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Sample records for community development corporation

  1. Community Entrepreneurship in Deprived Neighbourhoods: Comparing UK Community Enterprises with US Community Development Corporations (discussion paper)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varady, D.P.; Kleinhans, R.J.; Van Ham, M.

    2015-01-01

    Through a review of the recent American community development literature, this paper tests the assertion that British community enterprises (CEs) are fundamentally similar to American community development corporations (CDCs), and therefore, that CEs can learn from CDCs. In the context of the curren

  2. West Angeles Community Development Corporation final technical report on export market feasibility planning and research for the solar medical autoclave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, G.D.

    1998-04-20

    This report summarizes core findings from an investigation performed by the staff of West Angeles Community Development Corporation (CDC) regarding the feasibility of marketing the Solar Medical Autoclave (``autoclave``) in South Africa. The investigation was completed during 1997, the period prescribed by the Grant Award made by the U.S. Department of Energy on January 1, 1997, and was monitored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  3. Corporate social responsibility along pipelines: communities and corporations working together

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Edison D.R.; Lopes, Luciano E.; Danciguer, Lucilene; Macarini, Samuel; Souza, Maira de [Grupo de Aplicacao Interdisciplinar a Aprendizagem (GAIA), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we present GAIA's findings in three corporate social responsibility projects along pipelines owned by three Brazilian companies in gas, oil and mining sectors. The projects had as the main goal to improve the relationship with communities in the companies' direct influence areas. Clearly, the relationship with communities along pipelines is essential to prevent and reduce industrial hazards. The damage in pipelines due to agriculture, buildings, intentional perforations and traffic of heavy vehicles may cause fatal accidents, environmental and material losses. Such accidents have negative consequences with regard to economy, image and relationship with communities and environmental agencies. From communities' perspective, pipelines deteriorate their life quality due to risk of industrial hazards nearby their houses. The lack of proper information about the pipelines remarkably increases insecurity feelings and discourses against the companies among community leaders. The methodology developed by GAIA comprises companies' and communities' interests and encompasses nine stages. 1. Socio-environmental appraisal or inventory, mapping main risks, communities' needs and their leaders. 2. Communication plan, defining strategies, languages and communication vehicles for each stakeholder group. 3. Inter-institutional meetings to include other institutions in the program. 4. Launching seminar in partnership with local authorities, divulging companies' actions in the cities with pipelines. 5. Multiplier agents formation, enabling teachers, local leaders and government representatives to disseminate correct information about the pipelines such as their functioning, hazard prevention, maintenance actions, and restrictions of activities over the pipelines. 6. Formation on project management, enabling teachers, local leaders and government representatives to elaborate, fund raise and manage socio environmental projects aimed at

  4. Business Development Corporation, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasek, S.

    1995-12-31

    Business Development Corporation, Inc., is a company specializing in opportunity seeking and business development activities in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} post communist Central and Eastern Europe, with particular emphasis on the Republics of Poland and Slovakia. The company currently focuses its expertise on strategic investing and business development between Central Europe and the United States of America. In Poland and Slovakia, the company specializes in developing large scale energy and environmental {open_quotes}infrastructure{close_quotes} development projects on the federal, state, and local level. In addition, the company assists large state owned industries in the transformation and privatization process. Business Development Corporation has assisted and continues to assist in projects of national importance. The staff of experts advise numerous large Polish and Slovak companies, most owned or in the process of privatization, on matters of restructuring, finance, capital structure, strategic parternships or investors, mergers, acquisitions and joint ventures with U.S. based firms. The company also assists and advises on a variety of environmental and energy matters in the public and private sector.

  5. The Solar Development Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, C.E.

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes a proposed stand alone company, the Solar Development Corporation (SDC), to be a business development and financing entity for photovoltaic operations with the potential to be commercially sustainable. SDC will have a fully integrated policy advocacy link to the World Bank. SDC will define target countries where the potential exists for significant early market expansion. In those countries it will provide: market and business development services that will accelerate the growth of private firms and deepen the penetration of Solar Home Systems (SHS) and other rural PV applications in the market; and access to pre-commercial and parallel financing for private firms to (1) expand their capability in PV distribution businesses, and (2) strengthen their ability to provide credit to end users. SDC itself will not engage in direct financing of the final consumer. It is intended that as far as possible SDC`s finance will be provided in parallel with financing from Financial Intermediaries.

  6. Community Service: Lessons from the Corporate World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, Kitty

    2003-01-01

    Describes several corporation-derived client-satisfaction and customer-service standards that principals can use to strengthen relationships with their parents and community. For example, only our clients can judge the quality of our service; our first job is to understand and manage our client's expectations; no matter what we do, some people…

  7. Corporation-led urban development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, B.; Heurkens, E.W.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Since a couple of years a remarkable phenomenon is witnessed in the field of urban development which entails that large multinationals corporations, such as IKEA and Siemens, start to engage in urban development projects. As their motivation to do so is unclear, it is difficult to estimate whether

  8. Corporation-led urban development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potters, B.; Heurkens, E.W.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    Since a couple of years a remarkable phenomenon is witnessed in the field of urban development which entails that large multinationals corporations, such as IKEA and Siemens, start to engage in urban development projects. As their motivation to do so is unclear, it is difficult to estimate whether t

  9. Development of Corporate Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Mirčeva

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a number of educational approaches, experiences and methods touched upon in two Canadian studies: 1 The Development of Skills in the Workplace - Qualifying for the New Economy, and The Strategy of Success: The Profile of Developing Small and Middle-sized Companies. The first study focu sed primarily on the internal assumptions, needs and characteri stics of various companies all of which determine training contents, form and techniques. The res ults ofthis study are definitely valuable for the planning of economic and educational policy. The second study deals with relationships between structural and other traits of small and middle-sized companies and how they effect business success. Although Canadian and Slovenian societies are difficult to compare, there area number of common trends: the average level of employee knowledge and skills is extremely important for quality, innovation, progress and reduction of unemployment in both countries. This demonstrates that international experience, studies and analysis of research techniques can be crucial for shaping our own research and for opening the ways to new issues, concepts and methodology.

  10. Developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartis, Janice A; Sullivan, Trent

    2002-09-01

    This article presents the process that a large urban tertiary care hospital engaged in when developing a corporate compliance program for nursing. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate how nurse executives can successfully implement a comprehensive and practical nursing corporate compliance program. This article describes in detail the 5 steps the hospital took to develop its nursing corporate compliance program and provides examples of tools to guide you in developing a nursing corporate compliance program.

