shigella were associated with severity of symptoms, and that antibiotic use was frequent and in poor agreement with microbiological findings.

  1. Intravenous rehydration of malnourished children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration: A systematic review [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty A. Houston

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rehydration strategies in children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM and severe dehydration are extremely cautious. The World Health Organization (WHO SAM guidelines advise strongly against intravenous fluids unless the child is shocked or severely dehydrated and unable to tolerate oral fluids. Otherwise, guidelines recommend oral or nasogastric rehydration using low sodium oral rehydration solutions. There is limited evidence to support these recommendations. Methods: We conducted a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs and observational studies on 15th June 2017 comparing different strategies of rehydration therapy in children with acute gastroenteritis and severe dehydration, specifically relating to intravenous rehydration, using standard search terms. Two authors assessed papers for inclusion. The primary endpoint was evidence of fluid overload. Results: Four studies were identified, all published in English, including 883 children, all of which were conducted in low resource settings. Two were randomised controlled trials and two observational cohort studies, one incorporated assessment of myocardial and haemodynamic function. There was no evidence of fluid overload or other fluid-related adverse events, including children managed on more liberal rehydration protocols. Mortality was high overall, and particularly in children with shock managed on WHO recommendations (day-28 mortality 82%. There was no difference in safety outcomes when different rates of intravenous rehydration were compared. Conclusions: The current ‘strong recommendations’ for conservative rehydration of children with SAM are not based on emerging evidence. We found no clinical trials providing a direct assessment of the current WHO guidelines, and those that were available suggested that these children have a high mortality and remain fluid depleted on current therapy. Recent studies have reported no evidence of fluid overload or

  2. Emerging Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Pneumonia

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    Dragana Orlovic

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been an important nosocomial pathogen worldwide for more than four decades. Community-acquired MRSA infections, generally occurring in previously healthy persons without recognizable risk factors for health care setting-related MRSA, are emerging as serious clinical and public health concerns. The most frequent of these community-based infections include skin and soft tissue infections and necrotizing pneumonias. A majority of causative community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA isolates are associated with genes that encode the virulence factor, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL toxin. Aims & Objectives: To describe six cases of CA-MRSA pneumonia recently admitted to our community hospital in Florida, and discuss the epidemiology, clinical features, and management of these expanding infections. Methods/Study Design: The medical records of six patients with radiographically-confirmed pneumonia and positive sputum cultures for MRSA at the time of hospitalization at the Lawnwood Regional Medical Center and Heart Institute, Fort Pierce, Florida, from December 2006 through January 2007, were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were seen by one of the authors (DO, an infectious diseases consultant. Lawnwood Regional Medical Center is a 341-bed, acute care institution and regional referral center for four counties of Treasure Coast, FL. The hospital institution review board gave permission for this study. Results/Findings: Six patients (5 men, 1 woman with CA-MRSA pneumonia were identified. The mean patient age was 57 years (range, 32-79 years. Three patients had no history of previous hospital admission, while two patients had been last hospitalized two years prior to the study admission. Three elderly patients had known co-morbidities predisposing to pneumonia including carcinoma of the lung (2 patients, and cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, COPD, and cardiomyopathy (1

  3. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings - Differences between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Norovirus is a major cause of gastroenteritis and hospital outbreaks, leading to substantial morbidity and direct healthcare expenses as well as indirect societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of nosocomial norovirus infections among inpatients tested...... positive for norovirus in Denmark, 2002-2010, and to study the distribution of norovirus genotypes among inpatients with nosocomial and community-acquired norovirus infections, respectively. METHODS:  Admission and stool sampling dates from 3656 NoV infected patients were used to estimate the proportion...... of nosocomial infections. The associations between nosocomial infection and patient age, gender, and norovirus genotype GII.4 were examined. RESULTS:  Of the 3656 inpatients, 63% were classified as having nosocomial infections. Among these 9 capsid and 8 polymerase norovirus genotypes were detected whereas...

  4. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis following Campylobacter jejuni gastroenteritis: Case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziali, Simone; Picchi, Eliseo; Di Giuliano, Francesca; Altobelli, Simone; Mataluni, Giorgia; Marfia, Girolama; Garaci, Francesco; Floris, Roberto

    2017-02-01

    We describe a case of a 25-year-old male with a diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) following infection with Campylobacter jejuni, which is implicated in various human pathologies regarding the central nervous system (CNS) with acute course like Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS), Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis (BEE), acute transverse myelitis (ATM) as well as ADEM. These conditions are caused by cross-reactivity between Campylobacter's epitopes and cells of the CNS that causes an immunomediated inflammatory demyelination of the CNS. In the acute phase, magnetic resonance (MR) can detect pathologic signal intensity at the CNS with areas of pathologic contrast enhancement at cortical and spinal white matter that normalize over time or can be stable. These findings can be associated with edema in parts of the CNS. The lesions typically appear at different times during the disease course and also can have a different evolution. Our purpose therefore was to describe the clinical course and MR findings of this case and perform a critical review of the literature.

  5. [Differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deĭkina, O N; Mishin, V Iu; Demikhova, O V

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to enhance the efficiency of differential diagnosis of pneumonia and pulmonary tuberculosis. A hundred and fifty-nine adult patients were examined. These included 78 patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and 81 with community-acquired p neumonia. The clinical features of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (n = 48) and mild community-acquired pneumonia (n = 51) were compared. The course of caseous pneumonia (n = 30) was compared with that of moderate and severe community-acquired pneumonia (n = 30). Significant differences in the manifestations of the intoxication and bronchopulmonary syndrome were not found in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Physical studies showed that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, moist rale (54.9%) and crepitation (11.8%) were prevalent, but in those with infiltrative tuberculosis rale was absent in 60.4% of cases and the pattern of respiration was unchanged in 79.2%. Chest X-ray studies indicated that in patients with community-acquired pneumonia, lower lobar inflammatory changes were predominant in 62.8% of cases whereas in those with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis the process was mainly bilateral (43.8%) with the presence of destructive changes (83.3%) and bronchogenic dissemination (66.7%). In patients with caseous pneumonia, the intoxication syndrome was more significant than in those with severe community-acquired pneumonia. Chest X-ray studies demonstrated that in patients with caseous pneumonia, specific changes were bilateral with the involvement of 2 lobes or more, with destruction and bronchogenic dissemination while in those with community-acquired pneumonia, the pulmonary processes were predominantly bilateral (76.6%) at the lower lobar site (36.7%).

  6. Pulmonary infiltrates during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Gjeraa, Kirsten; Berthelsen, Birgitte G

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark.......The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark....

  7. Molecular detection and epidemiology of astrovirus, bocavirus, and sapovirus in Italian children admitted to hospital with acute gastroenteritis, 2008-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Albonetti, Valeria; Abelli, Laura Anna; Chezzi, Carlo; Calderaro, Adriana

    2012-04-01

    Although a number of enteric viruses have been identified in children with acute gastroenteritis, the majority of cases of gastroenteritis remain undiagnosed. In order to provide more insights into the epidemiology of enteric viruses that are not included usually in routine diagnostic tests, cases of childhood sporadic gastroenteritis of unknown etiology requiring hospital admission in Parma, Italy, during 2008-2009, were screened for astrovirus (AstV), sapovirus (SaV), and bocavirus (BoV). The stools of 712 children, negative for rotavirus, norovirus, adenovirus, enterovirus, and reovirus, were examined by PCR or RT-PCR for AstV, BoV, and SaV. The prevalence of AstV, BoV, and SaV in the patients examined was 2.1%, 3.2%, 2.4%, respectively, with the viruses being detected mostly in children <3 years of age. AstV strains were characterized by sequencing as types 1, 2, and 4, with a AstV-1 peak occurring in the 2008 fall-winter season. BoV strains were characterized as types 1, 2, and 3, with BoV-3 circulating more frequently in the 2008 autumn and winter season and BoV-2 during March-April 2009. The most common SaVs were GI.2 and GII.1 while GIV and GV SaVs were detected sporadically. Overall, AstV, BoV, and SaV infections accounted for 7.7% of the sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis with unknown etiology selected for the study. Different virus types and lineages were found to circulate and temporal peaks of virus activity were also demonstrated, suggesting either small clusters of infections or small outbreaks or epidemics in local population. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Acute viral gastroenteritis in children hospitalized in Iksan, Korea during December 2010 - June 2011

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    Cheol Whoan So

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Viral etiology is common in cases of children with acute diarrhea, and antibiotic therapy is usually not required. Therefore, it is important to determine the distribution of common viruses among children hospitalized with acute diarrhea. Methods: We included 186 children who suffered from acute diarrhea and were hospitalized at the Wonkwang University Hospital Pediatric ward from December 1, 2010 to June 30, 2011 in this study. Stool samples were collected and multiplex reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (multiplex RT-PCR was used to simultaneously determine the viral etiology such as rotavirus, norovirus, astrovirus, or adenovirus.&lt;br&gt; Results: Causative viruses were detected in 72 of the 186 cases (38.7%. The mean age of the viruspositive cases was 1 year and 9 months (range, 1 month to 11 years. Rotavirus was detected in 50/186 (26.9%; norovirus, in 18/186 (9.7%; and astrovirus, in 3/186 cases (1.6%. Adenovirus was not detected in any of the cases. Proportions of norovirus genogroups I and II were 21.1% and 78.9%, respectively. Four of the 51 rotavirus-positive cases (7.8% had received rotavirus vaccination at least once. The mean duration of diarrhea was 2.8 days (range, 1 to 10 days and vomiting occurred in 39 of the 72 cases (54.2%.&lt;br&gt; Conclusion: Viral etiology was confirmed in about one-third of the children with acute diarrhea, and the most common viral agent was rotavirus, followed by norovirus.

  9. Risk factors and outcome of community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falguera, Miquel; Carratalà, Jordi; Ruiz-Gonzalez, Agustín; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Gazquez, Isabel; Dorca, Jordi; Gudiol, Francesc; Porcel, José M

    2009-01-01

    Several sets of guidelines have advocated initial antibiotic treatment for community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli in patients with specific risk factors. However, evidence to support this recommendation is scarce. We sought to identify risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and to assess outcomes. An observational analysis was carried out on prospectively collected data for immunocompetent adults hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in two acute-care hospitals. Cases of pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli were compared with those of non-Gram-negative bacilli causes. Sixty-one (2%) of 3272 episodes of community-acquired pneumonia were due to Gram-negative bacilli. COPD (odds ratio (OR) 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-5.1), current use of corticosteroids (OR 2.8, 95% CI: 1.2-6.3), prior antibiotic therapy (OR 2.6, 95% CI: 1.4-4.8), tachypnoea >or=30 cycles/min (OR 2.1, 95% CI: 1.1-4.2) and septic shock at presentation (OR 6.1, 95% CI: 2.5-14.6) were independently associated with Gram-negative bacilli pneumonia. Initial antibiotic therapy in patients with pneumonia due to Gram-negative bacilli was often inappropriate. These patients were also more likely to require admission to the intensive care unit, had longer hospital stays, and higher early (Gram-negative bacilli is uncommon, but is associated with a poor outcome. The risk factors identified in this study should be considered when selecting initial antibiotic therapy for patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

  10. [Septic shock due to a community acquired Clostridium difficile infection. A case study and a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermejo, C; Maseda, E; Salgado, P; Gabilondo, G; Gilsanz, F

    2014-04-01

    The epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection has changed in the past decade. The incidence rate of community acquired cases has increased in patients with no typical risk factors. We present a patient who was diagnosed with community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection who presented with acute abdominal pain, and subsequently developed acute renal failure and septic shock. We describe the diagnosis, treatment and outcome and brief review of the literature. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  11. The Impact of E-Learning on Adherence to Guidelines for Acute Gastroenteritis: A Single-Arm Intervention Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Nicastro

    Full Text Available E-learning is a candidate tool for clinical practice guidelines (CPG implementation due to its versatility, universal access and low costs. We aimed to assess the impact of a five-module e-learning course about CPG for acute gastroenteritis (AGE on physicians' knowledge and clinical practice.This work was conceived as a pre/post single-arm intervention study. Physicians from 11 European countries registered for the online course. Personal data, pre- and post-course questionnaires and clinical data about 3 to 5 children with AGE managed by each physician before and after the course were collected. Primary outcome measures included the proportion of participants fully adherent to CPG and number of patients managed with full adherence.Among the 149 physicians who signed up for the e-learning course, 59 took the course and reported on their case management of 519 children <5 years of age who were referred to their practice because of AGE (281 and 264 children seen before and after the course, respectively. The course improved knowledge scores (pre-course 8.6 ± 2.7 versus post-course 12.8 ± 2.1, P < 0.001, average adherence (from 87.0 ± 7.7% to 90.6 ± 7.1%, P = 0.001 and the number of patients managed in full adherence with the guidelines (from 33.6 ± 31.7% to 43.9 ± 36.1%, P = 0.037.E-learning is effective in increasing knowledge and improving clinical practice in paediatric AGE and is an effective tool for implementing clinical practice guidelines.

  12. Emerging pathogen Arcobacter spp. in acute gastroenteritis: molecular identification, antibiotic susceptibilities and genotyping of the isolated arcobacters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayman, Tuba; Abay, Seçil; Hizlisoy, Harun; Atabay, H Ibrahim; Diker, K Serdar; Aydin, Fuat

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this study were as follows: (i) to isolate Arcobacter spp. from the stool samples of patients with gastroenteritis; (ii) to identify them with molecular methods; (iii) to genotype them using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR; and (iv) to determine their antibiotic susceptibilities. For the study, a total of 3287 diarrhoeal stool samples submitted to the Microbiology Laboratory of the Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey, between 2010 and 2011 were analysed. Campylobacter blood-free selective medium supplemented with cefoperazone, amphotericin B and teicoplanin was used for isolation. Medium inoculated with stool samples was incubated microaerobically at 37 °C for 72-96 h. Phenotypic tests, a genus-specific PCR and a multiplex PCR were used to identify the arcobacters, whilst ERIC-PCR was used for genotyping and the antibiotic susceptibilities of the isolates were detected by E-test. Arcobacter spp. were isolated from nine of the 3287 samples. These nine isolates were identified as Arcobacter butzleri and all showed different ERIC-PCR profiles. All nine isolates were resistant to ampicillin and susceptible to gentamicin, tetracycline, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin. As far as is known, this is the first study in which A. butzleri has been isolated from human acute gastrointestinal infections in Turkey. According to these results, it is recommended that, when investigating the aetiology of infections of the digestive system in humans, Arcobacter spp. be considered for inclusion. The results of this study should contribute to our knowledge related to A. butzleri infections in humans.

  13. Early Detection of Epidemic GII-4 Norovirus Strains in UK and Malawi: Role of Surveillance of Sporadic Acute Gastroenteritis in Anticipating Global Epidemics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Allen

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are endemic in the human population, and are recognised as a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Although they are a highly diverse group of viruses, genogroup-II genotype-4 (GII-4 noroviruses are the most frequently identified strains worldwide. The predominance of GII-4 norovirus strains is driven by the periodic emergence of antigenic variants capable of evading herd protection. The global molecular epidemiology of emerging GII-4 strains is largely based on data from outbreak surveillance programmes, but the epidemiology of GII-4 strains among sporadic or community cases is far less well studied. To understand the distribution of GII-4 norovirus strains associated with gastroenteritis in the wider population, we characterised the GII-4 norovirus strains detected during studies of sporadic cases of infectious gastroenteritis collected in the UK and Malawi between 1993 and 2009. Our data shows that GII-4 norovirus strains that have emerged as strains of global epidemic importance have circulated in the community up to 18 years before their recognition as pandemic strains associated with increases in outbreaks. These data may suggest that more comprehensive surveillance programmes that incorporate strains associated with sporadic cases may provide a way for early detection of emerging strains with pandemic potential. This may be of particular relevance as vaccines become available.

  14. Early Detection of Epidemic GII-4 Norovirus Strains in UK and Malawi: Role of Surveillance of Sporadic Acute Gastroenteritis in Anticipating Global Epidemics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David J; Trainor, Eamonn; Callaghan, Anna; O'Brien, Sarah J; Cunliffe, Nigel A; Iturriza-Gómara, Miren

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses are endemic in the human population, and are recognised as a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. Although they are a highly diverse group of viruses, genogroup-II genotype-4 (GII-4) noroviruses are the most frequently identified strains worldwide. The predominance of GII-4 norovirus strains is driven by the periodic emergence of antigenic variants capable of evading herd protection. The global molecular epidemiology of emerging GII-4 strains is largely based on data from outbreak surveillance programmes, but the epidemiology of GII-4 strains among sporadic or community cases is far less well studied. To understand the distribution of GII-4 norovirus strains associated with gastroenteritis in the wider population, we characterised the GII-4 norovirus strains detected during studies of sporadic cases of infectious gastroenteritis collected in the UK and Malawi between 1993 and 2009. Our data shows that GII-4 norovirus strains that have emerged as strains of global epidemic importance have circulated in the community up to 18 years before their recognition as pandemic strains associated with increases in outbreaks. These data may suggest that more comprehensive surveillance programmes that incorporate strains associated with sporadic cases may provide a way for early detection of emerging strains with pandemic potential. This may be of particular relevance as vaccines become available.

  15. Nuevos virus asociados con gastroenteritis New viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Aguirre

    1992-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Se hace un resumen de las características comunes y específicas de los diversos virus asociados con enfermedad diarreica aguda, con énfasis en la importancia que tienen en la génesis de este síndrome y en el hecho de que la mayoría de los casos, aunque sean severos, pueden ser manejados adecuadamente mediante el reemplazo de líquidos y electrolitos.

    A synopsis of the common and specific features of the various viruses associated with acute diarrheal disease is presented; emphasis Is made on their importance as etiologic agents of this syndrome and on the fact that most cases, even If they are severe, can be appropriately treated by fluid and electrolyte replacement.

  16. Herramientas para afrontar las situaciones de crisis en un brote de gastroenteritis aguda en un colegio público Practical lessons from the risk management of an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in a public school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Morillo-García

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo describimos las reflexiones y conclusiones extraídas del análisis de un brote de gastroenteritis en un centro escolar, que ocasionó una crisis de salud pública. El análisis realizado tuvo como base la metodología de las matrices de "debilidades, amenazas, fortalezas y oportunidades" (DAFO. Se describe la epidemiología de los sucesos y decisiones tomadas, basadas en aspectos operativos durante una situación de crisis. Incluye la experiencia del equipo responsable del brote, las relaciones con otras entidades y la gestión de la información. Las dificultades encontradas por el equipo coordinador consistieron en el retraso de la declaración, la falta de formación de algunas entidades implicadas y el mal uso de los circuitos establecidos. Es necesario un entrenamiento específico en los actuales protocolos de manejo de crisis y fomentar la mejora continua de los circuitos de coordinación mediante la autoevaluación y actualización de conocimientos y recursos.We present our reflections on the management of an acute gastroenteritis outbreak in a public school, which caused a public health crisis, and the conclusions drawn from this experience. The methodology of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT analysis was used. This article describes the epidemiology of the incident and the policy decisions made, but focuses on operational aspects of outbreak management. The experience of the outbreak control team, liaison with other organizations, and data management are discussed. The difficulties encountered by the outbreak team related to delay in declaring in the outbreak, lack of training in some of the entities involved, and incorrect use of the surveillance circuits. Current protocols and specific action plans for the management of outbreaks should be improved through self-evaluation and updating of resources and knowledge.

  17. Fever without apparent source on clinical examination, lower respiratory infections in children, other infectious diseases, and acute gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, P L; Klig, J E; Kahn, J S; Shapiro, E D; Baron, M A

    1997-02-01

    This section focuses on issues in infectious disease that are commonly encountered in pediatric office practice. Paul McCarthy discusses recent literature regarding the evaluation and management of acute fevers without apparent source on clinical examination in infants and children and the evaluation of children with prolonged fevers of unknown origin. Jean Klig reviews recent literature about lower respiratory tract infection in children. Jeffrey Kahn and Eugene Shapiro discuss literature concerning several infectious diseases commonly seen in office settings and concerning which recent developments are of interest. Michael Baron reviews recent literature about gastroenteritis and diarrhea of infancy and early childhood.

  18. Diagnosis and Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Karymdzhanov

    2016-03-01

    The initial antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia is carried out empirically. In the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children from 2 months to 5 years, the drug of choice is amoxicillin orally. Macrolides are the drugs of choice for children aged 5 to 16 years. In severe pneumonia, drugs of choice are amoxicillin clavulanate, 2nd–4th generation cephalosporins. In general, the duration of antibiotic therapy in the community-acquired pneumonia caused by typical bacteria is 7–10 days, by atypical bacteria — 10–14 days. In the real clinical practice, the errors associated with the choice of drug, route of administration, dosage, regimen of application, length of treatment are frequent during antibacterial therapy.

  19. The impact of childhood acute rotavirus gastroenteritis on the parents’ quality of life: prospective observational study in European primary care medical practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Javier

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotavirus (RV is the commonest cause of acute gastroenteritis in infants and young children worldwide. A Quality of Life study was conducted in primary care in three European countries as part of a larger epidemiological study (SPRIK to investigate the impact of paediatric rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE on affected children and their parents. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was linguistically validated in Spanish, Italian and Polish. The questionnaire was included in an observational multicentre prospective study of 302 children aged Results Questionnaire responses showed that acute RVGE in a child adversely affects the parents’ daily life as well as the child. Parents of children with RVGE experience worry, distress and impact on their daily activities. RVGE of greater clinical severity (assessed by the Vesikari scale was associated with higher parental worries due to symptoms and greater changes in the child’s behaviour, and a trend to higher impact on parents’ daily activities and higher parental distress, together with a higher score on the symptom severity scale of the questionnaire. Conclusions Parents of a child with acute RVGE presenting to primary care experience worry, distress and disruptions to daily life as a result of the child’s illness. Prevention of this disease through prophylactic vaccination will improve the daily lives of parents and children.

  20. Outcomes in elderly Danish citizens admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Regional differences, in a public healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard Klausen, Henrik; Petersen, J; Lindhardt, T

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate regional differences in and risk factors for admission, length of stay, mortality, and readmission for community-acquired pneumonia in elderly Danish patients. METHODS: National registry study on elderly Danish citizens with an acute admission in 2009 owing to community-ac...

  1. Genetic Diversity of Norovirus and Sapovirus in Hospitalized Infants with Sporadic Cases of Acute Gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Grant S.; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Maneekarn, Niwat; Peerakome, Supatra; Khamrin, Pattara; Tonusin, Supin; Okitsu, Shoko; Nishio, Osamu; Takeda, Naokazu; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    Stool specimens from hospitalized infants with sporadic gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand, between July 2000 and July 2001 were examined for norovirus and sapovirus by reverse transcription-PCR and sequence analysis. These viruses were identified in 13 of 105 (12%) specimens. One strain was found to be a recombinant norovirus. PMID:15004104

  2. The effectiveness and safety of treatments used for acute diarrhea and acute gastroenteritis in children: protocol for a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Ivan D; Al-Khalifah, Reem; Sierra, Javier M; Granados, Claudia M; Yepes-Nuñez, Juan J; Cuello-Garcia, Carlos; Perez-Gaxiola, Giordano; Zea, Adriana M; Hernandez, Gilma N; Veroniki, Areti-Angeliki; Guyatt, Gordon H; Thabane, Lehana

    2016-01-20

    Acute diarrhea and acute gastroenteritis (AD/AGE) are common among children in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) and high-income countries (HIC). Supportive therapy including maintaining feeding, prevention of dehydration, and use of oral rehydration solution (ORS), is the mainstay of treatment in all children. Several additional treatments aiming to reduce the episode duration have been compared to placebo, but the differences in effectiveness among them are unknown. We will conduct a systematic review of all randomized controlled trials evaluating the use of zinc, vitamin A, probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, racecadotril, smectite, and fermented and lactose-free milk/formula for AD/AGE treatment in children. The primary outcomes are diarrhea duration and mortality. Secondary outcomes are diarrhea lasting 3 or 7 days, stool frequency, treatment failure, hospitalizations, and adverse events. We will search MEDLINE, Ovid EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and LILACS through Ovid, as well as grey literature resources. Two reviewers will independently screen titles and abstracts, review full texts, extract information, and assess the risk of bias (ROB) and the confidence in the estimate (with the grading of recommendations, assessment, development, and evaluation [GRADE] approach). Results will be summarized narratively and statistically. Subgroup analysis according to HIC vs. LMIC, age, nutrition status, and ROB is planned. We will perform a Bayesian network meta-analysis to combine the pooled direct and indirect treatment effect estimates for each outcome, if adequate data is available. This is the first systematic review and network meta-analysis that aims to determine the relative effectiveness of pharmacological and nutritional treatments for reducing the duration of AD/AGE in children. The results will help to reduce the uncertainty of the effectiveness of the interventions, find knowledge gaps, and

  3. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  4. Diabetes and risk of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Søgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with diabetes may experience higher risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) than patients without diabetes due to decreased immunity or coexisting morbidities. We investigated the risk of community-acquired (CA) SAB in persons with and without diabetes. DESIGN: Using...

  5. Hydrocephalus in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Soemirien Kasanmoentalib; M.C. Brouwer; A. van der Ende; D. van de Beek

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the occurrence, treatment, and outcome of hydrocephalus complicating community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults. Methods: Case series from a prospective nationwide cohort study from Dutch hospitals from 2006 to 2009. Results: Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in 26 of 577 epi

  6. Atypical pathogens in community acquired pneumonia of Egyptian children

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deraz TE; El Sahriggy SA; Shaheen MA; Motawea AA; Gomaa HE; Fawzy SH; Mohamed AA

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Diagnosis of atypical pathogens as an aetiology for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)in chil-dren is a challenge world wide.The aim of this study was to detect the frequency of atypical pathogens as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)in Egyptian children.Methods:From 50 children (with age ranged from 2 months to 1 2 years)hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia;respiratory sputum samples were collected by induction or spontaneously.All samples were subjected to conventional cultures and Polymer-ase Chain Reaction(PCR)technique DNA extraction for identification of Mycoplasma,Chlamydia pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila.Results:A definite pathogen was identified in 78% of the studied children;30%typical bacteria,8% candida albicans and atypical bacteria in 40% of the pneumonic children.Chlamydia pneumoniae was isolated from 26% of the children while Mycoplasma pneumoniae was isolated from 1 4%, whereas Legionella pneumophilla was not isolated at all.Conclusion:Atypical pathogens are evident as a po-tential aetiology for community-acquired pneumonia in (1 3.3%)of young and (80%)of older Egyptian chil-dren.

  7. Corticosteroids for all adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

    OpenAIRE

    Ger Rijkers; Simone Spoorenberg; Stefan Vestjens; Werner Albrich

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid therapy as adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a promising but controversial subject. The potentially beneficial effect of corticosteroids is based on the ability of steroids to dampen an excessive inflammatory response that often occurs in patients with CAP. This excessive inflammatory response can cause damage to the lungs and other organs, and is associated with poor outcome.

  8. Tsukamurella infection: a rare cause of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yatin B; Goswami, Raktima; Bhanot, Nitin; Mehta, Zankhana; Simonelli, Paul

    2011-06-01

    A 79-year-old Asian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Antimycobacterial therapy was initiated when sputum smears revealed acid fast bacilli. The patient was, however, diagnosed to have pneumonia secondary to Tsukamurella spp. This is an exceedingly rare cause of pneumonia, especially in immunocompetent individuals. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies of Tsukamurella pneumonia are discussed with a literature review.

  9. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338003207; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074382160; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/234602236; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment (al

  10. Prevention and Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werkhoven, C.H. van

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. CAP is one of the major contributors of antibiotic consumption and thus contributes to development of antibiotic resistance through selective antibiotic pressure. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most commo

  11. The complete genome and phenome of a community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniel N; Elbourne, Liam D H; Hassan, Karl A; Eijkelkamp, Bart A; Tetu, Sasha G; Brown, Melissa H; Shah, Bhumika S; Peleg, Anton Y; Mabbutt, Bridget C; Paulsen, Ian T

    2013-01-01

    Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections.

  12. Surveillance of acute infectious gastroenteritis (1992-2009) and food-borne disease outbreaks (1996-2009) in Italy, with a focus on the Piedmont and Lombardy regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughini-Gras, L; Graziani, C; Biorci, F; Pavan, A; Magliola, R; Ricci, A; Gilli, G; Carraro, E; Busani, L

    2012-02-23

    We describe trends in the occurrence of acute infectious gastroenteritis (1992 to 2009) and food-borne disease outbreaks (1996 to 2009) in Italy. In 2002, the Piedmont region implemented a surveillance system for early detection and control of food-borne disease outbreaks; in 2004, the Lombardy region implemented a system for surveillance of all notifiable human infectious diseases. Both systems are internet based. We compared the regional figures with the national mean using official notification data provided by the National Infectious Diseases Notification System (SIMI) and the National Institute of Statistics (ISTAT), in order to provide additional information about the epidemiology of these diseases in Italy. When compared with the national mean, data from the two regional systems showed a significant increase in notification rates of non-typhoid salmonellosis and infectious diarrhea other than non-typhoid salmonellosis, but for foodborne disease outbreaks, the increase was not statistically significant. Although the two regional systems have different objectives and structures, they showed improved sensitivity regarding notification of cases of acute infectious gastroenteritis and, to a lesser extent, food-borne disease outbreaks, and thus provide a more complete picture of the epidemiology of these diseases in Italy.

  13. Prevalence of human cosavirus and saffold virus with an emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 2014-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menage, Lucy; Yodmeeklin, Arpaporn; Khamrin, Pattara; Kumthip, Kattareeya; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2017-09-01

    Human cosavirus and saffold virus are both newly discovered members of the Picornaviridae family. It has been suggested that these viruses may be the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis. In this study, 1093 stool samples collected from patients with acute gastroenteritis between January 2014 and December 2016, were screened for cosavirus and saffold virus using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The viral genotypes were then established via nucleotide sequencing. Here, cosavirus was detected in 16 of 1093 stool samples (1.5%) and saffold virus was detected in 18 of 1093 stool samples (1.6%). The saffold virus genotypes 1 (16.7%), 2 (50%) and 6 (33.3%), and the cosavirus genetic groups A (87.5%), C (6.25%) and D (6.25%), were all identified across the three-year study period. Interestingly, saffold virus genotype 6 has now been detected for the first time in Thailand. The present study provides the prevalence of cosavirus and saffold virus with the emergence of saffold virus genotype 6 in Thailand. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Homologous versus heterologous immune responses to Norwalk-like viruses among crew members after acute gastroenteritis outbreaks on 2 US Navy vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Tibor; Thornton, Scott A; Wilton, Nouansy; Zhong, Weiming; Altaye, Mekibib; Jiang, Xi

    2003-01-15

    Host immune responses to human caliciviruses are difficult to study because of the lack of a clear definition of antigenic or serological types. This report describes antibody responses to several Norwalk-like viruses in large outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis on 2 US Navy ships. Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) were used to measure antibody responses. To understand the antibody response to a homologous strain causing the outbreaks, the viral capsid gene of one isolate (C59) was expressed in baculovirus and included in the EIAs. Significantly greater seroresponses were detected in patients against the homologous strain than against the heterologous strains. Strains within genogroups reacted more strongly than did strains between genogroups. Significantly higher antibody titers against the outbreak strain were detected in acute serum samples from control subjects than in those from case patients. These results indicate that recombinant EIAs are useful for outbreak investigation and that the homologous antibody might be protective against reinfection.

  15. Pharmacotherapy and the risk for community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mody Lona

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some forms of pharmacotherapy are shown to increase the risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pharmacotherapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPI, inhaled corticosteroids, and atypical antipsychotics was associated with the increased risk for CAP in hospitalized older adults with the adjustment of known risk factors (such as smoking status and serum albumin levels. Methods A retrospective case-control study of adults aged 65 years or older at a rural community hospital during 2004 and 2006 was conducted. Cases (N = 194 were those with radiographic evidence of pneumonia on admission. The controls were patients without the discharge diagnosis of pneumonia or acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (N = 952. Patients with gastric tube feeding, ventilator support, requiring hemodialysis, metastatic diseases or active lung cancers were excluded. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the current use of inhaled corticosteroids (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-5.35 and atypical antipsychotics (AOR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.23-4.15 was an independent risk factor for CAP after adjusting for confounders, including age, serum albumin levels, sex, smoking status, a history of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, and COPD, the current use of PPI, β2 agonist and anticholinergic bronchodilators, antibiotic(s, iron supplement, narcotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The crude OR and the AOR of PPI use for CAP was 1.41 [95% CI = 1.03 - 1.93] and 1.18 [95% CI = 0.80 - 1.74] after adjusting for the above confounders, respectively. Lower serum albumin levels independently increased the risk of CAP 1.89- fold by decreasing a gram per deciliter (AOR = 2.89, 95% CI = 2.01 - 4.16. Conclusion Our study reaffirmed that the use of inhaled corticosteroids and atypical antipsychotics was both

  16. The clinical value of procalcitonin in elderly patients with acute left heart failure and community-acquired pneumonia%降钙素原对老年急性左心衰竭合并社区获得性肺炎患者的临床价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡少艾; 徐米清

    2016-01-01

    目的 探讨降钙素原(PCT)对老年急性左心衰竭合并社区获得性肺炎患者的病情评估、抗生素使用和预后的价值. 方法 对41例急性左心衰竭合并社区获得性肺炎患者(心衰肺炎组)和36例急性左心衰竭患者(心衰组)进行PCT、B型钠尿肽(BNP)及心脏彩超检查,比较两组患者的PCT动态变化、住院时间、病情加重情况,同时分析心衰肺炎组PCT与肺炎严重程度评分(CURB-65)、静脉抗生素使用时间、住院时间及病情加重情况的关系. 结果 心衰肺炎组与心衰组比较,PCT明显升高[(1.25±1.80)μg/L比(0.11±0.02》μg/L]、住院时间明显延长[(13.73±5.06)d比(11.61±3.07)d](t=3.76、2.18,均P<0.05).心衰肺炎组PCT与CURB-65评分呈正相关(r=0.585,P<0.05).随着PCT水平的升高,心衰肺炎组患者静脉抗生素使用时间及住院时间明显延长(F=3.58、3.53,P=0.038、0.039),在PCT>0.5 μg/L组出现了5例患者病情加重. 结论 PCT与老年急性左心衰竭合并社区获得性肺炎患者病情严重程度密切相关,可作为评估老年患者急性左心衰竭是否合并社区获得性肺炎的一项指标指导抗生素使用,评估预后.%Objective To investigate the clinical value of procalcitonin in the assessment of disease state,antibiotic administration and prognosis in elderly patients with acute left heart failure and community-acquired pneumonia.Methods Elderly patients were divided into two groups,with 41 in the acute left heart failure and community-acquired pneumonia group(the HF+P group)and 36 in the acute left heart failure group(the HF group).Data on PCT,BNP and cardiac Doppler ultrasonography were collected for all patients,and the two groups were compared for differences in dynamic changes of PCT,length of hospitalization and severity of illness.In addition,data from the HF+ P group were analyzed for any potential association of PCT with CURB-65 scores,duration of antibiotic administration,length of

  17. Clinical Severity and Rotavirus Vaccination among Children Hospitalized for Acute Gastroenteritis in Belém, Northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justino, Maria Cleonice A; Brasil, Patrícia; Abreu, Erika; Miranda, Yllen; Mascarenhas, Joana D'Arc P; Guerra, Sylvia F S; Linhares, Alexandre C

    2016-08-01

    In March 2006, Brazil introduced the monovalent rotavirus (RV) vaccine (Rotarix™) into the public sector. This study assessed the severity of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) according to the vaccination status among hospitalized children. We identified 1023 RVGE episodes among not vaccinated (n = 252), partially vaccinated (n = 156) and fully vaccinated (n = 615) children. Very severe gastroenteritis (scored ≥ 15) was reported in 16.7, 17.9 and 13.5% of not vaccinated, partially vaccinated and fully vaccinated children, respectively. There was a trend for a shorter duration of RV diarrhoea among vaccinated children than in not vaccinated children (p = 0.07). A protective effect of vaccination was noted when mean duration of symptoms and hospital stay are analysed, comparing unvaccinated, partially vaccinated and fully vaccinated children (p vaccination dose effect trend, with fully vaccinated children having less-severe RVGE than not vaccinated and partially vaccinated children.

  18. Norovirus in feces and nasopharyngeal swab of children with and without acute gastroenteritis symptoms: First report of GI.5 in Brazil and GI.3 in nasopharyngeal swab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dábilla, Nathânia; Nunes Vieira Almeida, Tâmera; Carvalho Rebouças Oliveira, Anniely; Kipnis, André; Neres Silva, Thairiny; Souza Fiaccadori, Fabíola; Teixeira de Sousa, Teresinha; de Paula Cardoso, Divina das Dôres; Souza, Menira

    2017-02-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are an important cause of acute gastroenteritis (AGE), worldwide. To evaluate the frequency, viral load and molecular profile of NoV in fecal and nasopharyngeal swab samples from hospitalized children, and to determine children's secretor status. From May 2014 to May 2015, 219 children were included in the study, 96 with gastroenteric symptoms and 123 without gastroenteric symptoms. All fecal and nasopharyngeal swab samples were screened by TaqMan RT-qPCR duplex (GI/GII NoV) and quality samples were characterized by genomic sequencing. Norovirus positivity rate in feces was 15.4% in asymptomatic and 18.8% in the symptomatic group. The median viral loads in feces were 2.69×10(8)GC/g and 4.32×10(7)GC/g from children with or without AGE symptoms, respectively. In nasopharyngeal swab samples, the NoV positivity was 11.4% in symptomatic children, with a median viral load of 2.20×10(7)GC/mL and 6.5% in asymptomatic children, with an average viral load of 1.73×10(6)GC/mL. In only two cases NoV was detected in both samples. A considerable genomic variability was observed in feces, with six genotypes being detected, as follows: GII.4, GII.6, GI.3 and GII.3, GI.2 and GI.5. Two GI.3 was detected in nasopharyngeal swab. Our data reveal considerable NoV frequencies in both nasopharyngeal and fecal samples from symptomatic and asymptomatic children. Higher viral loads were detected in samples from AGE symptomatic children, when compared to asymptomatic children. High genomic variability was observed, with this being the first report of GI.5 NoV in Brazil and of GI.3 in nasopharyngeal swab samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in a rural population, spread person to person contact Brote de gastroenteritis aguda en una población rural por transmisión de persona a persona

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Garrido Almagro

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe an outbreak of acute gastroenteritis in the population, occurred in June and July 2002.Design: A descriptive, case-control study.Location: Rural population of 1.323 inhabitants, living in Granada.Population and sample: It affected about 200 persons. 32 cases and 32 controls were selected.Intervention: An epidemiological survey was run, taking into account variables of time and person (age, sex, drinking water intake and clinical pattern of the disease antecedent. We investigated the different independents variables. A contingency tables, hypothesis X2 test, calculation of the unprocessed and subsequently adjusted Odds Ratio (IC 95% were carried out using logic regression.Results: No significant differences were found in the sex variable and consumption of water. The epidemic curve no showed a rapid onset. In the adjusted Odds Ratio calculation the clinical pattern of disease antecedent showed causal relationship values (adjusted Odds Ratio=5,32; IC-95% 1,23-22,93; p=0,025. The inspection of the water network no showed deficient. Patient stool samples no were sent for analysis.Conclusions: This study has not detected disease-causing agent, however, it’s spread through person-to-person contact.Objetivo: Describir un cuadro de gastroenteritis aguda de base poblacional ocurrido a durante los meses de junio y mediados de julio del año 2002.Diseño: Estudio descriptivo y de casos-control.Emplazamiento: Población rural de 1.323 habitantes (1-1-2001 de la provincia de Granada.Población y muestra: De unos 200 enfermos se recogieron 34 casos y los mismos controles.Intervenciones: Mediante encuesta epidemiológica se investiga la relación entre la enfermedad y distintas variables independientes: características personales (edad, sexo, consumo agua y antecedentes de enfermedad y tiempo. Se realizó tablas de contingencia y test de hipótesis χ2 y el cálculo de OR cruda y posteriormente ajustada (IC al 95% utilizando regresi

  20. Тhe features of severe community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramenko I.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data from a prospective analysis for the year of observation, the article presents information about the features of severe community acquired pneumonia in patients who were hospitalized at the department of pulmonology (or therapy, as well as department of the intensive care from three teaching hospitals in Dnepropetrovsk, namely "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №6», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №2», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №16», which are the clinical ones of "Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Ministry of Health Ukraine". Dependence of the severity of the condition shown on duration of illness before admission, features of season character of disease. The effect of breathing exercises on the course of the disease. The results can be the basis for a more personal approach to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic programs for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  1. 32 year old man with "community-acquired' pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill K. Gersh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia is a common reason for hospital admission; however underlying pathogens vary depending on host immunity and circulating pathogens in the community. Case Summary: A 32 year old man from Malawi presented with community-acquired pneumonia. After failing outpatient management, he was admitted and found to have underlying HIV disease. His diagnostic work up was initially inconclusive for M. tuberculosis (TB and thus his diagnostic evaluation and treatment focused on other etiologies. He was ultimately diagnosed with TB after an invasive procedure and had a rapid clinical response after initiating TB treatment. Conclusion: Both failure to recognize that TB can present with a syndrome similar to bacterial pneumonia and over-reliance on diagnostic testing delayed the diagnosis of TB. Delays in diagnosis contributed to substantial morbidity and risked nosocomial transmission. Despite declining incidence in the US, providers should remain cognizant of diagnostic limitations for TB disease and have a low threshold for empiric treatment.

