WorldWideScience

Sample records for community health education

  1. Community health education: reaching ethnically diverse elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    States, Rebecca A; Susman, William M; Riquelme, Luis F; Godwin, Ellen M; Greer, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    To address disparities in access to health care information, we developed a model program of community-based, health education workshops to be delivered in English and Spanish to older urban adults from diverse ethnic, cultural, and language backgrounds. The workshops were created through an interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty from seven health care professions and focused on three healthcare topics identified in Healthy People 2010: dementia and depression, stress reduction, and physical activity. The development of workshop content and structure, including didactic and interactive components, an approach to interdisciplinary student involvement, and program evaluation by clients and community center staff, are presented as a model for other educators. The workshops presented at five senior centers were attended by 1110 mostly female clients with an average age of 74 yrs and with a large proportion self-identified as of minority background. One hundred seven students from seven healthcare programs helped deliver the workshops. Interviews and surveys of the clients demonstrated that most had a positive learning experience, whereas the evidence of intent to take action on health care issues was less definitive. Analysis of student essays demonstrated increased student understanding of older adults and of community services. A website, Geriatric Educational Resources for Instructors and Elders (www.GERIE.org), was created to provide access to the instructional and resource materials used for the workshops, including presentation materials in Spanish. This model program may help address the substantial health education needs of a growing population of older adults from diverse ethnic, cultural, and language minorities.

  2. Public health and health education in faith communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatters, L M; Levin, J S; Ellison, C G

    1998-12-01

    This special issue of Health Education & Behavior is devoted to broadly examining the interconnections among public health, health education, and faith-based communities. In addition to a focus on questions related to the practice of public health and health education within religious settings (e.g., program development, implementation, and evaluation), the articles in this issue examine a broad range of both substantive and methodological questions and concerns. These articles include contributions that address (1) various theoretical and conceptual issues and frameworks explaining the relationships between religious involvement and health; (2) substantive reviews of current research in the area; (3) individual empirical studies exploring the associations between religious involvement and health attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors; (4) evaluations of health education programs in faith communities; and (5) religious institutions and their contributions to the development of health policy. The articles comprising the issue are selective in their coverage of the field and provide different and complementary perspectives on the connections between religious involvement and health. It is hoped that this approach will appeal to a broad audience of researchers, practitioners, policy makers, and others from health education, public health, and related social and behavioral science disciplines.

  3. Health Educators and Community Health Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact & Help Economic Releases Latest Releases » Major Economic Indicators » Schedules for news Releases » By Month By News ... support groups or home health agencies. They lead hospital efforts in ... nutrition, or stress management. They develop materials to be used by other ...

  4. Selecting alternative strategies for community health education in guineaworm control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J; Akpovi, S U; Adeniyi, J D

    1984-01-01

    Community health education strategies in guineaworm control can be applied at several intervention levels. Community development mobilizes local resources to provide safe water supplies such as wells. Mass education in schools and communities can teach personal protection measures such as filtering water. Training of volunteer community health workers produces front line staff, who by being culturally in tune with the community can demonstrate and promote the use of appropriate prevention and treatment measures. Advocacy assists community members to express their needs to government and ministry decision makers. All of these strategies have been applied in a community health education/primary health care program in Idere, Ibarapa District, Oyo State. Community development for well construction was found to be a long-term strategy that first must overcome problems of village organization and resource location. Mass education, to be effective, must have a simple and acceptable technology to promote. Trained village health workers must overcome traditional beliefs that inhibit use of preventive and treatment measures. Advocacy requires basic political education of community leaders. A variety of health education strategies is needed to address short- and long-term priorities as well as to overcome the different barriers to guineaworm control.

  5. Rural Community as Context and Teacher for Health Professions Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Kedar; Allison, Jill; Upadhyay, Shambu; Bhandary, Shital; Shrestha, Shrijana; Renouf, Tia

    2016-11-07

    Nepal is a low-income, landlocked country located on the Indian subcontinent between China and India. The challenge of finding human resources for rural community health care settings is not unique to Nepal. In spite of the challenges, the health sector has made significant improvement in national health indices over the past half century. However, in terms of access to and quality of health services and impact, there remains a gross urban-rural disparity. The Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) has adopted a community-based education model, termed "community based learning and education" (CBLE), as one of the principal strategies and pedagogic methods. This method is linked to the PAHS mission of improving rural health in Nepal by training medical students through real-life experience in rural areas and developing a positive attitude among its graduates towards working in rural areas. This article outlines the PAHS approach of ruralizing the academy, which aligns with the concept of community engagement in health professional education. We describe how PAHS has embedded medical education in rural community settings, encouraging the learning context to be rural, fostering opportunities for community and peripheral health workers to participate in teaching-learning as well as evaluation of medical students, and involving community people in curriculum design and implementation.

  6. Community intervention in higher education of environmental health

    OpenAIRE

    Cidália Guia; Raquel Rodrigues dos Santos; Rogério da Silva Nunes

    2012-01-01

    Currently, in the Bologna context, university teaching methods focus on the student and on a learning experience based on practical methods. Under the guidance of teachers, students in the second year of the first Environmental Health Course at the Polytechnic Institute of Beja have designed and developed the following nine community intervention projects relating to environmental health: dangerous products (mercury); habitability and geriatrics; health education and the environment; drinking...

  7. Building Sustainable Health and Education Partnerships: Stories from Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Growing health disparities have a negative impact on young people's educational achievement. Community schools that involve deep relationships with partners across multiple domains address these disparities by providing opportunities and services that promote healthy development of young people, and enable them to graduate from high…

  8. [Health for all--the development of community health nursing and public health nursing from the perspective of education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pay-Fan

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this article was to examine the development of community health nursing and public health nursing in Taiwan from an educational perspective. Key issues addressed include: teaching strategies and scopes of practice used in community health nursing in Taiwan between 1910 and the 1950s; the philosophical foundations for the concepts of "health for all" and "social justice" in Taiwan's community health nursing; the five "P"s of community health nursing teaching and practice (population, prevention, promotion, policy, and partnership); the core competencies and scope of practice of community health nursing proposed by the TWNA Community Health Nursing Committee; and the core competencies and the tiers of classification proposed by the Quad Council of Public Health Nursing Organizations. This article helps to elucidate the inseparable relationship between community health nursing education and practice at both the micro and macro level and examines possible future directions for community health nursing in Taiwan. The author proposes the following recommendations for future community health nursing education development in Taiwan: 1) implement competence classifications appropriate to each nursing education preparation level, 2) promote multidisciplinary cooperation among education, practice, and policy, and 3) promote collaboration and consensus among community health nursing and public health related associations.

  9. Improving Community Health Using an Outcome-Oriented CQI Approach to Community-Engaged Health Professions Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clithero, Amy; Ross, Simone Jacquelyn; Middleton, Lyn; Reeve, Carole; Neusy, Andre-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Health professionals providing health-care services must have the relevant competencies and clinical experiences needed to improve population health outcomes in different contexts. Current models of health profession education often fail to produce a fit-for-purpose workforce ready and willing to provide relevant, quality care to underserved communities. Evidence is emerging that community-engaged and socially accountable health workforce education, i.e., aligned with priority health needs, produces a workforce ready and willing to work in partnership with underserved regions. This model of education fosters greater affiliation between education and service delivery systems and requires institutions to measure graduate outcomes and institutional impact. The Training for Health Equity Network (THEnet), a partnership of socially accountable health workforce education institutions, has developed and tested a Social Accountability Framework for Health Workforce Education (the Framework) and toolkit to improve alignment of health workforce education with outcomes to assess how well education institutions meet the needs of the communities they serve. The Framework links education and service delivery creating a continuous quality improvement feedback loop to ensure that education addresses needs and maximizes impact on the quality of service delivery. The Framework also provides a unifying set of guidelines for health workforce policy and planning, accreditation, education, research, and service delivery. A key element to ensuring consistent high quality service delivery is an appropriately trained and equitably distributed workforce. An effective and comprehensive mechanism for evaluation is the method of CQI which links the design, implementation, accreditation, and evaluation of health workforce education with health service delivery and health outcomes measurement. PMID:28289678

  10. Benefits of community-based education to the community in South African health science facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Diab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-based education (CBE is utilised by health science facultiesworldwide to provide a relevant primary care experience for students and a service tounderserved communities and, hopefully, to affect student career choices. The benefits totraining institutions and students are well documented, but it may well be that communities,too, will be able to benefit from a more balanced partnership, where they are consulted in theplanning of such training programmes.Method: An exploratory qualitative study was undertaken by three South African universitiesin the provinces of Limpopo, KwaZulu-Natal and the Western Cape. Focus group interviewswere conducted in their local languages with groups of community leaders, patients andsupervisors at community sites involved in CBE training. A thematic analysis of their viewswas undertaken with the aid of NVivo (version 9. Ethics approval was obtained from therespective universities and health care training sites.Results: Benefits to the community could be categorised into short-term and long-term benefits.Short-term benefits included improved service delivery, reduction in hospital referrals, homevisits and community orientated primary health care, improved communication with patientsand enhanced professionalism of the health care practitioner. Long-term benefits includedimproved teaching through a relationship with an academic institution and student familiaritywith the health care system. Students also became involved in community upliftment projects,thereby acting as agents of change in these communities.Conclusion: Communities can certainly benefit from well-planned CBE programmes involvinga training site ‑ community site partnership. 

  11. Community intervention in higher education of environmental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cidália Guia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, in the Bologna context, university teaching methods focus on the student and on a learning experience based on practical methods. Under the guidance of teachers, students in the second year of the first Environmental Health Course at the Polytechnic Institute of Beja have designed and developed the following nine community intervention projects relating to environmental health: dangerous products (mercury; habitability and geriatrics; health education and the environment; drinking water; information and communication in environmental health; efficient use of resources in public buildings; child development in outdoor spaces; and allergenic factors in housing. This pedagogical action takes place over three semesters, corresponding to the three distinct phases: design, implementation and evaluation / dissemination. To ensure the viability of the projects, each group of three students has established partnerships with various entities, such as city and parish councils, hospitals, schools, consumer cooperatives, companies dealing with hazardous waste, the Youth Institute and other commercial enterprises. Although it has not been possible to evaluate the whole project, preliminary results suggest that the planned activities have been very successful, with health benefits for the people involved, through environmental improvements or an increase in empowerment. It was also possible to achieve economic gains and contribute to the conservation of the environment. The students were able to gain skills and knowledge in a teaching model characterized by the absence of lectures in which students, assisted by teachers, take decisions and independent action, simulating a real context of professional practice. This experience suggests that, by utilizing the Bologna method, the polytechnic institutions may improve their real contribution to the health of communities.

  12. Community Health Nursing Curriculum. Components in Baccalaureate Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catell, Grace Manion

    Community health nursing curriculum components in a sample of baccalaureate nursing programs were investigated. Questionnaires were sent to a sample of 12 National League of Nursing (NLN) accredited, generic, baccalaureate nursing programs representative of the four NLN regions in the United States. Community health nursing content in theory…

  13. Scientific and Popular Health Knowledge in the Education Work of Community Health Agents in Rio de Janeiro Shantytowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, M. S.; Kolawole Salami, B.; Perreault, M.; Leite, L. C.

    2012-01-01

    Health education for socially marginalized populations challenges the efficacy of existing strategies and methods, and the pertinence of the educational and philosophical principles that underpin them. The Brazilian Community Health Agents Initiative (CHAI) hires residents of deprived marginalized communities to undertake health promotion and…

  14. The application of digital technology in community health education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Ren

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of the internet and information technologies, coupled with a variety of digital media, the digital technology has become a conventional method of health education for the general public and has the potential to influence health behaviors. Our aim was to conduct a review of how digital technology projects have been used in the health education and health promotion, as well as the disadvantages and barriers in the process.

  15. The impact of health education on reproductive health knowledge among adolescents in a rural Nigerian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mba, C I; Obi, S N; Ozumba, B C

    2007-07-01

    This intervention study was to evaluate the impact of reproductive health education on the knowledge and attitude of adolescents in a rural Nigerian community to reproductive health issues. It compared adolescents in a secondary school (study group), which received health education on reproductive health with another secondary school (control group), which did not receive any. The impact of the programme was evaluated with a pre-test baseline knowledge and post-test gain in the knowledge 6 weeks later, using the same questionnaire. A total of 180 students selected by systematic sampling from each of the two randomly selected schools in Item, a rural community in south-east Nigeria participated in the programme. While all the respondents have heard of reproductive health and could identify at least one of its components, their knowledge of it prior to the health education were defective and were obtained mainly from peers and the mass media. Such information was incomplete and often coloured with cultural and religious bias. However, there was a significant (p health education. The students in the study group showed a positive and permissive attitude towards reproductive health education and there was a drop in risky sexual behaviour following the intervention. Pre-marital sex (94.3%), pregnancy prevention and abortion (88.5%) and sexually transmitted infections (82.8%) were common reproductive health problems raised by the students. Reproductive health education as part of the school curriculum will provide an effective means of improving knowledge and reducing reproductive health problems among adolescents in developing countries.

  16. Evaluation of Community Health Education Workshops among Chinese Older Adults in Chicago: A Community-Based Participatory Research Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xinqi; Li, Yawen; Chen, Ruijia; Chang, E-Shien; Simon, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Health education is one of the proven ways to improve knowledge and change health attitudes and behaviors. This study is intended to assess the effectiveness of five health workshops in a Chinese community, focusing on depression, elder abuse, nutrition, breast cancer and stroke. Methods: A community-based participatory research…

  17. Level of Educational Objectives Achievement in Health and Community Medicine Internship Course; Interns Viewpoint

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Nowadays, the community oriented medicine education model has been mainly noticed. The aim of this study was to survey the interns about achievement to the educational goals confirmed by Health Ministry in health internship and community medicine courses.    Instrument & Methods: In the descriptive cross-sectional study, 56 health internship and community medicine students of one of the military universities of medical sciences in Tehran were studied in 2014 and 2015....

  18. "Razoo Health:" A Community-Based Nursing Education Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Marjorie B.; Morgan, Connie M.; Matteson, Peggy S.

    2003-01-01

    In New Orleans, nursing faculty and students partnered with inner-city schools and churches to mobilize neighborhood assets and improve health care. Students learned community assessment skills and worked with empowered citizens who reclaimed their health resources. (Contains 28 references.) (SK)

  19. Community health clinical education in Canada: part 1--"state of the art".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Benita E; Gregory, David

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a survey of community health clinical education in twenty-four Canadian pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing programs. A qualitative research design was used, involving a content analysis of Canadian course syllabi and supporting documents for community health courses. This study afforded a cross-sectional understanding of the "state of the art" of community health clinical education in Canadian schools of nursing. Clinical course conceptual approaches, course objectives, types of clinical sites, format and number of clinical hours, and methods of student evaluation are identified. The findings suggest the need for a national dialogue or consensus building exercise regarding curriculum content for community health nursing. Informing this dialogue are several strengths including the current focus on community health (as opposed to community-based) nursing education, and a solid socio-environmental perspective informing clinical learning and practice. The national data set generated by this study may have relevance to nursing programs globally.

  20. Approaches to dog health education programs in Australian rural and remote Indigenous communities: four case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, S E; Dixon, R M; Dixon, R J; Toribio, J-A

    2013-09-01

    Dog health in rural and remote Australian Indigenous communities is below urban averages in numerous respects. Many Indigenous communities have called for knowledge sharing in this area. However, dog health education programs are in their infancy, and lack data on effective practices. Without this core knowledge, health promotion efforts cannot progress effectively. This paper discusses a strategy that draws from successful approaches in human health and indigenous education, such as dadirri, and culturally respectful community engagement and development. Negotiating an appropriate education program is explored in its practical application through four case studies. Though each case was unique, the comparison of the four illustrated the importance of listening (community consultation), developing and maintaining relationships, community involvement and employment. The most successful case studies were those that could fully implement all four areas. Outcomes included improved local dog health capacity, local employment and engagement with the program and significantly improved dog health.

  1. Source Book for Health Education Materials and Community Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Disease Control (DHEW/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    This book is primarily a guide and source directory to health education materials in 10 nationally recognized health risk areas: (1) stopping or reducing smoking; (2) improving nutrition; (3) controlling high blood pressure; (4) modifying alcohol intake or drinking habits; (5) increasing physical activity; (6) reducing stress; (7) detecting cancer…

  2. Gay Couples, Gay Communities, and HIV: Challenges for Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece, Michael

    2005-01-01

    For the last 2 decades, researchers and practitioners dedicated to improving the health of gay and bisexual men have largely focused their work on the need to reduce the incidence of HIV infection. This is certainly warranted given the intensity of this particular epidemic in the gay community and the challenges it has presented to the nation's…

  3. Doctoral Education in Community Health Nursing: A National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Pamela N.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    According to responses from 23 of 52 doctoral nursing program directors and interviews with 16, newer programs tend to offer more general rather than specialized curricula. Only four identified community health nursing as a specialty, all in older, long-standing programs. (SK)

  4. Community Health Nursing Education: Where We Are Going and How To Get There.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the shift in values needed to provide community health nursing education in partnership with a community. Offers principles for developing programs: refocused purpose, broad practice scope, problem solving as discovery, and family, community, and student empowerment. (Contains 37 references.) (Author/JOW)

  5. An educational strategy for using physician assistant students to provide health promotion education to community adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Cathy C

    2012-01-01

    The "Competencies for the Physician Assistant Profession" identify core competencies that physician assistants (PAs) are expected to acquire and maintain throughout their career (see http://www.nccpa.net/pdfs/Definition%20of%20PA%20Competencies% 203.5%20for%20Publication.pdf). Two categories of competencies relate to patient care and interpersonal and communication skills and articulate the need for PAs to be effective communicators and patient educators. The value of a health education curriculum for the adolescent population has been recognized since the early 1900s. PA student-designed health promotion presentations aimed at the adolescent population are an innovative educational strategy involving students in community education. PA student-designed presentations based upon previously identified topics were presented in the community. Students presented topics including Smoking Cessation, The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol, Self-Esteem, and others to adolescents. Community audiences were varied and included alternative high schools and teens within the Department of Youth Corrections facilities. PA students created 17 portable presentations for community adolescents. Two hundred sixty-eight students gave presentations to more than 700 adolescents ranging from 11-22 years of age between the years 2005-2010. Eighty-two percent (646/791) of adolescent participants either strongly agreed or agreed that they learned at least one new piece of information from the presentations. Sixty percent (12/20) of community leaders requested that the PA students return to give additional health promotion presentations. Analysis of comments by PA students revealed that 98% of students found the experience beneficial. Students identified the experience as helping them better understand how to design presentations to meet the needs of their audience, feel more comfortable with adolescents, and gain confidence in communicating. Seventy-five percent stated they would continue to be

  6. Continuing Education Needs of Community Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors for Supervising and Assessing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Ann M.; Davies, Susan; Shepherd, Bernadette; Whittaker, Karen

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 314 community nurses, midwives, and health visitors in Britain revealed the practitioners' need for continuing education to help them provide research-based instruction for learners preparing for community-health service. Most practitioners had to study on their own time at their own expense. (SK)

  7. Revitalizing communities together: the shared values, goals, and work of education, urban planning, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alison Klebanoff; Schuchter, Joseph W

    2013-04-01

    Inequities in education, the urban environment, and health co-exist and mutually reinforce each other. Educators, planners, and public health practitioners share commitments to place-based, participatory, youth-focused, and equitable work. They also have shared goals of building community resilience, social capital, and civic engagement. Interdisciplinary programs that embody these shared values and work towards these shared goals are emerging, including school-based health centers, full-service community schools, community health centers, Promise Neighborhoods, and Choice Neighborhoods. The intersection of these three fields represents an opportunity to intervene on social determinants of health. More collaborative research and practice across public health, education, and planning should build from the shared values identified to continue to address these common goals.

  8. Service-learning: community-campus partnerships for health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifer, S D

    1998-03-01

    In 1995, the Health Professions Schools in Service to the Nation (HPSISN) program was launched under the auspices of the Pew Health Professions Commission as a national demonstration of an innovative form of community-based education called service-learning. The foundation of service-learning is a balanced partnership between communities and health professions schools and a balance between serving the community and meeting defined learning objectives. This article offers a definition of service-learning and an outline of its core concepts; it also describes how service-learning differs from traditional clinical education in the health professions. Further, the author discusses how service-learning programs may benefit students, faculty, communities, higher education institutions, and the relationships among all these stakeholders. The article concludes with brief descriptions of recommended resources for integrating service-learning into the medical school curriculum.

  9. Community and school-based health education for dengue control in rural Cambodia: a process evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokrin Khun

    Full Text Available Dengue fever continues to be a major public health problem in Cambodia, with significant impact on children. Health education is a major means for prevention and control of the National Dengue Control Program (NDCP, and is delivered to communities and in schools. Drawing on data collected in 2003-2004 as part of an ethnographic study conducted in eastern Cambodia, we explore the approaches used in health education and their effectiveness to control dengue. Community health education is provided through health centre outreach activities and campaigns of the NDCP, but is not systematically evaluated, is under-funded and delivered irregularly; school-based education is restricted in terms of time and lacks follow-up in terms of practical activities for prevention and control. As a result, adherence is partial. We suggest the need for sustained routine education for dengue prevention and control, and the need for approaches to ensure the translation of knowledge into practice.

  10. Graduate health professions education: an interdisciplinary university - community partnership model 1996 - 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deborah; Behringer, Bruce; Smith, Patricia; Townsend, Tom; Wachs, Joy; Stanifer, Larry; Goodrow, Bruce

    2003-07-01

    In 1996, East Tennessee State University (ETSU) reinforced its historical commitment to multidisciplinary community engagement by developing a graduate level community partnerships program in the Division of Health Sciences. While the university's earlier health partnership efforts relied primarily on curricular innovation, the approach to graduate health professions education was to seed a series of curricular enhancements and interdisciplinary, community-based learning experiences and service into traditional curricula. This paper presents the experience of one school in crafting a regional network that became the basis of a division-wide graduate level teaching and learning initiative. Carefully selected planning and implementation techniques enabled multidisciplinary practitioners and community members from across a 20-county region to participate with university faculty in training ETSU learners in community-based medical care. By year four of the project, curricular "enhancements" were institutionalized in over five departments across the Division and engaged 1160 medical residents and graduate learners in a give - get model of health education. Programme evaluation methodology was collaboratively defined and documentation of programme effort and outcomes regularly reported and strategically reviewed. Programme evaluation demonstrates mutual benefit to community and university. Faculty involvement in programme activity increased fourfold and community involvement in training of health professions graduate learners increased threefold by year four. Educational innovations were adopted into traditional curricula, thousands of hours of clinical services were provided to underserved communities and the university-community team forged by network links continues to promote multidisciplinary interests through joint public policy endeavors.

  11. Public health, medicine, and dentistry as partners in community health: a pioneering initiative in interprofessional, practice-based education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Lois; Condon, Rebecca; Shanahan, Christopher W; Wolff, James; Culler, Corinna; Kalish, Richard

    2011-01-01

    As public health challenges grow more complex, the call for professional education to be interprofessional, collaborative, and grounded in real world practice has intensified. In this article, we describe the development, implementation, and results of one pioneering course at Boston University that aims to prepare public health, medical, and dental students for their combined roles in community health settings. The Schools of Public Health, Medicine, and Dental Medicine jointly offered the course in partnership with 3 community organizations. Participants include MPH, MD, and DMD candidates. The course design integrates the use of "The Challenge Model" (created by Management Sciences for Health) with training in public health consultation techniques (eg, community-based participatory research, logic models, monitoring and evaluation). Teams of 6 to 8 medical and public health students collaborate with managers and staff of a community health center to address 1 organizational challenge and recommend a sustainability plan. Postcourse evaluations revealed that a cross-disciplinary, practice-based education model is feasible and can meet students' learning objectives and exceed expectations of community partners. We overcame formidable obstacles related to the "silo'ed" nature of academic institutions and the competing priorities within overburdened community organizations. We found that sustained project implementation was attained at some but not all sites, yet all sites highly valued the perspective and contribution of student teams. Dynamic and replicable, this practice-based education model is adaptable to professional schools whose work intersects in the real world and calls for collaborative leadership.

  12. Educative practice of community health agents analyzed through the category of praxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapé, Carla Andrea; Soares, Cássia Baldini

    2007-01-01

    This study aimed to: analyze the conceptions of health education that guide educational practices of community health agents in the Family Health Program of the Butantã Health Coordination, São Paulo, Brazil, and analyze the character of these educational activities. Data were collected through focus groups and in-depth semi-structured interviews with 39 agents. The analysis procedures followed the recommendations of thematic content analysis, and praxis was the analytical category. Regarding theoretical activity as a component of praxis, we found that most health education conceptions were based on the transmission of normative information learned from health technicians. This theoretical activity ended up guiding a practical activity typical of repetitive praxis, in which the agents do not participate in the health work planning process and do not dominate the "ideal object", reproducing tasks planned by others.

  13. Community Organization in a School Health Education Program to Reduce Sodium Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Ruth B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the important role of community organization in providing reinforcing factors necessary to enable students to adopt dietary behavior changes recommended in a school health education program for cardiovascular health. The subjects were 55 urban, black, sixth grade students. The pilot program was of two years duration.…

  14. Barriers to prostate cancer prevention and community recommended health education strategies in an urban African American community in Jackson, Mississippi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekúndayò, Olúgbémiga T; Tataw, David B

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the use of survey research in collaboration with the African American urban community of Georgetown, Jackson, Mississippi to identify and understand prostate cancer knowledge, resource utilization, and health education strategies considered most effective in reaching the community with prostate cancer prevention messages. The study revealed profound needs in disease identification and resources awareness and utilization. Barriers to utilization were identified by participants to include lack of self-efficacy, low self-esteem, lack of trust in the health care system, limited knowledge of prostate pathology, and limited ability to pay. Participants' recommended strategies for reaching the community with prostate cancer education include traditional and nontraditional strategies. The list of recommendations exclude modern-day outlets such as handheld devices, Twitter, Facebook, blogs, wikis, and other Internet-based outlets. The findings provide a road map for program development and an intervention research agenda custom-tailored to the Georgetown community of Jackson, Mississippi.

  15. Learning Preferences and Impacts of Education Programs in Dog Health Programs in Five Rural and Remote Australian Indigenous Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Sophie; Dixon, Roselyn; Dixon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As part of strategies to improve dog and community health in rural and remote Indigenous communities, this study investigated preferences and impacts of dog health education programs. Semistructured interviews with 63 residents from five communities explored learning preferences. Though each community differed, on average yarning was preferred by…

  16. The impact of a community-based health education programme on oral cancer risk factor awareness among a Gujarati community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddique, I; Mitchell, D A

    2013-08-01

    To determine any differences in oral cancer risk factor awareness and behaviour among first and second generation Gujarati muslims and to investigate the impact of a community-based health education programme on oral cancer risk factor awareness. Respondents completed a confidential, bilingual questionnaire in English and Gujarati regarding alcohol, tobacco, paan, sopari, paan masala and gutka use before and after a community-based health education programme on oral cancer risk factors. Community Health Fair. Indian Muslim Welfare Association, Batley, West Yorkshire. Ninety-six male and female Gujarati muslims aged 16 to 81 years. Quantitative results on oral cancer risk factor awareness before and after a health education programme. Quantitative figures obtained from the questionnaire with regards to alcohol, tobacco, paan, sopari, paan masala and gutka usage. There were very low levels of alcohol consumption among Gujarati muslims. First generation Gujarati males consumed significantly more tobacco than second generation Gujarati males, difference in proportion 0.30 (0.03 to 0.56, p = 0.03). There was complete absence of paan use among Gujarati females. First generation Gujarati males consumed significantly higher amounts of sopari compared with their male counterparts in the second generation (p = 0.003). There were very low rates of paan masala use. Only first generation Gujarati males consumed gutka. Significantly more first generation males and females correctly identified all oral cancer risk factors after the health education intervention compared with baseline (difference 0.40, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.57, p = Gujarati muslims and that a local community-based health education programme was effective in raising awareness.

  17. Education for community mental health nurses: a summary of the key debates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenchard, Steve; Burnard, Philip; Coffey, Michael; Hannigan, Ben

    2002-04-01

    A wide range of post-qualifying education courses exist for community mental health nurses (CMHNs) working in the UK. 'Specialist practitioner' courses emphasize shared learning between CMHNs and members of other community nursing branches. These programmes typically include course content drawing on the social and behavioural sciences, as well as on material more tailored to the clinical needs of practitioners. Such courses and their predecessors have been subject to criticism, however. Courses have been described as anachronistic, and failing to take account of recent advances in treatment modalities. In addition concerns about the generic focus of some programmes have also been raised. Educational alternatives, such as programmes preparing nurses and other mental health workers to provide 'psycho-social interventions' have, correspondingly, become increasingly popular. In this paper we explore some of the debates surrounding the education of CMHNs, and explore the context in which CMHNs work and in which educational programmes are devised. We consider the multidisciplinary environment in which CMHNs practise, the differing client groups with which CMHNs work, the developing policy framework in which mental health care is provided, demands for more user-responsive education, and the relationship between higher educational institutions and health care providers. We conclude the paper with a series of questions for CMHN educators and education commissioners.

  18. A Community Health Education Approach to Occupant Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemming, Marianne G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This article reviews the major features of the "Seat Belts Pay Off" campaign and its evaluation and considers both theoretical and pragmatic issues pertinent to replicating the program in other community settings. (CT)

  19. [Evaluation of a community-based health education program for salt reduction through media campaigns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Kimiko; Harada, Mitiko; Wakabayashi, Yoko; Inagawa, Mieko; Oshima, Miyuki; Toriumi, Sawako; Hirose, Kumiko; Shiina, Yumi; Yamagishi, Kazumasa; Renshe, Cui; Ikeda, Ai; Yao, Masayuki; Noda, Hiroyuki; Tanigawa, Takeshi; Tanaka, Sayoko; Kurokawa, Michinori; Imano, Hironori; Kiyama, Masahiko; Kitamura, Akihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Shimamoto, Takashi; Iso, Hiroyasu

    2006-08-01

    To provide the strategies, achievement and evaluation of a community health education program for salt reduction with media campaigns. The intervention community was Kyowa town (A district of Chikusei city, census population in 1985 = 16,792) where we have systematically conducted a community-based blood pressure control program since 1981, and health education on reduction of salt intake since 1983 for primary prevention of hypertension. The education program was performed through media campaigns including use of banners, signboards, posters, and calendars with health catchphrases. We also used catchphrase-labeled envelopes when sending documents from the municipal health center to individuals. Health festivals were held annually to enhance health consciousnesses and to improve health behavior. Some of the posters and calligraphy were painted or drawn by elementary schoolchildren as part of their education. The program was evaluated by repeated questionnaires and examination of salt concentrations of miso soup and dietary salt intake. Between 1983 and 1988, the prevalence of persons who were aware that health consultation including blood pressure measurements were available at the town office increased from 65% to 84%. The prevalence of those who knew the salt intake goal (10 g or less/day) increased from 47% to 63% and that of those who reported to reduce salt intake also increased from 38% to 58%. As for salt concentrations of miso soup, the proportion with less than 1.1% increased from 47% to 66% between 1985 and 2004. Age-adjusted mean salt intake for persons aged 40-69 years declined from 14 g to 11 g in men and from 12 g to 10 g in women between 1982-1986 and 2000-2004. A long-term systemic education program through media campaigns proved feasible with the cooperation of community leaders, schools and food associations.

  20. Improving Health with Science: Exploring Community-Driven Science Education in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leak, Anne Emerson

    This study examines the role of place-based science education in fostering student-driven health interventions. While literature shows the need to connect science with students' place and community, there is limited understanding of strategies for doing so. Making such connections is important for underrepresented students who tend to perceive learning science in school as disconnected to their experiences out of school (Aikenhead, Calabrese-Barton, & Chinn, 2006). To better understand how students can learn to connect place and community with science and engineering practices in a village in Kenya, I worked with community leaders, teachers, and students to develop and study an education program (a school-based health club) with the goal of improving knowledge of health and sanitation in a Kenyan village. While students selected the health topics and problems they hoped to address through participating in the club, the topics were taught with a focus on providing opportunities for students to learn the practices of science and health applications of these practices. Students learned chemistry, physics, environmental science, and engineering to help them address the health problems they had identified in their community. Surveys, student artifacts, ethnographic field notes, and interview data from six months of field research were used to examine the following questions: (1) In what ways were learning opportunities planned for using science and engineering practices to improve community health? (2) In what ways did students apply science and engineering practices and knowledge learned from the health club in their school, homes, and community? and (3) What factors seemed to influence whether students applied or intended to apply what they learned in the health club? Drawing on place-based science education theory and community-engagement models of health, process and structural coding (Saldana, 2013) were used to determine patterns in students' applications of their

  1. Community Mental Health Service Providers' Codes of Ethics and the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacc, Nicholas A.; Juhnke, Gerald A.; Nilsen, Keith A.

    2001-01-01

    Compares the codes of ethics of 13 professional organizations for community mental health service providers. Results suggest that only two of the codes of ethics address many of the "Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing." Provides implications and recommendations for professional organizations. (Contains 20 references and…

  2. Health education: an experience in rural communities of Manabí, Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Bottasso

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Health is a very important issue for every human being. A person with deteriorated health can’t study, work and enjoy thoroughly of his/her life. Right to health is a fundamental right of every human being. Rural marginal zones of region Manabí inhabitants suffer serious difficulties in access of health services, for different reasons. With the objective of improve health access, we realized a training to 14 communities in order to introduce First Aid Kits with essential palliatives medication.As an alternative choice to improve access to health services, we promote an educational training of 14 rural communities, in order to bring in medicine and first-aid kits. The process has made considering the perspective of Participatory action research, Popular Education, Gender and the last, but not the least the perspective of human rights, as first requirement for its development.The educational process successfully concluded with empowerment of 12 Health Promoters and with the respective assignment of first-aid kits. It’s recommended to accomplish others activities to follow the project up, for example: an evaluative study, workshops to review, amplify and update the matters. Finally it would be important to replicate the process in these close communities that was excluded in this first phase. 

  3. Journey to Healthy Aging: Impact of Community Based Education Programs on Knowledge and Health Behavior in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarry, Sue

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if community based health education programs increased knowledge and health behavior in older adults. The study was a pretest-posttest design with a convenience sample of 111 independent community dwelling older adults. Participants received two disease prevention education presentations: type 2…

  4. Education resources in remote Australian Indigenous community dog health programs: a comparison of community and extra-community-produced resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Sophie Elizabeth; Dixon, Roselyn May; Dixon, Robert John

    2013-09-01

    Commercial dog health programs in Australian Indigenous communities are a relatively recent occurrence. Health promotion for these programs is an even more recent development, and lacks data on effective practices. This paper analyses 38 resources created by veterinary-community partnerships in Indigenous communities, to 71 resources available through local veterinary service providers. On average, community-produced resources used significantly more of the resource area as image, more imagery as communicative rather than decorative images, larger fonts and smaller segments of text and used images of people with a range of skin tones. As well as informal registers of Standard Australian English, community-produced resources used Aboriginal English and/or Creole languages in their text, while extra-community (EC)-produced resources did not. The text of EC resources had Flesh-Kincaid reading grade levels that excluded a large proportion of community recipients. Also, they did not cover some topics of importance in communities, used academic, formal and technical language, and did not depict people of a representative range of skin tones. As such, community-produced resources were more relevant to the unique situations in remote communities, while EC resources were often inappropriate and in some cases could even distance recipients by using inappropriate language, formats and imagery.

  5. Student-led oral health education for the homeless community of East London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, R M; Hine, C E; Franks, M A; Fisher-Brown, L

    2014-07-01

    Within the BDS curriculum, dental public health and the importance of social responsibility is clearly emphasised though often in a didactic manner, without practical application. Preventative concepts are taught and relayed to individual patients being treated within a dental school. The impact of oral disease on general health within disadvantaged communities is a problem commonly addressed by healthcare professionals. Part of this responsibility should be shared with and experienced by the next generation of dental practitioners through health education outreach programmes within the undergraduate curriculum. Not only will this benefit recipients within disadvantaged populations such as the homeless, but it will also develop and encourage a philosophy of social responsibility throughout the future careers of undergraduate dental and hygiene/therapy students. To explore the feasibility of achieving this objective, we devised an oral health awareness programme to address the needs of 'hard to reach' homeless people within the communities served by the Community Dental Service of Tower Hamlets, City and Hackney, London.

  6. An innovative approach to diabetes education for a Hispanic population utilizing community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valen, Mieca S; Narayan, Suzanne; Wedeking, Lorene

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes disproportionately affects the Hispanic population. New approaches are needed to provide effective education to this population. This evidence-based project utilized community health workers (CHWs) to deliver a culturally relevant diabetes education program to a Hispanic population at a migrant clinic. The program emphasized culturally relevant interventions to improve self-efficacy. Formative evaluation was used to develop and improve the program. Participants showed improvement in diabetes knowledge and diabetes related self-efficacy scores. Outcomes also included improvement in CHWs' diabetes knowledge and development of an educational program that could be utilized in other settings serving Hispanic populations with type 2 diabetes.

  7. The SAFE project: community-driven partnerships in health, mental health, and education to prevent early school failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, D L

    1997-11-01

    This article presents a case study of an innovative school-based health and mental health project that prevents early school failure in one county in Oklahoma. Success is attributed to social work development of broad-based partnerships involving families, schools, communities, and public policy officials. Citizen-driven, these partnerships have meshed previously fixed institutional boundaries in health, mental health, and education to prevent early school failure. The article describes school-family partnerships that form the core of the project's service intervention model. Statistics on service activities and outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of lessons learned for implementation of the project.

  8. COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Saheb-Zamani

    1972-08-01

    Full Text Available Twenty to twenty-five years ago, the Community Mental Health Center (CHMC, had scarcely been heard of. Today, it is indeed a movement, and apparently widespread. A total of ten services considered to be necessary to provide adequate mental health services: (1 in patient, (2 out-patient, (3 partial hospitalization, (4 emergency, (5 consultation, (6 diagn1ostic, (7 rehabilitative, (8 precare and aftercare, (9 training, (10 research and evaluation services. This Concept of Community Mental Health would include as many community agents as possible in co-operative efforts. To the average educated layman, and, unfortunately to most mental health practitioners the community mental health care has become synonymous with the provision of mere psycho-therapy. The community mental health center has not succeeded in becoming inductor of catalytic agent in the growth of its patients, nor has it become significantly involved with the community as a scrcla1 system. These are grim facts. But new hope has begun to appear. It is contained in four revolutions now under way – revolutions in understanding, in research, in nu1ternal and child care and in education for mental health.

  9. A Guide for Foodservice Education; Health Care; Community Care and School Feeding in California. Dietetic Service Supervision Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickling, Clarice; And Others

    This curriculum guide is intended to help California community college educators understand and develop a vocational program in health care, community care, and school food service. It establishes the general need for such a program, and provides guidelines to help educators determine if there is a need for such a program in their geographic…

  10. Community Perceptions on Integrating Animal Vaccination and Health Education by Veterinary and Public Health Workers in the Prevention of Brucellosis among Pastoral Communities of South Western Uganda.

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    Catherine Kansiime

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease of veterinary, public health, and economic significance in most developing countries, yet there are few studies that show integrated human and veterinary health care intervention focusing on integration at both activity and actors levels. The aim of our study, therefore, was to explore community perceptions on integration of animal vaccination and health education by veterinary and public health workers in the management of brucellosis in Uganda.This study used a qualitative design where six Focus Group Discussions (FGDs that were homogenous in nature were conducted, two from each sub-county, one with the local leaders, and another with pastoralists and farmers. Five Key Informant Interviews (KIIs with two public health workers and three veterinary extension workers from three sub-counties in Kiruhura district, Uganda were conducted. All FGDs were conducted in the local language and tape recorded with consent from the participants. KIIs were in English and later transcribed and analyzed using latent content data analysis method.All the groups mentioned that they lacked awareness on brucellosis commonly known as Brucella and its vaccination in animals. Respondents perceived improvement in human resources in terms of training and recruiting more health personnel, facilitation of the necessary activities such as sensitization of the communities about brucellosis, and provision of vaccines and diagnostic tests as very important in the integration process in the communities. The FGD participants also believed that community participation was crucial for sustainability and ownership of the integration process.The respondents reported limited knowledge of brucellosis and its vaccination in animals. The community members believed that mass animal vaccination in combination with health education about the disease is important and possible if it involves government and all other stakeholders such as wildlife authorities

  11. A Healthy Harvest: Adolescents Grow Food and Well-Being with Policy Implications for Education, Health and Community Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevec, Illene Susan

    2011-01-01

    The severe youth health crisis involving overweight and obesity requires a complex policy response involving multiple domains: education, agriculture, health services, and community planning. This research examines gardening's affective benefits for adolescents and the potential school and youth gardens have to support healthy communities.…

  12. A civic engagement paradigm for reforming health administration education and recreating the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renick, Oren; Metzler, Leanne; Murray, Jennifer; Renick, Judy

    2005-01-01

    The education of students of health administration has traditionally combined both the theoretical and practical to enhance and balance the learning experience. Classroom exposure to the principles of management, law, organizations, and finance is coupled with problem solving, practicum, internship, and administrative residency experiences. However, just as recent years have seen the developmentof courses from managed care and alternative delivery systems to total quality management and continuous quality improvement, there is also emerging an awareness of the need to enhance the practical side of the learning equation. Perhaps this need is finding expression in curricular opportunities for students to learn from a participatory model known as civic engagement (CE). CE is a way of integrating academic study and community service to strengthen learning while promoting civic and personal responsibility to strengthen communities. Based on experiences with graduate and undergraduate students spanning the last ten years at Texas State University--San Marcos (Texas State), it is suggested that a CE paradigm has been developed within the Department of Health Administration that merits consideration by other programs of health administration. As a model for change, it has the potential for reforming both health administration education and most other higher education disciplines as well.

  13. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  14. Impact of a District-Wide Diabetes Prevention Programme Involving Health Education for Children and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeladevi, Sethu; Sagar, Jayanthi; Pujari, Siddharth; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To present results from a district-wide diabetes prevention programme involving health education for school children and the local community. Method: The model of health education that was utilized aimed to secure lifestyle changes and the identification of diabetes risk by school children (aged 9-12 years). The children acted as health…

  15. Status of undergraduate community-based and public health physiotherapy education South Africa

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    K. Mostert-Wentzel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Curricula of health education institutions need to be periodically revised to be aligned with its context. This study explored the status of physiotherapy curricula in South Africa as point of departure for benchmarking by individual institutions. A document analysis was done of the university physiotherapy departments (N=8 in South Africa. institutional ethical clearance and permission from the heads of departments were obtained. Content analysis was used to analyse the South African Qualifications Authority exit-level outcomes and the university study guides for community placements. Most universities employed a form of service-learning, with interventions in a range of settings. Five themes emerged: practice of evidence-based physiotherapy, rendering physiotherapy services, acting professionally, communication, and collaboration. The country’s priority conditions were addressed. Teaching-learning strategies included group activities (class or education sessions, community projects, home visits and portfolios of evidence. Personal and small-group reflections were prominent. The undergraduate community physiotherapy curricula in South Africa address the health profile of the population and priorities in the health system to different degrees. The variation between universities should be interpreted with caution as the study guides only gave a limited snapshot into each institution’s curriculum. However, findings suggest that each physiotherapy university department may have gaps in preparing physiotherapy undergraduate students for the needs of the South African population and expectations of the government. Possible ways to share teaching-learning resources are recommended

  16. Has the Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh Addressed the Educational Divide in Accessing Health Care?

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    Mala Rao

    Full Text Available Equity of access to healthcare remains a major challenge with families continuing to face financial and non-financial barriers to services. Lack of education has been shown to be a key risk factor for 'catastrophic' health expenditure (CHE, in many countries including India. Consequently, ways to address the education divide need to be explored. We aimed to assess whether the innovative state-funded Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh state launched in 2007, has achieved equity of access to hospital inpatient care among households with varying levels of education.We used the National Sample Survey Organization 2004 survey as our baseline and the same survey design to collect post-intervention data from 8623 households in the state in 2012. Two outcomes, hospitalisation and CHE for inpatient care, were estimated using education as a measure of socio-economic status and transforming levels of education into ridit scores. We derived relative indices of inequality by regressing the outcome measures on education, transformed as a ridit score, using logistic regression models with appropriate weights and accounting for the complex survey design.Between 2004 and 2012, there was a 39% reduction in the likelihood of the most educated person being hospitalised compared to the least educated, with reductions observed in all households as well as those that had used the Aarogyasri. For CHE the inequality disappeared in 2012 in both groups. Sub-group analyses by economic status, social groups and rural-urban residence showed a decrease in relative indices of inequality in most groups. Nevertheless, inequalities in hospitalisation and CHE persisted across most groups.During the time of the Aarogyasri scheme implementation inequalities in access to hospital care were substantially reduced but not eliminated across the education divide. Universal access to education and schemes such as Aarogyasri have the synergistic potential

  17. Constructing Health and Physical Education Curriculum for Indigenous Girls in a Remote Australian Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatman, Susan L.; Singh, Parlo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the last 20 years, curriculum development in Health and Physical Education (HPE) (or Physical Education, Physical Education and Health, Sport Education as it is variously called) has repeatedly attempted to address issues of equity and social inclusion. Why then does systemic educational disadvantage persist, and why do the…

  18. Constructing Health and Physical Education Curriculum for Indigenous Girls in a Remote Australian Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whatman, Susan L.; Singh, Parlo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the last 20 years, curriculum development in Health and Physical Education (HPE) (or Physical Education, Physical Education and Health, Sport Education as it is variously called) has repeatedly attempted to address issues of equity and social inclusion. Why then does systemic educational disadvantage persist, and why do the…

  19. Integration of end-of-life education into a community health nursing course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullis, Bridgette Crotwell

    2013-01-01

    Student nurses and novice nurses report that they received little in their nursing education to adequately prepare them for the death of a patient. The American Association of Colleges of Nursing's (AACN) competencies for end-of-life care assert the need for competent nursing care at the time of death. To prepare students to care for dying patients and their families, a hospice clinical experience in a community health nursing course was designed to facilitate the development of competence in caring for adults and children at the end of life. At the end of the semester, the students were able to demonstrate principles of pain and symptom management and to communicate the goals and philosophy of hospice care to dying patients and their families. The students also demonstrated the ability to advocate for individuals at the end of life through the provision of information about hospice care, especially the benefits for timely referral to hospice and palliative care. The incorporation of a clinical experience into a community health nursing course that focuses on end-of-life care is an effective approach to teaching both community health concepts and care of dying patients. Such an approach incorporates essential content without adding to already extensive nursing curricula.

  20. Analysis of trauma care education in the South Sudan community health worker training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunniyi, Adedamola; Clark, Melissa; Donaldson, Ross

    2015-04-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with the majority occurring in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Allied health workers are often on the front lines of caring for trauma patients; this is the case in South Sudan, where a system of community health workers (CHWs) and clinical officers (COs) form an essential part of the health care structure. However, curricula for these workers vary, and it is unclear how much these training programs include trauma education. HYPOTHESIS/METHODS: The CHW training curriculum in South Sudan was reviewed to evaluate the degree to which it incorporates trauma education, according to established guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first formal comparison of a CHW curriculum with established WHO trauma guidelines. The curriculum incorporated a number of essential components of the WHO guidelines; however, the concepts taught were limited in scope. The curriculum only covered about 50% of the content required for basic providers, with major deficiencies being in the management of head and spinal injuries, safety protocols for health care personnel, and in the management of pediatric patients. The CHW training curriculum lacks the requisite content to provide adequately a basic level of trauma care and requires amending to ensure that all South Sudan citizens receive appropriate treatment. It is recommended that other LMICs review their existing training curricula in order to improve their ability to provide adequate trauma care and to ensure they meet the basic WHO guidelines.

  1. A Qualitative Evaluation of the Views of Community Workers on the Dental Health Education Material Available in New South Wales for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkhorn, Anthony; Gittani, Jamily

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To record the views of individuals whose main professional role is community liaison on dental health education material for culturally and linguistically diverse communities. Methods: Tape-recorded interviews were undertaken, reviewed by two individuals and themes identified. Results: Twenty four individuals were interviewed out of a…

  2. Teaching/learning strategies for the essentials of baccalaureate nursing education for entry-level community/public health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callen, Bonnie; Smith, Claudia M; Joyce, Barbara; Lutz, Jayne; Brown-Schott, Nancy; Block, Derryl

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe teaching/learning strategies for each of the 15 Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry-Level Community/Public Health Nursing (ACHNE, 2009). Carper's ways of knowing serve as foundations for creating classroom and clinical experiences that focus on clinical action with community as client. Each community/public health essential is defined with relevance to community/public health nursing practice. Five teaching/learning strategies have been delineated for each essential with suggestions of teaching resources and/or target population application. Teaching/learning strategies that focus on community as client, population health, and the essential knowledge and competencies of C/PH nursing will help ensure preparation of baccalaureate prepared nurses with knowledge and skills to improve the health of populations. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Impact of Educational Levels and Health Literacy on Community Acetaminophen Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Eric J; Tang, Terrill T-L; Cheng, Vincent; Yu, Junhua; Cheongsiatmoy, Derren S

    2015-12-01

    Patient understanding of acetaminophen is important for its safe and appropriate self-use. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area to determine the impact of educational level, patient health literacy score, and other demographic characteristics on acetaminophen knowledge. A 17-item, in-person, paper-and-pen questionnaire containing questions about demographics and acetaminophen knowledge was administered to 311 adults outside 5 local grocery stores in varying socioeconomic communities. Knowledge assessed was whether Tylenol-McNeil contains acetaminophen, maximum daily dose, and primary organ affected by toxicity. Participant health literacy was evaluated using the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine-Short Form (REALM-SF) test. Of the 300 who successfully completed the study, only 3.8% of all subjects were able to answer all 3 acetaminophen knowledge questions correctly regardless of educational level or health literacy score. This reaffirms that a lack of appropriate acetaminophen knowledge remains present in the general population, and further efforts to educate patients will be needed to prevent adverse events.

  4. Physical Education and General Health Courses and Minority Community College Student Risk Levels for Poor Health and Leisure-Time Exercise Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sally L.; Keating, Xiaofen Deng; Chen, Li; Guan, Jianmin; Delzeit-McIntyre, Linda; Bridges, Dwan

    2008-01-01

    College education is the last opportunity to educate a large segment of young adults to be physically active and develop a healthy lifestyle. This study examined minority community college student risks for cardiovascular disease, physical activity (PA) patterns, and effects of physical education and general health courses on promoting PA.…

  5. Performance in physical education and health impairment 30 years later--a community based cohort study.

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    Simon Timpka

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: A main purpose of physical education (PE in school is to promote future health. However, there is very limited evidence of the effects of PE on the adult health. We hypothesized that a low performance in PE was associated with an increased risk of health impairment by middle age. METHODS: We performed a cohort study in a community-based setting in Sweden spanning over three decades. We followed up on 1712 of 2225 students (76.9% who in 1974-1976 graduated with a grade in PE after 9 years of education (mean subject age 16 years. The grade in PE (compulsory subject was retrieved from municipal archives. We defined three proxies for health impairment: total number of visits to primary care physicians in 2003-2007, having been hospitalized 2003-2007, and total number of days with sick leave in 2004-2007. Using binomial regression models, we adjusted the risk estimates for level of education and occupation. Subjects with an average grade in PE served as reference category. RESULTS: In both the crude and adjusted model, women with a low grade in PE had more physician visits (adjusted IRR 1.30, 95% confidence interval 1.06-1.60 and an increased number of days with sick leave (adjusted IRR 1.44, 1.05-1.95. An increased, although not significant, risk was also observed for having received in-patient care (adjusted RR 1.26; 0.88-1.80. No significant results or similar pattern were observed in men. CONCLUSION: Women with a low grade in PE in adolescence seem to have an increased risk of health impairment by middle age, raising the question of early primary prevention towards these students in particular.