  11. Penerapan Corporate Social Responsibility dengan Konsep Community Based Tourism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Suriany

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Business is not only economic institution, but social institution too. As social institution, business has responsibility to help society in solving social problem. This responsibility called Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. CSR pays attention about social problem and environment, so CSR support continuous development to help government role. Nowadays, our government has national development’s agenda. One of them is tourism sector (Visit Indonesia Year 2008 programmed. But tourism sector has challenge in human resources. In this case, business role in practice CSR is needed to help tourism sector. With CSR activities, the quality of local community will increase to participate in tourism activities. CSR activities include training that based on research. When the quality of local community increase, local community can practice the concept of community based tourism (CBT. In the future, Indonesia has a power to compete with other countries.

  12. The political economy of corporate social responsibility and community development: a case study of Norway's Snoehvit natural gas complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klick, Matthew T.

    2009-07-01

    This project uses stakeholder evidence from semi-structured interviews to analyze the relative effectiveness of an oil company's stated 'corporate social responsibility' (CSR) initiatives in a new, Arctic host community. Specifically, this project analyzes the outcomes of StatoilHydro initiatives to date in Hammerfest, Norway, where the Snoehvit (Snow White) natural gas project began production in 2007. It gauges the ability of 'socially responsible' approaches to development to internalize negative externalisation and promote positive 'spin-offs'. Arctic countries are increasingly prioritizing petroleum development. The convergence of dramatic climate change, increasing energy demands, and high energy prices has made the Arctic an alluring frontier for the oil industry and Arctic governments. Small Arctic communities are increasingly playing host to large energy projects with the potential for dramatic cultural, social, environmental, and economic upheaval, but also economic growth and increased human capital. In this case study, CSR initiatives resulted in a broader accounting of social costs and benefits, an outcome that better internalized externalities, and pareto-improving trades between stakeholders and industry. (Author). 87 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs

  13. The corporate elite community structure of global capitalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Heemskerk; F.W. Takes

    2015-01-01

    A key debate on the merits and consequences of globalisation asks to what extent we have moved to a multipolar global political economy. Here we investigate this issue through the properties and topologies of corporate elite networks and ask: what is the community structure of the global corporate e

  14. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY IMPACTS ON SUSTAINABLE HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Anstätt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to critically analyze the findings of the first, recently published, studies about Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR impacts on Sustainable Human Development (SHD. We aim at deriving conclusions for effective CSR strategies and at identifying consequences for management and research. As CSR claims to create value for corporations and for society, we argue that the people-centered Capability Approach (CA is promising to provide neglected and much needed insights how corporate activities affect individuals and communities. Based on a survey of recent literature addressing CSR impacts on SHD, we highlight CSR potentials to improve average well-being in multiple dimensions of SHD. Moreover, we critically assess challenges and limitations of CSR as a strategy to preserve and foster SHD. For instance, studies have shown that, despite CSR-driven well-being increases, social capital, relational capabilities and collective agency may become challenged by corporate strategies. Moreover, corporate environmental impacts have been found to be less often addressed by both, companies and SHD researchers. Resulting inequality and fairness issues have been identified as causes of violence against corporations even in the presence of total well-being improvements. We conclude that companies should strategically take into account a comprehensive range of factors driving and hampering SHD to account for their whole portfolio of corporate opportunities and risks. This requires evaluating CSR impacts instead of only focusing on CSR inputs and outputs. Thereby, corporations can mitigate their risks, improve their stakeholder trust and strengthen their competitiveness.

  15. Corporate governance and development - an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, S.; Yurtoglu, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the relationships between corporate governance and economic development and well-being. It finds that better-governed corporate frameworks benefit firms through greater access to financing, lower cost of capital, better firm performance, and more favorable treatment of all

  16. Corporate governance and development - an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, S.; Yurtoglu, B.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the relationships between corporate governance and economic development and well-being. It finds that better-governed corporate frameworks benefit firms through greater access to financing, lower cost of capital, better firm performance, and more favorable treatment of all stakeho

  17. Features of corporate social responsibility development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Shandova

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the aspects of the formation of social responsibility of Ukrainian companies. The need in the analysis of the factors of development of the business corporate social responsibility concept is caused by a change of interaction between the government, business and society. The result of research represents the corporate social responsibility as a specific company’s reaction to the demands of society to reflect in its actions the interests, values and expectations of stakeholders. The article determines and systematizes the main factors that impact on company’s corporate social responsibility. To the external factors belong the policies of supranational and national governments in the area of corporate social responsibility, the level of economic development, the government support for entrepreneurship, the public opinion about corporate social responsibility and the external pressure of other stakeholders. The internal factors include the economic efficiency of enterprises, the ratio of benefits and costs of corporate social responsibility implementation, personal beliefs of owners and shareholders, the corporate culture of the organization. The research of the factors of corporate social responsibility development will provide the mass distribution of socially responsible business and will contribute to the creation of its own models of social responsibility.

  18. Community Reaction to Corporate Social Responsibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    that Delta Corporation crafts its CSR policies at national level aiming at addressing ... attention has been given on how multi-national companies are socially investing fairly into the ... negligible, with only some industry sectors, such as mining having some structures on ..... Journal of Marketing Research, 38 (2):225-. 243.

  19. Assessing human rights impacts in corporate development projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salcito, Kendyl, E-mail: kendyl.salcito@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Utzinger, Jürg, E-mail: juerg.utzinger@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Weiss, Mitchell G., E-mail: Mitchell-g.Weiss@unibas.ch [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, P.O. Box, CH-4002 Basel (Switzerland); University of Basel, P.O. Box, CH-4003 Basel (Switzerland); Münch, Anna K., E-mail: annak.muench@gmail.com [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Singer, Burton H., E-mail: bhsinger@epi.ufl.edu [Emerging Pathogens Institute, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Krieger, Gary R., E-mail: gkrieger@newfields.com [NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); Wielga, Mark, E-mail: wielga@nomogaia.org [NomoGaia, 1900 Wazee Street, Suite 303, Denver, CO 80202 (United States); NewFields, LLC, Denver, CO 80202 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Human rights impact assessment (HRIA) is a process for systematically identifying, predicting and responding to the potential impact on human rights of a business operation, capital project, government policy or trade agreement. Traditionally, it has been conducted as a desktop exercise to predict the effects of trade agreements and government policies on individuals and communities. In line with a growing call for multinational corporations to ensure they do not violate human rights in their activities, HRIA is increasingly incorporated into the standard suite of corporate development project impact assessments. In this context, the policy world's non-structured, desk-based approaches to HRIA are insufficient. Although a number of corporations have commissioned and conducted HRIA, no broadly accepted and validated assessment tool is currently available. The lack of standardisation has complicated efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of HRIA as a risk mitigation tool, and has caused confusion in the corporate world regarding company duties. Hence, clarification is needed. The objectives of this paper are (i) to describe an HRIA methodology, (ii) to provide a rationale for its components and design, and (iii) to illustrate implementation of HRIA using the methodology in two selected corporate development projects—a uranium mine in Malawi and a tree farm in Tanzania. We found that as a prognostic tool, HRIA could examine potential positive and negative human rights impacts and provide effective recommendations for mitigation. However, longer-term monitoring revealed that recommendations were unevenly implemented, dependent on market conditions and personnel movements. This instability in the approach to human rights suggests a need for on-going monitoring and surveillance. -- Highlights: • We developed a novel methodology for corporate human rights impact assessment. • We piloted the methodology on two corporate projects—a mine and a plantation.