  2. Predictors of inferior outcome in community acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streharova, A; Krcmery, V; Kisac, P; Kalavsky, E; Holeckova, K; Lesnakova, A; Luzinsky, L; Adamkovicova, E; Pavlikova, Z; Spilakova, N; Kacunova, B; Dovalova, V; Wiczmandyova, O; Spanik, S; Liskova, A; Chovancova, D; Kovac, M; Ondrusova, A; Bauer, F; Benca, J; Rudinsky, B; Sramka, M; Kralova, J; Krsakova, J; Krumpolcova, M; Findova, L; Svabova, V; Sladeckova, V; Seckova, S; Saniova, J; Pavlicova, B; Taziarova, M; Bukovinova, P; Kolenova, A; Horvathova, E; Hvizdak, F; Luzica, R; Rolnikova, B; Bocakova, A; Grey, E; Bielova, M; Huttova, M; Sabo, I; Jalili, N

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess mortality and sequellae within cases from Nationwide survey of community acquired meningitis and identify risk factors for inferior outcome. Risk factors such as underlying disease (diabetes mellitus, cancer, trauma, neonatal age, splenectomy, alcoholism, sepsis, other infections), etiology, clinical symptoms and outcome (death, improvement and cured after modifications of ATB therapy, cured without change of therapy, cured with neurologic sequellae) were recorded and analysed with univariate analysis (chi2 or t test for trends, CDC Atlanta 2004). Analysing risk factors for inferior outcome (death or cured with neurologic sequellae), we compared patients who died or survived with neurologic sequellae to all patients with community acquired bacterial meningitis. Univariate analysis showed that trauma (palcohol abuse (pdiabetes, S. aureus (pdiabetes mellitus (palcoholism (palcohol abuse (p<0.05), craniocerbral trauma (p<0.05) and less common in meningitis with pneumococcal etiology (p<0.05).

  3. Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii: clinical characteristics, epidemiology and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Carina; Murray, Gerald L; Paulsen, Ian T; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-05-01

    Community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii (CA-Ab) is a rare but serious cause of community-acquired pneumonia in tropical regions of the world. CA-Ab infections predominantly affect individuals with risk factors, which include excess alcohol consumption, diabetes mellitus, smoking and chronic lung disease. CA-Ab pneumonia presents as a surprisingly fulminant course and is characterized by a rapid onset of fever, severe respiratory symptoms and multi-organ dysfunction, with a mortality rate reported as high as 64%. It is unclear whether the distinct clinical syndrome caused by CA-Ab is because of host predisposing factors or unique bacterial characteristics, or a combination of both. Deepening our understanding of the drivers of overwhelming CA-Ab infection will provide important insights into preventative and therapeutic strategies.

  4. Principles of Antibiotic Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Michael T; Niederman, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) encompasses a broad spectrum of disease severity and may require outpatient, inpatient, or intensive care management. Successful treatment hinges on expedient delivery of appropriate antibiotic therapy tailored to both the likely offending pathogens and the severity of disease. This review summarizes key principles in starting treatment and provides recommended empiric therapy regimens for each site of care. In addition, we discuss the antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory role macrolides play in CAP, as well as specific information for managing individual CAP pathogens such as community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. We also examine several novel antibiotics being developed for CAP and review the evidence guiding duration of therapy and current best practices for the transition of hospitalized patients from intravenous antibiotics to oral therapy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. The Curative Effect of Feiyang Gastroenteritis Tablets Combined With Levofloxacin in the Treatment of Acute or Chronic Gastroenteritis%飞扬肠胃炎片联合左氧氟沙星治疗急慢性胃肠炎的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李波

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察飞扬肠胃炎片联合左氧氟沙星治疗急慢性肠胃炎的疗效。方法100例急慢性肠胃炎患者,随机均分为观察组和对照组各50例。对照组采用左氧氟沙星治疗急慢性肠胃炎,观察组采取飞扬肠胃炎片联合左氧氟沙星治疗。对两组治疗效果、相关临床症状以及患者生活质量评分等方面进行对比。结果观察组治疗效果、相关临床症状以及患者生活质量评分等情况均优于对照组(P<0.05)。结论飞扬肠胃炎片联合左氧氟沙星治疗急慢性肠胃炎,效果良好,改善患者发热、鼻塞以及腹泻等临床症状,减少不良反应产生情况,提高了患者生活质量。%Objective To observe curative effect of the feiyang gastroenteritis tablets combined levofloxacin for the treatment of acute or chronic gastroenteritis. Methods100 patients with acute or chronic gastroenteritis,randomly divided into observation group and control group,50 cases each. The control group treated by levofloxacin for acute or chronic gastroenteritis,observation group to take feiyang gastroenteritis tablets and levofloxacin therapy. On two groups of treatment effect,the quality of life scores and clinical symptoms were compared.ResultsObservation group with clinical symptoms and treatment effect,related quality of life score,were better than the control group(P< 0.05).Conclusion Feiyang gastroenteritis tablets with levofloxacin for therapy of acute or chronic gastroenteritis has obvious effect,improve the patients with fever,nasal congestion and diarrhea.

  6. Combination antibiotic therapy for community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Jesus; Rello, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common and potentially serious illness that is associated with morbidity and mortality. Although medical care has improved during the past decades, it is still potentially lethal. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism isolated. Treatment includes mandatory antibiotic therapy and organ support as needed. There are several antibiotic therapy regimens that include β-lactams or macrolides or fluoroquinolones alone or in combination. Co...

  7. Improving outcomes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Bewick, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a leading cause of adult morbidity and mortality worldwide despite decades of effective antibiotics and vaccination initiatives. There have been no recent significant improvements in outcomes, including 30-day mortality. The bacterium Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most prevalent causative pathogen in CAP, being found in up to half of cases. In September 2006 a childhood pneumococcal vaccine (PCV-7) was introduced, leading to reductions in vaccine-type (...

  8. The Role of Human Coronaviruses in Children Hospitalized for Acute Bronchiolitis, Acute Gastroenteritis, and Febrile Seizures: A 2-Year Prospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Jevšnik

    Full Text Available Human coronaviruses (HCoVs are associated with a variety of clinical presentations in children, but their role in disease remains uncertain. The objective of our prospective study was to investigate HCoVs associations with various clinical presentations in hospitalized children up to 6 years of age. Children hospitalized with acute bronchiolitis (AB, acute gastroenteritis (AGE, or febrile seizures (FS, and children admitted for elective surgical procedures (healthy controls were included in the study. In patients with AB, AGE, and FS, a nasopharyngeal (NP swab and blood sample were obtained upon admission and the follow-up visit 14 days later, whereas in children with AGE a stool sample was also acquired upon admission; in healthy controls a NP swab and stool sample were taken upon admission. Amplification of polymerase 1b gene was used to detect HCoVs in the specimens. HCoVs-positive specimens were also examined for the presence of several other viruses. HCoVs were most often detected in children with FS (19/192, 9.9%, 95% CI: 6-15%, followed by children with AGE (19/218, 8.7%, 95% CI: 5.3-13.3% and AB (20/308, 6.5%, 95% CI: 4.0-9.8%. The presence of other viruses was a common finding, most frequent in the group of children with AB (19/20, 95%, 95% CI: 75.1-99.8%, followed by FS (10/19, 52.6%, 95% CI: 28.9-75.6% and AGE (7/19, 36.8%, 95% CI: 16.3-61.6%. In healthy control children HCoVs were detected in 3/156 (1.9%, 95% CI: 0.4-5.5% NP swabs and 1/150 (0.7%, 95% CI: 0.02-3.3% stool samples. It seems that an etiological role of HCoVs is most likely in children with FS, considering that they had a higher proportion of positive HCoVs results than patients with AB and those with AGE, and had the highest viral load; however, the co-detection of other viruses was 52.6%.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00987519.

  9. Development of an algorithm for early clarification of isolation indication for acutely admitted patients with gastroenteritis (GE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skyum, Florence; Backer Mogensen, Christian; Chen, Ming

    Isolation of contagious patients is expensive, requires more caregiver time and the level of care and observation is lower than for non-isolated patients. But isolation is necessary to protect other patients, hospital staff and relatives from contagion. Different isolation regimes are available...... depending on the causative agent. A community acquired GE is most often caused by Norovirus, while a hospital acquired GE by toxin producing Clostridium difficile. Patients infected with these two agents must be isolated in single-bed rooms, while patients with GE due to other pathogens can be isolated...... in multi-bed rooms, with less strict isolation. As the causative agent to the GE is unknown on admission to hospital, the decision of isolation regime is based on the available information from the patient implying a risk of isolating too many or too few patients. The aim of the study is to identify...

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia in older patients: does age influence systemic cytokine levels in community-acquired pneumonia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death in the elderly. The age-related increase in comorbid illnesses plays a part but the effect of aging on the immune response may be equally important. We aimed to evaluate patients with CAP for evidence of a muted response to infection in elderly patients admitted to hospital compared with a younger patient group.

  11. 异位妊娠误诊为急性胃肠炎15例分析%Analysis of Ectopic Pregnancy Misdiagnosed as Acute Gastroenteritis (15 Cases)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶贵云; 谭艳丽

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the cause of ectopic pregnancy misdiagnosed as acute gastroenteritis, and to propose preventive measures. Methods The clinical data of 15 cases of ectopic pregnancy misdiagnosed in our hospital was retrospectively analyzed. Results All patients had the initial symptom of abdominal pain. 9 cases was observed as acute gastroenteritis at primary period, during which hemorrhagic shock appeared after treatment, so ectopic pregnancy was suspected and surgery was performed and then it was later confirmed as ruptured ectopic pregnancy with a blood loss of 2000 ~30 000 ml; 1 case was treated as acute gastroenteritis for 3 times in the local hospital, but died from excessive bleeding in our hospital. Urinary HCG of the patient was positive, intraperitoneal blood was drawn and confirmed as ruptured entopic pregnancy and hemorrhage shock; 5 cases was treated as acute gastroenteritis 2 or 3 times without remission, diagnosed as tubal pregnancy through gynecological consultation after abdominal B-ultrasound showed adnexal mass and abdominal effusion. The blood loss was 1000 ~ 1500 ml in the surgery. 1 patient died, and 14 patients were cured and discharged. Conclusion Ectopic pregnancy may be easily misdiagnosed because of its complicated clinical manifestations, and more attention should be paid to history and differential diagnosis to avoid misdiagnosis.%目的 探讨异位妊娠误诊为急性胃肠炎的原因,并提出防范对策.方法 对我院收治并误诊的异位妊娠15例的临床资料进行回顾性分析.结果 本组均以上腹痛为首发症状,其中9例病初按急性胃肠炎观察治疗,期间病情加重,出现失血性休克,拟诊异位妊娠行手术治疗而明确诊断为输卵管妊娠破裂出血,出血量2000~30000 ml;1例发病后在当地曾3次就诊,均按急性胃肠炎处理,后因失血过多到我院,经抢救无效死亡,后导尿查绒毛膜促性腺激素(HCG)阳性,腹穿抽出不凝血而明确诊

  12. Community acquired urinary tract infection: etiology and bacterial susceptibility

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    Dias Neto José Anastácio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Urinary tract infections (UTI are one of the most common infectious diseases diagnosed. UTI account for a large proportion of antibacterial drug consumption and have large socio-economic impacts. Since the majority of the treatments begins or is done completely empirically, the knowledge of the organisms, their epidemiological characteristics and their antibacterial susceptibility that may vary with time is mandatory. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of uropathogens and their antibiotic susceptibility of the community acquired UTI diagnosed in our institution and to provide a national data. METHODS: We analyzed retrospectively the results of urine cultures of 402 patients that had community acquired urinary tract infection in the year of 2003. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients in this study was 45.34 ± 23.56 (SD years. There were 242 (60.2% females and 160 (39.8% males. The most commonly isolated organism was Escherichia coli (58%. Klebsiella sp. (8.4% and Enterococcus sp.(7.9% were reported as the next most common organisms. Of all bacteria isolated from community acquired UTI, only 37% were sensitive to ampicillin, 51% to cefalothin and 52% to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The highest levels of susceptibility were to imipenem (96%, ceftriaxone (90%, amikacin (90%, gentamicin (88%, levofloxacin (86%, ciprofloxacin (73%, nitrofurantoin (77% and norfloxacin (75%. CONCLUSION: Gram-negative agents are the most common cause of UTI. Fluoroquinolones remains the choice among the orally administered antibiotics, followed by nitrofurantoin, second and third generation cephalosporins. For severe disease that require parenteral antibiotics the choice should be aminoglycosides, third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones or imipenem, which were the most effective.

  13. Sero diagnosis of Legionella infection in community acquired pneumonia.

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    Javed, Sabah; Chaudhry, Rama; Passi, Kapil; Sharma, Sutikshan; K, Padmaja; Dhawan, Benu; Dey, A B

    2010-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila has been increasingly recognized as an emerging pathogen responsible for community acquired pneumonia (CAP) worldwide. In India, the actual burden is not known. The present study was thus undertaken to see the presence of Legionella infection in patients with community acquired pneumonia admitted in a tertiary care centre in north India. Both children and adults (n=113) with symptoms of pneumonia were included in the study. Clinical samples (blood, urine, nasopharyngeal aspirates, bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum, etc.) were collected and subjected to culture and other tests. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was done by commercial kits for all the three classes of immunoglobulins (IgG, IgM & IgA). Urinary antigen was also detected using commercial kits. Culture was performed on 51 respiratory tract fluid samples. Serum samples of 44 healthy controls were also screened for the presence of anti-legionella antibodies (IgG, IgM & IgA). Thirty one of the 113 cases (27.43%) were serologically positive. Anti-legionella IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were positive in 7.96, 15.92 and 11.50 per cent patients respectively. In controls, seropositivity was 9.09 (4/44). IgA was positive in 3 and IgM, IgG combined in one. Antigenuria detection by Microwell ELISA kit showed 17.69 per cent positivity. Four antigenuria positive patients were also serologically positive; of these two patients were positive for IgM, hence considered as confirmed cases of Legionella infection. None of the sample was culture positive. Combination of serology and antigenuria detection may be a valuable tool for the diagnosis of Legionella infection in absence of culture positivity. In order to evaluate the actual burden of Legionella in community acquired pneumonia, further studies with larger samples need to be done.

  14. Polymicrobial community-acquired pneumonia: An emerging entity.

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    Cillóniz, Catia; Civljak, Rok; Nicolini, Antonello; Torres, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Polymicrobial aetiology in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is more common than previously recognized. This growing new entity can influence inflammation, host immunity and disease outcomes in CAP patients. However, the true incidence is complicated to determine and probably underestimated due mainly to many cases going undetected, particularly in the outpatient setting, as the diagnostic yield is restricted by the sensitivity of currently available microbiologic tests and the ability to get certain types of clinical specimens. The observed rate of polymicrobial cases may also lead to new antibiotic therapy considerations. In this review, we discuss the pathogenesis, microbial interactions in pneumonia, epidemiology, biomarkers and antibiotic therapy for polymicrobial CAP.

  15. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

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    Sunita M Bhatawadekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra.

  16. The complete genome and phenome of a community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii.

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    Daniel N Farrugia

    Full Text Available Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections.

  17. Characterization of GII.4 noroviruses circulating among children with acute gastroenteritis in Pune, India: 2005-2013.

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    Kulkarni, Ruta; Patel, Amit; Bhalla, Shilpa; Chhabra, Preeti; Cherian, Sarah; Chitambar, Shobha D

    2016-01-01

    Genogroup II genotype 4 noroviruses (GII.4 NoVs), an important cause of sporadic childhood gastroenteritis worldwide, undergo continuous evolution leading to the periodic emergence of novel variants. The present study was undertaken for surveillance of GII.4 NoVs and identification and characterization of GII.4 variants circulating among children with sporadic gastroenteritis in Pune, India during 2005-2013. Among the 12 GII genotypes detected in the study, GII.4 was predominant. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of ORF2 (major capsid protein VP1 gene) of the GII.4 NoVs revealed circulation of seven GII.4 variants, Hunter_2004 (2005-2007), Yerseke_2006a (2006), DenHaag_2006b (2007), Osaka_2007 (2007-2009), Apeldoorn_2007 (2008), New Orleans_2009 (2008-2012) and Sydney_2012 (2013), with the Pune strains grouping with the contemporary global reference strains. The Hunter_2004, Osaka_2007 and New Orleans_2009 variants showed prolonged circulation, with the Hunter_2004 and New Orleans_2009 variants differentiating into temporally separated sub-clusters. Analysis of VP1 sequences and predicted structures of the GII.4 variants identified variant specific amino acid positions, particularly in and near (within 8A(°)) the epitopes A-E, displaying differences in the sequence and physicochemical characteristics of the different variants. Comparison with the reference strains of each of the GII.4 variants revealed up to 11 amino acid substitutions at the variant specific positions in the GII.4 strains from Pune. Amino acid variations were also noted among the strains of the same GII.4 variant in Pune. The strains of different sub-clusters identified in the Hunter_2004 and New Orleans_2009 variants showed differences in sequence and physicochemical properties of either or all of the epitopes A, C and E. The study thus describes the temporal variations and diversity of the GII.4 strains in Pune and emphasizes continuous monitoring and analysis of the GII.4 variants.

  18. An outbreak of acute gastroenteritis associated with contaminated bottled water in a university – Jiangxi, China, 2012

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    Guang Zeng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: On 23 May 2012, a university in Jiangxi, China reported a gastroenteritis outbreak. We investigated the outbreak to identify the agent, source and mode of transmission and to recommend control measures.Methods: A case was defined as any person from the university with onset of diarrhoea (≥3 times/24h from 1 to 31 May 2012. Active case finding was conducted by reviewing university hospital and drug-store records and interviewing students, workers and teachers. We then conducted a case-control study in which we compared food, water and environmental exposure history. Water samples were collected and tested.Results: We identified 417 cases – an attack rate (AR of 4.7% (417/8781 for the university. There were 416 student cases (AR = 5.7% distributed across all 11 colleges, five of which were more heavily affected (AR range = 5.9%–14%. In the case-control study, cases had higher odds of having drunk bottled water (odds ratio [OR] = 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.7–9.9, and there was a dose–response relationship (X 2 trend = 4.6, P < 0.05. Drinking boiled bottled water was inversely associated with being a case (OR = "0.22," 95% CI = "0.07–0.71." Eating in any of the three university canteens or drinking water from the city water supply was not associated with being a case. Pathogenic Escherichia coli was isolated from two unopened bottled water specimens and from four student cases.Conclusion: This gastroenteritis outbreak was most likely caused by contaminated bottled water. The company in question has been shut down and no further cases have been reported. Increased regulation of bottled water plants and better coordination between different investigators for future outbreaks is recommended.

  19. Procalcitonin: Inflammatory Biomarker for Assessing the Severity of Community-Acquired Pneumonia – A Clinical Observation in Geriatric Patients

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a common disease of the elderly and involves a high mortality risk. Demographic developments are creating new challenges for acute medical treatment strategies in geriatric patients with their underlying multimorbidity. In addition to the diagnostic parameters recorded on hospital admission, such as white cell count and C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, more than the risk scores CRB- and CURB-65 evaluated to date, appears to be a promising parameter for assess...

  20. Are Pathogenic Leptospira Species Agents of Community-Acquired Pneumonia? Case Reports of Leptospirosis Presenting as Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasem, M Hussein; Farida, Helmia; Ahmed, Ahmed; Severin, Juliţte A; Suryanto, Agus; Isbandrio, Bambang; Verbrugh, Henri A; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; van den Broek, Peterhans J

    2016-01-01

    We report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Results of qPCR analysis of throat swabs were concordant with those obtained with acute-phase serum samples, which suggests its potential for use as a noninvasive diagnostic tool for leptospirosis.

  1. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

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    Katchanov, Juri [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Charite, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany); Endres, Matthias [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  2. Three-year multicenter surveillance of community-acquired listeria monocytogenes meningitis in adults

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    Grill-Díaz Fabio

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes is the third most frequent cause of bacterial meningitis. The aim of this study is to know the incidence and risk factors associated with development of acute community-acquired Lm meningitis in adult patients and to evaluate the clinical features, management, and outcome in this prospective case series. Methods A descriptive, prospective, and multicentric study carried out in 9 hospitals in the Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI over a 39-month period. All adults patients admitted to the participating hospitals with the diagnosis of acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (Ac-ABM were included in this study. All these cases were diagnosed on the basis of a compatible clinical picture and a positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF culture or blood culture. The patients were followed up until death or discharge from hospital. Results Two hundred and seventy-eight patients with Ac-ABM were included. Forty-six episodes of Lm meningitis were identified in 46 adult patients. In the multivariate analysis only age (OR 1.026; 95% CI 1.00-1.05; p = 0.042, immunosupression (OR 2.520; 95% CI 1.05-6.00; p = 0.037, and CSF/blood glucose ratio (OR 39.42; 95% CI 4.01-387.50; p = 0.002 were independently associated with a Lm meningitis. The classic triad of fever, neck stiffness and altered mental status was present in 21 (49% patients, 32% had focal neurological findings at presentation, 12% presented cerebellum dysfunction, and 9% had seizures. Twenty-nine (68% patients were immunocompromised. Empirical antimicrobial therapy was intravenous ampicillin for 34 (79% of 43 patients, in 11 (32% of them associated to aminoglycosides. Definitive ampicillin plus gentamicin therapy was significantly associated with unfavourable outcome (67% vs 28%; p = 0.024 and a higher mortality (67% vs 32%; p = 0.040.The mortality rate was 28% (12 of 43 patients and 5 of 31 (16.1% surviving patients developed adverse

  3. Garenoxacin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

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    Biswanath Biswas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a major cause of adult mortality in Asia. Empirical use of antibiotics depends on the pathogens that are commonly responsible. Evolution of resistant pathogens in CAP has added to the burden of treating physicians. Microbiological culture and antibiotic sensitivity testing are helpful for the treatment of such respiratory tract infections. Klebsiella pneumoniae though uncommon pathogen of CAP has been reported in many cases. Garenoxacin a newer fl uoroquinolone has found its utility in the treatment of respiratory tract infections. Providing symptomatic relief to the patient with the use of analgesics, antipyretics and cough preparations are also an essential part of the management. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2014; 3(6.000: 1093-1095

  4. Changing bacteriological profile and mortality trends in community acquired pneumonia

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    Sagar Khadanga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few and conflicting Indian data regarding the bacteriological etiology of community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Adding to this agony, there is no credible data from the eastern part of India. This is a cross-sectional study and descriptive in nature over a period of 1-year. Of the 464 cases of the study population, we could isolate aerobic bacteria in 149 patients (32.1%. Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified as the most common organism causing CAP (68/149. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB as a group exceeded marginally over S. pneumoniae (69/149. Among GNB, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism (31/69, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (29/69. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in (12/149 cases. Co-amoxyclav is still the most sensitive drug for S. pneumoniae. P. aeruginosa was most sensitive to imipenam followed by piperacillin-tazobactam.

  5. Hospital Resource Utilisation by Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, S

    2017-09-01

    Little data is available on the resource utilisation of patients admitted with Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Ireland. A retrospective review of 50 randomly-selected patients admitted to Beaumont Hospital with CAP was undertaken. The mean length of stay of patients with CAP was 12 days (+\\/- 16 days). All patients were emergency admissions, all had a chest x-ray, a C-reactive protein blood test, and occupied a public bed at some point during admission. Common antimicrobial therapies were intravenous (IV) amoxicillin\\/clavulanic acid and oral clarithromycin; 60% received physiotherapy. The estimated mean cost of CAP per patient was €14,802.17. Costs arising from admission to hospital with CAP are substantial, but efforts can be undertaken to ensure that resources are used efficiently to improve patient care such as discharge planning and fewer in-hospital ward transfers

  6. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children: A Multidisciplinary Consensus Review

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    Donald E Low

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is common among children and may have viral, bacterial or, occasionally, other causes. The etiology is complex, with age-related trends, and differs from that in adult CAP, necessitating different management guidelines. There is an absence of current guidelines for the management of pediatric CAP (PCAP that take into account changing etiologies, antimicrobial-resistance issues and the use of newly licensed antimicrobials. The present review does not provide specific guidelines, but it reviews the literature and presents currrent approaches to the treatment of PCAP. To compile the review, an expert panel was convened to provide a consensus. The review discusses the etiology, diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment of PCAP as well as indications for referral to a hospital emergency department. The goal of the review is to provide those involved with treatment of PCAP in the community setting with information that can be used to make effective treatment choices.

  7. Procalcitonin and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulia, Bivona; Luisa, Agnello; Concetta, Scazzone; Bruna, Lo Sasso; Chiara, Bellia; Marcello, Ciaccio

    2015-12-07

    The role of procalcitonin (PCT) as a biomarker for sepsis in adults is well documented, while its role in infections affecting neonatal children remains controversial. Among these infections, Community-Acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been studied extensively, because it's the second cause of death in children in developing countries, and one of the most frequent causes of hospitalization in industrialized countries. The PubMed database and the Cochrane Library were used to search for the following keywords: CAP, procalcitonin, and children. Thirteen articles were studied to determine the role of PCT in CAP management, specifically its usefulness for distinguishing pneumococcal infections from viral and unknown infections, for predicting severity and the correct antibiotic treatment. This paper focuses on the studies performed to identify the best inflammatory biomarker for CAP management. Although there is an increase in studies confirming the usefulness of PCT in CAP management in children, further studies are needed to have better understanding of its role for pediatric CAP management.

  8. Epidemiological pattern of community-acquired respiratory tract infections of the conscripts in the North Fleet during a vaccine-challenged period

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    Yu. V. Lobzin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the new military units in the North fleet is accompanied by vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The accination coincides with periods of a rising number of army conscripts being taken ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts: acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia. We need to study is to ascertain whether there is the correlation between the periods of the increase in the number of ervicemen fallen ill with community-acquired infection of respiratory tracts and the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination. The study was carried out on the North fleet conscripts who were drawn blood samples from the ulnar vein before and after the vaccination using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified. The blood was examined for the presence of antibodies to diphtheria and tetanus using direct hemagglutination test. The health status of the vaccinated conscripts was under observation for 4 months, during which acute illnesses (acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia were registered. Serologic testing demonstrated a high rate of immunological protection against diphtheria and tetanus before vaccination. After the diphtheria and tetanus vaccination, the number of conscripts, who were taken ill in the first month, was significantly higher compared to the following months. The conscripts, who fell ill, had high antibody titers against diphtheria and tetanus in the vaccine-challenged period. Vaccination of the servicemen using Exhausted diphtheria tetanus vaccine, modified, is serologically unfounded; it leads to complications such as acute tonsillitis, acute bronchitis and community-acquired pneumonia during the vaccinechallenged period especially during the first month and less considerably during the following months.

  9. CMV - gastroenteritis/colitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colitis - cytomegalovirus; Gastroenteritis - cytomegalovirus; Gastrointestinal CMV disease ... or after bone marrow or organ transplant Ulcerative colitis or Crohn disease Rarely, serious CMV infection involving ...

  10. The prevalence of norovirus, astrovirus and adenovirus infections among hospitalised children with acute gastroenteritis in Porto Velho, state of Rondônia, western Brazilian Amazon

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    Maria Sandra Costa Amaral

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although viruses are well-established causes of acute gastroenteritis, few data on the circulation of these pathogens in Porto Velho, state of Rondônia, Brazil, are available. Thus, faecal samples from hospitalised diarrhoeic children, under six years of age, were collected and tested for the presence of norovirus (NoV, adenovirus (AdV and astrovirus (AstV from February 2010-February 2012. Specimens were screened by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and viruses were found in 10.7% (63/591 of the cases. NoV, AdV and AstV were detected in 7.8%, 2% and 0.8% of the samples, respectively. NoV infection was observed at all ages and was most prevalent in zero-18-month-old children (84.7%; p = 0.002. A higher incidence of NoV was detected from February-April 2010, when it was found in 52.2% of the cases. Co-infections involving these viruses, rotavirus and enteropathogenic bacteria were detected in 44.4% (28/63 of the children with viral diarrhoea. Nosocomial infections were demonstrated in 28.6% (18/63 of the cases in which viruses were detected. The present paper reports, for the first time, the circulation of NoV and AstV among the paediatric population of Porto Velho and it contributes to our understanding of the roles of these pathogens in gastrointestinal infections.

  11. Severe Rotavirus gastroenteritis in a patient with infant leukemia

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    Hatice Uygun

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children. Reports about the clinical relevance of rotavirus in immunocompromised children are rare. We herein presented a case of life-threatening Rotavirus gastroenteritis in an infant with acute myeloblastic leukemia which could be prevented by recently recommended Rotavirus vaccination.

  12. Higher incidence of perineal community acquired MRSA infections among toddlers

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    Blumenthal Robert M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A six-fold increase in pediatric MRSA infections, prompted us to examine the clinical profile of children with MRSA infections seen at Mercy Children's Hospital, Toledo, Ohio and to characterize the responsible strains. Methods Records were reviewed of pediatric patients who cultured positive for MRSA from June 1 to December 31, 2007. Strain typing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFT and DiversiLab, SCCmec typing, and PCR-based lukSF-PV gene (encodes Panton-Valentine leukocidin, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME and cap5 gene detection was performed. Results Chart review of 63 patients with MRSA infections revealed that 58(92% were community acquired MRSA (CAMRSA. All CAMRSA were skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI. Twenty five (43% patients were aged mec type IVa and lukSF-PV gene positive. Nearly all contained ACME and about 80% were cap5 positive. Of the 58 USA300 strains by PFT, 55(95% were also identified as USA300 via the automated repetitive sequence-based PCR method from DiversiLab. Conclusions CAMRSA SSTI of the perineum was significantly more common among toddlers and that of the extremities in older children. The infecting strains were all USA300 PFT. Further studies are needed to identify the unique virulence and colonization characteristics of USA300 strains in these infections.

  13. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. [Microbiologic diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez P, Patricio; Calvo A, Mario

    2005-01-01

    Microbiological analysis allows us to identify the etiology of pneumonia and its in vitro susceptibility pattern. Antibiotic treatment directed against a known pathogen enables us to narrow antibacterial spectrum of action, and to reduce costs, drug adverse effects risk and antibiotic resistance. However it is unnecessary to perform extended microbiological studies in all patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). Etiological studies must be based in pneumonia severity, epidemiological risk factors and clinical response to empirical treatment. Routine microbiological analysis for ambulatory patients is not recommended. In patients with persistent cough and worsening in their general conditions, a sputum sample must be obtained to perform an acid-fast smear and Mycobacterium culture. The risk of complications and death of patients hospitalized with CAP justifies basic microbiological exploration (sputum Gram staining and culture, blood cultures, pleural fluid culture) intending to obtain a more accurate etiology of pulmonary infection and to guide specific antibiotic treatment. Paired serum samples obtained to document atypical pathogen infections (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae) and urine sample to detect Legionella pneumophila antigenuria are recommended in all CAP severely ill patients that are admitted to ICU, in those not responding to betalactamic drug treatment and in selected patients with specific epidemiological risks. A microbiological study would be useful in management of patients with severe CAP pneumonia outbreaks with clinical-epidemiological particular characteristics, and in-patients with empirical antimicrobial treatment failure.

  15. Professions and Working Conditions Associated With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Palomera, Elisabet; Roig, Jordi; Boixeda, Ramon; Bartolomé, Maria; de la Torre, Mari; Parra, Olga; Torres, Antoni

    2015-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not considered a professional disease, and the effect of different occupations and working conditions on susceptibility to CAP is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine whether different jobs and certain working conditions are risk factors for CAP. Over a 1-year period, all radiologically confirmed cases of CAP (n=1,336) and age- and sex-matched controls (n=1,326) were enrolled in a population-based case-control study. A questionnaire on CAP risk factors, including work-related questions, was administered to all participants during an in-person interview. The bivariate analysis showed that office work is a protective factor against CAP, while building work, contact with dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace were risk factors for CAP. The occupational factor disappeared when the multivariate analysis was adjusted for working conditions. Contact with dust (previous month) and sudden changes of temperature (previous 3 months) were risk factors for CAP, irrespective of the number of years spent working in these conditions, suggesting reversibility. Some recent working conditions such as exposure to dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace are risk factors for CAP. Both factors are reversible and preventable. Copyright © 2014 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. Cefditoren in upper and lower community-acquired respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Soriano

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Francisco Soriano1, María-José Giménez1,2, Lorenzo Aguilar1,21PRISM-AG, Madrid, Spain; 2Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid, SpainAbstract: This article reviews and updates published data on cefditoren in the evolving scenario of resistance among the most prevalent isolates from respiratory tract infections in the community (Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pneumoniae. By relating the in vitro activity of cefditoren (in national and multinational surveillance and against isolates with emerging resistant genotypes/phenotypes to its pharmacokinetics, the cefditoren pharmacodynamic activity predicting efficacy (in humans, animal models, and in vitro simulations is analyzed prior to reviewing clinical studies (tonsillopharyngitis, sinusitis, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and community-acquired pneumonia and the relationship between bacterial eradication and clinical efficacy. The high in vitro activity of cefditoren against the most prevalent respiratory isolates in the community, together with its pharmacokinetics (enabling a twice daily regimen leading to adequate pharmacodynamic indexes covering all S. pyogenes, H. influenzae, and at least 95% S. pneumoniae isolates, makes cefditoren an antibiotic that will play a significant role in the treatment of respiratory tract infections in the community. In the clinical setting, studies carried out with cefditoren showed that treatments with the 400 mg twice daily regimen were associated with high rates of bacteriological response, even against penicillin-nonsusceptible S. pneumoniae, with good correlation between bacteriological efficacy/response and clinical outcome.Keywords: cefditoren, Streptococcus pyogenes, Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, community-acquired respiratory tract infections

  17. The Modern Diagnostic Approach to Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, James D

    2016-12-01

    Respiratory tract infections, the majority of which are community acquired, are among the leading causes of death worldwide and a leading indication for hospital admission. The burden of disease demonstrates a "U"-shaped distribution, primarily affecting young children as the immune system matures, and older adults as the process of immunosenescence and accumulation of comorbidities leads to increased susceptibility to infection. Diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is traditionally based on demonstration of a new infiltrate on a chest radiograph in a patient presenting with an acute respiratory illness or sepsis. Advances in diagnosis have been slow, and although there are increasing data on the value of computed tomography or lung ultrasound as more sensitive diagnostic methodologies, they are not widely used as initial diagnostic tests. There are a wide range of differential diagnoses and pneumonia "mimics" which should be considered in patients presenting with CAP. Once the diagnosis of CAP has been made, identifying the causative microorganism is the next stage in the diagnostic process. Traditional culture-based approaches are relatively insensitive and achieve a positive diagnosis in only 30 to 70% of cases, even when rigorously applied. Urinary antigen tests, polymerase chain reaction assays, and even next-generation sequencing technologies have become available and are increasing the rates of positive diagnosis. In an era of increasing antimicrobial resistance, the accurate diagnosis of CAP and determining the causative pathogen are ever more important. Getting these both right is key in reducing both morbidity and mortality from CAP, and appropriate antimicrobial stewardship which is now an international healthcare priority.

  18. [Nutritional status and mortality in community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pecci, María Soledad; Carlson, Damián; Montero-Tinnirello, Javier; Parodi, Roberto L; Montero, Antonio; Greca, Alcides A

    2010-01-01

    Pneumonias are a major cause of morbidity and mortality and their prognosis depends on many factors including nutritional status. This study analyzed the relationship between malnutrition and the risk of death in Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) patients. This is a prospective observational study. The Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) was used as a screening tool to appraise the nutritional status. Ninety-eight patients with CAP requiring hospitalization were included consecutively from October 2004 to September 2006. The clinical, bacteriological and laboratory features were recorded. Patient's nutritional condition was assessed using the SGA. The monitoring was performed until discharge, death or shunt. Persistent cough or fever, the presence of pleural effusion, malignancies or long hospitalization were associated with worse prognosis. Mortality increased in proportion to the degree of malnutrition. Thirty two CAP patients (32.65%) were classified as SGA-category A; 44 (44.90%) as SGA-B, and 22 (22.45%) as SGA-C. Pneumonia resulted in death in 3/32 SGA-A (9.37%), 8/44 SGA-B (18.18%) and 10/22 SGA-C patients. SGA-C patients showed significantly higher odds ratios for death in comparison to SGA-A patients (OR = 6.085, CI95%: 1.071-34.591; p = 0.042). Considering death as the outcome variable, SGA-A class had the highest negative predictive value (0.906), while SGA-C class showed the highest positive predictive value (0.455). These results link the nutritional status to the NAC evolution prognostic. SGA provides a simple estimation of the nutritional status and it is a good predictor of the risk of death in CAP patients.

  19. Avaliação molecular de norovírus em pacientes com gastroenterite aguda Molecular evaluation of norovírus in patients with acute gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Georgiadis

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O norovírus foi recentemente identificado como o principal causador de surtos de gastroenterite aguda de origem não bacteriana em todo o mundo e está envolvido em episódios de origem alimentar. Neste estudo, foram avaliados pacientes com sintomas de gastroenterite aguda pelo período de um ano, a fim de se avaliar duas metodologias na identificação do NoV - a reação em cadeia por polimerase convencional e em tempo real -, incidência, sazonalidade e genótipo predominante. MÉTODOS: Após a extração do RNA, 50 amostras foram analisadas pela metodologia de PCR convencional e 365 amostras foram analisadas pela metodologia de PCR em tempo real. Todas as amostras que apresentaram resultado positivo pelas duas metodologias ou discordante foram sequenciadas, ao todo, 13 amostras foram sequenciadas. RESULTADOS: Das 50 amostras testadas pelas duas metodologias, 7 apresentaram resultado positivo pelo método convencional e 15 pelo método da PCR em tempo real. Do total de 365 amostras testadas pela metodologia de PCR, em tempo real, 48 foram positivas. Em relação às amostras sequenciadas, todas mostraram ser NoV do genogrupo II. Em relação à distribuição da incidência de amostras, positivas para NoV, ao longo do ano, pôde ser observada uma frequência de casos positivos maior na primavera, chegando a 29,7% em novembro. CONCLUSÕES: Observamos que o PCR em tempo real é o método mais sensível para a identificação do Nov, que a incidência do NoV é de 13,2% e o genogrupo II prevalece na população avaliada, sendo a primavera o período de maior taxa de infecção.INTRODUCTION: Norovírus was recently identified as the main cause of outbreaks of acute gastroenteritis of non-bacterial origin worldwide and it is involved in episodes of foodborne origin. In this study, patients with symptoms of acute gastroenteritis were evaluated over a one-year period, in order to evaluate two methods for identifying norovírus (real

  20. Seroepidemiology of Coxiella burnetii Infection and its Frequency as a Cause of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J Marrie

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested acute and convalescent serum samples from 788 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in seven Canadian provinces for antibodies to Coxiella burnetii. One hundred nine patients (13.8% had antibodies to this microorganism, and seven patients had acute Q fever. Serological evidence of infection with C burnetii was present in patients from all seven provinces. Three of the seven cases of acute Q fever were from Manitoba, suggesting that there may be unrecognized cases of Q fever in this province. In addition, a case of acute Q fever in Newfoundland, where there had previously been no reported cases, was noted, although subsequently, an outbreak of Q fever on goat farms has been reported.