  6. Gaps and gains from engaging districts stakeholders for community-based health professions education in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello, Elialilia S; Nankumbi, Joyce; Ruzaaza, Gad Ndaruhutse; Bakengesa, Evelyn; Gumikiriza, Joy; Arubaku, Wilfred; Acio, Christine; Samantha, Mary; Matte, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Community-based education research and service (COBERS) is a brand of community-based education that has been adopted by the Medical Education and Service for All Ugandans consortium. The COBERS programme is aimed at equipping students in health professional education with the knowledge, attitudes and skills required to provide appropriate health care services. For sustainability purposes, the health professional training institutions have made efforts to involve various stakeholders in the implementation of the programme. However, the actual engagement process and outcome of such efforts have not been documented. This paper documents gaps and gains made in engaging district stakeholders for community-based education. Key informant interviews, focus group discussions and document review were used to collect data. Atlas.ti, computer software for qualitative data was used to aid analysis. The analysis revealed that the adopted engagement model has registered some gains including increased awareness among district leaders about potential opportunities offered by COBERS such as boosting of human resources at health facilities, opportunities for professional development for health care workers at health facilities, and establishment of linkages between prospective employees and employers. However, the engagement model left some gaps in terms of knowledge, awareness and ownership of the programme among some sections of stakeholders. The apparent information gap about the programme among district stakeholders, especially the political leadership, may hinder concerted partnership. The findings highlight the need for health professional education institutions to broaden the scope of actively engaged stakeholders with the district level.

  7. The Educative Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerensky, V. M.

    1975-01-01

    The educative community develops and mobilizes all resources, both human and physical, throughout the community in the development of human potential. The assumption that underpins the educative community is that all people are teachers and all are learners. (Author)

  8. Evaluating arts-based cancer education using an internet survey among Alaska community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Cueva, Katie; Dignan, Mark; Lanier, Anne; Kuhnley, Regina

    2014-09-01

    Cancer, considered a rare disease among Alaska Native people as recently as the 1950s, surpassed heart disease in the 1990s to become the leading cause of mortality. In response to Alaska's village-based Community Health Workers' (CHWs) desire to learn more about cancer for themselves and the people in their communities, cancer education that incorporated the expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting was developed, implemented, and evaluated. Arts-based education integrates the dynamic wisdom and experiences of Alaska Native people and western medical knowledge to share cancer information in a culturally respectful way. Between May 2009 and March 2013, 12 5-day courses that included arts activities to support cancer information were provided for 118 CHWs in Anchorage, AK, USA. A post-course internet survey was conducted in April 2013, to learn how arts-based cancer education affected participants' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Surveys were completed by 54 of the 96 course participants; 22 course participants were lost to follow-up. As a result of integrating the arts with cancer education, respondents reported an increase in their cancer knowledge and comfort with talking about cancer. Additionally, 82 % (44) of respondents described feeling differently about cancer. By integrating the arts with cancer information, participants reported healthy behavior changes for themselves (76 %), with their families (70 %), and in their work (72 %). The expressive arts of moving, drawing, and sculpting provided a creative pathway for diverse adult learners in Alaska to increase their cancer knowledge, comfort with talking about cancer, and wellness behaviors.

  9. Elementary Health Education Guide to Better Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This curriculum guide for the elementary school portion of a K-12 health education program contains notes on eleven areas: Alcohol, Anatomy and Physiology, Community Health, Consumer Health, Dental Health, Disease Control, Family Health, Heredity and Environment, Mental Health, Nutrition, and Safety Education. The notes on each area contain a…

  10. Implementation of mass media community health education: the Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignan, M; Bahnson, J; Sharp, P; Beal, P; Smith, M; Michielutte, R

    1991-09-01

    The Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project (FCP) is a community-based health education project funded by the National Cancer Institute. The target population includes around 25 000 black women age 18 and older who reside in Forsyth County, North Carolina. The overall goal of the program is to prevent mortality from cervical cancer by promoting Pap smears and return for follow-up care when needed. Based on the principles of social marketing, a plan to reach the target population with mass media educational messages through electronic and print channels was developed. Guided by marketing objectives, the target population was divided into relatively discrete segments. The segments included church attenders, patients in waiting rooms of public and selected health providers, female students at local colleges, shoppers, viewers of radio and television, newspaper readers, and business owners and managers. Introduction of the program was based on strategies developed for reaching the target population in each segment with television, radio and print mass media messages. Qualitative assessment of the mass media developed by the program indicated that all forms of communication helped to increase awareness of the program.

  11. Early Childhood Education to Promote Health Equity: A Community Guide Economic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Ismaila; Chattopadhyay, Sajal K; Barnett, W Steven; Hahn, Robert A

    2017-03-01

    A recent Community Guide systematic review found that early childhood education (ECE) programs improve educational, social, and health-related outcomes and advance health equity because many are designed to increase enrollment for high-risk children. This follow-up economic review examines how the economic benefits of center-based ECE programs compare with their costs. Kay and Pennucci from the Washington State Institute for Public Policy, whose meta-analysis formed the basis of the Community Guide effectiveness review, conducted a benefit-cost analysis of ECE programs for low-income children in Washington State. We performed an electronic database search using both effectiveness and economic key words to identify additional cost-benefit studies published through May 2015. Kay and Pennucci also provided us with national-level benefit-cost estimates for state and district and federal Head Start programs. The median benefit-to-cost ratio from 11 estimates of earnings gains, the major benefit driver for 3 types of ECE programs (ie, state and district, federal Head Start, and model programs), was 3.39:1 (interquartile interval [IQI] = 2.48-4.39). The overall median benefit-to-cost ratio from 7 estimates of total benefits, based on all benefit components including earnings gains, was 4.19:1 (IQI = 2.62-8.60), indicating that for every dollar invested in the program, there was a return of $4.19 in total benefits. ECE programs promote both equity and economic efficiency. Evidence indicates there is positive social return on investment in ECE irrespective of the type of ECE program. The adoption of a societal perspective is crucial to understand all costs and benefits of ECE programs regardless of who pays for the costs or receives the benefits.

  12. Lessons learnt from comprehensive evaluation of community-based education in Uganda: a proposal for an ideal model community-based education for health professional training institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atuyambe Lynn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based education (CBE can provide contextual learning that addresses manpower scarcity by enabling trainees acquire requisite experiences, competence, confidence and values. In Uganda, many health professional training institutions conduct some form of community-based education (CBE. However, there is scanty information on the nature of the training: whether a curriculum exists (objectives, intended outcomes, content, implementation strategy, administration and constraints faced. The objective was to make a comprehensive assessment of CBE as implemented by Ugandan health professional training institutions to document the nature of CBE conducted and propose an ideal model with minimum requirements for health professional training institutions in Uganda. Methods We employed several methods: documentary review of curricula of 22 institutions, so as to assess the nature, purpose, outcomes, and methods of instruction and assessment; site visits to these institutions and their CBE sites, to assess the learning environment (infrastructure and resources; in-depth interviews with key people involved in running CBE at the institutions and community, to evaluate CBE implementation, challenges experienced and perceived solutions. Results CBE was perceived differently ranging from a subject, a course, a program or a project. Despite having similar curricula, institutions differ in the administration, implementation and assessment of CBE. Objectives of CBE, the curricula content and implementation strategies differ in similar institutions. On collaborative and social learning, most trainees do not reside in the community, though they work on group projects and write group reports. Lectures and skills demonstrations were the main instruction methods. Assessment involved mainly continuous assessment, oral or written reports and summative examination. Conclusion This assessment identified deficiencies in the design and implementation

  13. Community Education at Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryden, Gordon; Thomson, Peter

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe the situation in Leicestershire, England, where a group of users and staff formed The Association for Community Education to oppose severe budget cuts in the community education service. (Editor/SJL)

  14. [Self-rated health and educational level in Spain: trends by autonomous communities and gender (2001-2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Palacio, Isabel; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patricia; Rabanaque, M José

    2015-01-01

    To identify the trend in self-rated health in Spain by autonomous communities (AC) in the period 2001-2012, as well as differences by gender and age, and the influence of educational level. A cross sectional study was carried out using data from the National Health Surveys from 2001 to 2011-12 and the 2009 European Survey. A descriptive analysis was conducted that included gender, age, educational level, and the AC of residence. Logistic regression analyses were developed to explore the temporal trend and the association between educational level and self-rated health. The predictive capacity of the model was calculated using the C statistic. The prevalence of low self-rated health was higher in women with low educational level. Self-rated health improved in women with high educational level (2001:18.6% vs. 2012:14.6%). The highest prevalence of low self-rated health was observed in Andalusia, the Canary Islands, Galicia and Murcia, with differences by gender. Low educational level was associated with low self-rated health in most AC, with good predictive capacity. In all AC except Asturias, low self-rated health was more frequent in women than in men. In Spain, the prevalence of self-rated health showed no variations in the period analyzed and improved in the Balearic Islands, Catalonia, and Madrid. The prevalence of self-rated health in Spain differed by AC. Although health was unchanged during the period considered, inequalities were found in its temporal trend by educational level and gender, which could lead to an increase in health inequalities in women according educational level. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. The Impact of Household Participation in Community Based Organizations on Child Health and Education in Rural India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Mugdha; Katoch, Meghna; Datta Gupta, Nabanita

    This paper explores whether rural Indian households’ membership in community based organizations (CBOs) affect child human capital formation in terms of health and education. Using the 2005 Indian Human Development Survey (IHDS), both OLS and IV models show that membership in one or more CBOs...

  16. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Department of Community Health & Primary Care, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Idi-Araba, P.M.B. ... the child's health, culturally based beliefs and ..... immunization safety as this was a rural ... Charles SW, Olalekan AU, Peter MN,.

  17. Effectiveness of a Multifaceted Community-Based Promotion Strategy on Use of GetHealthyHarlem.org, a Local Community Health Education Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle; Mateo, Katrina F; Morita, Haruka; Hutchinson, Carly; Cohall, Alwyn T

    2015-07-01

    The use of health communication extends beyond simply promoting or disseminating a particular product or proposed behavior change; it involves the systematic and strategic integration and execution of evidence-based, theory-driven, and community engagement strategies. Much like in public health intervention design based on health behavior theory, health communication seeks to encourage the target audience to make a positive behavior change through core concepts such as understanding and specifying the target audience, tailoring messages based on audience segmentation, and continually conducting evaluation of specific and overarching goals. While our first article "Development of a Culturally Relevant Consumer Health Information Website for Harlem, New York" focused on the design, development, and initial implementation of GetHealthyHarlem.org between 2004 and 2009, this article delves into the process of promoting the website to increase its use and then evaluating use among website visitors. Just as for the development of the website, we used community-based participatory research methods, health behavior theory, and health communication strategies to systemically develop and execute a health communication plan with the goals of increasing awareness of GetHealthyHarlem.org in Harlem, driving online traffic, and having the community recognize it as a respected community resource dedicated to improving health in Harlem. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  18. [Health education for major parasitic diseases in rural community of China: current status and future development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Lin, Dan-dan

    2013-08-01

    Owing to human parasitic diseases being related to behavior, the health education as an important measure to prevent parasite infections through human behavior intervention, has played an important role in the process of parasitic disease prevention and control in rural area of China. This paper comments on the development history of the health education for parasitic disease prevention and control, current intervention modes and the effect of the health education for parasitic diseases in rural area. This paper also summarizes the role and impact of different modes of the health education for parasitic disease prevention and control and gives some suggestions to future development of the health education in rural area under current prevalent situation of parasitic diseases.

  19. Geriatric nursing education in community health: CareLink--partnering for excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmens, Donna; Goldstein, Jill M; Clarke, Kitty; Moriarty, Mari; Soberman, Rhonda Karp; Gardner, Daniel S

    2009-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how participation in the CareLink program influenced the community health knowledge and skill of baccalaureate nursing students regarding the care of community-dwelling older adults. Students were assigned three to four clients each during their 14-week clinical placement with a home care agency, situated in a naturally occurring retirement community or senior center. Students contracted with their clients to set goals and provided standardized health assessments and teaching. Students completed pretest and posttest surveys, and attended focus groups to address their learning. Students' public health nursing and cultural competence improved significantly. The CareLink program provides a meaningful learning experience for baccalaureate nursing students. Attitudes toward older adults and community health nursing in general shifted to acknowledge that older adults have strengths and resilience not previously acknowledged.

  20. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2Department of Community Health, University of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. ... public health problem that can lead to a great burden of disability in the community. ..... women. Equally worthy of note, is the fact that a higher proportion of females ...

  1. 社区艾滋病健康教育的研究现状%Research status quo of community AIDS health education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛海燕

    2014-01-01

    分析了艾滋病的传播途径、流行现状及社区艾滋病知识的知晓情况,总结社区艾滋病健康教育模式、重要性、健康教育内容及现存问题,从而指导社区艾滋病健康教育的实施,促进艾滋病健康教育在社区的开展。%It analyzed the transmission route and epidemic situation of AIDS, and the awareness on community AIDS knowledge.It summed up the com-munity AIDS health education model,importance,content of health education and the existing problems in the community AIDS health education,so as to guide the implementation of community AIDS health education,and promote the development in AIDS health education in community.

  2. Collaborating with Communities and Higher Education to Address the Health-care Needs of Individuals with Disabilities in Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna J. Cech

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with disabilities experience inequities in access to health care, education, employment, and social inclusion. Causes for Change International (CCI, a non-governmental Organization (NGO, using a community-based rehabilitation approach has worked for 20 years to build self-sufficiency, improve health-care services, and education for women, children, and persons with disabilities in Ecuador. CCI initially addressed health; advocacy for individuals with disabilities; and promoted educational opportunities for children with disabilities, starting in one rural community. CCI’s outreach has expanded through Ecuador’s coastal provinces, Andean provinces, and Galapagos Islands. CCI also focused on local health-care workforce development, developing employment skills for individuals with disabilities and social inclusion for this population. CCI collaborated with local organizations, government, and universities to provide resources, managed by local leadership. Key program elements of the CCI approach include (1 develop trust between CCI, local communities, local agencies, and government; (2 empower local groups to assume leadership and sustain programs; (3 support communities and groups invested in developing self-sufficiency; and (4 strengthen collaborations and partnerships between local and international organizations, universities, and government agencies. Key lessons learned by CCI are to be supportive of cultural differences; understand that limited financial and material resources may limit the program development; recognize that it is difficult not to foster dependent relationships with communities and appreciate the importance of working with and within the host country’s governmental systems. CCI is expanding its service base to other regions of Ecuador and is focusing on development of the Ecuadorian health-care workforce and social inclusion opportunities for individuals with disability. The efforts of a small NGO have

  3. Community Residents Health Education and Health Promotion%社区居民健康教育与健康促进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘荣

    2015-01-01

    With the development of community health services, community health system reform, community nurses getting into the role, so more and more attention is paid to community care. community health education is an important part of community care. it also determines the community residents’ awareness of health, promote the health of residents, health education must be good for the residents, the two complement each other. through a program, organized and systematic education, which promotes people to voluntarily adopt actions that are conducive to health, eliminate or reduce risk factors, reduce morbidity, disability rate and mortality, improve the quality of life, and evaluate the effect of education.%随着社区卫生服务的深入发展,社区医疗机制的变革,社区护士渐入角色,所以社区护理越来越被重视。而社区健康教育则是社区护理的重要组成部分。它也决定了社区居民对健康的认知度,促进居民健康,必须做好居民的健康教育,两者相辅相成。应通过有计划、有组织、有系统的教育活动,促使人们自愿地采用有利于健康的行动,消除或降低危险因素,降低发病率、伤残率和死亡率,提高生活质量,并对教育效果作出评价。

  4. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    Cervical cancer remains a major public health challenge in developing countries ... relation to knowledge on cervical cancer, primary level of education ... Latin America and Southeast Asia. ... practices such as level of awareness, educational.

  5. The Impact of Validated, Online Health Education Resources on Patient and Community Members' Satisfaction and Health Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atack, Lynda; Luke, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Objective: While access to health education information has become easier, the quality of information retrieved from the Internet varies considerably. In response to the need for accessible, quality health information that is tailored to meet individual patient needs, a patient education website, called PEPTalk, was developed. The site houses text…

  6. Independent and combined influence of homeownership, occupation, education, income, and community poverty on physical health in persons with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Leigh F; Martin, Kathryn Remmes; Shreffler, Jack; Kumar, Deepak; Schoster, Britta; Kaufman, Jay S; Schwartz, Todd A

    2011-05-01

    To examine the independent and combined influence of individual- and community-level socioeconomic status (SES) measures on physical health status outcomes in people with self-reported arthritis. From 2004-2005, 968 participants completed a telephone survey assessing health status, chronic conditions, community characteristics, and sociodemographic variables. Individual-level SES measures used included homeownership, occupation (professional or not), educational attainment (less than high school, high school degree, and more than high school), and income ($45,000). Community poverty (2000 US Census block group percentage of individuals living below the poverty line [low, medium, and high]) was used as a community-level SES measure. Outcomes were physical functioning (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 12 version 2 physical component summary [PCS]), functional disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire [HAQ]), and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) Healthy Days physical and limited activity days, and were analyzed via multivariable regressions. When entered separately, all individual-level SES variables were significantly (P education is reduced and marginally significant for the PCS and number of physically unhealthy days. No effects were seen for occupation, homeownership, and community poverty. Findings confirm that after adjusting for important covariates, lower individual- and community-level SES measures are associated with poorer physical health outcomes, while household income is the strongest predictor (as measured by both significance and effect) of poorer health status in final models. Studies not having participant-reported income available should make use of other SES measures, as they do independently predict physical health. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Has the Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh Addressed the Educational Divide in Accessing Health Care?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rao, Mala; Singh, Prabal Vikram; Katyal, Anuradha; Samarth, Amit; Bergkvist, Sofi; Renton, Adrian; Netuveli, Gopalakrishnan

    2016-01-01

    .... We aimed to assess whether the innovative state-funded Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh state launched in 2007, has achieved equity of access to hospital inpatient...

  8. Health education: an experience in rural communities of Manabí, Ecuador

    OpenAIRE

    Noemi Bottasso; Jazmin Cazón

    2016-01-01

    Health is a very important issue for every human being. A person with deteriorated health can’t study, work and enjoy thoroughly of his/her life. Right to health is a fundamental right of every human being. Rural marginal zones of region Manabí inhabitants suffer serious difficulties in access of health services, for different reasons. With the objective of improve health access, we realized a training to 14 communities in order to introduce First Aid Kits with essential palliatives medicatio...

  9. Effectiveness of a Community-Based Health Education Intervention in Cervical Cancer Prevention in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Chania

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women’s beliefs are one of the main reasons for not undergoing Pap-test for cervical cancer prevention. Health education programs could help change these beliefs and motivate women to adopt a preventive health behavior.Objectives: This study aims to assess the modification in women’s beliefs and behavior about cervical cancer prevention after the implementation of a health education intervention.Methodology: A health education intervention for cervical cancer prevention was implemented to 300 women in two prefectures of southern Greece. The experimental group received a 120-minute health education intervention, based on the Health Beliefs Model (HBM including a lecture, discussion and leaflets. The hypotheses were a will this brief intervention change women’s beliefs (perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer, benefits and barriers ofundergoing the Pap-test? b will this change in beliefs sustain in six months follow-up period? and c will women undergo pap-test in six months period? The women filled in an anonymous questionnaire, based on the Health Belief Model (HBM, before, immediately after and six months after the program.Results: The health education intervention significantly modified women’s beliefs and behaviors towards pap-test. The greater changes in women’s beliefs were observed in their sense of susceptibility towards the disease and the benefits of prevention which were sustained or improved after six months. Perceived barriers to undergo the Paptest, pain, embarrassment, and worry for the results decreased immediately after the program but started relapsingin the six month follow up period. Moreover, 88.1% of the women answered that they had underwent a Pap-test during the following six months.Conclusions: This health education intervention modified women’s beliefs and behavior about cervical cancer prevention. Short, low cost, health education interventions for breast cancer prevention to women can be

  10. Development of Community Based Learning and Education system within Undergraduate Medical Curriculum of Patan Academy of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, K P; Upadhyay, S K; Bhandary, S; Gongal, R N; Karki, A

    2016-01-01

    In response to continuing health disparities between rural and urban population, Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) was established in 2008. It aimed to produce physicians who would be able and willing to serve in the rural areas. In order to empower them with understanding and tools to address health issues of rural population, an innovative curriculum was developed. This paper aims to describe the community based learning and education (CBLE) system within the overall framework of PAHS undergraduate medical curriculum. A Medical School Steering Committee (MSSC) comprising of a group of committed medical educators led the curriculum development process. The committee reviewed different medical curricula, relevant literatures, and held a series of consultative meetings with the stakeholders and experts within and outside Nepal. This process resulted in defining the desirable attributes, terminal competencies of the graduates, and then the actual development of the entire curriculum including CBLE. Given the critical importance of population health, 25% of the curricular weightage was allocated to the Community Health Sciences (CHS). CBLE system was developed as the primary means of delivering CHS curriculum. The details of CBLE system was finalized for implementation with the first cohort of medical students commencing their studies from June 2010. The CBLE, a key educational strategy of PAHS curriculum, is envisaged to improve retention and performance of PAHS graduates and, thereby, health status of rural population. However, whether or not that goal will be achieved needs to be verified after the graduates join the health system.

  11. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    payment for health care services; a widely used strategy to supplement ... and opportunities for sustainable health care financing for low income communities in sub-. Saharan ..... funding and rising costs for health care services, More so, evidence from research studies have ... provider payment method has the potential to.

  12. Engaging an Urban African American Community to Deliver Cognitive Health Education to Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Jennifer; Nolan, Timiya S; Vo, Jacqueline B; Gisiger-Camata, Silvia; Meneses, Karen

    2016-12-28

    Little is known about cognitive changes among African American (AA) breast cancer survivors (BCS). Here, we report our experience with engagement of leaders of urban AA churches in Birmingham, Alabama to deliver and evaluate Think Well: Healthy Living to Improve Cognitive Function, an educational cognitive health program for BCS. The Think Well team engaged leaders of urban AA churches using a 7-step process: 1) identify leaders, 2) develop connection with leaders, 3) assess AA community preferences, 4) tailor for cultural relevance, 5) plan seminars, 6) deliver seminars, and 7) evaluate cultural relevance and overall program quality. Program evaluation was via a 22-item survey and sociodemographic questionnaire. Data from AA participants were analyzed using SPSS. The engagement process resulted in sustained partnerships with three urban AA churches and delivery of three Think Well seminars to 172 participants. Of the 172 participants, 138 (80%) AA participants (40 BCS, 98 co-survivors) returned the program survey. Respondents reported Think Well to be culturally relevant (90%) and of high quality (94%). Think Well was developed and evaluated with the collaboration of urban AA church leaders. Engaging church leaders facilitated reach of AA BCS. Partnership facilitated a culturally relevant, high quality program for AA BCS and co-survivors.

  13. Development and evaluation of a health education intervention against Taenia solium in a rural community in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, E; Flisser, A; Schantz, P M; Gleizer, M; Loya, M; Plancarte, A; Avila, G; Allan, J; Craig, P; Bronfman, M; Wijeyaratne, P

    1997-02-01

    A comprehensive study was undertaken in a rural community in the state of Morelos, Mexico to evaluate health education as an intervention measure against Taenia solium. An educational program was developed to promote recognition and knowledge of the transmission of the parasite and to improve hygienic behavior and sanitary conditions that foster transmission. The effects of educational intervention were evaluated by measuring changes in knowledge and practices and prevalence of human taeniasis and swine cysticercosis before and after the campaign. The health education strategy was implemented with the active participation of the population based on the information obtained from a sociologic study. A questionnaire was designed and used before, immediately after the intervention, and six months later. Statistically significant improvements occurred in knowledge of the parasite, its life cycle, and how it is acquired by humans; however, changes in behavior related to transmission were less dramatic and persistent. The prevalences of cysticercosis in pigs at the start of the education intervention were 2.6% and 5.2% by lingual examination and antibody detection (immunoblot assay), respectively, and approximately one year after the intervention they were 0% and 1.2% (P < 0.05). These changes were accompanied by significant reductions in the reported access of pigs to sources of infection and freedom to roam. We conclude that health education, developed along with community involvement, reduced opportunities for transmission of T. solium in the human-pig cycle.

  14. Learning the moral economy of commodified health care: "community education," failed consumers, and the shaping of ethical clinician-citizens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin-Fish, Michele

    2011-06-01

    Leaders of health professional schools often support community-based education as a means of promoting emerging practitioners' awareness of health disparities and commitment to serving the poor. Yet, most programs do not teach about the causes of health disparities, raising questions regarding what social and political lessons students learn from these experiences. This article examines the ways in which community-based clinical education programs help shape the subjectivities of new dentists as ethical clinician-citizens within the US commodified health care system. Drawing on ethnographic research during volunteer and required community-based programs and interviews with participants, I demonstrate three implicit logics that students learned: (1) dialectical ideologies of volunteer entitlement and recipient debt; (2) forms of justification for the often inferior care provided to "failed" consumers (patients with Medicaid or uninsured); and (3) specific forms of obligations characterizing the ethical clinician-citizen. I explore the ways these messages reflected the structured relations of both student encounters and the overarching health care system, and examine the strategies faculty supervisors undertook to challenge these messages and relations. Finally, I argue that promoting commitments to social justice in health care should not rely on cultivating altruism, but should instead be pursued through educating new practitioners about the lives of poor people, the causal relationships between poverty and poor health, and attention to the structure of health care and provider-patient interactions. This approach involves shining a critical light on America's commodified health care system as an arena based in relations of power and inequality.

  15. A Guide to Curriculum Review for Basic Nursing Education. Orientation to Primary Health Care and Community Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Geneva (Switzerland).

    A systematic procedure for reviewing a basic nursing curriculum, identifying needed changes, and developing and implementing a plan for change is described. Also examined are techniques used to evaluate the plan and to determine the relevance of the revised curriculum to community health needs. After presenting information on primary health care…

  16. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. ... This is one of the factors that determine whether or ..... Expired vaccines found in fridge / cold box .... date vaccine temperature monitoring charts. were stored on refrigerator door ...

  17. Is group singing special? Health, well-being and social bonds in community-based adult education classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Eiluned; Launay, Jacques; Machin, Anna; Dunbar, Robin I M

    Evidence demonstrates that group singing improves health and well-being, but the precise mechanisms remain unknown. Given that cohesive social networks also positively influence health, we focus on the social aspects of singing, exploring whether improvements in health and well-being are mediated by stronger social bonds, both to the group as a whole (collective-bonding) and to individual classmates (relational-bonding). To do so, seven newly-formed community-based adult education classes (four singing, N=84, and three comparison classes studying creative writing or crafts, N=51) were followed over seven months. Self-report questionnaire data on mental and physical health, well-being, and social bonding were collected at Months 1, 3 and 7. We demonstrate that physical and mental health and satisfaction with life significantly improved over time in both conditions. Path analysis did not show any indirect effects via social bonding of Condition on health and well-being. However, higher collective-bonding at timepoint 3 significantly predicted increased flourishing, reduced anxiety and improved physical health independently of baseline levels. In contrast, relational-bonding showed no such effects, suggesting that it is feeling part of a group that particularly yields health and well-being benefits. Moreover, these results indicate that singing may not improve health and well-being more than other types of activities. Nonetheless, these findings encourage further work to refine our understanding of the social aspects of community-based adult education classes in promoting health, well-being and community cohesion.

  18. An educational program for mental health nurses and community health workers from pacific island countries: results from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Kim; Park, Tanya; Trueman, Scott; Redman-Maclaren, Michelle; Casella, Evan; Woods, Cindy

    2014-05-01

    Delivery of mental health care relies upon professionals with the latest evidence upon which to base their care. This research reports on a pre-test/post-test evaluation of a four-week education program delivered to Pacific Island participants (n = 18) to enhance knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs). The education program used a combination of formal lectures, tutorials, clinical visits, simulations, and laboratory sessions. The measure used was the Nurse Self Report (NSR) questionnaire. Results indicate an education intervention can be an effective tool for improving the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of Pacific Island people who care for persons experiencing mental health problems.

  19. Microeconomic loans and health education to families in impoverished communities: implications for the HIV pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow D; Bronson, John D; Teter, Caroline J; Wykoff, Randolph F

    2004-01-01

    Poverty is among the root causes of death and poor health worldwide. Project HOPE's Village Health Bank (VHB) program is a public health intervention that combines integrated microcredit lending and health education. Groups of 18 to 25 women receive small loans, and biweekly, one-hour health education sessions. Since 1993, about 50,000 women in 949 VHBs have participated in seven countries in the Americas, Africa, and Southeast Asia, receiving more than US$25 million in loans and 8,445 hours of health education. Members of VHBs are charged modest interest rates that enable them to become self-sufficient (eg, able to cover all operating charges, including the costs of the health education staff, and the necessary loan capital to continue without infusion of outside resources). The VHB program produces substantial economic improvements for individuals and groups, and benefits in health knowledge and behaviors, including increased utilization of healthcare services. Data from Guatemala, Malawi, and Thailand demonstrate that VHBs in countries with high HIV prevalence have been comparably successful in spite of the enormous added burdens of chronic illness, deaths, and orphans in need of support. For example, in 2004, 48 percent of 266 VHB members in Malawi experienced at least one death in their household in the preceding year, and 67 percent housed one or more orphans with an average of two orphans per household. Because of the unique combination of increased household economic stability and improved health knowledge, the VHB program is now being adapted to families of people affected by HIV/AIDS, including orphans.

  20. Impact of health education based intervention on community's awareness of dengue and its prevention in Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuma, Yadlapalli S; Burman, Deepa; Kumari, Rita; Lamkang, Anjana S; Babu, Bontha V

    2017-03-01

    Dengue is endemic in India. The capital, Delhi, continues to witness a higher number of cases due to urbanization-related factors. This study is intended to implement health education towards prevention of dengue, and to assess its impact on people's knowledge and practices related to causes and prevention of dengue among urban poor in Delhi. Pre- ( n = 484) and post- ( n = 496) intervention surveys from 15 sub-clusters from five slums/slum-like settlements in Delhi were carried out. Health education based intervention was carried out through partnership with the municipal bodies and non-governmental organizations. Socio-demographic characteristics of participants were similar in both surveys. Intervention resulted in significant increase in knowledge on cause, symptom perception and mosquito behaviour in terms of breeding and biting habits. Practice of personal protection measures increased significantly. The participation of people increased during intervention compared to the routine programme. Health education based interventions are instrumental in improving people's knowledge and behaviour. Hence, routine health educational activities as a supportive strategy in the health system need to be strengthened. New integrated approaches such as eco-bio-social approaches with community participation are to be developed and tested in endemic settings like Delhi.

  1. Community as locus for health formal and non-formal education: the significance of ecological and collaborative research for promoting health literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Castanheira Pais

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Health Organization (2002 considers that a balance between government, community and individual action is necessary for health education and promotion, recognizing that nongovernmental organizations, local groups, and community institutions are central in this process. This argument reinforces the idea that individuals should be empowered and encouraged to make use of accurate health-related information. This paper highlights the potential of a socio-political perspective for the development of health literacy within children and adolescents, and presents two studies conducted in two daily life contexts: a community organization and a school. Both studies are based on methodological pluralism and collaborative research approaches and explore the promotion of health knowledge in formal and informal settings. Study 1 is based on a mixed methodology, using focus group discussions and questionnaires with children and youth with chronic diseases to explore the perceived impact of their participation in support associations. Study 2 presents four intensive case-studies in schools where adolescents used community profiling, a participatory research methodology, to explore health rights and access to healthcare in both a historical and prospective vision. The results enable a deeper understanding on how powerful tool ccommunity resources can be for individual and collective empowerment on health issues.

  2. Impact of an interprofessional community-based educational experience on students' perceptions of other health professions and older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furze, Jennifer; Lohman, Helene; Mu, Keli

    2008-01-01

    Caring for older adults has become increasingly complex due to multiple health and societal factors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of an interprofessional community-based educational project on students' attitudes toward other health care professions and older adults. A pretest and posttest quasi-experimental research design was implemented with 64 participating students from four health care professions (nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and pharmacy). These students completed the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) and Survey of Attitudes on Aging Scale (SAAS) before and following an educational experience with older adults. Qualitative data were collected through student reflection journals and focus groups with participating students. The results of the study showed that interprofessional community-based learning had a significant impact on some students' attitudes toward older adults. The difference between pretest and posttest reached a statistically significant level on the SAAS in occupational therapy (p = 0.013) and physical therapy students (p = 0.044). No significant differences, however, were found between the pretest and posttest in pharmacy (p = 0.097) or nursing students (p = 0.144). Similarly, the experience also had a positive impact on some students' perceptions of other health care professions as measured by the IEPS. A significant difference was found between the pretest and posttest in occupational therapy (p = 0.000) and physical therapy students (p = 0.028). This study indicates that interprofessional community-based learning can be an effective method for some students to increase their understanding and respect toward other health professionals and older adults.

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2Department of Health Policy and Management, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine and University ... 86 (21%) had primary school education, 210 (51.3%) were married, and 357 (87.3%) were employed. ...... patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions in. 5. .... Psychological Assessment 1995; 7 (3):309-319.

  4. An Educational Program for Mental Health Nurses and Community Health Workers from Pacific Island Countries: Results from a Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Usher, Kim; Park, Tanya; Trueman, Scott; Redman-MacLaren, Michelle; Casella, Evan; Woods, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    Delivery of mental health care relies upon professionals with the latest evidence upon which to base their care. This research reports on a pre-test/post-test evaluation of a four-week education program delivered to Pacific Island participants (n = 18) to enhance knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs). The education program used a combination of formal lectures, tutorials, clinical visits, simulations, and laboratory sessions. The measure used was the Nurse Self Report (NSR) questionnaire. R...

  5. Changes in knowledge and practices related to taeniasis/cysticercosis after health education in a south Indian community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, A M; Mohan, V R; Muliyil, J; Dorny, P; Rajshekhar, V

    2012-09-01

    A health education programme for taeniasis/cysticercosis was implemented and evaluated among schoolchildren and the general community in a rural block in southern India, an area that is endemic for cysticercosis. The baseline survey among 831 participants from three randomly selected villages showed poor knowledge regarding the spread of taeniasis and neurocysticercosis. There was also a lack of adequate hygiene and sanitation practices. Health education was given in these villages and in the schools located in these villages regarding the lifecycle of the pork tapeworm, spread of taeniasis and cysticercosis, and prevention of these conditions. The post-intervention test conducted 6 months later among 1060 participants revealed a 46% increase in the overall score of knowledge and practices. Awareness about the mode of spread of taeniasis and cysticercosis improved by almost 3 times and the reported practice of washing hands with soap and water before eating improved by 4.8 times and after using the toilet by 3.6 times. One person who reported the passage of tapeworm segments was confirmed to be a carrier of Taenia solium and was treated. The health education given on prevention of taeniasis and cysticercosis was useful in improving the knowledge and practices of the community and also in diagnosing taeniasis through self-reporting.

  6. Experience of health education about diabetes in community%社区糖尿病健康宣教体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强文莉

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To explore the health education about diabetes in community.Methods:68 patients with diabetes mellitus were selected,the clinical data of these patients and health education experience were analyzed retrospectively.Results:Health education guidance was through the treatment of diabetes,it can improve the quality of life of the patients.Conclusion:Through the guidance of clinical health education can improve the knowledge on diabetes of diabetic patients,adhere to scientific,systematic treatment in order to improve the quality of life of patients.%目的:探讨社区糖尿病患者的健康宣教指导。方法:收治患者68例,对其临床资料及健康宣教经验进行回顾性分析。结果:健康宣教指导贯穿糖尿病患者治疗的始终,能明显改善糖尿病患者的生活质量。结论:通过临床健康宣教指导可以提高患者对糖尿病的认知水平,坚持科学、系统地治疗,以提高患者的生活质量。

  7. Improving health and education outcomes for children in remote communities: A cross-sector and developmental evaluation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Maria Jones

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Early childhood is one of the most influential developmental life stages. Attainments at this stage will have implications for the quality of life children experience as they transition to adulthood. Children residing in remote Australia are exposed to socioeconomic disadvantage that can contribute to developmental delays and resultant poorer education and health outcomes. Complex contributing factors in far west New South Wales have resulted in children with speech and fine motor skill delays experiencing no to limited access to allied health services for a number of decades. More recently, growing awareness that no single policy, government agency, or program could effectively respond to these complexities or ensure appropriate allied health service access for children in these communities has led to the development of the Allied Health in Outback Schools Program, which has been operational since 2009. The program is underpinned by cross-sector partnerships and a shared aspirational aim to improve the developmental outcomes of children to enhance their later life opportunities. It was identified early that the initiative had the potential to deliver mutually beneficial outcomes for communities and participating partner organisations. Over the last five years the program has been the catalyst for partnership consolidation, expansion and diversification. The developmental evaluation approach to continuous program adaptation and refinement has provided valuable insights that have informed health and education policy and enabled the program to be responsive to changing community needs, emerging policy and funding reforms. This article explores the evolution of the program partnerships, their contribution to program success and longevity, and their capacity to respond to an emergent and dynamic environment. The authors propose that a community-centred and developmental approach to program innovation and implementation in remote locations is

  8. Family medicine education in rural communities as a health service intervention supporting recruitment and retention of physicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soles, Trina Larsen; Ruth Wilson, C.; Oandasan, Ivy F.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a pan-Canadian rural education road map to advance the recruitment and retention of family physicians in rural, remote, and isolated regions of Canada in order to improve access and health care outcomes for these populations. Composition of the task force Members of the task force were chosen from key stakeholder groups including educators, practitioners, the College of Family Physicians of Canada education committee chairs, deans, chairs of family medicine, experts in rural education, and key decision makers. The task force members were purposefully selected to represent a mix of key perspectives needed to ensure the work produced was rigorous and of high quality. Observers from the Canadian Medical Association and Health Canada’s Council on Health Workforce, and representatives from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, were also invited to provide their perspectives and to encourage and coordinate multiorganization action. Methods The task force commissioned a focused literature review of the peer-reviewed and gray literature to examine the status of rural medical education, training, and practice in relation to the health needs of rural and remote communities in Canada, and also completed an environmental scan. Report The environmental scan included interviews with more than 100 policy makers, government representatives, providers, educators, learners, and community leaders; 17 interviews with practising rural physicians; and 2 surveys administered to all 17 faculties of medicine. The gaps identified from the focused literature review and the results of the environmental scan will be used to develop the task force’s recommendations for action, highlighting the role of key partners in implementation and needed action. Conclusion The work of the task force provides an opportunity to bring the various partners together in a coordinated way. By understanding who is responsible and the actions each stakeholder

  9. Indian Health Service: Community Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... provide for community health. A variety of programs, disciplines, strategies and interventions work together to pursue the ... Office of Finance and Accounting - 10E54 Office of Human Resources - 11E53A Office of Information Technology - 07E57B Office of ...

  10. Use of the Home Safety Self-Assessment Tool (HSSAT) within Community Health Education to Improve Home Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Beverly P; Almonte, Tiffany; Vasil, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    This exploratory research examined the benefits of a health education program utilizing the Home Safety Self-Assessment Tool (HSSAT) to increase perceived knowledge of home safety, recognition of unsafe activities, ability to safely perform activities, and develop home safety plans of 47 older adults. Focus groups in two senior centers explored social workers' perspectives on use of the HSSAT in community practice. Results for the health education program found significant differences between reported knowledge of home safety (p = .02), ability to recognize unsafe activities (p = .01), safely perform activities (p = .04), and develop a safety plan (p = .002). Social workers identified home safety as a major concern and the HSSAT a promising assessment tool. Research has implications for reducing environmental fall risks.

  11. Impact of health education on community knowledge, attitudes and behaviour towards solid waste management in Al Ghobeiry, Beirut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karout, N; Altuwaijri, S

    2012-07-01

    The risks posed by accumulation of solid waste are most obvious in developing countries, where waste collection and treatment is often inadequate. This study aimed to determine the impact of a health education intervention (based on lectures and focus group discussions) on community knowledge, attitudes and behaviours concerning solid waste management in Al Ghobeiry, Beirut. A randomly selected sample of 320 inhabitants were divide into intervention and control groups who completed the same questionnaire in the pre- and post-intervention phases. Compared with the control group the intervention group, who attended the health education sessions, showed: significantly better knowledge about the problems of and diseases spread by accumulation of solid waste; better attitudes to management of solid waste collection; and improved practices in terms of handling and recycling of household waste. There was an observed increased participation by people in cleaning campaigns and voluntary work in all the municipality activities.

  12. Air Pollution Affects Community Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shy, Carl M.; Finklea, John F.

    1973-01-01

    Community Health and Environmental Surveillance System (CHESS), a nationwide program relating community health to environmental quality, is designed to evaluate existing environmental standards, obtain health intelligence for new standards, and document health benefits of air pollution control. (BL)

  13. Dental Health Education: Rhetoric or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions for facilitating dental health education programs in public schools include: (1) determining who will be responsible for dental health education; (2) involving parents; (3) using community health resources; and (4) assessing the results of programs. (JN)

  14. Evaluation of a Pilot Nutrition Education Program Delivered by Hmong Community Health Workers (CHWs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanette Treiber

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many members of the Hmong population in the United States suffer from comparatively bad health. Moreover, disease prevention messaging that has traditionally been used through various media and healthcare outlets is not as successful with the Hmong as with the general population, due in part to cultural barriers. This paper explores whether community health workers (CHWs may be a potentially successful way to deliver lessons in disease prevention, especially messages on healthy eating, drinking, and exercising. In addition, it explores the potential impact of a CHW program on participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP. Following a literature review, a pilot project that used CHWs in the Hmong Community of Sacramento, California is described. It used KAP (Knowledge, Attitude, Practice measures in a pre-post test. Statistically significant improvement was achieved in knowledge and attitude, and practice, but not in SNAP participation. The program and CHWs were well received as measured by a satisfaction survey of the 131 participants. Overall the pilot project proved to be successful.

  15. Health education in the Spanish education system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedrero-García Encarnación

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Health education is an instrument of Health Promotion that seeks to influence the development of healthy lifestyles by eliminating risk factors and thus influencing in a positive way the health of the population. One of the objectives of the educational system is to educate for the development of the integral health of the students as well as to provide the appropriate formation so that they have a healthy vital development from a physical perspective like psychological. To this end, the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport and in collaboration with the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality work on the development of actions and the implementation of stable programs of education and health promotion in the school environment With the purpose of fomenting and supporting an educational model directed to the development of the integral health of the whole educative community.

  16. 社区护士开展健康教育现状调查%Investigation on the current situation of community nurses to develop health education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周君妹

    2016-01-01

    目的:调查社区护士开展健康教育的现状,分析形成原因,为日后有效开展社区健康教育提供依据。方法:随机选取社区护士150例,通过问卷调查获取社区健康教育情况。结果:95.8%社区护士认为开展社区教育极其重要,94.7%护士到社区以发放宣传资料、利用宣传橱窗的方式开展健康教育,但能主动参与社区健康教育的仅29.8%,主要原因是社区护士本身缺乏健康教育知识、缺乏活动经费、人员不足、社区居民热情度不高等。结论:开展成功的社区健康教育,需要社区护士本身有较好素质和知识技能,也需要社区居民配合和经费。%Objective:To investigate the current situation of community nurses to develop health education,and analyze the formation reasons,and provide evidence for the effective development of community health education.Methods:150 cases of community nurses were randomly selected.The community health education situation was obtained through questionnaire survey. Results:95.8% community nurses thought that developing community education was extremely important.94.7% nurses developed health education by distributing publicity materials and using the way of propaganda window in community,but only 29.8% could actively participate in community health education.The main reason was community nurses lack of the health education knowledge,lack of activity funds,lack of personnel,not high community residents enthusiasm.Conclusion:Developing successful community health education needs than community nurses have a good quality and knowledge skills,also needs the community residents coordination and funds.

  17. Effectiveness of the Rural Trauma Team Development Course for Educating Nurses and Other Health Care Providers at Rural Community Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Thein Hlaing; Hollister, Lisa; Scheumann, Christopher; Konger, Jennifer; Opoku, Dazar

    2016-01-01

    The study evaluates (1) health care provider perception of the Rural Trauma Team Development Course (RTTDC); (2) improvement in acute trauma emergency care knowledge; and (3) early transfer of trauma patients from rural emergency departments (EDs) to a verified trauma center. A 1-day, 8-hour RTTDC was given to 101 nurses and other health care providers from nine rural community hospitals from 2011 to 2013. RTTDC participants completed questionnaires to address objectives (1) and (2). ED and trauma registry data were queried to achieve objective (3) for assessing reduction in ED time (EDT), from patient arrival to decision to transfer and ED length of stay (LOS). The RTTDC was positively perceived by health care providers (96.3% of them completed the program). Significant improvement in 13 of the 19 knowledge items was observed in nurses. Education intervention was an independent predictor in reducing EDT by 28 minutes and 95% confidence interval (CI) [-57, -0.1] at 6 months post-RTTDC, and 29 minutes and 95% CI [-53, -6] at 12 months post-RTTDC. Similar results were observed with ED LOS. The RTTDC is well-perceived as an education program. It improves acute trauma emergency care knowledge in rural health care providers. It promotes early transfer of severely injured patients to a higher level of care.

  18. Partnering With Community-Dwelling Individuals With Diabetes for Health Behavior Change Using Action Plans: An Innovation in Health Professionals Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry Hultquist, Teresa; Brown, Sara Goomis; Geske, Jenenne; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Waibel-Rycek, Denise

    2015-11-01

    Health care practitioners support or hinder an individual's attempts to self-manage health behavior. Practitioners must understand an individual's health needs and goals to effectively partner for behavior change. Self-management support (SMS) promote efforts toward positive health behavior change. Practitioners need training to provide effective SMS, beginning with their formal education. The purpose of this educational practice project was to integrate an evidence-based intervention (SMS using action plans) into a nursing curriculum. Three sequential steps included (1) providing foundational SMS education, (2) SMS application with students' personal action plans, and (3) implementing SMS with community-dwelling individuals with diabetes. Students (n = 130) partnered with participants (n = 85), developing short- (n = 240) and long-term (n = 99) action plans during home visits. The average baseline Diabetes Empowerment Scale score measuring participant's perceived psychosocial diabetes management self-efficacy was 4.3 (1-5 scale, SD = 0.51, n = 83). Most common short-term actions related to physical activity (n = 100, 42%) and healthy eating (n = 61, 25%). Average participant confidence level was 7.7 (SD = 1.9, 0-10 scale). Short-term goal evaluation (n = 209) revealed 66% (n = 137) were met more than 50% of the time. Both participants (99%) and students (99%) expressed satisfaction with home visit and action plan experiences. This teaching-learning experience is replicable and applicable to any professional health care student.

  19. Community Bioethics: The Health Decisions Community Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tom; Mrgudic, Kate

    1993-01-01

    Sees health care decision making posing variety of complex issues for individuals, families, and providers. Describes Health Decisions Community Council (HDCC), community-based bioethics committee established to offer noninstitutional forum for discussion of health care dilemmas. Notes that social work skills and values for autonomy and…

  20. Nursing care community health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Acosta-Salazar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Process Nursing Care (PAE is a systematic tool that facilitates the scientificity of care in community practice nurse, the application of scientific method in community practice, allows nursing to provide care in logical, systematic and comprehensive reassessing interventions to achieve the proposed results. It began with the valuation of Marjory Gordon Functional Patterns and then at the stage of diagnosis and planning North American Nursing Diagnosis Association (NANDA, Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC and Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC is interrelate. It is a descriptive and prospective study. Diagnosis was made by applying the instruments measuring scale of the socio-demographic characteristics, symptom questionnaire for early detection of mental disorders in the community and appreciation for functional patterns. The PAE includes more frequent diagnoses, criteria outcomes, indicators, interventions and activities to manage community issues. alteration was evidenced in patterns: Adaptation and Stress Tolerance, Self-perception-Self-concept-, Role-Relationships, sleep and rest and Perception and Health Management. A standardized NANDA-NIC-NOC can provide inter care holistic care from the perspective of community mental health with a degree of scientific nature that frames the professional work projecting the individual, family and community care.

  1. [Healthy heart: Results of a community education program on cardiovascular health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madridejos Mora, Rosa; Majem Fabres, Lourdes; Puig Acebal, Helena; Sanz Latorre, Inma; Llobet Traveset, Eva; Arce Casas, Mar; Ruiz Morilla, Dolors; Mercadal Dalmau, Angel; Pañart Sánchez, Dani

    2014-11-01

    To improve the knowledge of the population about heart-healthy habits through a training program supplemented by a web site and community activities. A controlled clinical trial with intervention done through participation in the Cardiovascular Health Training Classroom (CHTC) LOCATION: A town of 80,000 inhabitants. both sexes, aged 55 to 70 years, with at least one cardiovascular risk factor (CVRF). The intervention group (IG) consisted of patients who participated in the CHTC. Intervention was carried out through a 20-hour presential group course in which a support web site was offered and complementary activities were organized. Classes were taught by three Primary Care nurses. The primary endpoint was knowledge of CVRF. The secondary variables were age, sex, CVRF, lifestyle, visits to health centers, pharmaceutical use adherence, and satisfaction with the program. Data from patients in the first 10 courses (n=150) were evaluated. A statistically significant improvement was observed in overall knowledge of CVRF in the IG (87.3% to 100%) compared with control group (GC) (84.5% to 92.7%), p<.001, as well as an improvement in physical activity is (IG: 71.2% to 83.1% versus CG: 72.6% to 78.2%), p=.05. The total number of Primary Care visits (medical and nursing) decreased in the IG more than in the CG. The satisfaction rate of the course was very high. This experience is effective in improving cardiovascular health knowledge and promoting some healthy habits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Rural dentistry: Is it an imagination or obligation in community dental health education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çoruh Türksel Dülgergil

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past two decades, epidemiologic studies in less developed or developing countries have clearly reported that caries prevalence shows the distinctive patterns over the word, even though it is declining in many developed countries. Due to huge rural districts where arrival is problematic and ineffective dental and preventive care centers in most suburban districts, there has been significant difference between the different parts of the communities to provide dental care service, and unfortunately the sole preventive measure has been limited with the advising of using the tooth brush and paste. The problems are usually arisen not only from the inadequacy of trained personnel but also from the absence of an effective economic and pragmatic system which aims to effectively dispense the dental service to all over the country. For this reason, the basic aim of dental care should be to carry out the many dental services in a multidisciplinary manner within the first appointment and to serve the people at their own homes and/or districts. Clearly, the needed multidisciplinary dental care system can lead to a new educational doctrine for rural dental practice. This versatile and practical training program based on specific perceived needs of a specific population(s could need a new educational program. So, various preventive and/or restorative procedures included by this new doctrine could be named as "rural dentistry." In this review, with the examples from the many in vivo studies carried out under rural conditions over the world, the probable practices in this specific dental doctrine have generally been exemplified.

  3. Development of the community midwifery education initiative and its influence on women's health and empowerment in Afghanistan: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, Elizabeth M; Shafi, Ahmad; Sondorp, Egbert; Atta, Nooria; Howard, Natasha

    2014-09-15

    Political transition in Afghanistan enabled reconstruction of the destroyed health system. Maternal health was prioritised due to political will and historically high mortality. However, severe shortages of skilled birth attendants--particularly in rural areas--hampered safe motherhood initiatives. The Community Midwifery Education (CME) programme began training rural midwives in 2002, scaling-up nationally in 2005. This case study analyses CME development and implementation to help determine successes and challenges. Data were collected through documentary review and key informant interviews. Content analysis was informed by Walt and Gilson's policy triangle framework. The CME programme has contributed to consistently positive indicators, including up to a 1273/100,000 reduction in maternal mortality ratios, up to a 28% increase in skilled deliveries, and a six-fold increase in qualified midwives since 2002. Begun as a small pilot, CME has gained support of international donors, the Afghan government, and civil society. CME is considered by stakeholders to be a positive model for promoting women's education, employment, and health. However, its future is threatened by insecurity, corruption, lack of regulation, and funding uncertainties. Strategic planning and resource mobilisation are required for it to achieve its potential of transforming maternal healthcare in Afghanistan.