  20. A license to mine? : Community organizing against multinational corporations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Krämer (Romy)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWhat does it mean when a corporation claims to have a ‘license to operate’ in a local community? How does a member of an indigenous tribe make it to London to protest against a multinational mining company? How do managers perceive and speak about protest against their company and how do

  1. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MULTINATIONAL CORPORATIONS The Global Development of Nestle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈婵娟

    2006-01-01

    Several hundreds year ago, Nestle was just a small domestic corporation in Switzerland, but now it has developed into a really famous multinational corporation. It sells its brands and products all over the world, and built up its own infrastructures in many countries. And now it is taking a global perspective of its entire operation. I would like to use the secondary data to improve that Nestle is a really successful multinational corporation.

  2. Selecting indicators of future corporate business development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dvořáček

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents applications of discriminate analysis to predicting corporate economy future developments. The discriminate analysis was applied employing 5 to 8 input indicators (discriminators. Attaining maximum accuracy, 7 discriminators suffice. A final choice of discriminators was made by further discriminate analysis applications, and by searching causes of erroneous classification, which concerned a closer examination of input data files.

  3. Transnational Corporations and Corporate Citizenship: Analyzing New Roles of Organization Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ingo Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that too few transnational corporations (TNCs) have the organizational capacity to manage corporate citizenship. Evidence exists that ever more TNCs adopt programs of corporate citizenship development in order to increase this capacity. However, both in academic and practical literature, there is a general lack of a strategic…

  4. Transnational Corporations and Corporate Citizenship: Analyzing New Roles of Organization Development Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolz, Ingo Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Research shows that too few transnational corporations (TNCs) have the organizational capacity to manage corporate citizenship. Evidence exists that ever more TNCs adopt programs of corporate citizenship development in order to increase this capacity. However, both in academic and practical literature, there is a general lack of a strategic…

  5. Economic and innovative development of corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Kornukh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to determine the essence of economic and innovative development of corporation on the basis of complex approach. The results of the analysis. The article has revealed the nature of development from economic and philosophical points of view. The understanding of the nature of development enables managing it, i. e. working out appropriate development strategies (economic, innovative, technological, social, etc. The study of theoretical approaches to the essence of a corporation enables the statement that at present a corporation is the most promising form of entrepreneurship as the evolution of corporation has brought it to a higher level as compared with an enterprise in terms of property, approaches to management etc. The evident advantage of a corporation over an enterprise is in implementing innovative projects, pooling corporate interests and providing them with intellectual, financial, technical and other kinds of resources. Theoretical and methodological approach to determining the economic and innovative development of an enterprise consists in determining the complicated and capacious category «an enterprise’s economic development» through its main components (business processes, finances, investments, logistics and marketing and the structure of economic activities. Components of the innovative development and the structure of an enterprise’s innovative development are presented similarly. The article presents the complex approach to determining the essence of the economic and innovative development of a corporation on the grounds of relationship of a corporation’s development lines and gives the classification of a corporation’s economic and innovative development (CEID depending on the level of innovativeness of the economic development. The article defines the term «corporation’s economic and innovative development» as a category that characterizes dynamic qualitative

  6. Corporate Awakening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Partnerships have become more common as corporation...... public-private partnerships. These theoretical perspectives are used to gain a deeper understanding of the corporate drivers that motivated TOTAL S.A. to approach UNESCO for cooperation on community development programs in Myanmar.......Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Partnerships have become more common as corporations...... react to mounting pressure from corporate stakeholders, civil society and government on the responsible nature of their business practices. The corporate awakening towards a broader role of business in society and the trend of corporations embracing partnerships has led many to question the driving...

  7. Risk and Control Developments in Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Laursen, Peter Birkholm

    2007-01-01

    be perceived as the experts regarding internal control and risk management and that this must be engrained as part of the service rendered, i.e. part of the value adding nature of an audit. At the same time they must improve the transparency of the audit standards and the communication processes of audit......Are the risk and control developments in corporate governance changing the role of the external auditor? This paper examines how the concepts of risk and control are incorporated in current corporate governance promulgations and analyses the implications for the role of the external auditor....... Dominant determinants for the future role of the external auditor seem to be in conflict, namely the value adding function of the audit with an alignment of risk oriented efforts by the auditor and the company versus the notion of "back to basics". The external auditors ought to recognise that they must...

  8. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ec. drd. Oana Ghica

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR and Sustainable Development (SD are among the most important concepts applied and/or promoted by companies through specific programmes. Whether they are part of the company\\'s PR strategy or an element of the company\\'s operational system, CSR and SD programmes are becoming a constant part of corporate actions. Considered by some analysts as controversial concepts, studies regarding CSR and SD have increased especially over the last two decades and actions related to them have become both shield and weapon for companies, organizations and governments, depending on the pwpose they are used for.The following article makes a short presentation of the CSR and SD concepts, the relationship between them and benefits they generate, and ends with the case study of the eKOsystem programme launched by Hie Coca-Cola Company - a relevant example of programmes designed to promote and apply both CSR and SD concepts.

  9. Risk and Control Developments in Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Laursen, Peter Birkholm

    2007-01-01

    . Dominant determinants for the future role of the external auditor seem to be in conflict, namely the value adding function of the audit with an alignment of risk oriented efforts by the auditor and the company versus the notion of "back to basics". The external auditors ought to recognise that they must...... be perceived as the experts regarding internal control and risk management and that this must be engrained as part of the service rendered, i.e. part of the value adding nature of an audit. At the same time they must improve the transparency of the audit standards and the communication processes of audit......Are the risk and control developments in corporate governance changing the role of the external auditor? This paper examines how the concepts of risk and control are incorporated in current corporate governance promulgations and analyses the implications for the role of the external auditor...