  1. Epidemiology of Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by Human Calicivirus (Norovirus and Sapovirus) in Catalonia: A Two Year Prospective Study, 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torner, Nuria; Martinez, Ana; Broner, Sonia; Moreno, Antonio; Camps, Neus; Domínguez, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiology of cases of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) of viral etiology is a relevant public health issue. Due to underreporting, the study of outbreaks is an accepted approach to investigate their epidemiology. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics of AGE outbreaks due to norovirus (NoV) and sapovirus (SV) in Catalonia. Prospective study of AGE outbreaks of possible viral etiology notified during two years in Catalonia. NoV and SV were detected by real time reverse transcription polymerase (RT-PCR). A total of 101 outbreaks were registered affecting a total of 2756 persons and 12 hospitalizations (hospitalization rate: 0.8x1,000,000 persons-year); 49.5% of outbreaks were foodborne, 45.5% person to person and 5% waterborne. The distribution of outbreaks according to the setting showed a predominance of catering services (39.6%), nursing homes and long term care facilities (26.8%) and schools (11.9%). The median number of cases per outbreak was 17 (range 2-191). The total Incidence rate (IR) was 18.3 per 100,000 persons-years (95%CI: 17.6-19.0). The highest IR was in persons aged ≥65 years (43.6x100,000 (95% CI: 41.0-46.2)) (p<0.001). A total of 1065 samples were analyzed with a positivity rate of 60.8%. 98% of positive samples were NoV (GII 56.3%; GI 4.2%; GII+GI 4.2%; non- typable 33.0%). SV was identified in two person-to-person transmission outbreaks in children. These results confirm the relevance of viral AGE outbreaks, both foodborne and person-to-person, especially in institutionalized persons. SV should be taken into account when investigating viral AGE outbreaks.

  2. Miocarditis fulminante y enfermedad diarreica aguda por Coxsackie virus B6 Fulminant myocarditis and acute gastroenteritis due to Coxsackie virus B6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Málaga

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos el caso de una paciente joven que presentó choque cardiogénico por virus Coxsakie B6. La paciente acudió a una clínica particular con un cuadro clínico compatible con gastroenterocolitis aguda a la que después de una hora de estar recibiendo hidratación y manejo del cuadro diagnosticado, se agregó hipotensión que llegó al estado de choque, hipoxemia severa y compromiso pulmonar bilateral intersticial por lo que ingresó a Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos, donde recibió manejo de soporte. Debido al cuadro clínico y elevación de enzimas cardiacas se sospechó de compromiso cardiaco, la ecocardiografía evidenció cambios sugerentes de miocarditis. La evolución fue favorable y se le pudo dar de alta después de una semana. El diagnóstico etiológico del cuadro se hizo en el seguimiento, presentando serología con elevación de títulos para virus Coxsakie B6.We present the case of a young woman who suffered cardiogenic due to by Coxsackie virus B6. The patient attended a private clinic with an acute gastroenteritis and after one hour of receiving hydratation,she developed hypotension and shock, severe hypoxemia and bilateral lung infiltrate. The patient entered the Intensive Care Unit, where she received hemodynamic support. Due to the clinical picture and cardiac enzymes increase, a cardiac failure was suspected and the echocardiographic findings suggested "myocarditis". The evolution was successful and Coxsackie B6 virus infection diagnosis was made during the follow up by increase of the levels of antibodies for virus Coxsackie B6.

  3. Epidemiology of Acute Gastroenteritis Outbreaks Caused by Human Calicivirus (Norovirus and Sapovirus in Catalonia: A Two Year Prospective Study, 2010-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Torner

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of cases of acute gastroenteritis (AGE of viral etiology is a relevant public health issue. Due to underreporting, the study of outbreaks is an accepted approach to investigate their epidemiology. The objective of this study was to investigate the epidemiological characteristics of AGE outbreaks due to norovirus (NoV and sapovirus (SV in Catalonia.Prospective study of AGE outbreaks of possible viral etiology notified during two years in Catalonia. NoV and SV were detected by real time reverse transcription polymerase (RT-PCR.A total of 101 outbreaks were registered affecting a total of 2756 persons and 12 hospitalizations (hospitalization rate: 0.8x1,000,000 persons-year; 49.5% of outbreaks were foodborne, 45.5% person to person and 5% waterborne. The distribution of outbreaks according to the setting showed a predominance of catering services (39.6%, nursing homes and long term care facilities (26.8% and schools (11.9%. The median number of cases per outbreak was 17 (range 2-191. The total Incidence rate (IR was 18.3 per 100,000 persons-years (95%CI: 17.6-19.0. The highest IR was in persons aged ≥65 years (43.6x100,000 (95% CI: 41.0-46.2 (p<0.001. A total of 1065 samples were analyzed with a positivity rate of 60.8%. 98% of positive samples were NoV (GII 56.3%; GI 4.2%; GII+GI 4.2%; non- typable 33.0%. SV was identified in two person-to-person transmission outbreaks in children.These results confirm the relevance of viral AGE outbreaks, both foodborne and person-to-person, especially in institutionalized persons. SV should be taken into account when investigating viral AGE outbreaks.

  4. Viral and bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern molecular techniques reveal new information on the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia. In this study, we tried to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and bacteria in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted to the hospital.

  5. Bartonella spp. and Coxiella burnetii Associated with Community-Acquired, Culture-Negative Endocarditis, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, Rinaldo Focaccia; Castelli, Jussara Bianchi; Mansur, Alfredo Jose; Pereira dos Santos, Fabiana; Colombo, Silvia; do Nascimento, Elvira Mendes; Paddock, Christopher D; Brasil, Roosecelis Araújo; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Grinberg, Max; Strabelli, Tania Mara Varejao

    2015-08-01

    We evaluated culture-negative, community-acquired endocarditis by using indirect immunofluorescent assays and molecular analyses for Bartonella spp. and Coxiella burnetii and found a prevalence of 19.6% and 7.8%, respectively. Our findings reinforce the need to study these organisms in patients with culture-negative, community-acquired endocarditis, especially B. henselae in cat owners.

  6. Viral and bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Rossen, John W. A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Modern molecular techniques reveal new information on the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia. In this study, we tried to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and bacteria in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted to the hospital.

  7. Exploratory efficacy endpoints in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webber, Chris; Patton, Michael; Patterson, Scott; Schmoele-Thoma, Beate; Huijts, Susanne M; Bonten, Marc J M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Community-Acquired Pneumonia Immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) assessed vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia (VT-CAP) and vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD) prevention with 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) in adults aged ⩾65years. We report

  8. Vitamin D Level and Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J. Jovanovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OHD levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OHD levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.08–6.08 were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11–2.77 were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis.

  9. Predictors of non-invasive ventilation failure in severe respiratory failure due to community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Piroddi, Ines Maria Grazia; Barlascini, Cornelius; Senarega, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute respiratory failure to avoid endotracheal intubation and intensive care admission. Few studies have assessed the usefulness of NIV in patients with severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP). The use of NIV in severe CAP is controversial because there is a greater variability in success compared to other pulmonary conditions. We retrospectively followed 130 patients with CAP and severe acute respiratory failure (PaO2/FiO2 predictors of NIV failure and hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate analyses. NIV failed in 26 patients (20.0%). Higher chest X-ray score at admission, higher heart rate after 1 hour of NIV, and a higher alveolar-arteriolar gradient (A-aDO2) after 24 hours of NIV each independently predicted NIV failure. Higher chest X ray score, higher LDH at admission, higher heart rate after 24 hours of NIV and higher A-aDO2 after 24 hours of NIV were directly related to hospital mortality. NIV treatment had high rate of success. Successful treatment is related to less lung involvement and to early good response to NIV and continuous improvement in clinical response.

  10. Determinants for hospitalization in " low-risk" community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Muktar H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variable decision in managing community acquired pneumonia (CAP is the initial site of care; in-patient versus outpatient. These variations persist despite comprehensive practice guidelines. Patients with a Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI score lower than seventy have low risk for complications and outpatient antibiotic management is recommended in this group. These patients are generally below the age of fifty years, non-nursing home residents, HIV negative and have no major cardiac, hepatic, renal or malignant diseases. Methods A retrospective analysis of 296 low-risk CAP patients evaluated within a year one period at St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland was undertaken. All patients were assigned a PSI score. 208 (70% were evaluated and discharged from the emergency department (E.D. to complete outpatient antibiotic therapy, while 88 (30% were hospitalized. Patients were sub-stratified into classes I-V according to PSI. A comparison of demographic, clinical, social and financial parameters was made between the E.D. discharged and hospitalized groups. Results Statistically significant differences in favor of the hospitalized group were noted for female gender (CI: 1.46-5.89, p= 0.0018, African Americans (CI: 0.31-0.73, p= 0.004, insurance coverage (CI: 0.19-0.63, p= 0.0034, temperature (CI: 0.04-0.09, p= 0.0001 and pulse rate (CI: 0.03-0.14, p= 0.0001. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups for altered mental status, hypotension, tachypnea, laboratory/radiological parameters and social indicators (p>0.05. The average length of stay for in-patients was 3.5 days at about eight time's higher cost than outpatient management. There was no difference in mortality or treatment failures between the two groups. The documentation rate and justifications for hospitalizing low risk CAP patients by admitting physicians was less than optimal. Conclusions High fever, tachycardia, female gender

  11. Self-reported disease burden of acute gastroenteritis in Hangzhou-Jiaxing-Huzhou area in Zhejiang%浙江省杭嘉湖地区自报性急性胃肠炎负担研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章荣华; 陈江; 张荷香; 顾昉; 丁钢强

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the epidemiological characteristics of acute gastroenteritis in Hangzhou-Jiaxing-Huzhou area in Zhejiang province. Methods The household interview about the incidence, symptoms and treatment of acute gastroenteritis was conducted among the people selected by multi stage sampling in the area during July-September 2010. Results Totally 2399 people were surveyed. The average monthly prevalence of acute gastroenteritis was 7.0% (95% C/:5. 9% -8.0% ) and the incidence was 0.23 time/person. The weighted average monthly prevalence was 8. 7% (95% CI: 6% -9. 8% ) and the weighted incidence was 0.29 time/person. It is estimated that 4. 601 million cases of acute gastroenteritis occurred during this period. Among the cases in survey, 55. 7% sought medical care, and 28.0% of these cases sent stool samples for detection. 52. 0% of the cases took antibiotics and 11.4% reported work/ school absence due to the illness. The monthly prevalence in children less than 5 years old was 14. 8%. Conclusion The disease burden of acute gastroenteritis was heavy in Hangzhou-Jiaxing-Huzhou area during July-September 2010. The children aged < 5 years are high risk population. The incidence of acute gastroenteritis can be reduced by targeted prevention and control measures.%目的 了解浙江省杭嘉湖地区急性胃肠炎的分布和负担.方法 采用多阶段抽样方法抽取调查对象,2010年7-9月每月入户调查其4周内急性胃肠炎发生情况、临床表现、就诊情况等.结果 7-9月共调查2399人,人群急性胃肠炎月患病率为7.0%(95% CI:5.9% ~ 8.0%),发病率为0.23次/人(7-9月).加权患病率为8.7%(95% CI:7.6%~9.8%),加权发病率为0.29次/人(7-9月),由此推算杭嘉湖地区7-9月有460.1万人次感染急性胃肠炎.55.7%的病例去医院就诊,就诊病例中28.0%的人送检粪便样本;52.0%的病例服用抗生素.11.4%的病例报告因病误工或误学.不满5岁儿童月患病率为14

  12. Gastroenteritis: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viruses. Food or water contaminated by bacteria or parasites. Reaction to a new food. Young children may ... gastroenteritis. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/ ...

  13. community acquired pneumonia among children admitted in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-09-01

    Sep 1, 2012 ... Subjects: All the children admitted to the paediatric wards and found to have clinical features ... many developing countries have mortality rates of. 60-100 per ..... acute lower respiratory illness in urban bangladesh children ...

  14. Air pollution, aeroallergens, and emergency room visits for acute respiratory diseases and gastroenteric disorders among young children in six Italian cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orazzo, Flavia; Nespoli, Luigi; Ito, Kazuhiko; Tassinari, Davide; Giardina, Daniela; Funis, Maurizio; Cecchi, Alessandra; Trapani, Chiara; Forgeschi, Gisella; Vignini, Massimo; Nosetti, Luana; Pigna, Sabrina; Zanobetti, Antonella

    2009-11-01

    Past studies reported evidence of associations between air pollution and respiratory symptoms and morbidity for children. Few studies examined associations between air pollution and emergency room (ER) visits for wheezing, and even fewer for gastroenteric illness. We conducted a multicity analysis of the relationship between air pollution and ER visits for wheezing and gastroenteric disorder in children 0-2 years of age. We obtained ER visit records for wheezing and gastroenteric disorder from six Italian cities. A city-specific case-crossover analysis was applied to estimate effects of particulate matter (PM), nitrogen dioxide, sulfur dioxide, ozone, and carbon monoxide, adjusting for immediate and delayed effects of temperature. Lagged effects of air pollutants up to 6 prior days were examined. The city-specific results were combined using a random-effect meta-analysis. CO and SO(2) were most strongly associated with wheezing, with a 2.7% increase [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5-4.9] for a 1.04-microg/m(3) increase in 7-day average CO and a 3.4% (95% CI, 1.5-5.3) increase for an 8.0-microg/m(3) increase in SO(2). Positive associations were also found for PM with aerodynamic diameter < or = 10 microg and NO(2). We found a significant association between the 3-day moving average CO and gastroenteric disorders [3.8% increase (95% CI, 1.0-6.8)]. When data were stratified by season, the associations were stronger in summer for wheezing and in winter for gastroenteric disorders. Air pollution is associated with triggering of wheezing and gastroenteric disorders in children 0-2 years of age; more work is needed to understand the mechanisms to help prevent wheezing in children.

  15. Failure of CRP decline within three days of hospitalization is associated with poor prognosis of Community-acquired Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Bang; Baunbæk Egelund, Gertrud Louise; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-known acute phase protein used to monitor the patient's response during treatment in infectious diseases. Mortality from Community-acquired Pneumonia (CAP) remains high, particularly in hospitalized patients. Better risk prediction during hospitaliza......BACKGROUND: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a well-known acute phase protein used to monitor the patient's response during treatment in infectious diseases. Mortality from Community-acquired Pneumonia (CAP) remains high, particularly in hospitalized patients. Better risk prediction during...... hospitalization could improve management and ultimately reduce mortality levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate CRP on the 3rd day (CRP3) of hospitalization as a predictor for 30 days mortality. METHODS: A retrospective multicentre cohort study of adult patients admitted with CAP at three Danish hospitals....... Predictive associations of CRP3 (absolute levels and relative decline) and 30 days mortality were analysed using receiver operating characteristics and logistic regression. RESULTS: Eight hundred and fourteen patients were included and 90 (11%) died within 30 days. The area under the curve for CRP3 level...

  16. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P Grytdal

    Full Text Available Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE. However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years. Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested. In addition, 22 (2% of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2% were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1% were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children 65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person-years. Outpatient incidence rates of rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus were 2.0, 1.6, 0.6 per 1,000 person

  17. Incidence of Norovirus and Other Viral Pathogens That Cause Acute Gastroenteritis (AGE) among Kaiser Permanente Member Populations in the United States, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grytdal, Scott P; DeBess, Emilio; Lee, Lore E; Blythe, David; Ryan, Patricia; Biggs, Christianne; Cameron, Miriam; Schmidt, Mark; Parashar, Umesh D; Hall, Aron J

    2016-01-01

    Noroviruses and other viral pathogens are increasingly recognized as frequent causes of acute gastroenteritis (AGE). However, few laboratory-based data are available on the incidence of AGE caused by viral pathogens in the U.S. This study examined stool specimens submitted for routine clinical diagnostics from patients enrolled in Kaiser Permanente (KP) health plans in metro Portland, OR, and the Maryland, District of Columbia, and northern Virginia geographic areas to estimate the incidence of viral enteropathogens in these populations. Over a one-year study period, participating laboratories randomly selected stools submitted for routine clinical diagnostics for inclusion in the study along with accompanying demographic and clinical data. Selected stools were tested for norovirus, rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus using standardized real-time RT-PCR protocols. Each KP site provided administrative data which were used in conjunction with previously published data on healthcare utilization to extrapolate pathogen detection rates into population-based incidence rates. A total of 1,099 specimens collected during August 2012 to September 2013 were included. Mean age of patients providing stool specimens was 46 years (range: 0-98 years). Noroviruses were the most common viral pathogen identified among patients with AGE (n = 63 specimens, 6% of specimens tested). In addition, 22 (2%) of specimens were positive for rotavirus; 19 (2%) were positive for sapovirus; and 7 (1%) were positive for astrovirus. Incidence of norovirus-associated outpatient visits was 5.6 per 1,000 person-years; incidence of norovirus disease in the community was estimated to be 69.5 per 1,000 person-years. Norovirus incidence was highest among children 65 years (outpatient incidence = 7.8 per 1,000 person-years; community incidence = 75.8 per 1,000 person-years). Outpatient incidence rates of rotavirus, sapovirus, and astrovirus were 2.0, 1.6, 0.6 per 1,000 person-years, respectively; community

  18. Socio-demographic, Clinical and Laboratory Features of Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in Children Treated in Pediatric Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Azemi, Mehmedali; Berisha, Majlinda; Ismaili-Jaha, Vlora; Kolgeci, Selim; Avdiu, Muharrem; Jakupi, Xhevat; Hoxha, Rina; Hoxha-Kamberi, Teuta

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of work was presentation of several socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory characteristics of gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. The examinees and methods: The examinees were children under the age of five years treated at the Pediatric Clinic due to acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. Rotavirus is isolated by method chromatographic immunoassay by Cer Test Biotec. Results: From the total number of patients (850) suffering from acute gastroenteritis, feces test on bac...

  19. Antipsychotic drug use and community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Trifirò (Gianluca)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAntipsychotics are generally distinguished as atypical and typical agents, which are indicated in the treatment of acute and chronic psychoses and other psychiatric disorders. In April 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a warning about the increased risk of all-cause mortal

  20. Usefulness of Plasma YKL-40 in Management of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Severity in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang-Ling Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasma YKL-40 level has been reported as playing a significant role in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. However, the correlation between plasma level of YKL-40 and the severity of CAP has not been reported. This study identifies the relationship between plasma level changes of the YKL-40 gene in adult patients hospitalized with CAP. The ELISA was used to measure the plasma YKL-40 level from 61 adult CAP patients before and after antibiotic treatment and from 60 healthy controls. The plasma YKL-40 levels were significantly increased in patients with CAP compared to normal controls. Moreover, the plasma concentration of YKL-40 correlated with the severity of CAP based on the pneumonia severity index (PSI score (r = 0.630, p < 0.001, the CURB-65 (confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, BP, age 65 years score (r = 0.640, p < 0.001, the Acute Physiology And Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II score (r = 0.539, p < 0.001 and length of hospital stay (r = 0.321, p = 0.011, respectively. In conclusion, plasma YKL-40 may play a role in the diagnosis and clinical assessment of CAP severity, which could potentially guide the development of treatment strategies.

  1. CSF lactate for accurate diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulieri, S; Chapuis-Taillard, C; Jaton, K; Cometta, A; Chuard, C; Hugli, O; Du Pasquier, R; Bille, J; Meylan, P; Manuel, O; Marchetti, O

    2015-10-01

    CSF lactate measurement is recommended when nosocomial meningitis is suspected, but its value in community-acquired bacterial meningitis is controversial. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of lactate and other CSF parameters in a prospective cohort of adult patients with acute meningitis. Diagnostic accuracy of lactate and other CSF parameters in patients with microbiologically documented episodes was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The cut-offs with the best diagnostic performance were determined. Forty-five of 61 patients (74%) had a documented bacterial (n = 18; S. pneumoniae, 11; N. meningitidis, 5; other, 2) or viral (n = 27 enterovirus, 21; VZV, 3; other, 3) etiology. CSF parameters were significantly different in bacterial vs. viral meningitis, respectively (p viral meningitis, with a cutoff set at 3.5 mmol/l providing 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and efficiency. CSF lactate had the best accuracy for discriminating bacterial from viral meningitis and should be included in the initial diagnostic workup of this condition.

  2. [Antibiotic therapy for community acquired Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia: clinical relevance of antibiotic resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédos, J-P; Bruneel, F

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of Streptococcus pneumoniae strains with reduced susceptibility to beta-lactams and with multiple drug resistance has not led to major changes in recommendations for antibiotic therapy in patients with acute community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia. Numerous factors explain the limited clinical impact of this major microbiological change. The frequency of intermediate strains is high but the frequency of resistant strains to beta-lactams is very low. There is a complex relation between the acquisition of resistance to beta-lactams and the decreased virulence of S. pneumoniae strains. The only finding in studies of humanized experimental animal models of lethal bacteremic pneumonia caused by resistance and tolerant strains was a slowing in the kinetics of beta-lactams bactericidal activity, especially for amoxicillin. Taken together, this preclinical data shows that microbiological resistance of pneumococci to beta-lactams has very little influence on a possible failure of recommanded treatment regimens for pneumococcal pneumonia. The high rate of multiple drug resistance, particularly among beta-lactam resistant strains, rules out the probabilistic use of macrolides. Conversely, fluoroquinolone (FQ) resistance remains low, inferior to 3%, and the same is true for ketolides (management in the use of these new drugs could ensure their long-term activity. The high mortality rate of hospitalized S. pneumoniae pneumonia will only be improved with a better understanding of the complex host-bacteria interactions.

  3. An unprecedented outbreak investigation for nosocomial and community-acquired legionellosis in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Vincent Chi-Chung; Wong, Samson Sai-Yin; Chen, Jonathan Hon-Kwan; Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Poon, Rosana Wing-Shan; Wong, Sally Cheuk-Ying; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Tai, Josepha Wai-Ming; Ho, Pak-Leung; Tsang, Thomas Ho-Fai; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2012-12-01

    The environmental sources associated with community-acquired or nosocomial legionellosis were not always detectable in the mainland of China and Hong Kong, China. The objective of this study was to illustrate the control measures implemented for nosocomial and community outbreaks of legionellosis, and to understand the environmental distribution of legionella in the water system in Hong Kong, China. We investigated the environmental sources of two cases of legionellosis acquired in the hospital and the community by extensive outbreak investigation and sampling of the potable water system using culture and genetic testing at the respective premises. The diagnosis of nosocomial legionellosis was suspected in a patient presenting with nosocomial pneumonia not responsive to multiple beta-lactam antibiotics with subsequent confirmation by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria. High counts of Legionella pneumophila were detected in the potable water supply of the 70-year-old hospital building. Another patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis presenting with acute community-acquired pneumonia and severe diarrhoea was positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on both sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate despite negative antigenuria. Paradoxically the source of the second case was traced to the water system of a newly commissioned office building complex. No further cases were detected after shock hyperchlorination with or without superheating of the water systems. Subsequent legionella counts were drastically reduced. Point-of-care infection control by off-boiled or sterile water for mouth care and installation of water filter for showers in the hospital wards for immunocompromised patients was instituted. Territory wide investigation of the community potable water supply showed that 22.1% of the household water supply was positive at a mean legionella count of 108.56 CFU/ml (range 0.10 to 639.30 CFU

  4. An unprecedented outbreak investigation for nosocomial and community-acquired legionellosis in Hong Kong

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Vincent Chi-chung; HO Pak-leung; TSANG Thomas Ho-fai; YUEN Kwok-yung; WONG Samson Sai-yin; CHEN Jonathan Hon-kwan; CHAN Jasper Fuk-woo; TO Kelvin Kai-wang; POON Rosana Wing-shan; WONG Sally Cheuk-ying; CHAN Kwok-hung; TAI Josepha Wai-ming

    2012-01-01

    Background The environmental sources associated with community-acquired or nosocomial legionellosis were not always detectable in the mainland of China and Hong Kong,China.The objective of this study was to illustrate the control measures implemented for nosocomial and community outbreaks of legionellosis,and to understand the environmental distribution of legionella in the water system in Hong Kong,China.Methods We investigated the environmental sources of two cases of legionellosis acquired in the hospital and the community by extensive outbreak investigation and sampling of the potable water system using culture and genetic testing at the respective premises.Results The diagnosis of nosocomial legionellosis was suspected in a patient presenting with nosocomial pneumonia not responsive to multiple beta-lactam antibiotics with subsequent confirmation by Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 antigenuria.High counts of Legionella pneumophila were detected in the potable water supply of the 70-year-old hospital building.Another patient on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis presenting with acute community-acquired pneumonia and severe diarrhoea was positive for Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on both sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate despite negative antigenuria.Paradoxically the source of the second case was traced to the water system of a newly commissioned office building complex.No further cases were detected after shock hyperchlorination with or without superheating of the water systems.Subsequent legionella counts were drastically reduced.Point-of-care infection control by off-boiled or sterile water for mouth care and installation of water filter for showers in the hospital wards for immunocompromised patients was instituted.Territory wide investigation of the community potable water supply showed that 22.1% of the household water supply was positive at a mean legionella count of 108.56 CFU/ml (range 0.10 to

  5. Results of Performing Blood Cultures at Hospital Admission in Patients with Community-acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris González Morales

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: community-acquired pneumonia is a major health problem worldwide, in Cuba and in the province of Cienfuegos. Objective: to report the results of blood cultures performed at hospital admission in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Methods: a prospective descriptive study was conducted in the Gustavo Aldereguía Lima Hospital in Cienfuegos, during the second half of 2012. It included 52 patients with community-acquired pneumonia who underwent blood culture at their admission to the hospital. Results: only five patients (9.6% of the cases had a positive test result; Streptococcus pneumoniae was isolated from only one positive culture; Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae were isolated from the rest. Conclusions: the percentage obtained in this study confirms the low diagnostic yield of blood cultures performed at admission in patients with community-acquired pneumonia; the low isolation rate of S. pneumoniae in our study was also significant.

  6. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  7. A Molecular Biomarker to Diagnose Community-acquired Pneumonia on Intensive Care Unit Admission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scicluna, Brendon P; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; van Vught, Lonneke A; Wiewel, Maryse A; Ong, David S Y; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Franitza, Marek; Toliat, Mohammad R; Nürnberg, Peter; Hoogendijk, Arie J; Horn, Janneke; Cremer, Olaf L; Schultz, Marcus J; Bonten, Marc J; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) accounts for a major proportion of intensive care unit (ICU) admissions for respiratory failure and sepsis. Diagnostic uncertainty complicates case management, which may delay appropriate cause-specific treatment. Objectives: To characterize the blood

  8. Efficacy of Corticosteroids in Community-acquired Pneumonia A Randomized Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, Dominic; Daniels, Johannes M. A.; de Graaff, Casper S.; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Boersma, Wim G.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Some studies have shown a beneficial effect of corticosteroids in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), possibly by diminishing local and systemic antiinflammatory host response. Objectives: To assess the efficacy of adjunctive prednisolone treatment in patients hospitalized w

  9. Predictors of bacteraemia in patients with suspected community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H; Huijts, Susanne M; Postma, Douwe F; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The diagnostic yield of blood cultures is limited in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Yet, positive blood culture results provide important information for antibiotic treatment and for monitoring epidemiologic trends. We investigated the potential of clinical predictor

  10. Characteristics of Colon Microbiocenosis in Toddlers with Community-Acquired Pneumonia Associated with Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Smiyan

    2014-03-01

    Thus, impaired bowel microbiota in children with community-acquired pneumonia associated with iron deficiency anemia may be a reason to include probiotic preparation into the complex of pathogenetic therapy.

  11. Cardiovascular disease after Escherichia coli O157:H7 gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizo-Abes, Patricia; Clark, William F.; Sontrop, Jessica M.; Young, Ann; Huang, Anjie; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Austin, Peter C.; Garg, Amit X.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli O157:H7 is one cause of acute bacterial gastroenteritis, which can be devastating in outbreak situations. We studied the risk of cardiovascular disease following such an outbreak in Walkerton, Ontario, in May 2000. Methods: In this community-based cohort study, we linked data from the Walkerton Health Study (2002–2008) to Ontario’s large healthcare databases. We included 4 groups of adults: 3 groups of Walkerton participants (153 with severe gastroenteritis, 414 with mild gastroenteritis, 331 with no gastroenteritis) and a group of 11 263 residents from the surrounding communities that were unaffected by the outbreak. The primary outcome was a composite of death or first major cardiovascular event (admission to hospital for acute myocardial infarction, stroke or congestive heart failure, or evidence of associated procedures). The secondary outcome was first major cardiovascular event censored for death. Adults were followed for an average of 7.4 years. Results: During the study period, 1174 adults (9.7%) died or experienced a major cardiovascular event. Compared with residents of the surrounding communities, the risk of death or cardiovascular event was not elevated among Walkerton participants with severe or mild gastroenteritis (hazard ratio [HR] for severe gastroenteritis 0.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38–1.43, mild gastroenteritis HR 0.64, 95% CI 0.42–0.98). Compared with Walkerton participants who had no gastroenteritis, risk of death or cardiovascular event was not elevated among participants with severe or mild gastroenteritis. Interpretation: There was no increase in the risk of cardiovascular disease in the decade following acute infection during a major E. coli O157:H7 outbreak. PMID:23166291

  12. Clinical effects and bronchoalveolar transfer of levofloxacin in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林耀广; 苏薇; 徐作军; 白彦

    2001-01-01

    @@To evaluate the clinical effects and bronchoalveolar transfer of levofloxacin (LVFX) in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Twenty-eight outpatients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) were observed in an open-label, noncomparative study. The concentrations of levofloxacin in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured  by  high-performance  liquid  chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection in 10 patients and 15 non-levofloxacin users.

  13. A Case of Influenza A (H3N2) Complicated by Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Death in a Young Healthy Adult during the 2013–2014 Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Lauren F.; Anderson, Benjamin D.; Gray, Gregory C.

    2017-01-01

    With multiple available vaccines and antivirals, seasonal influenza A is typically a self-limited acutely debilitating illness in young healthy adults. Here, we illustrate unexpected morbidity and mortality in a relatively young and healthy patient seen at a large tertiary care academic medical center for seasonal influenza A (H3N2) complicated by community-acquired pneumonia, hypoxic respiratory failure, septic shock, and death.

  14. Early non-invasive ventilation treatment for respiratory failure due to severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolini, Antonello; Ferraioli, Gianluca; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius; Santo, Mario; Ferrera, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) have been as defined pneumonia requiring admission to the intensive care unit or carrying a high risk of death. Currently, the treatment of sCAP consists of antibiotic therapy and ventilator support. The use of invasive ventilation causes several complications as does admission to ICU. For this reason, non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute respiratory failure to avoid endotracheal intubation. However, few studies have currently assessed the usefulness of NIV in sCAP. We prospectively assessed 127 patients with sCAP and severe acute respiratory failure [oxygen arterial pressure/oxygen inspiratory fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2) intubation and the achievement of PaO2/FiO2 >250 with spontaneous breathing. We assessed predictors of NIV failure and hospital mortality using univariate and multivariate analyses. NIV failed in 32 patients (25.1%). Higher chest X-ray score at admission, chest X-ray worsening, and a lower PaO2/FiO2 and higher alveolar-arteriolar gradient (A-aDO2) after 1 h of NIV all independently predicted NIV failure. Higher lactate dehydrogenase and confusion, elevated blood urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure plus age ≥65 years at admission, higher A-aDO2, respiratory rate and lower PaO2/FiO2 after 1 h of NIV and intubation rate were directly related to hospital mortality. Successful treatment is strongly related to less severe illness as well as to a good initial and sustained response to medical therapy and NIV treatment. Constant monitoring of these patients is mandatory. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Clinical and bacteriological effects of cefetamet pivoxil against community-acquired respiratory tract infections. Part III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, R; Suzuki, Y; Nishinari, C; Ishii, Y; Matsumoto, Y; Kaku, M; Shimada, J

    1999-06-01

    We investigated clinical and bacteriological effects of cefetamet pivoxil (CEMT-PI) on community-acquired respiratory tract infection and obtained the following results: This method of investigation was almost the same to those adopted in 1994 and 1996. 1. 512 cases of respiratory tract infection were treated with CEMT-PI under the same protocol at a total of 53 institutions in Tokyo, Kanagawa, Saitama, Chiba and Yamanashi prefectures from January, 1, 1998 over March, 31, 1998. Outpatients accounted for 99.7% of all subjects. Diagnoses given to these patients included pharyngolaryngitis (51.4%), tonsillitis (37.7%), and acute bronchitis (10.1%). 2. For the bacteriological study, a manual detailing the method of collecting specimens, storage and transport was distributed to the above-mentioned institutions. The isolation and identification of suspected causative bacteria, determination of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), and investigation of beta-lactamase production were conducted all together at Section of Studies, Tokyo Clinical Research Center. Suspected causative bacteria were detected in 144 (37.2%) out of 387 cases that were the analytical subjects of the clinical efficacy. The major bacteria identified were 32 strains of Streptococcus pyogenes and 19 strains of Haemophilus influenzae. The clinical efficacy (the ratio of improvement) of CEMT by suspected causative bacterium was 84.4% against CEMT-indicated organisms and 81.2% against CEMT-non-indicated organisms. 3. We investigated clinical efficacy rates (the ratio of "markedly improved" + "improved") by disease. The improvement rate was 78.4% in pharyngolaryngitis, 87.0% in tonsillitis, and 79.5% in acute bronchitis. The clinical efficacy rate was an average of 81.9% in all CEMT-PI indicated diseases.

  16. Effects of immediate modified feeding on infantile gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoghton, M A; Mittal, N K; Sandhu, B K; Mahdi, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standard treatment of infants who are dehydrated as a result of acute gastroenteritis is to administer oral rehydration therapy (ORT). Traditionally, food has been withdrawn for 24-48 h, but there is no conclusive evidence that this is of any real benefit to the patient. Immediate modified feeding, in which an infant on ORT is not starved but administered a limited diet, may have benefits in the treatment of gastroenteritis, especially in children who are nutritionally compromised...

  17. Effects of immediate modified feeding on infantile gastroenteritis.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoghton, M A; Mittal, N K; Sandhu, B. K.; Mahdi, G

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Standard treatment of infants who are dehydrated as a result of acute gastroenteritis is to administer oral rehydration therapy (ORT). Traditionally, food has been withdrawn for 24-48 h, but there is no conclusive evidence that this is of any real benefit to the patient. Immediate modified feeding, in which an infant on ORT is not starved but administered a limited diet, may have benefits in the treatment of gastroenteritis, especially in children who are nutritionally compromised...

  18. Prospective study of the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in Danish children and their families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Thomas; Iturriza, Miren; Faaborg-Andersen, Jens

    2011-01-01

    This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children......This was the first study to characterize the total burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis (RVGE) at both hospital and general physician (GP) clinics in Denmark, and also the first to confirm rotavirus (RV) as the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis (GE) among children...

  19. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  20. Studies on Infantile Gastroenteritis due to Calicivirus

    OpenAIRE

    佐熊, 泰彦

    1981-01-01

    In October 1977 and August 1979, two outbreaks of acute-gastroenteritis occurred in an infant home in the city of Sapporo, Japan. During the outbreaks, out of 93 residents of one to 27 months old, 77 (83%) showed some intestinal symptoms, inculding diarrhea in 73 (95%), vomiting in 34 (44%) and fever in 14 (18%). Electron microscopic examinations revealed typical calicivirus particles in fecal specimens derived from the two outbreaks. During these outbreaks 61 stool specimens were examined, a...

  1. Update on community-acquired bacterial meningitis: guidance and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ettekoven, C N; van de Beek, D; Brouwer, M C

    2017-09-01

    The existing heterogeneity in diagnostic work-up and treatment strategies in bacterial meningitis was the incentive to develop a European evidence-based guideline, which was published in 2016 by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Study Group on Infections of the Brain (ESGIB). To summarize salient features of the guideline, identify recent developments and challenges currently faced. The ESCMID guideline, ongoing trial registries. Epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic work-up and therapy strategies of acute bacterial meningitis. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has decreased following pneumococcal and meningococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. In the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis the clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters are of limited diagnostic accuracy and therefore cerebrospinal fluid analysis remains the principal contributor to the final diagnosis. The ESCMID guideline advises to start empiric treatment within one hour of arrival in all suspected meningitis cases, and choice of antibiotics needs to be differentiated according to the patient's age, risk factors, and local resistance rates of pneumococci. Dexamethasone is the only proven adjunctive treatment and should be started together with the antibiotics. The follow-up of surviving patients should include evaluation for hearing loss and pneumococcal vaccination to prevent recurrences. Future perspectives include further development and implementation of vaccines, and new treatments aimed at further reducing the inflammatory response. Studies on implementation of the new guideline should determine adherence and evaluate whether improved prognosis can be achieved by following protocolled management strategies. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Older Adults: A Proposal for the Management of Community-acquired Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Ángel Serra Valdés

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: community-acquired pneumonia is the leading cause of hospitalization among older adults. It has a high fatality rate. At present, there are several risk and prognosis scores and different clinical practice guidelines available. Objective: to develop a proposal for the management of community-acquired pneumonia in older adults, applicable in both primary care, and the hospital setting. Methods: a search on community-acquired pneumonia, especially in older adults or the elderly, was conducted using index terms and existing guidelines from different countries, companies and regional consensus included in Clinical Evidence, The Cochrane Library, PubMed, Google Scholar, MEDLINE, LIS, Scielo, Medscape, LILACS, Latindex, HINARI, MEDIGRAPHIC-NEWS and others. The publications providing high-quality evidence in accordance with the criteria of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations approach were selected. Results: a proposal for practical management of community-acquired pneumonia at any level of care in our health system was developed considering the list of medications currently available in the country. Epidemiology, risk factors, risk stratification, treatment, and fatality rate were considered. Conclusions: community-acquired pneumonia is a current problem and future challenge. This proposal can be used by professionals treating this condition at any level of care. Its application could improve care and quality of life and reduce the fatality rate and costs.

  3. Oxidative stress in immunocompetent patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefler, S; Rodríguez, A; Martín-Loeches, I; Sanchez, V; Marín, J; Llauradó, M; Romeu, M; Díaz, E; Nogués, R; Giralt, M

    2014-03-01

    A comparison was made of the oxidative stress (OS) levels of patients with either viral or bacterial severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) and of patients without infection (healthy volunteers (HV) and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)). A prospective observational study was made. Critically ill patients with sCAP. The TBARS level was measured as an index of oxidative injury. SOD, CAT and redox glutathione system (GSH, GSSG, GR, GPx) activities were measured as reflecting antioxidant capacity. Severity of illness was assessed by the APACHE II, SOFA and SIRS scores. Thirty-seven subjects were included: 15 patients with CAP (12 of bacterial origin [BCAP] and 3 due to 2009 A/H1N1 virus [VCAP]), 10 HV and 12 AMI patients. Intensive care CAP mortality was 26.7% (n=4). Plasmatic TBARS levels were higher in CAP patients than in HV, but similar to those recorded in AMI patients. In contrast, VCAP was associated with lower TBARS levels, and some components of the glutathione redox system were higher in BCAP patients and HV. The OS levels did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Our results suggest the occurrence of higher OS in sCAP patients compared with HV. In contrast, lower TBARS levels were observed in VCAP patients, suggesting an increase of antioxidant activity related to the redox glutathione system. However, further research involving a larger cohort is needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  4. Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects in post-influenza community acquired MRSA pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi Bhan

    Full Text Available Post influenza pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, with mortality rates approaching 60% when bacterial infections are secondary to multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus, in particular community acquired MRSA (cMRSA, has emerged as a leading cause of post influenza pneumonia.Linezolid (LZD prevents acute lung injury in murine model of post influenza bacterial pneumonia.Mice were infected with HINI strain of influenza and then challenged with cMRSA at day 7, treated with antibiotics (LZD or Vanco or vehicle 6 hours post bacterial challenge and lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL harvested at 24 hours for bacterial clearance, inflammatory cell influx, cytokine/chemokine analysis and assessment of lung injury.Mice treated with LZD or Vanco had lower bacterial burden in the lung and no systemic dissemination, as compared to the control (no antibiotic group at 24 hours post bacterial challenge. As compared to animals receiving Vanco, LZD group had significantly lower numbers of neutrophils in the BAL (9×10(3 vs. 2.3×10(4, p < 0.01, which was associated with reduced levels of chemotactic chemokines and inflammatory cytokines KC, MIP-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β in the BAL. Interestingly, LZD treatment also protected mice from lung injury, as assessed by albumin concentration in the BAL post treatment with H1N1 and cMRSA when compared to vanco treatment. Moreover, treatment with LZD was associated with significantly lower levels of PVL toxin in lungs.Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects on host inflammatory response and lung injury in a murine model of post-viral cMRSA pneumonia.

  5. Procalcitonin: inflammatory biomarker for assessing the severity of community-acquired pneumonia--a clinical observation in geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppner, H J; Bertsch, T; Alber, B; Esslinger, A S; Dragonas, C; Bauer, J M; Sieber, C C

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a common disease of the elderly and involves a high mortality risk. Demographic developments are creating new challenges for acute medical treatment strategies in geriatric patients with their underlying multimorbidity. In addition to the diagnostic parameters recorded on hospital admission, such as white cell count and C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, more than the risk scores CRB- and CURB-65 evaluated to date, appears to be a promising parameter for assessing the severity of pneumonia in elderly patients to allow early detection of severe courses and initiation of suitable treatment. The decisive factor is the dynamic course of the procalcitonin values over 3 consecutive days, as demonstrated in this case series.