  4. 社区护士开展健康教育的现状调查与分析%Health education status among community nurses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓翠; 万巧琴; 张跃红; 马春红; 尚少梅

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore health education status among community nurses. Methods: One hundred and forty-two nurses in Haidian and Xicheng District in Beijing were investigated by self-designed questionnaire using convenient sampling, Results: About 95.1% of community nurses thought health education was important. About 90.2% of community nurses were willing to take health education positively. The factors affecting community nurses to take health education were limited professional knowledge (53.8%), no enthusiasm for community residents to participate (437%), no convenient and practical health education reference books (42.3%). The difficults that the community nurses confronted with were the organizing and atmosphere controling at the activity scene (58.5%), choosing and applying educational methods (17.6%), organizing community residents to participate in activities (16.9%).Conclusion: Community nurses carry out health education very positively, but they lack the practical skills of health education. Further training is needed to improve their health education ability.%目的:了解社区护士开展健康教育的现状.方法:方便取样,采用自设问卷对北京市西城区和海淀区社区的142名在职护士进行调查.结果:95.1%的社区护士认为健康教育是重要的,90.2%的社区护士积极参与健康教育;影响社区护士进行健康教育积极性的前三位因素分别是:专科知识掌握有限(53.8%),社区居民参与热情不高(43.7%),没有方便、实用的健康教育参考书(42.3%);影响社区护士开展健康教育的困难环节中列前三位的依次是:活动现场的组织与气氛调控(58.5%),宣教方式、方法的选择与应用(17 6%),组织社区居民来参与活动(16.9%).结论:社区护士开展健康教育的态度十分积极,但实施健康教育的技能相对较低,有待于进一步提高.

  5. Cultivating Community-Responsive Future Healthcare Professionals: Using Service-Learning in Pre-Health Humanities Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Casey

    2017-06-07

    This essay argues that service-learning pedagogy is an important tool in pre-health humanities education that provides benefits to the community and produces more compassionate, culturally competent, and community-responsive future healthcare professionals. Further, beginning this approach at the baccalaureate level instills democratic and collaborative values at an earlier, crucial time in the career socialization process. The discussion focuses on learning outcomes and reciprocity between the university and community in a Medical Humanities course for junior and senior premedical students, an elective in the premedical curriculum. The course includes an experiential learning element in which students shadow physicians and a service-learning component in which students complete medically-relevant service work, working with partners such as the veteran's hospital, a hospice home, and organizations that serve individuals with disabilities. We cover topics such as narrative medicine, ethics, cross-cultural medicine, patient/practitioner relationships, the human life cycle, and the illness experience, and the writing, discussion, and reflection we engage in is enriched by the real-world experiences from which the students are able to draw. The shadowing and service experiences and the classroom texts and topics combine to form a symbiosis that leads to especially meaningful teaching and learning outcomes.

  6. Is Group Singing Special? Health, Well-Being and Social Bonds in Community-Based Adult Education Classes Group singing, well-being and social bonds

    OpenAIRE

    Pearce, E; Launay, J.; A. Machin; Dunbar, RIM

    2016-01-01

    Evidence demonstrates that group singing improves health and well-being, but the precise mechanisms remain unknown. Given that cohesive social networks also positively influence health, we focus on the social aspects of singing, exploring whether improvements in health and well-being are mediated by stronger social bonds, both to the group as a whole (collective-bonding) and to individual classmates (relational-bonding). To do so, seven newly-formed community-based adult education classes (fo...

  7. Impact of health education intervention on insecticide treated nets uptake among nursing mothers in rural communities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoran Olorunfemi E

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ITN use is generally poor in Nigeria among all categories of people. Although use of ITNs has been shown to reduce malarial morbidity and mortality, this measure needs to be supported by an adequate healthcare system providing ITN possibly at the household level. This study was therefore designed to determine the effect of health education on the uptake of ITN among nursing mothers in rural communities in Nigeria. Methods The study design was a quasi-experimental study carried out in Ijebu North Local Government Area of Ogun State. A multistage random sampling technique was used in choosing the required samples for this study and a semi- structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant information. The intervention consisted of a structured educational programme based on a course content adapted from the national malaria control programme. A total of 400 respondents were recruited into the study with 200 each in both the experimental and control groups and were followed up for a period of 3 months when the knowledge and uptake of ITN was reassessed. Result There was no significant difference (P >0.05 observed between the experimental and control groups in terms of socio-dermographic characteristics such as age, marital status, religion, and income. The ITN ever users in experimental group were 59 [29.5%] and 138 [72.6%] in pre and post intervention period, respectively (p value =0.0001. These proportions of ITN ever users were 55 [27.5%] and 57 [31.6%] in control group, during the pre and post intervention periods (p = 0.37. Post health education intervention, degree of change in knowledge of ITN re-treatment [37.0%] and mounting [33.5%], readiness to use if given free [30.5%] and belief in efficacy [36.9%] improved significantly in the experimental group while there was no significant change in the control group [p = 0.84, 0.51, 0.68 &0.69 respectively]. Majority [89%] of the respondents were willing to buy

  8. Oral Health in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Rural Health Topics & States Topics View more Oral Health in Rural Communities Adequate access to oral healthcare ... about oral health programs in my area? What oral health disparities are present in rural America? According to ...

  9. Effectiveness of rapid transport of victims and community health education on snake bite fatalities in rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjib K; Bovier, Patrick; Jha, Nilambar; Alirol, Emilie; Loutan, Louis; Chappuis, François

    2013-07-01

    Snake bite is a major public problem in the rural tropics. In southern Nepal, most deaths caused by neurotoxic envenomation occur in the village or during transport to health centers. The effectiveness of victims' transport by motorcycle volunteers to a specialized treatment center, combined with community health education, was assessed in a non-randomized, single-arm, before-after study conducted in four villages (population = 62,127). The case-fatality rate of snake bite decreased from 10.5% in the pre-intervention period to 0.5% during the intervention (relative risk reduction = 0.949, 95% confidence interval = 0.695-0.999). The snake bite incidence decreased from 502 bites/100,000 population to 315 bites/100,000 population in the four villages (relative risk reduction = 0.373, 95% confidence interval = 0.245-0.48), but it remained constant in other villages. Simple educational messages and promotion of immediate and rapid transport of victims to a treatment center decreased the mortality rate and incidence of snake bite in southeastern Nepal. The impact of similar interventions should be assessed elsewhere.

  10. Effects of information, education, and communication campaign on a community-based health insurance scheme in Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Cofie

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The study analysed the effect of Information, Education, and Communication (IEC campaign activities on the adoption of a community-based health insurance (CHI scheme in Nouna, Burkina Faso. It also identified the factors that enhanced or limited the campaign's effectiveness. Design : Complementary data collection approaches were used. A survey was conducted with 250 randomly selected household heads, followed by in-depth interviews with 22 purposively selected community leaders, group discussions with the project management team, and field observations. Bivariate analysis and multivariate logistic regression models were used to assess the association between household exposure to campaign and acquisition of knowledge as well as household exposure to campaign and enrolment. Results : The IEC campaign had a positive effect on households’ knowledge about the CHI and to a lesser extent on household enrolment in the scheme. The effectiveness of the IEC strategy was mainly influenced by: 1 frequent and consistent IEC messages from multiple media channels (mass and interpersonal channels, including the radio, a mobile information van, and CHI team, and 2 community heads’ participation in the CHI scheme promotion. Education was the only significantly influential socio-demographic determinant of knowledge and enrolment among household heads. The relatively low effects of the IEC campaign on CHI enrolment are indicative of other important IEC mediating factors, which should be taken into account in future CHI campaign evaluation. Conclusion : The study concludes that an IEC campaign is crucial to improving the understanding of the CHI scheme concept, which is an enabler to enrolment, and should be integrated into scheme designs and evaluations.

  11. Health Education and Health Promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelen, M.A.; Ban, van den A.W.

    2004-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive resource for theory, research and action in health education and health promotion. The authors describe strategies and actions for health education and health promotion based on theories for understanding, predicting and changing behavioural, social and environmental det

  12. Health Knowledge Effects: An Integrated Community Health Promotion Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, I-Chiu; Lin, Chih-Yu; Tseng, Hsiao-Ting; Ho, Wen-Yu

    2016-03-01

    The Taiwanese government subsidizes healthcare providers offering preventive medicine to patients to help reduce the threats of chronic sickness and halt skyrocketing medical expenditures. Usually, nurses are the primary workers who perform community health promotion; however, because of the chronic shortage of working nurses, many Taiwan hospitals have closed wards and deferred the responsibility of promoting primary prevention. With a community health promotion platform integrating interactive response features and Web sites for community patients and hospital staff, a case hospital efficiently sustained the community health services. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of the integrated community health promotion platform for conducting education. Fifty-four patients/residents were invited to join a quasi-experiment of health education, and a follow-up survey was conducted to assess the acceptance of the community health promotion platform from both the experimental group of learners/users and the hospital staff. The results showed that the community health promotion platform was effective in improving participant health awareness. The experimental group outperformed the control group, with higher posttest scores and longer knowledge retention. Furthermore, users indicated a high acceptance of the community health promotion platform.

  13. Public Health Nutrition Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torheim, Liv Elin; Birgisdottir, Bryndis Eva; Robertson, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Public Health Nutrition Education Liv Elin Torheim* 1, Bryndis Eva Birgisdottir2, 3, Inga Thorsdottir2, 3, Aileen Robertson4, Runa Midtvåge4, Chalida Mae Svastisalee4, Hanne Gillett4, Agneta Yngve5, Arja Erkkilä6 1Department of Nursing and Health Promotion, Oslo and Akershus University College......) and healthy aging. Unhealthy dietary patterns, high blood pressure and obesity are major risk factors for NCDs such as cancers, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. There exists enormous potential to promote health and prevent diseases through targeting unhealthy life style, and it is crucial......, educational, social, economic, structural, political and/or legislative. The knowledge, skills, competencies and cultural heritage of the broader community should form a basis for all analyses and actions. The competencies required to be an effective PHN practitioner has been described by several scholars...

  14. Perception and valuations of community-based education and service by alumni at Makerere University College of Health Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mbalinda Scovia

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training of health professionals can be deliberately structured to enhance rural recruitment by exposing the trainees to the realities of rural life and practice through Community-Based Education and Service (COBE programs. Few studies have surveyed the alumni of these programs to establish their post-university views and whether the positive impact of COBE programs endures into the post-university life. This study surveyed the alumni of COBE at Makerere to obtain their perceptions of the management and administration of COBE and whether COBE had helped develop their confidence as health workers, competence in primary health care and willingness and ability to work in rural communities. Objectives • To assess the efficiency of the management and administration of COBES. • To obtain the views of the impact of COBES on its alumni. Methods A mixed qualitative and quantitative study was conducted using focus group discussions (FGD and a telephone administered questionnaire. From a total of 300 COBES alumni 150 were contacted. Twenty four Alumni (13 females and 11 males were purposefully selected by discipline, gender and place of work, and invited for the focus group discussion. The discussions were transcribed and analyzed using a manifest content analysis table. The thematic issues from the FGDs were used to develop a structured questionnaire which was administered by telephone by the authors. The data were entered into Microsoft excel template and exported to Stata for analysis. The findings of the telephone survey were used to cross-match the views expressed during the focus group discussions. Results The alumni almost unanimously agree that the initial three years of COBES were very successful in terms of administration and coordination. COBES was credited for contributing to development of confidence as health workers, team work, communication skills, competence in primary health care and willingness to work in rural

  15. Transferable Training Modules: Building Environmental Education Opportunities With and for Mexican Community Health Workers (Promotores de Salud).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Denise Moreno; Vea, Lourdes; Field, James A; Baker, Paul B; Gandolfi, A Jay; Maier, Raina M

    Community health workers (promotores de salud) have the ability to empower communities to mitigate negative health outcomes. Current training efforts in environmental topics are lacking. This project addressed this gap by developing 4 transferable training modules on environmental health. By applying a series of surveys, interviews, and trainings, we evaluated their relevance. Partners provided favorable feedback for 3 of the 4 modules. It was also learned that the development method could be improved by engaging technically trained promotores de salud in the role of co-creators. This project has implications for environmental justice communities as it can lessen information disparities.

  16. Development and evaluation of "Aging Well and Healthily": A health-education and exercise program for community-living older adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman-Rock, M.; Westhoff, M.H.

    2002-01-01

    The Aging Well and Healthily (AWH) program consists of health education by peers and low-intensity exercise. It was evaluated via a small randomized controlled trial and a community intervention trial involving older adults in the Netherlands. Reasons stated for participation were to exercise (35%),

  17. The Community Liaison Program: A Health Education Pilot Program to Increase Minority Awareness of HIV and Acceptance of HIV Vaccine Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, R. T.; Hannans, A.; Kreps, G. L.; Johnson, K.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a 16-month health education pilot program based on diffusion of innovation and social network theories. The program was implemented by volunteer community liaisons for the purposes of increasing awareness of and support for HIV vaccine research in minority populations. This theoretically driven pilot program allowed the…

  18. A Church-Based, Spanish-Language Community Education Breast Health Program Increases Awareness and Utilization of Breast Diagnostic Services among Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Otero, Gerardo; Albertie, Monica; Rodriguez, Judith; Nicholson, Garik; Kolomeyer, Irina; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Lesperance, Mary; Perez, Edith A.

    2014-01-01

    The Mayo Clinic Disparities Program and the University of North Florida Brooks College of Health partnered with representatives of the Hispanic community of Northeast Florida to develop an educational program aimed at raising awareness of the importance of diet in breast cancer prevention and availability of free breast cancer screening. An…

  19. Strategies for reducing morbidity and mortality from diabetes through health-care system interventions and diabetes self-management education in community settings. A report on recommendations of the Task Force on Community Preventive Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-28

    Reducing morbidity and mortality and improving quality of life for persons with diabetes is an ongoing challenge for health-care providers and organizations and public health practitioners. Interventions are available that focus on persons with diabetes, health-care systems, families, and public policies. The Task Force on Community Preventive Services (the Task Force) has conducted systematic reviews of seven population-oriented interventions that can be implemented by health-care organizations and communities. Two of these interventions focus on health-care systems (disease and case management), and five focus on persons with diabetes (diabetes self-management education delivered in community settings). On the basis of these reviews, the Task Force has made recommendations regarding use of these seven interventions. The Task Force strongly recommends disease and case management in health-care systems for persons with diabetes. Diabetes self-management education is recommended in community gathering places (e.g., community centers or faith institutions) for adults and in the home for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Evidence was insufficient to recommend diabetes self-management education interventions in other settings (i.e., schools, work sites, and recreational camps) or in the home for adults with type 2 diabetes. This report provides additional information regarding these recommendations, briefly describes how the reviews were conducted, provides sources of full reviews of interventions and information to assist in applying the interventions locally, and describes additional diabetes-related work in progress.

  20. Attitudes on Barriers and Benefits of Distance Education among Mississippi Delta Allied Health Community College Faculty, Staff, and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Mohn, Richard S.; Mitra, Amal K.; Young, Rebekah; McCullers, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Online distance education creates increased opportunities for continuing education and advanced training for allied health professionals living in underserved and geographically isolated areas. The purpose of this article was to explore attitudes on barriers and benefits of distance education technology among underrepresented minority allied…

  1. Multidisciplinary and participatory workshops with stakeholders in a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon: Development of priority concerns and potential health, nutrition and education interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyorkos Theresa W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Communities of extreme poverty suffer disproportionately from a wide range of adverse outcomes, but are often neglected or underserved by organized services and research attention. In order to target the first Millennium Development Goal of eradicating extreme poverty, thereby reducing health inequalities, participatory research in these communities is needed. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the priority problems and respective potential cost-effective interventions in Belen, a community of extreme poverty in the Peruvian Amazon, using a multidisciplinary and participatory focus. Methods Two multidisciplinary and participatory workshops were conducted with important stakeholders from government, non-government and community organizations, national institutes and academic institutions. In Workshop 1, participants prioritized the main health and health-related problems in the community of Belen. Problem trees were developed to show perceived causes and effects for the top six problems. In Workshop 2, following presentations describing data from recently completed field research in school and household populations of Belen, participants listed potential interventions for the priority problems, including associated barriers, enabling factors, costs and benefits. Results The top ten priority problems in Belen were identified as: 1 infant malnutrition; 2 adolescent pregnancy; 3 diarrhoea; 4 anaemia; 5 parasites; 6 lack of basic sanitation; 7 low level of education; 8 sexually transmitted diseases; 9 domestic violence; and 10 delayed school entry. Causes and effects for the top six problems, proposed interventions, and factors relating to the implementation of interventions were multidisciplinary in nature and included health, nutrition, education, social and environmental issues. Conclusion The two workshops provided valuable insight into the main health and health-related problems facing the community of

  2. Health literacy of an urban business community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barbara H; Hayes, Sandra C; Ekundayo, Olugbemiga T; Wheeler, Primus; Ford, D'Arcy M

    2012-02-01

    The impact of community-based organizations on the delivery of health care knowledge is well documented. Little research has focused on the importance of health literacy in the dissemination of health care information by minority small business owners. This study sampled 38 business owners within a local business district to assess their level of health literacy. Although adequate health literacy is not required to serve as a community resource, it may be necessary to understand the health literacy level of local business owners as gatekeepers in order to develop appropriate training/educational programs. The results of this descriptive cross-sectional study indicate that for sample of business owners, health literacy levels are adequate. The findings suggest the feasibility of using local business owners as disseminators of health-related materials to the communities in which they operate their businesses.

  3. Chaos Theory as a Planning Tool for Community-Based Educational Experiences for Health Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velde, Beth P.; Greer, Annette G.; Lynch, Deirdre C.; Escott-Stump, Sylvia

    2002-01-01

    Chaos theory, which attempts to understand underlying order where none is apparent, was applied to an interdisciplinary rural health training program for health professionals. Similar programs should anticipate systemic flux between order and chaos and pay attention to information flow, degree of diversity, richness of connectivity, contained…

  4. Community Health Centers: A Promising Venue for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education in the Central Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    MkNelly, Barbara; Nishio, Stephanie; Peshek, Cynthia; Oppen, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Health care providers could help achieve the necessary shift to healthful eating and active living; however, lack of coverage or reimbursement, lack of time, and limited information about appropriate interventions are some of the documented barriers. This report highlights the potential for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education…

  5. Value reflected health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of a value-reflected approach in health education by demonstrating the nature of professional competence development connected to this approach. It is based on findings from two three-year health educational development projects carried out by school health nurses...... develop pedagogical competences in health education improving school childrens’ health....

  6. "She is my teacher and if it was not for her I would be dead": exploration of rural South African community health workers' information, education and communication activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulliger, Rose; Moshabela, Mosa; Schneider, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Community health workers (CHWs) are important resources in health systems affected by the HIV/AIDS pandemic. International guidelines on task-shifting recommend that CHWs can provide diverse HIV services, ranging from HIV prevention to counselling patients for lifelong antiretroviral therapy. There is, however, little evidence on the experiences with CHW delivery of these services in Africa. This qualitative study included 102 interviews that explored experiences with information, education and communication (IEC) activities provided by CHWs within rural South Africa. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with CHWs (n = 17), their clients (n = 33) and the primary caregivers of these clients (n = 30), allowing for data source triangulation. Twenty-two follow-up interviews explored emergent themes from preliminary interviews. Despite limited formal education and training, CHWs in this study were significant providers of IEC, including provision of generic health talks and HIV-specific information and facilitation to support clients' entry and maintenance in the formal health system. They often incorporated local knowledge and understanding of illness in their communication. CHWs in this study were able to bridge the lifeworlds of the community and the formal services to expedite access and adherence to local clinics and other services. As mediators between the two worlds, CHWs reinterpreted health information to make it comprehensible in their communities. With growing formalisation of CHW programmes in South Africa and elsewhere, CHWs' important role in health service access, health promotion and health maintenance must be recognised and supported in order to maximise impact.

  7. Issues and Trends in Higher Education Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietjen-Smith, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Public speculation about bioterrorism and the increasing obesity epidemic are examples of current public health issues that continue to be illuminated in the spotlight. Major public health threats continue to drive the health job market and impact higher education health curricula (e.g., public health, health promotion, community health). Also,…

  8. 社区糖尿病患者饮食健康教育%Diet Health Education of Community Patients with Diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘文叶

    2016-01-01

    The diabetes diet education is the key point of health education of diabetes patients, which requires our com-munity medical workers to give scientific diet guidance thus effectively control ling the blood sugar of patients combined with the specific conditions of patients in community practical work.This article begins with the concept of diabetes, ana-lyzes the significance of dietary education for community diabetes patients, and finally focuses on the analysis of the spe-cific methods of diet education and health education for community diabetes patients.%糖尿病饮食教育是糖尿病患者健康教育的重中之重,这就要求我们社区医务工作者在社区实践工作中,结合每个患者的具体情况,因人而异,给予科学的饮食指导,使患者的血糖得到有效控制。该文从糖尿病的概念入手,分析了对社区糖尿病患者进行饮食教育的意义,最后着重分析了对社区糖尿病患者开展饮食教育以及健康教育的具体方法。

  9. Making Connections: Linking Generalist and Specialist Essentials in Baccalaureate Community/Public Health Nursing Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Carter, Kimberly Ferren; O'Hare, Patricia A.; Callister, Lynn Clark

    2002-01-01

    Describes the work of a task force to revise public health nursing curriculum that combined the expertise of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing and specialty organizations. Discusses the current state of community/public health nursing and the model used to identify core professional knowledge and values underpinning the curriculum.…

  10. Community-Oriented Medical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Community-orientated medicine is a topical area for debate in the current discussions about medical education, but it can be argued that medical education has always been in the community because medical practice is located therein. It is widely accepted that community settings provide a wealth of learning opportunities for students and trainees…

  11. Coalition for Healthier Schools Position Statement. Improving Education, Child Health, the Environment, and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    Each day over 53 million school children and 6 million adults--20 percent of the entire U.S. population--enter the nation's 120,000 school buildings to teach and learn. Unfortunately, in too many cases, they enter "unhealthy" school buildings," that undermine learning and health. In a recent five-state survey, more than 1,100 public schools were…

  12. Does education level affect the efficacy of a community based salt reduction program? - A post-hoc analysis of the China Rural Health Initiative Sodium Reduction Study (CRHI-SRS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xian; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Neal, Bruce; Bots, Michiel L.; Hoes, Arno W.; Wu, Yangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whether educational level influences the effects of health education is not clearly defined. This study examined whether the impact of a community-based dietary salt reduction program was affected by the level of education of participants. Methods: The China Rural Health Initiative Sodiu

  13. Does education level affect the efficacy of a community based salt reduction program? - A post-hoc analysis of the China Rural Health Initiative Sodium Reduction Study (CRHI-SRS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xian; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Neal, Bruce; Bots, Michiel L.; Hoes, Arno W.; Wu, Yangfeng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether educational level influences the effects of health education is not clearly defined. This study examined whether the impact of a community-based dietary salt reduction program was affected by the level of education of participants. METHODS: The China Rural Health Initiative Sodiu

  14. Does education level affect the efficacy of a community based salt reduction program? - A post-hoc analysis of the China Rural Health Initiative Sodium Reduction Study (CRHI-SRS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xian; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Neal, Bruce; Bots, Michiel L.; Hoes, Arno W.; Wu, Yangfeng

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether educational level influences the effects of health education is not clearly defined. This study examined whether the impact of a community-based dietary salt reduction program was affected by the level of education of participants. METHODS: The China Rural Health Initiative

  15. Does education level affect the efficacy of a community based salt reduction program? - A post-hoc analysis of the China Rural Health Initiative Sodium Reduction Study (CRHI-SRS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xian; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Neal, Bruce; Bots, Michiel L.; Hoes, Arno W.; Wu, Yangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background: Whether educational level influences the effects of health education is not clearly defined. This study examined whether the impact of a community-based dietary salt reduction program was affected by the level of education of participants. Methods: The China Rural Health Initiative

  16. The effects of an integrated health education and exercise program in community-dwelling older adults with hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeon-Hwan; Song, Misoon; Cho, Be-Long; Lim, Jae-Young; Song, Wook; Kim, Seon-Ho

    2011-01-01

    the aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of HAHA (Healthy Aging and Happy Aging) program, which is an integrated health education and exercise program for community-dwelling older adults with hypertension. older adults with hypertension from one senior center were randomly allocated to experimental (n=18) or control group (n=22). Experimental group received health education, individual counseling and tailored exercise program for 12 weeks. the mean ages were 71 years (experimental group) and 69 (control group). After the intervention, systolic blood pressure of experimental group was significantly decreased than that of control group. Scores of exercise self-efficacy, general health, vitality, social functioning, and mental health in SF-36 were statistically higher than those of control group. the HAHA program was effective in control of systolic blood pressure and improving self-efficacy for exercise and health-related quality of life. 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nursing Students in Community Health Education Practice Ability%护理本科生社区实习中健康教育能力的培养

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒲豪杰

    2013-01-01

    Objective To culticate nursing unduigraduates’ ability of community health education by practice.To investigate the methods of improving the capacity of community nursing students in health education and timely method of impact evaluation.Methods In the practice of community health education ,200 nursing underguaduates who were dicided into groups performed surveys in community and collected data.Main health problems of community patients were evaluated and found out and the health education plan was made.Nursing underguaduates were divided into groups and playde the roles repeatedly before health education.And they performed community health education practice and the results were assessed in time. Results After the performance of health education practice,200 community nurses score of health education theory test,simulation lectures,dialogue scenarios significantly were increased(P<0.01),the health knowledge awareness of communities and satisfaction of nurses signiifcantly increased(P<0.01).Conclusion The community health education practice of nursing students is a good way to cultivate and enhance their health education ability. To the community health nursing students education ability training, so that the students set up to prevention care idea, foster and improve the health education of consciousness and ability, enhance the effecticeness of community health education,enhance the image and value of community nurses, At the same time, for establishing the system, standardize the health education training system has laid a good foundation.%目的:通过社区临床护理教学实践培养护理本科生的健康教育能力,探讨提高社区护生健康教育能力的方法并及时进行效果评价。方法在社区临床护理实习中,将200名护理本科生随机分成两组,深入社区开展健康教育调查,收集资料,评估并找出社区服务对象中存在的主要健康教育问题,制定健康教育的合理计划,组织

  18. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    223 nursing mothers with babies over three months old on the immunization clinic days at Federal Medical Center,. Abeokuta. ... prevalent in communities with poor food hygiene,. 1 ... rice, mashed potatoes, and boiled carrots help in reducing ...

  19. Community health nursing vision for 2020: shaping the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Ruth; Ganann, Rebecca; Brooks, Sandy; McGugan, Jennifer; Dalla Bona, Kim; Betker, Claire; Dilworth, Katie; Parton, Laurie; Reid-Haughian, Cheryl; Slepkov, Marlene; Watson, Cori

    2011-12-01

    As health care is shifting from hospital to community, community health nurses (CHNs) are directly affected. This descriptive qualitative study sought to understand priority issues currently facing CHNs, explore development of a national vision for community health nursing, and develop recommendations to shape the future of the profession moving toward the year 2020. Focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted across Canada. Five key themes were identified: community health nursing in crisis now, a flawed health care system, responding to the public, vision for the future, and CHNs as solution makers. Key recommendations include developing a common definition and vision of community health nursing, collaborating on an aggressive plan to shift to a primary health care system, developing a comprehensive social marketing strategy, refocusing basic baccalaureate education, enhancing the capacity of community health researchers and knowledge in community health nursing, and establishing a community health nursing center of excellence.

  20. Has the Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh Addressed the Educational Divide in Accessing Health Care?: e0145707

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mala Rao; Prabal Vikram Singh; Anuradha Katyal; Amit Samarth; Sofi Bergkvist; Adrian Renton; Gopalakrishnan Netuveli

    2016-01-01

    .... We aimed to assess whether the innovative state-funded Rajiv Aarogyasri Community Health Insurance Scheme of Andhra Pradesh state launched in 2007, has achieved equity of access to hospital inpatient...

  1. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    be used to design policies and programmes to help workers identify environmental health risks, and improve their ... and his/her co-workers, who are subject to (SHE) departments and the Staff Clinic. It ... television and internet sources.

  2. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    catastrophic health expenditures (CHE) and risk of being impoverished as a result of cost of care were assessed. Statistical ... Impact and contributors to cost of managing long term conditions in a ... sectors is ongoing, it has become clear that.

  3. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    This was a cross-sectional, multi clinic study involving 265 mothers whose children had erupted at least a tooth and attending the ... parents, health care workers and personal experiences were the sources of beliefs ..... Ethiopians abroad.

  4. Community-Based Health Education has Positive Influence on the Attitude to Cervical Cancer Screening among Women in Rural Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, Sunila; Karmacharya, Biraj Man; Afset, Jan Egil; Bofin, Anna; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Syversen, Unni; Tingulstad, Solveig

    2016-09-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess the knowledge of cervical cancer among women in rural Nepal and explore the feasibility and impact of a community-based awareness program on cervical cancer. Community-based educational meetings on cervical cancer and its prevention were conducted among women's groups in rural Nepal. Through a questionnaire, the women's baseline knowledge of risk factors, symptoms, and perceived risk of cervical cancer were identified. The willingness to participate in cervical cancer screening was compared before and after the educational meeting. The meetings were followed by a cervical cancer screening program. Among the 122 participants at the educational meeting, only 6 % had heard of cervical cancer. Their baseline knowledge of risk factors and symptoms was poor. The proportion of women willing to participate in cervical screening increased from 15.6 to 100 % after attending the educational meeting. All the study subjects participated in the screening program. Additionally, the study participants recruited a further 222 of their peers for screening. Poor knowledge of cervical cancer among women in rural Nepal highlights the urgency of public awareness programs for cervical cancer at a national level. A community-based awareness program can change women's attitude to cervical screening, and women's groups can play a major role in promoting participation in cervical cancer screening programs.

  5. The Educative Community in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Roger

    1975-01-01

    The role of the educator can become one of identifying the various community resources of an educational nature that can be utilized by learners. An elementary school project at Red Oak, Iowa, and a University of Nebraska graduate student project utilizing community resources are described. (BP)

  6. Developing Interactive Video Resource Materials for Community Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Claire; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the creation of a series of interactive video modules on dental hygiene at Luzerne County Community College. These modules are intended to supplement instruction in a community dentistry and health education course and to guide students in an assignment to develop and implement dental health projects in their community. (MBR)

  7. 社区糖尿病患者健康教育的方法和效果分析%Community Diabetes Health Education Methods and Effects Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘细玉

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨社区糖尿病患者健康教育方法,提高糖尿病患者的生活质量。方法通过组织糖尿病支持小组活动,对300例社区糖尿病患者实施健康教育。结果集中讲座、发放健康教育处方、个别咨询等。结论通过糖尿病支持小组活动形式的健康教育,可以使社区糖尿病患者对糖尿病的认知、态度和行为发生变化,得到科学合理的治疗和管理,达到治疗效果的预期目标。%Objective To investigate the diabetes community health education methods to improve the quality of life of diabetic patients.Methods Diabetes support group activities through the organization of 300 cases of diabetes community health education.Results Centralized lectures,distribution of health education prescription,individual consulting.Conclusion Diabetes support group activities in the form of health education can make the community diabetes awareness of diabetes,at itudes and behavior change,to get a scientific and rational treatment and management,improve the patient's ability to maintain their own health,to achieve a therapeutic ef ect expected the goal.

  8. Using Community Health Assessment to Teach and Explore Health Status Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Marianne; Levine, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Community health assessment (CHA) is a useful tool for identifying health status disparities at the community level. Developing the skills of master's level public health students to conduct CHA addresses a number of the Association of Schools of Public Health Core competencies for graduate public health education. Teaching…

  9. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lifestyle Changes and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer among. Immigrants in the United .... food rich in red meat, animal fat, sugars and refined of CRC in Africa .... region to improve health care delivery and secure the is obtainable in the UK, ...

  10. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Tobacco is a risk factor Organization (WHO) at World Health Assembly for six of the ... information. Stata statistical software version 11 was used to describe the data and determine ... Only 5% of respondents ever received training on tobacco control. .... Pharmacist. 54. 23.2 .... and dental students surveyed in Lagos by .15.

  11. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... quality service delivery as perceived by the respondents', however it remains ... However, there remain the problems of inequities in tertiary ... unrelenting struggle in financing health households to the financial risk ... other things improve efficiency in utilization of Using a cross-sectional approach, this study.

  12. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adedamla

    eligible patients as they emerged from the pharmacy with their ... compare proportions while student's t-test was used to compare .... preference between the free and B.I. health services in an LGA in ... and training manual for the development.

  13. COMMUNITY HEALTH & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    study assessed the knowledge and practice of disease surveillance and notification ... for active surveillance especially if an outbreak Health workers play a key role in .... ethical clearance was obtained from the ethics and Eighty one percent of .... Salami S. Knowledge of disease notification among New York: John Wiley ...

  14. Interactive Influences on Health and Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Lilian H.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter examines multiple convergent forces affecting health, relates these to social determinants of health and critical adult health learning, and closes with discussion of opportunities for adult educators to contribute to human health at the individual, community, health provider, policy/regulatory agency, and international levels.

  15. New models to support the professional education of health visitors: A qualitative study of the role of space and place in creating 'community of learning hubs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donetto, Sara; Malone, Mary; Sayer, Lynn; Robert, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    In response to a policy-driven workforce expansion in England new models of preparing health visitors for practice have been implemented. 'Community of Learning hubs' (COLHs) are one such model, involving different possible approaches to student support in clinical practice placements (for example, 'long arm mentoring' or 'action learning set' sessions). Such models present opportunities for studying the possible effects of spatiality on the learning experiences of students and newly qualified health visitors, and on team relationships more broadly. To explore a 'community of learning hub' model in health visitor education and reflect on the role of space and place in the learning experience and professional identity development of student health visitors. Qualitative research conducted during first year of implementation. Three 'community of learning hub' projects based in two NHS community Trusts in London during the period 2013-2015. Managers and leads (n=7), practice teachers and mentors (n=6) and newly qualified and student health visitors (n=16). Semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews analysed thematically. Participants had differing views as to what constituted a 'hub' in their projects. Two themes emerged around the spaces that shape the learning experience of student and newly qualified health visitors. Firstly, a generalised need for a 'quiet place' which allows pause for reflection but also for sharing experiences and relieving common anxieties. Secondly, the role of physical arrangements in open-plan spaces to promote access to support from more experienced practitioners. Attention to spatiality can shed light on important aspects of teaching and learning practices, and on the professional identities these practices shape and support. New configurations of time and space as part of educational initiatives can surface new insights into existing practices and learning models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. CoDE: Community Diabetes Education for uninsured Mexican Americans

    OpenAIRE

    Culica, Dan; Walton, James W.; Prezio, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    Low-cost diabetes education programs that target Mexican Americans are essential to reduce the observed health disparities in this population. A culturally appropriate intervention was developed as the centerpiece of the Community Diabetes Education (CoDE) program. This article describes the structure, patient acceptance, and costs of this one-to-one educational model delivered in 7 patient contact hours by a community health worker over 12 months in a community clinic serving the uninsured. ...

  17. A community-based health education programme for bio-environmental control of malaria through folk theatre (Kalajatha in rural India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiwari Satyanarayan

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health education is an important component in disease control programme. Kalajatha is a popular, traditional art form of folk theatre depicting various life processes of a local socio-cultural setting. It is an effective medium of mass communication in the Indian sub-continent especially in rural areas. Using this medium, an operational feasibility health education programme was carried out for malaria control. Methods In December 2001, the Kalajatha events were performed in the evening hours for two weeks in a malaria-affected district in Karnataka State, south India. Thirty local artists including ten governmental and non-governmental organizations actively participated. Impact of this programme was assessed after two months on exposed vs. non-exposed respondents. Results The exposed respondents had significant increase in knowledge and change in attitude about malaria and its control strategies, especially on bio-environmental measures (p Conclusion This study was carried out under the primary health care system involving the local community and various potential partners. Kalajatha conveyed the important messages on malaria control and prevention to the rural community. Similar methods of communication in the health education programme should be intensified with suitable modifications to reach all sectors, if malaria needs to be controlled.

  18. A Model of Objectives for a Program of Continuing Education for Psychiatric Nurses in Community Mental Health Work in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Lillian Rachel

    The purpose of this study was (1) to develop a model of required functions and effective behaviors of psychiatric nurses in mental health programs in Massachusetts and (2) to construct a model of objectives of a continuing education program for them. Perceptual data concerning functions of nurses were gathered by interviews with authorities,…

  19. Health Promotion Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Christiansen, Sine

    The paper discusses the implications of health promotion in education. The paper is based on my PhD project entitled “Health promotion education seen through a power/knowledge and subjectification perspective” (in prep). The PhD project explores how professional health promotion skills...... are conceived in a specific educational setting; namely the Danish social and health education programme. Here, health promotion is formally conceived as a qualification aimed at citizens and patients - and not at the students themselves. However, as the paper will demonstrate, conceptions of student...... health promotion workers should ideally act as health promotion role models. This claim leads to a series of educational and morally anchored dilemmas and challenges. Inspired by Foucault and others who have developed this line of thinking (eg. Signild Vallgårde) health promotion is viewed as a heartfelt...

  20. Local Experiences in Community Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Fleuret

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the findings of international research with an original approach anchored in health geography, which illustrates the importance of place as a dimension in community health. The aim of the research is to identify the success factors in the processes used to build community health initiatives at the local level. The study is based on interviews encoded and analysed using the framework of the grounded theory. Three main themes—the place, the community and healthcare supply—and two cross-cutting issues referring to 18 explanatory dimensions are identified. These findings are then put to the test in France through an action research approach. Overall, the work suggest avenues to enable the transferability of successful elements of community health initiatives.

  1. Community Involvement - Health / Service

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Elizabeth Andress: Partnerships Produce a National Center for Home Food Preservation. Diana Friedman: National 4-H Healthy Lifestyles Grant. H. Wallace Goddard: Big Surprises on the Road to Happiness. Nancy Kershaw: Connecting the 4-H Clothing Project and Community. Jane A. Landis: NEAFCS Living Well Public Service Campaign. Rhea Lanting: The Healthy Diabetes Plate. Phyllis B. Lewis: Product Look-Alikes. Anna Martin: Raising Diabetes Awareness in Latino Communities. Earl Mcalexander: Youth Fi...

  2. Assessing Community Leadership: Understanding Community Capacity for Health Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Billie; Wendel, Monica; Kelly Pryor, Brandy N; Ingram, Monique

    The purpose of this study was to pilot a quantitative instrument to measure aspects of community leadership within an assessment framework. The instrument includes 14 Likert-type questions asking residents how they perceive leaders within 5 sectors: Louisville Metro Council/Mayor's Office, the faith community, education, business, and the civic sector. Louisville/Jefferson County, Kentucky, has a population of about 743 000 residents. Respondents were asked to examine leadership within West Louisville, an economically deprived area of the city made up of 9 contiguous neighborhoods. This area is predominantly African American (78% compared with 22% in Louisville Metro), with an overall poverty rate of 43% (compared with 18% in Louisville Metro), and unemployment rate of 23% (compared with 8% in Louisville Metro). Residents of West Louisville are looking to leadership to address many of the inequities. Twenty-seven participants representing 7 community sectors completed the survey, of whom 90% work in West Louisville. The instrument measured local perceptions of leadership strength, effectiveness, trust, communication, community building, and leadership development. The majority of respondents agree that strong leadership exists across the 5 sectors, with variation regarding perceptions of the quality of that leadership. City leadership within the Mayor's Office and Metro Council is largely viewed positively, while the growing tensions within the education sector were reflected in the survey results. The perception of community leadership is important to understanding local community capacity to improve health and also inclusivity of community voice in the assessment and community improvement processes. Results from such assessments can offer useful information for strengthening community capacity and sustaining relationships needed to enact progressive and equitable solutions to address local issues. Leaders in a variety of settings can utilize this instrument to

  3. Distance Learning for Community Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Anthony A.

    2010-01-01

    This article takes a look at the influence of technology on curriculum and teaching. It specifically examines the new wave of available technology and the opportunity for schools to make inroads into community outreach by engaging new, technological learning methods. The relationship among community education, public school relations, and distance…

  4. Community Health Workers Support Community-based Participatory Research Ethics:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Selina A.; Blumenthal, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Ethical principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR)— specifically, community engagement, mutual learning, action-reflection, and commitment to sustainability—stem from the work of Kurt Lewin and Paulo Freire. These are particularly relevant in cancer disparities research because vulnerable populations are often construed to be powerless, supposedly benefiting from programs over which they have no control. The long history of exploiting minority individuals and communities for research purposes (the U.S. Public Health Service Tuskegee Syphilis Study being the most notorious) has left a legacy of mistrust of research and researchers. The purpose of this article is to examine experiences and lessons learned from community health workers (CHWs) in the 10-year translation of an educational intervention in the research-to-practice-to-community continuum. We conclude that the central role played by CHWs enabled the community to gain some degree of control over the intervention and its delivery, thus operationalizing the ethical principles of CBPR. PMID:23124502

  5. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    Knowledge about andropause is better among older men (p<0.05) but educational status ... erectile dysfunction, changes in mood (depression ... quality of life [Karazindiyanoglu 2008]. represented ... with older patients about sexual health.

  6. Sociodrama, health and education

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Ana Maria; Lourdes de Araújo, Maria de

    2012-01-01

    This a report of an "Aids Sociodrama" presented during a round table about "Health Education". It starts with a brief explanation about the Sociodramatic theory and methods. It also embodies public health, education and Aids. Our objective is to establish the relationship among these areas and present sociodrama as an eficient way to solve the dificulties found in preventing diseases.

  7. Soil Health Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil health and cover crops are topics of interest to farmers, gardeners, and students. Three soil health and cover crop demonstrations provide educational resources. Demonstrations one outlines two educational cover crop seed displays, including the advantages and disadvantages. Demonstration two shows how to construct and grow a cover crop root…

  8. Paradoxical health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kari

    Key note presentation from International konference "Health Education and Teacher Training in Kenya", 8. December 2010, Stanley Sarova Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya.......Key note presentation from International konference "Health Education and Teacher Training in Kenya", 8. December 2010, Stanley Sarova Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya....

  9. 健康教育在社区预防接种中的应用%Application of health education in community vaccination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱阿林

    2013-01-01

    目的:评价健康教育在预防接种中的应用效果。方法将辖区内有预防接种儿童的家庭分传统接种组与健康教育组,健康教育组在预防接种中实施健康教育,传统接种组按常规方式开展工作。结果对预防接种知识的知晓率健康教育组明显高于传统接种组,差异具有统计学意义;接种儿童的接种率健康教育组明显高于传统接种组,差异具有统计学意义。结论在社区预防接种工作中实施健康教育能明显提高接种儿童家庭对预防接种知识的知晓率,提高儿童的免疫接种率,是预防接种工作顺利开展的重要保证。%Objective To evaluate the application effect of health education in vaccination. Methods The vaccinated children families in jurisdictional area were divided into traditional vaccination group and health education group.The health education group were implemented health education in vaccination,while traditional vaccination group worked as usual way. Results The vaccination knowledge rate in health education group was significantly higher than that in traditional vaccination group,and the difference was statistically significant.The vaccination rate of vaccinated children in health education group was significantly higher than that in traditional vaccination group,and the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion Implementing health education in community vaccination can significantly improve the vaccination knowledge awareness in vaccinated children families,improve children's immunization rate,and it is an important guarantee for the smooth operations of vaccination.

  10. COMMUNITY DENTAL HEALTH SURVEY TRAINING TO DENTAL HEALTH PERSONNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Fikawati; Ita Yulita

    2015-01-01

    Dentist and dental nurse as dental health personnel in community health center are spearheads in community dental health service. The effectiveness and efficacy of community dental health service needs updated adequate dental health knowledge and skill. One effort to assure the fulfillment of those needs is by providing community dental health survey training. This training aims at improving the skill and capability of dental health personnel to conduct dental health survey. The training cons...

  11. [Health education at the health workshops of Cahors: challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Théry, Céline

    2013-01-01

    There have been significant developments in health education over recent years. Focusing on France, the purpose of this paper is to examine the role of health education in reducing social inequalities based on the example of the Atelier santé ville de Cahors (Cahors Health Workshop). The paper addresses the following questions: What are the results and outcomes of the workshop? What kind of health education issues are at stake in the territorial approach to policy-making in an urban context? We examined the methods underlying the health education measures taken in the Cahors Health Workshop, which involve project-based approaches and the promotion of community health. Health education aimed at improving health is central to issues such as listening and speaking, the development of autonomy and the responsibilization of urban actors. Based on a rigorous methodology and the underlying values, health education in the Cahors Health Workshop places local residents, elected representatives and health professionals at the heart of the health care process (from the diagnostic process to the assessment process) and contributes to the reduction of social inequalities in health while facilitating access to information and health care. The goal of health education is to encourage individuals to be responsible for their own health in order to empower them to make informed choices adapted to the demands of their environment.

  12. Ethical considerations in community oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Sudeshni

    2015-05-01

    As the public's oral health care needs increase in complexity, there is renewed attention to the ethical dimensions of community oral health decision making and the development of public health ethics in teaching and research in dentistry. Despite their reduction globally, oral diseases persist with a particular distribution pattern that is a reflection of the increasingly widespread inequality in access to community oral health preventive and dental care. This is due to differences in the appropriateness, availability, accessibility, and acceptability of oral health education and the care provided. This article provides an overview of community oral health from an ethical perspective, including the importance of equity, human rights, and social justice in providing oral health care to the underserved. The need for a paradigm shift from highly technical and individualistic dental training curricula is discussed, together with the need to instill a holistic approach to ethical and social responsibility in new dental graduates. It concludes with some possible strategies, using the overarching principles of ethics and bioethics that are applicable to practice among vulnerable populations.

  13. Community old age cardiovascular patient health education discussion%社区老年心血管患者健康教育探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨冬青

    2013-01-01

    目的:向社区老年人进行有规划的心血管疾病健康教育,提升社区老年心血管患者的防治意识与自我监护意识。方法:对社区有心血管疾病的老年患者进行健康教育,通过“集体讲座、健康宣传栏、健康档案”等措施提升社区老年心血管患者的防治意识与自我监护意识,控制与稳定老年病患的病情,防范各类并发症的出现。结果:社区医生通过向老年病患普及心血管疾病的防治知识,通过“饮食教育、锻炼教育”帮助老年病患建立良好的生活行为方式。结论:有效提升老年病患的生活质量。%Goal:Carries on to the community senior citizens has the plan cardiovascular disease health education,promotion community old age cardio-vascular patient’s preventing and controlling consciousness and self-guardianship consciousness.Method:Has a mind the blood vessel disease old age patient to the community to carry on the health education,passes“the collective course,the health propaganda fence,the healthy file”and so on measure promotion commu-nity old age cardiovascular patient’s preventing and controlling consciousness with the self-guardianship consciousness,the control and the stable old age sickness condition,guards against each kind of complication the appearance.Results:Community doctor through to the old age sickness popularization cardiovascular dis-ease preventing and controlling knowledge,passes “the diet education,the exercise education”the help old age sickness establishment good life behavior way. Conclusion:promotes the old age sickness effectively the quality of life.

  14. Community Education: Perspectives from the Margins

    OpenAIRE

    Connolly, Brid

    2010-01-01

    This article delineates community education by exploring the wider contexts underlying the field. It associates community education with adult education, popular education, and community development. It reviews the historical bases from radical workers' education to empowering self-help. It depicts the facets of community education arising from these sources, and links praxis – the dynamics of methods and knowledge bases – with critical citizenship and democracy. It provides an overview of th...

  15. Using an academic-community partnership model and blended learning to advance community health nursing pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonwu, Mabel; Berkowitz, Bobbie; Vlasses, Frances R

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a model of teaching community health nursing that evolved from a long-term partnership with a community with limited existing health programs. The partnership supported RN-BSN students' integration in the community and resulted in reciprocal gains for faculty, students and community members. Community clients accessed public health services as a result of the partnership. A blended learning approach that combines face-to-face interactions, service learning and online activities was utilized to enhance students' learning. Following classroom sessions, students actively participated in community-based educational process through comprehensive health needs assessments, planning and implementation of disease prevention and health promotion activities for community clients. Such active involvement in an underserved community deepened students' awareness of the fundamentals of community health practice. Students were challenged to view public health from a broader perspective while analyzing the impacts of social determinants of health on underserved populations. Through asynchronous online interactions, students synthesized classroom and community activities through critical thinking. This paper describes a model for teaching community health nursing that informs students' learning through blended learning, and meets the demands for community health nursing services delivery.

  16. 社区儿童保健及预防接种健康教育的意义%The Significance of Health Education on Child Health Care and Vaccination in Community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦宏

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the health care and vaccination of community children with the significance of health education, in order to provide better data support for better development of community health education activities. Methods Randomly selected a community of parents of children with 282 cases ,Through the contrast before and after health education,then valuate the par-ents on the health knowledge level and the participation rate. Results Before the health education,the health knowledge level of parents in 194 cases (68.79%), 255 cases (90.43%) after the health education. Before the health education ,parents who partici-pant vaccination in 201 cases (71.28%), 260 cases (92.20%) after the health education. the health education was significantly better than its absence, the difference was significant (P<0.05).Conclusion Taking child health education in the community is very important to enhance the understanding of the health care knowledge, it can also make parents actively participate in the vaccina-tion activities, and promote the healthy growth of their children.%目的:根据家长对儿童保健及预防接种知识缺乏了解的现状,研讨社区儿童保健及预防接种健康教育的意义,为更好地开展社区健康教育活动提供更完善的数据支撑。方法随机选取某社区的儿童家长282例,通过健康教育前后对比,对儿童家长对保健知识的掌握程度及接种参与率作评价。结果健康教育前保健知识了解程度194例(68.79%),健康教育后255例(90.43%)。健康教育前预防接种参与者201例(71.28%),健康教育后260例(92.20%)健康教育后明显优于健康教育前,经统计学处理,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在社区采取儿童保健知识的健康教育宣传效果良好,增强家长对儿童保健知识的了解,积极参与预防接种活动中,进而促进儿童健康成长。

  17. Ghana - Community Services - Education

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The objectives in this ex-post performance evaluation target how the education sub-activity was implemented, if and how it has been sustained, and its perceived...

  18. Culturally-Relevant Online Cancer Education Modules Empower Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners to Disseminate Cancer Information and Reduce Cancer Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Katie; Revels, Laura; Cueva, Melany; Lanier, Anne P; Dignan, Mark; Viswanath, K; Fung, Teresa T; Geller, Alan C

    2017-04-12

    To address a desire for timely, medically accurate cancer education in rural Alaska, ten culturally relevant online learning modules were developed with, and for, Alaska's Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps). The project was guided by the framework of Community-Based Participatory Action Research, honored Indigenous Ways of Knowing, and was informed by Empowerment Theory. A total of 428 end-of-module evaluation surveys were completed by 89 unique Alaska CHA/Ps between January and December 2016. CHA/Ps shared that as a result of completing the modules, they were empowered to share cancer information with their patients, families, friends, and communities, as well as engage in cancer risk reduction behaviors such as eating healthier, getting cancer screenings, exercising more, and quitting tobacco. CHA/Ps also reported the modules were informative and respectful of their diverse cultures. These results from end-of-module evaluation surveys suggest that the collaboratively developed, culturally relevant, online cancer education modules have empowered CHA/Ps to reduce cancer risk and disseminate cancer information. "brought me to tears couple of times, and I think it will help in destroying the silence that surrounds cancer".