  10. Еnterprise’s corporate management improvement on the base of corporate culture development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.O. Biliak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The author reveals extremely important role of corporate culture and uniqueness of the corporate culture system. It is established that the corporate management is characterized above all, by the economic activity and corporate culture practice. The securement of the balance in the process of interaction between organization and its environment plays one of the key roles in any management system. The author determines the influence of corporate culture on the business activity of the enterprise, when personnel predicts the situation development according to which they build models and evaluate their behavior. While realizing them in their activity employees strengthen certain trends and create in such a way appropriate situations. The search of ways of development and changing corporate culture as the base of corporate management improvement is conducted with the use of the strategic approach. The creation of a corporate culture that supports the development strategy of the enterprise, is an essential component of effective business and management, because the culture shapes a socio-psychological climate and corporate spirit which contributes to the operational execution of tasks and achievement of certain goals. Accordingly to the mentioned above, the set of measures of enterprise’s corporate culture development securement is proposed.

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corporate Social Responsibility of Multinational Oil Corporations to Host ... adopting partnership strategies as a means of contributing to community development, ... community development partnership (CDPs) initiatives' undertaken by Exxon ...

  12. Communication on Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lassaad Ben Mahjoub

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available France is located at the crossroads of major European cultural currents, between Northern Europe and the Mediterranean, his attention to the preservation of corporate social responsibility and sustainable development has evolved in recent years by taking several attempts and measures. Many studies were interested to evaluate the scope of social and environmental disclosure by using different measures; these criteria do not cover all features which can reflect all social and environmental concerns.We attempt to determine the level of corporate social responsibility disclosure in France by a new measure; it takes the form of an index; for this, we use a content analysis of annual reports in order to evaluate the items which describe the impact of firm activity on environment and community.Our findings show an acceptable level of social and environmental disclosure, in French companies, compared to others studies.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.61.3.1393

  13. The Mechanisms for the State Supporting the Development of Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riabokin Taras V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the article is the theoretical substantiation of the necessity to build an efficient mechanism for the State supporting the corporate development, taking account of the main national and corporate interests. As result of processing and analyzing the available scientific-methodological and practical approaches to development of corporations and the State impact on this process, the phased scheme of the corporate development has been proposed, defining the main corporate and national priorities in each of the stages. On the basis of the administrative, fiscal, and monetary methods, the key directions for coordination of development of the individual corporations have been allocated and a mechanism for the State support has been proposed, implementation of which will provide to harmonize the public and the corporate interests, achieve the total recovery of the national economy. It has been pointed out to the need of creating on the basis of the powerful corporations an effective system of the corporate social responsibility as one of the main directions for harmonization of the national and the corporate interests. Promising directions for further research will be solving the problems associated with the long-term investment in the corporate development, determining and then minimizing the major risks at the stage of appearance of corporations at the international level.

  14. THE IMPACT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE DIMENSIONS ON FINANCIAL STRUCTURE OF THE COMPANIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    OpenAIRE

    IONESCU ALIN; TUDOREANU PETRU

    2014-01-01

    Corporate governance represents a current topic for academic community and practitioners, in the context of globalization and crisis, especially in case of developing countries. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze which dimensions of corporate governance are able to exercise a significant impact on the companies’ financial structure, using a dataset with 77 developing countries from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe. The data are provided from World Bank Ente...

  15. Influence of corporate social responsibility on development of corporate reputation and customer purchase intentions

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Imran

    2011-01-01

    The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has gained wide consideration in academic field as well as in business world in recent years. Organizations are using CSR to develop competitive advantage and establish congenial relations with its stakeholders. Despite the popularity of CSR in the developed world, the potential benefits of CSR are less emphasized in the developing economies like Pakistan. This study examines the influence of CSR on development of corporate reputation and ...

  16. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND PERFORMANCE IN THE CONTEXT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela-Oana PINTEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic elements of the new economy require economic entities new performance standards that go beyond economics. These standards should be integrated into corporate strategy development to ensure sustainability of activities. Globalization affects corporate governance reforms currently characterized by what we call corporate responsibility and transparency. Companies are pressed to provide in addition to financial information the non-financial information, which focus on social and environmental impact of their activities and the way sustainability related constraints are integrated into their strategy for achieving organizational success. This paper highlights the changes imposed by sustainable development on corporate governance regarding the increased information that stakeholders need and the way performance is seen, as a holistic concept. Today, corporations are challenged to meet through performance the values, interests and expectations of society. The main objective of a corporate governance system is to assure a sustainable growth of the company taking into consideration the new standards imposed by the requirements of sustainable development.

  17. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND PERFORMANCE IN THE CONTEXT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela-Oana PINTEA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The characteristic elements of the new economy require economic entities new performance standards that go beyond economics. These standards should be integrated into corporate strategy development to ensure sustainability of activities. Globalization affects corporate governance reforms currently characterized by what we call corporate responsibility and transparency. Companies are pressed to provide in addition to financial information the non-financial information, which focus on social and environmental impact of their activities and the way sustainability related constraints are integrated into their strategy for achieving organizational success. This paper highlights the changes imposed by sustainable development on corporate governance regarding the increased information that stakeholders need and the way performance is seen, as a holistic concept. Today, corporations are challenged to meet through performance the values, interests and expectations of society. The main objective of a corporate governance system is to assure a sustainable growth of the company taking into consideration the new standards imposed by the requirements of sustainable development.

  18. Corporate Social Responsibility and Environmental Concerns in Nigeria: A Critical Focus on Oil Producing Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabiru Isa Dandago

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A well-known fact about the Nigerian Niger Delta region is incessant conflicts between the Oil Transnational Corporations and the oil producing communities. This could be attributed to the fact that the activities of Oil TNCs have continued to unleash untold devastation on the environment of the oil producing communities and its consequences on the local economy and by extension the total obliteration of the livelihood of the inhabitants of the area. Therefore, the Oil TNCs are increasingly becoming conscious of their devastating impact on the ecology of the area and their blatant disregard for the socio-economic development of the host communities. Consequently, the Oil TNCs have come to embrace the idea of executing Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR projects as a vehicle to intervene meaningfully in order to mitigate the adverse effects of their operations on the environments of the host communities. This paper attempts to review and analyze CSR practices of the two major Oil TNCs in Bayelsa State: Shell and Agip in six host communities: Olugboboro, Olugbobiri, Ikebiri 1, Oporoma, Angiama, and Peremabiri in Southern Ijaw local government area. The key question explored in this study is: has the practice of CSR in the Nigerian Niger Delta region by Oil TNCs brought about socio-economic  development and drastic reduction in conflict between the host communities and the Oil TNCs? The paper argues that CSR projects of transnational oil corporations in Nigeria are driven by short-term expediency rather than the long term environmental developmental needs of host communities through the provision of poor quality social amenities to these communities in order to secure social license to operate. For transnational oil corporations to make positive impact in the Nigerian Niger Delta Region, their CSR projects should belong tern in nature, taking into consideration the sustainable development needs of the local communities. The CSR projects should