  6. How well do discharge diagnoses identify hospitalised patients with community-acquired infections? - a validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Laursen, Christian Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    in general is sparse. The aim of the study was to determine how well ICD-10 discharge diagnoses identify patients with community-acquired infections in a medical emergency department (ED), overall and related to sites of infection and patient characteristics. METHODS: We manually reviewed 5977 patients...... admitted to a medical ED in a one-year period (September 2010-August 2011), to establish if they were hospitalised with community-acquired infection. Using the manual review as gold standard, we calculated the sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios of discharge diagnoses...... indicating infection. RESULTS: Two thousand five hundred eleven patients were identified with community-acquired infection according to chart review (42.0%, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 40.8-43.3%) compared to 2550 patients identified by ICD-10 diagnoses (42.8%, 95%CI: 41.6-44.1%). Sensitivity of the ICD...

  7. [CAPNETZ. The competence network for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)]. [Article in German

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Plessen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    CAPNETZ is a medical competence network for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), which was funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research. It has accomplished seminal work on pneumonia over the last 15 years. A unique infrastructure was established which has so far allowed us to recruit...... Sepsis) (PROGRESS), the Systems Medicine of Community Acquired Pneumonia Network (CAPSyS) and SFB-TR84 (Sonderforschungsbereich - Transregio 84). The main recipients (Charité Berlin, University Clinic Ulm and the Hannover Medical School) founded the CAPNETZ foundation and transferred all data...

  8. Hospital bed occupancy for rotavirus and all cause acute gastroenteritis in two Finnish hospitals before and after the implementation of the national rotavirus vaccination program with RotaTeq®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Susanne; Uhari, Matti; Renko, Marjo; Bertet, Perrine; Hemming, Maria; Vesikari, Timo

    2014-12-11

    Vaccination-impact studies of the live-attenuated pentavalent oral vaccine Rotateq® have demonstrated that the burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis has been reduced significantly after the introduction of RotaTeq® vaccination, but less is known about the benefit of this vaccination on hospital overcrowding. As part of an observational surveillance conducted during the RV seasons 2000/2001 to 2011/2012, we analysed hospital discharge data collected retrospectively from two Finnish hospitals (Oulu and Tampere), concerning ICD 10 codes A00-09 (acute gastroenteritis, AGE) and A08.0 (rotaviral acute gastroenteritis RV AGE). We estimated the reduction in the number of beds occupied and analysed the bed occupancy rate, for RV AGE and all cause AGE, among 0-16 year-old children, before and after the implementation of the RV immunisation program. The rate of bed days occupied for RV AGE was reduced by 86% (95% CI 66%-94%) in Tampere and 79% (95% CI 47%-92%) in Oulu after RV vaccination implementation. For all cause AGE, reduction was 50% (95% CI 29% to 65%) in Tampere and 70% (95% CI 58% to 79%) in Oulu. Results were similar among 0-2 year-old children. This effect was also observed on overcrowding in both hospitals, with a bed occupancy rate for all cause AGE >25% in only 1% of the time in Tampere and 9% in Oulu after the implementation of the immunisation program, compared to 13% and 48% in the pre-vaccination period respectively. After extrapolation to the whole country, the annual number of prevented hospitalizations for all cause AGE in the post-vaccination period in Finland was estimated at 1,646 and 2,303 admissions for 0-2 and 0-16 year-old children respectively. This study demonstrated that universal RV vaccination is associated with a clear decrease in the number of bed days and occupancy rates for RV AGE and all cause AGE. Positive consequences include increase in quality of care and a better healthcare management during winter epidemics.

  9. INFECTION WITH HHV-6 OF MILITARY MEN AFFECTED BY COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brusnik SV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus, 6 type (HHV-6 was isolated at the end of the 20th century from the blood leukocytes of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. Serological studies conducted in different countries, indicate ubiquitylation of the HHV-6 and the existence of two antigenic variants - HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Their high tropism is determined in vitro to lymphocytic, nervous and dendritic cells of the CNS. Virus replicates in many cell, primary and passaged cultures of different origins. The reproduction cycle of HHV-6 continues on average 4-5 days forming syncytiums and intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Significant destruction and lysis almost 90 % of infected cells is reported after 5-10 day of monitoring. The utility of experimentation investigating the role of HHV-6 in the development of acute and chronic diseases in respiratory tract is caused by the fact that many patients, particularly those with chronic diseases, have complaints to chronic fatigue, decreased performance and low-grade temperature more than 3-6 months. Several studies demonstrate the presence of HHV-6 in saliva, salivary and bronchiolar glands, in swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge. Tropism of HHV-6 to oropharyngeal epithelium with the possibility of finding the virus in the saliva and swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge was found at the end of 20th century. This fact gave the basis for work determining the level of infection by this pathogen in patients with infectious and inflammatory pathology of the respiratory tract. Materials and methods. Serological studies were conducted with 38 soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia. Most of the surveyed patients were ranged in age from 20 to 45 years old, middle age (32,5±1,5 years. Patients were in stationary treatment in the Kharkov military hospital. The criteria for inclusion in the study on the infection of HHV-6 were soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia with atypical course of

  10. A cross -sectional study on self -reported acute gastroenteritis in Hangzhou -Jiaxing -Huzhou area%杭嘉湖地区居民自报急性胃肠炎现况研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈江; 齐小娟; 吕鹏; 王绩凯; 陈莉莉; 章荣华

    2015-01-01

    目的:了解浙江省杭嘉湖地区居民自报急性胃肠炎的患病状况及人群分布。方法采用多阶段抽样方法按人囗容量比抽取调查户,于2010年7月—2011年6月每月入户按生日确定调查其中1名家庭成员在近四周内急性胃肠炎发生情况及其就诊等情况。结果共调查居民9548人,急性胃肠炎四周患病率为2.95%,发病率为0.39次/人年。推算杭嘉湖地区全年有587.56万人次感染急性胃肠炎。多因素 Logistic 回归分析显示,女性四周患病率高于男性;7月和8月患病率较高;未到入学年龄人群急性胃肠炎四周患病率最高;农村患病率高于城市;家庭居住户人口数≥3人的月患病率高于居住人口数为1~2人户。56.38%的病例患病时曾去医院就诊,54.67%的病例服用抗菌药物;13.48%的病例因病误工,另有2.13%的病例因病误学。结论杭嘉湖地区人群自我报告急性胃肠炎患病率2.95%,自我报告患病率与性别、文化程度、月份(季节)、城乡居住地和家庭户人口数有关。%Objective To understand epidemiological characteristics of self -reported acute gastroenteritis in Hangzhou -Jiaxing -Huzhou area in Zhejiang Province.Methods According to the population capacity,the household interview was conducted among families selected by multi stage sampling method from July 2010 to June 2011,and one person who was approaching birthday in every family was selected for investigation, including symptoms and treatment of acute gastroenteritis.Results Totally 9 548 people were investigated.The monthly prevalence of acute gastroenteritis among the surveyed population was 2.95% and the incidence was 0.39 per person year.It was estimated that there would be 5.875 6 million cases of acute gastroenteritis occurred during this year in the area.Logistic regression analysis showed that monthly prevalence in female was higher than in male

  11. Enterovirus D68-associated community-acquired pneumonia in children living in Milan, Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Ruggiero, Luca; Madini, Barbara; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of children infected by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) and affected by severe respiratory illness, muscle weakness and paralysis were described in the USA and Canada in 2014 Objectives: To investigate the potential involvement of EV-D68 in determining community-acquired pn

  12. The burden and epidemiology of community-acquired central nervous system infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, H; Inan, A; Guven, E

    2017-01-01

    Risk assessment of central nervous system (CNS) infection patients is of key importance in predicting likely pathogens. However, data are lacking on the epidemiology globally. We performed a multicenter study to understand the burden of community-acquired CNS (CA-CNS) infections between 2012...

  13. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; van de Beek, D.; Spanjaard, L.; de Gans, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods: We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired

  14. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzer, Helmut J F; Rolling, Thierry; Schmiedel, Stefan; Klupp, Eva-Maria; Lange, Christoph; Seifert, Harald

    2016-01-01

    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen.

  15. Gender differences in the outcome of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; López-Cortés, Luis Eduardo; Kaasch, Achim J;

    2017-01-01

    Female gender has been suggested to be associated with poor outcome in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB), but existing data remain sparse and conflicting. We investigated clinical outcomes in female and male patients with community-acquired (CA-) SAB. Population-based medical...

  16. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina;

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance with g...

  17. Usefulness of C-reactive protein in monitoring the severe community-acquired pneumonia clinical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Luís; Póvoa, Pedro; Almeida, Eduardo; Fernandes, Antero; Mealha, Rui; Moreira, Pedro; Sabino, Henrique

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the C-reactive protein level, the body temperature and the white cell count in patients after prescription of antibiotics in order to describe the clinical resolution of severe community-acquired pneumonia. A cohort of 53 consecutive patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia was studied. The C-reactive protein levels, body temperature and white cell count were monitored daily. By day 3 a C-reactive protein level 0.5 times the initial level was a marker of poor outcome (sensitivity, 0.91; specificity, 0.59). Patients were divided according to their C-reactive protein patterns of response to antibiotics, into fast response, slow response, nonresponse, and biphasic response. About 96% of patients with a C-reactive protein pattern of fast response and 74% of patients with a slow response pattern survived, whereas those patients with the patterns of nonresponse and of biphasic response had a mortality rate of 100% and 33%, respectively (P prescription is useful in identification, as early as day 3, of severe community-acquired pneumonia patients with poor outcome. The identification of the C-reactive protein pattern of response to antibiotic therapy was useful in the recognition of the individual clinical course, either improving or worsening, as well as the rate of improvement, in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  18. Revised SWAB guidelines for antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, JA; Prins, JM; Bonten, MJ; Degener, J; Janknegt, RE; Hollander, JMR; Jonkers, RE; Wijnands, WJ; Verheij, TJ; Sachs, APE; Kullberg, BJ

    2005-01-01

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) develops evidence-based guidelines, aimed at optimalisation of antibiotic use and limitation of the spread of antimicrobial resistance. A revision of the SWAB guideline for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), published in 1998, was

  19. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak;

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings...

  20. Use of Glucocorticoids and Risk of Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Kaasch, Achim J; Søgaard, Mette;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the use of systemic glucocorticoids is a risk factor for community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CA-SAB). PATIENTS AND METHODS: We used population-based medical registries in Northern Denmark to conduct a case-control study including all adults...

  1. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  2. Study on epidemic characteristics and etiology of community acquired pneumonia in Guangzhou from 2009 to 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘慧

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the epidemic characteristics and pathogenic spectrum of community acquired pneumonia(CAP)in Guangzhou from 2009 to 2012.Method 14 major comprehensive hospitals were selected from 11 districts as sentinel hospitals for CAP cases surveillance,including 18 982 223 in total during the 4years.The

  3. Prognostic factors for early clinical failure in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, M; Oosterheert, J J; Hak, E; Hoepelman, I M; Bonten, M J M

    2006-01-01

    For patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), clinical response during the first days of treatment is predictive of clinical outcome. As risk assessments can improve the efficiency of pneumonia management, a prospective cohort study to assess clinical, biochemical and microbiological predict

  4. Enterovirus D68-associated community-acquired pneumonia in children living in Milan, Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Ruggiero, Luca; Madini, Barbara; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: An increasing number of children infected by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) and affected by severe respiratory illness, muscle weakness and paralysis were described in the USA and Canada in 2014 Objectives: To investigate the potential involvement of EV-D68 in determining community-acquired pn

  5. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; van de Beek, D.; Spanjaard, L.; de Gans, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods: We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired ba

  6. Clinical characteristics and innate immunity in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, H.

    2009-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infectious disease requiring hospitalisation in the Western world. In spite of improving antibiotic regiments, CAP still has significant mortality. In non-immune compromised patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently isolated micro

  7. Chlamydia psittaci : a relevant cause of community-acquired pneumonia in two Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, S M C; Bos, W J W; van Hannen, E J; Dijkstra, F; Heddema, E R; van Velzen-Blad, H; Heijligenberg, R; Grutters, J C; de Jongh, B M; Meijvis, SCA

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Of all hospitalised community-acquired pneumonias (CAPs) only a few are known to be caused by Chlamydia psittaci. Most likely the reported incidence, ranging from of 0% to 2.1%, is an underestimation of the real incidence, since detection of psittacosis is frequently not incorporated in

  8. Aetiology and resistance patterns of community-acquired pneumonia in León, Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matute, A J; Brouwer, W P; Hak, E; Delgado, E; Alonso, E; Hoepelman, I M

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prevalence study to gain greater insight into the aetiology, bacterial resistance and risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the region of León, Nicaragua. During the period from July 2002 to January 2005, all consecutive patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of

  9. Markers of infectious disease emergencies: Focus on patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, C.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the potential of several biomarkers of infection in infectious disease emergencies in general with a specific focus on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), risk factors in the development of CAP and markers of infection in CAP as well as in specific etiologic forms of CAP, l

  10. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...... with guidelines for treatment and care of patients with CAP....

  11. Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Comparison between elderly and nonelderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jafari

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia could be a life-threatening condition especially in elderly patients. The factors influencing the outcome in elderly patients are thought to be different from those in young adults. We compared the clinical and paraclinical profiles in elderly and nonelderly patients with community-acquired pneumonias. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, seventy nine patients who were hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia over a period of one year were included. Patients' medical records were reviewed; and data related to comorbid conditions, signs and symptoms, laboratory and radiographic findings were gathered using a checklist. Results: The clinical features, laboratory parameters and complications from pneumonia were almost similar in 41 elderly (group I, age ≥65years and 38 young (group II, age<65years subjects. Delirium was seen more in elderly group (p=0.05. The average body temperature and pulse rate were significantly higher in nonelderly group. Sixty one percent of elderly patients and 21% of young patients have Po2 less than 60 (p=0.02. Smoking (29.1%, neurological disturbances (19%, congestive heart failure (15.2%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes mellitus (13.9% were associated comorbidities in both groups. In non elderly group, immune compromise and IV drug use were more common as underlying comorbid conditions. Two of three mortalities were due to elder patients. Conclusion: Community acquired pneumonia could have more serious clinical and abnormal laboratory features in the elderly than younger patients. Mortality rate may be higher in older patients. Comorbid conditions are frequently seen in both elderly and nonelderly patients with community acquired pneumonia, but IV drug use and immune compromise are more frequent in nonelderly patients.

  12. Management strategies in the treatment of neonatal and pediatric gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciccarelli S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Simona Ciccarelli,1 Ilaria Stolfi,1 Giuseppe Caramia2 1Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy; 2Division of Neonatology and Pediatrics, Maternal and Child Hospital "G. Salesi", Ancona, Italy Abstract: Acute gastroenteritis, characterized by the onset of diarrhea with or without vomiting, continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children in mostly resource-constrained nations. Although generally a mild and self-limiting disease, gastroenteritis is one of the most common causes of hospitalization and is associated with a substantial disease burden. Worldwide, up to 40% of children aged less than 5 years with diarrhea are hospitalized with rotavirus. Also, some microorganisms have been found predominantly in resource-constrained nations, including Shigella spp, Vibrio cholerae, and the protozoan infections. Prevention remains essential, and the rotavirus vaccines have demonstrated good safety and efficacy profiles in large clinical trials. Because dehydration is the major complication associated with gastroenteritis, appropriate fluid management (oral or intravenous is an effective and safe strategy for rehydration. Continuation of breastfeeding is strongly recommended. New treatments such as antiemetics (ondansetron, some antidiarrheal agents (racecadotril, and chemotherapeutic agents are often proposed, but not yet universally recommended. Probiotics, also known as “food supplement,” seem to improve intestinal microbial balance, reducing the duration and the severity of acute infectious diarrhea. The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the European Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases guidelines make a stronger recommendation for the use of probiotics for the management of acute gastroenteritis, particularly those with documented efficacy such as Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Saccharomyces boulardii. To date, the

  13. Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Human Adenovirus in Immunocompetent Adults: A Multicenter Case Series.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dingyu Tan

    Full Text Available Severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP caused by human adenovirus (HAdV, especially HAdV type 55 (HAdV-55 in immunocompetent adults has raised increasing concerns. Clinical knowledge of severe CAP and acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by HAdV-55 is still limited, though the pathogen has been fully characterized by whole-genome sequencing.We conducted a multicentre retrospective review of all consecutive patients with severe CAP caused by HAdV in immunocompetent adults admitted to the Emergency Department Intensive Care Unit of two hospitals in Northern China between February 2012 and April 2014. Clinical, laboratory, radiological characteristics, treatments and outcomes of these patients were collected and analyzed.A total of 15 consecutive severe CAP patients with laboratory-confirmed adenovirus infections were included. The median age was 30 years and all cases were identified during the winter and spring seasons. HAdV-55 was the most frequently (11/15 detected HAdV type. Persistent high fever, cough and rapid progression of dyspnea were typically reported in these patients. Significantly increased pneumonia severity index (PSI, respiratory rate, and lower PaO2/FiO2, hypersensitive CRP were reported in non-survivors compared to survivors (P = 0.013, 0.022, 0.019 and 0.026, respectively. The rapid development of bilateral consolidations within 10 days after illness onset were the most common radiographic finding, usually accompanied by adjacent ground glass opacities and pleural effusions. Total mortality was 26.7% in this study. Corticosteroids were prescribed to 14 patients in this report, but the utilization rate between survivors and non-survivors was not significant.HAdV and the HAdV-55 sub-type play an important role among viral pneumonia pathogens in hospitalized immunocompetent adults in Northern China. HAdV should be tested in severe CAP patients with negative bacterial cultures and a lack of response to antibiotic

  14. Gastro-enteritis in huisartsenpeilstations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, W.J. van; Vinje, J.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duijnhoven, Y.T.P.H. van

    1998-01-01

    De incidentie van huisartsconsulten voor gastro-enteritis van 77 per 10.000 persoonjaren lijkt een lichte daling te vertonen t.o.v. de incidentie van 90 per 10.000 persoonjaren in een vergelijkbaar onderzoek in 1992-1993. De belangrijkste verwekkers van gastro-enteritis waarvoor de huisarts wordt ge

  15. Proton pump inhibitors and gastroenteritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J. Hassing (Robert); A. Verbon (Annelies); H. de Visser (Herman); A. Hofman (Albert); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAn association between proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy and bacterial gastroenteritis has been suggested as well as contradicted. The aim of this study was to examine the association between the use of PPIs and occurrence of bacterial gastroenteritis in the prospective Rotterdam Study

  16. Gastro-enteritis in huisartsenpeilstations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, W.J. van; Vinje, J.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duijnhoven, Y.T.P.H. van

    1998-01-01

    De incidentie van huisartsconsulten voor gastro-enteritis van 77 per 10.000 persoonjaren lijkt een lichte daling te vertonen t.o.v. de incidentie van 90 per 10.000 persoonjaren in een vergelijkbaar onderzoek in 1992-1993. De belangrijkste verwekkers van gastro-enteritis waarvoor de huisarts wordt

  17. Epidemiology of gastroenteritis viruses in Japan: Prevalence, seasonality, and outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprachum, Aksara; Khamrin, Pattara; Maneekarn, Niwat; Hayakawa, Satoshi; Ushijima, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Acute gastroenteritis has been recognized as one of the most common diseases in humans and continues to be a major public health problem worldwide. Several groups of viruses have been reported as the causative agents of acute gastroenteritis, including rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, human astrovirus, adenovirus, and an increasing number of others which have been reported more recently. The epidemiology, prevalence, seasonality, and outbreaks of these viruses have been reviewed in a number of studies conducted in Japan over three decades. Rotavirus and norovirus were the two most common viruses detected almost equally in children under 5 years of age who were suffering from acute gastroenteritis. Like many other countries, the main rotavirus strains circulating in pediatric patients in Japan are G1P[8], G2P[4], G3P[8], and G9P[8]. Norovirus GII.4 was involved in most outbreaks in Japan and found to be associated with the emergence of new variants Sydney_2012. The classic human astrovirus, MLB, and VA clades astroviruses were also commonly found in pediatric patients with acute diarrhea. The sapovirus and adenovirus have been identified as the minor viral causative agents for acute gastroenteritis in Japan.

  18. Audit of Physicians’ Adherence to a Preprinted Order Set for Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowkes, Curt T; Gee, Carol; Bluemink, Tammy; Cole, Dana; Falkner, Barbara L; Hamour, Abu A

    2010-01-01

    Background: Community-acquired pneumonia is the seventh leading cause of death in Canada. Previous studies have shown reductions in both mortality rate and length of hospital stay with the use of guideline-concordant empiric therapy and standardized preprinted orders. Objectives: The primary objective was to determine adherence to the preprinted order for community-acquired pneumonia at the University Hospital of Northern British Columbia (UHNBC). The study also had the following secondary objectives: to assess the appropriateness of prescribing of levofloxacin in relation to institutional recommendations; to determine adherence with recent guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia; and to determine all-cause mortality, duration of IV antibiotic therapy, and length of stay for the various regimens reviewed. Methods: A retrospective observational chart review was conducted of patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted between November 2007 and February 2008. Exclusion criteria were designed to eliminate patients who did not have this condition. Descriptive statistics were used to assess adherence with the preprinted order. Secondary outcomes were analyzed with the Pearson χ2 test, t tests, and analysis of variance. Results: In total, the charts for 113 patients were reviewed, and 58 patients were included in the study. The preprinted order for community-acquired pneumonia was used for 25 (43%) of the 58 patients; however, for only 4 (7%) of these admissions were all sections of the preprinted order used correctly. No statistically significant differences in length of stay were found for any of the antibiotic combinations assessed. However, the proportion of patients treated according to the IDSA–ATS guidelines was significantly greater when the preprinted order was used (p = 0.012). In addition, use of the preprinted order encouraged

  19. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimias from 1980 to 1993: Impact of Intravascular Devices and Methicillin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Steinberg; C.C. Clarke; B.O. Hackman

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rate of nosocomial bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus has increased over the past decade, but trends in community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia are less certain. This hospital-based observational study compares nosocomial and community-acquired S. aureus bacteremias during

  20. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimias from 1980 to 1993: Impact of Intravascular Devices and Methicillin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Steinberg; C.C. Clarke; B.O. Hackman

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rate of nosocomial bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus has increased over the past decade, but trends in community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia are less certain. This hospital-based observational study compares nosocomial and community-acquired S. aureus bacteremias during 1980-

  1. 轮状病毒疫苗对深圳地区儿童腹泻临床特征的影响%Effect of rotavirus vaccine on acute gastroenteritis among children in Shenzhen city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    代东伶; 刘四喜; 丁娟; 周绍明

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To assess effect of rotavirus vaccine on acute rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis among Children in Shenzhen,by comparison of the rotavirus infection and the severity of rotavirus-associated diarrhea in vaccine age-eligible children (aged 2-36 months)with and without rotavirus vaccine implementation from 2009 to 2010. Methods All the children aged 2 months to 3 years visited doctors for diarrhea in our hospital from 2009 to 2010 were included,and divided into two groups, vaccine group and non-vaccine group. The incidence of rotavirus-associated gastroenteritis between the two groups was recorded, and the rate of complication,length of average hospital stay,and the sum of average hospitalization expenses were compared between the two groups. Results The incidence rate of rotavirus gastroenteritis was 11.8% in vaccine group and 39.4% in non-vaccine group. The incidence of complication,duration of average hospital stay,and sum of average hospitalization expenses were 10.2 ±2.1% ,4.6 ±1.3 days, 1857.8 ±32.4 Yuan in vaccine group,and 31.7 ±8.2%, 6.5 ±2.8 days,2356.3 ±54.2 Yuan in non-vaccine group,respectively. Conclusions The immunization with rotavirus vaccine can apparently reduce incidence of gastroenteritis due to rotovirous infection among children,,shorten duration of hospital stay .reduce expense.%目的 探讨使用轮状病毒疫苗对儿童中轮状病毒肠炎临床特征的影响.方法 收集2009~2010年因腹泻、急诊就诊的2月~3岁儿童,分为疫苗组和非疫苗组,比较其轮状病毒肠炎发病情况、平均住院天数及住院费用.结果 所有急诊就诊的腹泻患儿中,疫苗组轮状病毒肠炎占11.8%,非疫苗组占39.4%,疫苗组并发症发生率为(10.2±2.1)%,平均住院天数(4.6±1.3)d,住院费用(1857.8±32.4),三者均明显低于非疫苗组并发症发生率(31.7±8.2)%,平均住院天数(6.5±2.8)d,平均住院费用(2356.3±54.2)元,差异均有统计学意义.结论 口服轮状病

  2. Evidence of multiple reassortment events of feline-to-human rotaviruses based on a rare human G3P[9] rotavirus isolated from a patient with acute gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tinh Huu; Than, Van Thai; Thanh, Hien Dang; Kim, Wonyong

    2016-06-01

    A rare human/feline-like rotavirus G3P[9] strain, CAU14-1-262, from a 2-year-old girl with severe gastroenteritis was isolated and sequenced. The 11 gene segments of the CAU14-1-262 strain possessed a novel genotype constellation, G3-P[9]-I3-R3-C3-M3-A3-N3-T1-E3-H6, which was identified for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis of this strain identified the following genome origins: VP7, VP4, VP6, VP1-VP3, NSP1, NSP2, and NSP4 genes possessed an AU-1-like genotype 3 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the feline and human/feline-like rotaviruses; NSP5 possessed a H6 lineage, with highest sequence identity to the human/feline-like E2541 strain; and the NSP3 gene possessed a Wa-like genotype 1 constellation with high sequence identity to those of the of human rotaviruses. These results provided evidence of multiple reassortment events in G3P[9] rotavirus CAU14-1-262 and possibility of feline-to-human interspecies transmission.

  3. Soluble RAGE as a severity marker in community acquired pneumonia associated sepsis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is considered the most important cause of death from infectious disease in developed countries. Severity assessment scores partially address the difficulties in identifying high-risk patients. A lack of specific and valid pathophysiologic severity markers affect early and effective sepsis therapy. HMGB-1, sRAGE and RAGE have been involved in sepsis and their potential as severity markers has been proposed. The aim of this study was to eva...

  4. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Gattarello,Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales,José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi; ,

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. Methods A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. Results In the case of...

  5. Characterization of Escherichia coli causing community acquired urinary tract infections in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont-Monroy, Laura; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Manjarrez-Hernández, H Ángel; Gavilanes-Parra, Sandra; Aparicio-Ozores, Gerardo; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia Isidra; Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Molina-López, José

    2017-02-01

    The O25-ST131 clone was identified within 169 uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. The 44.8% of the 29 O25-ST131 clones detected were positive to least to one extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene. The phylogroup D was mainly found. The O25-ST131 clone appeared to be associated with community-acquired UTI in Mexico City.

  6. Choosing the right combination therapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Waterer, Grant W.; Rello, Jordi

    2006-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that combination antibiotic therapy is preferable to monotherapy for severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In this issue Mortensen and colleagues present retrospective data suggesting that combination therapy with a cephalosporin and a fluoroquinolone is inferior to combination therapy with a cephalosporin and a macrolide. Several mechanisms exist by which quinolones could be inferior to macrolides in combination therapy, so if these findings are confirmed b...

  7. Population-based surveillance for hypermucoviscosity Klebsiella pneumoniae causing community-acquired bacteremia in Calgary, Alberta

    OpenAIRE

    Gisele Peirano; Johann DD. Pitout; Laupland, Kevin B.; Bonnie Meatherall; Daniel B Gregson

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of hypermucoviscosity isolates among Klebsiella pneumoniae causing community-acquired bacteremia were investigated. The hypermucoviscous phenotype was present in 8.2% of K pneumoniae isolates, and was associated with rmpA and the K2 serotype; liver abscesses were the most common clinical presentation. The present analysis represents the first population-based surveillance study of hypermucoviscosity among K pneumoniae causing bacteremia.

  8. Biomarkers in community-acquired pneumonia: A state-of-the-art review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Seligman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP exhibits mortality rates, between 20% and 50% in severe cases. Biomarkers are useful tools for searching for antibiotic therapy modifications and for CAP diagnosis, prognosis and follow-up treatment. This non-systematic state-of-the-art review presents the biological and clinical features of biomarkers in CAP patients, including procalcitonin, C-reactive protein, copeptin, pro-ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide, adrenomedullin, cortisol and D-dimers.

  9. Community-Acquired Pyelonephritis in Pregnancy Caused by KPC-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatri, Asma; Naeger Murphy, Nina; Wiest, Peter; Osborn, Melissa; Garber, Kathleen; Hecker, Michelle; Hurless, Kelly; Rudin, Susan D.; Jacobs, Michael R.; Kalayjian, Robert C.; Salata, Robert A.; van Duin, David; Harris, Patrick N. A.

    2015-01-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) usually infect patients with significant comorbidities and health care exposures. We present a case of a pregnant woman who developed community-acquired pyelonephritis caused by KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite antibiotic treatment, she experienced spontaneous prolonged rupture of membranes, with eventual delivery of a healthy infant. This report demonstrates the challenge that CRE may pose to the effective treatment of common infections in obstetric patients, with potentially harmful consequences to maternal and neonatal health. PMID:26185273

  10. Antibiograms from community-acquired uropathogens in Gulu, northern Uganda - a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Odongo, Charles O; Anywar, Denis A; Luryamamoi, Kenneth; Odongo, Pancras

    2013-01-01

    Background Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common in clinical practice and empirical treatment is largely employed due to predictability of pathogens. However, variations in antibiotic sensitivity patterns do occur, and documentation is needed to inform local empirical therapy. The current edition of the Uganda Clinical Guidelines recommends amoxicillin or cotrimoxazole as choice drugs for empirical treatment of community-acquired UTI. From our clinical observations, we suspected that this...

  11. Severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in young female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milačić Nena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is common agent causing community acquired pneumonia in younger population. However, the course of illness is usually benign and is rarely associated with pulmonary complications. We report a 27 years old female patient with unilateral pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and adhesions on the same side. This potential source of infection should be considered in young patients where resolution of symptoms from pneumonia is delayed.

  12. Stresshyperglykaemi hos et barn med svaer akut gastroenteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, Jesper V.

    2002-01-01

    A case of a two years and ten months old girl with severe acute gastroenteritis, dehydration, and hyperglycaemia is described. Transient hyperglycaemia is a common clinical finding in children under stress. We discuss the distinction between hyperglycaemia as a prediabetic state and that as a phy...

  13. Use of proton pump inhibitors and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Holm, Anette; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    . Cases (n=7642) were defined as all patients with a first-discharge diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia from a hospital during 2000 through 2004. We also selected 34 176 control subjects, who were frequency matched to the cases by age and sex. Data on the use of PPIs and other drugs......, on microbiological samples, on x-ray examination findings, and on comorbid conditions were extracted from local registries. Confounders were controlled by logistic regression. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) associating current use of PPIs with community-acquired pneumonia was 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI......], 1.3-1.7). No association was found with histamine(2)-receptor antagonists (OR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.8-1.3) or with past use of PPIs (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 0.9-1.6). Recent initiation of treatment with PPIs (0-7 days before index date) showed a particularly strong association with community-acquired pneumonia...

  14. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of Klebsiella pneumoniae from community-acquired recurrent urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, W H; Kao, C Y; Yang, D C; Tseng, C C; Wu, A B; Teng, C H; Wang, M C; Wu, J J

    2014-09-01

    Understanding the pathogenesis of recurrent urinary tract infection (RUTI) and whether it is attributable to reinfection with a new strain or relapse with the primary infecting strain is of considerable importance. Because previous studies regarding community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae RUTI are inconclusive, we undertook this study to evaluate the characteristics of the host and the bacterial agent K. pneumoniae in RUTI. A prospective study was designed, using consecutive patients diagnosed with community-acquired K. pneumoniae-related UTI from January 2007 to December 2009. Of the total 468 consecutive episodes, we found 7 patients with RUTI. All the patients with RUTI were elderly (median, 74 years), with diabetes (100 %, 7 out of 7). Clinical K. pneumoniae isolates derived from the same patients with RUTI revealed identical genomic fingerprints, indicating that K. pneumoniae UTI relapsed despite appropriate antibiotic therapy. The antimicrobial resistance, growth curve and biofilm formation of the recurrent isolates did not change. K. pneumoniae strains causing RUTI had more adhesion and invasiveness than the colonization strains (p recurrent strains with the community-acquired UTI strains, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus was significant (100 % vs 53.7 %, p = 0.03) in the RUTI group. Our data suggest that K. pneumoniae strains might be able to persist within the urinary tract despite appropriate antibiotic treatment, and the greater adhesion and invasiveness in the recurrent strains may play an important role in recurrent infections.

  15. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia: influence of age, residence status and antimicrobial treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothe, H; Bauer, T; Marre, R; Suttorp, N; Welte, T; Dalhoff, K

    2008-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia remains a major cause of mortality in developed countries. There is much discrepancy in the literature regarding factors influencing the outcome in the elderly population. Data were derived from a multicentre prospective study initiated by the German Competence Network for Community-Acquired Pneumonia. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia (n = 2,647; 1,298 aged or = 65 yrs) were evaluated, of whom 72.3% were hospitalised and 27.7% treated in the community. Clinical history, residence status, course of disease and antimicrobial treatment were prospectively documented. Microbiological investigations included cultures and PCR of respiratory samples and blood cultures. Factors related to mortality were included in multivariate analyses. The overall 30-day mortality was 6.3%. Elderly patients exhibited a significantly higher mortality rate that was independently associated with the following: age; residence status; confusion, urea, respiratory frequency and blood pressure (CURB) score; comorbid conditions; and failure of initial therapy. Increasing age remained predictive of death in the elderly. Nursing home residents showed a four-fold increased mortality rate and an increased rate of gram-negative bacillary infections compared with patients dwelling in the community. The CURB score and cerebrovascular disease were confirmed as independent predictors of death in this subgroup. Age and residence status are independent risk factors for mortality after controlling for comorbid conditions and disease severity. Failure of initial therapy was the only modifiable prognostic factor.

  16. Chest radiographic characteristics of community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhigang; Liu Xinmin; Chen Luzeng; Qiu Jianxing

    2014-01-01

    Background Legionella is an important community-acquired pneumonia pathogen.Although the elderly are especially susceptible to Legionella,few studies have looked at comparative radiographic features of Legionella pneumonia in this population.The aim of this study was to explore the chest radiographic characteristics of community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly.Methods Serial chest radiographs obtained in 34 patients hospitalized with serologically proven Legionella pneumonia were retrospectively reviewed.Chest x-ray features of an aged group of ≥65 years were assessed and compared with a non-aged group of <65 years old with regard to initial patterns and distributions of pulmonary abnormalities,accompanying signs,and progression.Results The most common initial presentation was a patchy alveolar infiltrate involving a single lobe,most often the lower lobe.There was no middle or lingular lobe involvement in the aged group patients,but bilateral pleural effusion was significantly more common in this group.In the aged group patients,radiographic progression following adequate therapy,despite a clinical response,was more often noted and the radiographs were less likely to have returned to the premorbid state at discharge,but the differences were not significant between the two groups.Conclusion The discrepancy between imaging findings and clinical symptoms seems more prominent in community-acquired Legionella pneumonia in the elderly.

  17. Hydrocephalus is a rare outcome in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik I

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid in this ......BACKGROUND: Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid...... in this field of research we set out to ascertain the risk and outcome of hydrocephalus in patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) in North Denmark Region. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of CABM cases above 14 years of age. Cases diagnosed during a 13......-year period, 1998 through 2010, were identified in a laboratory register and data were acquired through patient records. Cases not confirmed by culture met other strict inclusion criteria. The diagnosis of hydrocephalus relied upon the radiologists' reports on cranial imaging. Outcome was graded...

  18. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: an increasing public health threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Arjun Gupta, Sahil Khanna Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: There has been a startling shift in the epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infection over the last decade worldwide, and it is now increasingly recognized as a cause of diarrhea in the community. Classically considered a hospital-acquired infection, it has now emerged in populations previously considered to be low-risk and lacking the traditional risk factors for C. difficile infection, such as increased age, hospitalization, and antibiotic exposure. Recent studies have demonstrated great genetic diversity for C. difficile, pointing toward diverse sources and a fluid genome. Environmental sources like food, water, and animals may play an important role in these infections, apart from the role symptomatic patients and asymptomatic carriers play in spore dispersal. Prospective strain typing using highly discriminatory techniques is a possible way to explore the suspected diverse sources of C. difficile infection in the community. Patients with community-acquired C. difficile infection do not necessarily have a good outcome and clinicians should be aware of factors that predict worse outcomes in order to prevent them. This article summarizes the emerging epidemiology, risk factors, and outcomes for community-acquired C. difficile infection. Keywords: community acquired infection, Clostridium difficile, epidemiology, risk factors, outcome

  19. Methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infection among children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Tavares Gomes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a pathogen associated with community-acquired infections worldwide. We report the spectrum of community-acquired S. aureus infections and compare the patients infected with methicillin-susceptible or methicillin-resistant strains among patients aged <20 years. Overall, 90 cases of community acquired S. aureus were detected in an 11-year period. Clinical and microbiological data were registered. Fifty-nine (66% patients were male and the median age was two years. The majority (87% of the patients were hospitalized and chronic underlying illnesses were detected in 27 (30% cases. Overall, 34 (37.8% patients had skin/soft tissue infections and 56 (62.2% patients had deep-seated infection. Four (5.1% patients were transferred to the intensive care unit and two (2.6% died. Complications were detected in 17 (18.9% cases, such as pleural effusion (41.2%, osteomyelitis (23.5%, and sepsis (17.6%. Six (6.7% methicillin-resistant strains were detected. Patients infected with methicillin-susceptible or methicillin-resistant strains had similar baseline characteristics and treatment outcomes. Approximately 93% of the cases received systemic antibiotics, out of which 59 (65.5% used oxacillin or cefalotin. Both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains resulted in morbidity and death among children in this setting where methicillin-resistant strains are infrequent.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Lung Ultrasonography for the Detection of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Corradi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. Chest X-ray is recommended for routine use in patients with suspected pneumonia, but its use in emergency settings is limited. In this study, the diagnostic performance of a new method for quantitative analysis of lung ultrasonography was compared with bedside chest X-ray and visual lung ultrasonography for detection of community-acquired pneumonia, using thoracic computed tomography as a gold standard. Methods. Thirty-two spontaneously breathing patients with suspected community-acquired pneumonia, undergoing computed tomography examination, were consecutively enrolled. Each hemithorax was evaluated for the presence or absence of abnormalities by chest X-ray and quantitative or visual ultrasonography. Results. Quantitative ultrasonography showed higher sensitivity (93%, specificity (95%, and diagnostic accuracy (94% than chest X-ray (64%, 80%, and 69%, resp., visual ultrasonography (68%, 95%, and 77%, resp., or their combination (77%, 75%, and 77%, resp.. Conclusions. Quantitative lung ultrasonography was considerably more accurate than either chest X-ray or visual ultrasonography in the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia and it may represent a useful first-line approach for confirmation of clinical diagnosis in emergency settings.

  1. Prospective etiological investigation of community-acquired pulmonary infections in hospitalized people living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo-Mello, Claudia; Naucler, Pontus; Negra, Marinella D.; Levin, Anna S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The study of the etiological agents of community-acquired pulmonary infections is important to guide empirical therapy, requires constant updating, and has a substantial impact on the prognosis of patients. The objective of this study is to determine prospectively the etiology of community-acquired pulmonary infections in hospitalized adults living with HIV. Patients were submitted to an extended microbiological investigation that included molecular methods. The microbiological findings were evaluated according to severity of the disease and pneumococcal vaccine status. Two hundred twenty-four patients underwent the extended microbiological investigation of whom 143 (64%) had an etiology determined. Among the 143 patients with a determined etiology, Pneumocystis jirovecii was the main agent, detected in 52 (36%) cases and followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis accounting for 28 (20%) cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Rhinovirus were diagnosed in 22 (15%) cases each and influenza in 15 (10%) cases. Among atypical bacteria, Mycoplasma pneumoniae was responsible for 12 (8%) and Chlamydophila pneumoniae for 7 (5%) cases. Mixed infections occurred in 48 cases (34%). S pneumoniae was associated with higher severity scores and not associated with vaccine status. By using extended diagnostics, a microbiological agent could be determined in the majority of patients living with HIV affected by community-acquired pulmonary infections. Our findings can guide clinicians in the choice of empirical therapy for hospitalized pulmonary disease. PMID:28121925

  2. Clinical data analysis of 19 cases of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Mao-Mao; Pu, Zeng-Hui; Wang, Yun-Qiang; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of clinical manifestations, laboratory tests and imaging changes of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in immunocompetent adults. A retrospective study was performed on 19 adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia cases in Yantai, whereby the clinical data were collected and analyzed. Of 19 cases, 14 (73.68%) had fever and 17 (89.47%) had cough symptoms. Moreover, 14 cases (73.68%) had normal white blood cell counts, while 11 cases (57.89%) exhibited a reduction in lymphocyte proportion. Among the 19 cases, 17 cases exhibited lesions in a single lung, while 2 cases involved bilateral lungs. The lesions predominantly exhibited ground glass-like changes. The clinical manifestations of adult community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia patients with normal immune functions were mild, with such presenting symptoms as fever, cough, and sputum; most patients did not exhibit high levels of white blood cells or low lymphocyte counts, and the imaging features (ground glass-like effusion) were indicative of single-lung involvement.