  19. [Advertising and health education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López González, M L; Cueto Espinar, A; Martínez Cuervo, F; Redondo Cornejo, M L; Suárez González, J R; Secall Mellén, L

    1990-01-01

    Health education and advertising have a common aim: to modify human behaviour. Health education tries to induce healthy behaviours. In some occasions Publicity proposes risky behaviours. Ads appearing during a two-month period in magazines of the largest circulation in Spain are analyzed here. A total of 1,726 ads which could have a negative influence on health either because of the product or service offered or for the use of health as a persuasive argument in their text, are considered. The magazines Hola and Lecturas had the highest ratio ads/magazine. Spirits, food and drugs were the most frequently advertised products. And more than 50% of the ads used health and welfare as argument for better selling. Health educators should know and teach the critical analysis of publicity, and use advertisements as a teaching tool to enable people to see through misleading advertising.

  20. Preparation for Community Health Nursing: Issues and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; White, Caroline

    1980-01-01

    Highlights of a survey of community health nursing agencies and faculty suggest the need for better planning and collaboration between service and education in preparing students for this field. Survey data tables are included. (CT)

  1. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    availability and affordability of ACTs in Secondary Health Care (SHC) facilities in Lagos State and ... percent (37.5%) of the hospitals did not have the drug in stock at the time of visit and drugs had been out of .... Only one in the community pharmacies as single dose .... funding and international competitive bidding for.

  2. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. 26 (1) 96-107 ... obesity. Specific criteria for MetS developed by. 19 of hypertension. .... Triglycerides 150 mg/dL or more or on Christians 329 (96.2%); and lower grade income.

  3. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    western Nigeria to Participate in Community Based Health Insurance. 1. 2 ..... Islam. Others. 159. 225. 3. 41.1. 58.1. 0.8. Marital status. Single. Married. 96. 287. 24.8 ..... services in southeast Nigeria. ... and the poor: evidence from Nigeria",.

  4. 健康教育对社区婴儿家长参与儿童保健的效果评价%Effect of Health Education to Parental Involvement in Community Child Health Care

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨彦; 张德春; 李胜玲

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨健康教育对婴儿家长参与儿童保健的效果,为更好地开展社区儿童保健工作提供科学依据.方法 采用随机整群抽样方法,将银川市妇幼保健院高台寺社区卫生服务站所管辖的6个居民小区按其所处地理位置随机分为观察组120例和对照组120例.观察组采取发放宣传小册子、电话咨询、讲座等多种形式进行健康教育;对照组按社区常规工作制度向其介绍儿童保健相关知识.6个月后就婴儿家长参与儿童保健的效果进行评价.结果 健康教育后观察组社区婴儿家长对儿童保健相关知识的知晓率、定期健康体检的参与率、Ⅰ类疫苗和Ⅱ类疫苗的按时接种率均高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 对社区婴儿家长实施多种形式的健康教育,可明显提高社区婴儿家长对儿童保健相关知识的掌握程度,促进其参与社区儿童保健的行为.%Objective To explore the effect of health education to parental involvement in community child health care, in order to provide scientific basis for carrying out community child health care effectively.Methods Cluster random sampling was adopted, and the parents from six communities under the service of Gaotai temple community health service station of Yinchuan Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital were randomly divided into trial group ( n = 120 ) and control group ( n = 120 ) according to their geographic settings.Various ways of health education, such as handing out pamphlet, telephone consultation, lectures and so on were performed for the parents in the group; while, those in the control group received related knowledge of community child health care in accordance with conventional community working system.The effect of parental involvement in community child health care was evaluated after six months.Results Parental wareness rate on related knowledge of community child health care, participation rate of regular

  5. The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project - a community-level, public health initiative to build community disaster resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, David; Chandra, Anita; Fogleman, Stella; Magana, Aizita; Hendricks, Astrid; Wells, Ken; Williams, Malcolm; Tang, Jennifer; Plough, Alonzo

    2014-08-19

    Public health officials need evidence-based methods for improving community disaster resilience and strategies for measuring results. This methods paper describes how one public health department is addressing this problem. This paper provides a detailed description of the theoretical rationale, intervention design and novel evaluation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR), a public health program for increasing community disaster resilience. The LACCDR Project utilizes a pretest-posttest method with control group design. Sixteen communities in Los Angeles County were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental community resilience group or the comparison group. Community coalitions in the experimental group receive training from a public health nurse trained in community resilience in a toolkit developed for the project. The toolkit is grounded in theory and uses multiple components to address education, community engagement, community and individual self-sufficiency, and partnerships among community organizations and governmental agencies. The comparison communities receive training in traditional disaster preparedness topics of disaster supplies and emergency communication plans. Outcome indicators include longitudinal changes in inter-organizational linkages among community organizations, community member responses in table-top exercises, and changes in household level community resilience behaviors and attitudes. The LACCDR Project is a significant opportunity and effort to operationalize and meaningfully measure factors and strategies to increase community resilience. This paper is intended to provide public health and academic researchers with new tools to conduct their community resilience programs and evaluation research. Results are not yet available and will be presented in future reports.

  6. Health workforce equity in urban community health service of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Zhao, Yali; Du, Juan; Wu, Tao; Huang, Yafang; Guo, Aimin

    2014-01-01

    To reveal the equity of health workforce distribution in urban community health service (CHS), and to provide evidence for further development of community health service in China. A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in China from September to December 2011. In the study, 190 CHS centers were selected from 10 provinces of China via stratified multistage cluster sampling. Human resources profiles and basic characteristics of each CHS centers were collected. Lorenz curves and Gini Coefficient were used to measure the inequality in the distribution of health workforce in community health service centers by population size and geographical area. Wilcoxon rank test for paired samples was used to analyze the differences in equity between different health indicators. On average, there were 7.37 health workers, including 3.25 doctors and 2.32 nurses per 10,000 population ratio. Significant differences were found in all indicators across the samples, while Beijing, Shandong and Zhejiang ranked the highest among these provinces. The Gini coefficients for health workers, doctors and nurses per 10,000 population ratio were 0.39, 0.44, and 0.48, respectively. The equity of doctors per 10,000 population ratio (G = 0.39) was better than that of doctors per square kilometer (G = 0.44) (P = 0.005). Among the total 6,573 health workers, 1,755(26.7%) had undergraduate degree or above, 2,722(41.4%)had junior college degree and 215(3.3%) had high school education. Significant inequity was found in the distribution of workers with undergraduate degree or above (G = 0.52), which was worse than that of health works per 10000 population (Purban CHS centers.

  7. Teachers as Community Educators: Training in Teacher Education Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, John; Weaver, Donald

    1977-01-01

    Colleges of teacher education should give serious consideration to providing training programs to prepare community educators and inform prospective teachers and school administrators of the potential of the educative community. (JD)

  8. Patient moderator interaction in online health communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jina; McDonald, David W; Hartzler, Andrea; Pratt, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of people visit online health communities to share experiences and seek health information. Although studies have enumerated reasons for patients' visits to online communities for health information from peers, we know little about how patients gain health information from the moderators in these communities. We qualitatively analyze 480 patient and moderator posts from six communities to understand how moderators fulfill patients' information needs. Our findings show that patients use the community as an integral part of their health management practices. Based on our results, we suggest enhancements to moderated online health communities for their unique role to support patient care.

  9. Outcomes of interprofessional education for Community Mental Health Services in England: the longitudinal evaluation of a postgraduate programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, John; Barnes, Di; Dickinson, Claire; Wooff, David

    2006-03-01

    We report a comprehensive, longitudinal evaluation of a two-year, part-time postgraduate programme designed to enable health and social care professionals in England to work together to deliver new community mental health services, including psychosocial interventions (PSIs). The study tracked three successive cohorts of students (N = 111) through their learning. Outcomes were assessed according to the Kirkpatrick/Barr et al. framework using a mixed methodology, which employed both quantitative measures and interviews. The students evaluated the programme positively and appreciated its focus on interprofessional learning and partnership with services users, but mean levels of stress increased and almost one quarter dropped out. There was considerable evidence of professional stereotyping but little evidence of change in these during the programme. Students reported substantial increases in their knowledge and skills in multidisciplinary team working and use of PSIs (p team colleagues (N = 62), but there was strong evidence from self-report measures (p work-place interviews that the students' use of PSIs had increased. Users with severe mental health problems (N = 72) randomly selected from caseloads of two cohorts of students improved over six months in terms of their social functioning (p = 0.047) and life satisfaction (p = 0.014). Having controlled statistically for differences in baseline score, those in the intervention (programme) group retained a significant advantage in terms of life skills (p skills and personal qualities. We conclude that that there is strong evidence that a well-designed programme of IPE can be effective in helping students to learn new knowledge and skills, and to implement their learning in the workplace. Further, we consider that there is some modest evidence of the benefits of such learning for service users.

  10. Promotores de salud and community health workers: an annotated bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WestRasmus, Emma K; Pineda-Reyes, Fernando; Tamez, Montelle; Westfall, John M

    2012-01-01

    For underserved and disenfranchised communities in the United States, affordable, effective health care can be nearly inaccessible, which often leads to the exclusion of these communities from relevant medical information and care. Barriers to care are especially salient in minority communities, where language, traditions and customs, socioeconomics, and access to education can serve as additional roadblocks to accessing health care information and services. These factors have contributed to a national health disparity crisis that unnecessarily places some communities in a vulnerable position without adequate prevention and treatment opportunities. One solution to the exclusion some communities face in the health care system may be the promotores de salud (PdS)/community health worker (CHW), an approach to culturally competent health care delivery whose popularity in the mainstream health care system has been steadily growing in recent decades. Known by a wide variety of names and broad in the spectrum of health issues they address, the PdS/CHW serves as cultural brokers between their own community and the formal health care system and can play a crucial role in promoting health and wellness within their community. This annotated bibliography was created to educate the reader about the history, definition, key features, utility, outcomes, and broad potential of the CHW approach in a variety of populations. Intended to serve as a reference point to a vast body of information on the CHW/PdS approach, this document is a resource for those wishing to effect change in the disparities within the health care system, and to improve the access to, quality, and cost of health care for underserved patients and their communities. Promotores de Salud is a Spanish term that translates to Health Promoter. A female health worker may be referred to as a Promotora, a male as a Promotor, and the plural of both is Promotores. For the purposes of this bibliography, the terms community

  11. Public health leadership education in North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideo Uno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hideo Uno, Kenneth ZakariasenDepartment of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, CanadaAbstract: Public health leadership is one of the priority disciplines public health professionals need to learn well if they are to deal with demanding public health issues effectively and efficiently. This article looks at the trends in public health leadership education by reviewing the literature and using the Internet to explore the public health leadership programs offered in various parts of the world, and suggests several principles to be taken into account for the development of public health leadership education in the future. A variety of educational programs in public health leadership are classified into several types in terms of their formats: degree programs offered by schools of public health or other programs of public health, those offered in partnership with public health agencies, and so on. All of these programs have important implications for the overall effectiveness of public health leadership education. For public health leadership education to be effective, the partnership between academia and public health agencies is vitally important. Programs should provide opportunities to learn on the basis of practical public health experience, a commitment to life-long learning, flexibility in design, and recognition of the diverse needs of individuals and communities. The application of distance learning methods is one of the options to make this possible.Keywords: public health leadership, public health professionals, school of public health

  12. Impact of health education intervention on malaria prevention practices among nursing mothers in rural communities in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olorunfemi Emmanuel Amoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Malaria is the most prevalent parasitic endemic disease in Africa, which is preventable, treatable and curable. This study aims to assess the effect of health education intervention on the knowledge, attitude, and prevention practices amongst mothers of under-five children in a rural area of Ogun State, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: The study design was a quasi-experimental study carried out in Ijebu North Local Government Area of Ogun State. A multistage random sampling technique was used in choosing the required samples and a semi-structured questionnaire was used to collect relevant information. A total of 400 respondents were recruited into the study with 200 each in both the experimental and control groups and were followed up for a period of 3 months. Results: There was no statistically significant differences observed between the experimental and control groups. Knowledge of indoor spraying increased from 14.7% to 58.2% (P < 0.001 and window and door nets increased from 48.3% to 74.8% (P < 0.001. The proportion of those with ITN use increased from 50.8% to 87.4% (P < 0.001 while those with practice of maintaining clean environment also increased from 40.4% to 54.5% (P < 0.001. There were no significant changes in all the practice of malaria prevention methods in the control group. Conclusion: This suggests that malaria control can be significantly improved in rural areas, if the caregivers are adequately empowered through appropriate health education intervention though change in attitude and belief may require a longer and persistent effort.

  13. Development of the Community Midwifery Education initiative and its influence on women’s health and empowerment in Afghanistan: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Political transition in Afghanistan enabled reconstruction of the destroyed health system. Maternal health was prioritised due to political will and historically high mortality. However, severe shortages of skilled birth attendants - particularly in rural areas - hampered safe motherhood initiatives. The Community Midwifery Education (CME) programme began training rural midwives in 2002, scaling-up nationally in 2005. Methods This case study analyses CME development and implementation to help determine successes and challenges. Data were collected through documentary review and key informant interviews. Content analysis was informed by Walt and Gilson’s policy triangle framework. Results The CME programme has contributed to consistently positive indicators, including up to a 1273/100,000 reduction in maternal mortality ratios, up to a 28% increase in skilled deliveries, and a six-fold increase in qualified midwives since 2002. Begun as a small pilot, CME has gained support of international donors, the Afghan government, and civil society. Conclusion CME is considered by stakeholders to be a positive model for promoting women’s education, employment, and health. However, its future is threatened by insecurity, corruption, lack of regulation, and funding uncertainties. Strategic planning and resource mobilisation are required for it to achieve its potential of transforming maternal healthcare in Afghanistan. PMID:25220577

  14. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    4 and optimal use. In Nigeria, despite the The main objective of this study is therefore to .... Islam. Others. 185. 205. 5. 46.8. 51.9. 1.3. Utilization (use) of PHC Services and educational qualifications and of low socio-economic .... other zones except in the south-east region. .... primary health care interventions, the evidence is.

  15. Psychology in the community: a community psychologist looks at 30 years in community mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, John R

    2008-01-01

    I review my 30 years in the community mental health field, emphasizing the personal and historical context that shaped this career. I especially highlight the origins of the values that guided significant career decisions, including family, neighborhood, religious and educational influences. The core guiding value was the belief that public service is both a privilege and an obligation, and that righting social injustice through such service is a noble calling. I trace the evolution of my thoughts and actions reflecting this value, from an early desire to "help children," through preparation to become a child psychologist, and ultimately to practice in a public community mental health setting and a career dedicated first to primary prevention and then to broader safety net services for those in need. I highlight a corresponding intellectual evolution as well, a progressive change in identity from "clinical psychologist in the community" to community psychologist.

  16. A novel educational strategy targeting health care workers in underserved communities in Central America to integrate HIV into primary medical care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Flys

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Current educational strategies to integrate HIV care into primary medical care in Central America have traditionally targeted managers or higher-level officials, rather than local health care workers (HCWs. We developed a complementary online and on-site interactive training program to reach local HCWs at the primary care level in underserved communities. METHODS: The training program targeted physicians, nurses, and community HCWs with limited access to traditional onsite training in Panama, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, and Guatemala. The curriculum focused on principles of HIV care and health systems using a tutor-supported blended educational approach of an 8-week online component, a weeklong on-site problem-solving workshop, and individualized project-based interventions. RESULTS: Of 258 initially active participants, 225 (225/258=87.2% successfully completed the online component and the top 200 were invited to the on-site workshop. Of those, 170 (170/200=85% attended the on-site workshop. In total, 142 completed all three components, including the project phase. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation instruments included knowledge assessments, reflexive essays, and acceptability surveys. The mean pre and post-essay scores demonstrating understanding of social determinants, health system organization, and integration of HIV services were 70% and 87.5%, respectively, with an increase in knowledge of 17.2% (p<0.001. The mean pre- and post-test scores evaluating clinical knowledge were 70.9% and 90.3%, respectively, with an increase in knowledge of 19.4% (p<0.001. A survey of Likert scale and open-ended questions demonstrated overwhelming participant satisfaction with course content, structure, and effectiveness in improving their HIV-related knowledge and skills. CONCLUSION: This innovative curriculum utilized technology to target HCWs with limited access to educational resources. Participants benefited from technical skills

  17. A Novel Educational Strategy Targeting Health Care Workers in Underserved Communities in Central America to Integrate HIV into Primary Medical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flys, Tamara; González, Rosalba; Sued, Omar; Suarez Conejero, Juana; Kestler, Edgar; Sosa, Nestor; McKenzie-White, Jane; Monzón, Irma Irene; Torres, Carmen-Rosa; Page, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Background Current educational strategies to integrate HIV care into primary medical care in Central America have traditionally targeted managers or higher-level officials, rather than local health care workers (HCWs). We developed a complementary online and on-site interactive training program to reach local HCWs at the primary care level in underserved communities. Methods The training program targeted physicians, nurses, and community HCWs with limited access to traditional onsite training in Panama, Nicaragua, Dominican Republic, and Guatemala. The curriculum focused on principles of HIV care and health systems using a tutor-supported blended educational approach of an 8-week online component, a weeklong on-site problem-solving workshop, and individualized project-based interventions. Results Of 258 initially active participants, 225 (225/258 = 87.2%) successfully completed the online component and the top 200 were invited to the on-site workshop. Of those, 170 (170/200 = 85%) attended the on-site workshop. In total, 142 completed all three components, including the project phase. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation instruments included knowledge assessments, reflexive essays, and acceptability surveys. The mean pre and post-essay scores demonstrating understanding of social determinants, health system organization, and integration of HIV services were 70% and 87.5%, respectively, with an increase in knowledge of 17.2% (p<0.001). The mean pre- and post-test scores evaluating clinical knowledge were 70.9% and 90.3%, respectively, with an increase in knowledge of 19.4% (p<0.001). A survey of Likert scale and open-ended questions demonstrated overwhelming participant satisfaction with course content, structure, and effectiveness in improving their HIV-related knowledge and skills. Conclusion This innovative curriculum utilized technology to target HCWs with limited access to educational resources. Participants benefited from technical skills acquired

  18. Education, cognition, health knowledge, and health behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Naci; Altindag, Duha T

    2014-04-01

    Using data from NLSY97, we analyze the impact of education on health behavior. Controlling for health knowledge does not influence the impact of education on health behavior, supporting the productive efficiency hypothesis. Accounting for cognitive ability does not significantly alter the relationship between education and health behavior. Similarly, the impact of education on health behavior is the same between those with and without a learning disability, suggesting that cognition is not likely to be a significant factor in explaining the impact of education on health behavior.

  19. Workforce diversity and community-responsive health-care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet, Marc A; Berlin, Anne

    2014-01-01

    While the levers for the social determinants of health reside largely outside institutional walls, this does not absolve health professional schools from exercising their influence to improve the communities in which they are located. Fulfilling this charge will require a departure from conventional thinking, particularly when it comes to educating future health professionals. We describe efforts within medical education to transform recruitment, admissions, and classroom environments to emphasize diversity and inclusion. The aim is to cultivate a workforce with the perspectives, aptitudes, and skills needed to fuel community-responsive health-care institutions.

  20. Adult Education and Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Krajnc

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Community education means a new way of connecting knowledge with what people create. It increases the applicability of knowledge and con­ nects education with the direct needs of people. There are quite few things one can do by him/her­ self. Mainly one is dependent on the things he/she can create together with others. In non-democratic societies people get used to being given solutions from above, which is why they can wait for some­ one else (especially institutions to solve their problems while they remain passive. Socio-economic and political changes require from the people in Slovenia to redefine their attitude to the environment and life in general and to assume an active role. Community education means learning in groups of interested people in order to reach a certain goal or find a solution to a certain problem, e. g. establishing a local museum, publishing a tourist guide, constructing a bypass to decrease the traffic in town, erecting a monument, protecting green areas, introducing new forms of child care, solving problems of the disabled, unemployment and income maintenance, etc. People leam in order to be able to work. There are two goals which are always present: product and knowledge. People leam parallelly with the phases of work in order to achieve certain goal. It is typical of community education that it was developed in order to meet the needs of local people explicitly. It is therefore of great importance for adult educators facilitating problem-solving based on knowledge to get to know the real needs of people first. Generallack of knowledge is manifested in functional illiteracy. As long as people are unable to communicate orally or by writing with the others, their activities are blocked and they cannot help themselves. They can only live a dependent life, based on help expected from others, which nowadays is not possible any more. Each individual has to be responsible for his/her own survival. In the present

  1. The role of health education in addressing the health divide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simovska, Venka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to argue that an approach to health education, consistent with critical education theory echoing Freire’s ideas, has the potential to play a significant role in addressing determinants of health by, first and foremost, providing children and young people...... with opportunities (as part of teaching and learning processes) to critically examine health issues, including social determinants of health, and to gain experience with initiating health-promoting changes within the everyday realms of their school or its adjacent community....

  2. Community intervention in higher education of environmental health Intervencion comunitaria en la educación superior de salud ambiental Intervenção comunitária no ensino superior de saúde ambiental

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Currently, in the Bologna context, university teaching methods focus on the student and on a learning experience based on practical methods. Under the guidance of teachers, students in the second year of the first Environmental Health Course at the Polytechnic Institute of Beja have designed and developed the following nine community intervention projects relating to environmental health: dangerous products (mercury); habitability and geriatrics; health education and the environment; drinking...

  3. Community Dental Health Promotion for Children: Integrating Applied Behavior Analysis and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Kathryn D.; Geller, E. Scott

    1987-01-01

    The article examines community dental health promotion for children in terms of factors impacting children's dental health (water fluoridation, dental health education, behavior change strategies, use of dental services, and dental phobias). Proposed is a large scale behavior change approach to public dental health which integrates applied…

  4. Role of community pharmacists in providing oral health advice in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamad Al-Saleh

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Community pharmacists are approached frequently for oral healthcare advices. Majority of them had no oral health training. Almost all of them were willing to provide oral health information in the community. It is essential to provide continuous oral health education to the pharmacists to better serve oral health needs of the community.

  5. The Educative Community. Linking the Community, School, and Family. The Professional Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Roger

    This book has been created to meet the basic needs of future teachers, educational specialists, parents, and those citizens who desire to become better informed on current educational concepts and practices. Eight chapters discuss the nature of the community, the activation of the educative community, the community school and community education,…

  6. Community and Interns' Perspectives on Community-Participatory Medical Education: From Passive to Active Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Akiteru; Misaki, Hidekazu; Takemura, Yousuke

    2017-07-01

    The use of community-based medical education as a method of learning primary care is now common worldwide. However, in many cases community participation remains passive. This study sought to explore the effects of introducing community members into medical education as active teachers. Medical education taught directly by community members might be a key to comprehensive community-based learning. This study was conducted in Japan at two postgraduate programs in community hospitals. We asked 10 community groups and 10 interns to join our 2-year "participatory" community curriculum continuously. Questionnaires completed by 10 interns and 77 community members were analyzed quantitatively. Audio-recorded and transcribed interview data from 10 interns and 39 community members were read iteratively and analyzed qualitatively. Community members who participated in groups with the interns gave higher scores on approval of and willingness to participate in such experiences. Interns scored higher on their view of the importance and preferences to work with the community. In the qualitative analysis, health-oriented behavior, social connectedness, and shaping community orientation among doctors emerged as important for community members. Important themes that emerged from the interns' interviews were: taking responsibility for shared understanding, community-oriented focus, valuing community nurses, and tension from competing demands. Interaction between interns and community members had positive effects for both. Community-participatory medical education could present a further step in the evolution of community-based medical education, one that is closest to community. Finding a balance between the time dedicated to working at the hospital and in the community proved to be essential to the success of this curriculum.

  7. On the front line of primary health care: the profile of community health workers in rural Quechua communities in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zumaran Adriana

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To describe the profile of community health workers – health promoters, traditional birth attendants and traditional healers – in rural Quechua communities from Ayacucho, Peru. Methods Basic quantitative and qualitative information was gathered as part of a community health project implemented between 1997 and 2002 in 40 Andean communities with information from questionnaires, personal interviews and group discussions. Results The majority of current community health workers are men with limited education who are primarily Quechua speakers undertaking their work on a voluntary basis. Health promoters are mostly young, male, high school graduates. There exists a high drop-out rate among these workers. In contrast, traditional healers and traditional birth attendants possess an almost diametrically opposite profile in terms of age, education and drop-out rates, though males still predominate. At the community level the health promoters are the most visible community health workers. Conclusion It is very important to consider and to be aware of the profile of community health workers in order to provide appropriate alternatives when working with these groups as well as with the indigenous population, particularly in terms of culture, language and gender issues.

  8. Pollution Prevention through Peer Education: A Community Health Worker and Small and Home-Based Business Initiative on the Arizona-Sonora Border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Denise Moreno; Ramírez-Andreotta, Mónica D; Vea, Lourdes; Estrella-Sánchez, Rocío; Wolf, Ann Marie A; Kilungo, Aminata; Spitz, Anna H; Betterton, Eric A

    2015-09-09

    Government-led pollution prevention programs tend to focus on large businesses due to their potential to pollute larger quantities, therefore leaving a gap in programs targeting small and home-based businesses. In light of this gap, we set out to determine if a voluntary, peer education approach led by female, Hispanic community health workers (promotoras) can influence small and home-based businesses to implement pollution prevention strategies on-site. This paper describes a partnership between promotoras from a non-profit organization and researchers from a university working together to reach these businesses in a predominately Hispanic area of Tucson, Arizona. From 2008 to 2011, the promotora-led pollution prevention program reached a total of 640 small and home-based businesses. Program activities include technical trainings for promotoras and businesses, generation of culturally and language appropriate educational materials, and face-to-face peer education via multiple on-site visits. To determine the overall effectiveness of the program, surveys were used to measure best practices implemented on-site, perceptions towards pollution prevention, and overall satisfaction with the industry-specific trainings. This paper demonstrates that promotoras can promote the implementation of pollution prevention best practices by Hispanic small and home-based businesses considered "hard-to-reach" by government-led programs.

  9. Pollution Prevention through Peer Education: A Community Health Worker and Small and Home-Based Business Initiative on the Arizona-Sonora Border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Moreno Ramírez

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Government-led pollution prevention programs tend to focus on large businesses due to their potential to pollute larger quantities, therefore leaving a gap in programs targeting small and home-based businesses. In light of this gap, we set out to determine if a voluntary, peer education approach led by female, Hispanic community health workers (promotoras can influence small and home-based businesses to implement pollution prevention strategies on-site. This paper describes a partnership between promotoras from a non-profit organization and researchers from a university working together to reach these businesses in a predominately Hispanic area of Tucson, Arizona. From 2008 to 2011, the promotora-led pollution prevention program reached a total of 640 small and home-based businesses. Program activities include technical trainings for promotoras and businesses, generation of culturally and language appropriate educational materials, and face-to-face peer education via multiple on-site visits. To determine the overall effectiveness of the program, surveys were used to measure best practices implemented on-site, perceptions towards pollution prevention, and overall satisfaction with the industry-specific trainings. This paper demonstrates that promotoras can promote the implementation of pollution prevention best practices by Hispanic small and home-based businesses considered “hard-to-reach” by government-led programs.

  10. Pollution Prevention through Peer Education: A Community Health Worker and Small and Home-Based Business Initiative on the Arizona-Sonora Border

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Ramírez, Denise; Ramírez-Andreotta, Mónica D.; Vea, Lourdes; Estrella-Sánchez, Rocío; Wolf, Ann Marie A.; Kilungo, Aminata; Spitz, Anna H.; Betterton, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Government-led pollution prevention programs tend to focus on large businesses due to their potential to pollute larger quantities, therefore leaving a gap in programs targeting small and home-based businesses. In light of this gap, we set out to determine if a voluntary, peer education approach led by female, Hispanic community health workers (promotoras) can influence small and home-based businesses to implement pollution prevention strategies on-site. This paper describes a partnership between promotoras from a non-profit organization and researchers from a university working together to reach these businesses in a predominately Hispanic area of Tucson, Arizona. From 2008 to 2011, the promotora-led pollution prevention program reached a total of 640 small and home-based businesses. Program activities include technical trainings for promotoras and businesses, generation of culturally and language appropriate educational materials, and face-to-face peer education via multiple on-site visits. To determine the overall effectiveness of the program, surveys were used to measure best practices implemented on-site, perceptions towards pollution prevention, and overall satisfaction with the industry-specific trainings. This paper demonstrates that promotoras can promote the implementation of pollution prevention best practices by Hispanic small and home-based businesses considered “hard-to-reach” by government-led programs. PMID:26371028

  11. Evaluation of the achievement of educational objectives of the Community Oral Health and Periodontics Departments using the CIPP model of evaluation–students' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pakdaman A

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aims: Evaluation is a continuous process which is necessary for improvement of students learning and planning for required changes to obtain the educational objectives. The aim of the present study was to assess students' perspective on the achievement of the educational objectives of the Community Oral Health and Periodontology Departments using the CIPP model of evaluation."nMaterials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey has been conducted using a questionnaire consists of four domains as introduced in the CIPP model of evaluation (Context, Input, Process and Product. Two groups of senior dental students of the dental school of Tehran University of Medical Sciences were approached. Data was collected anonymously and was analyzed with non-parametric Mann-Whitney test using the SPSS statistical package."nResults: The response rate was 67.7% for year 6 and 87.5% for the year 5 students. Respondents considered material presented in Periodontology Department more relevant and in need for their future career. However, teaching skills and motivation of the educators in Periodontology Department was considered inadequate. 67% of students reported having problem with material taught in Periodontology Department. Overall, significant difference in domains of Context and Process was observed between two departments (p<0.05. In the output domain students rated their clinical and theoretical ability "weak" in relation to splint, implant, management of acute gingivitis and electrosurgery compared with other topics which rated "good". Students considered their ability in using the principals of Evidence-Based Dentistry moderate."nConclusion: The evaluation of the educational achievements of the two departments (COH and Periodontics using CIPP model of evaluation showed that there is significant difference in two domains (Context and Process. In those topics which achievement was reported weak the revision of teaching methods is

  12. Community Health Nursing through a Global Lens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Norma; Dallwig, Amber; Abbott, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Community Health Nursing (N456) is a required senior clinical course in the undergraduate nursing curriculum at the University of Michigan in which students learn to assess and address the health of populations and communities. In 2012, we began our efforts to internationalize the curriculum using a globally engaged nursing education framework. Our goal is for all students to have an intercultural learning experience understanding that all students are unable to travel internationally. Therefore, this intercultural learning was implemented through a range of experiences including actual immersion, virtual activities (videoconferencing) and interventions with local vulnerable populations. Grants were obtained to provide immersion experiences in Quito, Ecuador and New Delhi, India. Several technologies were initiated with partner nursing schools in Leogane, Haiti and New Delhi, India. Weekly videoconferencing utilizing BlueJeans software and exchange of knowledge through the Knowledge Gateway facilitated intercultural exchange of knowledge and culture. Local clinical groups work with a variety of vulnerable populations. A private blog was developed for all sections to share community assessment data from local and international communities. Qualitative evaluation data was collected for local and international students to begin to assess cultural competence and student learning. Analysis of data documented increased awareness of culture and identified the many positive benefits of interaction with a global partner.

  13. [Special Report: Adult Education and Primary Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayendra, T.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    A series of five case studies examines (1) literacy, health, and conscientization in the Mandar region of India; (2) the training of community health workers in Indonesia; (3) the Chinese strategy combining health, political will, and participation; (4) British community-based health education programs, and (5) participatory methodology for…

  14. Interactive Development of Community Education and Migrant Workers’ Continuing Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning; WANG

    2015-01-01

    Community education is an essential carrier of continuing education and plays a positive role in promoting continuing education of migrant workers. On the one hand,it can raise employment quality and labor skills of migrant workers; on the other hand,it manifests function of serving society of community education. Besides,it is also an important measure for building learning society and lifelong learning system.From the perspective of interactive development,it discusses interactive relationship between community education and migrant workers’ continuing education,analyzes their interactive mechanism,and comes up with recommendations for developing community education and migrant workers’ continuing education.

  15. Establishing common ground in community-based arts in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mike

    2006-05-01

    This article originates in current research into community-based arts in health. Arts in health is now a diverse field of practice, and community-based arts in health interventions have extended the work beyond healthcare settings into public health. Examples of this work can now be found internationally in different health systems and cultural contexts. The paper argues that researchers need to understand the processes through which community-based arts in health projects evolve, and how they work holistically in their attempt to produce therapeutic and social benefits for both individuals and communities, and to connect with a cultural base in healthcare services themselves. A development model that might be adapted to assist in analysing this is the World Health Organisation Quality of Life Index (WHOQOL). Issues raised in the paper around community engagement, healthy choice and self-esteem are then illustrated in case examples of community-based arts in health practice in South Africa and England; namely the DramAide and Siyazama projects in KwaZulu-Natal, and Looking Well Healthy Living Centre in North Yorkshire. In South Africa there are arts and media projects attempting to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS through mass messaging, but they also recognize that they lack models of longer-term community engagement. Looking Well by contrast addresses health issues identified by the community itself in ways that are personal, empathic and domesticated. But there are also similarities among these projects in their aims to generate a range of social, educational and economic benefits within a community-health framework, and they are successfully regenerating traditional cultural forms to create public participation in health promotion. Process evaluation may provide a framework in which community-based arts in health projects, especially if they are networked together to share practice and thinking, can assess their ability to address health inequalities and focus

  16. Envy in a nurse education community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Eija; Latvala, Eila; Isola, Arja

    2003-03-01

    The definition of envy is based on views of anthropology, sociology, psychology and nursing science. According to these definitions, a nurse education community consists of shared values, customs and beliefs common in the nursing community. The purpose of this paper was to describe envy in the reciprocal relations between student nurses in a polytechnic of health and welfare in Finland. The sample consisted of 110 student nurses in one faculty of health and welfare in a Finnish polytechnic. They were selected from among the available (attending classes) students, who had been studying in the same group for 1-3 years in 1996. The response percentage was 85.5 (n=94). The data were processed by various statistical methods. The findings of envy in a nurse education community were defined through the student nurses' views of their sense of self, their relations with their fellow students, the objects of envy and also the influence of the lecturers. The ways of coping with envy were also identified. The most common object of envy was a fellow student who worked part-time while studying. Another object of envy consisted of fellow students successful in examinations and skills, such as listening, friendships and good ideas. The students coped with their envy by sharing their own success and by denying envy. These results highlight some essential points of envy in a nurse education community and underline the need for open discussion, as emotions and envy are important to understand as part of nurse education. If envy is not identified, it may cause learning problems and even problems in patient care.

  17. Health workforce equity in urban community health service of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Chen

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To reveal the equity of health workforce distribution in urban community health service (CHS, and to provide evidence for further development of community health service in China. METHODS: A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted in China from September to December 2011. In the study, 190 CHS centers were selected from 10 provinces of China via stratified multistage cluster sampling. Human resources profiles and basic characteristics of each CHS centers were collected. Lorenz curves and Gini Coefficient were used to measure the inequality in the distribution of health workforce in community health service centers by population size and geographical area. Wilcoxon rank test for paired samples was used to analyze the differences in equity between different health indicators. RESULTS: On average, there were 7.37 health workers, including 3.25 doctors and 2.32 nurses per 10,000 population ratio. Significant differences were found in all indicators across the samples, while Beijing, Shandong and Zhejiang ranked the highest among these provinces. The Gini coefficients for health workers, doctors and nurses per 10,000 population ratio were 0.39, 0.44, and 0.48, respectively. The equity of doctors per 10,000 population ratio (G = 0.39 was better than that of doctors per square kilometer (G = 0.44 (P = 0.005. Among the total 6,573 health workers, 1,755(26.7% had undergraduate degree or above, 2,722(41.4%had junior college degree and 215(3.3% had high school education. Significant inequity was found in the distribution of workers with undergraduate degree or above (G = 0.52, which was worse than that of health works per 10000 population (P<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Health workforce inequity was found in this study, especially in quality and geographic distribution. These findings suggest a need for more innovative policies to improve health equity in Chinese urban CHS centers.

  18. La Palabra Es Salud: A Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Popular Education vs. Traditional Education for Enhancing Health Knowledge and Skills and Increasing Empowerment among Parish-Based Community Health Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Noelle

    2010-01-01

    Popular education is a mode of teaching and learning which seeks to bring about more equitable social conditions by creating settings in which people can identify and solve their own problems. While the public health literature offers evidence to suggest that popular education is an effective strategy for increasing empowerment and improving…

  19. La Palabra Es Salud: A Comparative Study of the Effectiveness of Popular Education vs. Traditional Education for Enhancing Health Knowledge and Skills and Increasing Empowerment among Parish-Based Community Health Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Noelle

    2010-01-01

    Popular education is a mode of teaching and learning which seeks to bring about more equitable social conditions by creating settings in which people can identify and solve their own problems. While the public health literature offers evidence to suggest that popular education is an effective strategy for increasing empowerment and improving…

  20. The value of using schools as community assets for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caan, W; Cassidy, J; Coverdale, G; Ha, M-A; Nicholson, W; Rao, M

    2015-01-01

    In planning, designing, procuring and ensuring delivery of improved services ('commissioning') for the school age population, the outcomes should be students who are healthy to learn and who learn to be healthy. Intuitively, linking education and health development together within the wider learning environment seems a good start to planning school health. However there has been a shortage of either theoretical models that can span different settings or experimental research that demonstrates improved community health. Is there evidence that the wider learning environment provided in a school is valuable in improving health? An initial scoping exercise identified domains of health where there was a promise of health gain. International literature on school health outcomes using the framework of Asset-Based Community Development (ABCD) has been reviewed. It was found that research on a variety of interventions was relevant to schools as an asset for public health. Effective areas for health gain were identified for local planning and evaluation using this community model. However, none of the studies reviewed was originally designed to test schools as assets and most of the research lacked methodological rigour, especially regarding children in low income countries. The ABCD model could help national governments develop resources for both education and health, but there is a global need to generate better quality evidence. Then people who commission for their local communities can make more effective use of these multifaceted assets to improve health and education outcomes for children.

  1. Psychoneuroimmunology in Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Carl

    1992-01-01

    Studies suggest that stress, emotions, personality, and cognition can affect the immune system's response to disease. This paper argues the need for psychoneuroimmunology to be taught in health education courses and provides a brief overview of research showing the link between the mind and the immune system. (GLR)

  2. Women need health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Groups of 15-20 women in Dacca, Bangladesh received a 2-week training program in basic health and nutrition in addition to advice on contraceptive methods and use. Contraceptives were also supplied. There were 18 field teams at work, operating in 24 union councils around Dacca city. The basic health training included 1 week of theoretical classes on sore eyes, scabies and parasites. The 2nd week was devoted to practical application and demonstration. At this time the mothers were given the formula to prepare saline water -- oral rehydration fluid. The mothers then prepared the saline and used it for the children in case of any diarrheal incidence in the community. It was the experience of the fieldworkers of the Concerned Women for Family Planning (CWFP) that the communities under their program live under unsanitary conditions.

  3. 健康教育对社区居民生活质量的影响%The influence of health education on the life quality of community residents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王巧慧; 张芳琴

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To discuss the influence of health education on the life quality of community residents.Methods:We selected community residents for health education objects,and compared before and after health education of community residents' quality of life.Results:Through effective form of health education,community residents to actively participate and take a healthy lifestyle,it had a significant improvement in the maintenance of health, disease prevention,self diagnostic ability, quality of life improvement.Conclusion:The effective health education can make the residents of the community establishing a good lifestyle and behavior,enhancing the self-care ability,and improving the quality of life.%目的:探讨健康教育对社区居民生活质量的影响。方法:选择社区居民为健康教育对象,比较健康教育前后社区居民的生活质量。结果:通过有效的健康教育形式,积极参加并采取健康生活方式的社区居民,在维护健康、预防疾病、自我诊断方面的能力显著提高,生活质量明显改善。结论:通过有效的健康教育,使社区居民建立了良好的生活方式和行为方式,增强了自我照顾能力,提高了生活和生命质量。

  4. Siete tesis sobre la educación sanitaria para la participación comunitaria Seven theses on health education for community participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Briceño-León

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available El artículo procura establecer algunos postulados que puedan orientar la educación sanitaria con el proposito de fomentar la participación comunitaria. Se parte de las teorías de la acción humana para poder establecer las dos corrientes que pretenden explicar la acción o no-acción de las personas. Se plantean dos principios de trabajo: es necesario conocer y contar con el ser humano, los cuales se expresan en dos premisas: "Sólo conociendo al individuo y sus circunstancias es posible una acción eficiente y permanente en salud"; y "Nadie puede cuidar la salud de otro, si éste no quiere hacerlo por si mismo". Luego se postulan las siete tesis: I - No hay uno que sabe y otro que no sabe, sino dos que saben cosas distintas. II - La educación no es sólo lo que se imparte en programas educativos, sino en toda la acción sanitaria. III - La ignorancia no es un hueco a ser llenado, sino un lleno a ser transformado. IV - La educación debe ser dialógica y participativa V - La educación debe reforzar la confianza de la gente en sí misma. VI - La educación debe procurar reforzar el modelo de conocimiento: esfuerzo-logro.VII - La educación debe fomentar la responsabilidad individual y la cooperación colectiva.This article attempts to establish some postulates to orient health education aimed at promoting community participation. Theories on human action serve as the point of departure for establishing two currents of thought explaining action or non-action by people. Two working principles are proposed, i.e., that it is necessary to both know and rely on human beings. These two principles are expressed in two premises: "Only by knowing individuals and their living circumstances is it possible to take efficient and on-going action in health," and "No one can care for someone else's health if that person does not wish to do so himself/herself." The author goes on to raise seven theses: 1. There is no such thing as one person knowing and

  5. Preserving community in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, E J; Emanuel, L L

    1997-02-01

    There are two prominent trends in health care today: first, increasing demands for accountabilty, and second, increasing provision of care through managed care organizations. These trends promote the question: What form of account-ability is appropriate to managed care plans? Accountability is the process by which a party justifies its actions and policies. Components of accountability include parties that can be held or hold others accountable, domains and content areas being assessed, and procedures of assessment. Traditionally, the professional model of accountability has operated in medical care. In this model, physicians establish the standards of accountability and hold each other accountable through professional organizations. This form of accountability seems outdated and inapplicable to managed care plans. The alternatives are the economic and the political models of accountability. In the economic model, medicine becomes more like a commodity, and "exit" (consumers changing providers for reasons of cost and quality) is the dominant procedure of accountability. In the political model, medicine becomes more like a community good, and "voice" (citizens communicating their views in public forums or on policy committees, or in elections for representatives) is the dominant procedure of accountability. The economic model's advantages affirm American individualism, make minimal demands on consumers, and use a powerful incentive, money. Its disadvantages undermine health care as a nonmarket good, undermine individual autonomy, undermine good medical practice, impose significant demands on consumers to be informed, sustain differentials of power, and use indirect procedures of accountability. The political model's advantages affirm health care as a matter of justice, permit selecting domains other than price and quality for accountability, reinforce good medical practice, and equalize power between patients and physicians. Its disadvantages include inefficiency in

  6. Forming an Educative Community in the Village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembry, James X.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the development of an educative community called Project SUCCESS (Schools, Universities, Community, Committed to Excellence in Service and Scholastics), considering the start-up, growth, and mature stage of the project. Discusses the need for educative communities that involve inter-institutional collaboration. (JPB)

  7. Community Organizing and Educational Change: A Reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Dennis

    2009-01-01

    Ten years ago community organizing as a form of educational change had only begun to challenge traditional models of school reform. Yet a decade later, community organizing has led to important changes in school and community relationships that have been documented by scholars in the areas of education, sociology, social work, and political…

  8. Community Health Education for Patients with High Blood Pressure Medication Adherence%社区健康教育对高血压患者服药依从性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑秀萍

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨社区健康教育对高血压患者服药依从性的影响。方法选择2013年第四季度10~12月我社区诊治的200例高血压患者进行服药依从性研究,比较分析社区健康教育前后的服药依从性差异。结果200例高血压患者,经社区健康教育后服药依从性良好率为88.0%,血压控制率为79.0%,明显高于健康教育前,经比较,P<0.05,差异具有统计学意义。结论社区健康教育可以明显提高高血压患者的服药依从性,值得临床推广应用。%ObjectiveTo investigate the community health education for patients with high blood pressure medication adherence.Methods Choose 10~12 month in the fourth quarter of 2013 I treated 200 cases of hypertension patients in community to medication adherence research, comparative analysis of community health education before and after medication adherence.Results 200 cases of patients with high blood pressure, the community health education after medication compliance rate was 88.0%, the good blood pressure control rates was 79.0%, significantly higher than that of before health education, by comparison,P<0.05, the difference is statistically significant.Conclusion Community health education can significantly improve patients with high blood pressure medication adherence, worthy of clinical popularization and application.

  9. Research and development in health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Health professionals working in the field of health promotion and education experience certain value conflicts: their professional and personal values, the values of their clients or of the health services clash with pedagogic values such as participation, involvement, learning and competence...... development. My educational research is concerned with the exploration and development of the knowledge about values and health education related to competence development among health professionals. The purpose is to contribute to systematic knowledge development with a view to support and diversify...... the significance that is founded in theory and relevant to the practice of working with values within various cultures and selected settings: schools, local communities, educational institutions and political organisations. The research moreover aims to diversify a number of more general concepts and connections...

  10. Research and development in health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Health professionals working in the field of health promotion and education experience certain value conflicts: their professional and personal values, the values of their clients or of the health services clash with pedagogic values such as participation, involvement, learning and competence...... development. My educational research is concerned with the exploration and development of the knowledge about values and health education related to competence development among health professionals. The purpose is to contribute to systematic knowledge development with a view to support and diversify...... the significance that is founded in theory and relevant to the practice of working with values within various cultures and selected settings: schools, local communities, educational institutions and political organisations. The research moreover aims to diversify a number of more general concepts and connections...

  11. The Virtual Communities and Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Arişanu LACULEANU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The progress made in the information and communication technology builds new communication and connection opportunities of the citizens and organizations leading to an important change of the citizen's behavior and of the functioning way of the organizations. The intelligence, as the only lasting active of a organization, is made up of individual and collective knowledge. As a matter of fact, the citizens feel more often the need of information and communication, the organizations are trying to rebuild the information so that the access to the useful information to become as easy as possible. The virtual communities appeared and are developing as a result of rising the trust grade in the major role that the Internet plays in the informational society. The educational portals, weblogs and the group software infrastructure are becoming necessary instruments in the present educational systems.

  12. International guidelines and standards for education and training to reduce the consequences of events that may threaten the health status of a community. A report of an Open International WADEM Meeting, Brussels, Belgium, 29-31 October, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Frank; Seynaeve, Geert

    2007-01-01

    The continued professionalization of the humanitarian workforce requires sound underpinning by appropriate educational programs. The international disaster medicine and emergency health community requested the World Association for Disaster and Emergency Medicine (WADEM) develop international standards and guidelines for the education and training for disaster medicine. The Working Group of the WADEM Education Committee prepared and circulated an Issues Paper to structure input on this significant international task. Subsequently, the Working Group facilitated an Open International Meeting convened in Brussels, Belgium, 2004. The "Issues Paper" also was used as a framework to structure this International Meeting, which utilized case studies selected to represent the scope of disaster medicine, and prepared a meeting consensus on a framework for disaster health and for related educational programs. The two-day Brussels meeting attracted 51 participants from 19 countries, representing 21 disciplines. Participants reinforced the need to address the development of international standards and guidelines on education and training in this emerging discipline. Participants supported the view that the term "Disaster Health" suggested a multidisciplinary approach that is a more inclusive contemporary and appropriate term to describe this field, although there were dissenting views. The meeting formulated a consensus view in support of a framework for "Disaster Health", which included: (1) primary disciplines; (2) support disciplines; (3) community response, resilience, and communication; and (4) socio-political context. The participants considered that this model lends itself to facilitating the development of educational programs in this field and believed that standards and guidelines initially should be developed in the "Core of Disaster Health" for undergraduates in relevant professions, for practicing professionals wishing to expand their practice in this field, and in

  13. Community Participation, Cultural Discourse, and Health Education Projects in Developing Areas: The Case of the Radio Communication Project in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linn, J. Gary

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author comments on the article by Dutta and Basnyat (see EJ802883) that provides an insightful and comprehensive critique of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) entertainment-education program, The Radio Communication Program (RCP) in Nepal, which has been reported to be highly participatory. Despite…

  14. Engaging in Continuing Education and Training: Learning Preferences of Worker-Learners in the Health and Community Services Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Sarojni; Billett, Stephen; Kelly, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Current tertiary education and training provisions are designed mainly to meet the learning needs of those preparing for entry into employment and specific occupations. Yet, changing work, new work requirements, an ageing workforce and the ongoing need for employability across lengthening working lives make it imperative that this educational…

  15. Community-Based Health Education Programs Designed to Improve Clinical Measures Are Unlikely to Reduce Short-Term Costs or Utilization Without Additional Features Targeting These Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Joe; Eggleston, Barry; Brenner, Jeffrey; Truchil, Aaron; Zulkiewicz, Brittany A; Lewis, Megan A

    2016-06-07

    Stakeholders often expect programs for persons with chronic conditions to "bend the cost curve." This study assessed whether a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program offered as part of a multicomponent initiative could affect emergency department (ED) visits, hospital stays, and the associated costs for an underserved population in addition to the clinical indicators that DSME programs attempt to improve. The program was implemented in Camden, New Jersey, by the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers to address disparities in diabetes care. Data used are from medical records and from patient-level information about hospital services from Camden's hospitals. Using multivariate regression models to control for individual characteristics, changes in utilization over time and changes relative to 2 comparison groups were assessed. No reductions in ED visits, inpatient stays, or costs for participants were found over time or relative to the comparison groups. High utilization rates and costs for diabetes are associated with longer term disease progression and its sequelae; thus, DSME or peer support may not affect these in the near term. Some clinical indicators improved among participants, and these might lead to fewer costly adverse health events in the future. DSME deployed at the community level, without explicit segmentation and targeting of high health care utilizers or without components designed to affect costs and utilization, should not be expected to reduce short-term medical needs for participating individuals or care-seeking behaviors such that utilization is reduced. Stakeholders must include financial outcomes in a program's design if those outcomes are to improve. (Population Health Management 20XX;XX:XXX-XXX).

  16. 7岁以下社区儿童营养不良的临床保健指导与健康宣教%Clinical health guidance and health education of malnutrition in community children under 7 years old

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾亚玲

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨保健指导与健康宣教在7岁以下社区儿童营养不良中的应用效果。方法:收治营养不良患儿66例,随机分为观察组与对照组各33例,对照组给予常规对症治疗,观察组在此基础上给予保健指导与健康宣教,对比两组临床疗效。结果:对照组治疗总有效率明显低于观察组;观察组治疗满意度明显高于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:7岁以下社区儿童营养不良中施加保健指导与健康宣教可改善治疗效果,提高治疗满意度。%Objective:To explore the application effect of health guidance and health education of malnutrition in community children under 7 years old.Methods:66 children with malnutrition were selected.They were randomly divided into the observation group and the control group with 33 cases in each.The control group was given conventional symptomatic treatment.The observation group was given health guidance and health education.The clinical curative effects of two groups were compared. Results:The treatment total effective rate of the control group was significantly lower than that of the observation group,and the treatment satisfaction of the observation group was significantly higher than that of the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:The health guidance and health education of malnutrition in community children under 7 years old can improve the treatment effect and improve the treatment satisfaction.

  17. [Discourses and practices concerning the social participation process in health education activities: community mobilization in the PCDEN/PE. Programa de Controle das Doenças Endêmicas do Nordeste/Pernambuco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acioli, M D; de Carvalho, E F

    1998-01-01

    This study analyzes and compares several social participation concepts in health education processes to practical experiences with schistosomiasis prevention measures under the Northeast Endemic Disease Control Program (Brazilian Ministry of Health/World Bank, 1987). Using qualitative methods, institutional documents and discourses were interpreted (Sucam, FNS, and Ministry of Health). A field study was also performed (using interviews with community-based health agents and the general population) in the Zona da Mata region of Pernambuco (a historically endemic area for schistosomiasis), focused in the county of Amaraji. Comparing discourses and educational practices, we found factors that explain respective points of convergence and divergence, as well as elements linked to the social and historical process of the target population which systematically limit the efficacy of such educational measures.