  19. Corporate Awakening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    LaFrance, Julie; Lehmann, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Predominantly since the 1992 Rio Summit, corporations have been increasingly pursuing partnerships with public institutions including governments, international organisations and NGOs that aim to contribute to sustainable development activities. Both the business community and public organisations...... are recognizing the potential benefits of public-private partnerships for furthering the Millennium Development Goals while having a positive impact on business. Partnerships have become more common as corporations react to mounting pressure from corporate stakeholders, civil society and government...... on the responsible nature of their business practices. The accountability of corporations has moved beyond the traditional obligations of addressing shareholder demands and today, corporations must be accountable to society and all stakeholders affected by global development. The corporate awakening towards...

  20. Corporate Social Responsibility: Case Study of Community Expectations and the Administrative Systems, Niger Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogula, David

    2012-01-01

    Poor community-company relations in the Niger Delta have drawn attention to the practice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the region. Since the 1960s, transnational oil corporations operating in the Niger Delta have adopted various CSR strategies, yet community-company relations remain adversarial. This article examines community…

  1. Political corporate social responsibility and development

    OpenAIRE

    Adelopo, I.; Yekini, K.; Raimi, L.

    2015-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has attracted varied applications in management. This chapter contribution provides evidence of a political CSR where multinational corporations (MNCs) are complementing government’s role in bridging governance gap. The governance gap thesis and political costs hypothesis provide grounding for the discussions in this paper. Data from case studies across the Middle-Eastern countries were critically analysed and justify the political and developmental under...

  2. Influence of Leadership Styles on Community Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Key words: Leadership styles, laissez faire, community development, communication ... towards the effectiveness and success of the organisations of which they are ... minimal or no innovation, and virtually no personal or corporate improvement in the ... emphasis on teamwork, while functioning as a facilitator to develop a.

  3. Development of New B2B Venture Corporate Brand Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Törmälä, Minna; Gyrd-Jones, Richard I.

    2017-01-01

    The development and role of brand identity in new B2B ventures is not well explored despite the challenge for such organisations in establishing reputational legitimacy. Previous research defines corporate brand identity as stable and endogenous to the organisation based either on the reputational...... of interviews and archival data generated during a three-year period to examine the development of corporate brand over time. This study shows that the development of corporate brand identity and the context of the development of new B2B venture are closely intertwined processes and provides a framework...

  4. Recent Developments in German Corporate Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goergen, M.; Manjon, M.C.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2004-01-01

    We contrast the features of the German corporate governance system with those of other systems and discuss the recent regulatory initiatives.For example, the rules on insider trading and anti-trust have been strengthened.The Restructuring Act has been revised to prevent minority shareholders from st

  5. Recent Developments in German Corporate Governance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goergen, M.; Manjon, M.C.; Renneboog, L.D.R.

    2004-01-01

    We contrast the features of the German corporate governance system with those of other systems and discuss the recent regulatory initiatives.For example, the rules on insider trading and anti-trust have been strengthened.The Restructuring Act has been revised to prevent minority shareholders from

  6. Developing a Mindset of Corporate Consciousness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    China calls on its enterprises in Africa to make a bigger contribution to social welfare by Zhang Zhongxiang CHINESE enterprises should take the time to integrate into African society, both culturally and financially and be aware of their corporate responsibility. Chinese Vice President Xi Jinping made this clear while meeting Chinese

  7. On Corporate Governance Guidelines & Developing Markets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁卫

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the questions of "What is the governance" and "How to make the governance guidelines", explores some special nature of the listed companies and the implications in China market. By doing so, we can focus on where, why and how china corporate governance guidelines falls short of international standards and expectations.

  8. Does Gender Matter? Collaborative Learning in a Virtual Corporate Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcsik, Rachel E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how gender identity construction in virtuality and actuality affect collaborative learning in a corporate community of practice. As part of a virtual ethnographic design, participants were employees from a major American corporation who were interested specifically in social networking applications. The…

  9. Adoption of community engagement in the corporate culture of Australian forest plantation companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, M.; Lockwood, M.; Schirmer, Jacki; Vanclay, F.; Hanson, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides practical insight into what can be done to improve the adoption of community engagement (CE) in the corporate culture of two Australian forest plantation companies. Previous research has identified that CE can be limited by corporate cultures that promote a narrow range of CE

  10. 78 FR 57922 - American Energy Production, Inc., Best Energy Services, Inc., Community Central Bank Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION American Energy Production, Inc., Best Energy Services, Inc., Community Central Bank Corporation... Central Bank Corporation because it has not filed any periodic reports since the period ended September 30...

  11. 12 CFR 225.127 - Investment in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Investment in corporations or projects designed... equity and debt investments in corporations or projects designed primarily to promote community welfare... not intended to limit projects under § 225.25(b)(6) to that area. Other investments primarily designed...

  12. Adoption of community engagement in the corporate culture of Australian forest plantation companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordon, M.; Lockwood, M.; Schirmer, Jacki; Vanclay, F.; Hanson, D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides practical insight into what can be done to improve the adoption of community engagement (CE) in the corporate culture of two Australian forest plantation companies. Previous research has identified that CE can be limited by corporate cultures that promote a narrow range of CE ben

  13. Corporate Brand Identity Development in SMEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyrd-Jones, Richard; Törmälä, Minna

    2016-01-01

    We study the interactive narratives that underpin the emergence of corporate brand identity in new venture SMEs. We apply a process perspective that considers the complex interactions between layers of identities and sense-making in and around the organisation in the stakeholder eco-system. We...... propose a typology of brand identity drivers that reflects a co-creative approach to the emergence of brand identity....

  14. A corporate approach to social monitoring and assessment for development in a fragile environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Peter H; Dabbs, Alan W; Fernández-Dávila, Patricia; Da Vinha, Valéria; Zaidenweber, Nathan

    2002-05-01

    The prevailing corporate trend regarding development of energy resources in the tropics emphasizes financial gain over long-term societal benefits. Some corporations are beginning to find a competitive advantage linked to proactive relations with host communities and adequate protection of fragile ecosystems. Herein, we describe a case study where an international energy production company worked with stakeholders to achieve social capital and sustainable development. The strategies aimed to strengthen local capacity to improve social welfare and to ensure conservation and wise use of biodiversity. We provide examples, discuss lessons learned and make recommendations for future development projects.