  3. Observation Curative Effect on Magnesium Sulfate and Benzene Three Phenol in the treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis Spastic Abdominal Pain%硫酸镁联合间苯三酚治疗急性胃肠炎痉挛性腹痛疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周丽华

    2016-01-01

    目的:观察硫酸镁联合间苯三酚治疗急性胃肠炎痉挛性腹痛的效果。方法随机将70例急性胃肠炎痉挛性腹痛患者平均分为两组,对照组行间苯三酚治疗,观察组在对照组的基础上行硫酸镁治疗,比较两组临床疗效。结果观察组治疗总有效率、VAS 评分等均优于对照组(P<0.05)。结论硫酸镁联合间苯三酚治疗急性胃肠炎痉挛性腹痛效果理想。%Objective To analyze the benzene three phenol and magnesium sulfate in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis spastic abdominal pain. Methods Random 70 cases of acute gastroenteritis spasm of abdominal pain in patients divided into two groups, control group interline phloroglucinol treatment, observe group in the control group based uplink magnesium sulfate treatment, compared two groups of clinical curative effect. Results The total effective rate and VAS score of the observation group were better than those of the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion Magnesium sulfate combined with benzene three phenol treatment of acute gastroenteritis spastic abdominal pain effect.

  4. IL-8 CHEMOTACTIC FACTOR IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA AND FEATURES OF IL-8 GENE POLYMORPHISM (251 T/А

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Aznabaeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-four patients with different clinical course (acute and protracted forms of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, were studied for interleukin-8 (IL-8 contents in blood serum and its production levels (spontaneous and PHA-stimulated, depending on the IL-8 gene polymorphism at the 251 T → A locus. Employing the data about immunogenetic differences, we have shown some associations between IL-8 production, depending on clinical outcome (adequate responders vs poor response to medication in acute pneumonia. Both in acute and chronic forms of pneumonia, poor response to therapy was associated with decreased reserve capacity of IL-8 production, and a downward trend of cytokine concentration in blood serum. It was revealed that the CAP patients with poor response to treatment exhibit deficient production of IL-8 associated with homozygous AA genotype at the -251 T/A locus of IL-8 gene.

  5. The role of haloaerosolotherapy in immunorehabilitation of convalescents after community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Lemko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation of the peculiarities of different haloaerosoltherapy regimes influence (treatment with different intensity of haloaerosol load upon non-specific defense and cellular immunity at convalescents after community acquired pneumonia. Objectives: patients with community acquired pneumonia in the early convalescence period (after completing antibiotic therapy, who received treatment in conditions of artificial rock salt aerosol medium (haloaerosoltherapy. Material and Methods. 42 patients with non-severe community acquired pneumonia were examined in the early convalescence period before and after the course of haloaerosoltherapy, which was prescribed after antibacterial therapy. Immunological studies included: evaluation of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (PhAN - the percentage of phagocytic neutrophils, phagocytic number (PhN - average number of latex particles absorbed by a neutrophil; metabolism of neutrophils in the test with nitroblue tetrasolium (NBT-test spontaneous and induced, which allowed to assess the functional reserve of neutrophils (FR; calculation of cytochemical coefficient (CCC for lysosomal cationic proteins (LCP and for myeloperoxidase (MPO of neutrophils; number of T- and B-lymphocytes and their subpopulations (CD3+ -, CD4+ -, CD8+ -, CD22+ - lymphocytes, calculation the number of 0- lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ /CD8+ lymphocytes. Laboratory examinations were also conducted in 21 practically healthy individuals (control group. Two regimes of haloaerosoltherapy were used in recovery treatment of patients with community acquired pneumonia: treating complex №1 (TC-1 with standard haloaerosol load and with increased haloaerosol load (TC-2. Results. After completion the antibiotic therapy at patients with community acquired pneumonia the moderate inhibition of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (47,6±0,58% to 55,5±1,14% in control group remained and was accompanied with a decrease in neutrophil bactericidal

  6. 诺氟沙星联合加味藿香正气丸治疗急性胃肠炎的108例临床观察%Norfloxacin combined with Jiawei Huoxiang Zhengqi Wan in the treatment of 108 Patients with acute gastroenteritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    禤惠连

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of Norfloxacin combined with Jiawei Huoxiang Zhengqi Wan in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis and provide theoretical basis for the clinical application.Methods From Mar 2000 to Aug 2012,108 cases of acute gastroenteritis in our hospital were randomly divided into two groups.Control group used Norfloxacin only,while observation group used Norfloxacin combined with Jiawei Huoxiang Zhengqi Wan.We observed and compared the clinical effect of two groups.Results After the treatment,the total effective rate of observation group was higher than that of control group(98.1% vs 72.2%).Symptoms of acute gastroenteritis such as diarrhea,fever in observation group were fewer than those in control group.Conclusion Norfloxacin combined with Jiawei Huoxiang Zhengqi Wan in the treatment of acute gastroenteritis is significantly effective,with fewer symptoms of acute gastroenteritis and less pain,which has a clinical research value.%目的 探究诺氟沙星联合加味藿香正气丸治疗急性胃肠炎的临床效果,为临床治疗提供理论依据.方法 将在2000年3月至2012年8月之间,入院治疗的108位患有急性肠胃炎的患者,随机分为两组(观察组与对照组).对照组仅使用诺氟沙星治疗,观察组则是诺氟沙星联合加味藿香正气丸治疗.对比观察两组的疗效.结果 观察组治疗有效率为为98.1%,对照组为72.2%,观察组患者在腹泻、发热等方面的急性胃肠炎症状明显减少,具有明显的临床疗效优势.结论 诺氟沙星联合加味藿香正气丸治疗急性胃肠炎临床疗效良好,可以较好地减少急性胃肠炎的症状,减轻患者痛苦,具有较大临床研究价值.

  7. Plasma Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1 Level as a Predictor of the Severity of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Kok-Khun; Chang, Jer-Hwa; Chien, Ming-Hsien; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Yu, Ming-Chih; Bai, Kuan-Jen; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-01-29

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 increases in the serum of immunocompetent patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, the correlation between the circulating level of MCP-1 and severity of CAP remains unclear. This study investigated differential changes in the plasma MCP-1 levels of patients with CAP before and after an antibiotic treatment and further analyzes the association between the CAP severity and MCP-1 levels. We measured the plasma MCP-1 levels of 137 patients with CAP and 74 healthy controls by using a commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Upon initial hospitalization, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II); confusion, urea level, respiratory rate, blood pressure, and age of >64 years (CURB-65); and pneumonia severity index (PSI) scores were determined for assessing the CAP severity in these patients. The antibiotic treatment reduced the number of white blood cells (WBCs) and neutrophils as well as the level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and MCP-1. The plasma MCP-1 level, but not the CRP level or WBC count, correlated with the CAP severity according to the PSI (r = 0.509, p < 0.001), CURB-65 (r = 0.468, p < 0.001), and APACHE II (r = 0.360, p < 0.001) scores. We concluded that MCP-1 levels act in the development of CAP and are involved in the severity of CAP.

  8. Clinical usefulness of oral immunoglobulins in lung transplant recipients with norovirus gastroenteritis: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gairard-Dory, A-C; Dégot, T; Hirschi, S; Schuller, A; Leclercq, A; Renaud-Picard, B; Gourieux, B; Kessler, R

    2014-12-01

    Viral gastroenteritis causing diarrhea is a common complication observed in lung transplant recipients. Differently from the mild and typically self-limited disease seen in immunocompetent subjects, immunocompromised patients frequently have a more severe course. Norovirus and rotavirus are among the leading causes of severe gastroenteritis in transplant recipients. Specific treatment is unavailable, although good supportive treatment can significantly reduce morbidity. Previous studies have suggested that oral immunoglobulins may be used for the treatment of acute viral gastroenteritis after solid-organ transplantation. Herein, we conducted a retrospective chart review of 12 lung transplant recipients with norovirus-induced gastroenteritis who were treated with oral immunoglobulins for 2 days. Eleven patients were successfully treated, whereas 1 subject was only mildly improved. Four patients had at least 1 recurrence. No significant adverse effects were observed. We conclude that oral immunoglobulins may be clinically useful for lung transplant recipients with norovirus-induced gastroenteritis.

  9. Causes of non-adherence to therapeutic guidelines in severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattarello, Simone; Ramírez, Sergio; Almarales, José Rafael; Borgatta, Bárbara; Lagunes, Leonel; Encina, Belén; Rello, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    To assess the adherence to Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines and the causes of lack of adherence during empirical antibiotic prescription in severe pneumonia in Latin America. A clinical questionnaire was submitted to 36 physicians from Latin America; they were asked to indicate the empirical treatment in two fictitious cases of severe respiratory infection: community-acquired pneumonia and nosocomial pneumonia. In the case of community acquired pneumonia, 11 prescriptions of 36 (30.6%) were compliant with international guidelines. The causes for non-compliant treatment were monotherapy (16.0%), the unnecessary prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics (40.0%) and the use of non-recommended antibiotics (44.0%). In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the rate of adherence to the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines was 2.8% (1 patient of 36). The reasons for lack of compliance were monotherapy (14.3%) and a lack of dual antibiotic coverage against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (85.7%). If monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered adequate, the antibiotic treatment would be adequate in 100% of the total prescriptions. The compliance rate with the Infectious Disease Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines in the community-acquired pneumonia scenario was 30.6%; the most frequent cause of lack of compliance was the indication of monotherapy. In the case of nosocomial pneumonia, the compliance rate with the guidelines was 2.8%, and the most important cause of non-adherence was lack of combined antipseudomonal therapy. If the use of monotherapy with an antipseudomonal antibiotic was considered the correct option, the treatment would be adequate in 100% of the prescriptions.

  10. [Increasing incidence of community-acquired pneumonia caused by atypical microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazón-Varela, M A; Alonso-Valle, H; Muñoz-Cacho, P; Gallo-Terán, J; Piris-García, X; Pérez-Mier, L A

    2017-09-01

    Knowing the most common microorganisms in our environment can help us to make proper empirical treatment decisions. The aim is to identify those microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia. An observational, descriptive and prospective study was conducted, including patients over 14 years with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia during a 383 consecutive day period. A record was made of sociodemographic variables, personal history, prognostic severity scales, progress, and pathogenic agents. The aetiological diagnosis was made using blood cultures, detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigens, sputum culture, influenza virus and Streptococcus pyogenes detection. Categorical variables are presented as absolute values and percentages, and continuous variables as their means and standard deviations. Of the 287 patients included in the study (42% women, mean age 66±22 years), 10.45% died and 70% required hospital admission. An aetiological diagnosis was achieved in 43 patients (14.98%), with 16 microorganisms found in 59 positive samples. The most frequently isolated pathogen was Streptococcus pneumonia (24/59, 41%), followed by gram-negative enteric bacilli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae isolated in 20% of the samples (12/59), influenza virus (5/59, 9%), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (3/59, 5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2/59, 3%), Moraxella catarrhalis (2/59, 3%), Legionella pneumophila (2/59, 3%), and Haemophilus influenza (2/59, 3%). Polymicrobial infections accounted for 14% (8/59). A high percentage of atypical microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia were found. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacteriological and clinical profile of Community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Bashir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to obtain comprehensive insight into the bacteriological and clinical profile of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. The patient population consisted of 100 patients admitted with the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, as defined by British Thoracic society, from December 1998 to Dec 2000, at the Sher- i-Kashmir institute of Medical Sciences Soura, Srinagar, India. Gram negative organisms were the commonest cause (19/29, followed by gram positive (10/29. In 71 cases no etiological cause was obtained. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen (10/29, followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7/29, Escherichia coli (6/29, Klebsiella spp. (3/29, Streptococcus pyogenes (1/29, Streptococcus pneumoniae (1/29 and Acinetobacter spp. (1/29. Sputum was the most common etiological source of organism isolation (26 followed by blood (6, pleural fluid (3, and pus culture (1. Maximum number of patients presented with cough (99%, fever (95%, tachycardia (92%, pleuritic chest pain (75%, sputum production (65% and leucocytosis (43%. The commonest predisposing factors were smoking (65%, COPD (57%, structural lung disease (21%, diabetes mellitus (13%, and decreased level of consciousness following seizure (eight per cent and chronic alcoholism (one per cent. Fourteen patients, of whom, nine were males and five females, died. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in four, Pseudomonas in two, Klebsiella in one, and no organism was isolated in seven cases. The factors predicting mortality at admission were - age over 62 years, history of COPD or smoking, hypotension, altered sensorium, respiratory failure, leucocytosis, and s0 taphylococcus pneumonia and undetermined etiology. The overall rate of identification of microbial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was 29%, which is very low, and if serological tests for legionella, mycoplasma and viruses are performed the diagnostic yield would

  12. Adherence to clinical practice guidelines on community acquired pneumonia and its relation to mortality rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Caridad Fragoso Marchante

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community acquired pneumonia is a common disease that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality rates. In the General University Hospital ´´Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima¨ in Cienfuegos, there are guidelines for the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia, but no studies have been conducted as to the relation between their compliance and the mortality rate. Objective: To assess the adherence to guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and its relation to mortality in hospitalized patients. Methods: A descriptive, observational and prospective case series study was conducted in all patients with a diagnosis of pneumonia or bronchopneumonia at the moment of admission and discharge from June 2006 to May 31, 2007. The relation between the different variables and the mortality rate was analyzed as to the different types of risks and the overall compliance with the guidelines for each risk with mortality. A multivariate analysis (logistic regression was performed, with a 95% confidence interval. Results: The results are presented in tables of numbers and percent. Variables independently associated with mortality were: age (over 65 years old people, radiological lesions in more than one lobe or bilateral, atypical pneumonia debut, negative assessments as to the adherence to guidelines and inadequate treatments. Conclusion: The variables included in the study were enough to explain the final outcome of the patients, so it could be determined, for the first time in Cienfuegos, that the non-compliance with the guidelines of good clinical practice is related to mortality rates.

  13. Bacteriological and clinical profile of Community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Bashir Ahmed; Singh, Gurmeet; Naik, Muzafar Ahmed; Dhobi, Ghulam Nabi

    2010-01-01

    The aim of our study was to obtain comprehensive insight into the bacteriological and clinical profile of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. The patient population consisted of 100 patients admitted with the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), as defined by British Thoracic society, from December 1998 to Dec 2000, at the Sher- i-Kashmir institute of Medical Sciences Soura, Srinagar, India. Gram negative organisms were the commonest cause (19/29), followed by gram positive (10/29). In 71 cases no etiological cause was obtained. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen (10/29), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (7/29), Escherichia coli (6/29), Klebsiella spp. (3/29), Streptococcus pyogenes (1/29), Streptococcus pneumoniae (1/29) and Acinetobacter spp. (1/29). Sputum was the most common etiological source of organism isolation (26) followed by blood (6), pleural fluid (3), and pus culture (1). Maximum number of patients presented with cough (99%), fever (95%), tachycardia (92%), pleuritic chest pain (75%), sputum production (65%) and leucocytosis (43%). The commonest predisposing factors were smoking (65%), COPD (57%), structural lung disease (21%), diabetes mellitus (13%), and decreased level of consciousness following seizure (eight per cent) and chronic alcoholism (one per cent). Fourteen patients, of whom, nine were males and five females, died. Staphylococcus aureus was the causative organism in four, Pseudomonas in two, Klebsiella in one, and no organism was isolated in seven cases. The factors predicting mortality at admission were - age over 62 years, history of COPD or smoking, hypotension, altered sensorium, respiratory failure, leucocytosis, and staphylococcus pneumonia and undetermined etiology. The overall rate of identification of microbial etiology of community-acquired pneumonia was 29%, which is very low, and if serological tests for legionella, mycoplasma and viruses are performed the diagnostic yield would

  14. Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: an emerging infection in Ireland and Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, R

    2013-02-05

    INTRODUCTION: Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a predominant cause of community-acquired mono-microbial pyogenic liver abscess. This was first described in Taiwan and has been widely reported in Asia. This infectious entity has been described in Europe, with single case reports predominating. METHODS: We present three cases in one year from our institution in Ireland and review the European literature to date. RESULTS\\/CONCLUSION: Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome is now emerging in Europe and notably is not restricted to individuals of Asian descent.

  15. A rare case of community acquired Burkholderia cepacia infection presenting as pyopneumothorax in an immunocompetent individual

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suman S Karanth; Hariharan Regunath; Kiran Chawla; Mukhyaprana Prabhu

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia) infection is rarely reported in an immunocompetent host. It is a well known occurence in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease where it increases both morbidity and mortality. It has also been included in the list of organisms causing nosocomial infections in an immunocompetent host, most of them transmitted from the immunocompromised patient in which this organism harbors. We report a rare case of isolation of B. cepacia from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of an immunocompetent agriculturist who presented with productive cough and fever associated with a pyopneumothorax. This is the first case of community acquired infection reported in an immunocompetent person in India.

  16. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Case Validation in an Anonymized Electronic Medical Record-Linked Expert System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Maliapen, Mahendran; Ong, Venetia; Jakes, Rupert W; Mundy, Linda M; Jialiang, Li; Tambyah, Paul A

    2017-05-15

    An electronic anonymized patient portal analysis using radiographic reports and admission and discharge diagnoses had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 84.7%, 78.2%, 75%, and 87%, respectively, for community-acquired pneumonia validated against a blinded expert medical review. This approach can help to track antimicrobial use and resistance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak;

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings...... and outcome parameters were collected. Three groups were established according to the initial choice of antibiotic(s): penicillin only (n = 160); non-allergic patients starting broader spectrum therapy (n = 54); and patients with suspected penicillin allergy (n = 29). RESULTS: The overall mortality within...... with similar patterns of microbial pathogens and resistance....

  18. A rare case of community acquired Burkholderia cepacia infection presenting as pyopneumothorax in an immunocompetent individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman S Karanth

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cepacia (B. cepacia infection is rarely reported in an immunocompetent host. It is a well known occurence in patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease where it increases both morbidity and mortality. It has also been included in the list of organisms causing nosocomial infections in an immunocompetent host, most of them transmitted from the immunocompromised patient in which this organism harbors. We report a rare case of isolation of B. cepacia from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of an immunocompetent agriculturist who presented with productive cough and fever associated with a pyopneumothorax. This is the first case of community acquired infection reported in an immunocompetent person in India.

  19. Community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia in a patient with chronic lymphatic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, I K; Nielsen, H

    2005-03-01

    Described here is a severe case of community-acquired adenovirus pneumonia that occurred in a previously healthy 54-year-old male who was later determined to have stage A chronic lymphatic leukemia. The clinical presentation was consistent with that of atypical pneumonia. Testing with PCR revealed adenovirus in a bronchoalveolar lavage sample, while all other tests to determine a bacterial or virological etiology were negative. Further examination of the patient revealed the previously undiagnosed chronic lymphatic leukemia. Following treatment with human immunoglobulin and oxygen therapy with continuous positive airway pressure support the patient recovered from the pneumonia completely.

  20. Emergence of Raoultella ornithinolytica on O'ahu: a case of community-acquired R. ornithinolytica urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Elizabeth S; Kaneshiro, Ricky; Min, Kathleen; Tokeshi, Jinichi

    2015-05-01

    Human infection with Raoultella ornithinolytica is rare, with only ten cases having been reported previously. This case report describes a local patient diagnosed with community-acquired R. ornithinolytica urinary tract infection in 2014.

  1. Analysis of the effectiveness of physical rehabilitation according spirographic indicators in community-acquired pneumonia during convalescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalmykova Y.S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to make a program of physical rehabilitation for convalescents after community-acquired pneumonia, promotes normalization of respiratory function. The objectives of the study was to evaluate the dynamics spirographic indicators during convalescence community-acquired pneumonia. Material: the study involved 28 women aged 19 to 24 years with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia after convalescent. Results: the positive influence of physiotherapy based dance aerobics; morning hygienic gymnastics; therapeutic massage and physical therapy on indicators of lung volumes, ventilation and bronchial patency according spirographic research. Conclusion: in community-acquired pneumonia during the convalescence period recommended physical rehabilitation, which includes curative gymnastics based on dance aerobics, morning hygienic gymnastics, massage therapy, physiotherapy. It improves the functionality of the cardiorespiratory system, nonspecific immunity and overall physical performance level.

  2. Emergence of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: the experience of a French hospital and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Ogielska

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: CDI can cause community-acquired diarrhoea, and CA-CDI may be more severe than HCA-CDI. Prospective studies of CDI involving people from the general community without risk factors are required to confirm this observation.

  3. The Impact of Patient Profiles and Procedures on Hospitalization Costs through Length of Stay in Community-Acquired Pneumonia Patients Based on a Japanese Administrative Database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironori Uematsu

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia is a common cause of patient hospitalization, and its burden on health care systems is increasing in aging societies. In this study, we aimed to investigate the factors that affect hospitalization costs in community-acquired pneumonia patients while considering the intermediate influence of patient length of stay.Using a multi-institutional administrative claims database, we analyzed 30,041 patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia who had been discharged between April 1, 2012 and September 30, 2013 from 289 acute care hospitals in Japan. Possible factors associated with hospitalization costs were investigated using structural equation modeling with length of stay as an intermediate variable. We calculated the direct, indirect (through length of stay, and total effects of the candidate factors on hospitalization costs in the model. Lastly, we calculated the ratio of indirect effects to direct effects for each factor.The structural equation model showed that higher disease severities (using A-DROP, Barthel Index, and Charlson Comorbidity Index scores, use of mechanical ventilation, and tube feeding were associated with higher hospitalization costs, regardless of the intermediate influence of length of stay. The severity factors were also associated with longer length of stay durations. The ratio of indirect effects to direct effects on total hospitalization costs showed that the former was greater than the latter in the factors, except in the use of mechanical ventilation.Our structural equation modeling analysis indicated that patient profiles and procedures impacted on hospitalization costs both directly and indirectly. Furthermore, the profiles were generally shown to have greater indirect effects (through length of stay on hospitalization costs than direct effects. These findings may be useful in supporting the more appropriate distribution of health care resources.

  4. "I really should've gone to the doctor": older adults and family caregivers describe their experiences with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lohfeld Lynne

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Responding to acute illness symptoms can often be challenging for older adults. The primary objective of this study was to describe how community-dwelling older adults and their family members responded to symptoms of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods A qualitative study that used face-to-face semi-structured interviews to collect data from a purposeful sample of seniors aged 60+ and their family members living in a mid-sized Canadian city. Data analysis began with descriptive and interpretive coding, then advanced as the research team repeatedly compared emerging thematic categories to the raw data. Searches for disconfirming evidence and member checking through focus groups provided additional data and helped ensure rigour. Results Community-acquired pneumonia symptoms varied greatly among older adults, making decisions to seek care difficult for them and their family members. Both groups took varying amounts of time as they attempted to sort out what was wrong and then determine how best to respond. Even after they concluded something was wrong, older adults with confirmed pneumonia continued to wait for days, to over a week, before seeking medical care. Participants provided diverse reasons for this delay, including fear, social obligations (work, family, leisure, and accessibility barriers (time, place, systemic. Several older adults and family members regretted their delays in seeking help. Conclusion Treatment-seeking delay is a variable, multi-phased decision-making process that incorporates symptom assessment plus psychosocial and situational factors. Public health and health care professionals need to educate older adults about the potential causes and consequences of unnecessary waits. Such efforts may reduce the severity of community-acquired pneumonia upon presentation at clinics and hospitals, and that, in turn, could potentially improve health outcomes.

  5. Evaluation of Sofia Fluorescent immunoassay analyzer for pneumococcal urinary antigen detection in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Diego; López-Olaizola, Maddi; de la Caba, Idoia; Cilla, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    The Sofia Streptococcus pneumoniae FIA® test was prospectively evaluated in non-concentrated urine samples of 106 hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. The test detected pneumococcal urinary antigen in 24/31 (77.4%) confirmed pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia episodes. The specificity of the test was 86.7% (92% after urine heating). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. IL-6 and TNF-α serum levels are associated with early death in community-acquired pneumonia patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacci, M.R.; Leme, R.C.P.; Zing, N.P.C. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Murad, N. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Adami, F.; Hinnig, P.F. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Feder, D. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Chagas, A.C.P. [Departamento de Cardiologia, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, F.L.A. [Departamento de Cliníca Médica, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil)

    2015-02-24

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is amongst the leading causes of death worldwide. As inflammatory markers, cytokines can predict outcomes, if interpreted together with clinical data and scoring systems such as CURB-65, CRB, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II). The aim of this study was to determine the impact of inflammatory biomarkers on the early mortality of hospitalized CAP patients. Twenty-seven CAP patients needing hospitalization were enrolled for the study and samples of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and homocystein were collected at the time of admission (day 1) as well as on the seventh day of the treatment. There was a significant reduction in the levels of IL-6 between the first and the second collections. Median IL-6 values decreased from 24 pg/mL (day 1) to 8 pg/mL (day 7) (P=0.016). The median levels of TNF-α were higher in patients: i) with acute kidney injury (AKI) (P=0.045), ii) requiring mechanical ventilation (P=0.040), iii) with short hospital stays (P=0.009), iv) admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (P=0.040), v) who died early (P=0.003), and vi) with worse CRB scores (P=0.013). In summary, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were associated with early mortality of CAP patients. Longer admission levels demonstrated greater likelihood of early death and overall mortality, necessity of mechanical ventilation, and AKI.

  7. HDL-c levels predict the presence of pleural effusion and the clinical outcome of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saballs, M; Parra, S; Sahun, P; Pellejà, J; Feliu, M; Vasco, C; Gumà, J; Borràs, J L; Masana, L; Castro, A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate if HDL cholesterol (HDL-c) could be a biomarker of the degree of severity according to prognostic prediction scores in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or the development of clinical complications such as pleural effusion. We included in a retrospective study 107 patients admitted to the hospital that fulfilled diagnostic criteria for CAP between the 30th October 2011 and 1st September 2012. HDL-c levels at admission, CAP prognosis scores (PSI and CURB65) and clinical outcomes were recorded for the study. Basal HDL-c levels were not statistically different according to prognostics scores neither PSI nor CURB-65. Significantly lower levels of HDL-c were also associated to the development of septic shock and admission to the intensive care unit. HDL-c were inversely correlated with acute phase reactants CRP (r = -0.585, P HDL-c [28.9 (15.5) mg/dl vs. 44.6 (21.1) mg/dl]; P = 0.007. HDL-c is a good predictor of the presence of pleural effusion in multivariate analyses and using ROC analyses [AUC = 0.712 (0.591-0.834), P = 0.006]. HDL-c levels of 10 mg/dl showed a sensitivity of 97.6 % and a specificity of 82.4 % for the presence of pleural effusion. Monitoring HDL-c in CAP is an useful serum marker of acute phase response, clinical outcome and the presence of pleural effusion.

  8. CYP1A1, GCLC, AGT, AGTR1 gene-gene interactions in community-acquired pneumonia pulmonary complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salnikova, Lyubov E; Smelaya, Tamara V; Golubev, Arkadiy M; Rubanovich, Alexander V; Moroz, Viktor V

    2013-11-01

    This study was conducted to establish the possible contribution of functional gene polymorphisms in detoxification/oxidative stress and vascular remodeling pathways to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) susceptibility in the case-control study (350 CAP patients, 432 control subjects) and to predisposition to the development of CAP complications in the prospective study. All subjects were genotyped for 16 polymorphic variants in the 14 genes of xenobiotics detoxification CYP1A1, AhR, GSTM1, GSTT1, ABCB1, redox-status SOD2, CAT, GCLC, and vascular homeostasis ACE, AGT, AGTR1, NOS3, MTHFR, VEGFα. Risk of pulmonary complications (PC) in the single locus analysis was associated with CYP1A1, GCLC and AGTR1 genes. Extra PC (toxic shock syndrome and myocarditis) were not associated with these genes. We evaluated gene-gene interactions using multi-factor dimensionality reduction, and cumulative gene risk score approaches. The final model which included >5 risk alleles in the CYP1A1 (rs2606345, rs4646903, rs1048943), GCLC, AGT, and AGTR1 genes was associated with pleuritis, empyema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, all PC and acute respiratory failure (ARF). We considered CYP1A1, GCLC, AGT, AGTR1 gene set using Set Distiller mode implemented in GeneDecks for discovering gene-set relations via the degree of sharing descriptors within a given gene set. N-acetylcysteine and oxygen were defined by Set Distiller as the best descriptors for the gene set associated in the present study with PC and ARF. Results of the study are in line with literature data and suggest that genetically determined oxidative stress exacerbation may contribute to the progression of lung inflammation.

  9. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

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    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  10. C reactive protein, calcitonin and D-dimer in patients of community acquired pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Lin Zhang; Zhen Wang; Shu-Hui Lv; Hai-Jun Jing; Jian-Yun Kang; Jian-Qing Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical significance of C- reactive protein (CRP), calcitonin (PCT) and D- two (D-D) in community acquired pneumonia.Methods:A total of 102 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) admitted from March 2015- March 2016 as the research objects. A total of 5 mL peripheral venous blood of CAP patients (within 24 h of admission, before antibiotic therapy) were collected, and centrifuged to obtain serum. Immune turbidimetric method was used in determination of CRP and DD, immune fluorescence method was used for determination of PCT.Results:As grade increasing, the levels of CRP, PCT, D-D were increased gradually, with significant difference among different levels (P<0.05); CRP, PCT and D-D levels of severe group were significantly higher than those of non severe group (P<0.05); death group, CRP, PCT and D-D levels of death group were significantly higher than those of the survival group (P< 0.05).Conclusions:CRP, PCT, D-D levels have certain correlation with degree of severity. They can be used as important indicators to judge the severity of the disease, and predict the prognosis. High levels of CRP, PCT, D-D indicate severity of the disease and poor prognosis.

  11. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

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    P Kale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance Trends among Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Pathogens in Greece, 2009–2012

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    Sofia Maraki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to determine the antimicrobial resistance trends of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTIs in Crete, Greece, over a 4-year period (2009–2012. A total of 588 community-acquired respiratory pathogens were isolated during the study period. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism responsible for 44.4% of CARTIs, followed by Haemophilus influenzae (44.2% and Moraxella catarrhalis (11.4%. Among S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of isolates with intermediate- and high-level resistance to penicillin was 27.2% and 12.3%, respectively. Macrolide resistance slightly decreased from 29.4% over the period 2009-2010 to 28.8% over the period 2011-2012. Multiresistance was observed among 56 (54.4% penicillin nonsusceptible isolates. A nonsignificant increase in resistance of H. influenzae isolates was noted for β-lactams, cotrimoxazole, and tetracycline. Among the 67 M. catarrhalis tested, 32 produced beta-lactamase and were resistant to ampicillin. Macrolide resistance decreased over the study period. All isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol, rifampicin, and the fluoroquinolones. Although a decreasing trend in the prevalence of resistance of the three most common pathogens involved in CARTIs was noted, continuous surveillance of antimicrobial susceptibility at the local and national level remains important, in order to guide appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy.

  13. [Clinical features and outcome of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obed, Mora; García-Vidal, Carolina; Pessacq, Pedro; Mykietiuk, Analia; Viasus, Diego; Cazzola, Laura; Domínguez, M Angeles; Calmaggi, Anibal; Carratalà, Jordi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiological and clinical features, treatment and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in two different geographic regions where community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) infections have different frequencies. Observational study of patients admitted to two hospitals (one in Argentina, the other in Spain) between March 2008 and June 2012. We documented 16 cases of CAP caused by MRSA. MRSA accounted for 15 of 547 (2.7%) cases of CAP in Hospital Rodolfo Rossi and 1 of 1258 (0,08%) cases at the Hospital Universitari de Bellvitge (P ≤ .001). Most patients were young and previously healthy. Multilobar infiltrates, cavitation and skin and soft tissue involvement were frequent. All patients had positive blood cultures. Five patients required admission to the intensive care unit. Early mortality (≤ 48 hours) was 19%, and overall mortality (≤ 30 days) was 25%. CAP caused by MRSA causes high morbidity and mortality rates. It should be suspected in areas with a high prevalence of CA-MRSA infections, and especially in young and healthy patients who present with multilobar pneumonia with cavitation. Mortality is mainly related to septic shock and respiratory failure and occurs early in most cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. [Consensus guidelines for the management of community acquired pneumonia in the elderly patient].

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    González Del Castillo, Juan; Martín-Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Llinares, Pedro; Menéndez, Rosario; Mujal, Abel; Navas, Enrique; Barberán, José

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia increases with age and is associated with an elevated morbidity and mortality due to the physiological changes associated with aging and a greater presence of chronic disease. Taking into account the importance of this disease from an epidemiological and prognostic point of view, and the enormous heterogeneity described in the clinical management of the elderly, we believe a specific consensus document regarding this patient profile is necessary. The purpose of the present work was to perform a review of the evidence related to the risk factors for the etiology, the clinical presentation, the management and the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in elderly patients with the aim of producing a series of specific recommendations based on critical analysis of the literature. This document is the result of the collaboration of different specialists representing the Spanish Society of Emergency Medicine and Emergency Care (SEMES), the Spanish Society of Geriatrics and Gerontology (SEGG), the Spanish Society of Chemotherapy (SEQ), the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI), the Spanish Society of Respiratory Medicine and Thoracic Surgery (SEPAR), Spanish Society of Home Hospitalization (SEHAD) and the Spanish Society of Infectious Disease and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC).

  15. Bacteriology and changes in antibiotic susceptibility in adults with community-acquired perforated appendicitis.

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    Hong Gil Jeon

    Full Text Available This study evaluated bacterial etiology and antibiotic susceptibility in patients diagnosed with community-acquired perforated appendicitis over a 12-year-period. We retrospectively reviewed records of adult patients diagnosed with perforated appendicitis at an 800-bed teaching hospital between January 2000 and December 2011. In total, 415 culture-positive perforated appendicitis cases were analyzed. Escherichia coli was the most common pathogen (277/415, 66.7%, followed by Streptococcus species (61/415, 14.7%. The susceptibility of E. coli to ampicillin, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftriaxone, cefepime, amikacin, gentamicin, and imipenem was 35.1%, 97.1%, 97.0%, 98.2%, 98.9%, 81.8%, and 100%, respectively. The overall susceptibility of E. coli to quinolones (ciprofloxacin or levofloxacin was 78.7%. During the study period, univariate logistic regression analysis showed a significant decrease in E. coli susceptibility to quinolones (OR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.84-0.99, P = 0.040. We therefore do not recommend quinolones as empirical therapy for community-acquired perforated appendicitis.

  16. Cytokines and Chemokines as Biomarkers of Community-Acquired Bacterial Infection

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    Michal Holub

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Routinely used biomarkers of bacterial etiology of infection, such as C-reactive protein and procalcitonin, have limited usefulness for evaluation of infections since their expression is enhanced by a number of different conditions. Therefore, several inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were analyzed with sera from patients hospitalized for moderate bacterial and viral infectious diseases. In total, 57 subjects were enrolled: 21 patients with community-acquired bacterial infections, 26 patients with viral infections, and 10 healthy subjects (control cohorts. The laboratory analyses were performed using Luminex technology, and the following molecules were examined: IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, INF-γ, MIP-1β, and MCP-1. Bacterial etiology of infection was associated with significantly (P<0.001 elevated serum concentrations of IL-1Ra, IL-2, IL-6, and TNF-α in comparison to levels observed in the sera of patients with viral infections. In the patients with bacterial infections, IL-1Ra and IL-8 demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein, whereas, IL-1Ra, TNF-α, and MCP-1 correlated with procalcitonin. Furthermore, elevated levels of IL-1Ra, IL-6, and TNF-α decreased within 3 days of antibiotic therapy to levels observed in control subjects. The results show IL-1Ra as a potential useful biomarker of community-acquired bacterial infection.

  17. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Ana Carolina Costa; Santos, Susana Regia da Silva; Souza, Siane Campos de; Saldanha, Milena Góes; Pitanga, Thassila Nogueira; Oliveira, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-07-11

    To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy.

  18. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

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    Ana Carolina Costa REIS

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014. All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy.

  19. CIPROFLOXACIN RESISTANCE PATTERN AMONG BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    REIS, Ana Carolina Costa; SANTOS, Susana Regia da Silva; de SOUZA, Siane Campos; SALDANHA, Milena Góes; PITANGA, Thassila Nogueira; OLIVEIRA, Ricardo Riccio

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective: To identify the main bacterial species associated with community-acquired urinary tract infection (UTI) and to assess the pattern of ciprofloxacin susceptibility among bacteria isolated from urine cultures. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in all the patients with community-acquired UTI seen in Santa Helena Laboratory, Camaçari, Bahia, Brazil during five years (2010-2014). All individuals who had a positive urine culture result were included in this study. Results: A total of 1,641 individuals met the inclusion criteria. Despite the fact that participants were female, we observed a higher rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin in males. The most frequent pathogens identified in urine samples were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Antimicrobial resistance has been observed mainly for ampicillin, sulfamethoxazole + trimethoprim and ciprofloxacin. Moreover, E. coli has shown the highest rate of ciprofloxacin resistance, reaching 36% of ciprofloxacin resistant strains in 2014. Conclusion: The rate of bacterial resistance to ciprofloxacin observed in the studied population is much higher than expected, prompting the need for rational use of this antibiotic, especially in infections caused by E. coli. Prevention of bacterial resistance can be performed through control measures to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms and a rational use of antimicrobial policy. PMID:27410913

  20. Community-acquired vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium: a case report from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, N S; Karunakaran, R; Ngeow, Y F; Awang, R

    2005-09-01

    Vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are formidable organisms renowned for their ability to cause infections with limited treatment options and their potential for transferring resistance genes to other Gram-positive bacteria. Usually associated with nosocomial infections, VRE are rarely reported as a cause of community-acquired infection. Presented here is a case of community-acquired infection due to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium. The patient had been applying herbal leaves topically to his cheek to treat a buccal space abscess, resulting in a burn of the overlying skin. From pus aspirated via the skin a pure culture of E. faecium was grown that was resistant to vancomycin with a MIC of >256 microg ml-1 by the E test and resistant to teicoplanin by disc diffusion, consistent with the VanA phenotype. The organism was suspected of contaminating the leaf and infecting the patient via the burnt skin. This case highlights the need for further studies on the community prevalence of VRE among humans and animals to define unrecognized silent reservoirs for VRE, which may pose a threat to public health.

  1. Fluorocycline TP-271 Is Potent against Complicated Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Corey; O’Brien, William; Hackel, Meredith; Minyard, Mary Beth; Waites, Ken B.; Dubois, Jacques; Murphy, Timothy M.; Slee, Andrew M.; Weiss, William J.; Sutcliffe, Joyce A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT TP-271 is a novel, fully synthetic fluorocycline antibiotic in clinical development for the treatment of respiratory infections caused by susceptible and multidrug-resistant pathogens. TP-271 was active in MIC assays against key community respiratory Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA; MIC90 = 0.25 µg/ml), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA; MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), Streptococcus pyogenes (MIC90 = 0.03 µg/ml), Haemophilus influenzae (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml), and Moraxella catarrhalis (MIC90 ≤0.016 µg/ml). TP-271 showed activity (MIC90 = 0.12 µg/ml) against community-acquired MRSA expressing Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). MIC90 values against Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, and Chlamydia pneumoniae were 0.004, 1, and 4 µg/ml, respectively. TP-271 was efficacious in neutropenic and immunocompetent animal pneumonia models, generally showing, compared to the burden at the start of dosing, ~2 to 5 log10 CFU reductions against MRSA, S. pneumoniae, and H. influenzae infections when given intravenously (i.v.) and ~1 to 4 log10 CFU reductions when given orally (p.o.). TP-271 was potent against key community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) pathogens and was minimally affected, or unaffected, by tetracycline-specific resistance mechanisms and fluoroquinolone or macrolide drug resistance phenotypes. IMPORTANCE Rising resistance rates for macrolides, fluoroquinolones, and β-lactams in the most common pathogens associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) are of concern, especially for cases of moderate to severe infections in vulnerable populations such as the very young and the elderly. New antibiotics that are active against multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus are needed for use in the empirical treatment of the most severe forms of this disease. TP-271 is a promising

  2. Propagation of infantile gastroenteritis virus (orbi-group) in conventional and germfree piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, P J; Petric, M; Szymanski, M T

    1975-12-01

    Infantile gastroenteritis virus (orbi-group) recovered from stools of infants with acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis was administered per os to germfree and conventional piglets. Virus was found subsequently in stools and in the mucosal epithelial cells of the small intestine of these animals. Some animals developed diarrhea. Added proof of orbivirus replication was obtained through the use of tritiated uridine injections and the recovery of labeled virus in gut contents at the time of autopsy. Serological conversion was demonstrated in infected germfree piglets.