  18. Towards a Conceptualization of Online Community Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, David; Richter, Alexander; Trier, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Along with the increasing popularity of social media and online communities in many business settings, the notion of online community health has become a common means by which community managers judge the condition or state of their communities. It has also been introduced to the literature, yet...... the concept remains underspecified and fragmented. In this paper, we work toward a construct conceptualization of online community health. Through a review of extant literature and dialogue with specialists in the field, we develop a multi-dimensional construct of online community health, consisting of seven...... elements. In writing this paper, we attempt to foster theory development around new organizational forms by advancing a new and important construct. The paper further provides guidance to the managers of social media and online communities by taking a systematic look at the well-being of their communities....

  19. Considering place in community health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Amy; Clune, Laurie; Guruge, Sepali

    2007-09-01

    When a geographic location is assigned meaning, it becomes a place. The authors argue that place matters as both geographical location and lived experience. They extend the current conceptualization of nursing geography to encompass community health nursing and address intricacies of community nursing practice and research that often go unnoticed. They do so by exploring the notion of place in home and community, including the structural/spatial dimensions of the nurse-client relationship. The authors review the health geography literatures, then discuss the implications for practice and research in community health. They invite community health nurses to critically examine their practice and research with reference to such issues as the power of the nurse, marginalized places as determinants of health, and how best to care for clients living in diverse community settings.

  20. Personas in online health communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Jina; Kwon, Bum Chul; Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Sukwon; Choo, Jaegul; Kim, Jihoon; Choi, Min-Je; Yi, Ji Soo

    2016-10-01

    Many researchers and practitioners use online health communities (OHCs) to influence health behavior and provide patients with social support. One of the biggest challenges in this approach, however, is the rate of attrition. OHCs face similar problems as other social media platforms where user migration happens unless tailored content and appropriate socialization is supported. To provide tailored support for each OHC user, we developed personas in OHCs illustrating users' needs and requirements in OHC use. To develop OHC personas, we first interviewed 16 OHC users and administrators to qualitatively understand varying user needs in OHC. Based on their responses, we developed an online survey to systematically investigate OHC personas. We received 184 survey responses from OHC users, which informed their values and their OHC use patterns. We performed open coding analysis with the interview data and cluster analysis with the survey data and consolidated the analyses of the two datasets. Four personas emerged-Caretakers, Opportunists, Scientists, and Adventurers. The results inform users' interaction behavior and attitude patterns with OHCs. We discuss implications for how these personas inform OHCs in delivering personalized informational and emotional support.

  1. Community Mental Health Clinic Cost Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Healthcare Cost Report Information System (HCRIS) Dataset - Community Mental Health Center (CMHC). This data was reported on form CMS-2088-92. The data in this...

  2. The problems and countermeasures of the education of community health nursing in China%我国社区护理教育存在的问题与相应对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金慧实; 李春玉

    2008-01-01

    该文描述了我国社区护理教育中的学校教育、职业教育和相关方面存在的问题,以及探讨了这几个方面的相应对策,寻求适合我国社区护理的教育方法和模式,促进社区护理的开展,推进社区卫生服务的发展.%The problems and countermeasures of the education of community health nursing in school,vocation and relative aspects were described,to explore the proper teaching methods and patterns to promote the performance of community health nursing and advance the community health service in China.

  3. Home visits by Family Health Strategy nurses and community health agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Valadão Alves Kebian

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article was to describe the practice of nurses and community health agents within the context of the Family Health Strategy home visits. This is a descriptive study with a qualitative approach. Data collection was performed between January and March of 2010, through semi-structured interviews with eight nurses and seven community health agents from two family health units in the city of Rio de Janeiro. Data were submitted to content analysis. Low interaction was observed between nurses and community health agents in the home visits. Work overload and violence are the main hindrances identified for performing home visits. It was found that the home visit planning was unsystematic. Permanent education should be intensified with the purpose to discuss, following a problem-posing approach, the roles and attributions of each team member in the home visit, as well as the systematization of this activity. Descriptors: Family Health; Nursing; Community Health Workers; Home Visit.

  4. Comparison of Family Clinic Community Health Service Model with State-owned Community Health Service Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万方荣; 卢祖洵; 张金隆

    2002-01-01

    Summary: Based on a survey of community health service organization in several cities, communi-ty health service model based on the family clinic was compared with state-owned communityhealth service model, and status quo, advantages and problems of family community health serviceorganization were analyzed. Furthermore, policies for the management of community health ser-vice organization based on the family clinic were put forward.

  5. African Journal of Health Professions Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The African Journal of Health Professions Education is an online, bi-annual, ... Use of role-play and community engagement to teach parasitic diseases ... 'He has a life, a soul, a meaning that extends far deeper than his medical assessment …

  6. The Changing Educational Needs of Mental Health and Disability Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Ian J.; Redfern, Sally J.; Bodley, Denise; Holroyd, Sue; Smith, Clive; White, Edward

    A study identified and explored the changing educational needs of mental health and learning disability nurses in Britain following the 1990 National Health Service and Community Care Act. A literature review focused on service developments in mental health and learning disability nursing and changes in education. Interviews were conducted with…

  7. 社区糖尿病患者饮食指导与健康教育%Dietary guidance and health education for the community patients with diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱艳霞

    2015-01-01

    糖尿病是常见内分泌代谢疾病,与遗传和营养密切相关。随着人们生活水平的逐渐提高,高蛋白、高脂肪、高糖饮食使糖尿病发病率不断增加,控制饮食是糖尿病的基本疗法。本文综述对社区糖尿病患者进行饮食指导和健康教育,可有效控制糖尿病和防止并发症发生。%Diabetes is a common endocrine and metabolic disease, which is closely related to the genetics and nutrition. With the gradual improvement of the living standard, and the high-protein, high-fat and high-sugar diet, the diabetic incidence is increasing. The diet control is the basic therapy for diabetes. This article reviews the development of the dietary guidance and health education for the community diabetic patients, which can effectively control diabetes and prevent its complication.

  8. [Community health building: the safe community promotion experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Lu

    2011-02-01

    Safety and health promotion at the community level involves special concerns and approaches. A community may develop into a safe community or healthy city depending on the focus of relevant promotion efforts. Neither area nor population size should be factors affecting an initial decision to start safe community or healthy city programs. However, one should consider the diversity of issues that may have the potential impact on people with different gender and age or on different environments and situations, and whether a planned program is sustainable. While safe communities and healthy cities may be linked to international networks, the qualifications for joining such networks differ. The Healthy City Alliance emphasizes outcome measures and the International Safe Community Network emphasizes the appropriateness of sustainability mechanisms. While Taiwan communities are eligible for designation as international safe communities, they may are eligible for associate membership only in the Healthy City Alliance. The author has the following recommendations with regard to sustainability in community health building in Taiwan: 1) The relevant infrastructure must involve both public and private sectors; 2) The community should try to receive financial support from diverse sources; 3) involve significant numbers of active volunteers; and 4) charge local health centers with data collection and analysis responsibilities.

  9. COMMUNITY PARTICIPATION IN HEALTH DELIVERY AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Social, Historical and Political Studies. University for ... In Ghana, a series of policies and programmes outlining strategies for community ... the Community Based Health Planning and Services (CHPS) (WHO, 1978; MOH, ... tion in Ghana in the search for the evolving forms, nature and content of community.

  10. Designing a Community-Based Lay Health Advisor Training Curriculum to Address Cancer Health Disparities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwede, Clement K.; Ashley, Atalie A.; McGinnis, Kara; Montiel-Ishino, F. Alejandro; Standifer, Maisha; Baldwin, Julie; Williams, Coni; Sneed, Kevin B.; Wathington, Deanna; Dash-Pitts, Lolita; Green, B. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Racial and ethnic minorities have disproportionately higher cancer incidence and mortality than their White counterparts. In response to this inequity in cancer prevention and care, community-based lay health advisors (LHAs) may be suited to deliver effective, culturally relevant, quality cancer education, prevention/screening, and early detection services for underserved populations. Approach and Strategies Consistent with key tenets of community-based participatory research (CBPR), this project engaged community partners to develop and implement a unique LHA training curriculum to address cancer health disparities among medically underserved communities in a tricounty area. Seven phases of curriculum development went into designing a final seven-module LHA curriculum. In keeping with principles of CBPR and community engagement, academic–community partners and LHAs themselves were involved at all phases to ensure the needs of academic and community partners were mutually addressed in development and implementation of the LHA program. Discussion and Conclusions Community-based LHA programs for outreach, education, and promotion of cancer screening and early detection, are ideal for addressing cancer health disparities in access and quality care. When community-based LHAs are appropriately recruited, trained, and located in communities, they provide unique opportunities to link, bridge, and facilitate quality cancer education, services, and research. PMID:22982709

  11. Functionalism and holism: community nurses' perceptions of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, A; Baxter, R

    2001-05-01

    This paper reports the results of a study that was designed to explore and examine the perceptions of two groups of newly qualified community nurses about the factors they considered to be embedded within the concepts of health, health-enhancing behaviours at individual, family and community levels and their 'innermost self'. The research was exploratory in nature, and included two sample groups: group 1 comprised 16 newly qualified health visitors; group 2 comprised 16 newly qualified community mental health nurses. Purposive sampling was used and data were collected using semi-structured interviews. The group of health visitors perceived health in terms of physical fitness and functional states. At a global level they perceived the need to provide education on health matters. They gave generously to 'charities' and perceived the 'inner self' as 'that part that matters'. The group of community mental health nurses perceived health in terms of holism and being states. Their concept of health was related to listening to each individual's perception of what is 'right' and 'health-enhancing' for them. At a global level they considered the protection of the ozone layer and the promotion of a just and equitable society which focused on the reduction of poverty, to be key health-enhancing activities. They perceived their 'innermost self' to be 'that part of me that makes life worth living', and the soul. The findings have implications for developing new and creative approaches for teaching the holistic concept of health and healing. Educational activities could be designed which strive to ensure that nurses themselves have safe and health embracing opportunities for exploring all the elements that are embedded within the topic of health. Their role in facilitating holistic health promoting activities for all clients also needs to be addressed.

  12. Team management in community mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, M

    2000-02-01

    The community mental health team is now the established model for mental health service delivery in the community. Managing CMHTs requires a diverse range of managerial skills, role clarity and authority. More research needs to be undertaken on the role and effectiveness of the CMHT manager.

  13. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  14. The narrative psychology of community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Michael; Ziegler, Friederike

    2015-03-01

    Community health psychology is an approach which promotes community mobilisation as a means of enhancing community capacity and well-being and challenging health inequalities. Much of the research on this approach has been at the more strategic and policy level with less reference to the everyday experiences of community workers who are actively involved in promoting various forms of community change. This article considers the narrative accounts of a sample of 12 community workers who were interviewed about their lives. Their accounts were analysed in terms of narrative content. This revealed the tensions in their everyday practice as they attempted to overcome community divisions and management demands for evidence. Common to all accounts was a commitment to social justice. These findings are discussed with reference to opportunities and challenges in the practice of community work.

  15. [Health education methodology: an attempt at classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudier, F

    1986-09-01

    Health education is a major tool in the implementation of any dynamic health promotion policy. In the author's view, its conventional role, the improvement of health by bringing about behavioural changes is today subject to controversy. He identifies five key approaches in health education: the traditional approach, characterized by three features: the didactic provision of information, the use of fear as an educational technique, and the appeal to the individual's sense of responsibility for his own health. the media approach, which uses marketing methods to promote health, with a tendency to resort to positive humorous messages. the socio-political approach, which questions the very purpose of health education. According to those who hold this view, wide-scale educational campaigns would only increase social and health inequalities and would be quite ineffective in fighting the powerful economic interests that control most of our habits. The health educator's real role would be to raise the people's political awareness. the epidemiological approach, which aims at great soundness through precise planning by objectives. It is based on the so-called exact sciences such as epidemiology and its aim is to study needs and assess actions. It incorporates the classical concept according to which a change in knowledge leads to a change in behaviour and habits and thus induces health improvement. Its very elaborate character accounts for both its strength and its weakness. In fact, it takes little account of the complexity of the educational process. the community approach fills some of these gaps by stressing the participation of individuals and institutions at all programming levels. For this purpose, it uses techniques designed to ensure consensus. In conclusion, the author recommends that active research in health education be undertaken in order to clarify more adequately these approaches with a view to improving the effectiveness of preventive work.

  16. Analysis of North Carolina Community College Early Childhood Education Coursework on Nutrition, Health, and Physical Activity. Early Childhood Professional Development Report, Volume 1, Number 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunst, Carl J.; Raab, Melinda; Hamby, Deborah W.; Long, Anna Lauren

    2015-01-01

    The results from a content analysis of coursework required and offered at the 58 North Carolina Community Colleges to obtain an Associate in Applied Sciences Degree in early childhood education are described. The analyses were conducted to determine the likelihood that the courses could include content knowledge or practice on 12 infant and child…

  17. Health Ethics Education for Health Administration Chaplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Russell; Broussard, Amelia; Duckett, Todd

    2008-01-01

    It is imperative for divinity and health administration programs to improve their level of ethics education for their graduates who work as health administration chaplains. With an initial presentation of the variation of ethical dilemmas presented in health care facilities covering social, organizational, and patient levels, we indicate the need…

  18. An integrative review of community health advisors in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Caralise W; Grant, Joan S; Appel, Susan J

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this paper was to report findings from an integrative literature review conducted to identify the theoretical basis of interventions for studies using community health advisors; populations and settings served by community health advisors; characteristics, training, and roles and activities of community health advisors; and the effectiveness of interventions by community health advisors for improving self-management of patients living with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Community health advisors' theoretical interventions were based on providing culturally appropriate care and resolution of health disparities within minority populations. Typically community health advisors were patients themselves living with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Major roles of community health advisors included: supporter, educator, case manager, advocate, and program facilitator. Activities of community health advisors were: coordinating educational programs, conducting educational courses for patients, serving as a link between patients and healthcare professionals, providing counseling, and leading peer support meetings. The effectiveness of interventions by community health advisors was mixed. Examples of outcome criteria were improvements in: knowledge, hemoglobin A1C, low density lipoprotein levels, blood pressure, and physical activity. Community health advisors provide culturally appropriate interventions to promote and restore health and prevent diseases while serving as links between community and healthcare providers.

  19. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY: impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhodes LA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay A Rhodes,1 Carrie E Huisingh,1 Gerald McGwin Jr,1,2 Stephen T Mennemeyer,3 Mary Bregantini,4 Nita Patel,4 Jinan Saaddine,5 John E Crews,5 Christopher A Girkin,1 Cynthia Owsley11Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, 2Department of Epidemiology, 3Department of Health Care Organization and Policy, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, 4Prevent Blindness, Chicago, IL, USA; 5Vision Health Initiative, Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USAPurpose: To assess the impact of the education program of the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY telemedicine program on at-risk patients’ knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care as well as to assess patient satisfaction with EQUALITY.Patients and methods: New or existing patients presenting for a comprehensive eye exam (CEE at one of two retail-based primary eye clinics were enrolled based on ≥1 of the following at-risk criteria for glaucoma: African Americans ≥40 years of age, Whites ≥50 years of age, diabetes, family history of glaucoma, and/or preexisting diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 651 patients were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered prior to the patients’ CEE and prior to the patients receiving any of the evidence-based eye health education program; a follow-up questionnaire was administered 2–4 weeks later by phone. Baseline and follow-up patient responses regarding knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care were compared using McNemar’s test. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of patient-level characteristics with improvement in knowledge and attitudes. Overall patient satisfaction was summarized.Results: At follow-up, all patient responses in the knowledge and attitude domains significantly improved from baseline (P≤0.01 for all questions. Those who were unemployed (odds

  20. Critical Pedagogy in Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This review investigated how the three-phase model of critical pedagogy, based on the writings of Paulo Freire, can be put into practice in health education. Design: The study considers literature related to the fields of health education, health promotion and critical pedagogy. Setting: The study is a scholarly review completed as part…

  1. The evolution of the Fenway Community Health model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, K; Appelbaum, J; Rogers, T; Lo, W; Bradford, J; Boswell, S

    2001-06-01

    Fenway Community Health was founded by community activists in 1971 in the Fenway neighborhood of Boston, Mass, and within a decade had rapidly expanded its medical services for gay men in response to the AIDS epidemic. Increased expertise and cultural competence in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) care led to expansion of medical services to address broader community concerns, ranging from substance use to parenting issues to domestic and homophobic violence, as well as specialized programs for lesbians, bisexuals, and transgendered individuals. Fenway began as a grassroots neighborhood clinic. In 1975, the center recorded 5000 patient care visits; in 2000, Fenway's clinical departments recorded 50,850 visits by 8361 individuals, including more than 1100 individuals receiving HIV-associated care. The center now has more than 170 staff people responsible for clinical programs, community education, research, administration, planning, and development. Over the past few years, Fenway's annual budget has exceeded $10 million. Fenway has established standards for improved cultural competence about LGBT health issues for other health providers and has developed programs to educate the general community about specific LGBT health concerns. This health center may provide a model of comprehensive LGBT health services that have a local impact.

  2. Health education through analogies: preparation of a community for clinical trials of a vaccine against hookworm in an endemic area of Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Flavia Gazzinelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obtaining informed consent for clinical trials is especially challenging when working in rural, resource-limited areas, where there are often high levels of illiteracy and lack of experience with clinical research. Such an area, a remote field site in the northeastern part of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, is currently being prepared for clinical trials of experimental hookworm vaccines. This study was conducted to assess whether special educational tools can be developed to increase the knowledge and comprehension of potential clinical trial participants and thereby enable them to make truly informed decisions to participate in such research. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An informational video was produced to explain the work of the research team and the first planned hookworm vaccine trial, using a pedagogical method based on analogies. Seventy-two adults living in a rural community of Minas Gerais were administered a structured questionnaire that assessed their knowledge of hookworm, of research and of the planned hookworm vaccine trial, as well as their attitudes and perceptions about the researchers and participation in future vaccine trials. The questionnaire was administered before being shown the educational video and two months after and the results compared. After viewing the video, significant improvements in knowledge related to hookworm infection and its health impact were observed: using a composite score combining related questions for which correct answers were assigned a value of 1 and incorrect answers a value of 0, participants had a mean score of 0.76 post-video compared to 0.68 pre-video (p = 0.0001. Similar improvements were seen in understanding the purpose of vaccination and the possible adverse effects of an experimental vaccine. Although 100% of participants expressed a positive opinion of the researchers even before viewing the film and over 90% said that they would participate in a hookworm vaccine

  3. Health and Hospital Management Education in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavya Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Public health has been of national and international concern as in the process of assuring the health standards of any nation, it involves mobilizing and engaging local, state, national and international resources. Since the health problems and issues vary from country to country, the health policies and reforms addressing these should also be customized. To effectively implement and practice these developments, it is necessary to scientifically derive the lessons learnt and relate them to adequately trained and adroit health workforce. Winslow in his definition of Public Health stated, “Public Health is the science and art of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health and efficiency through organized community efforts for the sanitation of environment, the control of community infections, the education of individuals in principles of hygiene, the organization of medical and nursing services for the early diagnosis and preventive treatment of disease and the development of social machinery which will ensure to every individual in the community a standard of living adequate for maintenance of health, so organizing these benefits as to enable every citizen to realize his birth right of health and longevity(1. To effectively comply with the multidisciplinary dimensions reflected in Winslow’s definition, it is necessary to explore the different domains of public health and provide sufficient capacity building initiatives to work upon the existing situations related to each of these domains. Public health education and competencies at various levels needed to translate evidence into policies, and to design, implement and evaluate programs(2. The reach of public health has now burgeoned from studying infectious and tropical diseases to understanding the health systems and workforce at large.........

  4. Analysis of the health education intervention for hypertension patients in community under expectations theory%期望理论视域下的社区高血压患者健康教育干预分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林丽妹

    2014-01-01

    Through the health education intervention to intervene the behavior of hypertension patients in community is the effective measures to solve the hypertension "three high" and "three low" situations.Expectancy theory introduced to the health education for patients with hypertension in community can effectively expand the intervention content and enhance the effectiveness of intervention.%通过健康教育干预社区高血压患者行为方式是解决高血压“三高”、“三低”现状的有效举措。期望理论引入到社区高血压患者健康教育中能够有效拓展干预内容,提升干预实效。

  5. Infectious Diseases: Current Issues in School and Community Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Wilma; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Some children in American schools have known and unknown communicable diseases, including herpes, cytomegalovirus, AIDS, mononucleosis, pinworms, and hepatitis. This article examines major public health issues, school responsibility, preventative measures (like basic hygiene), and the need for more effective community education programs. A disease…

  6. Infectious Diseases: Current Issues in School and Community Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Wilma; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Some children in American schools have known and unknown communicable diseases, including herpes, cytomegalovirus, AIDS, mononucleosis, pinworms, and hepatitis. This article examines major public health issues, school responsibility, preventative measures (like basic hygiene), and the need for more effective community education programs. A disease…

  7. Hospital Library’s Attempt in Serving Community Health Education---Taking the Library of Tianjin First Hospital as an Example%医院图书馆在服务社区健康教育方面的尝试--以天津市第一医院图书馆为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈立新

    2015-01-01

    This paper expounds the necessity of carrying out the community health education, analyzes the limitation of the community health education, and puts forward some concrete measures for the hospital library to serve the community health education.%阐述了开展社区健康教育的必要性,分析了社区健康教育的局限性,提出了医院图书馆在服务社区健康教育中的具体措施。

  8. 高中生网络成瘾的社区健康教育%Community intervention of health education to internet addiction in high school students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄悦勤; 张新乔; 刘肇瑞

    2011-01-01

    目的:采取知信行健康教育模式,对北京市高中生网络成瘾进行社区干预研究,评价对网络成瘾的知识、态度和行为的干预效果.方法:采用分层整群抽样方法,选取4877名高中生,随机分为干预组(n=2538)和非干预组(n=2139).采用观看视频讲座、发放知识手册和张贴宣传画方式进行干预,自编网络成瘾知信行(Knowledge,Attitude and Practice,KAP)问卷和网络使用自评量表(the Self-rating Internet Using Scale,SIUS)评估效果.结果:(1) 干预后干预组的SIUS分明显低于非干预组,而KAP 分明显高于非干预组(均P<0.01);(2) 干预组干预前后的SIUS 分和KAP 分差值均大于非干预组(均P<0.001);(3) 干预组在干预后对网络成瘾知识的回答正确率比干预前普遍提高,不正确的网络成瘾相关态度和行为的出现率普遍降低,而非干预组均无明显变化.结论:针对高中生这一网络成瘾的高危人群中进行健康教育干预,能有效提高中学生对网络成瘾的认识和了解,促进其对网络的正确使用.%Objective: Using health education model, a community intervention study to internet addiction was carried in high school students in Beijing to evaluate the effect on knowledge, attitude and practice of internet addiction. Method: Using stratify cluster sampling, 4877 high schools students were randomly divided into intervention group and control group. The self-made questionnaire of Knowledge Attitude and Practice for Internet Addiction (KAPI) and Self-report Internet Using Scale (SIUS) were used to evaluate the effect of mental health education after intervention. Result: (1) The mean scores of SIUS of the intervention group were significantly lower than that of the non-intervention group. The mean scores of KAPI in the intervention group were significantly higher than that in the control group (P <0. 01). (2) The differences of the SIUS and KAPI scores between pre-and post-intervantion were higher in the

  9. Have Broad-Based Community and Professional Education Programs Influenced Mental Health Literacy and Treatment Seeking of those with Major Depression and Suicidal Ideation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldney, Robert D.; Fisher, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    "Mental health literacy" is the knowledge and beliefs about mental disorders that aid in their recognition, management, or prevention; it is also a determinant of help seeking. As such, it is presumed to be important in community suicide prevention programs. In Australia there have been a number of government, professional, and…

  10. Reproductive Health Education Model in Early Childhood through Education Film "Damar Wulan"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahrulianingdyah, Atiek

    2015-01-01

    Reproductive health education for early childhood it has been the time to teach, because the demand of the changing times and will affect the child's life when he/she is a teenager. During this time, the reproductive health education, which is in it there is sex education, considered taboo among some communities. They argue that the reproductive…

  11. Factors associated with sense of community among allied health students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haar, Mindy; Scanlan, Craig

    2012-01-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a substantial increase in online education in the health professions, as well as growing recognition that teamwork and collaboration are essential to success. While the impact of students' sense of community on factors such as course satisfaction and retention has been studied among college enrollees in general, there is little research exploring this concept among allied health students. To address this shortcoming, a convenience sample of students enrolled in a large northeastern school of health-related professions was surveyed to gather information on their demographics, curriculum and selected course attributes, perceived instructor teaching perspectives, and sense of community. Univariate analysis indicated that entry-level students experienced a greater sense of community than post-professional students. Multivariate analysis revealed that instructor-determined factors of encouraging discussion, encouraging expression of opinions, and specifying response times best predicted sense of community. With all other variables controlled, perceptions of community were significantly lower in online courses, among students for whom English was their second language, and in courses where instructors were perceived as focused primarily on content delivery. This study supports promoting selected course and instructor-related attributes associated with sense of community in allied health education, with a particular focus on both non-native English speakers and post-professional students. Enhancement of online courses with strategies that increase instructor presence, better engage students, and facilitate interaction also are warranted.

  12. 实习护生参与社区老年糖尿病患者健康教育的效果评价%Effect evaluation of student nurses in participating elderly diabetes patients′ health education of communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀川; 张静; 叶冬青

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To improve the knowledge and self-management ability of community elderly diabetes patients, develop the communication ability of student nurses and improve the levels of community health education. Methods: Sixty-eight high-quality student nurses were selected to evaluate the health of community diabetes patients and propagandize health education. The personalized health education was conducted. The knowledge and self-management ability of community diabetes patients and the communication ability of student nurses were compared before and after conducting the plan. Results: After conducting the plan, the knowledge and self-management ability of community diabetes patients and the communication ability of student nurses were greatly improved, which difference was statistically significant P < 0. 01) . Conclusions: Student nurses take part in the community health education of diabetes, which can play the role of human resources, not only increase the knowledge and self-management ability of community diabetes patients, but also improve the communication ability of student nurses.%目的:提高社区老年糖尿病患者知识水平及自我管理能力,培养实习护生的沟通能力,提高社区健康教育水平.方法:选择综合素质较高的实习护生68名参与社区糖尿病患者的健康评估及健康宣教,实施有针对性的个体化、个性化的健康教育.在实施前后对糖尿病患者的知识水平及自我管理能力、实习护生的沟通能力进行比较.结果:实施前后糖尿病患者的知识水平及自我管理能力、实习护生的沟通能力均有显著提高(P<0.01).结论:由实习护生参与的社区糖尿病健康教育,能够发挥实习护生人力资源的作用,既提高了社区糖尿病患者的知识水平及自我管理能力,又提高了实习护生的沟通交流能力.

  13. 社区健康教育对哺乳期母乳喂养及乳腺炎的影响%Effect of community health education on lactation mastitis and breast feeding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽玲; 黄新桥; 曾绍芳; 幸晓燕

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨社区健康教育对哺乳期母乳喂养和乳腺炎发生的影响。方法对90例产妇实施社区健康教育,时间6个月。了解其乳腺炎发生情况和母乳喂养情况。结果本组产妇乳腺炎发病率为3.3%,母乳喂养率为97.8%。结论对哺乳期产妇实施社区健康教育,可及时纠正产妇不良饮食习惯,使其能正确掌握哺乳期保健及新生儿护理方法,从而降低乳腺炎的发生,进而提高母乳喂养率。%Objective To study the effect of community health education on lactation mastitis and breast feeding.Method Ninety parturients were given community health education for 6 months and then the rates of mastitis and breast feeding were recorded.Results The mastitis morbidity was 3.3%and the rate of breast feeding was 97.8%.Conclusion The implementation of the community health education can reduce the morbidity of maternal mastitis and raise the rate of breast feeding.

  14. Implementing community-based education in basic nursing education programs in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.G. Mtshali

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Education of health professionals using principles of community-based education is the recommended national policy in South Africa. A paradigm shift to community based education is reported in a number of nursing education institutions in South Africa. Reviewed literature however revealed that in some educational institutions planning, implementation and evaluation of Community-based Educational (CBE programmes tended to be haphazard, uncoordinated and ineffective, resulting in poor student motivation. Therefore the purpose of this study was to analyse the implementation of community-based education in basic nursing education programmes in South Africa. Strauss and Corbin’s (1990 grounded theory approach guided the research process. Data were collected by means of observation, interviews and document analysis. The findings revealed that collaborative decision-making involving all stakeholders was crucial especially during the curriculum planning phase. Furthermore, special criteria should be used when selecting community learning sites to ensure that the selected sites are able to facilitate the development of required graduate competencies. Collaborative effort, true partnership between academic institutions and communities, as well as government support and involvement emerged as necessary conditions for the successful implementation of community-based education programmes.

  15. Community Partnerships: Educational Linkages to Increase the Number of Primary Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ronald W.; Henry, Rebecca C.

    1993-01-01

    The Kellogg Foundation's Community Partnerships in Health Professions Education, a program designed to increase multidisciplinary, comprehensive, cost-effective primary care teams in communities, uses an organizational structure linking academic medical education with communities. The new structures have resulted in new curricula and other…

  16. Community health centers and community development financial institutions: joining forces to address determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelchuck, Ronda; Lowenstein, Daniel; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2011-11-01

    Community health centers and community development financial institutions share similar origins and missions and are increasingly working together to meet community needs. Addressing the social and economic determinants of health is a common focus. The availability of new federal grants and tax credits has led these financial institutions to invest in the creation and expansion of community health centers. This article reviews the most recent trends in these two sectors and explores opportunities for further collaboration to transform the health and well-being of the nation's low-income communities.

  17. Partnering for Health with Nebraska's Latina Immigrant Community Using Design Thinking Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Athena K; Trinidad, Natalia; Correa, Antonia; Rivera, Roy

    2016-01-01

    The Center for Reducing Health Disparities at the University of Nebraska Medical Center partnered with El Centro de Las Americas, a community-based organization, and various community members to develop a 1-day Spanish-language health conference entitled El Encuentro de La Mujer Sana (Healthy Woman Summit) for immigrant Latinas in Nebraska during May 2013 as part of National Women's Health Week. Design thinking was used to create a meaningful learning experience specifically designed for monolingual Spanish-speaking immigrant Latinas in Nebraska and build a foundation for collaboration between an academic institution, community-based organizational partners, and community members. We used the design thinking methodology to generate ideas for topics and prototyped agendas with community stakeholders that would be relevant and provide culturally and linguistically appropriate health education. By developing community-based health education programs for Latinas with Latinas through a community-engaged co-creation process, organizations and communities build trust, enhance community capacity, and meet identified needs for education and service. Design thinking is a valuable tool that can be used to develop community health education initiatives and enhance civic participation. This method holds promise for health education and public health in becoming more relevant for traditionally marginalized or disenfranchised populations.

  18. Theoretical framework of community education improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaúl Brizuela Castillo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper explains the connection between the approach selected for the analysis and development of community education and the contradictions manifested in its theoretical and practical comprehension. As a result, a comprehensive model for community education, describing the theoretical and methodological framework to improve community education, is devised. This framework is based on a conscious organizing of educative influences applied to the regular task of the community under the coordinate action of social institutions and organization that promote the transformational action of the neighborhood assuming a protagonist role in the improvement of the quality of live and morals related to the socialism updating process. The comprehensive model was proved experimentally at District 59 of San Miguel town; the transformation of the community was scientifically registered together with the information gather by means of observation and interviewing. The findings proved the pertinence and feasibility of the proposed model.

  19. Community socioeconomic status and children's dental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillcrist, J A; Brumley, D E; Blackford, J U

    2001-02-01

    Although a substantial decline in dental caries has occurred among U.S. children, not everyone has benefited equally. The first-ever surgeon general's report on oral health in America indicates that the burden of oral diseases is found in poor Americans. This study investigates the relationship between community socioeconomic status, or SES, and dental health of children. An oral health survey of 17,256 children, representing 93 percent of children residing in 62 Tennessee communities, was conducted in public elementary schools during the 1996-1997 school year. Portable dental equipment was used for examinations, and data from each examination were entered directly into a laptop computer. The authors performed analyses of covariance to examine the relationship between community SES (low/medium/high) and dental health, controlling for community fluoridation. Community SES was significantly related to caries experience in the primary teeth, the proportion of untreated caries in the primary and permanent teeth, dental treatment needs, dental sealants and incisor trauma. Overall, dental health was significantly worse for low-SES communities than for medium- and high-SES communities. The authors conclude that all specific dental indexes used to measure children's dental health in this study, with the exceptions of caries experience in the permanent teeth and sealant presence, were inversely related to the communities' SES. The percentage of children with dental sealants was directly related to the community's SES. Further improvements in oral health will necessitate that community-based preventive programs and access to quality dental care be made available to children who are identified as being at highest risk of experiencing oral disease.

  20. The Community College and Prison Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarborough, Thelma B.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the history of education in the prison system and the practices used to deal with prisoners. Traces changes and improvements in prison educational services. Calls for further research to measure the effectiveness of correctional rehabilitation, prison education, and community college programs for offenders. (DMM)

  1. Developing patient education in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.T.G.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians’ patient education behavior and the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities in the pharmacy. Thi

  2. Community Education: An Amalgam of Many Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minzey, Jack

    1972-01-01

    Community education is an educational philosophy, which holds that the school is responsible for all aspects of education. The promise of that philosophy lies in its potential for involving people in the identification and solution of their problems. (Author/JH)

  3. Curriculum Design in Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceicao, Simone C. O.; Colby, Holly; Juhlmann, Anne; Johaningsmeir, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    While health care providers are knowledgeable of health conditions and of the information patients need to make appropriate health decisions and follow health providers' recommendations, they lack information about adult teaching and learning and appropriate curriculum design. Adult educators can contribute more sophisticated skills in program…

  4. Investigation the health situation of middle-aged and old in community and its health education countermeasures%社区中老年人健康状态的调查及健康教育对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李露; 朱铁军; 朱日英

    2011-01-01

    Objective : To investigate the health situation of eldery in community, aims to explore the nursing of elderly people with community service system for control of intervention and performance evaluation. Methods : To selection and intvesigate shekou 4 communities 1174 example for people over age 45 by questionnaire. Results : The total rate of food - wrapping health knowledge , respondents for health " four foundation" , to prevent diabetes , nutritional knowledge of low awareness,five basic health skill mastery accuracy for greatly, Residents of the main concern ahout chronic disease prevention knowledge is the knowledge of mental health, health knowledge and infectious disease control knowledge, etc. Most of the need to improve the problem is not the noise,sports facilities, public security problem. Conclusion : To satisfy the aging of the population needs, estahlish standardized community elderly care service system, such as the early detection of patient care scheme, education, an intervention, support service system, and healthy life quality assessment. In order to achieve the goal: to promote healthy elderly care, enhance self - care ability and physical function, prevent can avoid the best of health, and improve the quality of life.%目的:调查社区中老年人健康状况,旨在探讨符合社区中老年人的护理服务体系,为开展有针对性的干预和效果评价提供依据.方法:采用问卷调查法,采取随机抽样方法选择蛇口4个社区1 174例45岁以上中老年人为调查对象.结果:调查对象的健康知识知晓率偏低,调查对象对于健康的"四大基石"、糖尿病预防、营养知识的知晓率偏低;五项基本健康技能的掌握正确率为68.7%;居民主要关注的是有关慢性病防治知识、心理保健知识、传染病防治等健康知识;社区最需要改善的问题前三位分别是噪音较大、体育设施不全、治安问题.结论:为满足人口老龄化的需求,

  5. A collaborative model for supporting community-based interdisciplinary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Patricia A; Schifferdecker, Karen E; Pipas, Catherine F; Fall, Leslie H; Poor, Daniel A; Peltier, Deborah A; Nierenberg, David W; Brooks, W Blair

    2002-07-01

    Development and support of community-based, interdisciplinary ambulatory medical education has achieved high priority due to on-site capacity and the unique educational experiences community sites contribute to the educational program. The authors describe the collaborative model their school developed and implemented in 2000 to integrate institution- and community-based interdisciplinary education through a centralized office, the strengths and challenges faced in applying it, the educational outcomes that are being tracked to evaluate its effectiveness, and estimates of funds needed to ensure its success. Core funding of $180,000 is available annually for a centralized office, the keystone of the model described here. With this funding, the office has (1) addressed recruitment, retention, and quality of educators for UME; (2) promoted innovation in education, evaluation, and research; (3) supported development of a comprehensive curriculum for medical school education; and (4) monitored the effectiveness of community-based education programs by tracking product yield and cost estimates needed to generate these programs. The model's Teaching and Learning Database contains information about more than 1,500 educational placements at 165 ambulatory teaching sites (80% in northern New England) involving 320 active preceptors. The centralized office facilitated 36 site visits, 22% of which were interdisciplinary, involving 122 preceptors. A total of 98 follow-up requests by community-based preceptors were fulfilled in 2000. The current submission-to-funding ratio for educational grants is 56%. Costs per educational activity have ranged from $811.50 to $1,938, with costs per preceptor ranging from $101.40 to $217.82. Cost per product (grants, manuscripts, presentations) in research and academic scholarship activities was $2,492. The model allows the medical school to balance institutional and departmental support for its educational programs, and to better position

  6. New Developments in Mental Health and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fazenda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The community mental health model implies a bio‐psycho‐social perspective of mental health/illness issues, as well as a set of values that advocate equity in service access, community treatment, respect for human rights, a recovery vision, promotion of independent living, social integration and user and family participation. In accordance with the priorities set by the European Union, mental health services must guarantee that these principles are applied in the prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and promotion of mental health. Inter‐sector cooperation is an essential part of developing transversal policies that ensure society’s involvement in mental health promotion. Advances in community mental health in‐ dicate the relevance of considering human rights both in policy development and in practice, of the recovery perspective and of the need to promote the participation of user and carer organizations.

  7. Health education and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Service, A

    1986-01-01

    The UK's Minister for Health has again raised the debate about the role of health educators, and in particular that of the Health Education Council, in what is termed public policy work. 1 possible definition of public policy work as regards health education is that aspect that seeks to establish certain health promoting principles as part of the conscious factors always to be considered by individuals, by opinion leaders, by manufacturers, by employers and trade unions, by service providers, by local authorities, and by central government in their plans and decisions. The Health Education Council (HEC) has no power to make or impose public policy; the Department of Health and Social Security (DHSS) has that task. The world of health education providers includes the Health Education Officers working for the Health Authorities and with the Education Authorities, an increasing number of important academic workers in the field, the HEC, the Scottish Health Education Group (SHEG), the DHSS, and some of the members of various professions who provide health education to the public as part of their daily work. Most of the HEC's work consists of providing these people with health educational tools. If the HEC begins to do more in the public policy field, it will not be at the cost of providing health educational tools. At the HEC a staff of 4 liaison workers is responsible for keeping field workers informed about future and imminent HEC work programs. They also assess needs and ideas by holding periodic meetings with Health Education Officers and others in various parts of the country. HEC's efforts have contributed substantially to increasing attention to preventive health measures on the part of the DHSS, parliamentary committees, the Royal Colleges, other professional bodies, and the media. In regard to the future, several paths deserve exploration as part of the HEC's education of decision-makers and opinion-formers. These include: local authorities, relevant

  8. Measuring health literacy in community agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elsworth, Gerald R.; Beauchamp, Alison; Osborne, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    for its use in community health settings. Methods: Data were provided by 813 clients of 8 community agencies in Victoria, Australia who were administered the HLQ during the needs assessment stage of the Ophelia project, a health literacy-based intervention. Most analyses were conducted using Bayesian...... including community-based health promotion and support services. We report a follow-up study of the psychometric properties of the HLQ with respondents from a diverse range of community-based organisations with the principal goal of contributing to the development of a soundly validated evidence base....... These analyses provide researchers, program managers and policymakers with a range of robust evidence by which they can make judgements about the appropriate use of the HLQ for their community-based setting....

  9. Improving health literacy in community populations: a review of progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutbeam, Don; McGill, Bronwyn; Premkumar, Pav

    2017-03-28

    Governments around the world have adopted national policies and programs to improve health literacy. This paper examines progress in the development of evidence to support these policies from interventions to improve health literacy among community populations. Our review found only a limited number of studies (n=7) that met the criteria for inclusion, with many more influenced by the concept of health literacy but not using it in the design and evaluation. Those included were diverse in setting, population and intended outcomes. All included educational strategies to develop functional health literacy, and a majority designed to improve interactive or critical health literacy skills. Several papers were excluded because they described a protocol for an intervention, but not results, indicating that our review may be early in a cycle of activity in community intervention research. The review methodology may not have captured all relevant studies, but it provides a clear message that the academic interest and attractive rhetoric surrounding health literacy needs to be tested more systematically through intervention experimentation in a wide range of populations using valid and reliable measurement tools. The distinctive influence of the concept of health literacy on the purpose and methodologies of health education and communication is not reflected in many reported interventions at present. Evidence to support the implementation of national policies and programs, and the intervention tools required by community practitioners are not emerging as quickly as needed. This should be addressed as a matter of priority by research funding agencies.

  10. Financial impact of community-based dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailit, Howard L

    2010-10-01

    The financial impact of community-based dental education on dental school and community clinic budgets is a major issue. The evidence suggests that community experiences for dental students of fifty or more days, if effectively managed, can increase school net revenues due to the following factors: 1) the community rotations increase student productivity, approximating the loss of dental school clinical income; 2) the reallocation of unused clinical resources at the dental school reduces student clinic deficits; 3) schools and federally qualified health centers (FQHCs) that share surplus student patient revenues generate additional net income; and 4) enrollment of more students without additional new facilities and faculty increases total school tuition revenues. For FQHC dental clinics, student rotations increase the number of patients treated and may generate surplus revenues. Community-based dental education also provides schools and clinics important non-financial advantages.

  11. Fostering the health of communities: a unifying mission for the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, A; Galbraith, P; Alfero, C; Urbina, C; Derksen, D; Wiese, W; Contreras, R; Kalishman, N

    1996-05-01

    Fostering the health of communities can serve as a unifying mission of the academic health center (AHC), which can set the AHC apart from other health providers in the community. To achieve this mission, the University of New Mexico's AHC is increasingly focusing education, research, and service upon the identified health and service needs of communities in its state. Since major health problems in our society have social, behavioral, and economic roots, New Mexico's AHC has tapped into the broad expertise of its different components as well as that of its state and community partners to adequately address health problems in the community. Its hospitals offer financing and management resources, its colleges offer innovative approaches to community-based education, and the state department of health offers expertise in health policy development. To adequately respond to the complexity of community health needs, the different colleges and departments at New Mexico's AHC are increasingly merging into integrated governance units. Measures of community outreach success include evidence of strengthened community development, increased health care access, and improved indices of community health. New Mexico's AHC formed an interdisciplinary rural outreach task force, which has demonstrated its ability to form partnerships with state and local agencies and to mobilize institutional resources in education, research, and service from the AHC's different departments, colleges, and hospitals to respond promptly to unique community health needs. Evidence shows that such an integrated, coordinated AHC intervention can generate strong and lasting AHC-community alliances, improve the quality and economic viability of community health systems, and enhance the financial resources of the AHC.

  12. Evaluation of community health education effect on Family Health Keepers in Beijing%北京市家庭保健员社区健康教育效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张华兴; 郝良; 刘芬; 何燕

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the community health education intervention effect on improvement of family health keepers' behavior habits and basic physiological indexes. Methods A questionnaire survey was carried out before and after the training of family health keepers. The changes of life behavior habit and physiological indexes before and after training a year were determined. Results Compared to before training, the daily habits and basic physiological indexes of family health keepers had obvious changes after the training. The percentage of respondents who used cooking oil > 30 grams/day was decreased from 18.6% to 7. 7% , the percentage of respondents who used salt >6 grams/day from 24.0% to 9. 8% , the percentage of respondents who smoked >5 cigarettes/day from 31.3% to 22.9% , and the percentage of respondents who drank > 3 times/month from 48. 9% to 37. 7% , and the differences were statistically significant ( P < 0. 01). Conclusion Community health education interventions on family health keepers are effective to improve their life behavior habit and basic physiological indexes. It is useful to carry out community intervention activities as family unit for chronic diseases prevention and control.%目的 探索社区健康教育对家庭保健员生活行为习惯及基本生理指标的改善效果.方法 随机抽取北京市18个区县的家庭保健员,在健康教育前与健康教育结束一年后分别以问卷形式进行健康信息收集采样,观察其培训前后生活行为习惯及基本生理指标变化.结果 健康教育前后家庭保健员的日常生活习惯及基本生理指标有明显改变,如炒菜用油> 30 g/d人群由18.6%降至7.7%;食盐摄入>6 g/d人群由24.0%降至9.8%,吸烟>5支/d人群由31.3%降至22.9%;饮酒>3次/月人群由48.9%降至37.7%,且差异有统计学意义(P<0.01).结论 社区健康教育对家庭保健员的生活行为习惯及基本生理指标的改善有显著效果,对

  13. Lived experiences of a community regarding its involvement in a university community-based education programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Engelbrecht

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community involvement is one of the crucial principles in the implementation of successful community-based education programmes. However, a gap continues to exist between the rhetoric of this principle and the reality of involving or engaging communities in the education of health professionals. Objectives: This study investigated the experiences of a community regarding its involvement in a community-based education programme offered by a university nursing school in Durban, South Africa. Methods: An interpretive existentialist-phenomenological design was employed for its richness in extracting human experiences. Individual interviews were held with school teachers and coordinators from non-government organisations, whilst focus groups were used for school children and community health workers. Although focus group discussions are not well suited for phenomenological studies, they can promote active participation and reduce possible intimidation by providing support through group interaction. Analysis of data was guided by Schweitzer’s model for analysing phenomenological data. Results: Themes that emerged from the data include: (1 Community experience of unmet expectations; (2 Benefits to the community from its involvement in the University Nursing School community-based education programme; (3 Existing partnership between the community and the university; (4 Sharing in the case-based learning activities; (5 Awareness of available services, human rights and self-reliance. Conclusion: The researched community indeed benefited in its participation in the University Nursing School (UNS CBE programme. However, there is a need to improve the communication between partners to make the partnership more sustainable through close relationships and interaction. There is also a need for further research on related aspects of the community’s involvement.

  14. Lived experiences of a community regarding its involvement in a university community-based education programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ntombizodwa S.B. Linda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community involvement is one of the crucial principles in the implementation of successful community-based education programmes. However, a gap continues to exist between the rhetoric of this principle and the reality of involving or engaging communities in the education of health professionals. Objectives: This study investigated the experiences of a community regarding its involvement in a community-based education programme offered by a university nursing school in Durban, South Africa.Methods: An interpretive existentialist-phenomenological design was employed for its richness in extracting human experiences. Individual interviews were held with school teachers and coordinators from non-government organisations, whilst focus groups were used for school children and community health workers. Although focus group discussions are not well suited for phenomenological studies, they can promote active participation and reduce possible intimidation by providing support through group interaction. Analysis of data was guided by Schweitzer’s model for analysing phenomenological data.Results: Themes that emerged from the data include: (1 Community experience of unmet expectations; (2 Benefits to the community from its involvement in the University Nursing School community-based education programme; (3 Existing partnership between the community and the university; (4 Sharing in the case-based learning activities; (5 Awareness of available services, human rights and self-reliance.Conclusion: The researched community indeed benefited in its participation in the University Nursing School (UNS CBE programme. However, there is a need to improve the communication between partners to make the partnership more sustainable through close relationships and interaction. There is also a need for further research on related aspects of the community’s involvement.

  15. Effect of Health Education on Nursing Effect of Community Acquired Pneu-monia in Elderly%健康教育对老年人社区获得性肺炎护理效果的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丽林

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨健康教育对老年人社区获得性肺炎护理效果的影响。方法以2015年12月-2016年5月在该院接受治疗的社区获得性肺炎的老年患者97例作为研究对象,通过心理教育、饮食指导、作息指导、用药教育、特殊教育、口腔护理教育和出院指导等方面进行健康教育,观察治疗的总有效率。结果观察组通过心理教育、饮食指导、作息指导、用药教育、特殊教育、口腔护理教育和出院指导等方面进行健康教育。结果显示:对照组的总有效率为71.13%,观察组的总有效率为94.85%,观察组明显优于对照组,两组比较差异有统计学意义(字2=10.72,P<0.05)。结论良好的健康教育能够提高治疗的效果,减轻并发症的反应几率。%Objective To study the effect of health education on nursing effect of community acquired pneumonia in elderly. Methods 97 cases of senile patients with community acquired pneumonia in our hospital from December, 2015 to April, 2016 were selected as the research objects, After health education such as mental education, diet guidance, work-rest guidance, medication education, special education, oral nursing education and discharge guidance,and the total effective rate of treatment was observed. Results Observation group through psychological education, dietary advice, guidance and rest, medication education, special education, and oral care education discharge guidance in areas such as health education. The results showed that:the control group total effective rate 71.13%, the total effective rate of the observation group 94.85% in the observation group than the control group, the difference was statistically significant (χ²= 10.72, P<0.05). Conclusion The good health education can improve the treatment effect, relieve the reaction probability of complications.

  16. Reproductive Health in a Rural Ngwa Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the study were collected from a rural Ngwva community using two separate surveys — a ... factors that affect maternal reproductive health status. Little attempt has been made to investigate ... one point the Ngwa see the family in its nuclear.

  17. Education in geriatric medicine for community hospital staff.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hanlon, Shane

    2010-12-01

    Community hospitals provide many services for older people. They are mainly managed by nursing staff, with some specialist input. Little is known about education provided in these facilities. Most education in geriatric medicine is provided in hospitals, despite most elderly care being provided in the community. The authors surveyed senior nursing staff in Irish community hospitals to examine this area in more detail. Staff in all 18hospitals in the Health Service Executive (South) area were invited to participate. The response rate was 100%. Sixteen of the 18 respondents (89%) felt staff did not have enough education in geriatric medicine. Just over half of hospitals had regular staff education sessions in the area, with a minority of sessions led by a geriatrician, and none by GPs. Geriatrician visits were valued, but were requested only every 1-3 months. Staff identified challenging behaviour and dementia care as the areas that posed most difficulty.

  18. 社区健康教育对糖尿病患者治疗依从性的影响%Influence of Community Health Education on Treatment Compliance of Pa-tients with Diabetes Mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑜

    2016-01-01

    目的:探究社区健康教育者在治疗依从性上给糖尿病患者带来的影响。方法择取2012年11月—2015年11月期间就诊的200例糖尿病患者,按照是否接受了社区健康教育进行分组∶实行社区健康教育的100例患者归入研究组,未行社区健康教育的100例患者归入对照组。对比两组患者的糖尿病控制效果及治疗依从度等指标。结果就血糖相关指标,患者依从性而言,研究组均要优于对照组,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论社区健康教育可以改善患者对糖尿病的错误认识,提高其自觉性,使患者积极主动配合治疗,从而实现糖尿病病情的更有效控制。%Objective To explore the effect of community health educators on the treatment compliance of patients with di-abetes mellitus. Methods Chooses the November 2012 to November 2015 during the treatment of 200 cases of diabetes pa-tients, according to whether or not to accept the health education in community were divided into three groups: the imple-mentation of community health education of 100 cases of patients included in the study group, no community health educa-tion of 100 cases of patients were included in the control group. The effect of diabetes control and treatment compliance were compared between the two groups. Results In terms of glycemic index, patient compliance, the study group was better than the control group, there were statistically significant differences(P < 0.05). Conclusion Community health education can improve the patient's awareness of diabetes, improve their awareness, so that patients actively cooperate with treatment, so as to achieve more effective control of diabetes.