  15. Transformation processes of the corporate development in Russia: corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna Sergeyevna Belyayeva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Financial and economic crises made the level of readiness to changes in the different types of organizations throughout the world and Russia visible. Variation of social and economic programmes implemented by governmental and corporate sectors is widely seen; not all of them work positively for the population, especially in the countries with emerging markets. At the same time, twenty years of the market economy in Russia, for instance, have definitely built a new social and economic system, but whether it has changed fundamentally in the management techniques? This research generalizes some trends of the corporate development in Russia in the context of social responsibility and socio-economic transformation. The author attempts to define Russia's place on the world map of corporate social responsibility. The opportunities for Russia to learn from foreign experience are also examined.

  16. PROTECTION OF HUMAN RIGHTS AGAINST THE ADVERSE IMPACT OF TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS AND OTHER BUSINESS ENTERPRISES: DILEMMAS OF INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machoňová-Schellongová Ivana

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no doubt about an impact of corporate and business operations on human rights, both positive and negative. Growing influence of corporations, power shift between business and states, as well as the complex nature of corporate governance and transnational operations require international regulations. International community undertook numerous initiatives, the most significant and recent being the United Nations Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights [2011], embraced by States, corporations and civil society as a “milestone“ in business and human rights agenda. While being a  useful comprehensive set of guidelines, Principles are lacking the legally binding force and any monitoring or complaints mechanism. Therefore, there are growing calls for a legally binding treaty to stipulate clearly human rights obligations of States/businesses vis-à-vis human rights and fill the protection gap for victims of corporate abuses. A newly established working group by the Human Rights Council has started to negotiate terms of reference of such a treaty in June 2015. However, meaningful negotiations are threatened by many factors, including the negative approach of US, EU and other developed States along with the corporate sector advocating for stronger implementation of Principles instead. This article aims to describe efforts of international community to prevent and eliminate a  negative impact of corporate activities on human rights. It shows different approaches and highlights some challenges and dilemmas. It concludes that parallel efforts should be undertaken - to implement the Principles and to negotiate an international treaty – in order to improve protection against an adverse impact of corporate operations on human rights. As for the Czech Republic, it is suggested to embark on the elaboration of the National Action Plan, thus providing for an opportunity to discuss implementation of the Principles among all the

  17. State Grid Corporation of China in Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC) was established on December 29,2002,with the construction and operation of power grids as its core business covering 26 provinces (including autonomous regions and municipalities),88% of the Chinese territory and a population of more than one billion.SGCC has a management of more than 1.5 million people,and is currently operating the Philippine national power transmission network and seven power transmission projects in Brazil.In 2010,SGCC as the largest utility in the world ranked the 8th on the Fortune Global 500.

  18. Recent developments in Corporate Taxation in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomann Christian

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates if increasing neutrality between debt and equity capital might improve the efficiency in a corporate tax system. Firm-level and sector- level taxation data from Sweden is used to study if a tax system that is characterized by very few limitations with respect to the deductibility of interest costs leads to systematic differences in the taxes paid by different sectors. This paper finds that there are differences between different sectors’ tax payments and these differences can be explained by the sectors’ use of debt capital.

  19. COGNITIVE MODELS OF PREDICTION THE DEVELOPMENT OF A DIVERSIFIED CORPORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranovskaya T. P.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The application of classical forecasting methods applied to a diversified corporation faces some certain difficulties, due to its economic nature. Unlike other businesses, diversified corporations are characterized by multidimensional arrays of data with a high degree of distortion and fragmentation of information due to the cumulative effect of the incompleteness and distortion of accounting information from the enterprises in it. Under these conditions, the applied methods and tools must have high resolution and work effectively with large databases with incomplete information, ensure the correct common comparable quantitative processing of the heterogeneous nature of the factors measured in different units. It is therefore necessary to select or develop some methods that can work with complex poorly formalized tasks. This fact substantiates the relevance of the problem of developing models, methods and tools for solving the problem of forecasting the development of diversified corporations. This is the subject of this work, which makes it relevant. The work aims to: 1 analyze the forecasting methods to justify the choice of system-cognitive analysis as one of the effective methods for the prediction of semi-structured tasks; 2 to adapt and develop the method of systemic-cognitive analysis for forecasting of dynamics of development of the corporation subject to the scenario approach; 3 to develop predictive model scenarios of changes in basic economic indicators of development of the corporation and to assess their credibility; 4 determine the analytical form of the dependence between past and future scenarios of various economic indicators; 5 develop analytical models weighing predictable scenarios, taking into account all prediction results with positive levels of similarity, to increase the level of reliability of forecasts; 6 to develop a calculation procedure to assess the strength of influence on the corporation (sensitivity of its

  20. Theoretical aspect of the development of 'corporate social responsibility' concept

    OpenAIRE

    Milanović, Vesna M.; Bučalina, Andrea D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical aspect of the development of 'corporate social responsibility' concept from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day, with the focus on the following periods: up to 1950, between 1950 an 1970, from 1970 to 1990 and from 1990 to now. We employed historical approach. We had an insight into the results of theoretical research on 'corporate social responsibility' concept, which were mostly presented in scientific papers in the English language. The ab...

  1. Development of transnational corporations in the world: opportunities and threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra NICULA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transnational corporations (TNCs are incorporated or unincorporated enterprises comprising parent enterprises and their foreign affiliates. Transnational Corporations exert a great deal of power in the globalized world economy. Many corporations are richer and more powerful than the states that seek to regulate them. Through mergers and acquisitions corporations have been growing very rapidly and some of the largest TNCs now have annual profits exceeding the GDPs of many low and medium income countries. TNCs dominate the global economy and exert their influence over global policymaking. Worldwide companies start the trend in many domains having a big range of competitors. Trade is an important development tool. Trade between developing and industrialized countries has expanded and borrowing from rich countries to the poor areas of this world increased. The links between these differing groups of economies intensified subsequently and made these two groups increasingly dependent from each other. TNCs based their activity around this idea. In this paper, we try to emphasize the role of the TNCs in the worldwide economy, the advantages and disadvantages these corporations bring to the countries they activate in and even to the entire world and what effect they have on globalization. Some opportunities and threats of TNS activity are presented, exemplifying through some well known corporations which succeded in this competitive world. The authors wanted in this way to show the positive and negative aspects of their performance and give the reader the opportunity to develop the own opinion.