  3. Evolving trends in Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance: implications for therapy of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Jacobs, Michael R; Sader, Helio S

    2010-09-01

    Pneumonia is a major infectious disease associated with significant morbidity, mortality and utilisation of healthcare resources. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), accounting for 20-60% of bacterial cases. Emergence of multidrug-resistant S. pneumoniae has become a significant problem in the management of CAP. Although pneumococcal conjugate vaccine usage in children has led to significant decreases in morbidity and mortality due to S. pneumoniae in all age groups, disease management has been further complicated by the unexpected increase in resistant serotypes, such as 19A, in some regions. Until rapid and accurate diagnostic tests become available, initial treatment of CAP will remain empirical. Thus, selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy for CAP must be based on prediction of the most likely pathogens and their local antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. This article reviews information on antimicrobial resistance patterns amongst S. pneumoniae and implications for managing CAP.

  4. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy evaluation in empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0-24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0-24/MIC of >75 for H...... the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic....... influenzae and L. pneumophila. Individual predicted estimates for Cmax/MIC and fAUC0-24/MIC as well as simulated maximal MICs resulting in target attainment for oral and intravenous administration of the drug were suitable for S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae but not for L. pneumophila. These results indicate...

  5. Predictors of failure of noninvasive ventilation in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carron, Michele; Freo, Ulderico; Zorzi, Manuel; Ori, Carlo

    2010-09-01

    The study aimed to investigate cardiorespiratory parameters potentially predictive of failure of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Sixty-four consecutive patients with severe CAP entered the study and underwent NIV with a helmet. Arterial blood gases, Pao(2)/FIo(2), and oxygenation index (OI; mean airway pressure × FIo(2) × 100/Pao(2)) were determined before and after a 1-hour trial of NIV. Noninvasive ventilation succeeded in 28 patients (43%) and failed in 36 patients (56%). Patients who avoided intubation had significantly (P intubation failed to improve or worsened arterial blood gases during NIV trial and, by the end of the trial, had lower (P predictors of NIV failure, with OI delta being significantly more accurate. Noninvasive ventilation failed in approximately half patients with severe CAP. Posttrial to pretrial deltas of Pao(2)/FiO(2) and OI may help to guide decision about endotracheal intubation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Community Acquired Chronic Arthritis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Previously Healthy Pregnant Woman

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    Mesut Yilmaz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic arthritis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is uncommon in the immunocompetent population, despite its occurrence in younger patients with open injuries and in intravenous drug abusers. Here we report a case of septic arthritis caused by P. aeruginosa. This case is unique for several reasons. First, it is a case of septic arthritis in a pregnant woman with no traditional risk factors reported in the literature including history of prior traumatic events, hospitalisation, or chronic underlying disease. She was suspected of having transient osteoporosis associated with pregnancy to involve both hip joints. Second, this is the first reported case of a community acquired chronic septic arthritis due to P. aeruginosa involving large joints of both upper and lower extremities. The patient was treated successfully with a combination of ceftazidime and amikacin for 4 weeks followed by oral ciprofloxacin 750 mg twice daily for 8 weeks.

  7. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Ariza-Prota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapid generation of mutants and have been associated with high death rates in the past. We believe this is the first case described in the literature of a community-acquired pneumonia and empyema caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  8. Single versus combination antibiotic therapy in adults hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Chamira; Mckeever, Tricia M; Woodhead, Mark; Lim, Wei Shen

    2013-05-01

    The benefits of β-lactam/macrolide combination therapy over β-lactam therapy alone for the treatment of hospitalised community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in relation to pneumonia severity are uncertain. We studied 5240 adults hospitalised with CAP from 72 secondary care trusts across England and Wales. The overall 30-day inpatient (IP) death rate was 24.4%. Combination therapy was prescribed in 3239 (61.8%) patients. In a multivariable model, combination therapy was significantly associated with lower 30-day IP death rate in patients with moderate-severity CAP (adjusted OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.41 to 0.72) and high-severity CAP (adjusted OR 0.76, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.96) but not low-severity CAP.

  9. Fluoroquinolones in the management of community-acquired pneumonia in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wispelwey, Brian; Schafer, Katherine R

    2010-11-01

    A literature search was conducted to evaluate the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of the respiratory fluoroquinolones (gemifloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin) and their efficacy and safety in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Data show that CAP is a common presentation in primary care practice, and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Although the causative pathogens differ depending on treatment setting and patient factors, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the primary pathogen in all treatment settings. As a class, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have a very favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile. Pharmacodynamic criteria suggest that moxifloxacin and gemifloxacin are more potent against S. pneumoniae, which may have the added benefit of reducing resistance selection and enhancing bacterial eradication. The respiratory fluoroquinolones are also generally well tolerated, and are first-line options for outpatient treatment of CAP in patients with comorbidities or previous antibiotic use.

  10. Gatifloxacin used for therapy of outpatient community-acquired pneumonia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ronald N; Andes, David R; Mandell, Lionel A; Gothelf, Samantha; Ehrhardt, Anton F; Nicholson, Susan C

    2002-09-01

    Gatifloxacin is an advanced-generation fluoroquinolone with demonstrated efficacy and safety as therapy for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). As part of a phase IV postmarketing surveillance program (TeqCES), 136 outpatients with CAP whose sputum was culture-positive for Streptococcus pneumoniae were enrolled in an open-label trial of oral gatifloxacin 400 mg daily for 7 to 14 days. An antibiogram of isolates showed 100% susceptibility to gatifloxacin (MIC(90) 0.5 micro g/mL) and respective susceptibilities of 67%, 70%, and 80% to penicillin, erythromycin, and tetracycline. Clinical cure was achieved in 95.3% of evaluable patients, including seven patients infected with penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (MIC > or =2 micro g/mL). The bacteriologic eradication rate for S. pneumoniae was 94.5%. Diarrhea, nausea, and dizziness, the most common adverse events in CAP patients (pneumoniae including multidrug-resistant strains, with the newer 8-methoxy-fluoroquinolone, gatifloxacin.

  11. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G., E-mail: kng@cardio-tomsk.ru [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Efimova, Nataliya Y., E-mail: efimova@cardio-tomsk.ru; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B. [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  12. Molecular characteristics of serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates among community-acquired pneumonia patients in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isozumi, Rie; Ito, Yutaka; Ishida, Tadashi; Hirai, Toyohiro; Ito, Isao; Maniwa, Ko; Hayashi, Michio; Kagioka, Hitoshi; Hirabayashi, Masataka; Onaru, Koichi; Tomioka, Hiromi; Tomii, Keisuke; Gohma, Iwao; Osawa, Makoto; Imai, Seiichiro; Takakura, Shunji; Iinuma, Yoshitsugu; Chin, Kazuo; Ichiyama, Satoshi; Mishima, Michiaki

    2008-06-01

    In order to understand the spread of the erythromycin-resistant serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae clone in Japan, we have assessed the molecular characteristics of this clone. Among 156 S. pneumoniae isolates recovered from adults with community-acquired pneumonia between 2003 and 2005, 42 were serotype 3 and 40 were sequence type (ST) 180/Netherlands(3)-31 by multilocus sequence typing. Thirty-eight of the 40 ST 180 isolates had acquired resistance to erythromycin via the ermB gene. Although the ermB-positive ST180 clone isolates were more susceptible to penicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole than ermB-positive non-ST180 isolates and contained a less mutated pbp1a or pbp2b gene, without a mefA gene, the ST180 clone was highly prevalent among ermB-positive isolates. Routine surveillance for the ST180 S. pneumoniae clone may soon become necessary.

  13. Optimal treatment strategies for community-acquired pneumonia: high-risk patients (geriatric and with comorbidity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon, C

    2001-01-01

    The four major factors predisposing individuals to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, diabetes, and a high alcohol intake. The elderly are also at increased risk of severe infection. The introduction of fluoroquinolones with increased activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and other CAP pathogens has been an important development, with recent guidelines recommending the use of respiratory fluoroquinolones as a first-line choice in outpatients with modifying factors, nursing home residents, and hospitalised patients in medical wards. Of the fluoroquinolones currently available that have antipneumococcal activity, levofloxacin is well tolerated and effective. It has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of CAP and widespread use has shown it to be very safe.

  14. Community-Acquired MRSA Pyomyositis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Douglas P. Olson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is responsible for a broad range of infections. We report the case of a 46-year-old gentleman with a history of untreated, uncomplicated Hepatitis C who presented with a 2-month history of back pain and was found to have abscesses in his psoas and right paraspinal muscles with subsequent lumbar spine osteomyelitis. Despite drainage and appropriate antibiotic management the patient's clinical condition deteriorated and he developed new upper extremity weakness and sensory deficits on physical exam. Repeat imaging showed new, severe compression of the spinal cord and cauda equina from C1 to the sacrum by a spinal epidural abscess. After surgical intervention and continued medical therapy, the patient recovered completely. This case illustrates a case of CA-MRSA pyomyositis that progressed to lumbar osteomyelitis and a spinal epidural abscess extending the entire length of the spinal canal.

  15. Association of sputum microbiota profiles with severity of community-acquired pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, Melinda M; Gent, Janneane F; Kong, Yong; Wade, Martina; Gansebom, Shane; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Arnold, Sandra L R; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2016-07-08

    Competitive interactions among bacteria in the respiratory tract microbiota influence which species can colonize and potentially contribute to pathogenesis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, understanding of the role of respiratory tract microbiota in the clinical course of pediatric CAP is limited. We sought to compare microbiota profiles in induced sputum and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal (NP/OP) samples from children and to identify microbiota profiles associated with CAP severity. We used 16S ribosomal RNA sequencing and several measures of microbiota profiles, including principal component analysis (PCA), to describe the respiratory microbiota in 383 children, 6 months to microbiota profiles and CAP severity (hospital length of stay and intensive care unit admission) using logistic regression. Relative abundance of bacterial taxa differed in induced sputum and NP/OP samples. In children 6 months to microbiota, which were detected in induced sputum samples, are associated with the clinical course of CAP.

  16. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  17. Hospital-acquired and Community-acquired Uropathogens; Modelling of Infection

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    Aija ?ilevi?a

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are among the most common human infections. They may be community-acquired or nosocomial, and caused by a variety of microorganisms. In the present study, we analysed more than 4000 urine samples collected from in-patients and outpatients, and registered the differences in the etiological spectrum of agents. The most widespread uropathogens are gram-negative rods, from them E. coli, Klebsiella spp. and the non-fermentive genus Pseudomonas. Women are more intensively affected by E. coli. From gram-positive cocci, the leading agents are coagulase negative Staphylococci, followed by S. aureus. No differences were registered between the genders. Polyresistance among gram-negative uropathogens is high.

  18. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Institutionalized Adults with Developmental Disabilities1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, Abraham; Gilad, Jacob; Yagupsky, Pablo; Peled, Nechama; Porat, Nurith; Trefler, Ronit; Shprecher-Levy, Hannah; Riesenberg, Klaris; Shipman, Miriam

    2002-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has recently been reported to emerge in the community setting. We describe the investigation and control of a community-acquired outbreak of MRSA skin infections in a closed community of institutionalized adults with developmental disabilities. In a 9-month period in 1997, 20 (71%) of 28 residents had 73 infectious episodes. Of the cultures, 60% and 32% obtained from residents and personnel, respectively, grew S. aureus; 96% and 27% were MRSA. All isolates were genetically related by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and belonged to a phage type not previously described in the region. No known risk factors for MRSA acquisition were found. However, 58 antibiotic courses had been administered to 16 residents during the preceding 9 months. Infection control measures, antibiotic restriction, and appropriate therapy resulted in successful termination of this outbreak. Selective antibiotic pressure may result in the emergence, persistence, and dissemination of MRSA strains, causing prolonged disease. PMID:12194775

  19. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

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    Mary PE Slack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined.

  20. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  1. Outcome of children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia treated with aqueous penicillin G

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    Raquel Simbalista

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the evolution and outcome of children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia receiving penicillin. METHODS: A search was carried out for all hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia cases in a 37-month period. Inclusion criteria comprised age >2 months, intravenous penicillin G use at 200,000 IU/kg/day for >48 h and chest x-ray results. Confounders leading to exclusion included underlying debilitating or chronic pulmonary illnesses, nosocomial pneumonia or transference to another hospital. Pneumonia was confirmed if a pulmonary infiltrate or pleural effusion was described by an independent radiologist blind to the clinical information. Data on admission and evolution were entered on a standardized form. RESULTS: Of 154 studied cases, 123 (80% and 40 (26% had pulmonary infiltrate or pleural effusion, respectively. Penicilli was substituted by other antibiotics in 28 (18% patients, in whom the sole significant decrease was in the frequency of tachypnea from the first to the second day of treatment (86% vs. 50%, p = 0.008. Among patients treated exclusively with penicillin G, fever (46% vs. 26%, p = 0.002, tachypnea (74% vs. 59%, p = 0.003, chest indrawing (29% vs. 13%, p<0.001 and nasal flaring (10% vs. 1.6%, p = 0.001 frequencies significantly decreased from admission to the first day of treatment. Patients treated with other antimicrobial agents stayed longer in the hospital than those treated solely with penicillin G (16±6 vs. 8±4 days, p<0.001, mean difference (95% confidence interval 8 (6-10. None of the studied patients died. CONCLUSION: Penicillin G successfully treated 82% (126/154 of the study group and improvement was marked on the first day of treatment.

  2. Prognostic scores and biomarkers for pediatric community-acquired pneumonia: how far have we come?

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    Uwaezuoke SN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Samuel N Uwaezuoke,1 Adaeze C Ayuk2 1Pediatric Nephrology Firm, 2Pediatric Pulmonology Firm, Department of Pediatrics, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: This article aimed to review the current prognostic and diagnostic tools used for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and highlight those potentially applicable in children with CAP. Several scoring systems have been developed to predict CAP mortality risk and serve as guides for admission into the intensive care unit. Over the years, clinicians have adopted these tools for improving site-of-care decisions because of high mortality rates in the extremes of age. The major scoring systems designed for geriatric patients include the Pneumonia Severity Index and the confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age >65 years (CURB-65 rule, as well as better predictors of intensive care unit admission, such as the systolic blood pressure, multilobar chest radiography involvement, albumin level, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, oxygenation and arterial pH (SMART-COP score, the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, the criteria developed by España et al as well as the systolic blood pressure, oxygenation, age and respiratory rate (SOAR criteria. Only the modified predisposition, insult, response and organ dysfunction (PIRO score has so far been applied to children with CAP. Because none of the tools is without its limitations, there has been a paradigm shift to incorporate biomarkers because they are reliable diagnostic tools and good predictors of disease severity and outcome, irrespective of age group. Despite the initial preponderance of reports on their utility in geriatric CAP, much progress has now been made in demonstrating their usefulness in pediatric CAP. Keywords: community-acquired pneumonia, children, scoring systems, biomarkers 

  3. Prevalence and resistance pattern of Moraxella catarrhalis in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

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    Shaikh SBU

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Safia Bader Uddin Shaikh, Zafar Ahmed, Syed Ali Arsalan, Sana Shafiq Department of Pulmonology, Liaquat National Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan Introduction: Moraxella catarrhalis previously considered as commensal of upper respiratory tract has gained importance as a pathogen responsible for respiratory tract infections. Its beta-lactamase-producing ability draws even more attention toward its varying patterns of resistance. Methods: This was an observational study conducted to evaluate the prevalence and resistance pattern of M. catarrhalis. Patients aged 20–80 years admitted in the Department of Chest Medicine of Liaquat National Hospital from March 2012 to December 2012 were included in the study. Respiratory samples of sputum, tracheal secretions, and bronchoalveolar lavage were included, and their cultures were followed. Results: Out of 110 respiratory samples, 22 showed positive cultures for M. catarrhalis in which 14 were males and eight were females. Ten samples out of 22 showed resistance to clarithromycin, and 13 samples out of 22 displayed resistance to erythromycin, whereas 13 showed resistance to levofloxacin. Hence, 45% of the cultures showed resistance to macrolides so far and 59% showed resistance to quinolones. Conclusion: Our study shows that in our environment, M. catarrhalis may be resistant to macrolides and quinolones; hence, these should not be recommended as an alternative treatment in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections caused by M. catarrhalis. However, a study of larger sample size should be conducted to determine if the recommendations are required to be changed. Keywords: community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections or pneumonia, M. catarrhalis, antibiotic resistance, gram-negative diplococcic, Pakistan

  4. Oral versus intravenous clarithromycin in moderate to severe community-acquired pneumonia: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Nikolas; Singanayagam, Aran; Schembri, Stuart; Chalmers, James D

    2017-01-01

    British Thoracic Society guidelines recommend clarithromycin in addition to beta-lactam antibiotics for patients with community-acquired pneumonia and CURB-65 score 2-5. Intravenous therapy is commonly used but there are few data on whether oral therapy is equally effective. This observational study used propensity matching to compare two groups of patients with moderate to severe community-acquired pneumonia (CURB-65 score 2-5) treated with oral (n = 226) or intravenous (n = 226) clarithromycin on admission. Outcomes were 30-day mortality, intensive care unit admission, time to clinical stability, and length of hospital stay. There was no significant difference in 30-day mortality (16.8% for intravenous [IV] group vs. 14.6% for oral group, hazard ratio for IV group 1.11 95% CI 0.70-1.78), ICU admission (10.6% in both groups) or complications (10.6% for IV group and 9.3% for oral group) between the groups. The time to clinical stability in both cohorts was a median of 5 days (interquartile range 3-7 days, p = 0.3). The median length of hospital stay was 8 days in the IV group (interquartile range 4-14 days) and 7 days in the oral group (interquartile range 4-13 days), p = 0.5. No other differences were observed between oral and IV groups. Where the oral route is not compromised, oral macrolides appear to be equivalent to IV in treating moderate to severe CAP.

  5. Fulfilment assessment of the good clinical practices guidelines for community acquired pneumonia.

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    Iris Gonzalez Morales

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community acquired pneumonia is the most common cause of infections found during the medical practice. Objective: To assess the fulfilment of the good clinical practices guidelines for the treatment of community acquired pneumonia. Methods: Prospective, descriptive study of series of cases developed in the Hospital “Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima” between January, 1st and June 30th, 2006. 500 patients were studied which main diagnosis was pneumonia or bronchial pneumonia. The assessment tool includes four questions. A single-varied analysis was performed, with a confidence interval of 95%. The final result of this measurement was the fulfilment of the guidelines as excellent, fine, acceptable and not well, as well as the outcome in living and dead patients. Results: Patients older than 65 years of age are the most affected by  this disease and fatality is also higher in this age group; 40, 6% of admitted patients are classified as type III. Not performing thoracic radiography and inappropriate treatment led to a higher lethality risk. 53, 2 % of the clinical histories reflects a bad fulfillment of the guide, likewise the biggest lethality  was found  in that group (36,8 percent. Conclusions: The patients with pneumonias non serious are those that more are admitted in the center, with a non negligible lethality, although the highest  was found in the classes IV and V of pnemonia, that were considered the most serious pneumonias. The global adherence to the guide can be related with the final outcome of the patient.

  6. Gastroenteritis: A Grass Root Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dure-Samin, Akram; Mubina, Agboatwalla

    1992-01-01

    In Karachi, Pakistan, 4 resource personnel disseminated information about sanitation and breastfeeding in the prevention of gastroenteritis to 100 households. Compared to 100 that did not receive health information, the intervention group had less incidence of diarrhea and better use of oral rehydration salt. (SK)

  7. Reservoirs of Acinetobacter baumannii outside the hospital and potential involvement in emerging human community-acquired infections.

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    Eveillard, Matthieu; Kempf, Marie; Belmonte, Olivier; Pailhoriès, Hélène; Joly-Guillou, Marie-Laure

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the present report was to review briefly the potentially community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii infections, to update information on the reservoirs of A. baumannii outside the hospital, and to consider their potential interactions with human infections. Most reports on potentially community-acquired A. baumannii have been published during the last 15 years. They concern community-acquired pneumonia, infections in survivors from natural disasters, and infected war wounds in troops from Iraq and Afghanistan. Although the existence of extra-hospital reservoirs of A. baumannii has long been disputed, the recent implementation of molecular methods has allowed the demonstration of the actual presence of this organism in various environmental locations, in human carriage, in pets, slaughter animals, and human lice. Although the origin of the A. baumannii infections in soldiers injured in Southwestern Asia is difficult to determine, there are some arguments to support the involvement of extra-hospital reservoirs in the occurrence of community-acquired infections. Overall, the emergence of community-acquired A. baumannii infections could be associated with interactions between animals, environment, and humans that are considered to be potentially involved in the emergence or re-emergence of some infectious diseases.

  8. Impact of the pneumococcal 10-valent vaccine on reducing hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Sandra Rodrigues; de Mello, Luane Marques; da Silva, Anderson Soares; Nunes, Altacílio Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe and analyze the occurrence of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia in children before and after the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine implementation into the National Immunization Program. Methods: This is an ecological study that includes records of children younger than one year old, vaccinated and not vaccinated with the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine in the periods pre- and post-inclusion of the vaccine in the National Immunization Program in the area covered by the Regional Health Superintendence of Alfenas, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Vaccination was considered as the exposure factor and hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia as the endpoint, using secondary annual data by municipality. The prevalence ratio and its 95% confidence interval (95%CI) were used to verify the association between variables. The Z test was used to calculate the difference between proportions. Results: Considering the 26 municipalities of the Regional Health Superintendence of Alfenas, there was a significant reduction in hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia in children younger than one year of age, with prevalence ratio (PR)=0.81 (95%CI: 0.74-0.89; p<0.05), indicating a 19% lower prevalence of hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia in the post-vaccination period. Conclusions: The results suggest the effectiveness of the pneumococcal 10-valent conjugate vaccine in preventing severe cases of community-acquired pneumonia in children younger than one year of age. PMID:27108092

  9. Probiotics and prebiotics in infectious gastroenteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan

    2016-02-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is worldwide a common problem in infants and children. While AGE is still an important cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries, it is mainly a problem with high socioeconomic impact in the rest of the world. Oral rehydration solutions (ORS) and rapid refeeding remain the cornerstone of the management. However, ORS does not decrease the duration of diarrhea. There is evidence that selected strains of probiotics decrease the duration of AGE with 24 h, both in ambulatory care and in hospitalized children, resulting also in a decrease of the duration of hospitalization. Synbiotics are equally effective as probiotics alone, but prebiotics are not effective. Both pro- and prebiotics have limited to no efficacy in the prevention of AGE. The administration of pre- and probiotics is considered to be safe, even in newborns. Only these pre-, pro and synbiotics that have been clinically tested can be recommended.

  10. Relationship between the use of inhaled steroids for chronic respiratory diseases and early outcomes in community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Jordi Almirall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The role of inhaled steroids in patients with chronic respiratory diseases is a matter of debate due to the potential effect on the development and prognosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. We assessed whether treatment with inhaled steroids in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma and CAP may affect early outcome of the acute pneumonic episode. METHODS: Over 1-year period, all population-based cases of CAP in patients with chronic bronchitis, COPD or asthma were registered. Use of inhaled steroids were registered and patients were followed up to 30 days after diagnosis to assess severity of CAP and clinical course (hospital admission, ICU admission and mortality. RESULTS: Of 473 patients who fulfilled the selection criteria, inhaled steroids were regularly used by 109 (23%. In the overall sample, inhaled steroids were associated with a higher risk of hospitalization (OR=1.96, p = 0.002 in the bivariate analysis, but this effect disappeared after adjusting by other severity-related factors (adjusted OR=1.08, p=0.787. This effect on hospitalization also disappeared when considering only patients with asthma (OR=1.38, p=0.542, with COPD alone (OR=4.68, p=0.194, but a protective effect was observed in CB patients (OR=0.15, p=0.027. Inhaled steroids showed no association with ICU admission, days to clinical recovery and mortality in the overall sample and in any disease subgroup. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with inhaled steroids is not a prognostic factor in COPD and asthmatic patients with CAP, but could prevent hospitalization for CAP in patients with clinical criteria of chronic bronchitis.

  11. Community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in hospitalised infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Marco, Roberto; Guillén Olmos, Elena; Bretón-Martínez, José Rafael; Giner Pérez, Lourdes; Casado Sánchez, Benedicta; Fujkova, Julia; Salamanca Campos, Marina; Nogueira Coito, José Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria are infrequent pathogens of urinary tract infections in children. The objective of our study was to investigate the presence, clinically associated characteristics and risk factors for acquisition of urinary tract infection/acute pyelonephritis (UTI/APN) in hospitalised children <2years old caused by community-acquired ESBL. A case-control study in a second level community hospital in Spain, in which 537 episodes of UTI/APN were investigated in a retrospective study between November 2005 and August 2014. Cases were patients with ESBL strains. For each case, four ESBL-negative controls were selected. A questionnaire with the variables of interest was completed for every patient, and the groups were compared. ESBL-positive strains were found in 19 (3,5%) cultures. Of these 16 (84%) were Escherichia coli. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of any grade was more frequent in the ESBL group (60 vs. 29%), although without statistical significance. Relapses were more frequent in the ESBL group (42% vs. 18%) (P=.029; OR=3.2; 95%CI: 1.09-9.5). The prevalence of UTI/APN due to ESBL-positive strains increased slightly from 2.7% in the period 2005-2009 to 4.4% in the period 2010-2014. ESBL UTI/APN were associated with more frequent relapses. VUR of any grade was twice more frequent in the ESBL group. Piperacillin/tazobactam, fosfomycin and meropenem showed an excellent activity. Aminoglycosides may be a therapeutic option, and in our patients gentamicin was the antibiotic most used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of an Educational Program to Reduce Healthcare Resources in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: The EDUCAP Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Jordi Adamuz

    Full Text Available Additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations after discharge are frequent among patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and have a major impact on healthcare costs. We aimed to determine whether the implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP would decrease subsequent healthcare visits and readmissions within 30 days of hospital discharge.A multicenter, randomized trial was conducted from January 1, 2011 to October 31, 2014 at three hospitals in Spain. We randomly allocated immunocompetent adults patients hospitalized for CAP to receive either an individualized educational program or conventional information before discharge. The educational program included recommendations regarding fluid intake, adherence to drug therapy and preventive vaccines, knowledge and management of the disease, progressive adaptive physical activity, and counseling for alcohol and smoking cessation. The primary trial endpoint was a composite of the frequency of additional healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of hospital discharge. Intention-to-treat analysis was performed.We assigned 102 patients to receive the individualized educational program and 105 to receive conventional information. The frequency of the composite primary end point was 23.5% following the individualized program and 42.9% following the conventional information (difference, -19.4%; 95% confidence interval, -6.5% to -31.2%; P = 0.003.The implementation of an individualized educational program for hospitalized patients with CAP was effective in reducing subsequent healthcare visits and rehospitalizations within 30 days of discharge. Such a strategy may help optimize available healthcare resources and identify post-acute care needs in patients with CAP.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN39531840.

  13. [Study of automated acid-base mapping on diagnose and treatment of community acquired pneumonia in emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu-feng; Wang, Hai-rong; Gu, Jin-hua; Jiang, Jian; Pan, Shu-ming

    2012-10-01

    To analyze the value of automated acid-base mapping on diagnose and treatment of patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in emergency department. According to medical history, pulmonary function test, diagnosing guideline of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 111 patients with CAP were divided into two groups: single CAP group (n=56) and COPD complicated with CAP group [acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) group, n=55]. After enquiring medical history, arterial blood samples were drawn for blood gas analysis and automated acid-base mapping was analyzed. Arterial blood gas analysis showed arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO(2)), HCO(3)(-), base excess of AECOPD group were obviously higher than those in CAP group (PaCO(2): 7.714±2.414 kPa vs. 5.896±1.308 kPa, HCO(3)(-): 30.767±7.185 mmol/L vs. 25.014±3.043 mmol/L, BE: 4.345±5.371 mmol/L vs. -0.354±3.180 mmol/L, all Prespiratory acidosis (12.7%, 14.3%), chronic respiratory acidosis (49.1%, 10.7%), respiratory alkalosis (7.3%, 14.3%), metabolic acidosis (12.7%, 17.9%), metabolic alkalosis (12.7%, 8.9%) between AECOPD group and CAP group, and statistical significance was found between AECOPD group and single CAP group (χ (2)=24.421, P=0.001). Advanced Chi-square analysis for patients of normal, acute respiratory acidosis, respiratory alkalosis, metabolic acidosis, metabolic alkalosis were done and showed no statistical difference (χ (2)=5.280, P=0.260). It is indicated chronic respiratory acidosis occurrences rate in AECOPD patients was higher than single CAP patients. Our study demonstrated that automated acid-base mapping may be helpful for emergency physician to rapidly recognize multi-acid-base disturbance in patients with CAP, and to promptly identify acute or chronic phase of respiratory disease.

  14. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermezoglu, Oznur; Ocal Topcu, Didem; Karbuz, Adem; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli) meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates.

  15. Escherichia coli Meningitis after Rotavirus Gastroenteritis in an Infant

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    Gamze Ozgurhan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rotavirus gastroenteritis is quite common in the pediatric population, secondary bacterial sepsis following rotavirus infection is a rare clinical entity. Gram-negative bacilli are the fifth most common cause of meningitis in infants but this infection rarely occurs after gastroenteritis. Here, we report a 2.5-month-old infant who developed Escherichia coli (E. coli meningitis after acute rotavirus gastroenteritis. The 2.5-month-old male infant with fever, vomiting, and watery diarrhea that started 1 day earlier was admitted to the hospital. Rotavirus antigen in stool sample was positive. He was hospitalized, and fever was measured at 39.5°C on the second day. Lumbar puncture was done for suspicion of meningitis, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF findings suggested meningitis. Intravenous vancomycin and cefotaxime were started empirically. Since E. coli reproduction was seen in blood culture and CSF culture, treatment was continued with cefotaxime. The patient was discharged with minimal midlevel hydrocephalus findings in cranial ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging following 21 days of antibiotics treatment. Septicemia development following rotavirus gastroenteritis is an extremely rare clinical condition. It is vital to start prompt antibiotic treatment as soon as the diagnosis of secondary bacterial infection is made because of high mortality and morbidity rates.

  16. Use of serology and urine antigen detection to estimate the proportion of adult community-acquired pneumonia attributable to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, J P; Moïsi, J C; Donaldson, R L A; Reid, R; Ferro, S; Whitney, C G; Santosham, M; O'Brien, K L

    2010-12-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) but existing diagnostic tools have limited sensitivity and specificity. We enrolled adults undergoing chest radiography at three Indian Health Service clinics in the Southwestern United States and collected acute and convalescent serum for measurement of PsaA and PspA titres and urine for pneumococcal antigen detection. Blood and sputum cultures were obtained at the discretion of treating physicians. We compared findings in clinical and radiographic CAP patients to those in controls without CAP. Urine antigen testing showed the largest differential between CAP patients and controls (clinical CAP 13%, radiographic CAP 17%, control groups 2%). Serological results were mixed, with significant differences between CAP patients and controls for some, but not all changes in titre. Based on urine antigen and blood culture results, we estimated that 11% of clinical and 15% of radiographic CAP cases were due to pneumococcus in this population.

  17. Cumulative clinical experience from over a decade of use of levofloxacin in community-acquired pneumonia: critical appraisal and role in therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreddin AM

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ayman M Noreddin1, Walid F Elkhatib2, Kenji M Cunnion3, George G Zhanel41Department of Pharmacy Practice, Hampton University, Hampton, VA, USA; 2Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Ain-Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; 3Department of Pediatrics, East Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA; 4Department of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada Abstract: Levofloxacin is the synthetic L-isomer of the racemic fluoroquinolone, ofloxacin. It interferes with critical processes in the bacterial cell such as DNA replication, transcription, repair, and recombination by inhibiting bacterial topoisomerases. Levofloxacin has broad spectrum activity against several causative bacterial pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Oral levofloxacin is rapidly absorbed and is bioequivalent to the intravenous formulation such that patients can be conveniently transitioned between these formulations when moving from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Furthermore, levofloxacin demonstrates excellent safety, and has good tissue penetration maintaining adequate concentrations at the site of infection. The efficacy and tolerability of levofloxacin 500 mg once daily for 10 days in patients with CAP are well established. Furthermore, a high-dose (750 mg and short-course (5 days of once-daily levofloxacin has been approved for use in the US in the treatment of CAP, acute bacterial sinusitis, acute pyelonephritis, and complicated urinary tract infections. The high-dose, short-course levofloxacin regimen maximizes its concentration-dependent antibacterial activity, decreases the potential for drug resistance, and has better patient compliance.Keywords: levofloxacin, community-acquired pneumonia, pharmacodynamics, resistance, pharmacokinetics, clinical use

  18. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pyomyositis with myelitis: A rare occurrence with diverse presentation

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    Kulkarni Girish

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is the most common bacterial pathogen implicated in pyomyositis. There are increasing reports of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections. The present case report brings out the diverse clinical manifestations of MRSA infection in the form of paraspinal pyomyositis, myelitis, spinal osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. Molecular typing of the organism confirmed the diagnosis. Patient was successfully treated with vancomycin and surgical drainage. Consideration of the possibility of methicillin-resistance and appropriate antibiotic selection is vital in the treatment of serious community-acquired staphylococcal infections.

  19. Impact and indication of early systemic corticosteroids for very severe community-acquired pneumonia

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    Ugajin M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Motoi Ugajin, Kenichi Yamaki, Natsuko Hirasawa, Takanori Kobayashi, Takeo YagiDepartment of Respiratory Medicine, Ichinomiya-Nishi Hospital, Ichinomiya City, Aichi Prefecture, JapanBackground: The efficacy of systemic corticosteroids in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has not yet been confirmed. We prospectively investigated the clinical features of patients treated with early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids and its clinical impact in very severe CAP.Methods: One hundred and one consecutive CAP patients having a pneumonia severity index of >130 points were enrolled from August 2010 through February 2013. Early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids were defined as administration of systemic corticosteroids equivalent to prednisone of ≥20 mg/day added to initial antibiotics. The multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate the independent factors associated with mortality.Results: Thirty-two patients (31.7% died within 28 days of admission. Early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids were administered in 30 patients (29.7%, who more frequently had alteration of mental status, serious respiratory failure, or underlying lung diseases and received fluoroquinolones as initial antibiotics. In most patients treated with early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids, the dosage was less than 60 mg/day of an equivalent to prednisone by bolus intravenous infusion for a period shorter than 8 days. The occurrence of adverse events did not differ between the groups. Factors independently associated with mortality were blood urea nitrogen (hazard ratio [HR] 1.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.00–1.04, serum albumin (HR 0.44, 95% CI 0.22–0.86, a requirement for intensive care (HR 4.93, 95% CI 1.75–13.87, and the therapy with early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids (HR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11–0.81.Conclusion: Early adjunctive systemic corticosteroids may have an effect to reduce the mortality in very severe CAP, although a larger-scale study is necessary

  20. Human Noroviruses and Sporadic Gastroenteritis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-08-05

    In this podcast, Dan Rutz speaks with Dr. Manish Patel, a medical officer with the Division of Viral Diseases at CDC, about an article in August 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases reporting on nororviruses. Dr. Patel reviewed 235 studies and identified 31 original studies about noroviruses. Norovirus is the leading cause of epidemic gastroenteritis.  Created: 8/5/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 7/30/2008.

  1. Viruses and bacteria in sputum samples of children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkinen, M; Lahti, E; Österback, R; Ruuskanen, O; Waris, M

    2012-03-01

    Few comprehensive studies have searched for viruses and bacteria in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We identified 76 children hospitalized for pneumonia. Induced sputum samples were analysed for 18 viruses by antigen detection and PCR, and for six bacteria by culture and PCR. Viruses were found in 72% of samples, bacteria in 91%, and both in 66%. Rhinovirus (30%), human bocavirus (18%) and human metapneumovirus (14%) were the most commonly detected viruses. Two viruses were found in 22% of samples and three in 8%. The most common bacteria found were Streptococcus pneumoniae (50%), Haemophilus influenzae (38%), and Moraxella catarrhalis (28%). Rhinovirus-S. pneumoniae was the most commonly found combination of virus and bacterium (16%). All six children with treatment failure had both viruses and bacteria detected in the sputum. Otherwise, we found no special clinical characteristics in those with mixed viral-bacterial detections. With modern molecular diagnostic techniques, there are high rates of both viral and bacterial identification in childhood CAP. The clinical significance of mixed viral-bacterial infections remains unclear, although we found a potential association between them and treatment failure.

  2. Potential role of tigecycline in the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Mary L; Pound, Melanie W; Drew, Richard H

    2011-01-01

    Tigecycline is a member of the glycylcycline class of antimicrobials, which is structurally similar to the tetracycline class. It demonstrates potent in vitro activity against causative pathogens that are most frequently isolated in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), including (but not limited to) Streptococcus pneumoniae (both penicillin-sensitive and -resistant strains), Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (including β-lactamase-producing strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae, and ‘atypical organisms’ (namely Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella pneumophila). Comparative randomized clinical trials to date performed in hospitalized patients receiving tigecycline 100 mg intravenous (IV) × 1 and then 50 mg IV twice daily thereafter have demonstrated efficacy and safety comparable to the comparator agent. Major adverse effects were primarily gastrointestinal in nature. Tigecycline represents a parenteral monotherapy option in hospitalized patients with CABP (especially in patients unable to receive respiratory fluoroquinolones). However, alternate and/or additional therapies should be considered in patients with more severe forms of CABP in light of recent data of increased mortality in patients receiving tigecycline for other types of severe infection. PMID:21694911

  3. Biomarkers of Delirium in a Low-Risk Community-Acquired Pneumonia-Induced Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasi, Cristiane Damiani; Vuolo, Francieli; Generoso, Jaqueline; Soares, Márcio; Barichello, Tatiana; Quevedo, João; Ritter, Cristiane; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    There are different theories about the pathophysiology of sepsis-associated encephalopathy (SAE), and the majority of our knowledge was derived from critically ill patients. 7In less severe sepsis, it is probable that neuroinflammation can be a major aspect of SAE development. We hypothesized that in non-severe septic patients, blood biomarkers of inflammation, endothelial activation, coagulation, and brain function would be different when compared to patients with and without brain dysfunction. A total of 30 patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP)-induced sepsis were included of which 10 (33 %) developed SAE. Eight medical patients admitted to the general ward, except due to sepsis or infection, which developed delirium were included as delirium, non-sepsis group. From all measured biomarkers, only brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed, and presumably secreted (RANTES), and interleukin (IL)-10 where significantly different when compared to SAE and sepsis groups. In addition, SAE patients presented higher levels of BDNF, vascular cellular adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB and RANTES when compared to delirium patients. In conclusion, the profile of biomarkers differs between SAE, sepsis, and delirium patients, suggesting that pathways related to SAE are different from delirium and from sepsis itself.

  4. Fluoroquinolones in community-acquired pneumonia: guide to selection and appropriate use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Christopher R; Labreche, Matthew J; Attridge, Russell T

    2011-04-16

    Fluoroquinolone use has dramatically increased since the introduction of the first respiratory fluoroquinolone in the late 1990s. Over a relatively brief period of time, the respiratory fluoroquinolones have supplanted other first-line options as the predominant community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) therapy in hospitals. This article discusses the rise of the fluoroquinolone era, debates the comparative effectiveness of fluoroquinolones for CAP therapy, examines fluoroquinolone resistance and adverse drug reactions, and discusses new trends in pneumonia epidemiology and outcomes assessment. Overall, published data suggest that fluoroquinolone monotherapy is associated with improved patient survival compared with β-lactam monotherapy and similar survival to β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy. Fluoroquinolone monotherapy may be associated with shorter hospital length of stay compared with β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy, particularly in severe pneumonia or with high-dose therapy. There is insufficient evidence to conclude that any individual fluoroquinolone therapy is better than another with regards to patient mortality. Fluoroquinolones are generally well tolerated and Streptococcus pneumoniae resistance remains low; however, rare but serious adverse effects have been reported. Some members of the fluoroquinolone class have been removed from the market amidst safety concerns. Pneumonia classifications have changed and antipseudomonal fluoroquinolones may have a role in healthcare-associated pneumonia when administered in combination with other antipseudomonal and anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus therapies.