  19. Mothers' Community Participation and Child Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, Jenna; Frankenberg, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    We use rich data from the Indonesia Family Life Survey to assess the relationship between mothers' access to social capital via participation in community activities and their children's health. We exploit the advantages of longitudinal data and community fixed effects to mitigate some of the concerns about spuriousness and reverse causality that…

  20. Authenticity and Lesbian Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler-Timmins, Rebecca A.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study used narrative inquiry to explore how lesbian health educators navigate authenticity in a heteronormative higher education setting. The study was grounded in a lesbian standpoint pedagogical viewpoint, which provided a lens with which to view the nine participants' experiences. Of particular interest was how the educators in…

  1. The role of the community health nurse in environmental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufer, L

    1994-06-01

    Chemical contamination in the environment is affecting public health in increasing numbers of communities across the country. Although historically and theoretically well within the realm of nursing, methods for assessing and diagnosing threats to community environmental health are not being included in community health nurses' training. A community's environmental health is assessed by retrieving information from federal, state, and local sources. Developing the diagnosis involves four steps: identifying a community aggregate at highest risk of exposure, determining the potential or actual health response, citing related host and environmental factors, and correlating any existing epidemiologic data that may substantiate the nursing diagnosis. To illustrate these concepts, a systematic environmental health assessment was conducted for Douglas, Arizona. The results indicated elevated lead levels in residential soils and led to the community diagnosis, potential for injury: children in Douglas are at risk of developing adverse neurobehavioral health effects, and pregnant women in Douglas are at risk of developing adverse reproductive health effects related to several environmental and host factors, as evidenced by average blood lead level, in children exceeding the Centers for Disease Control recommended level of 10 micrograms/dl.

  2. Unveiling Their Worlds: The Use of Dialogue as a Health-Promotion Tool for HIV/AIDS Education in a Poor Community in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiragu, Susan; McLaughlin, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Three decades since the onset of HIV/AIDS, 33.2 million people worldwide are infected and prevalence in Kenya is on the rise. This paper contributes to discussions about HIV/AIDS education and draws on the health promotion approach and the emancipatory theory of Paulo Freire. Freire argued that through dialogue people unveil their world. The…

  3. Improving the health of the community: Duke's experience with community engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michener, J Lloyd; Yaggy, Susan; Lyn, Michelle; Warburton, Samuel; Champagne, Mary; Black, MaryAnn; Cuffe, Michael; Califf, Robert; Gilliss, Catherine; Williams, R Sanders; Dzau, Victor J

    2008-04-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the United States is falling behind in its potential to translate biomedical advances into practical applications for the population. Societal forces, increased awareness of health disparities, and the direction of clinical and translational research are producing a compelling case for AHCs to bridge the gaps between scientific knowledge and medical advancement and between medical advancement and health. The Duke University Health System, the city and county of Durham, North Carolina, and multiple local nonprofit and civic organizations are actively engaged in addressing this need. More than a decade ago, Duke and its community partners began collaborating on projects to meet specific, locally defined community health needs. In 2005, Duke and Durham jointly developed a set of Principles of Community Engagement reflecting the key elements of the partnership and crafted an educational infrastructure to train health professionals in the principles and practice of community engagement. And, most recently, Duke has worked to establish the Duke Translational Medicine Institute, funded in part by a National Institutes of Health Clinical Translational Science Award, to improve health through innovative behavioral, social, and medical knowledge, matched with community engagement and the information sciences.

  4. The community need index. A new tool pinpoints health care disparities in communities throughout the nation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Richard; Barsi, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    Catholic Healthcare West, San Francisco (CHW), has developed a national Community Need Index (CNI) in partnership with Solucient, an information products company, to help health care organizations, not-for-profits, and policymakers identify and address barriers to health care access in their communities. The CNI aggregates five socioeconomic indicators long known to contribute to health disparity--income, culture/language, education, housing status, and insurance coverage--and applies them to every zip code in the United States. Each zip code is then given a score ranging from 1.0 (low need) to 5.0 (high need). Residents of communities with the highest CNI scores were shown to be twice as likely to experience preventable hospitalization for manageable conditions--such as ear infections, pneumonia or congestive heart failure--as communities with the lowest CNI scores. The CNI provides compelling evidence for addressing socioeconomic barriers when considering health policy and local health planning. The tool highlights health care disparities between geographic regions and illustrates the acute needs of several notable geographies, including inner city and rural areas.Further, it should enable health care providers, policymakers, and others to allocate resources where they are most needed, using a standardized, quantitative tool. The CNI provides CHW with an important means to strategically allocate resources where it will be most effective in maintaining a healthy community.

  5. Beacon communities' public health initiatives: a case study analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudi, Barbara L; Marcial, Laura H; Haque, Saira; Bailey, Robert; Chester, Kelley; Cunningham, Shellery; Riley, Amanda; Soper, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The Beacon Communities for Public Health (BCPH) project was launched in 2011 to gain a better understanding of the range of activities currently being conducted in population- and public health by the Beacon Communities. The project highlighted the successes and challenges of these efforts with the aim of sharing this information broadly among the public health community. The Beacon Community Program, designed to showcase technology-enabled, community-based initiatives to improve outcomes, focused on: building and strengthening health information technology (IT) infrastructure and exchange capabilities; translating investments in health IT to measureable improvements in cost, quality, and population health; and, developing innovative approaches to performance measurement, technology, and care delivery. Four multimethod case studies were conducted based on a modified sociotechnical framework to learn more about public health initiative implementation and use in the Beacon Communities. Our methodological approach included using document review and semistructured key informant interviews. NACCHO Model Practice Program criteria were used to select the public health initiatives included in the case studies. Despite differences among the case studies, common barriers and facilitators were found to be present in all areas of the sociotechnical framework application including structure, people, technology, tasks, overarching considerations, and sustainability. Overall, there were many more facilitators (range = 7-14) present for each Beacon compared to barriers (range = 4-6). Four influential promising practices were identified through the work: forging strong and sustainable partnerships; ensuring a good task-technology fit and a flexible and iterative design; fostering technology acceptance; and, providing education and demonstrating value. A common weakness was the lack of a framework or model for the Beacon Communities evaluation work. Sharing a framework or approach

  6. Emergency preparedness training of tribal community health representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Lisle S; Granillo, Brenda S; Garrison, Edward R; Cimetta, Adriana D; Serafin, Verena J; Renger, Ralph F; Wakelee, Jessica F; Burgess, Jefferey L

    2012-04-01

    This study describes the development and evaluation of online Public Health Emergency Preparedness (PHEP) training adapted to the learning styles and needs of tribal Community Health Representatives (CHRs). Working through a university-tribal community college partnership, the Arizona Center for Public Health Preparedness at the University of Arizona and Diné College of the Navajo Nation delivered a blended online and face-to-face public health preparedness certificate program based on core public health emergency preparedness competencies. This program was carefully adapted to meet the environmental and learning needs of the tribal CHRs. The certificate program was subsequently evaluated via a scenario-based decision-making methodology. Significant improvements in five of six competency areas were documented by comparison of pre- and post-certificate training testing. Based on statistical support for this pedagogical approach the cultural adaptations utilized in delivery of the certificate program appear to be effective for PHEP American Indian education.

  7. Bringing Health Policy Issues Front and Center in the Community: Expanding the Role of Community Health Coalitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel S. Meister, PhD

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Systemic, environmental, and socioeconomic conditions create the context in which community members deal with their health concerns. Comprehensive, community-based chronic disease prevention interventions should address community-wide or regional policy issues that influence lifestyle behaviors associated with chronic diseases. Context In two communities along the Arizona-Mexico border, community coalitions that administered a comprehensive diabetes prevention and control intervention expanded their membership to become policy and advocacy coalitions with broad community representation. These coalitions, or Special Action Groups (SAGs, identified and prioritized policy issues that directly or indirectly affect physical activity or nutrition. Methods Local schools were one focus of advocacy. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s School Health Index was implemented as part of the overall intervention; the SAGs supported schools in advocating for more physical education programs, removal of vending machines, substitution of more healthful options in vending machines, and changes in health education curricula. In the broader community, the SAGs promoted opportunities for walking and bicycling, long-term planning by their cities and counties, and healthy food choices in local grocery stores. Advocacy tactics included attending and making presentations at city council, school board, parks and recreation, and planning and zoning commission meetings; participating on long-range planning committees; organizing an annual community forum for elected and appointed officials; and presenting healthy food and cooking demonstrations in local markets. Consequences After three years, SAGs were able to document changes in local policies and practices attributable to their activities. Interpretation The SAGs contributed to systems changes in their communities and were able to obtain new resources that support protective behaviors. Also, the

  8. Community Outreach and Education on Soil Fumigants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information on how outreach programs can help address the risk of bystander exposure by educating community members about fumigants, buffer zones, how to recognize warning signs, and how to respond appropriately in case of an incident.

  9. Sexual health needs and the LGBT community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sue

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) individuals have particular vulnerabilities to sexually transmitted infections and HIV infection. Globally, reasons for this include physiological factors, discrimination and poor understanding of their sexual health needs. In many countries LGBT individuals are not able to exercise fully their rights to health care. This raises public health concerns for the LGBT community and the wider population. This article explores these issues, and makes recommendations for the healthcare profession to address health inequalities and promote improved health outcomes for LGBT populations. This article aims to promote an evidence-based approach that focuses on rights and public health issues.

  10. Promoting the Health of Families and Communities: A Moral Imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Diana J

    2016-09-01

    The Hill Burton Act, which was signed into law in 1946 and ended in 1997, was one of the most significant forces that shaped the health care system we have today. Providing grants and loans for the construction and expansion of hospitals across the country, it required beneficiary hospitals to give some amount of uncompensated care to the poor and uninsured in return. The act not only led to our health care system's current emphasis on the acute-care hospital as the primary site of health care delivery, but it also had a profound effect on nursing, fully involving the profession in an acute-care world. The act created jobs for nurses at an unprecedented level. There are over 3.4 million nurses in the United States, and in 2013, 63 percent of all nurses worked for hospitals. Nursing education continues to emphasize acute care, despite the calls for shifting the curriculum to more community-based content and experiences that focus on health promotion and wellness for individuals, families, and communities. It is my premise that the nursing profession and all who profess to be committed to promoting health have a moral obligation to help the nation adopt a Hill-Burton Act of the twenty-first century that will focus on building healthy communities, supporting families in ways that promote health, and helping individuals to live healthier lives. This would require a shift in resources from a costly health care system to investing in community development, whether job creation, building safe places to play and exercise, providing access to affordable and nutritious foods, advancing the quality of education, or other approaches to addressing and improving the social determinants of health. Making this kind of investment would speak to the principles of beneficence, least harm, and justice, particularly for socioeconomically stressed communities.

  11. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decision-making power limiting the ability to warts, herpes and HIV were reported by ... education and failure of the families and According to Bandura's Learning Theory , .... The pre-intervention and perception of factors that contribute to risky.

  12. Health promotion and partnerships: collaboration of a community health management center, county health bureau, and university nursing program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Ling

    2002-06-01

    Effective partnerships were established between a community health management center, a county health bureau and a university nursing program. A health fair was undertaken to heighten public health awareness through the collaboration of these various agencies. In this research, formative, process, and summative evaluations were conducted to determine the benefits of partnerships. Elements evaluated included the planning process, health fair relevancy, integration of community resources, participants satisfaction and knowledge acquisition, and partnership satisfaction. The samples of this study included (1) 529 adult participants who completed the on-site evaluation questionnaires; (2) 1,090 child participants who returned gift-reward cards; (3) 114 partners who gave written feedback on their satisfaction; and (4) 57 third-year and 16 fourth-year undergraduate nursing student participants. Data was collected from the evidence report of the Department of Health, the project proposal, activity protocols, meeting records, the project final report, students term papers, and questionnaires. The chief administrator of the County Health Bureau was very impressed with the creative exhibits in the fair and, therefore, invited a coalition to continue further workshops. Seventeen educational exhibits, two dance programs and two drama programs related to health issues were demonstrated in the fair. Resources from community organizations were successfully integrated and allocated. Community participants expressed satisfaction with the fair and anticipated similar activities in the future. Participants revealed more than 80% accuracy in health knowledge quizzes. The senior nursing students highlighted their interaction with the community, community health nurses, and health volunteers. Community-based health promotion and nursing education can be successfully connected when various disciplines and sectors form effective partnerships.

  13. Does education level affect the efficacy of a community based salt reduction program? - A post-hoc analysis of the China Rural Health Initiative Sodium Reduction Study (CRHI-SRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Xian; Vaartjes, Ilonca; Neal, Bruce; Bots, Michiel L; Hoes, Arno W; Wu, Yangfeng

    2016-08-11

    Whether educational level influences the effects of health education is not clearly defined. This study examined whether the impact of a community-based dietary salt reduction program was affected by the level of education of participants. The China Rural Health Initiative Sodium Reduction Study (CRHI-SRS) was a cluster-randomized controlled trial conducted in 120 villages from five Northern Chinese provinces. The intervention comprised a village-wide health education program and availability of salt substitute at village shops. 24-h urine samples were collected among 1903 participants for primary evaluation of the intervention effect. A post-hoc analysis was done to explore for heterogeneity of intervention effects by education level using generalized estimating equations. All models were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and province. Daily salt intake was lower in intervention than in control at all educational levels with no evidence of a difference in the effect of the intervention across different levels of education. P value for the interaction term between education level and the intervention was 0.35. There was likewise no evidence of an interaction for effects of the intervention on potassium intake (p = 0.71), the sodium to potassium ratio (p = 0.07), or knowledge and behaviors related to salt (all p > 0.05). The study suggests that the effects of the intervention were achieved regardless of the level of education and that the intervention should therefore be broadly effective in rural Chinese populations. The trial was registered with clinicaltrial.gov ( NCT01259700 ).

  14. Community Health Asset Mapping Partnership Engages Hispanic/Latino Health Seekers and Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, Teresa; Langdon, Sarah; Meza, Francis Rivers; Hochwalt, Bridget; Pichardo-Geisinger, Rita; Sowell, Brandon; Chapman, Jessica; Dorton, Linda Batiz; Kennett, Beth; Jones, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    The Hispanic/Latino population in Forsyth County, North Carolina, is growing quickly and experiencing significant disparities in access to care and health outcomes. Assessing community perceptions and utilization of health care resources in order to improve health equity among Hispanics/Latinos at both the county and state levels is critical. Our community engagement process was guided by the Community Health Assets Mapping Partnerships (CHAMP) approach, which helps identify gaps in health care availability and areas for immediate action to improve access to and quality of health care. Specifically, we invited and encouraged the Hispanic/Latino population to participate in 4 different workshops conducted in Spanish or English. Participants were identified as either health care providers, defined as anyone who provides health care or a related service, or health care seekers, defined as anyone who utilizes such services. The most commonly cited challenges to access to care were cost of health care, documentation status, lack of public transportation, racism, lack of care, lack of respect, and education/language. These data were utilized to drive continued engagement with the Hispanic community, and action steps were outlined. While participation in the workshops was acceptable, greater representation of health care seekers and community providers is needed. This process is fundamental to multilevel initiatives under way to develop trust and improve relationships between the Hispanic/Latino community and local health care entities in Forsyth County. Follow-through on recommended action steps will continue to further identify disparities, close gaps in care, and potentially impact local and state policies with regard to improving the health status of the Hispanic/Latino community. ©2016 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  15. Value Creation in Online Communities for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Sharon E.; Kellogg, Shaun B.

    2015-01-01

    The popularity and pervasiveness of online communities have led researchers and practitioners alike to closely examine the utility of online communities for supporting and facilitating professional learning. As economic constraints leave fewer resources available for professional development, educators in particular are examining the potential of…

  16. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  17. Using community participation to assess acceptability of "Contra Caries", a theory-based, promotora-led oral health education program for rural Latino parents: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeft, Kristin S; Rios, Sarah M; Pantoja Guzman, Estela; Barker, Judith C

    2015-09-03

    Latino children experience more prevalent and severe tooth decay than non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic black children. Few theory-based, evaluated and culturally appropriate interventions target parents of this vulnerable population. To fill this gap, the Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program, a theory-based, promotora-led education program for low-income, Spanish-speaking parents of children aged 1-5 years, was developed. This article describes qualitative findings of the acceptability of curriculum content and activities, presents the process of refinement of the curriculum through engaging the target population and promotoras, and presents results from the evaluation assessing the acceptability of the curriculum once implemented. Focus groups were conducted with low-income Spanish-speaking parents of children 1-5 years living in a city in an agricultural area of California. Interviews were digitally recorded, translated and transcribed, checked for accuracy and the resulting data was thematically coded and analyzed using a social constructionist approach. The Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program was then implemented with a separate but similar sample, and after completing the program, participants were administered surveys asking about acceptability and favorite activities of the education program. Data were entered into a database, checked for accuracy, open-ended questions were categorized, and responses to close-ended questions counted. Twelve focus groups were conducted (N = 51), 105 parents attended the Contra Caries Oral Health Education Program, and 83 parents filled out surveys. Complete attendance and retention was high (89% and 90%, respectively). This study found that their children's oral health is a high priority. Parents were not only interested in, but actually attended classes focused on increasing their knowledge and skills with respect to early childhood oral health. The Contra Caries content and format was perceived as

  18. Health promotion education in India: present landscape and future vistas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Sanghamitra; Sharma, Kavya; Zodpey, Sanjay; Chauhan, Kavita; Dobe, Madhumita

    2012-06-24

    'Health promotion is the process of enabling people to increase control over and to improve their health'. This stream of public health is emerging as a critical domain within the realm of disease prevention. Over the last two decades, the curative model of health care has begun a subtle shift towards a participatory model of health promotion emphasizing upon practice of healthy lifestyles and creating healthy communities. Health promotion encompasses five key strategies with health communication and education as its cornerstones. Present study is an attempt to explore the current situation of health promotion education in India with an aim to provide a background for capacity building in health promotion. A systematic predefined method was adopted to collect and compile information on existing academic programs pertaining to health promotion and health education/communication. Results of the study reveal that currently health promotion education in India is fragmented and not uniform across institutes. It is yet to be recognized as a critical domain of public health education. Mostly teaching of health promotion is limited to health education and communication. There is a need for designing programmes for short-term and long-term capacity building, with focus on innovative methods and approaches. Public health institutes and associations could play a proactive role in designing and imparting academic programs on health promotion. Enhancing alliances with various institutes involved in health promotion activities and networking among public health and medical institutes as well as health services delivery systems would be more productive.

  19. Parenting Education - Health and Hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Indian Child Abuse and Neglect Resource Center, Tulsa, OK.

    The second in a series on parenting education for American Indians, the booklet offers information on health and hygiene for the mother-to-be and the newborn baby. Chapters include care during pregnancy, mother's weight, mother's health, feeding newborns, washing the baby, baby's early diet, and baby's health care. (ERB)

  20. 社区高血压防治中健康教育的作用分析%The Role of Community Health Education in Prevention and Control of Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张静

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨健康教育在社区高血压防治过程中的作用。方法以我社区的86例高血压患者为研究对象,对其实施健康教育,观察并对比健康教育前后患者的血压控制、饮食行为、高血压并发症及其疾病认知水平等情况。结果对社区的86例高血压患者实施健康教育之后,在以上各项观察指标上与干预前相比都要显著改善,干预前后差异显著,且具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论对社区高血压患者实施健康教育能够促进患者病情的改善,生活和生命质量的提升。%ObjectiveTo explore the role in the process of health education in community prevention and control of hypertension.MethodsIn my community of 86 patients with high blood pressure as the research object, the implementation of health education to its, observed and compared before and after health education, eating behavior, high blood pressure, blood pressure control in patients with high-risk groups, hypertension and its complications disease cognitive level, and so on.ResultTo the community of 86 cases of patients with high blood pressure, after the implementation of health education on the above observation indexes compared with before intervention should be improved signiifcantly, signiifcant difference before and after the intervention, and statistically signiifcant (P<0.05).ConclusionsFor hypertension patients in community health education can promote the improvement of the patients, life and the life quality of ascension.

  1. Factors associated with fourth grade health education scores on the Maine Educational Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroble, L P

    1997-02-01

    Data collected in 1994 on the health section of the fourth grade Maine Educational Assessment (MEA) were analyzed in this study. Correlational studies and analyses of variance tested significance of community, school, and teacher variables. A multiple regression analysis with a path model determined significant factors associated with achievement in health. The most salient finding was that students' overall ability--represented by achievement in the other MEA content areas--related strongly to achievement in health. Community socioeconomic status emerged as another significant influence on health scores. Type of health education program did not make a difference in scores, but any method of delivering health education, in contrast to no health education affected health scores significantly. Up to 30 minutes of instruction per week yielded the highest mean scores. The teachers' rating of the health program emerged as a pivotal variable.

  2. [In France, school health education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilian, C

    1984-12-01

    Since 1976 health education has been incorporated in most school programmes at various levels, from the kindergarten (3 years) to the end of high school (16 years). In kindergarten and at primary level health education belongs to a series of activities called d'éveil meant to sharpen the interest of the child in the social, cultural and artistic fields. At secondary level, health education, though not an autonomous discipline, is usually incorporated in courses of natural sciences or biology. There are also specific health education activities when an entire form spends a month by the sea shore or in the mountains. To help teachers in their task the French Committee for Health Education produces every year teaching material specially conceived for different age groups. The main subjects dealt with concern oral health, the prevention of home accidents, nutrition, smoking control and the promotion of health. The various activities of the French Committee for Health Education have revealed new needs which concern the training of teachers, change in mentality and improved coordination.

  3. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    For effective malaria control in Nigeria, free or subsidized malaria treatment and rural health insurance scheme ... triggers productive asset sales or high levels of debt,. Cost of malaria ..... November, 2012. Insurance Schemes and promotion/.

  4. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajiboro

    birth attendants, and if there is a proper division of labour amongst the three tiers of the health system. 3 ... Obstetric. Care,. Traditional. Birth. Attendants,. Maternal. Mortality,. Neonatal ..... interview believed that sudden onset of labor and.

  5. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    satisfy the perceived needs of the clients they serve. age (15-45years) is put at .... Table 3: ANC clients' satisfaction of interpersonal relationship with Health .... listening to them, provider understanding their complaints are usually lodged, ...

  6. Schistosomiasis control and health education in Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, D; Mpitabakana, P

    1989-06-01

    In Burundi, the intestinal parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, inhabits the waters of the Rusizi Plain (1 of the worst affected areas), the Capital Bujumbura, the Imbo-Sud, and around Lake Cohoha. It continues to cause illness in these regions. In 1985, the Lutte Contre la Schistosomiase project implemented a control program in these regions, chiefly involving chemotherapy. In addition, the European Development Fund had financed integration of safe water supply and environmental sanitation efforts into the program. To further reduce the incidence of schistosomiasis, the control program has introduced a training program for auxiliary health workers and health education campaigns. These efforts assist the program in decentralizing schistosomiasis control to health services and communities. Auxiliary health workers in primary schools, health centers, and subcommittees for sociosanitary development are responsible for educating the public about schistosomiasis. Program workers have developed educational material which allows the educators to address consistent messages to all audiences yet also allows for flexibility. The material consists of posters demonstrating how the disease is transmitted and other preventive measures, a film on schistosomiasis control, and a flip chart. Eventually health centers will be responsible for epidemiological surveillance of schistosomiasis. Communal subcommittees for sociosanitary development play an important role in informing local authorities of needed actions to control the disease and in setting priorities.

  7. Reproductive health education intervention trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwej, Saroj; Kumar, Rajesh; Walia, Indarjeet; Aggarwal, Arun K

    2005-04-01

    To measure the effectiveness of a reproductive health education package in improving the knowledge of adolescent girls aged 15-19 years in Chandigarh (India). A reproductive health education package, developed in consultation with parents, teachers and adolescents, was delivered to randomly sampled classes of two senior secondary schools and one school was selected as control. In one school, a nurse conducted 15 sessions for 94 students in three batches using conventional education approach. In another school she conducted sessions for a selected group of 20 adolescents who later disseminated the messages informally to their 84 classmates (peer education). Using a 70-item structured questionnaire the knowledge of 95 adolescents from conventional, 84 from peer, and 94 from control school were assessed before and one month after the last session. Change in the score in intervention and control groups was tested by ANOVA taking age and socio-economic status as covariates. Teachers, parents and students overwhelmingly (88%, 95.5% and 93% respectively) favoured reproductive health education program. Five percent of the respondents reported that someone in their class is having sexual relations, and 13% of the girls approved of pre-marital sexual relations. Reproductive health knowledge scores improved significantly after intervention in conventional education (27.28) and peer education group (20.77) in comparison to the controls (3.64). Post-test scores were not significantly different between peer education group and conventional education group (43.65 and 40.52 respectively) though the time consumed in delivering the peer education intervention was almost one third of the time taken to implement conventional education. Peer education and conventional education strategies were effective in improving the reproductive health knowledge of adolescent girls but peer strategy was less time consuming.

  8. A Systems Approach to Community Family Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynson, Lawrence M., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    This paper sets forth a community family life education model within the structure-functional framework. Attention is first focused on societal and family needs, followed by the model, its goals, organization, and implementation. Finally, several recommendations and a challenge are given to family educators. (Author)

  9. Community Education and the Urban Indian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockart, Barbetta L.

    Because the circumstances and problems of the urban American Indian are unique and are not being met by public education and service agencies, urban Indians across the nation have joined together within their communities and taken steps to help address their special social, educational, cultural, economic, and political needs. The establishment of…

  10. Pre-registration education: learning communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gail; Crooke, Lois; Curtis, Peter

    Changes in nurse education in the UK and the introduction of a new pre-registration nursing programme have led to developments in education methods. This article describes the creation of learning communities at Thames Valley University as a means of adapting to the new curriculum.

  11. 糖尿病患者社区健康教育的效果评价%Evaluation on the effect of health education for diabetes patients in community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任丽芬

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨社区健康教育对糖尿病患者知、信、行的影响,为制定有效的社区健康教育方式提供依据.方法 对在北京市丰台区大红门社区卫生服务中心就诊的93例2型糖尿病患者进行为期1年的综合健康教育,并于教育前、后对患者进行问卷调查和医学体检,评价其健康教育效果.结果 ①糖尿病相关知识:健康教育后患者对血糖正常范围、危险因素、科学饮食方法知晓率分别为86.02%、80.65%、76.34%,明显高于教育前(47.31%、31.18%、26.88%),差异均有高度统计学意义(P<0.01);②遵医行为:教育后按时复诊、规范服药、自我监护、采纳健康生活方式的依从率分别为93.55%、92.47%、86.02%、79.57%,明显高于教育前(46.24%、45.16%、36.56%、39.78%),差异均有高度统计学意义(P<0.01);③糖尿病相关指标:教育后空腹血糖、餐后2h血糖、糖化血红蛋白等控制率分别为76.34%、84.95%、88.17%,明显高于教育前(37.63%、62.37%、55.91%),差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 社区健康教育可以提高患者糖尿病相关知识知晓率,提高治疗依从性,提高糖尿病相关指标的控制率,降低医疗费用,是糖尿病综合防治的重要组成部分,应在社区积极开展多种形式的健康教育.%Objective To analyze the influence of community health education on the diabetic's knowledge,belief and practice,in order to provide evidence for formulation effective way of community health education.Methods One-year comprehensive health education was provided to 93 cases of type 2 diabetic patients who had been treated in Dahongmen Community Health Service Center of Fengtai District in Beijing City.And the evaluation of the health education effect was performed in analyzing the questionnaire and physical examination before and after the education.Results ①Correlative diabetic knowledge:the diabetic awareness rates of the

  12. The health perception rural community adolescents: between the ideal and the real

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anny Giselly Milhome da Costa

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative exploratory-descriptive study was performed by means of the Community Based Participant Research. The main objective was to understand the health perception of adolescents from a rural community. The focal group and field journal techniques were used to collect data from 26 adolescents of a rural community. The results were analyzed and qualitatively interpreted, expressed through two thematic categories that showed the ideal and real health conception of the adolescents. From this group’s perspective, the health of rural community adolescents is determined by positive and negative aspects, with reveal their perception of health and disease. It is concluded that nursing can reduce the distance between the ideal and real health in the rural community by taking hold of the sociocultural approach of becoming adolescent and developing intersectoral interventions to promote satisfactory sanitary conditions and encourage the adolescent’s potential as a social actor. Descriptors: Adolescent; Rural Population; Public Health; Health Education; Community Health Nursing.

  13. Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Community Medicine and Primary Health Care. ... of research findings, reviews, theories and information on all aspects of public health. ... health planning and management, health policy, health care financing, public health nutrition, ...

  14. Korea Community Health Survey Data Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang Wha; Ko, Yun Sil; Kim, Yoo Jin; Sung, Kyoung Mi; Kim, Hyo Jin; Choi, Hyung Yun; Sung, Changhyun; Jeong, Eunkyeong

    2015-06-01

    In 2008, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention initiated the first nationwide survey, Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS), to provide data that could be used to plan, implement, monitor, and evaluate community health promotion and disease prevention programs. This community-based cross-sectional survey has been conducted by 253 community health centers, 35 community universities, and 1500 interviewers. The KCHS standardized questionnaire was developed jointly by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention staff, a working group of health indicators standardization subcommittee, and 16 metropolitan cities and provinces with 253 regional sites. The questionnaire covers a variety of topics related to health behaviors and prevention, which is used to assess the prevalence of personal health practices and behaviors related to the leading causes of disease, including smoking, alcohol use, drinking and driving, high blood pressure control, physical activity, weight control, quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions, European Quality of Life-Visual Analogue Scale, Korean Instrumental Activities of Daily Living ), medical service, accident, injury, etc. The KCHS was administered by trained interviewers, and the quality control of the KCHS was improved by the introduction of a computer-assisted personal interview in 2010. The KCHS data allow a direct comparison of the differences of health issues among provinces. Furthermore, the provinces can use these data for their own cost-effective health interventions to improve health promotion and disease prevention. For users and researchers throughout the world, microdata (in the form of SAS files) and analytic guidelines can be downloaded from the KCHS website (http://KCHS.cdc.go.kr/) in Korean.

  15. The therapeutic effects of community health education on diabetes patients%社区健康教育对糖尿病患者的治疗效果影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许明红; 徐周红; 郑晓丽

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨社区健康教育对糖尿病患者的治疗效果。方法:对64例Ⅱ型糖尿病患者在社区健康教育前、后,采用自行设计的调查表对患者进行问卷调查,了解患者对糖尿病相关知识的掌握情况,并将患者空腹和餐后2h血糖、糖化血红蛋白等监测情况进行统计比较。结果:社区健康教育后,掌握糖尿病相关知识的患者人数明显上升;患者空腹、餐后2h血糖及糖化血红蛋白的监测值改善良好,以上这些指标与教育前进行比较,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:社区健康教育可提高糖尿病患者对相关知识的掌握程度,有效控制血糖,提高患者的生活质量。%Objective:To investigate the therapeutic effect of community health education on diabetes patients. Methods:In 64 patients with type II diabetes in the community before and after health education, using the self-designed questionnaire survey of patients, patients understand the diabetes related knowledge, and 2H blood glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin monitoring in patients with fasting and postprandial statistical comparisons. Results:Community health education, grasp the number of patients with diabetes related knowledge was significantly increased;fasting, postprandial blood glucose and glycated hemoglobin monitoring of 2H changes the value of the good, these indexes and education before the comparison, the difference was statistically signiifcant (P<0.05). Conclusion:Community health education can improve the degree of diabetic patients to master the related knowledge, effective control of blood glucose, improve the quality of life of patients.

  16. [Community health in primary health care teams: a management objective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot Adell, Carme; Pasarin Rua, Maribel; Canela Soler, Jaume; Sala Alvarez, Clara; Escosa Farga, Alex

    2016-12-01

    To describe the process of development of community health in a territory where the Primary Health Care board decided to include it in its roadmap as a strategic line. Evaluative research using qualitative techniques, including SWOT analysis on community health. Two-steps study. Primary care teams (PCT) of the Catalan Health Institute in Barcelona city. The 24 PCT belonging to the Muntanya-Dreta Primary Care Service in Barcelona city, with 904 professionals serving 557,430 inhabitants. Application of qualitative methodology using SWOT analysis in two steps (two-step study). Step 1: Setting up a core group consisting of local PCT professionals; collecting the community projects across the territory; SWOT analysis. Step 2: From the needs identified in the previous phase, a plan was developed, including a set of training activities in community health: basic, advanced, and a workshop to exchange experiences from the PCTs. A total of 80 team professionals received specific training in the 4 workshops held, one of them an advanced level. Two workshops were held to exchange experiences with 165 representatives from the local teams, and 22 PCTs presenting their practices. In 2013, 6 out of 24 PCTs have had a community diagnosis performed. Community health has achieved a good level of development in some areas, but this is not the general situation in the health care system. Its progression depends on the management support they have, the local community dynamics, and the scope of the Primary Health Care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Hospitals as health educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes like yoga, tai chi, qigong, Zumba, Pilates, dance, or strength training Weight- ... blood pressure and other health screenings Giveaways like stress balls Health risk surveys Your hospital may sponsor ...

  18. Paradoxical health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kari

    Poster presented at International Conference "Communicating for Social Change: Lessons learnt from public health", Glocal NOMAD, Aidsnet (The Danish NGO Network on AIDS and Development), ADRA Denmark and Enreca Health. Copenhagen: Copenhagen University, May 4., 2010,Denmark....

  19. Exploring Social Quality and Community Health Outcomes: An Ecological Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life is widely used as a measure of individual well-being in developed countries. Social quality (SQ), however, describes how favorable the socioenvironmental components are that impact the life chance of an individual. Despite the associations between SQ, including institutional capacity and citizen capacity, and other community indicators, the impact of SQ on community health status has not been fully examined. This study investigated the interrelationships among institutional capacity, citizen capacity, and their associations with community-level health indicators such as mortality and suicide among 230 local governments in South Korea. Under the principles of conceptual suitability, clarity, reliability, consistency, changeability, and comparability, a total of 81 SQ indicators were collected, and 19 indicators of the 81 indicators were selected. The 19 indicators were transformed by the imputation of missing values, standardization, and geographic information system transformation. It was found that the health outcome of local government was superior as social welfare, political participation, and education were higher. According to the result of the regression analysis based on the regional type, social welfare had the most influence on the health level of local government in both metropolises and small-/medium-sized cities. In addition, education and political participation had a positive effect on the health indicator of local metropolis government. However, SQ indicators did not have any meaningful influence at the county level. Therefore, small- and medium-sized cities need to promote the collective health of the local government through improving social welfare, and metropolises need to consider the complex relationship among other indicators while increasing the level of social welfare and education. Meanwhile, counties need to develop health indicators that reflect aged population characteristics and social environment of rural areas

  20. & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY MEDICINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    users of the services, desire for more children, fear of side effects and partner's ... It confers important health and potential to control population growth and in the ... number of children, thereby enhance reproductive planning would avert a total of ..... collection of the data. review and recommendation for future policy decision.

  1. COMMUNITY MEDICINE & PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the_monk

    Breastfeeding is the super food for babies and is sufficient if given exclusively in the ... Approximately 90% of all mothers interviewed had heard about EBF, although with .... formula for proportion was used to estimate a total ..... diseases was one important benefit mentioned in ... and her health are different, he is healthier.

  2. [The practice of the community health agency in health promotion of and disease prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Maria Rizoneide Negreiros; Assunção, Raquel Silva

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses practices developed by the community health agency in the Family Health Program of Divinópolis--MG reporting on practices in the fields of Health Promotion and Disease Prevention, taking as main reference the principles established at the 1st International Health Promotion Conference, which took place in Canada in 1986. Field research was carried out by questionnaire, direct observation of work and open interviews with community health agencies. A qualitative approach was chosen in which the concepts and statements of the subjects were dealt with in the light of historical and dialectical materialism, and the organization and analysis of the discourses according to the Discourse of the Collective Subject. We conclude that the community health agency performs actions recommended by the Ministry of Health, and that its health promoting actions are confined to the creation of environments favorable to health, actions in the home. It works more widely in disease prevention, in individual actions, health education for the community and for groups at risk, and controlling infectious disease and parasites such as dengue and worms. Its focus of attention is predominantly the individual and not the family.

  3. The Connection Between Health and Education. Adult Education Series. Discussion Paper Five.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lethbridge Univ. (Alberta). Four Worlds Development Project.

    This paper promotes discussion by native community groups of the meaning of physical and mental health, the differences between treatment and prevention, and how education contributes to disease and health of children. Education's role in disease prevention is defined as helping the learner respond appropriately to stress arising from the…

  4. Effect of Community Health Education for Diabetes Blood Glucose Control:a Meta-analysis%社区健康教育对糖尿病患者血糖控制效果的meta分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋彦李青; 王竹影; 李国

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the effect of community health education for diabetes blood glucose control, provide theoretical for community health education inter-vention diabetes to improve blood glucose control results. Methods:Such databases as CNKI, VIP and WanFang were searched relevant literature, Quality of articles was assessed with Jadad Scale and the available data were an-alyzed with RevMan5. 0 software. The result showed:only 7 eligible articles were included. Meta-analysis shows:(1)The effect of community health education for experi-mental group of diabetes FPG control is better than control group [ WMD=1. 90 , 95%CI ( 1. 50 , 2. 29 ) , P<0. 00001 ] ( 2 ) The effect of community health education for experimental group of diabetes 2hPG control is better than control group [ WMD=2. 61 ,95%CI ( 0. 80 ,4. 41 ) , P=0. 005 ] ( 3 ) The effect of community health education for experimental group of diabetes HbALc control is better than control group[WMD=1. 46,95%CI(0. 46,2. 45),P=0. 004 ] . Conclusion:Community health education can improve diabetes blood glucose control. Because analysis include only 7 studies, there is lack of large and multi-center sample,it needs further research.%目的::评价社区健康教育对糖尿病患者血糖控制效果的影响,为社区健康教育干预手段提高糖尿病患者血糖控制效果提供理论依据。方法:计算机检索中国期刊全文数据库( CNKI )、维普数据库( VIP )和万方数据知识平台搜索相关文献,根据纳入标准和排除标准全面收集相关文献,采用Jadad量表对文献质量进行评价,提取有效研究资料,采用RevMan 5软件进行Meta分析。结果:最终纳入符合标准的7篇RCT研究进行meta分析。 Meta 分析结果显示(1)社区健康教育对实验组糖尿病患者FP G控制效果优于对照组(WMD=1.90,95%CI(1.50,2.29),P<0.00001);(2)社区健康教育对实验组糖尿病患者2 hP G控制效果优于对照组(WMD=2.61,95% CI(0.80

  5. Liberal Education and Global Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, Martha

    2004-01-01

    As the ninetieth anniversary is celebrated, the idea of liberal education is more important than ever in the interdependent world. An education based on the idea of an inclusive global citizenship and on the possibilities of the compassionate imagination has the potential to transcend divisions created by distance, cultural difference, and…

  6. Building a Human Resource System. Marketing Community Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Karen S.

    1990-01-01

    The coordination of human resources is a fundamental part of the community education process. It may also be the community educator's most effective marketing strategy. Four models for human resource programs are informational, participatory, advisory, and educational. (JOW)

  7. Entrepreneurship Education in Health Care Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Salminen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the content of entrepreneurship education in health care education and the kinds of teaching methods that are used when teaching about entrepreneurship. Health care entrepreneurship has increased in many countries in recent decades and there is evidence that entrepreneurs have also a role in public health care. Therefore the health care professionals need to be educated to have the entrepreneurial skills. Education in the field of health care is still based on traditional forms of teaching and does not give enough attention to the issue of becoming an entrepreneur. The data was collected from teachers (n=111 via e-mail from six Finnish polytechnics. The data were analysed statistically and the open-ended questions were analysed via content analysis. Approximately 23% of the teachers had taught about entrepreneurship. The most popular teaching methods were company visits and cases, lecturing, and project work. The courses dealt with establishing a company, entrepreneurship in general, and marketing. Nearly all of the teachers had cooperated with the entrepreneurs or with the companies in question. Approximately 33% of the teachers took entrepreneurship into consideration often in other courses related to entrepreneurship.

  8. A new paradigm of health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Ditte-Marie

    2016-01-01

    This article draws upon research exploring school-based community practices of health education for overweight children and their families. In accordance with the existing critique of the ‘obesity epidemic’ and medico-scientific discourses around food and exercise, this article challenges...... the prevailing binary risk-based pedagogies that inevitably lead to imperatives of right and wrong health behaviour. The analyses presented in this article draw on sociological and pedagogical perspectives, informed by obese children’s participation in lifestyle courses in Denmark. Observations and narratives...

  9. Professional and community satisfaction with the Brazilian family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian G Perez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the strengths and limitations of the Family Health Strategy from the perspective of health care professionals and the community. METHODS: Between June-August 2009, in the city of Vespasiano, Minas Gerais State, Southeastern Brazil, a questionnaire was used to evaluate the Family Health Strategy (ESF with 77 healthcare professionals and 293 caregivers of children under five. Health care professional training, community access to health care, communication with patients and delivery of health education and pediatric care were the main points of interest in the evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals as well as to assess the statistical significance of the variables studied. RESULTS: The majority of health care professionals reported their program training was insufficient in quantity, content and method of delivery. Caregivers and professionals identified similar weaknesses (services not accessible to the community, lack of healthcare professionals, poor training for professionals and strengths (community health worker-patient communications, provision of educational information, and pediatric care. Recommendations for improvement included: more doctors and specialists, more and better training, and scheduling improvements. Caregiver satisfaction with the ESF was found to be related to perceived benefits such as community health agent household visits (OR 5.8, 95%CI 2.8;12.1, good professional-patient relationships (OR 4.8, 95%CI 2.5;9.3, and family-focused health (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.6;10.2; and perceived problems such as lack of personnel (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.2;0.6, difficulty with access (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.1;0.4, and poor quality of care (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.1;0.6. Overall, 62% of caregivers reported being generally satisfied with the ESF services. CONCLUSIONS: Identifying the limitations and strengths of the Family Health Strategy from the healthcare professional and

  10. Community health workers and mobile technology: a systematic review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Braun

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In low-resource settings, community health workers are frontline providers who shoulder the health service delivery burden. Increasingly, mobile technologies are developed, tested, and deployed with community health workers to facilitate tasks and improve outcomes. We reviewed the evidence for the use of mobile technology by community health workers to identify opportunities and challenges for strengthening health systems in resource-constrained settings. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from health, medical, social science, and engineering databases, using PRISMA guidelines. We identified a total of 25 unique full-text research articles on community health workers and their use of mobile technology for the delivery of health services. RESULTS: Community health workers have used mobile tools to advance a broad range of health aims throughout the globe, particularly maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and sexual and reproductive health. Most commonly, community health workers use mobile technology to collect field-based health data, receive alerts and reminders, facilitate health education sessions, and conduct person-to-person communication. Programmatic efforts to strengthen health service delivery focus on improving adherence to standards and guidelines, community education and training, and programmatic leadership and management practices. Those studies that evaluated program outcomes provided some evidence that mobile tools help community health workers to improve the quality of care provided, efficiency of services, and capacity for program monitoring. DISCUSSION: Evidence suggests mobile technology presents promising opportunities to improve the range and quality of services provided by community health workers. Small-scale efforts, pilot projects, and preliminary descriptive studies are increasing, and there is a trend toward using feasible and acceptable interventions that lead to

  11. Community Health Workers and Mobile Technology: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Rebecca; Catalani, Caricia; Wimbush, Julian; Israelski, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Introduction In low-resource settings, community health workers are frontline providers who shoulder the health service delivery burden. Increasingly, mobile technologies are developed, tested, and deployed with community health workers to facilitate tasks and improve outcomes. We reviewed the evidence for the use of mobile technology by community health workers to identify opportunities and challenges for strengthening health systems in resource-constrained settings. Methods We conducted a systematic review of peer-reviewed literature from health, medical, social science, and engineering databases, using PRISMA guidelines. We identified a total of 25 unique full-text research articles on community health workers and their use of mobile technology for the delivery of health services. Results Community health workers have used mobile tools to advance a broad range of health aims throughout the globe, particularly maternal and child health, HIV/AIDS, and sexual and reproductive health. Most commonly, community health workers use mobile technology to collect field-based health data, receive alerts and reminders, facilitate health education sessions, and conduct person-to-person communication. Programmatic efforts to strengthen health service delivery focus on improving adherence to standards and guidelines, community education and training, and programmatic leadership and management practices. Those studies that evaluated program outcomes provided some evidence that mobile tools help community health workers to improve the quality of care provided, efficiency of services, and capacity for program monitoring. Discussion Evidence suggests mobile technology presents promising opportunities to improve the range and quality of services provided by community health workers. Small-scale efforts, pilot projects, and preliminary descriptive studies are increasing, and there is a trend toward using feasible and acceptable interventions that lead to positive program outcomes

  12. Community as classroom: teaching and learning public health in rural Appalachia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florence, James; Behringer, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Traditional models for public health professional education tend to be didactic, with brief, discrete practica appended. National reports of both practitioners and academicians have called for more competency-driven, interdisciplinary-focused, community-based, service-oriented, and experientially-guided learning for students across the curriculum. East Tennessee State University began its own curricular revisioning in health professions education nearly 2 decades ago with a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, emphasizing competencies development through community-based learning in community-academic partnerships. This article describes 3 examples that grew from that initiative. In the first example, students in multiple classes delivered a longitudinal community-based employee wellness intervention for a rural county school district. BS public health students conducted needs assessments and prepared health education materials; MPH students conducted health assessments and worked with school wellness councils to deliver client-centered interventions; DrPH students supervised the project and provided feedback to the schools using participatory methods. In the second example, MPH students in a social-behavioral foundations course used experiential learning to investigate the region's elevated cancer mortality ranking. Following meetings with multiple community groups, students employed theoretical constructs to frame regional beliefs about cancer and presented findings to community leaders. One outcome was a 5-year community-based participatory research study of cancer in rural Appalachia. In the third example, MPH students in a health-consulting course assessed local African Americans' awareness of the university's health and education programs and perceptions of their community health issues. Students learned consultation methods by assisting at multiple regional African American community meetings to discover issues and interest that resulted in the

  13. Sexual and reproductive health education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M Den Uyl; M Dijkstra; NK De Vries; Jolien van der Geugten; prof Berno van Meijel

    2014-01-01

    There have been few assessments of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) education programmes in sub-Saharan Africa from the students’ and educators’ perspective. This study examined students’ opinions on an SRH programme in northern Ghana and explored the facilitators and barriers for educators

  14. Community Participation in Rural Ecuador's School Feeding Programme: A Health Promoting School Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Irene; Simovska, Venka

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the debate concerning community participation in school-based health education and health promotion, with regard to food and nutrition. Design/methodology/approach: Based on empirical data generated over the course of one year of fieldwork in three rural communities and schools in Ecuador, the…

  15. Mobile health monitoring system for community health workers

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sibiya, G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available . Functional description The application provides technology for real time, dependable and intelligent health monitoring by health workers in the field. It integrates a set of wearable wireless sensors with a mobile computing device, such as a 3... communities remain a challenge for many governments, technological innovations that can increase prevention and control of NCDs are needed. Wearable health devices such as ambulatory blood pressure (ABP) monitors are a step in the right direction. ABP...

  16. Effect analysis of community diabetes health education in Lanxi Zhuyuan Huanglong Cave%兰溪竹园黄龙洞社区糖尿病健康教育效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵慧娟

    2014-01-01

    目的:开展社区糖尿病健康教育就是改变患者不良健康行为以及稳定血糖、延缓并发症的发生和发展,提高患者的糖尿病知晓率、控制率和生活质量。方法:通过责任医生团队对竹园黄龙洞社区203例糖尿病患者开展各种形式的健康教育并进入随访管理、随访评估、分类干预。结果:开展社区健康教育并实行干预2年后患者对糖尿病相关知识的知晓率由原来58%提高到83%,血糖控制率由原来31.5%提高到46.6%,改变不良健康行为由原来62%提高到81%,定期检测血糖由原来46%提高到72%,严格遵医嘱用药由原来61%提高到83%。干预前空腹血糖平均值(9.3±0.5) mmol/L,干预后空腹血糖平均值(6.7±0.5)mmol/L,社区健康教育实行干预前后比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:积极开展糖尿病患者的社区健康教育势在必行,鼓励健康的行为,增强患者改进和处理自身健康问题的能力。%Objective:Carrying out community diabetes health education is to change the adverse health behaviors in patients, stable blood sugar,delay the occurrence and development of complications,improve diabetes awareness rate,and control rate and quality of life of patients.Methods:The duty doctor team carried out various forms of health education for 203 diabetes patients in Zhuyuan Huanglong Cave community,and gave the follow-up management,follow-up evaluation,classification of intervention. Results:After 2 years of carrying out community health education and practicing the intervention,the awareness rate of diabetes related knowledge of patients increased from the original 58% to 83%.The blood glucose control rate increased from the original 31.5% to 46.6%.Changing the bad health behavior increased from the original 62% to 81%.Regularing blood glucose increased from the original 46% to 72% .Strictly prescribed medication improved from the original 61% to 83% .Before intervention

  17. E-health-oriented community health information system in china: our challenges, solution, and experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Junping; Zhang, Zhenjiang; Guo, Huayuang; Li, Yi; Xue, Wanguo; Ren, Lianzhong; Chen, Yunqi; Chen, Shifu; Liu, Tongze; Jia, Ru; Zhao, Yi; Chai, Chang

    2011-09-01

    China has been implementing regional collaborative medical service (also known as e-health) for >5 years, but is still facing the challenges of bridging different community health information systems (CHISs). The fact that different communities have different systems makes it difficult to share information and data between different CHISs. To explore a solution for addressing this problem, we constructed a demonstration CHIS in Beijing's Dongcheng District. This system is based on the Software-as-a-Service model, in which a central data center is used to store users' health records and to provide different services. This system provides a comprehensive platform combining disease prevention, health protection, medical care, rehabilitation, health education, and family planning. In this article, we first show the challenge of implementing e-health-oriented CHIS in China, then we briefly introduce our solution, and finally we share our experience learned from the modern CHIS implementation practice.

  18. Influence of age on community health worker's knowledge and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of age on community health worker's knowledge and service provision for ... in community health worker (CHW) programs to address rural health needs. ... there was no statistical difference in CHW knowledge retention, and service ...

  19. Health Educational Potentials of Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The field of health promotion technology has been in an exponential growth in recent years and smart phone applications, exer-games and self-monitoring devices has become part of fitness activities and health education. In this work-in-progress-paper theoretical perspectives for categorising...

  20. Effect of Health Education on Infant Supplementary Food Addition in the Community%社区健康教育对婴儿辅食添加的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张凤莲; 宋亚娟; 谢凤珠

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨在社区对家长进行婴儿科学喂养知识健康教育的效果,避免婴儿营养性疾病的发生.方法 选择3个月以内的婴儿的家长,对其进行问卷调查,按照家长的意愿随机分成观察组和对照组,对观察组采取系统健康教育.结果 通过健康教育使家长了解了有关辅食添加的相关知识,婴儿辅食添加及时率明显提高,观察组明显高于对照组(P<0.01).结论 在社区实施婴儿辅食添加知识的健康教育能有效提高家长的育儿水平.%Objective To investigate the effect of educating the parents how to feed the infants scientifically and to avoid the occurrence of the infant nutrition disorders in community.Methods A questionnaire survey was conducted on the parents of infants who were no more than three months old.The parents were randomly divided into two groups:the observation group and the control group.The observation group received the systematic health education.Results The parents that received health education obtained relevant knowledge of supplementary food addition,which apparently increased the timeliness rate of the supplementary food addition to their infants.The rate of the observation group is obviously higher than that of the control group (P<0.01).Conclusion The implementation of health education in the community on infant supplementary food addition can effectively improve the level of child-feeding of parents.