  2. Community Development in lreland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liam Carey

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Community Development is about enabling people to actively participate in shaping the society of which they area part. Primarily the program focussed mainly on disadvantaged communities. It has been recognized that the ability to participate fully in society is open more to some groups and individuals than others. Social exclusion has many different dimensions: Jack of money, isolation, powerlessness, poor access to basic public services such as health, education, legal aid, arts and culture ... In the first place community development is based on education, being closely related to the local development concept. It recognizes and meets educational needs of the members of certain community. Such programmes result especially in a community's political development, development of its capacities, potentials and creativity, enhancement of the structures, important for the long-term functioning of the community.

  3. The Role of Private Corporations in Regional Planning and Development: Opportunities and Challenges for the Governance of Housing and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, T. H.; Wilson, C.; Bell, M.

    2012-01-01

    There is a broad consensus that the corporate sector has an active role in facilitating community development through corporate-community investment. However, there remains uncertainty as to how much the sector should invest without taking on responsibilities and influencing decisions which are traditionally within the realm of the state. This…

  4. The Role of Private Corporations in Regional Planning and Development: Opportunities and Challenges for the Governance of Housing and Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, T. H.; Wilson, C.; Bell, M.

    2012-01-01

    There is a broad consensus that the corporate sector has an active role in facilitating community development through corporate-community investment. However, there remains uncertainty as to how much the sector should invest without taking on responsibilities and influencing decisions which are traditionally within the realm of the state. This…

  5. Development of the SEA Corporation Powergrid{trademark} photovoltaic concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminar, N.; Curchod, D.; Daroczi, S.; Walpert, M.; Sahagian, J.; Pepper, J. [Photovoltaics International, LLC, Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1998-03-01

    This report covers the three phase effort to bring the SEA Corporation`s Powergrid{trademark} from the concept stage to pilot production. The three phases of this contract covered component development, prototype module development, and pilot line production. The Powergrid is a photovoltaic concentrator that generates direct current electricity directly from sunlight using a linear Fresnel lens. Analysis has shown that the Powergrid has the potential to be very low cost in volume production. Before the start of the project, only proof of concept demonstrations of the components had been completed. During the project, SEA Corporation developed a low cost extruded Fresnel lens, a low cost receiver assembly using one sun type cells, a low cost plastic module housing, a single axis tracking system and frame structure, and pilot production equipment and techniques. In addition, an 800 kW/yr pilot production rate was demonstrated and two 40 kW systems were manufactured and installed.

  6. Peculiarities of Corporate Culture Development under Conditions of Remote Working

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shchetinina Ludmila V

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the significance and peculiarities of corporate culture formation for remote employees. Particular attention is paid to instruments that allow creating a team in the absence of the usual office environment. There have been defined the signs of trust manifestation that distinguish the corporate culture in a team with experience of teamwork and without such experience — a level of weakness manifestation and recognition of mistakes, presence of critics from colleagues, asking for recourse, interest in colleagues’ experience and skills. According to the signs the necessary management practices for the development and creation of the corporate culture has been offered. It is noted that the team with the experience of teamwork at the early stages acts quite consistently adhering to the declared standards, rules and basic values. However, even under these conditions, the corporate culture is growing weaker in time. And here it would be helpful to use the management practices that do not replace personal contact but are maximally close to it. All management practices are classified in accordance with the directions of the corporate culture development, namely, creation of effective social intranet, establishment of quality communication, transparent motivation and clear description of the control sequences, description and establishment of clear guidelines, development of personal effectiveness of employees, simplification of the project communication process, creation of “virtual coolers”, the philosophy of “getting into the body” of a remote employee, monitoring professional burnout, etc.

  7. Exploring opportunities for collaboration between the corporate sector and the dental education community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, D; Clarkson, J; Buchanan, R; Chadwick, G; Chesters, R; Drisko, C L; Douglass, C W; Farrell, L; Fletcher, K; Makoni, F; Monaco, M; Nordquist, B; Park, N I; Riggs, S; Schou, L; Smales, F C; Stamm, J W; Toh, C G; Volpe, T; Ward, P; Warren, P

    2008-02-01

    The ultimate purpose of both dental industry and dental education is to improve the oral health of the public. This report provides background information on the different roles and objectives of the dental industry and dental education communities, the different operating environment of each sector and also areas of common interest where collaboration will be of mutual benefit. The report addresses five areas for potential collaboration between the dental industry and the dental education communities: 1. Contribution to joint activities. 2. Effectiveness and efficiency. 3. Workforce needs. 4. Middle- and low-income countries. 5. The future of International Federation of Dental Educators and Associations (IFDEA). The traditional areas of support and their limitations that have been provided by industry are outlined in the report and some new approaches for collaboration are considered. Industry-based research has been an important factor in developing new products and technologies and in promoting oral health. However there is a need to facilitate the introduction of these developments at an early stage in the education process. Industry has to operate in an efficient manner to remain competitive and maximise its returns and therefore survive. The academic sector operates in a different environment and under different governance structures; although some trends are noted towards adoption of greater efficiency and financial accountability similar to industry. Opportunities to jointly develop best business practices should be explored. Industry has responded well to the oral health needs of the public through the development of new products and technologies. The education community needs to respond in a similar way by examining different healthcare delivery models worldwide and developing programmes to train members of the dental team to cater for future needs and demands of communities in different regions of the world. The reputation of industry-based scientists

  8. Involving Corporate Functions: Who Contributes to Sustainable Development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Schaltegger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A large body of literature claims that corporate sustainable development is a cross-functional challenge, which requires all functional units to be involved. However, it remains uncertain to what extent and in which way different corporate functions are actually involved in corporate sustainability management. To bridge this research gap, our paper draws on a concept of involvement introduced in the field of consumer behavior. Based on this previous research, our paper distinguishes two components of involvement: first, a cognitive-affective component, incorporating being affected by sustainability issues and being supportive of corporate sustainability; and second, a behavioral component, represented by the application of sustainability management tools. We use this concept to empirically analyze the involvement of corporate functions in sustainability management and find considerable differences in large German companies. Whereas public relations and strategic management are heavily involved, finance, accounting and management control appear not to be involved. A multinomial logistic regression shows that the cognitive-affective component significantly influences the behavioral component, with a functional unit being affected influencing the application of tools the most. Building on the model proposed, the paper provides implications on how to increase a functional unit’s involvement in sustainability management.