  5. Clinical Pathway and Monthly Feedback Improve Adherence to Antibiotic Guideline Recommendations for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Almatar

    Full Text Available Compliance with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP guidelines remains poor despite a substantial body of evidence indicating that guideline-concordant care improves patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to compare the relative effectiveness of a general educational and a targeted emergency department intervention on improving physicians' concordance with CAP guidelines.Two distinct interventions were implemented over specific time periods. The first intervention was educational, focusing on the development of local CAP guidelines and their dissemination through hospital-wide educational programmes. The second intervention was a targeted one for the emergency department, where a clinical pathway for the initial management of CAP patients was introduced, followed by monthly feedback to the emergency department (ED physicians about concordance rates with the guidelines. Data on the concordance rate to CAP guidelines was collected from a retrospective chart review.A total of 398 eligible patient records were reviewed to measure concordance to CAP guidelines over the study period. Concordance rates during the baseline and educational intervention periods were similar (28.1% vs. 31.2%; p > 0.05. Significantly more patients were treated in accordance with the CAP guidelines after the ED focused intervention when compared to the baseline (61.5% vs. 28.1%; p < 0.05 or educational period (61.5% vs. 31.2%; p < 0.05.A targeted intervention with a CAP clinical pathway and monthly feedback was a successful strategy to increase adherence to empirical antibiotic recommendations in CAP guidelines.

  6. Predictors of Severe Sepsis among Patients Hospitalized for Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Beatriz Montull

    Full Text Available Severe sepsis, may be present on hospital arrival in approximately one-third of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP.To determine the host characteristics and micro-organisms associated with severe sepsis in patients hospitalized with CAP.We performed a prospective multicenter cohort study in 13 Spanish hospital, on 4070 hospitalized CAP patients, 1529 of whom (37.6% presented with severe sepsis. Severe sepsis CAP was independently associated with older age (>65 years, alcohol abuse (OR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.07-1.61, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (OR, 1.75; 95% CI, 1.50-2.04 and renal disease (OR, 1.57; 95% CI, 1.21-2.03, whereas prior antibiotic treatment was a protective factor (OR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.52-0.73. Bacteremia (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05-1.79, S pneumoniae (OR, 1.59; 95% CI, 1.31-1.95 and mixed microbial etiology (OR, 1.65; 95% CI, 1.10-2.49 were associated with severe sepsis CAP.CAP patients with COPD, renal disease and alcohol abuse, as well as those with CAP due to S pneumonia or mixed micro-organisms are more likely to present to the hospital with severe sepsis.

  7. THE OUTCOME OF ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY AMONG CHILDREN WITH SEVERE COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    M. R. Usman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV status on the evolution of community acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. There are controversies regarding antibiotic treatment outcome of CAP in HIV infected children. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in hospital outcomes, with compared the outcome of the treatment in severe CAP among HIV infected and HIV uninfected children which had an empiric antibiotic therapy. Methods: A case control study of 80 patients with severe CAP in Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital, Bali-Indonesia. We evaluated clinical features for seeing the effectiveness of the antibiotic therapy according to Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital’s clinical pathway for severe pneumonia between HIV infected and HIV uninfected patients. Results: 58% patients in failure treatment and 45% patients in favorable treatment were HIV infected. There were similar characteristics from both groups, except malnutrition condition was statistically significant contribute the outcome (OR 2.87 (95% CI 1.098 to 7.500, p= 0.031. There was no significantly statistic difference of the outcome in HIV infected as compared to HIV uninfected patients with severe CAP (OR 1.65 (95% CI 0.683 to 4.002, p= 0.263. Conclusion: HIV infection was not gave an effect on the outcome of severe CAP patients which had an antibiotic therapy based on Department of Child Health, Sanglah General Hospital’s clinical pathway for severe pneumonia.

  8. Escherichia coli: an unknown and infrequent cause of community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Luis Alberto; Zalacain, Rafael; Gómez, Ainhoa; Camino, Jesús; Jaca, Carmen; Núñez, Juan Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to describe the incidence, clinical characteristics and outcome of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Escherichia coli through the analysis of a cohort of patients with this condition. This study includes all the patients who were admitted to our hospitals because of CAP caused by E. coli, diagnosed with highly reliable microbiological techniques, such as blood culture, bronchoscopic protected specimen brush (PSB) or transthoracic needle aspiration (TNA). 29 patients were enrolled, representing 0.4% of CAP cases admitted. Main symptoms were fever and dyspnoea. 18 patients were classified into class IV and class V of the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). Diagnosis was based on blood culture in 24 cases, PSB in 4 cases and by TNA in 1 case. Three of the patients died, the longer time evolution of the symptoms being the only factor related to higher mortality (p<0.05). Mean hospitalization time was 7.1+/-3.1 d, and correlated with severity at admission (r=0.43; p<0.003). This study demonstrates that CAP caused by E. coli is infrequent. It has an unspecific presentation and mortality rate is 10.3%, associated with longer time before admission to hospital.

  9. Duration of Antimicrobial Therapy in Community Acquired Pneumonia: Less Is More

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Rita Pinzone

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Community acquired pneumonia (CAP represents the most common cause of infection-related morbidity and mortality worldwide. Appropriate treatment of CAP is challenging and sometimes limited by the availability to obtain rapid and timely identification of the etiologic agent in order to initiate or deescalate the correct antimicrobial therapy. As a consequence, prescribers frequently select empiric antimicrobial therapy using clinical judgment, local patterns of antimicrobial resistance, and, sometimes, individual patient expectations. These issues may contribute to prolonged courses of inappropriate therapy. In this review, we discuss the evidence and recommendations from international guidelines for the management of CAP and the clinical trials that specifically addressed duration of antimicrobial therapy for CAP in adults. In randomized controlled trials comparing the clinical efficacy of a short-course antimicrobial regimen versus an extended-course regimen, no differences in terms of clinical success, bacterial eradication, adverse events, and mortality were observed. The use of biomarkers, such as procalcitonin, to guide the initiation and duration of antimicrobial therapy may reduce total antibiotic exposure and treatment duration, healthcare costs, and the risk of developing antimicrobial resistance. In clinical practice, antimicrobial stewardship interventions may improve the management of CAP and may help in reducing treatment duration. Sometimes “less is more” in CAP.

  10. Viral infection in community-acquired pneumonia: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Burk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The advent of PCR has improved the identification of viruses in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Several studies have used PCR to establish the importance of viruses in the aetiology of CAP. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the studies that reported the proportion of viral infection detected via PCR in patients with CAP. We excluded studies with paediatric populations. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with viral infection. The secondary outcome was short-term mortality. Our review included 31 studies. Most obtained PCR via nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab. The pooled proportion of patients with viral infection was 24.5% (95% CI 21.5–27.5%. In studies that obtained lower respiratory samples in >50% of patients, the proportion was 44.2% (95% CI 35.1–53.3%. The odds of death were higher in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.32–3.31. Viral infection is present in a high proportion of patients with CAP. The true proportion of viral infection is probably underestimated because of negative test results from nasopharyngeal or oropharyngeal swab PCR. There is increased mortality in patients with dual bacterial and viral infection.

  11. Clinical predictors for Legionella in patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia to the emergency department

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    Frei Reno

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Legionella species cause severe forms of pneumonia with high mortality and complication rates. Accurate clinical predictors to assess the likelihood of Legionella community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in patients presenting to the emergency department are lacking. Methods We retrospectively compared clinical and laboratory data of 82 consecutive patients with Legionella CAP with 368 consecutive patients with non-Legionella CAP included in two studies at the same institution. Results In multivariate logistic regression analysis we identified six parameters, namely high body temperature (OR 1.67, p Legionella CAP. Using optimal cut off values of these six parameters, we calculated a diagnostic score for Legionella CAP. The median score was significantly higher in Legionella CAP as compared to patients without Legionella (4 (IQR 3–4 vs 2 (IQR 1–2, p Legionella pneumonia. Conversely, of the 73 patients (16% with ≥4 points, 66% of patients had Legionella CAP. Conclusion Six clinical and laboratory parameters embedded in a simple diagnostic score accurately identified patients with Legionella CAP. If validated in future studies, this score might aid in the management of suspected Legionella CAP.

  12. EXOME SEQUENCING REVEALS PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCIES IN CHILDREN WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA SEPSIS

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    Samira Asgari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is a common bacterium mostly associated with healthcare-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. 2 out of 8 (25% fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in primary immunodeficiency genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing primary immunodeficiencies in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  13. Exome Sequencing Reveals Primary Immunodeficiencies in Children with Community-Acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgari, Samira; McLaren, Paul J; Peake, Jane; Wong, Melanie; Wong, Richard; Bartha, Istvan; Francis, Joshua R; Abarca, Katia; Gelderman, Kyra A; Agyeman, Philipp; Aebi, Christoph; Berger, Christoph; Fellay, Jacques; Schlapbach, Luregn J

    2016-01-01

    One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs) have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is a common bacterium mostly associated with health care-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. Two out of eight (25%) fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in PID genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing PIDs in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying PIDs.

  14. An appraisal of the evidence underlying performance measures for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kevin C; Schünemann, Holger J

    2011-06-01

    Numerous organizations use performance measures to monitor the quality of care provided for a variety of clinical conditions. An appraisal of the evidence underlying such performance measures has never been reported. Our objective was to estimate the effects of interventions recommended by performance measures and to determine the quality of evidence from which those estimates derive, using the Joint Commission and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' performance measures for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) as examples. We performed systematic reviews of the literature to identify evidence related to the performance measures for CAP. Metaanalyses were then performed to estimate the absolute and relative effects of the interventions recommended by the performance measures. The Grading Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation system was used to determine the quality of evidence. The estimated effects favored the interventions recommended by five of the six performance measures. These included pneumococcal vaccination (incidence of pneumococcal pneumonia: relative risk [RR], 0.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.75), blood cultures, antibiotic administration within 6 hours, use of a guideline-compliant antibiotic regimen, and influenza vaccination (incidence of symptomatic influenza: RR, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.22-0.40). However, among these performance measures, only influenza vaccination was supported by high-quality evidence. One-step smoking cessation counseling was contradicted by moderate-quality evidence (smoking quit rate: RR, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.90-1.22). The evidence supporting performance measures is frequently not of high quality and occasionally contradictory.

  15. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia in patients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, L; Clemente, M G; Miranda, B; Alvarez, C; del Busto, B; Cocina, B R; Alvarez, F; Gorostidi, J; Orejas, C

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the possible differences, especially those regarding mortality, between patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the risk factors related to mortality in the COPD group. 710 patients with CAP were included in a prospective multicenter observational study. 244 of the patients had COPD confirmed by spirometry. COPD was associated with mortality in patients with CAP (OR=2.62 CI: 1.08-6.39). Patients with COPD and CAP had a significantly higher 30-day mortality rate as compared to patients without COPD. Multivariate analysis showed that PaO(2) or =45 mmHg (OR=4.6; CI: 2.3-15.1); respiratory rate > or =30/min (OR=12.25; CI: 3.45-35.57), pleural effusion (OR=8.6; 95% CI: 2.01-24.7), septic shock (OR=12.6; 95% CI: 3.4-45.66) and renal failure (OR=13.4; 95% CI: 3.2-37.8) were significantly related to mortality. Purulent sputum and fever were considered as protective factors. COPD was an independent risk factor for mortality in patients with CAP. Hypoxemia and hypercapnia are associated with mortality in patients with CAP with and without COPD. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and PaCO(2) value could be useful prognostic factors and should be incorporated in risk stratification in patients with CAP.

  17. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical and laboratory parameters in community-acquired pneumonia

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    Nusbaumer Charly

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is the most frequent infection-related cause of death. The reference standard to diagnose CAP is a new infiltrate on chest radiograph in the presence of recently acquired respiratory signs and symptoms. This study aims to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of clinical signs and symptoms and laboratory biomarkers for CAP. Methods 545 patients with suspected lower respiratory tract infection, admitted to the emergency department of a university hospital were included in a pre-planned post-hoc analysis of two controlled intervention trials. Baseline assessment included history, clinical examination, radiography and measurements of procalcitonin (PCT, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP and leukocyte count. Results Of the 545 patients, 373 had CAP, 132 other respiratory tract infections, and 40 other final diagnoses. The AUC of a clinical model including standard clinical signs and symptoms (i.e. fever, cough, sputum production, abnormal chest auscultation and dyspnea to diagnose CAP was 0.79 [95% CI, 0.75–0.83]. This AUC was significantly improved by including PCT and hsCRP (0.92 [0.89–0.94]; p Conclusion PCT, and to a lesser degree hsCRP, improve the accuracy of currently recommended approaches for the diagnosis of CAP, thereby complementing clinical signs and symptoms. PCT is useful in the severity assessment of CAP.

  18. A review of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus for primary care physicians

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    Huda A Bukharie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infections among young people without healthcare-associated risk factors have emerged during the past decade. Reported prevalence rates of CA-MRSA vary widely among studies, largely because of the different definitions employed and different settings in which the studies have been performed. Although the majority of CA-MRSA infections are mild skin and soft tissue infections, severe life-threatening cases have been reported. CA-MRSA infections have mostly been associated with staphylococcal strains bearing the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV element and Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes. These strains are more frequently susceptible to a variety of non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Clinicians must be aware of the wide spectrum of disease caused by CA-MRSA. Continued emergence of MRSA in the community is a public health problem, and therefore warrants increased vigilance in the diagnosis and management of suspected and confirmed staphylococcal infections.

  19. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp. infection in community-acquired pneumonia, Germany, 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumke, Roger; Schnee, Christiane; Pletz, Mathias W; Rupp, Jan; Jacobs, Enno; Sachse, Konrad; Rohde, Gernot

    2015-03-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia spp., which are associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), are difficult to propagate, and can cause clinically indistinguishable disease patterns. During 2011-2012, we used molecular methods to test adult patients in Germany with confirmed CAP for infection with these 2 pathogens. Overall, 12.3% (96/783) of samples were positive for M. pneumoniae and 3.9% (31/794) were positive for Chlamydia spp.; C. psittaci (2.1%) was detected more frequently than C. pneumoniae (1.4%). M. pneumoniae P1 type 1 predominated, and levels of macrolide resistance were low (3.1%). Quarterly rates of M. pneumoniae-positive samples ranged from 1.5% to 27.3%, showing a strong epidemic peak for these infections, but of Chlamydia spp. detection was consistent throughout the year. M. pneumoniae-positive patients were younger and more frequently female, had fewer co-occurring conditions, and experienced milder disease than did patients who tested negative. Clinicians should be aware of the epidemiology of these pathogens in CAP.

  20. Optimal imaging strategy for community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus musculoskeletal infections in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, Lorna P.; Cassady, Christopher I.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Guillerman, R.P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Edward B. Singleton Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Mason, Edward O.; Kaplan, Sheldon L. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Infectious Disease Service, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Invasive musculoskeletal infections from community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) are increasingly encountered in children. Imaging is frequently requested in these children for diagnosis and planning of therapeutic interventions. To appraise the diagnostic efficacy of imaging practices performed for CA-SA osteomyelitis and its complications. A retrospective review was conducted of the clinical charts and imaging studies of CA-SA osteomyelitis cases since 2001 at a large children's hospital. Of 199 children diagnosed with CA-SA osteomyelitis, 160 underwent MRI examination and 35 underwent bone scintigraphy. The sensitivity of MRI and bone scintigraphy for CA-SA osteomyelitis was 98% and 53%, respectively. In all discordant cases, MRI was correct compared to bone scintigraphy. Extraosseous complications of CA-SA osteomyelitis detected only by MRI included subperiosteal abscesses (n = 77), pyomyositis (n = 43), septic arthritis (n = 31), and deep venous thrombosis (n = 12). MRI is the preferred imaging modality for the investigation of pediatric CA-SA musculoskeletal infection because it offers superior sensitivity for osteomyelitis compared to bone scintigraphy and detects extraosseous complications that occur in a substantial proportion of patients. (orig.)

  1. Using data-driven rules to predict mortality in severe community acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang Wu

    Full Text Available Prediction of patient-centered outcomes in hospitals is useful for performance benchmarking, resource allocation, and guidance regarding active treatment and withdrawal of care. Yet, their use by clinicians is limited by the complexity of available tools and amount of data required. We propose to use Disjunctive Normal Forms as a novel approach to predict hospital and 90-day mortality from instance-based patient data, comprising demographic, genetic, and physiologic information in a large cohort of patients admitted with severe community acquired pneumonia. We develop two algorithms to efficiently learn Disjunctive Normal Forms, which yield easy-to-interpret rules that explicitly map data to the outcome of interest. Disjunctive Normal Forms achieve higher prediction performance quality compared to a set of state-of-the-art machine learning models, and unveils insights unavailable with standard methods. Disjunctive Normal Forms constitute an intuitive set of prediction rules that could be easily implemented to predict outcomes and guide criteria-based clinical decision making and clinical trial execution, and thus of greater practical usefulness than currently available prediction tools. The Java implementation of the tool JavaDNF will be publicly available.

  2. Viruses and Gram-negative bacilli dominate the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia, a cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farida, H.; Gasem, M.H.; Suryanto, A.; Keuter, M.; Zulkarnain, N.; Satoto, B.; Eijk, A.A. van der; Djokomoeljanto, R.; Wahyono, H.; Verbrugh, H.A.; Severin, J.A.; Broek, P.J. van den

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Knowledge about the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is essential for adequate management. Presently, few studies about CAP are available from Southeast Asia. This study aimed to investigate the etiology, severity, and outcome of CAP in the most populous Southeast Asia

  3. Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Ceftobiprole Medocaril for the Treatment of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Different Patient Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Torres; J.W. Mouton (Johan); Pea, F. (Federico)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are among the most common infections treated in the hospital setting, and together they place a significant burden on healthcare systems. Successful management of HAP and CAP depends on rapid initiation of empirical

  4. Understanding variation in quality of antibiotic use for community-acquired pneumonia: effect of patient, professional and hospital factors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, J.A.; Hulscher, M.E.J.L.; Kullberg, B.J.; Cox, A.; Gyssens, I.C.J.; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop effective and targeted interventions to improve care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), insight is needed into the factors that influence the quality of antibiotic use. Therefore, we measured the performance of nine quality indicators and studied

  5. Understanding variation in quality of antibiotic use for community-acquired pneumonia: Effect of patient, professional and hospital factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Schouten (Jeroen); M.E.J.L. Hulscher (Marlies); B.J. Kullberg (Bart Jan); A. Cox (Angela); I.C. Gyssens (Inge); J.W.M. van der Meer (Jos); R.P.T.M. Grol (Richard)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To develop effective and targeted interventions to improve care for patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), insight is needed into the factors that influence the quality of antibiotic use. Therefore, we measured the performance of nine quality indicators and studied

  6. Are pathogenic leptospira species agents of community-acquired pneumonia? case reports of leptospirosis presenting as pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Gasem; H. Farida (Helmia); A. Ahmed (Ahmed); J.A. Severin (Julitte A.); A. Suryanto (Agus); B. Isbandrio; H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); R.A. Hartskeerl (Rudy); P.J. Van Den Broek (Peterhans J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe report four Indonesian cases meeting the clinical and radiological criteria for community-acquired pneumonia and other findings suggestive of leptospirosis. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analyses of serum and urine samples and serology confirmed the diagnosis of leptospirosis in each. Resul

  7. Do We Know When, What and For How Long to Treat? Antibiotic Therapy for Pediatric Community-acquired Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Cohen, Robert; Domingo, Javier Diez; Pecurariu, Oana Falup; Greenberg, David; Heininger, Ulrich; Knuf, Markus; Lutsar, Irja; Principi, Nicola; Rodrigues, Fernanda; Sharland, Mike; Spoulou, Vana; Syrogiannopoulos, George A.; Usonis, Vytautas; Vergison, Anne; Schaad, Urs B.

    2012-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common cause of morbidity among children in developed countries and accounts for an incidence of 10-40 cases per 1000 children in the first 5 years of life. Given the clinical, social and economic importance of CAP, there is general agreement that prompt and a

  8. Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA Load in Blood as a Marker of Infection in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, R.P.H.; Boer, de R.F.; Schuurman, T.; Gierveld, S.; Kooistra-Smid, M.; Agtmael, van M.A.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.J.E.; Persoons, M.C.J.; Savelkoul, P.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Direct detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae DNA in blood adds to culture results in the etiological diagnosis of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Quantification of the amount of DNA, the bacterial DNA load (BDL), provides a measurement of DNAemia that may increase the understanding

  9. Outbreaks of Infection Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Canadian Correctional Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl L Main

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has been identified in prison settings in the United States. The present study investigated two clusters of skin and soft tissue infection caused by community-acquired (CA MRSA in a correctional facility in southern Ontario.

  10. Development of quality indicators to evaluate antibiotic treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farida, H.; Rondags, A.; Gasem, M.H.; Leong, K.; Adityana, A.; Broek, P.J. van den; Keuter, M.; Natsch, S.S.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an instrument for evaluating the quality of antibiotic management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) applicable in a middle-income developing country. METHOD: A previous study and Indonesian guidelines were reviewed to derive potential quality of care indicator

  11. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in patients with liver cirrhosis in China: Comparative Microbiology and Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Wu, Dan; Wei, Lei; Liu, Suxia; Zhao, Peng; Tu, Bo; Xie, Yangxin; Liu, Yanan; Wang, Xinhua; Liu, Liying; Zhang, Xin; Xu, Zhe; Wang, Fusheng; Qin, Enqiang

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common complication of liver cirrhosis. This study was performed to compare the microbiological characteristics of nosocomial and community-acquired episodes of bacterial peritonitis in China. Five hundred and seventy-five strains were isolated from the ascitic fluid of cirrhotic patients from the Beijing 302 Hospital from January 2014 to December 2014. The patients in the community-acquired SBP (n = 311) and the nosocomial SBP (n = 264) groups exhibited significant differences in clinical symptoms (P < 0.01). In both groups, most of the bacteria were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, coagulase-negative staphylococcus and Enterococcus. There were more frequent gram-positive cocci (G+ C) in the nosocomial group (n = 170). Compared with the community-acquired group, the proportion of Enterococcus was significantly increased in the nosocomial group (9.0% vs. 16.6%, P < 0.05). The resistance rate of the main pathogenic bacteria to the recommended first-line drug in the guideline was very high. Community-acquired and nosocomial SBP groups exhibited differences in clinical symptoms and antibiotic susceptibility tests. Optimal treatments should be provided for these patients. We recommend that cefoperazone/sulbactam or piperacillin/tazobactam should be used for the empirical treatment of SBP. PMID:28382951

  12. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating...

  13. Aetiology of childhood viral gastroenteritis in Lucknow, north India

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    Shilpi Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Due to limited availability of data on viral aetiology of acute gastroenteritis in north India, the present study was planned to detect rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus and astrovirus in stool samples of both in hospitalized and non-hospitalized children less than five years of age presenting with acute gastroenteritis. Methods: A total of 278 stool samples from equal number of children were tested for rotavirus antigen using ELISA and for norovirus, sapovirus and astroviruses by reverse transcription (RT-PCR. Results: Of the 169 samples from hospitalized patients, rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus and astrovirus were detected in 19.5, 2.3, 3.5 and 2.9 per cent samples, respectively. Of the 109 samples collected from the non-hospitalized patients, frequency of rotavirus and sapovirus detection was 9.1 and 1.8 per cent, respectively while norovirus and astrovirus were not detected. Interpretation & conclusions: Rotavirus was the most frequent cause of viral gastroenteritis in both hospitalized and non-hospitalized children. Maximum positivity of the viruses was seen in children less than two years of age.

  14. Different norovirus genotypes in patients with gastroenteritis in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rashidi, Amirah; Chehadeh, Wassim; Szücs, György G; Albert, M John

    2013-09-01

    Norovirus is a leading cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. The importance of this virus infection in Kuwait is not known. Eight out of 100 stool samples (8.0%) from children up to 5 years of age with gastroenteritis studied during 2006-2007 from one hospital, and 6 out of 70 stool samples (8.5%) from similar children studied from another hospital during 2010-2011 were positive for norovirus by RT-PCR. Out of these 170 samples studied from both hospitals, 10 samples were positive for norovirus when tested by ELISA. Phylogenetic tree analysis of norovirus strains showed that 50% of the norovirus strains belonged to genotype GII.4, and the predominant strain was GII.4 2006b. Other detected genotypes were GII.12, GII.b, GII.3, GII.8, and GII.7. This study highlights the importance of screening for norovirus infection in acute gastroenteritis and having a reporting system to understand better the epidemiology of norovirus infection in Kuwait.

  15. A Gastroenteritis Outbreak Caused by Noroviruses in Greece

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    Yiannis Alamanos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, an outbreak alert regarding cases of acute gastroenteritis in a region in North Eastern Greece (population 100,882 inhabitants, triggered investigations to guide control measures. The outbreak started the first days of June, and peaked in July. A descriptive epidemiological study, a virological characterization of the viral agent identified from cases as well as a phylogenetic analysis was performed. From June 5 to September 3, 2006 (weeks 23–44, 1,640 cases of gastroenteritis (45.2% male and 54.8% female, aged 3 months to 89 years were reported. The overall attack rate for the period was 16.3 cases/1,000 inhabitants. About 57% of cases observed were under the age of 15 years. Αnalysis of faecal samples identified Norovirus GII strains. Fifteen different Norovirus GII strains were recorded, presenting a homology of 94.8% (86–97% to GII strains obtained from GenBank. The long duration of the outbreak suggests an important role of person-to-person transmission, while the emergence of the outbreak was possibly due to contaminated potable water, although no viruses were detected in any tested water samples. This outbreak underscores the need for a national surveillance system for acute non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks.

  16. Comparative antimicrobial susceptibility of aerobic and facultative bacteria from community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem in Taiwan

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    Fung Chang-Phone

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ertapenem is a once-a-day carbapenem and has excellent activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacteria. The susceptibility of isolates of community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem has not been reported yet. The present study assesses the in vitro activity of ertapenem against aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired bacteremia by determining and comparing the MICs of cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin. The prevalence of extended broad spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL producing strains of community-acquired bacteremia and their susceptibility to these antibiotics are investigated. Methods Aerobic and facultative bacteria isolated from blood obtained from hospitalized patients with community-acquired bacteremia within 48 hours of admission between August 1, 2004 and September 30, 2004 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Taiwan, were identified using standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by Etest according to the standard guidelines provided by the manufacturer and document M100-S16 Performance Standards of the Clinical Laboratory of Standard Institute. Antimicrobial agents including cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin were used against the bacterial isolates to test their MICs as determined by Etest. For Staphylococcus aureus isolates, MICs of oxacillin were also tested by Etest to differentiate oxacillin-sensitive and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. Results Ertapenem was highly active in vitro against many aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens commonly recovered from patients with community-acquired bacteremia (128/159, 80.5 %. Ertapenem had more potent activity than ceftriaxone, piperacillin

  17. Clinical efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin versus levofloxacin plus metronidazole for community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Tieying; Sun Li; Wang Rongmei; Ren Xiaoping; Sui Dong-jiang; Pu Chun; Ren Yajuan

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infectious disease throughout the world and the incidence continues to grow as the population ages.Aspiration is an important pathogenic mechanism for pneumonia in the elderly and the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors is a major medical problem.Our study aimed to assess whether moxifloxacin in comparison to levofloxacin plus metronidazole are effective and safe in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors.Methods In this prospective,multicenter,open-label,randomized controlled trial,77 patients with mild-to-moderate community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive moxifloxacin or levofloxacin plus metronidazole.The primary efficacy variables were clinical outcomes in evaluable patients at a follow-up visit 7 to 14 days after the end of therapy.Results Seven days after the end of therapy a clinical cure was achieved for 76.7% (23 of 37) of efficacy-evaluable patients in the moxifloxacin group and 51.7% (15 of 40) of patients in the levofloxacin plus metronidazole group.There was a significant difference between the two groups (x2=4.002,P <0.05).Bacteriological success rates were similar in the moxifloxacin group (93.3%) and levofloxacin plus metronidazole group (96.4%),there was no significant difference between the two groups (P >0.05).The overall adverse event rate was 10.8% (4/37) in the moxifloxacin group versus 17.5% (7/40) in the levofloxacin plus metronidazole group,there was no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05).No serious adverse events were observed.Conclusions Moxifloxacin is effective and safe for treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with aspiration factors.And the regimen of moxifloxacin monotherapy is more convenient compared with levofloxacin plus metronidazole.

  18. TGF-β Blood Levels Distinguish Between Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 Virus Sepsis and Sepsis due to Other Forms of Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendón-Ramirez, Erick J; Ortiz-Stern, Alejandro; Martinez-Mejia, Corazon; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Rendon, Adrian; Mata-Tijerina, Viviana L; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian G

    2015-06-01

    There is a strong interest in finding adequate biomarkers to aid in the diagnosis and prognosis of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus infection. In this study, serum levels of inflammatory cytokines and laboratory markers were evaluated to assess their usefulness as biomarkers of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and their association with fatal cases. Serum samples of consecutive patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 and progression to sepsis were evaluated. Serum inflammatory cytokines and routine laboratory tests were performed and correlated with positivity for influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 influenza by real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and the results of three clinical severity scores (Sequential Organ Failure Assessment [SOFA], CURB-65, and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II [APACHE II]). High SOFA scores and some of its individual components, but not CURB-65 or APACHE II scores, correlate with fatal cases regardless of etiology. Total and unconjugated bilirubin, Ca(++), Cl(-), prothrombin times, and partial thromboplastin times discriminate influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. High levels of IL-8, IL-10, and IL-17 were increased in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (pH1N1)pdm09 patients and non-(H1N1)pdm09 patients when compared with controls (pH1N1)pdm09 patients, and patients with other causes of community-acquired pneumonia. TGF-β levels were negatively correlated with SOFA on admission in influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 patients. TGF-β levels are a useful tool for differentiating influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 from other causes of pneumonia progressing to sepsis.

  19. Increased risk of community-acquired pneumonia in COPD patients with comorbid cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SH

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sheng-Hao Lin,1,2 Diahn-Warng Perng,3,4 Ching-Pei Chen,5,6 Woei-Horng Chai,1 Chin-Shui Yeh,1 Chew-Teng Kor,7 Shih-Lung Cheng,8,9 Jeremy JW Chen,2,* Ching-Hsiung Lin1,10,11,* 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Chest Medicine, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, 2Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, 3Department of Chest Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, 4School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, 5Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Changhua Christian Hospital, 6Department of Beauty Science and Graduate Institute of Beauty Science Technology, Chien-Kuo Technology University, 7Department of Internal Medicine, Internal Medicine Research Center, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, 8Department of Internal Medicine, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, Taipei, 9Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Zhongli City, Taoyuan, 10Department of Respiratory Care, College of Health Sciences, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, 11School of Medicine, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Background and objective: COPD patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP have worse clinical outcomes, as compared to those without COPD. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is a common comorbidity for COPD patients. Whether COPD with comorbid CVD will increase the risk of CAP is not well investigated. The incidence and factors associated with CAP in COPD patients with and without CVD were analyzed. Methods: The medical records of patients with newly diagnosed COPD between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. The patients’ characteristics, medical history of CVD, occurrence of CAP, and type of medication were recorded. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to assess the differences in cumulative incidence of CAP. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the

  20. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Central Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Claire L; Ralph, Anna; McLeod, James E T; McDonald, Malcolm I

    2006-01-01

    To date, there has been scant information about the burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Central Australia. Our aims were to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus infections due to methicillin-resistant strains in Central Australia, to characterise resistance to non-beta lactam antibiotics and to correlate findings with available demographic information. We retrospectively reviewed S. aureus isolates identified by the Microbiology Laboratory of the Pathology Department, Alice Springs Hospital between September 2005 and February 2006. Multi-resistance was defined as resistance to three or more non-beta lactam antibiotics. We identified the recovery site and extended antibiotic resistance profile of each isolate. Demographic data included place of residence, discharge diagnosis and ethnicity. There were 524 S. aureus isolates: 417 (79.6%) methicillin-sensitive S. aureus, 104 (19.7%) non-multi-resistant MRSA (nmrMRSA) and 3 (0.7%) multi-resistant MRSA (mrMRSA). MRSA accounted for 7/22 (32%) invasive infections and 91/474 (19.2%) cases of staphylococcal skin infections. Aboriginal people comprised 89 per cent (93/104) of patients with nmrMRSA; 57 per cent lived in remote communities, 21 per cent in suburban Alice Springs, and 18 per cent in Alice Springs Town Camps. Six per cent (6/104) of nmrMRSA were hospital-acquired. Of the nmrMRSA isolates, 57 per cent (59/104) were resistant to erythromycin and 7 per cent (7/104) to fusidic acid. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to co-trimoxazole. In conclusion, Central Australia has high rates of community-acquired nmrMRSA and low rates of multi-resistant MRSA. Erythromycin resistance in S. aureus is also common. These findings should prompt the review of antimicrobial prescribing guidelines for the region, especially for treatment of skin and soft tissue infections.

  1. Etiology and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia in adult patients in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Li-li; DENG Wei-wu; HU Bi-jie; HE Li-xian; WEI Li; XIE Hong-mei; WANG Bao-qing; LI Hua-ying; CHEN Xue-hua; ZHOU Chun-mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Appropriate antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is mainly based on the distribution of etiology and antimicrobial resistance of major pathogens.We performed a prospective observational study of adult with CAP in 36 hospitals in China.Methods Etiological pathogens were isolated in each of the centers,and all of the isolated pathogens were sent to Zhongshan Hospital for antimicrobial susceptibility tests using agar dilution.Results A total of 593 patients were enrolled in this study,and 242 strains of bacteria were isolated from 225 patients.Streptococcus pneumoniae (79/242,32.6%) was the most frequently isolated pathogen,followed by Haemophilus influenzae (55/242,22.7%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (25/242,10.3%).Totally 527 patients underwent serological tests for atypical pathogens; Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae infections were identified in 205 (38.9%)and 60 (11.4%) patients respectively.Legionella pneumophila infections were identified in 4.0% (13/324) of patients.The non-susceptibility rate of isolated Streptococcus pneumoniae to erythromycin and penicillin was 63.2% and 19.1%respectively.Six patients died from the disease,the 30-day mortality rate was 1.1% (6/533).Conclusions The top three bacteria responsible for CAP in Chinese adults were Streptococcus pneumonia,Haemophitus influenza and Klebsiella pneumonia.There was also a high prevalence of atypical pathogens and mixed pathogens.The resistance rates of the major isolated pathogens were relatively low except for the high prevalence of macrolide resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

  2. DIAGNOSTIC BEHAVIOR OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA: SURVEY CONDUCTED IN SOME REGIONS OF CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Wei; DENG Wei-wu

    2006-01-01

    Objective To analyze the spectrum of microbiological agents causing community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in recent years. We also investigated the procedure of diagnosis as well as the empirical treatment for this disease in OPD (outpatient department) of pulmonary disease. Methods A total of 7097 patients from 150 hospitals in 24 provinces in China were enrolled in the study from Nov. 2002 to Mar. 2003. Every patient was diagnosed, treated and registered at the same time. Diagnostic behavior for doctors include chest radiograph and/or CT examination of the lung, as well as collecting sputum samples at the time of diagnosis for bacteria culture to identify the pathogen. Appointed staff fulfilled the questionnaires and information sheets in each center. After that,data were computerized and analyzed. Results There were 7404 valid information sheets and 7097 questionnaires taken into count. The majority CAP patients were from cities ( 77.3% ), most of those who had medical insurance. Most CAP patients had productive cough (81.1% ), and 76.7% and 18.2% CAP patients received chest film and CT examination respectively for diagnosis. Only 24% patients received sputum sample tested and with 36% got positive results. Streptococcus pneumoniae remained the main pathogen of CAP (43. 2% ). Most doctors used to prescribe β-lactam antibiotics as the first line of empirical therapy of CAP (51.1%) with oral taken as the main method for drug using (66.3% ). Conclusion This survey provides a key point of empirical therapy in China.The procedure for diagnosing as well as the empirical treatment of CAP in OPD of pulmonary disease in China still to be improved, especially in accessing the pathogen. Guidelines developed to recognize and evaluate CAP should base on epidemiological information of the pathogen prevalence, then could offer a rational approach to the initial management of the CAP patients.

  3. Ceftaroline in the management of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpenge MA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mbiye A Mpenge,1 Alasdair P MacGowan2 1Department of Medical Microbiology, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, England; 2Department of Medical Microbiology, North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, England Abstract: Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs including those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Ceftaroline has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and exerts its bactericidal effects by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, resulting in inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It binds to PBP 2a of MRSA with high affinity and also binds to all six PBPs in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In in vitro studies, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA and vancomycin-intermediate isolates, Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multidrug resistant isolates, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and many common gram-negative pathogens, excluding extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, ceftaroline was noninferior to its comparator agents and demonstrated high clinical cure rates in the treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. It demonstrated favorable outcomes in patients treated for both regulatory-approved indications and unlicensed indications in a retrospective analysis. Ceftaroline is a safe and effective option for treatment in specific patient populations in which its efficacy and safety have been proven. This article reviews the challenges in the treatment of cSSTI and CAP, ceftaroline and its microbiology, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data which support its use in

  4. Variability in pediatric infectious disease consultants' recommendations for management of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam L Hersh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a common childhood infection. CAP complications, such as parapneumonic empyema (PPE, are increasing and are frequently caused by antibiotic-resistant organisms. No clinical guidelines currently exist for management of pediatric CAP and no published data exist about variations in antibiotic prescribing patterns. Our objectives were to describe variation in CAP clinical management for hospitalized children by pediatric infectious disease consultants and to examine associations between recommended antibiotic regimens and local antibiotic resistance levels. METHODS: We surveyed pediatric members of the Emerging Infections Network, which consists of 259 pediatric infectious disease physicians. Participants responded regarding their recommended empiric antibiotic regimens for hospitalized children with CAP with and without PPE and their recommendations for duration of therapy. Participants also provided information about the prevalence of penicillin non-susceptible S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA in their community. RESULTS: We received 148 responses (57%. For uncomplicated CAP, respondents were divided between recommending beta-lactams alone (55% versus beta-lactams in combination with another class (40%. For PPE, most recommended a combination of a beta-lactam plus an anti-MRSA agent, however, they were divided between clindamycin (44% and vancomycin (57%. The relationship between reported antibiotic resistance and empiric regimen was mixed. We found no relationship between aminopenicillin use and prevalence of penicillin non-suscepetible S. pneumoniae or clindamycin use and clindamycin resistance, however, respondents were more likely to recommend an anti-MRSA agent when MRSA prevalence increased. CONCLUSIONS: Substantial variability exists in recommendations for CAP management. Development of clinical guidelines via antimicrobial stewardship programs and dissemination of data

  5. Community-acquired pneumonia: why aren't national antibiotic guidelines followed?

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    Almatar, M A; Peterson, G M; Thompson, A; McKenzie, D S; Anderson, T L

    2015-02-01

    Adherence to guidelines for the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been shown to improve patients' clinical outcomes. This study aimed to assess adherence to the Australian Therapeutic Guidelines (TG14) for the empirical management of CAP, and explore the potential barriers affecting adherence to these guidelines. Medical records were reviewed for all patients who were diagnosed with CAP within 24 h of presentation at the Royal Hobart Hospital, the main teaching hospital in Tasmania, Australia, between July 2010 and March 2011. A survey of emergency department and medical team prescribers was also undertaken to identify potential barriers to adhere with the guidelines. χ(2) and Fisher's exact tests were used to test the significance between categorical data. To compare categorical and scale data, the Mann-Whitney U-test was used. A total of 193 patient records were assessed. The overall adherence to TG14 for the empirical antibiotic management of CAP was 16.1% (3.1%, 20.7% and 25.4% for patients with mild, moderate and severe CAP, respectively). Ceftriaxone was prescribed to 34.4%, 26.8% and 57.4% of patients with mild, moderate and severe CAP, respectively. The response rate to the barrier survey was 43.1%; of those who responded, 46.4% thought the influence of senior doctors on junior doctors could be a factor affecting adherence to the guidelines. Other barriers noted were a lack of guideline awareness (39.3%), the requirement to calculate the severity of CAP (35.7%), and the existence of other guidelines that conflict with TG14 (28.6%). Adherence to CAP treatment guidelines was poor, especially in patients with mild disease. Prescribing was mainly influenced by senior doctors. Efforts to improve compliance with CAP treatment guidelines should consider the potential barriers that hinder adherence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [Efficacy and safety of azithromycin infusion in patients with mild or moderate community-acquired pneumonia].