  1. Grass-root health education strategies in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tembo, K C

    1995-10-01

    Various health education strategies have been observed to be practiced at the grassroots level in Malawi. One approach to communicate health knowledge and information in health education is by teaching people directly by a lecture that may be delivered at prearranged meetings. Generally, lectures stress the value of: good housing, good sanitation practice, personal hygiene, food and nutrition, child care, use of potable water, communicable disease control, and use of available health services in their communities. Another approach to health education is through the use of mass media (radio and newspapers and leaflets). There are articles on health issues in local newspapers. Their disadvantage is that there is delayed feedback with room for misunderstanding the messages; Malawi has a literacy rate of only 30% for women and 60% for men. Health education messages are further disseminated by using visual aids: posters, films, models, flip charts, and photographs. The Ministry of Health and many nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) produce very good visual aids for teaching. Posters on AIDS are displayed in schools and colleges. Other widely practiced methods of communicating health messages to people include role playing through drama and singing health songs in promoting maternal and child health, nutrition, sanitation, and hygiene at clinics. Primary health care started in Malawi in 1979 by embracing both curative, preventive, and promotive aspects of health. Primary health workers (PHWs) in the villages are trained in basic curative medicine, public health work, and health education methods. Village health committees (VHCs) conduct health education. Women's groups, chiefs, church leaders, schools, farmers' clubs, and business associations publicize proposed health education programs in rural and urban communities.

  2. Building Social Capital Through a Peer-Led Community Health Workshop: A Pilot with the Bhutanese Refugee Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyojin; Rosenberg, Rachel

    2016-06-01

    Despite the high health and mental health care needs, resettled refugees often face cultural and linguistic challenges that hinder the access to appropriate and timely interventions and services. Additionally, such concepts as preventive health or mental health treatment are foreign to this population, which creates additional burdens to the refugee community that already have difficulty navigating a complex health care system in the U.S. To address multiple and complex gaps in health and mental health support for the refugee community, requested is an innovative approach that can convey culturally responsive and effective interventions for health promotion, such as peer-based health education. Few studies have been conducted on the effectiveness of peer-led community health interventions with refugee populations in the U.S. resettlement context. However, peer-led interventions have been shown to be effective when working with cultural minorities and interventions in an international context. Adopting a social capital framework, the current study conducted qualitative evaluation on the impact of a pilot peer-led community health workshop (CHW) in the Bhutanese refugee community. A hybrid thematic analysis of focus group discussion data revealed the improvement in health promotion outcomes and health practice, as well as perceived emotional health. The results also showed that the peer-led CHW provided a platform of community building and participation, while increasing a sense of community, sense of belonging and unity. The findings posit that a peer-led intervention model provides culturally responsive and effective tools for building social capital and promoting community health in the refugee community.

  3. Community Changes Address Common Health Threat

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-09-30

    This podcast helps residents living in multiunit housing, like apartments and condos, understand the threat of secondhand smoke. It also helps residents understand what steps they can take to breathe a little easier if involuntarily exposed to secondhand smoke.  Created: 9/30/2013 by Division of Community Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 9/30/2013.

  4. Effect of oral Health Education on Oral Health Care for Children in the Community%口腔健康教育在社区儿童口腔保健中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王翔飞

    2015-01-01

    Twenty-first Century is a time to pay attention to health education, and the health of the oral cavity is a com-mon concern of the society. This paper first introduces the necessity of oral health education in children's oral health care, and then describes how to carry out oral health care for children, and then expounds the education problems in various as-pects, and finally shows that oral health education in children's oral health is an indispensable role.%21世纪是一个注重健康教育的时代,而口腔的健康则是目前社会上普遍比较关注的话题. 该文首先介绍了口腔健康教育在社区儿童口腔保健中的必要性,然后系统阐述了如何开展儿童口腔保健,其次阐述了各方面的教育问题,最后表明了口腔健康教育在儿童口腔保健中有着不可或缺的作用.

  5. Effect Analysis of Health Education and Dietary Intervention on Hypertension in Community Comprehensive Prevention%健康教育及膳食干预对高血压社区综合防治的效果分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴玉秀

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the health education and the ef ect of dietary intervention on hypertension community comprehensive prevention. Methods On 450 patients with hypertension, high blood pressure and a high-risk population groups for health education and health dietary intervention,observe the relevant circumstances change.Results About 450 people grasp the extent of hypertension-related knowledge and control pressure dif erences exist in terms of the patients were 110 cases of high blood pressure before and after the intervention has a statistical y significant ( 0.05).Conclusion The residents of dietary intervention on health education and comprehensive prevention and control of hypertension community can play an ef ective role,worthy of promotion.%目的探讨健康教育及膳食干预对高血压社区综合防治的效果分析。方法对450例高血压患者、高血压高危人群以及健康人群进行健康教育及膳食干预,观察相关情况变化。结果该450例关于高血压相关知识的掌握程度和110例高血压患者控压方面存在的差异在干预前后均具有统计学意义(<0.05),而吸烟、肥胖等方面的检出率差异无统计学意义(P跃0.05)。结论对居民进行健康教育及膳食干预对高血压社区综合防治可起到有效作用,值得推广。

  6. PDCA 循环健康教育模式在社区脑卒中防治中的应用%Application of PDCA circulation health education mode on stroke prevention in community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘冬梅; 薛荃

    2012-01-01

    [ Objective ] To study the application of PDCA ( plan-do-check-adjust) circulation theory on health education among patients with stroke in community. [Methods]118 stroke patients who received the standardized management.of chronic disease were given the health education of PDCA circulation mode, the effect evaluation was conducted by the questionnaire, which included the knowledge, attitudes and practices before and after management. [ Results] After management, the awareness rate of knowledge a-bout stroke prevention and treatment increased significantly (P<0. 01) , and the formation status of health concept and healthy lifestyle improved significantly [P<0.01 or P<0.05). [ Conclusion ] The health education of PDCA circulation mode in patients with stroke in community is effective, which is worth popularizing.%目的 研究计划、实施、检查、处理(PDCA)循环理论在社区脑卒中患者健康教育中的应用.方法 对118例纳入慢病规范化管理的脑卒中患者采用PDCA循环式的健康教育,对管理前后的知、信、行等方面依据调查问卷进行效果评价.结果 管理前后患者对脑卒中防治知识的知晓率显著提高(P<0.01),健康理念形成情况和健康生活方式形成情况均有明显改善(P <0.01或P<0.05).结论 社区脑卒中患者PDCA循环的健康教育模式行之有效,值得推广.

  7. Evaluating the Impact of Educational Interventions on Patients and Communities: A Conceptual Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowyckyj, Andrew S; Dow, Alan; Knab, Mary S

    2017-05-02

    Health professions education programs can have direct effects on patients and communities as well as on learners. However, few studies have examined the patient and community outcomes of educational interventions. To better integrate education and health care delivery, educators and researchers would benefit from a unifying framework to guide the planning of educational interventions and evaluation of their impact on patients.The authors of this Perspective mirrored approaches from Miller's pyramid of educational assessment and Moore and colleagues' framework for evaluating continuing professional development to propose a conceptual framework for evaluating the impact of educational interventions on patients and communities. This proposed framework, which complements these existing frameworks for evaluating the impact of educational interventions on learners, includes four levels: (1) interaction; (2) acceptability; (3) individual outcomes (i.e., knowledge, skills, activation, behaviors, and individual health indicators); and (4) population outcomes (i.e., community health indicators, capacity, and disparities). The authors describe measures and outcomes at each level and provide an example of the application of their new conceptual framework.The authors encourage educators and researchers to use this conceptual framework to evaluate the impact of educational interventions on patients and to more clearly identify and define which educational interventions strengthen communities and enhance overall health outcomes.

  8. Innovations in community-based nursing education: transitioning faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Kimberly Ferren; Fournier, Maggie; Grover, Susan; Kiehl, Ermalynn M; Sims, Kathleen M

    2005-01-01

    The health-care climate is changing rapidly and in ways that challenge the abilities of professionals who provide health care. Nursing educators are preparing professional nurses who can think critically, use sound clinical judgment, and participate as full partners in shaping health-care delivery and policy. Therefore, many schools of nursing, including five schools of nursing whose experiences are synthesized in this article, are revising their curricula to a community-based nursing perspective. Strategies to assist faculty in the transition to a community-based nursing curriculum include using change theory, creating a supportive environment, reducing tension and isolation, and evaluating. Potential challenges during transition include addressing grief and loss, overcoming the tedium of curricular development, moving the revision along while allowing opportunities for faculty input and consensus building, exploring alternative pedagogies, managing faculty workload and qualification issues, and preparing for transition. Outcomes include a more complete understanding of the community client as a partner in the delivery of health care, increased visibility and role modeling to potential future candidates for health careers, cultural transformations within a university, and promotion of the overall health of a community.

  9. Use of the community assessment for public health emergency response to conduct community health assessments for public health accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Ashley M; Vagi, Sara; Horney, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    A community health assessment (CHA) is a collaborative process of collecting and analyzing data to learn about the health status of a community. Community health assessments are also a requirement of public health accreditation for state and local health departments and of the Affordable Care Act for nonprofit hospitals. One element of a CHA is primary data collection. This article describes the use of the Community Assessment for Public Health Emergency Response (CASPER) method for primary data collection to meet public health accreditation requirements in 2 case study communities--Nashua, New Hampshire, and Davidson County, North Carolina; CASPER is a flexible and efficient method for the collection of population-based primary data in an urban or rural setting.

  10. A unique strategy for pediatric community health nursing for ADN students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janvier, K A

    1999-01-01

    Students were overwhelmingly positive when given the opportunity to evaluate the pilot project and the model of pediatric community health nursing. According to the students, the strong points of the model were the orientation before the community experience, the presence of faculty of the community, the ability to contact faculty when needed, and the postclinical conference. The students' comments confirmed the faculty's belief that a clinical experience in community health nursing must place more emphasis on the specialty of community health nursing to be meaningful for students. To do the of job of educating tomorrow's nurses, ADN faculty should develop new strategies for teaching the pediatric clinical component of community health nursing. Clearly, hospitals are no longer the exclusive sites where students learn about patient and family needs and nursing care delivery. Community-based and community-focused experiences will continue to be required so that nursing students are prepared to practice in a dynamic and changing healthcare environment.

  11. Cash planning in community mental health agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, E

    1976-01-01

    Community mental health agencies often receive funds from a number of different sources with varying restrictions. Cash planning can help them manage these funds properly and avoid serious problems. The use of a projected cash flow statement may even help produce additional income for them.

  12. 护生开展社区高血压老年人健康教育的实践探索%Nursing students'practice research of health education for old people with high blood pressure in communities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋畅; 李金凤; 周君; 杨柳; 孙丹宇; 王利群

    2015-01-01

    Objective To strengthen health awareness in elderly people with hypertension and to develop the health education ability of undergraduate nursing students .Methods Questionnaires were given to 200 elderly people from Baoshan Residential District of Jilin City who suffer from hypertension ,to survey their understanding about the preven-tion of hypertension with respect to diet , medication , mental health , and physical exercise , and to understand their needs for health education .Targeted health education was provided to them .Five months later ,the same questionnaire was used again reassess their grasp of hypertension-related knowledge ,and the results were analysed statistically using SPSS 7.0.Results The elderly people gained knowledge about hypertension and health and changed some bad health concepts were voluntary to took right way of health behavior .Conclusion Health education is key to the im-provement of health awareness in elderly people with hypertension in communities .%目的:增强社区高血压老年人的保健意识,提高护理本科生的健康教育能力。方法抽取200名高血压老年人,以调查问卷的形式了解其预防保健包括饮食、用药、心理、运动等知识的掌握情况及其需求,并有针对性地开展健康教育,5个月后再用相同的调查问卷检测其对高血压知识的掌握情况,并运用SPSS7.0软件对健康教育前后的结果进行统计分析。结果老年人掌握高血压相关健康保健知识,改变部分不良的健康观念,并自愿采取正确的健康行为方式。结论健康教育是提高社区高血压老年人保健意识的重要途径。

  13. Problems of health education in rural areas in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charzyńska-Gula, Marianna; Sygit, Katarzyna; Sygit, Marian; Goździewska, Małgorzata; Dobrowolska, Beata; Gałęziowska, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    Health promotion is aimed at the reduction of the differences in society's access to factors determining the frequency of occurrence of pro-health behaviours. This means the construction of health resources and increase in the level of egalitarianism in access to these resources. Health education carried out on a high level in rural schools provides actual possibilities for gaining these resources. Many examples of educational practices confirm that the establishment of health conditioning and health behaviours of schoolchildren, and the diagnosis of rural school on the background of the specificity of the community in which it functions. These are a basis for the construction of effective educational programmes, and not analysis of the differences between urban and rural children and adolescents. In Poland, the performance of health education in rural schools encounters many problems associated both with the lack of infrastructure for health promotion, insufficient perception of the importance of health education at school by the educational authorities, underestimation of primary health care, low activity of the local governments, and lack of qualified rural health promoters. Current health education in Polish rural schools deepens inequalities in access to health, and postpones the moment of providing equal opportunities for rural and urban schoolchildren with access to the resources which condition the maintenance or even an enhancement of health. The objective of the study is to present selected problems in the performance of health education in a Polish rural school in the light of international trends, experiences and discussions related with an optimum form of health promotion in the environment of rural a school and the community.

  14. Using public relations strategies to prompt populations at risk to seek health information: the Hanford Community Health Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory D; Smith, Stephen M; Turcotte, Joseph A

    2009-01-01

    The Hanford Community Health Project (HCHP) addressed health concerns among "downwinders" exposed to releases of radioactive iodine (I-131) from the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in the 1940s and 1950s. After developing educational materials and conducting initial outreach, HCHP had to decide whether to apply its limited resources to an advertising or public relations approach. The decision to apply public relations strategies was effective in driving awareness of the risk communication message at the community level, reinvigorating the affected community, and ultimately increasing the number of people who sought information about their risk of exposure and related health issues. HCHP used a series of communication tools to reach out to local and regional media, medical and health professionals, and community organizations. The campaign was successful in increasing the number of unique visitors to HCHP Web site and educating and activating the medical community around the releases of I-131 and patient care choices.

  15. Experimenting within an Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, L. Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Elwyn Richardson's experimental approach to teaching and learning and Oruaiti was officially sanctioned, but the history of education in Aotearoa/New Zealand shows that teachers have been typically conformist. In this article, I suggest that positivist paradigms from the industrial age continue to shape classroom teaching, partly because of norms…

  16. Experimenting within an Education Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, L. Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Elwyn Richardson's experimental approach to teaching and learning and Oruaiti was officially sanctioned, but the history of education in Aotearoa/New Zealand shows that teachers have been typically conformist. In this article, I suggest that positivist paradigms from the industrial age continue to shape classroom teaching, partly because of norms…

  17. Assessment of community health needs of Chongqing residents: a qualitative study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ying; Li Daikun; He Jia; Shi Kai; Liu HongHong; Zhang Hu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this preliminary qualitative study was to gain insight into community health needs in order to develop health program for community in Chongqing. Methods: Totally 40 participants were assigned into 6 focus group discussions. All groups were led by local language speakers, and their talking was recorded after gaining informed consent. Transcribed data were coded and subjected to thematic analysis. Results: The main obtained themes were that community health problems were chronic noncommunicable disease, main health service needs included regularly free check-up and health education, and perceived health risk factors were unhealthy lifestyle and behavior as well as environment problems. Conclusion: Our community health needs assessment (CHNA) with FGDs indicate that residents realize the importance of prevention of disease. Our study identifies that primarily community health promotion is one of the priorities of community health service needs, including reorienting health service, health education, guiding behavior or lifestyle, and creating healthy environments. The findings of this study can provide guidance to the development of more effective and pertinent health program in this community.

  18. 开展社区糖尿病肾病中医健康教育的调查%Role of TCM in community health education of diabetic nephropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱秀丽; 宋先东; 黄波

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨中医在社区糖尿病肾病(DN)患者健康教育中的作用.方法 将124例糖尿病肾病患者分为两组各62例,观察组为自愿参加社区中医健康教育者,对照组未参加社区中医健康教育者,通过调查问卷,了解DN患者相关知识的掌握情况,以及对中医健康教育的需求和建议.结果 观察组对DN知识了解程度明显高于教育前,治疗情况明显优于对照组(λ2=3.376,P<0.01).结论 在社区DN人群中实施中医健康教育可有效提高患者对DN的认知程度,对DN的院外治疗有较好的推动作用.%Objective To discuss the role of traditional Chinese medicine in community health education of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Methods 124 patients of DN were randomly recruited into an observation group and a control group, with 62 patients in each group. The patients in the observation group participated in TCM health care education voluntarily, while the patients in the control group did not take any TCM education health care. Questionnaires were used to investigate relative knowledge to DN and demands and suggestions to TCM education health care. Results Patients in the observation groups had an obviously better understanding to DN knowledge than before. The therapeutic effects in the observation group were significantly better than the control group (λ2=3.376, P<0.01). Conclusion The application of TCM health education in community DN patients will effectively enhance the cognition of the patients to DN, and will also promote the therapeutic effects of DN treatment outside hospital.

  19. My Career: Health Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Thuy Vu, Research Coordinator at the University of Washington and Project Director at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington. In this interview, Vu talks about what she does, how she got these jobs, how her education ties in, and her first job out of college. The interview concludes…

  20. Assessing health professional education: workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuff, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing health professional education is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health...

  1. Multiculturalism, Medicine and Health Part V: Community Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, R.

    1989-01-01

    In this article the author examines multicultural health issues from a community perspective, dealing with relationships between cultural communities and health-care systems in terms of: hospitals and health-care institutions, family and social supports, social norms, and community-health programs. PMID:21248882

  2. Community, family, and subjective socioeconomic status: Relative status and adolescent health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Elizabeth C; McGrath, Jennifer J

    2015-06-01

    Relative socioeconomic status (SES) may be an important social determinant of health. The current study aimed to examine how relative SES, as measured by subjective SES, income inequality, and individual SES relative to others in the community, is associated with a wide range of adolescent health outcomes, after controlling for objective family SES. Adolescents (13-16 years; N = 2,199) from the Quebec Child and Adolescent Health and Social Survey were included. Socioeconomic measures included adolescents' subjective SES; parental education and household income; community education/employment, income, and poverty rate; and community income inequality. Health outcomes included self-rated health, mental health problems, dietary and exercise health behaviors, substance-related health behaviors, reported physical health, and biomarkers of health. Best-fitting multilevel regression models (participants nested within schools) were used to test associations. Findings indicated that lower subjective SES was associated with poorer health outcomes. After accounting for family SES, lower community education/employment had an additional negative effect on health, while lower community income had a protective effect for certain health outcomes. There was less evidence for an independent effect of income inequality. Findings highlight the importance of measures of relative SES that span across a number of levels and contexts, and provide further understanding into the socioeconomic gradient in adolescence. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. [Food education: health and social cohesion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, Eva Zafra

    2017-01-01

    Using a theoretical-reflexive approach, this article connects the results of various qualitative studies in social conflict and medical anthropology, in order to investigate how food can be a tool for social transformation in terms of health but also in terms of the dialogue, respect and coexistence among people, groups and communities. In this sense the article presents a first approximation to a new theoretical and methodological approach to food education. In this approach, food adopts a political, sociocultural and participatory perspective that brings us closer to an innovative understanding of the phenomenon of food: not only as an analytic and diagnostic tool, but also as an instrument for health education interventions toward conflict resolution and the promotion of healthier societies overall - nutritionally, but also in terms of equality and social cohesion.

  4. Food education: health and social cohesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Zafra Aparici

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Using a theoretical-reflexive approach, this article connects the results of various qualitative studies in social conflict and medical anthropology, in order to investigate how food can be a tool for social transformation in terms of health but also in terms of the dialogue, respect and coexistence among people, groups and communities. In this sense the article presents a first approximation to a new theoretical and methodological approach to food education. In this approach, food adopts a political, sociocultural and participatory perspective that brings us closer to an innovative understanding of the phenomenon of food: not only as an analytic and diagnostic tool, but also as an instrument for health education interventions toward conflict resolution and the promotion of healthier societies overall – nutritionally, but also in terms of equality and social cohesion.

  5. Health education and nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpitsiori Ε.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over the centuries both the medical and wider health sectors have developed and many new inventions and discoveries have been made; however, the health sector has never stopped to be a current issue. Every time a possible cure of a disease was found, another disease appeared and affected humans. Therefore, the requirement of our time focuses mainly on early diagnosis, immediate intervention and prevention. Objective: By using the structures and services of the Greek Public Health, this study aims to explore the ways through which models on nutrition can be developed so that human illnesses will be avoided. Methods: The material of this review is based on the printed Greek and international literature and in electronic databases. In parallel, a cheirodialogi books, articles and studies from libraries with the help of keywords. Results: The need of a system managing the huge amount of information and the different interrelated Public Health sectors is now more pressing than ever before. The Public Health interferes collectively with perpetual efforts in improving population health. As a result, its main objective is to focus on prevention and primary care. In addition, the dissemination of healthy eating habits is of primary importance for the Public Health. Conclusions: The radical change to modern lifestyle, along with the reduction in leisure time, the transformation of family structure and the subsequent adoption of new dietary habits leading to the consumption of ready and standardized food, is one of the most serious challenges for Public Health in today's era. The issue of nutrition policy is not only confined to its hygiene aspect, but it has many other important components. At first, this policy accounts for a large amount of the total economic activity of a country, concerning the primary, secondary and tertiary sector, while at the same time it absorbs a large proportion of idividual consumption. Furthermore, it is linked

  6. Knowledge flows in health communities of practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrott, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    This article will examine a case study of an outpatient's clinic in an Australian public hospital with the objective of gaining a better understanding of the issues related to knowledge dynamics in communities of practice within a health care environment. This case study research approach was considered to provide a fine-grained approach recommended for improved understanding of nuances, detail, and the forces underlying the phenomena under observation. Focus on detail was an important attribute of this study notwithstanding possible shortcomings in not being able to externalize the research findings. Of the four modes of knowledge exchange observed to take place in this public hospital community of practice, Mode C (tacit to explicit) stands out as a key finding. Here, the release of each individual's tacit knowledge is forthcoming and free flowing given the established culture of trust in this clinic. The informal communication environment in the luminal space of their workplace corridor provided a conducive environment that enabled a free-flowing exchange of community knowledge. Health-care managers are increasingly required to guide the use and flow of knowledge within their organizations. The insights gained from this project will provide them with a better understanding of knowledge dynamics within a health-care community of practice, which is a microcosm of the larger organization.

  7. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use.

  8. Health Education/Promotion Students' Attitudes toward Homosexuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Sara L.; Reece, Michael; Lindeman, Alice K.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the attitudes of health education/promotion students toward homosexuals and the extent to which those attitudes were related to their comfort and interest in working with gay, lesbian, and bisexual (GLB) individuals and health issues socially-related to this community. Participants included 182 undergraduate and graduate…

  9. Education Improves Public Health and Promotes Health Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Robert A.; Truman, Benedict I.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a framework and empirical evidence to support the argument that educational programs and policies are crucial public health interventions. Concepts of education and health are developed and linked, and we review a wide range of empirical studies to clarify pathways of linkage and explore implications. Basic educational expertise and skills, including fundamental knowledge, reasoning ability, emotional self-regulation, and interactional abilities, are critical components of health. Moreover, education is a fundamental social determinant of health – an upstream cause of health. Programs that close gaps in educational outcomes between low-income or racial and ethnic minority populations and higher-income or majority populations are needed to promote health equity. Public health policy makers, health practitioners and educators, and departments of health and education can collaborate to implement educational programs and policies for which systematic evidence indicates clear public health benefits. PMID:25995305

  10. Community, Difference, and Voice in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jill C.

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the ethical, methodological, and practical issues of translating critical theory and research into praxis through a case study analysis of a graduate capstone seminar that explored the familiar, and seemingly benign, concepts common to educational discourses: "Creativity, Collaboration, and Community." The author…

  11. Investigating Classroom Community in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Jessica J.; Svinicki, Marilla D.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to demonstrate an empirical relationship between classroom community and students' achievement goals in higher education, and to offer a possible explanation for differences in this relationship for cooperative and non-cooperative classrooms. Structural equation modeling techniques revealed that students'…

  12. Communities of Practice in Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Kathleen; Hunt, Pam; Leroy, Mieke; Van de Putte, Inge; Van Hove, Geert

    2010-01-01

    The data in this paper represent the experiences and perspectives of parents and teachers who worked as communities of practice, designing support plans for the inclusion of three students with intellectual disabilities in general education classrooms. Their reflections, obtained through interviews and questionnaires, show how they constructed…

  13. Building science education in the community college

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uniacke, M.

    1994-05-01

    This article describes a course at Yavapai Community College (Arizona) in energy efficient building and design: a systems approach. The premise is that architects and builders would design and construct more efficient housing if made aware of the impact of their decisions. The results-orient curriculum is described along with the educational tools and techniques used.

  14. Community control of health services. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Health Center's community management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichy, N M; Taylor, J I

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the case of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Health Center's unique community management system in which neighborhood workers have been developed to assume managerial responsibilities and are directing the Center. The Martin Luther King Center experience is instructive because the Center was able to achieve significant community control by focusing primarily on the internal dimension of control, namely, management, without experiencing destructive conflicts and the deterioration of health services.

  15. Mobile Health (mHealth) Services and Online Health Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Mobile technology enables health-care organizations to extend health-care services by providing a suitable environment to achieve mobile health (mHealth) goals, making some health-care services accessible anywhere and anytime. Introducing mHealth could change the business processes in delivering services to patients. mHealth could empower patients as it becomes necessary for them to become involved in the health-care processes related to them. This includes the ability for patients to manage their personal information and interact with health-care staff as well as among patients themselves. The study proposes a new position to supervise mHealth services: the online health educator (OHE). The OHE should be occupied by special health-care staffs who are trained in managing online services. A survey was conducted in Brunei and Indonesia to discover the roles of OHE in managing mHealth services, followed by a focus group discussion with participants who interacted with OHE in a real online health scenario. Data analysis showed that OHE could improve patients' confidence and satisfaction in health-care services.

  16. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...

  17. Short-term global health education programs abroad: disease patterns observed in Haitian migrant worker communities around La Romana, Dominican Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Brian J; Townsley, Elizabeth; MacKay, Christopher R; Lin, Henry C; Loh, Lawrence C

    2014-11-01

    The possibility of encountering rare tropical disease presentations is commonly described as a benefit derived by developed world medical trainees participating in clinical service-oriented short-term global health experiences in the developing world. This study describes the health status of a population served by a short-term experience conducted by a North American institute, and the results of a retrospective review are used to identify commonly encountered diseases and discuss their potential educational value. Descriptive analysis was conducted on 1,024 encounter records collected over four unique 1-week-long trips by a North American institution serving Haitian migrant workers in La Romana, Dominican Republic. The top five diagnoses seen in the clinic were gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), hypertension (HTN), upper respiratory infections, otitis media, and fungal skin infection. On occasion, diagnoses unique to an indigent tropical population were encountered (e.g., dehydration, malnutrition, parasites, and infections.). These findings suggest a similarity between frequently encountered diagnoses on a short-term clinical service trip in Dominican Republic and primary care presentations in developed world settings, which challenges the assumption that short-term service experiences provide exposure to rare tropical disease presentations. These findings also represent additional data that can be used to better understand the health and healthcare planning among this vulnerable population of Haitian migrant workers.

  18. Moral education: School as a just community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miočinović Ljiljana Đ.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses Kohlberg’s view of moral education, how it was developing and changing over time. Starting from a theoretical postulate that thinking constitutes the essence of morality and from empirical findings of the stage development of moral judgment, in his early works Kohlberg defines moral education as "encouraging the natural course of moral judgment development". As a principal method of work, Kohlberg recommends the encouragement of a cognitive conflict by means of discussing hypothetic moral dilemmas. Criticisms that he is over-intellectualizing moral education, getting acquainted with a collective upbringing in kibbutz's, active participation in work in schools and prisons and finding that moral judgment and acting in everyday life is a response to the prevailing moral atmosphere of a group are leading to the changes in moral education goals and development of a new approach known as "just community". Now a group is in the focus of moral education, not an individual any longer, the major area of studies being group norms and expectations. The "just community" approach does not remain only at the classroom level discussing hypothetical moral dilemmas but directly influences the structure of school justice i.e. its rules and discipline, processes they are passed as well as the rights and duties of both teachers and students. Its goal is no longer to develop moral judgment of an individual student but to develop a group as moral community founded upon the norms of trust, participation and collective responsibility.

  19. Brazilian community health agents and qualitative primary healthcare information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Margareth S; Pinto, Rogério Meireles; Galhego-Garcia, Wilson; da Cunha, Zeilma; Cordeiro, Hésio A; Fagundes-Filho, Francisco E; Pinho, Mônica A L; Voet, Susan M V; Talbot, Yves; Caldas, Rodrigo S; de Souza, Thiago J; Costa, Edwaldo

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore female community health agents' views about the value of recording qualitative information on contextual health issues they observe during home visits, data that are not officially required to be documented for the Brazilian System of Primary Healthcare Information. The study was conducted in community primary healthcare centres located in the cities of Araçatuba and Coroados (state of São Paulo) and Rio de Janeiro (state of Rio de Janeiro), Brazil. The design was a qualitative, exploratory study. The purposeful sampling criteria were being female, with a minimum of three years of continuous service in the same location. Data collection with 62 participants was conducted via 11 focus groups (in 2007 and 2008). Audio files were transcribed and submitted to the method of thematic analysis. Four themes guided the analysis: working with qualitative information and undocumented observation; reflecting on qualitative information; integrating/analysing quantitative and qualitative information; and information-sharing with agents and family health teams. In 2010, 25 community health agents verified the final interpretation of the findings. Participants valued the recording of qualitative, contextual information to expand understanding of primary healthcare issues and as an indicator of clients' improved health behaviour and health literacy. While participants initiated the recording of additional health information, they generally did not inform the family health team about these findings. They perceived that team members devalued this type of information by considering it a reflection of the clientele's social conditions or problems beyond the scope of medical concerns. Documentation of qualitative evidence can account for the effectiveness of health education in two ways: by improving preventative care, and by amplifying the voices of underprivileged clients who live in poverty to ensure the most appropriate and best quality primary

  20. An Informal Online Learning Community for Student Mental Health at University: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek; Tangney, Brendan

    2008-01-01

    As a potential solution to increasing demands on mental health services at universities, this project seeks to develop an informal online learning community for mental health support and education. Students' use of the Internet and Information and Communication Technologies (ICT), especially to access health information, provides a supporting…

  1. Community acceptability of use of rapid diagnostic tests for malaria by community health workers in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiswa Peter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many malarious countries plan to introduce artemisinin combination therapy (ACT at community level using community health workers (CHWs for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Use of ACT with reliance on presumptive diagnosis may lead to excessive use, increased costs and rise of drug resistance. Use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs could address these challenges but only if the communities will accept their use by CHWs. This study assessed community acceptability of the use of RDTs by Ugandan CHWs, locally referred to as community medicine distributors (CMDs. Methods The study was conducted in Iganga district using 10 focus group discussions (FGDs with CMDs and caregivers of children under five years, and 10 key informant interviews (KIIs with health workers and community leaders. Pre-designed FGD and KII guides were used to collect data. Manifest content analysis was used to explore issues of trust and confidence in CMDs, stigma associated with drawing blood from children, community willingness for CMDs to use RDTs, and challenges anticipated to be faced by the CMDs. Results CMDs are trusted by their communities because of their commitment to voluntary service, access, and the perceived effectiveness of anti-malarial drugs they provide. Some community members expressed fear that the blood collected could be used for HIV testing, the procedure could infect children with HIV, and the blood samples could be used for witchcraft. Education level of CMDs is important in their acceptability by the community, who welcome the use of RDTs given that the CMDs are trained and supported. Anticipated challenges for CMDs included transport for patient follow-up and picking supplies, adults demanding to be tested, and caregivers insisting their children be treated instead of being referred. Conclusion Use of RDTs by CMDs is likely to be acceptable by community members given that CMDs are properly trained, and receive regular technical

  2. The Health Professions Education Pathway: Preparing Students, Residents, and Fellows to Become Future Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; Wamsley, Maria A; Azzam, Amin; Julian, Katherine; Irby, David M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-01-01

    Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools. The Pathway applies the theoretical framework of communities of practice in its curricular design to promote learner identity formation as future health professions educators. It employs the strategies of engagement, imagination, and alignment for identity formation. Through course requirements, learners engage and work with members of the educator community of practice to develop the knowledge and skills required to participate in the community. Pathway instructors are faculty members who model a breadth of educator careers to help learners imagine personal trajectories. Last, learners complete mentored education projects, adopting scholarly methods and ethics to align with the broader educator community of practice. From 2009 to 2014, 117 learners participated in the Pathway. Program evaluations, graduate surveys, and web-based searches revealed positive impacts on learner career development. Learners gained knowledge and skills for continued engagement with the educator community of practice, confirmed their career aspirations (imagination), joined an educator-in-training community (engagement/imagination), and disseminated via scholarly meetings and peer-reviewed publications (alignment). Learners identified engagement with the learner community as the most powerful aspect of the Pathway; it provided peer support for imagining and navigating the development of their dual identities in the clinician and educator

  3. Assessing Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing Health Professional Education" is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health professional education. At the event, Forum members shared personal experiences and learned from patients, students, educators, and…

  4. The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project — A Community-Level, Public Health Initiative to Build Community Disaster Resilience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Eisenman

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Public health officials need evidence-based methods for improving community disaster resilience and strategies for measuring results. This methods paper describes how one public health department is addressing this problem. This paper provides a detailed description of the theoretical rationale, intervention design and novel evaluation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR, a public health program for increasing community disaster resilience. The LACCDR Project utilizes a pretest–posttest method with control group design. Sixteen communities in Los Angeles County were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental community resilience group or the comparison group. Community coalitions in the experimental group receive training from a public health nurse trained in community resilience in a toolkit developed for the project. The toolkit is grounded in theory and uses multiple components to address education, community engagement, community and individual self-sufficiency, and partnerships among community organizations and governmental agencies. The comparison communities receive training in traditional disaster preparedness topics of disaster supplies and emergency communication plans. Outcome indicators include longitudinal changes in inter-organizational linkages among community organizations, community member responses in table-top exercises, and changes in household level community resilience behaviors and attitudes. The LACCDR Project is a significant opportunity and effort to operationalize and meaningfully measure factors and strategies to increase community resilience. This paper is intended to provide public health and academic researchers with new tools to conduct their community resilience programs and evaluation research. Results are not yet available and will be presented in future reports.

  5. The Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project — A Community-Level, Public Health Initiative to Build Community Disaster Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, David; Chandra, Anita; Fogleman, Stella; Magana, Aizita; Hendricks, Astrid; Wells, Ken; Williams, Malcolm; Tang, Jennifer; Plough, Alonzo

    2014-01-01

    Public health officials need evidence-based methods for improving community disaster resilience and strategies for measuring results. This methods paper describes how one public health department is addressing this problem. This paper provides a detailed description of the theoretical rationale, intervention design and novel evaluation of the Los Angeles County Community Disaster Resilience Project (LACCDR), a public health program for increasing community disaster resilience. The LACCDR Project utilizes a pretest–posttest method with control group design. Sixteen communities in Los Angeles County were selected and randomly assigned to the experimental community resilience group or the comparison group. Community coalitions in the experimental group receive training from a public health nurse trained in community resilience in a toolkit developed for the project. The toolkit is grounded in theory and uses multiple components to address education, community engagement, community and individual self-sufficiency, and partnerships among community organizations and governmental agencies. The comparison communities receive training in traditional disaster preparedness topics of disaster supplies and emergency communication plans. Outcome indicators include longitudinal changes in inter-organizational linkages among community organizations, community member responses in table-top exercises, and changes in household level community resilience behaviors and attitudes. The LACCDR Project is a significant opportunity and effort to operationalize and meaningfully measure factors and strategies to increase community resilience. This paper is intended to provide public health and academic researchers with new tools to conduct their community resilience programs and evaluation research. Results are not yet available and will be presented in future reports. PMID:25153472

  6. A History of Learning Communities within American Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, John E.; Inkelas, Karen Kurotsuchi

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the historical development of learning communities within American higher education. We examine the forces both internal and external to higher education that contributed to and stalled the emergence of learning communities in their contemporary form.

  7. Microenterprise in health care and health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, A A

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, development aid has increasingly used a more collaborative model, with donors and recipients both contributing ideas, methods and goals. Though many examples of collateral aid projects exist in agriculture, business administration and banking, few have found their way into health care and health education, a typically donor-dominated model. The following case report describes a collateral project in health care education. This case report analyzes data-inducing project proposals, personal interviews and project reports obtained through standard archival research methods. The setting for this joint project was the collaboration between international nongovernmental (NGO) aid foundations and the faculty of a major sub-Saharan African Medical School's Department of Anesthesia. The initial goal of this project was to improve record keeping for all anesthetic records, both in the operating theatres and outside. Analysis of the data was performed using ethnographic methods of constant comparative analysis. The purpose of the analysis was to critically evaluate both the goals and their results in the Department of Anesthesiology. The findings of this analysis suggested that results included not only quality assurance and improvement programs in the department but also advances in the use of critical incidents as teaching tools, hospital-wide drug and equipment utilization information and the initiation of an outreach program to district hospitals throughout the country for similar projects.

  8. Microenterprise in health care and health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Over the last decade, development aid has increasingly used a more collaborative model, with donors and recipients both contributing ideas, methods and goals. Though many examples of collateral aid projects exist in agriculture, business administration and banking, few have found their way into health care and health education, a typically donor-dominated model. The following case report describes a collateral project in health care education. This case report analyzes data-inducing project proposals, personal interviews and project reports obtained through standard archival research methods. The setting for this joint project was the collaboration between international nongovernmental (NGO) aid foundations and the faculty of a major sub-Saharan African Medical School's Department of Anesthesia. The initial goal of this project was to improve record keeping for all anesthetic records, both in the operating theatres and outside. Analysis of the data was performed using ethnographic methods of constant comparative analysis. The purpose of the analysis was to critically evaluate both the goals and their results in the Department of Anesthesiology. The findings of this analysis suggested that results included not only quality assurance and improvement programs in the department but also advances in the use of critical incidents as teaching tools, hospital-wide drug and equipment utilization information and the initiation of an outreach program to district hospitals throughout the country for similar projects. PMID:10604789

  9. Physical Education's Role in Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallis, James F.; McKenzie, Thomas L.

    1991-01-01

    Analyzes contributions physical education makes to child and adult health. Topics discussed are current levels of U.S. children's physical activity; status of elementary physical education programs; health-related physical activity interventions; public health analysis of elementary physical education; and public health role and goal for physical…

  10. Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the National Technical Information Service NCHS Use of Electronic Health Records in Residential Care Communities Recommend on ... Facilities Most residential care communities did not use electronic health records in 2010, and use varied by ...

  11. [Comparison of health education and drug therapy monitoring interventions in patients with cardiovascular risk factors attending a community pharmacy (FISFTES-PM Study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bofí Martínez, Patricia; García Jiménez, Emilio; Martínez Martínez, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    To compare health education (HE) and drug therapy monitoring (DTM) interventions in patients with cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF). Randomised experimental studys: 100 patients per group. Playa-Miramar pharmacy (Valencia, Spain). March 2010-November 2011. Patients with one or more CVRF detected based on medication they were taking or questions they asked when drugs were dispensed. Patients were assigned to one of the two groups (HE or DTM) using a random number table. 100 patients by group were included. Six months of DTM (DTMG) or health education (HEG) per patient. The primary variables were modifiable CVRF: hypertension, dyslipidaemia, diabetes, smoking, obesity and low physical activity. Secondary variables were non modifiable CVRF (age, sex, cardiovascular disease), heart rate, body mass index, waist measurement, waist-to-hip ratio, waist-to-height ratio, body fat, treatment compliance. The differences in the reduction percentages were statistically greater in DTMG than in HEG for the following variables: systolic pressure 5.40% (p=0.001); heart rate 2.95%(p=0.015); weight 2.00% (p=0.002); BMI 2.24% (p=0.003); fasting glucose 8.65% (p=0.004); total cholesterol 6.45% (p=0.002); waist measurement 1.85% (p=0.010); and waist-to-height ratio 1.66% (p=0.002). Triglycerides and body fat were reduced by 12.78% (p<0.001) and 1.84% (p<0.001) more, respectively, in DTMG. These differences were not statistically significant. The reduction percentages were generally higher for all variables in DTMG except diastolic blood pressure, which decreased by 4.7% (P<.001) more in HEG because the baseline values were higher. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Community health workers adherence to referral guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lal, Sham; Ndyomugenyi, Richard; Paintain, Lucy;

    2016-01-01

    Background Many malaria-endemic countries have implemented national community health worker (CHW) programmes to serve remote populations that have poor access to malaria diagnosis and treatment. Despite mounting evidence of CHWs’ ability to adhere to malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs...... artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and recognize symptoms in children that required immediate referral to the nearest health centre. Intervention arm CHWs had additional training on how to conduct an RDT; CHWs in the control arm used a presumptive diagnosis for malaria using clinical signs...

  13. Community collaboration as a disaster mental health competency: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebowitz, Adam Jon

    2015-02-01

    Disasters impact the mental health of entire communities through destruction and physical displacement. There is growing recognition of the need for disaster mental health competencies. Professional organizations such as the AAFP and the ASPH recommend engaging with communities in equal partnership for their recovery. This systematic study was undertaken for the purpose of reviewing published disaster medicine competencies to determine if core competencies included community cooperation and collaboration. A search of Internet databases was conducted using major keywords "disaster" and "competencies". Articles eligible contained laundry lists of basic core competency curriculum beyond emergency response. Data were qualitatively analyzed to identify types of competencies, and the degree of community cooperation. A total of 12 studies were reviewed. Only one study listed competencies specifying community cooperation, although others refer indirectly to it. Findings suggest competency-based education programs could do more to educate future disaster health professionals about the importance of community collaboration.

  14. Childhood Diabesity: International Applications for Health Education and Health Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Perez, Helda; Kotkin-Jaszi, Suzanne; Perez, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Health policy has a direct impact on health education initiatives, health care delivery, resource allocation, and quality of life. Increasing rates in the epidemics of obesity and obesity-dependent diabetes mellitus (aka diabesity) suggest that health policy changes should be included in health education and disease prevention strategies. Health…

  15. Delivering health information services and technologies to urban community health centers: the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E R; McDaniels, C; Crespo, J; Lanier, D

    1997-10-01

    Health professionals cannot address public health issues effectively unless they have immediate access to current biomedical information. This paper reports on one mode of access, the Chicago AIDS Outreach Project, which was supported by the National Library of Medicine through outreach awards in 1995 and 1996. The three-year project is an effort to link the programs and services of the University of Illinois at Chicago Library of the Health Sciences and the Midwest AIDS Training and Education Center with the clinic services of community-based organizations in Chicago. The project was designed to provide electronic access to AIDS-related information for AIDS patients, the affected community, and their care givers. The project also provided Internet access and training and continued access to library resources. The successful initiative suggests a working model for outreach to health professionals in an urban setting.

  16. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  17. 社区老年人抑郁症的影响因素及心理健康教育的作用%The function of psychological health education and the influence factors of elderly depression in community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鑫

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨社区老年人抑郁症的影响因素及心理健康教育的作用。方法:收治老年抑郁症患者90例,采取随机性的方法,将患者分为观察组和对照组,每组45例,对照组接受常规的健康教育,观察组接受综合性的心理健康教育,包括心理疗法、运动疗法、药物疗法等,比较两组患者的抑郁状态进展,分析社区老人抑郁症的影响因素。结果:影响社区老人抑郁的因素有离退休、空巢现象、经济问题、心理因素等,通过对患者进行心理健康教育,观察组抑郁状态优于对照组,组间比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论:社区老年人抑郁症的影响因素为老年抑郁症的防治工作提供了重要依据,对老年人进行心理健康教育干预对老年抑郁症的治疗是必不可少的。%Objective:To discuss the function of psychological health education and the influence factors of elderly depression in community.Methods:90 patients with elderly depression were selected.They were randomly divided into the observation group and the control group with 45 cases in each.Patients in the control group received conventional health education,and the observation group received comprehensive mental health education,including psychological therapy,exercise therapy,drug therapy,comparing two groups of patients depression progress.We analyzed influence factors of elderly depression in community.Results:The influence factors of community elderly depression have retired,empty nest phenomenon,economic problems,psychological factors, through the psychological health education for patients,the observation group was better than the control group in patients with depression,there was statistically significant(P<0.05).Conclusion:The influence factors of elderly depression in community provides an important basis for the prevention and control of elderly depression,mental health education intervention in the

  18. Peruvian community health promoters: expanding the spaces of health voluntarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Katy

    2011-01-01

    This paper emphasises the importance of recognising the global South as a key site for understanding the patterning of geographies of health voluntarism. Feeding into a broader critique of neoliberal health and development policies, the paper explores what a case study of health promoters in a popular settlement in Lima, Peru, can add to our understanding of practices of health voluntarism rooted in distinct places, emphasising the uneven and gendered nature of such voluntary activity. In particular, the paper considers the ways in which urban community spaces are negotiated, inhabited and shaped by volunteer women health workers, arguing that an exploration of these everyday practices provides a more nuanced picture of the role of voluntarism in healthcare provisioning under neoliberal regimes.

  19. From community outreach to reaching students: using public access television as an educational strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBartolo, Mary C; Seldomridge, Lisa A

    2010-01-01

    Nursing faculty are not only charged with educating students in creative and engaging ways but also expected to participate in service activities that benefit the surrounding community. One such initiative was the creation of a television health education series hosted by nursing faculty. The authors describe the evolution of a partnership between a university-based public access television channel and the nursing department that provided community education while enriching both the undergraduate and graduate nursing curricula.

  20. Social justice as a framework for undergraduate community health clinical experiences in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutain, Doris M

    2008-01-01

    Educating future registered nurses for social justice is an urgent, yet complex undertaking in undergraduate education. Although the need for social justice education is often highlighted, few articles describe practical teaching strategies for ensuring that undertaking. The purpose of this article is to illustrate how a curricular focus on social justice framed and supported the development of a clinical evaluation tool for undergraduate community health clinical experiences. First, social justice is defined and its relationship to baccalaureate nursing education explained. Then a description is provided of how social justice was highlighted in the vision, curriculum, and community health clinical evaluation tool of a College of Nursing. The article subsequently showcases the content and evaluation of students' journal entries about social justice. The development of the social justice component presented in this article may be useful to nurse educators striving to match theory and practice in the evaluation of social justice in students' community health experience.

  1. Coming Together--Respectfully: Building Community in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Julie; Guyton, Edi

    Many researchers recommend building community to promote K-12 school improvement, noting the importance of teachers experiencing community in teacher education. This paper examines the concept of a learning community in the context of teacher education. It describes a 2-year qualitative study of community in a master's degree program. The program…

  2. New Developments in Undergraduate Education in Public Health: Implications for Health Education and Health Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Michael D.; Wykoff, Randy; King, Laura Rasar; Petersen, Donna J.

    2012-01-01

    The article provides an overview of efforts to improve public health and health education training and on the potential use of Critical Component Elements (CCEs) for undergraduate health education programs toward more consistent quality assurance across programs. Considered in the context of the Galway Consensus Conference, the authors discuss the…

  3. Moving from Health Education to Health Promotion: Developing the Health Education Curriculum in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Soula; Kouta, Christiana; Charalambous, Neofytos

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to discuss the rationale of the newly reformed health education curriculum in Cyprus, which aspires to enable not only teachers, but also all the school personnel, to work from the perspective of health promotion. It is a curriculum which moves from the traditional approach of health education focusing on individual…

  4. Health carnival: an experiment in health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, R F; Hawley, R C; James, M

    1980-04-01

    Some common diseases or accidents that kill or disable persons prematurely are preventable, delayable or sometimes curable if detected early. Prevention, delay or cure requires that individuals be informed of the risks and of the ways they can avoid them, and that those with habits that increase their risks change their behavior. The authors decided to attempt health education of employees and their families by using a carnival setting to make it attractive and memorable. Active participation and demonstrations were used to stimulate interest and involvement to promote learning. Attendance was satisfactory and post-carnival conversations and questionnaires suggest that this might be a useful method of promoting health and safety with employees and their families.

  5. Education, Technology and Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Sølling, Ina Koldkjær; Carøe, Per;

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration contributes to the creation of a natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between the 3...... as a theoretical and practical learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management in relation to e-health and Health Literacy. The Student Academy inspires students...... areas of expertise is to create an understanding for each other's skills and cultural differences. Futhermore enabling future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve Health Literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view on welfare technology a Student Academy was created...

  6. Community Education and Evidence-based Knowledge Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N mohaghegh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Utilizing as well as transferring knowledge can be provided via motivating teachers, educating researchers, better utilizing of evidence and creating communication between members of the scientific communities based on the needs of the community and community education. Therefore, the present study mainly aimed at evaluating the process of knowledge production and use of evidence in the research centres of Tehran and Iran University of Medical Sciences. Moreover, this study intended to investigate its application in improving the health system and community education of students.   Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the study population finally consisted of 68 research centres affiliated to Tehran and Iran University of Medical Sciences. In order to glean the study data, a questionnaire was utilized by Nejat et al. in two fields of “knowledge production” and “promote using of evidence”, and the study data were analyzed using SPSS (version 18.   Results: The production and use of knowledge status in Tehran and Iran medical universities in regard with “knowledge and evidence production” used in decision-making was reported in a favourable condition. Moreover, an unfavourable condition was revealed regarding “promoting use of evidence” which needs proper intervention.   Conclusion: The study finding revealed that at the beginning of the formulation of each research, identifying the specific audience of the study results causes the produced evidence and knowledge to be applicable. This leads to conducting research in accordance with the needs of community. As a result, status of medical universities in Iran necessitates to be reviewed. Ameliorating production status and promoting evidence-based knowledge can lead to a significant qualitative development in community education.

  7. Community mental health in India: A rethink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynkran Jothy R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community care of the chronic mentally ill has always been prevalent in India, largely due to family involvement and unavailability of institutions. In the 80s, a few mental health clinics became operational in some parts of the country. The Schizophrenia Research Foundation (SCARF, an NGO in Chennai had established a community clinic in 1989 in Thiruporur, which was functional till 1999. During this period various programmes such as training of the primary health center staff, setting up a referral system, setting up of a Citizen's Group, and self-employment schemes were initiated. It was decided to begin a follow up in 2005 to determine the present status of the schemes as well as the current status of the patients registered at the clinic. This we believed would lead to pointers to help evolve future community based programmes. Methods One hundred and eighty five patients with chronic mental illness were followed up and their present treatment status determined using a modified version of the Psychiatric and Personal History Schedule (PPHS. The resources created earlier were assessed and qualitative information was gathered during interviews with patient and families and other stakeholders to identify the reasons behind the sustenance or failure of these initiatives. Results Of the 185 patients followed up, 15% had continued treatment, 35% had stopped treatment, 21% had died, 12% had wandered away from home and 17% were untraceable. Of the patients who had discontinued treatment 25% were asymptomatic while 75% were acutely psychotic. The referral service was used by only 15% of the patients and mental health services provided by the PHC stopped within a year. The Citizen's group was functional for only a year and apart from chicken rearing, all other self-employment schemes were discontinued within a period of 6 months to 3 years. There were multiple factors contributing to the failure, the primary reasons being the

  8. Community College Student Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel Seth; Davison, Karen

    2014-01-01

    This study explores community college student mental health by comparing the responses of California community college and traditional university students on the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment II (ACHA-NCHA II). Using MANOVA, we compared community college and traditional university students, examining…

  9. The Health of the School Nurse Community: A Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christeson, Elisabeth P.