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    Noguchi, Shingo; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yamasaki, Kei; Uchimura, Keigo; Hata, Ryosuke; Tachiwada, Takashi; Oda, Keishi; Hara, Kanako; Suzuki, Yu; Akata, Kentarou; Ogoshi, Takaaki; Tokuyama, Susumu; Inoue, Naoyuki; Nishida, Chinatsu; Orihashi, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yugo; Kawanami, Yukiko; Taura, Yusuke; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Obata, Hideto; Tsuda, Toru; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Azithromycin (AZM) is one of 15-membered rings macrolide antibiotics with wide spectrum of antimicrobial efficacy for Gram-positive and -negative bacteria and also atypical bacteria. So far, there had been no reports of the prospective studies evaluating efficacy and safety of AZM infusion in patients with mild or moderate community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study was conducted to evaluate prospectively the efficacy and safety of AZM in patients with mild or moderate CAP. AZM 500 mg was intravenously administered once daily, and the clinical efficacy were evaluated by clinical symptoms, peripheral blood laboratory findings and chest X-rays. Sixty-four patients were firstly registered, and eventually 61 and 62 patients were enrolled for the evaluation of clinical efficacy and safety of AZM, respectively. The efficacy of AZM in 61 patients evaluated was 88.5%. In addition, the efficacies of AZM in each pneumonia severity index by A-DROP system by the Japanese Respiratory Society (JRS) guideline in CAP were 85.2% in mild and 91.2% in moderate. Furthermore, the efficacy of AZM in each differentiation between suspicion of bacterial pneumonia and that of atypical pneumonia by JRS guideline in CAP were 91.7% in suspicion of atypical pneumonia, and its efficacy was high than that of bacterial pneumonia. Nineteen patients (20 cases; 15 with liver dysfunction, 4 with diarrhea, 1 with vascular pain) out of 62 patients were reported to have possible adverse effects of AZM. All of the patients with these adverse effects demonstrated mild dysfunction and continued AZM treatment, and these dysfunctions normalized soon after cessation of AZM. In conclusion, AZM is effective drug for patients with mild or moderate CAP, and we believe that it may be one of effective choice in the treatment of CAP patients who need hospitalization.

  7. Gender and Age-Dependent Etiology of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

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    Enrico Magliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the most frequent community-acquired infections worldwide. Escherichia coli is the most common UTI pathogen although underlying host factors such as patients’ age and gender may influence prevalence of causative agents. In this study, 61 273 consecutive urine samples received over a 22-month period from outpatients clinics of an urban area of north Italy underwent microbiological culture with subsequent bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive samples. A total of 13 820 uropathogens were isolated and their prevalence analyzed according to patient’s gender and age group. Overall Escherichia coli accounted for 67.6% of all isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.8%, Enterococcus faecalis (6.3%, Proteus mirabilis (5.2%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.5%. Data stratification according to both age and gender showed E. coli isolation rates to be lower in both males aged ≥60 years (52.2%, E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa being more prevalent in this group (11.6% and 7.8%, resp., as well as in those aged ≤14 years (51.3% in whom P. mirabilis prevalence was found to be as high as 21.2%. Streptococcus agalactiae overall prevalence was found to be 2.3% although it was shown to occur most frequently in women aged between 15 and 59 years (4.1%. Susceptibility of E. coli to oral antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: fosfomycin (72.9%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (72.9%, ciprofloxacin (76.8%, ampicillin (48.0%, and amoxicillin/clavulanate (77.5%. In conclusion, both patients’ age and gender are significant factors in determining UTIs etiology; they can increase accuracy in defining the causative uropathogen as well as providing useful guidance to empiric treatment.

  8. Obesity paradox in patients with community-acquired pneumonia: Is inflammation the missing link?

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    Braun, Nina; Hoess, Claus; Kutz, Alexander; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Thomann, Robert; Henzen, Christoph; Zimmerli, Werner; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp

    2017-01-01

    Positive associations between body mass index (BMI) and clinical outcomes have been found and are called "the obesity survival paradox." However, whether obesity has protective effects or if this paradox is because of confounding remains unclear. Herein, we analyzed the effects of weight on long-term mortality in a large cohort of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and investigated whether the differential effects of obesity on inflammation pathways accounted for mortality differences. For this secondary analysis, we followed prospectively for 6 y 763 CAP patients who were previously included in a multicenter trial (the ProHOSP Trial). To assess associations of BMI with mortality and with several inflammatory biomarker levels, we calculated three regression models adjusted for severity: the pneumonia severity index (PSI); fully adjusted for PSI, age, sex, metabolic factors, cardiovascular diseases, and other comorbidities; and fully adjusted including biomarker levels. Within the 763 patients studied, all-cause 6-y mortality was significantly lower in obese patients (BMI >30 kg/m(2)) compared with normal-weight patients (BMI 18.5-25 kg/m(2)), with a severity-adjusted hazard ratio of 0.641 (95% confidence interval 0.462-0.889) and robust results in fully adjusted and fully adjusted plus biomarker models. No associations of increased BMI and C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, or white blood cell count were found, but BMI > 30 kg/m(2) was associated with higher proadrenomedullin levels. Over a 6-y long-term follow-up, we found obesity to be associated with lower all-cause mortality in CAP patients, confirming the obesity paradox in this population. However, differences in inflammatory pathways did not explain these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Etiology and anti-microbial sensitivity of organisms causing community acquired pneumonia: A single hospital study

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    Resmi U Menon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to identify the common etiological pathogens causing community acquired pneumonia (CAP in our hospital and sensitivity patterns to the common antibiotics used. Materials and Methods: This study was undertaken in a 750 bedded multi-specialty referral hospital in Kerala catering to both urban and semi-urban populations. It is a prospective study of patients who attended the medical out-patient department and those admitted with a clinical diagnosis of CAP, during the year 2009. Data were collected based on detailed patient interview, clinical examination and laboratory investigations. The latter included sputum culture and sensitivity pattern. These were tabulated and percentage incidence of etiological pathogens calculated. The antimicrobial sensitivity pattern was also classified by percentage and expressed as bar diagram. Results: The study showed Streptococcus pneumoniae to be the most common etiological agent for CAP, in our hospital setting. The other organisms isolated in order of frequency were Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Alpha hemolytic streptococci, Escherichia coli, Beta hemolytic streptococci and atypical coli. S. pneumoniae was most sensitive to linezolid, followed by amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, cloxacillin and ceftriaxone. Overall, the common pathogens causing CAP showed highest sensitivity to amikacin, followed by ofloxacin, gentamycin, amoxicillin-clavulanate (augmentin, ceftriaxone and linezolid. The least sensitivity rates were shown to amoxicillin and cefoperazone. Conclusion: In a hospital setting, empirical management for cases of CAP is not advisable. The present study has shown S. pneumoniae as the most likely pathogen and either linezolid or amikacin as the most likely effective antimicrobial in cases of CAP, in our setting.

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity,

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    Vojislav Cupurdija

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. Methods: This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65 scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Results: Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively. The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity; diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Conclusions: Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe.

  11. Cytokine Concentrations in Plasma from Children with Severe and Non-Severe Community Acquired Pneumonia.

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    Johanne Haugen

    Full Text Available Children in low and middle-income countries have a high burden of pneumonia. Measuring the cytokine responses may be useful to identify novel markers for diagnosing, monitoring, and treating pneumonia.To describe and compare a wide range of inflammatory mediators in plasma from children with WHO-defined severe and non-severe community acquired pneumonia (CAP, and explore to what extent certain mediators are associated with severity and viral detection.We collected blood samples from 430 children with severe (n = 43 and non-severe (n = 387 CAP. Plasma from these children were analysed for 27 different cytokines, and we measured the association with age, disease severity and viral detection.There were generally higher plasma concentrations of several cytokines with both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects among children with severe CAP than in children with non-severe CAP. We found significantly higher concentrations of interleukin (IL-1, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-9, IL-15, eotaxin, basic fibroblast growth factor (b-FGF, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α in the group of severe CAP. Most of these associations persisted when adjusting for age in linear regression analyses. The cytokine response was strongly associated with age but to a lesser extent with viral etiology.The plasma concentrations of several cytokines, both with pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects, were higher among children with severe illness. In particular G-CSF and IL-6 reflected severity and might provide complementary information on the severity of the infection.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00148733.

  12. Delirium is a predictor of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with community acquired pneumonia.

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    Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Mancini, Antonio; Grazzini, Maddalena; Paolacci, Giulia; Morettini, Alessandro; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2014-03-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common reason for hospitalization and death in elderly people. Many predictors of in-hospital outcome have been studied in the general population with CAP. However, data are lacking on the prognostic significance of conditions unique to older patients, such as delirium and the coexistence of multiple comorbidities. The aim of this study was to evaluate predictors of in-hospital outcome in elderly patients hospitalized for CAP. In this retrospective study, consecutive patients with CAP aged ≥65 years were enrolled between January 2011 and June 2012 in two general wards. Clinical and laboratory characteristics were collected from electronic medical records. The end-point of the study was the occurrence of in-hospital death. 443 patients (mean age 81.8 ± 7.5, range 65-99 years) were enrolled. More than 3 comorbidities were present in 31 % of patients. Mean confusion, blood urea nitrogen, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65 years (CURB-65) score was 2.5 ± 0.7 points. Mean length of stay was 7.6 ± 5.7 days. In-hospital death occurred in 54 patients (12.2 %). At multivariate analysis, independent predictors of in-hospital death were: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (OR 6.21, p = 0.005), occurrence of at least one episode of delirium (OR 5.69, p = 0.017), male sex (OR 5.10, p patients with CAP older than 65 years are similar to those of younger patients. In this cohort of elderly patients, the occurrence of delirium was highly prevalent and represented a distinctive predictor of death.

  13. [Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacteremia in patients with community acquired pneumonia].

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    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Flores Chacartegui, Manuel; Gallardo Schall, Pablo

    2014-04-07

    To analyze the usefulness and ability of procalcitonin (PCT) to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) or other bacteria. This is an observational, prospective and descriptive study involving patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our Emergency Department. Data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index and criteria of severe NAC, microbiologic studies and biomarker determinations (PCT and C reactive protein). The follow-up was carried out during 30 days to calculate the predictive power and the diagnostic performance for bacteremia caused or not by S. pneumoniae. Four hundred and seventy-four patients were finally included in the study. Blood cultures were positive in 85 individuals (17.9%) and S. pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 75 of them (88.4%) (in 5 cases together with another agent). The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve for PCT to predict bacteremia (caused by S. pneumoniae or not) was 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.908-0.995; P98% and>10, respectively. The most frequently isolated serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19A, 7F, 1 and 3. The highest mean levels of PCT were found in serotypes 7F, 19A, 3 and 1, which showed statistically significant differences with regard to the others serotypes considered (P=.008). Serotypes associated with the highest percentage of severe sepsis-septic shock, 30-days mortality and multi-lobe or bilateral affection were 3, 1 and 19A; 1, 3 and 19A; and 3, 19A and 6A, respectively. PCT had a remarkable diagnostic ability to discard or suspect bacteremia and to guide the etiology of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 1, 3, 19A and 7F showed greater frequency, systemic inflammatory response and clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Etiology of childhood community acquired pneumonia and its implications for vaccination

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    Nascimento-Carvalho Cristiana M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world. Vaccines are available for some organisms, but they are underutilized and/or still in development. To evaluate the potential impact of vaccines, we review studies in which the etiology of childhood community-acquired pneumonia was recorded. In North America and Europe (9 studies, the etiology of pneumonia was established in 62% of studied children (range 43%-88% by use of noninvasive specific methods for microbiologic diagnosis. The most often identified agents were S. pneumoniae (22%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (20%, Haemophilus influenzae (7%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (15%. In Africa and South America (8 studies, bacteria were recovered from 56% (range 32%-68% of severely ill children studied by lung aspirate. The most often isolated bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (33% and Haemophilus influenzae (21%. A high percentage of H. influenzae strains were not serotype b. Throughout the world, children requiring hospitalization were most likely to have infection caused by pneumococcus H. influenzae or RSV. Out patients also had Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Countries in Africa and Asia recorded 2 to 10 times more children with pneumonia (7 to 40/100 annually than in the USA. Widespread use of pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccines could reduce the frequency of childhood pneumonia by one-third. Further reduction will require development of non-type b H. influenzae, RSV and M. pneumoniae vaccines. This could result in a > 50% reduction of pneumonia in children. This goal should be sought and achieved as soon as possible.

  15. Serum levels of immunoglobulins and severity of community-acquired pneumonia

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    de la Torre, Mari C; Torán, Pere; Serra-Prat, Mateu; Palomera, Elisabet; Güell, Estel; Vendrell, Ester; Yébenes, Joan Carles; Torres, Antoni; Almirall, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Instruction There is evidence of a relationship between severity of infection and inflammatory response of the immune system. The objective is to assess serum levels of immunoglobulins and to establish its relationship with severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and clinical outcome. Methods This was an observational and cross-sectional study in which 3 groups of patients diagnosed with CAP were compared: patients treated in the outpatient setting (n=54), patients requiring in-patient care (hospital ward) (n=173), and patients requiring admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) (n=191). Results Serum total IgG (and IgG subclasses IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4), IgA and IgM were measured at the first clinical visit. Normal cutpoints were defined as the lowest value obtained in controls (≤680, ≤323, ≤154, ≤10, ≤5, ≤30 and ≤50 mg/dL for total IgG, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, IgG4, IgM and IgA, respectively). Serum immunoglobulin levels decreased in relation to severity of CAP. Low serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 showed a relationship with ICU admission. Low serum level of total IgG was independently associated with ICU admission (OR=2.45, 95% CI 1.4 to 4.2, p=0.002), adjusted by the CURB-65 severity score and comorbidities (chronic respiratory and heart diseases). Low levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2 were significantly associated with 30-day mortality. Conclusions Patients with severe CAP admitted to the ICU showed lower levels of immunoglobulins than non-ICU patients and this increased mortality. PMID:27933180

  16. Macrolides vs. quinolones for community-acquired pneumonia: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

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    Skalsky, K; Yahav, D; Lador, A; Eliakim-Raz, N; Leibovici, L; Paul, M

    2013-04-01

    The relative efficacy, safety and ecological implications of macrolides vs. quinolones in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are debatable. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing any macrolide vs. any quinolone for the treatment of CAP among adult inpatients or outpatients, as monotherapy or both in combination with a beta-lactam. We did not limit inclusion by pneumonia severity, publication status, language or date of publication. The primary outcomes assessed were 30-day all-cause mortality and treatment failure. Two authors independently extracted the data. Fixed effect meta-analysis of risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals was performed. Sixteen trials (4989 patients) fulfilling inclusion criteria were identified, mostly assessing outpatients with mild to moderate CAP. All-cause mortality was not significantly different for macrolides vs. quinolones, RR 1.03 (0.63-1.68, seven trials), with a low event rate (2%). Treatment failure was significantly lower with quinolones, RR 0.78 (0.67-0.91, 16 trials). The definition of failure used in the primary studies was not clearly representative of patients' benefit. Microbiological failure was lower with quinolones, RR 0.63 (0.49-0.81, 13 trials). All adverse events, adverse events requiring discontinuation and any premature antibiotic discontinuation were significantly more frequent with macrolides, mainly on account of gastrointestinal adverse events. Resistance development was not assessed in the trials. Randomized controlled trials show an advantage of quinolones in the treatment of CAP with regard to clinical cure without need for antibiotic modification at end of treatment and gastrointestinal adverse events. The clinical significance of this advantage is unclear.

  17. Etiologic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility of community-acquired urinary tract infection in two Cameroonian towns.

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    Akoachere, Jane-Francis Tatah Kihla; Yvonne, Suylika; Akum, Njom Henry; Seraphine, Esemu Nkie

    2012-05-07

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) represents one of the most common diseases encountered in community medical practice. In resource poor settings, treatment is usually empiric due to the high cost and long duration required for reporting diagnosis by culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing. With the growing problem of drug resistance knowledge of antibiotic susceptibility pattern is pertinent for successful eradication of invading pathogens. Our study, the first of its kind in Cameroon, analyzed the distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria causing community-acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in two towns (Bamenda and Buea) with a large number of young and middle aged persons, to provide data that could guide empiric treatment. We cultured 235 urine specimens and analyzed the antibiotic susceptibility of isolates by the disc diffusion technique. Uropathogens were recovered from 137 (58.3%), with prevalence rates in Buea and Bamenda being 65.9% and 54% respectively. Predominant pathogens were Escherichia coli (31.4%), Klebsiella oxytoca (25.5%) and Staphylococcus spp (24.1%). Geographic variation in uropathogen distribution and antibiotic susceptibility was observed, and a significant difference in pathogen distribution with respect to gender. The 20-39 years age group had the highest prevalence of infection. All pathogens isolated were detected in this group. Isolates exhibited low susceptibility to antibiotics tested. Bamenda isolates generally exhibited lower susceptibility compared to those from Buea. Regional variation in etiology of CAUTI and antibiotic susceptibility observed in our study emphasizes the need to establish local and national antimicrobial resistance monitoring systems in Cameroon to provide information for the development of CAUTI treatment guidelines.

  18. Ceftobiprole medocaril: a review of its use in patients with hospital- or community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Syed, Yahiya Y

    2014-09-01

    Ceftobiprole, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftobiprole medocaril (Zevtera(®)), is a new generation broad-spectrum intravenous cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftobiprole exhibits potent in vitro activity against a number of Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens associated with hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It is the first cephalosporin monotherapy approved in the EU for the treatment of both HAP (excluding ventilator associated-pneumonia [VAP]) and CAP. In phase III trials, ceftobiprole medocaril was noninferior, in terms of clinical cure rates at the test-of-cure visit, to ceftazidime plus linezolid in patients with HAP and to ceftriaxone ± linezolid in patients with CAP severe enough to require hospitalization. In patients with HAP, noninferiority of ceftobiprole medocaril to ceftazidime plus linezolid was not demonstrated in a subset of patients with VAP. In patients with CAP, ceftobiprole medocaril was effective in those at risk for poor outcomes (pneumonia severity index ≥91, Pneumonia Patient Outcomes Research Team score IV-V or bacteraemic pneumonia). In the phase III trials, ceftobiprole medocaril was generally well tolerated, with ≈10 % of patients discontinuing the treatment because of adverse events. The most common treatment-related adverse events occurring in ceftobiprole recipients in the trials in patients with HAP or CAP included nausea, diarrhoea, infusion site reactions, vomiting, hepatic enzyme elevations and hyponatraemia. Therefore, ceftobiprole medocaril monotherapy offers a simplified option for the initial empirical treatment of patients with HAP (excluding VAP) and in those with CAP requiring hospitalization.

  19. Switch therapy in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia: Tigecycline vs. Levofloxacin

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    Ramirez Julio A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Switch therapy is a management approach combining early discontinuation of intravenous (IV antibiotics, switch to oral antibiotics, and early hospital discharge. This analysis compares switch therapy using tigecycline versus levofloxacin in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blind, Phase 3 clinical trial; patients were randomized to IV tigecycline (100 mg, then 50 mg q12h or IV levofloxacin (500 mg q24h. Objective criteria were used to define time to switch therapy; patients were switched to oral levofloxacin after ≥6 IV doses if criteria met. Switch therapy outcomes were assessed within the clinically evaluable (CE population. Results In the CE population, 138 patients were treated with IV tigecycline and 156 were treated with IV levofloxacin. The proportion of the population that met switch therapy criteria was 67.4% (93/138 for tigecycline and 66.7% (104/156 for levofloxacin. The proportion that actually switched to oral therapy was 89.9% (124/138 for tigecycline and 87.8% (137/156 for levofloxacin. Median time to actual switch therapy was 5.0 days each for tigecycline and levofloxacin. Clinical cure rates for patients who switched were 96.8% for tigecycline and 95.6% for levofloxacin. Corresponding cure rates for those that met switch criteria were 95.7% for tigecycline and 92.3% for levofloxacin. Conclusions Switch therapy outcomes in hospitalized patients with CAP receiving initial IV therapy with tigecycline are comparable to those of patients receiving initial IV therapy with levofloxacin. These data support the use of IV tigecycline in hospitalized patients with CAP when the switch therapy approach is considered. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00081575

  20. Patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia present reduced functional performance

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    Anderson José

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Symptoms of fatigue and dyspnea, treatment with oral corticosteroids, high circulating levels of cytokines, and oxidant/antioxidant imbalance in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP could affect the patients' exercise tolerance and peripheral muscle strength (PMS. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the functional capacity (FC of patients hospitalized for CAP and to correlate the FC with length of hospital stay. METHOD: We prospectively evaluated 45 patients (49±16 years; CAP group and 20 healthy subjects (53±17 years; control group. They were randomized to perform, on separate days, a 6-minute walk test (6MWT, a test of PMS, and the Glittre test (GT. Additionally, the SF-36 questionnaire and the MRC scale were completed and evaluated. RESULTS: There were significant differences between the groups (CAP and controls for the 6MWT (381.3±108 vs. 587.1±86.8 m and GT (272.8±104.3 vs. 174±39 sec. The CAP group also presented worse health-related quality of life (HRQoL scores, reduced strength (quadriceps and biceps, and higher scores of dyspnea. The time required to perform the GT correlated with the length of hospital stay (r=0.35, P=0.02 and dyspnea (r=0.36, P=0.02. Significant correlations were observed between GT and 6MWT (r=-0.66, P=0.0001 and between GT with the physical functioning domain of SF-36 (r=-0.51, P=0.0001. CONCLUSIONS: Patients hospitalized for CAP presented with reduced FC, PMS, and HRQoL during hospitalization. In addition, GT performance was related to the length of hospital stay.

  1. Impact of antibiotic de-escalation on clinical outcomes in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia.

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    Viasus, Diego; Simonetti, Antonella F; Garcia-Vidal, Carolina; Niubó, Jordi; Dorca, Jordi; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-02-01

    Although antibiotic de-escalation is regarded as a measure that reduces selection pressure, adverse drug effects and costs, evidence supporting this practice in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia (CAPP) is lacking. We carried out a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of a cohort of hospitalized adults with CAPP. Pneumococcal aetiology was established in patients with one or more positive cultures for Streptococcus pneumoniae obtained from blood, sterile fluids or sputum, and/or a positive urinary antigen test. De-escalation therapy was considered when the initial antibiotic therapy was narrowed to penicillin, amoxicillin or amoxicillin/clavulanate within the first 72 h after admission. The primary outcomes were 30 day mortality and length of hospital stay (LOS). Adjustment for confounders was performed with multivariate and propensity score analyses. Of 1410 episodes of CAPP, antibiotic de-escalation within the first 72 h after admission was performed in 166 cases. After adjustment, antibiotic de-escalation was not associated with a higher risk of mortality (OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.24-2.81), but it was found to be a protective factor for prolonged LOS (above the median) (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.30-0.70). Similar results were found in patients classified into high-risk pneumonia severity index classes (IV-V), those with clinical instability and those with bacteraemia. No significant differences were documented in adverse drug reactions or readmission (Antibiotic de-escalation seems to be safe and effective in reducing the duration of LOS, and did not adversely affect outcomes of patients with CAPP, even those with bacteraemia and severe disease, and those who were clinically unstable. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupurdija, Vojislav; Lazic, Zorica; Petrovic, Marina; Mojsilovic, Slavica; Cekerevac, Ivan; Rancic, Nemanja; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65) scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively). The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity); diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays) in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe.

  3. Community-acquired pneumonia: economics of inpatient medical care vis-à-vis clinical severity*,**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupurdija, Vojislav; Lazic, Zorica; Petrovic, Marina; Mojsilovic, Slavica; Cekerevac, Ivan; Rancic, Nemanja; Jakovljevic, Mihajlo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the direct and indirect costs of diagnosing and treating community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), correlating those costs with CAP severity at diagnosis and identifying the major cost drivers. Methods: This was a prospective cost analysis study using bottom-up costing. Clinical severity and mortality risk were assessed with the pneumonia severity index (PSI) and the mental Confusion-Urea-Respiratory rate-Blood pressure-age ≥ 65 years (CURB-65) scale, respectively. The sample comprised 95 inpatients hospitalized for newly diagnosed CAP. The analysis was run from a societal perspective with a time horizon of one year. Results: Expressed as mean ± standard deviation, in Euros, the direct and indirect medical costs per CAP patient were 696 ± 531 and 410 ± 283, respectively, the total per-patient cost therefore being 1,106 ± 657. The combined budget impact of our patient cohort, in Euros, was 105,087 (66,109 and 38,979 in direct and indirect costs, respectively). The major cost drivers, in descending order, were the opportunity cost (lost productivity); diagnosis and treatment of comorbidities; and administration of medications, oxygen, and blood derivatives. The CURB-65 and PSI scores both correlated with the indirect costs of CAP treatment. The PSI score correlated positively with the overall frequency of use of health care services. Neither score showed any clear relationship with the direct costs of CAP treatment. Conclusions: Clinical severity at admission appears to be unrelated to the costs of CAP treatment. This is mostly attributable to unwarranted hospital admission (or unnecessarily long hospital stays) in cases of mild pneumonia, as well as to over-prescription of antibiotics. Authorities should strive to improve adherence to guidelines and promote cost-effective prescribing practices among physicians in southeastern Europe. PMID:25750674

  4. Etiologic profile and antimicrobial susceptibility of community-acquired urinary tract infection in two Cameroonian towns

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    Akoachere Jane-Francis Tatah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urinary tract infection (UTI represents one of the most common diseases encountered in community medical practice. In resource poor settings, treatment is usually empiric due to the high cost and long duration required for reporting diagnosis by culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing. With the growing problem of drug resistance knowledge of antibiotic susceptibility pattern is pertinent for successful eradication of invading pathogens. Our study, the first of its kind in Cameroon, analyzed the distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of bacteria causing community-acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI in two towns (Bamenda and Buea with a large number of young and middle aged persons, to provide data that could guide empiric treatment. Findings We cultured 235 urine specimens and analyzed the antibiotic susceptibility of isolates by the disc diffusion technique. Uropathogens were recovered from 137 (58.3%, with prevalence rates in Buea and Bamenda being 65.9% and 54% respectively. Predominant pathogens were Escherichia coli (31.4%, Klebsiella oxytoca (25.5% and Staphylococcus spp (24.1%. Geographic variation in uropathogen distribution and antibiotic susceptibility was observed, and a significant difference in pathogen distribution with respect to gender. The 20–39 years age group had the highest prevalence of infection. All pathogens isolated were detected in this group. Isolates exhibited low susceptibility to antibiotics tested. Bamenda isolates generally exhibited lower susceptibility compared to those from Buea. Conclusion Regional variation in etiology of CAUTI and antibiotic susceptibility observed in our study emphasizes the need to establish local and national antimicrobial resistance monitoring systems in Cameroon to provide information for the development of CAUTI treatment guidelines.

  5. Increased risk of community-acquired pneumonia in COPD patients with comorbid cardiovascular disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Hao; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Chen, Ching-Pei; Chai, Woei-Horng; Yeh, Chin-Shui; Kor, Chew-Teng; Cheng, Shih-Lung; Chen, Jeremy JW; Lin, Ching-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective COPD patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have worse clinical outcomes, as compared to those without COPD. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a common comorbidity for COPD patients. Whether COPD with comorbid CVD will increase the risk of CAP is not well investigated. The incidence and factors associated with CAP in COPD patients with and without CVD were analyzed. Methods The medical records of patients with newly diagnosed COPD between 2007 and 2010 were reviewed. The patients’ characteristics, medical history of CVD, occurrence of CAP, and type of medication were recorded. Kaplan–Meier curves were used to assess the differences in cumulative incidence of CAP. Cox’s proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the adjusted hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals in relation to factors associated with CAP in COPD patients with and without CVD. Results Among 2,440 patients, 475 patients (19.5%) developed CAP during the follow-up period. COPD patients who developed CAP were significantly older, had lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second, frequent severe exacerbation and comorbid CVD, as well as received inhaled corticosteroid (ICS)-containing therapy than those without CAP. The cumulative incidence of CAP was higher in COPD patients with CVD compared to those without CVD. Patients who received ICS-containing therapy had significantly increased risk of developing CAP compared to those who did not. Conclusion For patients with COPD, comorbid CVD is an independent risk factor for developing CAP. ICS-containing therapy may increase the risk of CAP among COPD patients. PMID:27980402

  6. The Seropositivity Rate of Atypical Agents in Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

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    Ruhan Karakoc Gunes

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the IgM antibody positivities of atypical pneumonia agents in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP, and to compare the results with controls. The serum samples which were collected from 87 adult patients and 21 healthy controls have been investigated by a commercial ELISA (Pneumobact ELISA IgM, Vircell, Spain in which four different atypical pneumonia agents were fixed onto a slide. In the patients group, IgM positivity rates for the agents were as follows, respectively; 2.3% for Legionella pneumophila, 56.3% Chlamydia pneumoniae, 33.3% for Mycoplasma pneumoniae, 9.2% for Coxiella burnetii. The rates of IgM positivities in the control group varied 7% for all of the agents except M. Pneumoniae and C. Pneumoniae and 2 of these controls were positive for L. Pneumophila IgM, one was positive for C. Burnetii IgM. According to the statistical evaluation, there were significant differences for IgM seropositivities to Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia Pneumoniae,between the patient and the control groups (p0.05. We showed that the seropositivity rate of atypical agents in patients with CAP was significantly higher when compared to healthy control group. This result suggests us, atypical agents might be responsible in CAP patients in a great amount. Furthermore, our study also suggests that clinical and radiological findings are not useful for discriminating atypical from typical pneumonia. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2007; 6(4.000: 279-284

  7. Ceftaroline fosamil for community-acquired pneumonia and skin and skin structure infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Turgeon, Ricky D; Wilby, Kyle John

    2017-02-01

    Background Ceftaroline is a parentally administered cephalosporin that has an in vitro expanded spectrum of activity compared with other cephalosporins yet data is conflicting regarding its place in therapy. Aim of the Review To compare the efficacy and safety of ceftaroline against standard antibiotic regimens for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Method The databases of MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Embase were searched up to June 2016. Manual review of references was completed and experts in the field were contacted for unpublished data. Randomized controlled trials of ceftaroline in CAP or cSSSI populations were included. Outcomes included clinical cure, mortality, adverse events, serious adverse events, and discontinuation due to adverse events. Meta-analysis was used to pool results for these outcomes. We performed subgroup analyses for gram positive infections in CAP and infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in cSSSIs. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies. Results Six trials (three for each indication) were included, each of which had an unclear or high risk of bias in at least one domain. For CAP, ceftaroline was significantly more efficacious in achieving clinical cure than ceftriaxone [risk ratio (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.19; I(2) = 47%]. For cSSSIs, there was no significant difference in clinical cure between ceftaroline and vancomycin plus aztreonam (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.05; I(2) = 0%). No differences were found for overall mortality, serious adverse events, discontinuation due to adverse events, and overall adverse events. Conclusion Ceftaroline is a viable therapeutic alternative for patients with CAP and cSSSIs, yet identified risks of bias and poor external validity preclude it from being recommended as a first-line agent.

  8. Thrombocytosis is a marker of poor outcome in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prina, Elena; Ferrer, Miquel; Ranzani, Otavio T; Polverino, Eva; Cillóniz, Catia; Moreno, Encarnación; Mensa, Josep; Montull, Beatriz; Menéndez, Rosario; Cosentini, Roberto; Torres, Antoni

    2013-03-01

    Thrombocytosis, often considered a marker of normal inflammatory reaction of infections, has been recently associated with increased mortality in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We assessed the characteristics and outcomes of patients with CAP and thrombocytosis (platelet count ≥ 4 × 105/mm3) compared with thrombocytopenia (platelet count < 105/mm3) and normal platelet count. We prospectively analyzed 2,423 consecutive, hospitalized patients with CAP. We excluded patients with immunosuppression, neoplasm, active TB, or hematologic disease. Fifty-three patients (2%) presented with thrombocytopenia, 204 (8%) with thrombocytosis, and 2,166 (90%) had normal platelet counts. Patients with thrombocytosis were younger (P < .001); those with thrombocytopenia more frequently had chronic heart and liver disease (P < .001 for both). Patients with thrombocytosis presented more frequently with respiratory complications, such as complicated pleural effusion and empyema (P < .001), whereas those with thrombocytopenia presented more often with severe sepsis (P < .001), septic shock (P = .009), need for invasive mechanical ventilation (P < .001), and ICU admission (P = .011). Patients with thrombocytosis and patients with thrombocytopenia had longer hospital stays (P = .004), and higher 30-day mortality (P = .001) and readmission rates (P = .011) than those with normal platelet counts. Multivariate analysis confirmed a significant association between thrombocytosis and 30-day mortality (OR, 2.720; 95% CI, 1.589-4.657; P < .001). Adding thrombocytosis to the confusion, respiratory rate, and BP plus age ≥65 years score slightly improved the accuracy to predict mortality (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve increased from 0.634 to 0.654, P = .049). Thrombocytosis in patients with CAP is associated with poor outcome, complicated pleural effusion, and empyema. The presence of thrombocytosis in CAP should encourage ruling out

  9. Predictors of Bacteraemia in Patients with Suspected Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis H van Werkhoven

    Full Text Available The diagnostic yield of blood cultures is limited in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Yet, positive blood culture results provide important information for antibiotic treatment and for monitoring epidemiologic trends. We investigated the potential of clinical predictors to improve the cost-benefit ratio of obtaining blood cultures.Data from two prospective cohort studies of adults with suspected CAP, admitted to non-ICU wards, were combined. Two models were created, one using readily available parameters and one additionally including laboratory parameters.3,786 patients were included (2,626 (69% with X-ray confirmed CAP. Blood cultures were obtained from 2,977 (79% patients (and from 2,107 (80% with X-ray confirmed CAP. 266 (8.9% of the patients with a blood culture had bacteraemia. Clinical predictors of bacteraemia were absence of pre-admission antibiotic treatment, pleuritic pain, gastro-intestinal symptoms, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension and absence of hypoxia. After including laboratory results in the model, younger age, C-reactive protein, leukocytosis or leukopenia, low thrombocyte count, low sodium level, elevated urea and elevated arterial pH were added, while gastro-intestinal symptoms and hypotension were no longer significant. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.66 (95% confidence interval 0.63-0.70 for the first model and 0.76 (95% confidence interval 0.73-0.79 for the second model.In conclusion, in patients hospitalized with CAP, bacteraemia was moderately predictable using clinical parameters only. We recommend against the use of a risk prediction model for the decision to obtain blood cultures.

  10. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

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    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  11. Genomic analysis of ST88 community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buultjens, Andrew H.; Giulieri, Stefano; Owusu-Mireku, Evelyn; Aboagye, Samuel Y.; Baines, Sarah L.; Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Howden, Benjamin P.; Pluschke, Gerd; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy

    2017-01-01

    Background The emergence and evolution of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains in Africa is poorly understood. However, one particular MRSA lineage called ST88, appears to be rapidly establishing itself as an “African” CA-MRSA clone. In this study, we employed whole genome sequencing to provide more information on the genetic background of ST88 CA-MRSA isolates from Ghana and to describe in detail ST88 CA-MRSA isolates in comparison with other MRSA lineages worldwide. Methods We first established a complete ST88 reference genome (AUS0325) using PacBio SMRT sequencing. We then used comparative genomics to assess relatedness among 17 ST88 CA-MRSA isolates recovered from patients attending Buruli ulcer treatment centres in Ghana, three non-African ST88s and 15 other MRSA lineages. Results We show that Ghanaian ST88 forms a discrete MRSA lineage (harbouring SCCmec-IV [2B]). Gene content analysis identified five distinct genomic regions enriched among ST88 isolates compared with the other S. aureus lineages. The Ghanaian ST88 isolates had only 658 core genome SNPs and there was no correlation between phylogeny and geography, suggesting the recent spread of this clone. The lineage was also resistant to multiple classes of antibiotics including β-lactams, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. Discussion This study reveals that S. aureus ST88-IV is a recently emerging and rapidly spreading CA-MRSA clone in Ghana. The study highlights the capacity of small snapshot genomic studies to provide actionable public health information in resource limited settings. To our knowledge this is the first genomic assessment of the ST88 CA-MRSA clone. PMID:28265515

  12. The scrutiny of identifying community-acquired pneumonia episodes quantified bias in absolute effect estimation in a population-based pneumococcal vaccination trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Huijts, Susanne M.; Paling, Fleur P.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the accurateness of detecting community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the Community-Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA), a community-based, double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial in which the needed to treat (NNT) for prevention of vaccine-type p

  13. Characteristics of patients with community-acquired bacteremia who have low levels of C-reactive protein (≤20 mg/L)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudtzen, Fredrikke Christie; Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Gradel, Kim Oren

    2014-01-01

    To characterize patients presenting with community-acquired bacteremia and a low C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma level at date of bacteremia.......To characterize patients presenting with community-acquired bacteremia and a low C-reactive protein (CRP) plasma level at date of bacteremia....

  14. Global Economic Burden of Norovirus Gastroenteritis.

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    Sarah M Bartsch

    Full Text Available Despite accounting for approximately one fifth of all acute gastroenteritis illnesses, norovirus has received comparatively less attention than other infectious pathogens. With several candidate vaccines under development, characterizing the global economic burden of norovirus could help funders, policy makers, public health officials, and product developers determine how much attention and resources to allocate to advancing these technologies to prevent and control norovirus.We developed a computational simulation model to estimate the economic burden of norovirus in every country/area (233 total stratified by WHO region and globally, from the health system and societal perspectives. We considered direct costs of illness (e.g., clinic visits and hospitalization and productivity losses.Globally, norovirus resulted in a total of $4.2 billion (95% UI: $3.2-5.7 billion in direct health system costs and $60.3 billion (95% UI: $44.4-83.4 billion in societal costs per year. Disease amongst children <5 years cost society $39.8 billion, compared to $20.4 billion for all other age groups combined. Costs per norovirus illness varied by both region and age and was highest among adults ≥55 years. Productivity losses represented 84-99% of total costs varying by region. While low and middle income countries and high income countries had similar disease incidence (10,148 vs. 9,935 illness per 100,000 persons, high income countries generated 62% of global health system costs. In sensitivity analysis, the probability of hospitalization had the largest impact on health system cost estimates ($2.8 billion globally, assuming no hospitalization costs, while the probability of missing productive days had the largest impact on societal cost estimates ($35.9 billion globally, with a 25% probability of missing productive days.The total economic burden is greatest in young children but the highest cost per illness is among older age groups in some regions. These large

  15. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for gastroe

  16. Brachyspira Species and Gastroenteritis in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L.J.; Boer, de R.F.; Roelfsema, J.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Kusters, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Brachyspira species have been implicated as a potential cause of gastroenteritis in humans; this is, however, controversial. In 733 gastroenteritis cases and 464 controls, we found 29 samples positive for Brachyspira species (2.3% of cases and 2.6% of controls; P = 0.77). Brachyspira species were no

  17. Brachyspira Species and Gastroenteritis in Humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, L.J.; Boer, de R.F.; Roelfsema, J.H.; Friesema, I.H.M.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Wagenaar, J.A.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Kusters, J.G.

    2013-01-01

    Brachyspira species have been implicated as a potential cause of gastroenteritis in humans; this is, however, controversial. In 733 gastroenteritis cases and 464 controls, we found 29 samples positive for Brachyspira species (2.3% of cases and 2.6% of controls; P = 0.77). Brachyspira species were

  18. Gastroenteritis in sentinel general practices, the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, N.J. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duynhoven, Y.T.H.P. van

    2001-01-01

    From 1996 to 1999, the incidence of gastroenteritis in general practices and the role of a broad range of pathogens in the Netherlands were studied. All patients with gastroenteritis who had visited a general practitioner were reported. All patients who had visited a general practitioner for

  19. A nosocomial sapovirus-associated outbreak of gastroenteritis in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, P J Hugo; Bergentoft, Katarina; Larsson, Per Anders; Magnusson, Gunilla; Widell, Anders; Thorhagen, Margareta; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof

    2005-01-01

    The human caliciviruses norovirus and sapovirus are leading causes of acute, non-bacterial gastroenteritis. In contrast to norovirus, sapovirus is known to give infec