    2003-01-01

    School nursing is based on a conceptual foundation of community health nursing. Using community health nursing as a reference point, this article describes a viewpoint of school nurses as the population of care. With this perspective, school nurses will better understand how to foster the health of their community. Developed on the basis of…

  10. The effect of community oral health education on the oral hygiene of residents%社区口腔健康教育对居民口腔卫生的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭淑玲; 吕达; 伍晓; 罗媛

    2016-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of the community oral health education on the dental hygiene of the residents .Methods A total of 200 community residents were selected and ran-domly divided into a control group and an observation group ,each of 100 cases .Both groups were given free toothbrushes and toothpaste ,the control group was given simple explain the importance of brushing teeth and the correct method ,while the observation group was additionally provided with o-ral health lectures and one-to-one oral health consultation for 4 times .The oral health knowledge and plaque index were evaluated before and 3 months after the intervention .Results Three months after the intervention ,the observation group had significantly higher scores in all dimensions of the oral health knowledge questionnaire and lower dental plaque index ,compared with the control group . Conclusion Community oral health instruction can raise the awareness of oral health among resi-dents and promote their oral hygiene .%目的:观察社区口腔健康教育对居民口腔卫生的影响。方法选取社区居民200例随机将其分为对照组和观察组各100例。对照组在首次免费发放牙刷及牙膏时给予简单讲解刷牙的必要性和正确刷牙的方法;观察组在免费发放牙刷及牙膏同时,举办口腔健康教育讲座和进行4次一对一健康教育会谈。比较2组居民入选时及3个月后口腔卫生知识评分、牙菌斑指数。结果观察组3个月后口腔卫生知识评分高于对照组,牙菌斑指数低于对照组。结论社区口腔健康教育能够有效增强社区居民口腔健康意识,改善居民的口腔卫生状况。

  11. From health situation to health education and health service reforms for Thai society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthongviriyakul, Charnchai; Kessomboon, Pattapong; Sutra, Sumitr

    2012-07-01

    Health problems and service utilization patterns among Thai populations have changed significantly over the past three decades. It is imperative to scrutinize the changes so that the health service and human resource development systems can appropriately respond to the changing health needs. To synthesize critical issues for future planning of health service reforms, medical education reforms and health research for Thai society. The authors analyzed data on health service utilization, types of illnesses and hospital deaths among Thais in the fiscal year 2010. Information on the illnesses of in-/out-patients and hospital deaths was extracted from the three main health insurance schemes providing coverage to 96% of the population. The authors then synthesized the key issues for reforming medical education and health services. In summary, Thai patients have better access to health services. The total number of out-patient visits was 326,230,155 times or 5.23 visits per population. The total number of in-patient admissions was 6,880,815 times or 0.11 admissions per population. The most frequent users were between 40-59 years of age. The most common conditions seen at OPD and IPD and the causes of in-hospital mortality varied between age-groups. The key health issues identified were: psychosocial conditions, health behaviour problems, perinatal complications, congenital malformations, teenage pregnancy, injury, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and neoplasms. Medical education reforms need to be designed in terms of both undergraduate and post-graduate education and/or specialty clinical needs. Health service reforms should be designed in terms of patient care systems, roles of multidisciplinary teams and community involvement. The government and other responsible organizations need to actively respond by designing the health service systems and human resource development systems that are relevant, appropriate and integrated. Different levels of care need to

  12. Role of health education in promoting health in Libya: Evaluation of the existing situation and assessment of future needs

    OpenAIRE

    Elfituri, Abdulbaset Ali

    2000-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University. A variety of programmes of health education are designed, addressing promotion of health of the Libyan community. These programmes employ various communication methods and use different education media. This research is the first to evaluate the national programmes of health education in Libya and to determine future needs. It compares health officials' assessments with those of the gener...

  13. Inlfuence of health education on compliance behavior of elderly patients with diabetes in community%健康教育对社区老年糖尿病患者遵医行为的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高倩谊

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨健康教育对社区老年糖尿病患者遵医行为的影响。方法:200例糖尿病患者均进行健康教育,分析患者干预前后的遵医行为和糖尿病控制情况。结果:健康教育干预后,饮食控制、遵医用药、定期检查、定期检测血糖及合理运动情况均明显改善,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。健康教育干预后,空腹和用餐后2 h血糖、糖化血红蛋白、尿糖及血脂指标均明显改善,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01)。结论:对糖尿病患者开展健康教育能够有效降低并发症的发生率,改善患者血糖指标,提高患者的生活质量。%Objective To explore the effect of health education on compliance behavior of elderly patients with diabetes in community. Methods In 200 patients with diabetes mellitus,were take health education,and analysis of compliance behavior and diabetes mellitus that before and after the intervention of patients.Results After the intervention of health education,diet control,compliance of medication,regular inspections,regular blood glucose and reasonable movement was improved obviously,the difference was statistically significant(P<0.01).After health education intervention,fasting and after meal blood glucose,glycosylated hemoglobin,urine 2H and serum lipid indexes were significantly improved,the differences were statistically significant(P<0.01).Conclusion To carry out health education in diabetic patients,can effectively reduce the incidence of complications,improve glycemic index of patients,improve the quality of life of patients.

  14. Youth, Social Communities and Educational Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canger, Tekla; Larsen, Vibe

    2014-01-01

    Youth and education is becoming an increasingly large part of the debate in Danish media as well as on the political scene. If one wants an acknowledged position in society as well as a job, educa-tion is often the means to achieve this goal. Most of the young people in Denmark finish mandato......-ry schooling and continue on to further education and graduate. However, there is still a group of young people who do not accomplish this satisfactorily, and who are excluded, not only from the educational system, but also from the job market, and are thereby marginalized in society as such. This is one...... of social life, community and on social learning. In this project we are interested in young people who are on the brink of exclusion, and we wish to in-vestigate their situation by concentrating our research on a broader perspective on the youth in question....

  15. The Role of Nurses in Community Awareness and Preventive Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjaneh M. Fooladi

    2015-10-01

    as a theoretical framework within that community should be considered to help explain how communities address adversity.2 In a British study, researchers established the importance of the role of nursing in preventive health when nurses added significant improvement to reduce the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease in middle aged patients. Nurses, compared to other healthcare providers, were able to provide health screening and doubled the recorded blood pressure, quadrupled identification of smoking habit, and increased documented weight related issues by fivefold in a primary care setting.3 Community health nursing theory addresses collective concepts of nursing domains in an attempt to rectify environmental, resiliency, and community abilities for healthcare issues among diverse population and avoids simple groupings of aggregates. Conceptual frameworks are introduced to help urban and rural communities implement preventative measures for health and wellbeing of residents through rural-based community health nursing programs.1,4 With this awareness, Iranian nurses in any practice area will find a golden opportunity to encourage, motivate, inform and guide the public to consider health screening, annual check-ups, childhood and adult immunizations and offer health education to patients across the lifespan. The role of nursing does not begin or end in a hospital-based or clinical facility. It is important to remember “Once a nurse, Always a nurse”, which means a nurse can guide and educate the public every minute and in all places, for the mere fact that medicine does NOT. Community health is a major part of nursing profession as Sarah, who graduated from a baccalaureate nursing program 5 years ago, demonstrates her role as a spiritual journey with a firm belief to bring health awareness through motivation. Her usual day begins by telling a 45 year-old male cashier in a supermarket to go for a prostate cancer screening; a 50 year-old woman sitting in

  16. Promoting health within the community: community therapy as strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Fuentes R

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to identify, by assessing the records of community therapy meetings, the everyday problems that affect communities in order to understand and map the pain and suffering expressed by the participants. Methodology: the records created by the therapists after each meeting were used for data collection. The following two topics were chosen for analysis purposes: the problems that were presented and the ones that were chosen. Likewise, analysis categories were identified based on the frequency with which they were mentioned by the participants. The records of 774 meetings were analyzed. Such meetings took place from August, 2006 to December, 2008. An average of 9 to 20 people attended each meeting. Results: openness, freedom, warmth, and respect were characteristics of these meetings. The most common problems were: domestic violence, sexual abuse, divorce, discrimination, feelings of guilt, abandonment, rage, fear, negligence, problems with children, partners, co-workers or neighbors, losing one’s job, one’s loved ones or one’s material possessions, drug addiction, alcoholism, smoking, etc. Conclusions: community therapy has led not only to identify the people who really are in need of treatment, but also contributed to reduce the demand for the municipality’s health services. Having people meet without judging them by what they say, feel or think makes it easier for them to cope with their suffering and fears. It also creates social support networks, develops better attitudes of solidarity, responsibility and affectiveness, empowers the people and the community, and makes it easier to find better ways of overcoming problems. At the same time, it makes it possible to learn how people live and cope with their daily problems, thus allowing them to reframe these problems, and enabling the development of more effective care.

  17. Dental plaque control effect analysis on community residents by periodic oral health education%阶段性口腔健康教育对社区居民口腔菌斑控制的效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐世平; 葛风华; 张国明

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the dental plaque control effect analysis on community residents by periodic oral health education .Methods Selected 200 cases community residents from January 2013 and January 2014 from Shenzhen baoan district ganoderma lucidum garden community as the observation objects .They were selected from east community and west community ,100 .divided into control group and the observation group according to the geographical position .The con‐trol group east community residents were given collective preach joint promotional material on a regular basis ,the observation group west community residents were given dental plaque control for 6 mouths .The dental plaque clearance and plaque vol‐ume changes before and after intervention of two groups patients were compared .Results Before the intervention , the dental plaque volume of the control group was (2 .78 ± 0 .03) ,the dental plaque volume of the observation group was (2 .86 ± 0 .05 ) ,there was no significantly different (P >0 .05) .After health education ,the dental plaque volume of the observation group was significantly less than that of the control group (2 .01 ± 0 .02)vs(2 .48 ± 0 .04) ,(P<0 .05) .Con‐clusions Periodic oral education can raise residents'awareness of oral object step by step ,with clear plaque skills and quality with quantity can be more clear plaque ,it can ensure people's oral health .%目的:探讨阶段性口腔健康教育对社区居民口腔菌斑控制的效果。方法以2013年1月~2014年1月深圳市宝安区灵芝园社区200名常住居民作为研究对象,人为按地理位置划分为东区和西区,各100名。其中以东区作为对照组,采取常规宣教方法。西区作为观察组,采取为期6个月的阶段性口腔健康教育的方式。比较两组菌斑清除率和干预前后菌斑量的变化。结果干预前对照组口腔菌斑量为(2.78±0.03)分,观察组为(2.86±0.05)分,两组

  18. Integrating Community Health Workers (CHWs) into Health Care Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Julianne; Razi, Sima; Emery, Kyle; Quattrone, Westleigh; Tardif-Douglin, Miriam

    2017-04-08

    Health care organizations increasingly employ community health workers (CHWs) to help address growing provider shortages, improve patient outcomes, and increase access to culturally sensitive care among traditionally inaccessible or disenfranchised patient populations. Scholarly interest in CHWs has grown in recent decades, but researchers tend to focus on how CHWs affect patient outcomes rather than whether and how CHWs fit into the existing health care workforce. This paper focuses on the factors that facilitate and impede the integration of the CHWs into health care organizations, and strategies that organizations and their staff develop to overcome barriers to CHW integration. We use qualitative evaluation data from 13 awardees that received Health Care Innovation Awards from the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Innovation to enhance the quality of health care, improve health outcomes, and reduce the cost of care using programs involving CHWs. We find that organizational capacity, support for CHWs, clarity about health care roles, and clinical workflow drive CHW integration. We conclude with practical recommendations for health care organizations interested in employing CHWs.

  19. Monks' Health: Holistic Health Care Model by Community Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decha Buates

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Monks’ health tended to be a continuous increased problem. They were groups who had limitations to access health services due to their monastic disciplines and their most importance for Buddhist institution. Without urgent solution, their normal way of life would have been affected. Approach: This research aimed to study current conditions and to develop monks’ holistic health care models by community participation in central region of Thailand. The study was a qualitative research conducted in 9 temples; 3 temples in urban area, 3 in semi-urban area and 3 in rural area. Samples were 224 persons; consisted of monks, public health officers from Department of Religious Affairs, local administrative organizations and people; selected by purposive sampling method. Observation form, survey form, interview form, focus group discussion and workshop were used as research tools while data was analyzed by descriptive research. Results: The result founded that in former time culture of monks’ health care was leaned on community, social, culture and tradition. People spoke in style of central Thai language and were in agricultural sector as well as had their belief in merit, sin and elder respect. Relation in communities was in form of generosity and living as similar as relatives. When some monk got sick, they would visit, take care and give foods and medicines. Most of medicines were household remedy and Thai herbal medicine that bought from drug stores in local market or grocery stores in village and monks were sent to hospital in case of severe illness. Temple was a part of community, so they had close relation. Nowadays people increasingly worked in manufactories that caused conflicts and alienations among them. Monks leaned on local markets for receiving foods offering and most of foods were cooked from flour, sugar, coconut milk and fat. These caused three-fourth of monks having chronic disease as diabetes

  20. 社区糖尿病患者的护理干预及健康教育%Nursing intervention and health education of patients with diabetes in community

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪守玉

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the nursing intervention and health education effect of patients with diabetes in community. Methods:196 patients with diabetes were selected.They were randomly divided into the control group and the observation group. The control group was given conventional nursing.The observation group was given community intervention and health education. The blood glucose index, behavior index of two groups were compared before and after intervention.Results:Six months after intervention,the FPG,2 hPG,HbA1c of the observation group were significantly lower than those of the control group(P<0.05).The diet regulation,exercise,prescribed medication,blood glucose detection and other behavior index improvement situation of the observation group were significantly better than those of the control group(P<0.05).Conclusion:Community nursing intervention and health education can effectively control the blood glucose level of patients with diabetes,and the effect is significant.%目的:探讨社区糖尿病患者的护理干预及健康教育效果。方法:收治糖尿病患者196例,随机分为对照组和观察组,对照组给予常规护理,观察组给予社区理干预及健康教育,对比两组患者干预前后血糖指标、行为指标。结果:干预后6个月,观察组FPG、2 hPG、HbA1c均显著低于对照组(P<0.05);观察组饮食调节、运动锻炼、遵医嘱用药、血糖检测等行为指标改善情况均显著优于对照组(P<0.05)。结论:社区护理干预及健康教育可有效控制糖尿病患者血糖水平,效果显著。

  1. Fonoaudiólogo e agente comunitário de saúde: uma experiência educativa Speech-language and hearing pathologist and community health agent: an educative experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liara Saldanha Brites

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Analisar a eficácia de um processo de formação sobre a Fonoaudiologia, desenvolvido com Agentes Comunitários de Saúde, embasado na concepção teórica da educação radical em saúde. MÉTODOS: Inicialmente, uma equipe, composta por cinco agentes comunitários de uma Unidade de Programa de Saúde da Família, foi submetida a uma entrevista coletiva semi-estruturada. Posteriormente, por meio da técnica de grupo focal, foi realizado um processo de educação radical em saúde, perfazendo um total de oito encontros de aproximadamente uma hora e meia cada. Na fase final, o grupo recebeu um exemplar de material informativo escrito sobre Fonoaudiologia, comunicação humana, seus distúrbios e formas de intervenção. RESULTADOS: Durante a entrevista inicial, o grupo demonstrou uma visão predominantemente relacionada a práticas clínicas, de modo especial, em distúrbios da fala e escrita/aprendizagem, surdez e acamados. O processo educativo teve início com a representação do modelo tradicional de educação em saúde e, ao longo dos encontros, com a ampliação do diálogo, assumiu a proposta de modelo radical em saúde, apesar da centralização no modelo de prevenção em saúde. Apenas um agente leu o material escrito. CONCLUSÃO: O processo educativo apresentou-se eficiente para tratar os temas propostos pelo grupo e permitiu o empoderamento no nível individual.PURPOSE: To analyze the efficacy of a formation process regarding Speech-Language and Hearing Sciences developed with Community Health Agents, based on the theoretical concept of radical education in health. METHODS: Initially, a group of five community agents from a Family Health Program Unit was submitted to a semi-structured collective interview. Then, through the focal group technique, a process of radical education in health was carried out, totalizing eight sessions of approximately 90 minutes each. In the final phase, the group received an informative written

  2. The profile of professionals in health and education fields at work in their communities Perfil de profissionais nas áreas de saúde e educação atuando em suas comunidades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Anthony Beinner

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Social roles mold attitudes of actors who play the part in the community, and affect behavioral and moral attitudes and social conscience. There is a diversity of behaviors that demonstrates the extension to which individuals are in constant participation in the community life. A group profile of professional's health and education may supply information on the disciplinary approach in Community Health. Objective: to examine the profile of professionals at work in the Health and Education fields. Subjects participated in answering questions concerning professional work, leisure/religious activities, feeding/sleep habits, prevention and contraceptive methods, medical and/or psychological treatment and medicine/herbal use. Characteristics of the professional group regarding life style and the paradox of the practice of safe sex behavior were recorded. There exists the possibility to improve the quality of life for people in communities by reducing the sources of stress and tension by promoting physical and mental health. Methods should be investigated to allow for the promotion of a quality of life in a small fraction of the population engaged in health and education work in their own communities.Papéis sociais moldam as atitudes dos atores que participam na comunidade e afetam as atitudes comportamentais, morais e a consciência social. Há uma diversidade de comportamentos que demonstra a extensão em que os indivíduos estão em constante participação na vida da comunidade. O perfil de um grupo de profissionais em saúde e educação poderia fornecer informação disciplinar sobre a saúde da comunidade. Objetivo: examinar o perfil de profissionais da saúde e da educação. Os sujeitos participaram respondendo questões sobre trabalho profissional, atividades de lazer e religiosas, hábitos de alimentação e sono, métodos de prevenção e de contracepção, tratamento médico e/ou psicológico e uso de medicamentos/plantas medicinais

  3. Supporting Community-Oriented Educational Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Mabry

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of a federally funded program to develop and implement community-oriented social studies curricula and curriculum-based assessments grounds cautions for educational change initiatives. In this case, despite the project director's stated intent to support teachers' desire for instruction regarding local culture and history, top-down support for classroom-level change evidenced insensitivity. Production and implementation of the planned curricula and assessments was obstructed by teacher's lack of cultural identification with the targeted community groups, workload, competing instructional priorities, inadequate communication, and organizational politics. Professional development was sometimes beneficial but more often ineffective—either perfunctory, unnecessary, or disregarded. The findings offer insight regarding educational change and a systemic analysis.

  4. Methopedia - Pedagogical Design Community for European Educators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Niemczik, Christian; Brenstein, Elke

    2009-01-01

    The paper will discuss theoretical, methodological and technical aspects of the community based Methopedia wiki (www.methopedia.eu), which has been developed as a part of the EU-funded collaborative research project “Community of Integrated Blended Learning in Europe” (COMBLE; www.......comble-project.eu). Methopedia is a wiki and social community aimed at facilitating knowledge transfer between trainers/educators from different institutions or countries through interactive peer-to-peer support, and sharing of learning practices.   We describe how Methopedia has been developed though engaging practitioners...... informed the practical design and theoretical issues regarding the design of Methopedia. The workshops have led to redesigns and also a number of important issues and problems have emerged. In the paper, we therefore present and discuss the socio-technical design of Methopedia, which is based on open...

  5. Evaluating community-based participatory research to improve community-partnered science and community health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Sarah; Duran, Bonnie; Wallerstein, Nina; Avila, Magdalena; Belone, Lorenda; Lucero, Julie; Magarati, Maya; Mainer, Elana; Martin, Diane; Muhammad, Michael; Oetzel, John; Pearson, Cynthia; Sahota, Puneet; Simonds, Vanessa; Sussman, Andrew; Tafoya, Greg; Hat, Emily White

    2012-01-01

    Since 2007, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) Policy Research Center (PRC) has partnered with the Universities of New Mexico and Washington to study the science of community-based participatory research (CBPR). Our goal is to identify facilitators and barriers to effective community-academic partnerships in American Indian and other communities, which face health disparities. We have described herein the scientific design of our National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded study (2009-2013) and lessons learned by having a strong community partner leading the research efforts. The research team is implementing a mixed-methods study involving a survey of principal investigators (PIs) and partners across the nation and in-depth case studies of CBPR projects. We present preliminary findings on methods and measures for community-engaged research and eight lessons learned thus far regarding partnership evaluation, advisory councils, historical trust, research capacity development of community partner, advocacy, honoring each other, messaging, and funding. Study methodologies and lessons learned can help community-academic research partnerships translate research in communities.

  6. Barriers of Reproductive Health Education in Schools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tahereh Kamalikhah; Fatemeh Rahmati-Najarkolaei; Masoud Karimi

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to explore the barriers on reproductive health education and prospects among teachers and students in the Zahedan city related to reproductive health education at schools...

  7. Women's empowerment in rural China: the impact of community health workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Amy; Factor, Dawn; Deutsch, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Surmang Foundation's Clinic is located in Qinghai Province, Yushu Prefecture, Xiao Surmang Township, China. It is a remote, 97 percent ethnic Tibetan, mountainous region with little access to organized health care services. Surmang Foundation, a US 501(c)3 charity, has organized a cadre of local women to provide community-based care and education to women, resulting in a notable reduction in maternal mortality based on the report of community members. A festival organized to celebrate the accomplishments of the community health workers provided an opportunity for the women to demonstrate how their roles benefit themselves and their community. Both health care services and support for community empowerment are provided through the community health worker model. © 2013 AWHONN.

  8. Long-term employment and health inequalities in Canadian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Jalil

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the long-term unemployment rate and various health outcomes across Canadian communities to estimate employment-related health inequalities in these communities. The study uses cross-sectional community-level health data along with data on the long-term employment rate for various communities across Canada to quantify health inequalities among these communities. The health outcomes that are considered in this study include total and disease specific mortality rates; health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, injuries, and self rated health; and life expectancies at birth and at age 65. Health inequalities are estimated using the concentration index, which is used to measure health inequalities along socioeconomic dimensions. The concentration index is estimated by a regression of weighted relative health (ill health) over weighted cumulative relative rank of the populations. All the estimates are provided separately for males and females. The findings of the study support the existence of inequalities in community health outcomes as related to the long-term employment rates in those communities. Communities with lower long term employment rates (higher unemployment rates) have poorer health outcomes in terms of higher mortality rates, worse health conditions, and shorter life expectancies. Health inequalities related to long-term employment have important policy implications. They call for policies that would increase and maintain long term employment rates as part of a broader socioeconomic approach to health. Long term employment ensures income security and prevents the psychosocial experiences leading to mental and physical ill health.

  9. Health Extension and Clinical and Translational Science: An Innovative Strategy for Community Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Arthur; Rhyne, Robert L; Anastasoff, Juliana; Ronquillo, Francisco; Nixon, Marnie; Mishra, Shiraz; Poola, Charlene; Page-Reeves, Janet; Nkouaga, Carolina; Cordova, Carla; Larson, Richard S

    Health Extension Regional Officers (HEROs) through the University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center (UNMHSC) help to facilitate university-community engagement throughout New Mexico. HEROs, based in communities across the state, link priority community health needs with university resources in education, service, and research. Researchers' studies are usually aligned with federal funding priorities rather than with health priorities expressed by communities. To help overcome this misalignment, the UNM Clinical and Translational Science Center (CTSC) provides partial funding for HEROs to bridge the divide between research priorities of UNMHSC and health priorities of the state's communities. A bidirectional partnership between HEROs and CTSC researchers was established, which led to: 1) increased community engaged studies through the CTSC, 2) the HERO model itself as a subject of research, 3) a HERO-driven increase in local capacity in scholarship and grant writing, and 4) development of training modules for investigators and community stakeholders on community-engaged research. As a result, 5 grants were submitted, 4 of which were funded, totaling $7,409,002.00, and 3 research articles were published. Health extension can serve as a university-funded, community-based bridge between community health needs and Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) research capacity, opening avenues for translational research. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  10. Surgical education and the theoretical concept of communities of practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra Nestel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgical practice is largely learned in the workplace. Changes in health services and education provision have seen a shift from traditional apprenticeship-type learning to competency-based curricula with the workplace remaining the principal site for learning. Sociocultural learning theories offer valuable lenses through which to observe, design for, and analyze workplace-based learning. In this paper, we consider the theoretical concept of communities of practice in surgery. We describe notions of legitimate peripheral participation and development of professional identity. We highlight the benefits that communities of practice bring to surgical training, as well as the limitations. By understanding community of practice theory as applied to the surgical workplace and the factors that both drive and impede its development, surgical trainers may improve the learning environment, enhancing the attainment of competencies by surgical trainees.

  11. Assessing community perspectives of the community based education and service model at Makerere University, Uganda: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbalinda, Scovia N; Plover, Colin M; Burnham, Gilbert; Kaye, Dan; Mwanika, Andrew; Oria, Hussein; Okullo, Isaac; Muhwezi, Wilson; Groves, Sara

    2011-03-09

    Community partnerships are defined as groups working together with shared goals, responsibilities, and power to improve the community. There is growing evidence that these partnerships contribute to the success and sustainability of community-based education and service programs (COBES), facilitating change in community actions and attitudes. Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) is forging itself as a transformational institution in Uganda and the region. The College is motivated to improve the health of Ugandans through innovative responsive teaching, provision of service, and community partnerships. Evaluating the COBES program from the community perspective can assist the College in refining an innovative and useful model that has potential to improve the health of Ugandans. A stratified random sample of 11 COBES sites was selected to examine the community's perception of the program. Key Informant Interviews of 11 site tutors and 33 community members were completed. The data was manually analyzed and themes developed. Communities stated the students consistently engaged with them with culturally appropriate behaviour. They rated the student's communication as very good even though translators were frequently needed. Half the community stated they received some feedback from the students, but some communities interpreted any contact after the initial visit as feedback. Communities confirmed and appreciated that the students provided a number of interventions and saw positive changes in health and health seeking behaviours. The community reflected that some programs were more sustainable than others; the projects that needed money to implement were least sustainable. The major challenges from the community included community fatigue, and poor motivation of community leaders to continue to take students without compensation. Communities hosting Makerere students valued the students' interventions and the COBES model. They reported witnessing

  12. Population Health Science: A Core Element of Health Science Education in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiatt, Robert A; Engmann, Natalie J; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Amarsi, Yasmin; Macharia, William M; Macfarlane, Sarah B; Ngugi, Anthony K; Rabbani, Fauziah; Walraven, Gijs; Armstrong, Robert W

    2017-04-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa suffers an inordinate burden of disease and does not have the numbers of suitably trained health care workers to address this challenge. New concepts in health sciences education are needed to offer alternatives to current training approaches.A perspective of integrated training in population health for undergraduate medical and nursing education is advanced, rather than continuing to take separate approaches for clinical and public health education. Population health science educates students in the social and environmental origins of disease, thus complementing disease-specific training and providing opportunities for learners to take the perspective of the community as a critical part of their education.Many of the recent initiatives in health science education in sub-Saharan Africa are reviewed, and two case studies of innovative change in undergraduate medical education are presented that begin to incorporate such population health thinking. The focus is on East Africa, one of the most rapidly growing economies in sub-Saharan Africa where opportunities for change in health science education are opening. The authors conclude that a focus on population health is a timely and effective way for enhancing training of health care professionals to reduce the burden of disease in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. Outcome evaluation of community health promotion intervention within a donor funded project climate in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwell, H E; Barclay, L

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) funded Women and Children's Health Project sought to improve the health of women and children throughout Papua New Guinea between 1998 and 2004. The project utilised education, community development and health promotion interventions aimed to increase community support for the health of women and children. An outcome evaluation in 2006 investigated the long-term impact of the project using a multi-methods approach and covering 10 selectively sampled provinces, 19 districts and 93 communities. Qualitative data were collected from 175 interviews (national to village level) and 77 community discussions. Quantitative data from national, provincial and district levels were examined to attempt to validate findings. The evaluation found new-health-knowledge initiated changes to lifestyle practices and improved physical health and social and economic well-being in villages where volunteers and staff had been trained. Factors influencing success were a health-motivated person acting as a catalyst for change, empowered leadership through new community governance structures, effective visual tools and village health volunteers linking community and rural health workers. Failure was attributed to poor understanding of community development, limited information sharing, a 'top down' approach to community development and weak community leadership. The project's community health interventions improved the interaction between the community and health system, and influenced improved use of maternal and child health services. Evaluation suggests sustainable improvements in health can be achieved through community led and maintained activity.

  14. Community health needs assessment with precede-proceed model: a mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community health services in China have developed over the last few decades. In order to use limited health resources more effectively, we conducted a community health needs assessment. This aimed to provide an understanding of the community's health problems and the range of potential factors affecting risk behaviours for the priority health problems. Methods We used the precede-proceed model for the needs assessment. Triangulation of data, methods and researchers were employed in data collection. Results Main findings include: cardiovascular diseases (CVDs were identified as the priority health problems in the study communities; risk factors associated with CVDs included smoking, physical inactivity and unhealthy eating behaviours, particularly amongst male residents with low education level; factors negatively affecting behaviours were classified into predisposing factors (limited knowledge, beliefs and lack of perceived needs, enabling factors (limited access to health promotion activities, unawareness of health promotion, lack of work-site and school health promotion, absence of health promotion related policy and reinforcing factors (culture. Policies and organization were not perfect; there were limited staff skilled in providing health promotion in the community. Conclusion CVDs were identified by the communities as priority health problems. Future health programs should focus on smoking, physical inactivity and unhealthy eating behaviours. Behaviour change strategies should take predisposing factors, enabling factors and reinforcing factors into consideration. Policies, organization and human resource need strengthening.

  15. Community mental health nurses' perspectives of recovery-oriented practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, J; Marshall-Lucette, S

    2012-05-01

    Recovery-oriented practice, an approach aligned towards the service user perspective, has dominated the mental health care arena. Numerous studies have explored service users' accounts of the purpose, meaning and importance of 'recovery'; however, far less is known about healthcare staff confidence in its application to care delivery. A self-efficacy questionnaire and content analysis of nursing course documents were used to investigate a cohort of community mental health nurses' recovery-oriented practice and to determine the extent to which the current continuing professional development curriculum met their educational needs in this regard. Twenty-three community mental health nurses completed a self-efficacy questionnaire and 28 course documents were analysed. The findings revealed high levels of nurses' confidence in their understanding and ability to apply the recovery model and low levels of confidence were found in areas of social inclusion. The content analysis found only one course document that used the whole term 'recovery model'. The findings suggest a gap in the nurses' perceived ability and confidence in recovery-oriented practice with what is taught academically. Hence, nursing education needs to be more explicitly focused on the recovery model and its application to care delivery.

  16. Effect Evaluation of Community Health Education for Children with Float-ing Population%社区健康教育对流动人口儿童计划免疫的干预效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王庆冬

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of community health education on the intervention of the mobile children's im-munization program. Methods 124 children aged 22~45 years old were selected as the intervention objects, and the rate of knowledge about the prevention and the qualified rate among the 124 children in the community, and 112 0~7 years old. Results Before health education intervention, the awareness rate of parents for preventive inoculation knowledge was signifi-cantly lower than that of the intervention, the qualified rate of parents to children in the program were significantly higher than that in children with five seedlings, and the number of children vaccinated with P was significantly higher than that in the intervention group (P<0.05). Conclusion Community health education applied to the floating population community, can effectively improve the children's parents to prevent the knowledge of vaccination, increase the popularity of children vacci-nated five seedlings, reduce the health risks of children in the floating population community.%目的 观察社区健康教育对流动儿童计划免疫的干预效果. 方法 选取一个流动人口较为集中的社区中124名22~45岁的儿童家长作为干预对象,分别对其进行预防接种知识的普及,在干预的前后调查对比这124名家长对预防接种知识的知晓率和对儿童计划内接种五苗的合格率;同时选取该社区中112名0~7岁的儿童进行干预前后的计划免疫接种情况调查. 结果 在进行健康教育干预前,家长对于预防接种知识的知晓率明显低于干预后的知晓率,两者间对比明显,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);家长对儿童计划内接种五苗的合格率在接受干预后也有了明显的提升,前后对比差异明显,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);在对儿童的计划疫苗接种情况的调查中,接受干预后,儿童接种各项疫苗的数量明显高于干预前的接种量,前

  17. Community health workers support community-based participatory research ethics: lessons learned along the research-to-practice-to-community continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Selina A; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2012-11-01

    Ethical principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR)--specifically, community engagement, mutual learning, action-reflection, and commitment to sustainability--stem from the work of Kurt Lewin and Paulo Freire. These are particularly relevant in cancer disparities research because vulnerable populations are often construed to be powerless, supposedly benefiting from programs over which they have no control. The long history of exploiting minority individuals and communities for research purposes (the U.S. Public Health Service Tuskegee Syphilis Study being the most notorious) has left a legacy of mistrust of research and researchers. The purpose of this article is to examine experiences and lessons learned from community health workers (CHWs) in the 10-year translation of an educational intervention in the research-to-practice-to-community continuum. We conclude that the central role played by CHWs enabled the community to gain some degree of control over the intervention and its delivery, thus operationalizing the ethical principles of CBPR.

  18. Distance Education: A New Paradigm for Physical Education and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Danny R.

    Increasingly, limited financial resources have resulted in program reductions in undergraduate physical education and health education at several higher education institutions. As traditional methods of program delivery are phased out, physical and health educators need to consider alternative forms of training and servicing future professionals.…

  19. Empowerment Education: Freire's Ideas Adapted to Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Nina; Bernstein, Edward

    1988-01-01

    This article contains three sections: (1) a literature review demonstrating that powerlessness is linked to disease and empowerment to health; (2) an exposition of Brazilian educator Paulo Freire's empowering education theory with a comparison to traditional health education; and (3) a case study of an empowering education substance abuse…

  20. Introducing HEAL: The Health Education Assets Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candler, Chris S.; Uijtdehaage, Sebastian H. J.; Dennis, Sharon E.

    2003-01-01

    Describes the development of a new Health Education Assets Library (HEAL), a freely accessible, national library of high-quality digital multimedia to support all levels of health sciences education. HEAL's primary mission is to provide educators with high-quality and free multimedia materials (such as images and videos) to augment health science…

  1. Indexing: Its Importance in Health Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Stephen M.; Laflin, Molly T.; Nims, Julia K.

    1999-01-01

    Investigated how health educators could improve literature searches and increase the accessibility of their research to others. A frequency count of databases indexed 84 health education journals and analyzed the 16 top indexes for journal coverage. Results indicated that selecting the appropriate indexes can help health educators more effectively…

  2. A Researcher's Guide to Health Education Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflin, Molly T.; Horowitz, Stephen M.; Nims, Julia K.

    1999-01-01

    Developed a tool to help health-education researchers match manuscript submissions with the most appropriate journals. The Delphi method was used to elicit information from health-education leaders/scholars on primary content areas in health education, preeminent journals, and information about the journals. The results include nine categories and…

  3. Health and Nutrition: Preconditions for Educational Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negussie, Birgit

    This paper discusses the importance of maternal and infant health for children's educational achievement. Education, health, and nutrition are so closely related that changes in one causes changes in the others. Improvement of maternal and preschooler health and nutrition is a precondition for improved educational achievement. Although parental…

  4. Critical service learning in community health nursing: enhancing access to cardiac health screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Angela; Mac Lellan, Marian A

    2013-04-23

    Critical service learning (CSL) offers promise for preparing community health nursing students to be advocates for social justice and social change. The purpose of this article is to describe a community based CSL project designed to provide cardiac health screening to an underserviced population, wherein nursing's role in social justice is integrated into nursing practice. First, the relationship between social justice and CSL is explored. Then, the CSL approach is examined and differentiated from the traditional service learning models frequently observed in the nursing curriculum. The CSL project is described and the learning requisites, objectives, requirements, and project outcomes are outlined. While not a panacea for system reform, CSL offers nursing students avenues for learning about social justice and understanding the social conditions that underlie health inequalities. Nurse educators may benefit from the new strategies for incorporating social justice into nursing curriculum; this paper suggests that CSL offers one possibility.

  5. Australian rural, remote and urban community nurses' health promotion role and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roden, Janet; Jarvis, Lynda; Campbell-Crofts, Sandra; Whitehead, Dean

    2016-09-01

    Community nurses have often been 'touted' as potential major contributors to health promotion. Critical literature, however, often states that this has not been the case. Furthermore, most studies examining nurses' role and function have occurred mainly in hospital settings. This is a sequential mixed-methods study of two groups of community nurses from a Sydney urban area (n = 100) and from rural and remote areas (n = 49) within New South Wales, Australia. A piloted questionnaire survey was developed based on the five action areas of the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion. Following this, 10 qualitative interviews were conducted for both groups, plus a focus group to support or refute survey results. Findings showed that rural and remote nurses had more positive attitudes towards health promotion and its clinical implementation. Survey and interview data confirmed that urban community nurses had a narrower focus on caring for individuals rather than groups, agreeing that time constraints impacted on their limited health promotion role. There was agreement about lack of resources (material and people) to update health promotion knowledge and skills. Rural and remote nurses were more likely to have limited educational opportunities. All nurses undertook more development of personal skills (DPS, health education) than any other action area. The findings highlight the need for more education and resources for community nurses to assist their understanding of health promotion concepts. It is hoped that community nurse leaders will collectively become more effective health promoters and contribute to healthy reform in primary health care sectors.

  6. Assessing community perspectives of the community based education and service model at Makerere University, Uganda: a qualitative evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okullo Isaac

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community partnerships are defined as groups working together with shared goals, responsibilities, and power to improve the community. There is growing evidence that these partnerships contribute to the success and sustainability of community-based education and service programs (COBES, facilitating change in community actions and attitudes. Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS is forging itself as a transformational institution in Uganda and the region. The College is motivated to improve the health of Ugandans through innovative responsive teaching, provision of service, and community partnerships. Evaluating the COBES program from the community perspective can assist the College in refining an innovative and useful model that has potential to improve the health of Ugandans. Methods A stratified random sample of 11 COBES sites was selected to examine the community’s perception of the program. Key Informant Interviews of 11 site tutors and 33 community members were completed. The data was manually analyzed and themes developed. Results Communities stated the students consistently engaged with them with culturally appropriate behaviour. They rated the student’s communication as very good even though translators were frequently needed. Half the community stated they received some feedback from the students, but some communities interpreted any contact after the initial visit as feedback. Communities confirmed and appreciated that the students provided a number of interventions and saw positive changes in health and health seeking behaviours. The community reflected that some programs were more sustainable than others; the projects that needed money to implement were least sustainable. The major challenges from the community included community fatigue, and poor motivation of community leaders to continue to take students without compensation. Conclusions Communities hosting Makerere students valued the

  7. Evaluation of community health education intervention on patients with osteoporosis%社区健康教育干预对骨质疏松症患者的效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘艳

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨社区健康教育干预对骨质疏松患者的影响和效果.方法:收治骨质疏松症患者300例,将其分为两组各150例,对照组给予常规口服补钙治疗,干预组除了常规口服补钙,还给予饮食、运动等干预,观察、分析两组患者的骨密度数据变化.结果:干预后患者在准确服药、合理饮食、运动和骨密度数据T值等方面都得到了明显改善(P<0.05).结论:社区健康教育干预对于骨质疏松症患者具有良好的效果和积极的意义.%Objective:To investigate the impact of community health education intervention on patients with osteoporosis and its effect.Methods:300 patients with osteoporosis were selected,they were divided into the two groups with 150 cases in each,patients in the control group were given conventional oral calcium treatment,while in the experimental group were treated with diet, exercises and other interventions,in addition to conventional oral calcium,then observed and analyzed the changes of bone mineral density(BMD) in patients of the two groups.Results:After the intervention,the accurate medication,reasonable diet,exercise and bone mineral density data T value of patients in the two groups were improved significantly(P<0.05).Conclusion:Community health education intervention has good effect on patients with osteoporosis,and also has positive significance.

  8. The cataloging of virtual communities of educational thematic

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    Roman Korzh; Andriy Peleschyshyn; Yuriy Syerov; Solomia Fedushko

    2014-01-01

    This article considers the current problem of investigation the specific of specialized catalog of educational virtual communities. Peculiarities of catalogs of virtual communities are formed. This study provides a method of organization of catalog of virtual communities of educational direction. This method is based on a formal model of virtual communities as an environment of information activity of the higher educational institutions. The result of the research is the method of socio-demog...

  9. Community matters - why outbreak responses need to integrate health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickbusch, Ilona; Reddy, K Srikanth

    2016-03-01

    Communities are characterized by common interests, common ecology, and common social system or structure. These characteristics, qualities, and processes involved in the community affect both health behaviors and health outcomes during disease outbreaks. Hence, health promotion theorists and practitioners emphasize working 'with' rather than 'on' communities. They believe health promotion, with all its experiences in community mobilization, empowerment, and health literacy programs, should be part of disease prevention and control efforts from the very beginning. Health promotion knowledge needs to be fully integrated into infectious disease control, especially in the context of outbreaks.

  10. Community participation in primary health care projects of the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme

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    M. Barker

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available After numerous teething problems (1974-1994, the Department of Nursing Education of WITS University took responsibility for the Muldersdrift Health and Development Programme (MHDP. The nursing science students explored and implemented an empowerment approach to community participation. The students worked with MHDP health workers to improve health through community participation, in combination with primary health care (PHC activities and the involvement of a variety of community groups. As the PHC projects evolved overtime, the need arose to evaluate the level of community participation and how much community ownership was present over decision-making and resources. This led to the question “What was the level of community participation in PHC projects of the MHDP?” Based on the question the following objectives were set, i.e. i to evaluate the community participation in PHC initiatives; ii to provide the project partners with motivational affirmation on the level of community participation criteria thus far achieved; iii to indicate to participants the mechanisms that should still be implemented if they wanted to advance to higher levels of community participation; iv to evaluate the MHDP’s implementation of a people-centred approach to community participation in PHC; and v the evaluation of the level of community participation in PHC projects in the MHDP. An evaluative, descriptive, contextual and quantitative research design was used. Ethical standards were adhered to throughout the study. The MHDP had a study population of twentythree (N=23 PHC projects. A purposive sample of seven PHC initiatives was chosen according to specific selection criteria and evaluated according to the “Criteria to evaluate community participation in PHC projects” instrument (a quantitative tool. Structured group interviews were done with PHC projects’ executive committee members. The Joint Management Committee’s data was collected through mailed

  11. Analysis of Effect of Health Education on the Management of Community Diabetes Patients%健康教育对社区糖尿病患者管理的影响分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑云

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of health education on the management of community diabetes patients. Methods 96 cases of diabetes patients in some community from January 2014 to January 2016 were selected and randomly divided into two groups with 48 cases in each, the control group adopted the routine education, the research group adopted the sys-tematical diabetes health education, and the management effect of the two groups was compared. Results The proportion of patients mastering the diabetes knowledge, medication knowledge, health dieting, moderate exercise and quitting smoking-limited wine in the research group was higher than that in the control group, and the difference had statistical significance by comparison, P<0.05, the good rates of blood sugar control and glycosylated hemoglobin control were respectively 81.3%and 64.6%, which were obviously higher than those in the control group, and the differences between the two groups had statistical significance by comparison, P<0.05. Conclusion Health education in the management of community diabetes pa-tients can make patients master more diabetes knowledge and health behavior, and more effectively control blood sugar at the same time, which is worth promotion.%目的:探讨健康教育对社区糖尿病患者管理的影响。方法将2014年1月—2016年1月某社区的糖尿病患者人,共96例,采用数字随机法分为对照组和研究组,每组均为48例,对照组患者采用常规教育,研究组患者采用系统的糖尿病健康教育,比较两组患者的管理效果。结果研究组掌握糖尿病知识﹑掌握用药知识﹑健康饮食﹑适量运动以及戒烟限酒的比例均高于对照组,组间比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05);研究组的血糖控制良好率和糖化血红蛋白控制良好率分别为81.3%和64.6%,均明显高于对照组,组间比较差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论健康教育用于社区糖尿病患者管理中,可以

  12. Service-Learning through Partnership with a Community High School: Impact on Minority Health Science Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Suha M.; Hamed, Kastro M.

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning has been used to integrate an educational experience with community outreach, particularly among underserved populations. In this study, college students enrolled in a health science major were engaged in an educational outreach initiative with a group of students from a high school with a predominantly minority population. The…

  13. Medical Simulation in the Community College Health Science Curriculum: A Matrix for Future Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Michael P.; Starobin, Soko S.; Laanan, Frankie Santos

    2010-01-01

    As the nation's healthcare education system struggles to keep pace with the demand for its services, educators are seeking creative and innovative solutions to meet the needs of a growing number of students. The integration of medical simulation technology into the community college health science curriculum is a creative solution that can meet…

  14. Does "community social capital" contribute to population health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folland, Sherman

    2007-06-01

    Robert Putnam showed that a social capital index, created as a weighted sum of 14 variables chosen to describe the civic degree of sociability and community mindedness, is correlated with many community outcomes, such as education, child well-being, crime, and the total mortality rate. Although correlation does not establish causation, we can find that in a large number of studies this index, a selection of its elements, or similar measures register as significantly correlated with health variables, virtually always in a direction consistent with the hypothesis that social capital improves health. The potential benefit of this relationship is substantial, especially if it proves to be robust to differences in time and place, statistical contexts, and ultimately if the relation can be supported to be causal. This paper subjects the social capital and health hypothesis to an expanded set of rigorous tests, which, by surviving, it becomes stronger or, by failing, its weaknesses are better revealed. The paper seeks to extend this body of research by a combination of study characteristics that are each relatively unusual in social capital and health research. Though causality cannot be established by these tests, the work shows that the association of social capital with health is quite robust when challenged in the following ways: (1) seven different health measures are studied, including five mortality rates; (2) the 48 contiguous states are observed at six points in time covering the years from 1978 to 1998 over four year intervals, thus forming a panel; (3) the multivariate tests feature economic variables from the production of health literature; and (4) a statistical method (instrumental variables) is applied to account for the possibility that omitted variables are confounding the social capital estimates. The results and the discussion find cases for which the social capital and health hypothesis performs only weakly, but, on the whole, the hypothesis is

  15. Training for impact: the socio-economic impact of a fit for purpose health workforce on communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pálsdóttir, Björg; Barry, Jean; Bruno, Andreia; Barr, Hugh; Clithero, Amy; Cobb, Nadia; De Maeseneer, Jan; Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie; Neusy, André-Jacques; Reeves, Scott; Strasser, Roger; Worley, Paul

    2016-08-15

    Across the globe, a "fit for purpose" health professional workforce is needed to meet health needs and challenges while capitalizing on existing resources and strengths of communities. However, the socio-economic impact of educating and deploying a fit for purpose health workforce can be challenging to evaluate. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of six promising strategies and interventions that provide context-relevant health professional education within the health system. The strategies focused on in the paper are:1. Distributed community-engaged learning: Education occurs in or near underserved communities using a variety of educational modalities including distance learning. Communities served provide input into and actively participate in the education process.2. Curriculum aligned with health needs: The health and social needs of targeted communities guide education, research and service programmes.3. Fit for purpose workers: Education and career tracks are designed to meet the needs of the communities served. This includes cadres such as community health workers, accelerated medically trained clinicians and extended generalists.4. Gender and social empowerment: Ensuring a diverse workforce that includes women having equal opportunity in education and are supported in their delivery of health services.5. Interprofessional training: Teaching the knowledge, skills and attitudes for working in effective teams across professions.6. South-south and north-south partnerships: Sharing of best practices and resources within and between countries.In sum, the sharing of resources, the development of a diverse and interprofessional workforce, the advancement of primary care and a strong community focus all contribute to a world where transformational education improves community health and maximizes the social and economic return on investment.

  16. PERCEPTION OF AGENTS ABOUT COMMUNITY HEALTH MEN'S HEALTH IN NORTHERN JUAZEIRO-EC

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    Grayce Alencar Albuquerque

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to understand the perception of Community Health Agents (ACS on the health of man. Methods: This was an exploratory research, descriptive and qualitative approach with ACS's the city of Juazeiro do Norte - Ceará. Results: Data were grouped into categories and subcategories, where he observed that the ACS's still has a woman as the main focus of care and that the male population is not addressed routinely by the refusal of such information, the work, the macho culture and hours of operation of health facilities. However, the ACS's develop health education at home, hosting and search active at different times. Conclusions: It is assumed then, the importance of the ACS approach to articulate practices of prevention, promotion and support men's health.

  17. Organization of school health education in obesity in children

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    Joanna Woźniak-Holecka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal body weight poses a risk of the development of various health disorders, having a negative impact on the quality and length of life. The prevalence of overweight and obesity among European children is estimated to be 10–20%. In Poland this figure reaches 18%. A war on the epidemic obesity waged from the youngest age of the child is a strategy that brings long-term health benefits for the entire population. Apart from the family, the school is the second important educational environment responsible for conducting health education activities among children and teenagers. School health education programs should be implementing by teachers in collaboration with other school staff, parents and the broadly understood local community. Comprehensive health education aiming at combating obesity should cover the entire population of school children and teenagers, with special attention given to high risk groups. The school, undertaking health education activities aimed at preventing abnormal body weight, should implement nationwide programs for the prevention of obesity, and should also pursue its own health education program based on its curriculum. In most cases, development of obesity at children results from improper eating habits and insufficient physical activity, and therefore school health education programs aimed at the prevention of overweight and obesity should focus on these two most important modifiable risk factors of abnormal body weight.

  18. 健康教育与模拟训练预防社区儿童意外伤害研究%Prevention of unintended injuries of children in the community through health education and simulation training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖雪梅; 杨昌志; 钱笑菲

    2011-01-01

    Objective To probe into measures which help prevent unintended injuries of children in community, to improve care givers' safety-keeping awareness, knowledge level and first-aid skills, and to reduce incidence of child injury. Methods A total of 40 children and their care givers were recruited into the study. They were divided into 2 groups according children's ages ( 0-3 age group and 4-5 age group). Community healthcare providers gave education to the participants through lectures, case analysis, video playing, animation watching, etc. Simulation training included a variety of first-aid methods and simulation games. Results The rates of care givers'mastery of knowledge and skills about dealing with unintended injuries, and the incidence of unintended injuries of children in the community, were significantly different before and after intervention (P< 0. 05, P<0. 01). Conclusion Through health education and simulation training in the community, care givers have higher level of knowledge and skills about dealing with unintended injuries. Therefore, unintended injuries of children in the community are reduced.%目的 探讨预防社区儿童意外伤害的健康教育与模拟训练方法,提高家长的防护意识、知识及技能,降低儿童意外伤害的发生率.方法 对40名儿童及其家长按0~3岁组,4~5岁组分组进行健康教育,包括专题讲座,实际案例、录像、动画片等;模拟训练包括各种急救法的训练,模拟游戏等.结果 干预前后儿童家长意外伤害知识与技能掌握率、社区儿童意外伤害发生率比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05,P<0.01).结论 在社区开展健康教育和模拟训练,可提高社区儿童家长意外伤害知识与技能掌握程度,防止社区儿童意外伤害的发生.

  19. Global health education consortium: 20 years of leadership in global health and global health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velji, Anvar

    2011-06-01

    The Global Health Education Consortium (GHEC) is a group of universities and institutions committed to improving the health and human rights of underserved populations worldwide through improved education and training of the global health workforce. In the early 1990s, GHEC brought together many of the global health programs in North America to improve competencies and curricula in global health as well as to involve member institutions in health policy, development issues, and delivery of care in the inner cities, marginalized areas, and abroad.

  20. Trust the process: community health psychology after Occupy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Flora; Montenegro, Cristian; van Reisen, Kirsten; Zaka, Flavia; Sevitt, James

    2014-01-01

    This article argues that community health psychology's core strategy of 'community mobilisation' is in need of renewal and proposes a new way of conceptualising community health action. Taking the Occupy movement as an example, we critique modernist understandings of community mobilisation, which are based on instrumental action in the service of a predetermined goal. Aiming to re-invigorate the 'process' tradition of community health psychology, we explore possibilities of an open-ended, anti-hierarchical and inclusive mode of community action, which we label 'trusting the process'. The gains to be made are unpredictable, but we suggest that the risk is worth taking.