  9. THE IMPACT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE DIMENSIONS ON FINANCIAL STRUCTURE OF THE COMPANIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONESCU ALIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a current topic for academic community and practitioners, in the context of globalization and crisis, especially in case of developing countries. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze which dimensions of corporate governance are able to exercise a significant impact on the companies’ financial structure, using a dataset with 77 developing countries from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe. The data are provided from World Bank Enterprise Survey website and the variables are grouped in two directions: corporate governance and financial structure variables. In this regard, using principal components analysis approach, we grouped firstly the variables related to financial structure and then variables related to the main four dimensions of corporate governance, such as ownership structure and management quality, transparency, environment and corruption. The impact of corporate governance dimensions on companies’ financial structure was analyzed in a generalized linear model framework and the main result of this paper consists in the fact that, for analyzed countries, companies’ financial structure is significantly influenced by several dimensions of the governance like transparency, environment or corruption.

  10. THE IMPACT OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE DIMENSIONS ON FINANCIAL STRUCTURE OF THE COMPANIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IONESCU ALIN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a current topic for academic community and practitioners, in the context of globalization and crisis, especially in case of developing countries. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze which dimensions of corporate governance are able to exercise a significant impact on the companies’ financial structure, using a dataset with 77 developing countries from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Central and Eastern Europe. The data are provided from World Bank Enterprise Survey website and the variables are grouped in two directions: corporate governance and financial structure variables. In this regard, using principal components analysis approach, we grouped firstly the variables related to financial structure and then variables related to the main four dimensions of corporate governance, such as ownership structure and management quality, transparency, environment and corruption. The impact of corporate governance dimensions on companies’ financial structure was analyzed in a generalized linear model framework and the main result of this paper consists in the fact that, for analyzed countries, companies’ financial structure is significantly influenced by several dimensions of the governance like transparency, environment or corruption

  11. United Nations Development Program solicits funds from corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karliner, J; Srivastava, A; Bruno, K

    1999-01-01

    The Global Sustainable Development Facility (GSDF) project, a collaboration between the U.N. Development Program and a variety of global corporate sponsors, some with poor human rights, labor, and environmental records, has come under criticism from prestigious nongovernmental organizations around the world. A letter to James Gustave Speth, Administrator of the U.N. Development Program, expresses concern about the threat posed by the GSDF project to the independence and credibility of the U.N. Development Program.

  12. Corporate America and community health: exploring the business case for investment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Baase, Catherine; Noyce, Jerry; Stevens, Denise E

    2015-05-01

    The principal aim of this project was to learn from corporate executives about the most important components of a business case for employer leadership in improving community health. We used dialogue sessions to gain insight into this issue. The strongest elements included metrics and measurement, return on investment, communications, shared values, shared vision, shared definitions, and leadership. Important barriers included lack of understanding, lack of clear strategy, complexity of the problem, trust, lack of resources and leadership, policies and regulations, and leadership philosophy. Substantial variability was observed in the degree of understanding of the relationship between corporate health and community health. The business case for intentional and strategic corporate investment in community health occurs along a continuum has a set of clearly defined elements that address why investment may make sense, but also asks questions about the "what-to-do" and the "how-to-do-it."

  13. The Urban Development Investment Corporations (UDICs) in Chongqing, China

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2010-01-01

    Urban Development Investment Corporations (UDICs) have over the years become the central pillar in the local government drive to build infrastructure in China, where local governments are not allowed to engage in direct market borrowing. UDICs were established during the early 1990s when local governments were under great pressure to both build municipal infrastructure and to reform the ro...

  14. Sustainable Development and Corporate Social Responsibility: Linking Goals to Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radostina Bakardjieva

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility (CSR is the core of sustainable development of companies. On one hand, the corporate social responsibility of companies is a prerequisite for sustainable business, on the other - sustainable development sets specific requirements for the development of businesses in the context of increasing requirements to the degree of quality and reliability of financial information. In recent years, sustainable development has become a strategic issue for companies and this trend applies to Bulgarian companies too. Development of non-financial reporting is a very dynamic process, whose peak is the establishment of an integrated system of accountability. Current paper makes analyses of advantages of CSR linking it to the implementation of sustainable development goals through the integrated reporting following the requirements of the standards of the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI.

  15. DEVELOPING COUNTRIES AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE. THE CASE OF ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GIOVANA IUHASZ

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the past years, developing countries have become extremely interesting for researchers, as well as for capital investors. Dominated by growth and industrialization, but lacking macroeconomic indicator stability or sufficiently mature financial markets, these countries make it acutely necessary to identify measures that will stimulate foreign investors to invest and that will ensure the financial stability for SMEs. One such measure is increasing the quality of corporate governance at the level of small and medium-sized enterprises, where it is currently almost absent. This article aims to help raise awareness of the need to implement good corporate management practices at the level of companies in developing countries and especially in Romania. This paper uses a questionnaire in order to evaluate the state of the corporate governance in Timis county and offers some suggestions on what should be done for a higher corporate governance quality in the case of small and medium-sized companies in Romania, with the purpose of establishing a connection between governance quality and business performance of SMEs

  16. Sustainable Eco Coastal Development Through Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakhmanissazly, Arsi; Mursito Ardy, Yong; Abdullah

    2017-02-01

    Besides technical problems the company’s operational constraints that may effect high deficiency for the company is the company - community conflicts. Company - community conflict can also arise depends on the geographic conditions and characteristics of the community itself. Some studies has show that coastal community have higher level of social risk when compared to non-coastal community. Also, the coastal community ussually only rely on what sea provides as their main livelihood. Because of the level of education still contemtible the community couldn’t optimized the potential of their own area. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) har emerged as an important approach for addressing the social and environmental impact of company activities. Through CSR program, PT Pertamina EP Asset 3 Tambun Field (PEP) try to form value integration by utilizing resources from the community and the company by making sustainable eco - coastal living in Desa Tambaksari, Karawang, one of PEP working area. Using sustainable livelihood approach begin with compiling data by doing social mapping PEP has initiate the area to becoming Fish Processing Industry Centre. By implementing PDCA in every steps of the program, PEP has multiplied some other programs such as Organic Fish Feed Processing, Seaweed Farming and Waste Bank for Green Coastal Village. These program is PEP’s effort to create a sustainability environment by enhancing the community’s potentials as well as resolving social problems around Tambaksari. The most important result besides getting our license to operate from the community, is the community itself can grow into an eco coastal sustainable system.

  17. Sustainable Development and Global Responsibility in Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela M Salvioni; Astori, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The sustainable development and the company global responsibility have emerged recently as relevant factors both at a business level and with reference to the company in general. The global markets impose new and complex systems of corporate governance aimed at a generic retrieval of effectiveness if compared to the growing dynamism and to the gradual increase of complex relations between  company and environment. In this regard the sustainable development represents an important issue, whose...

  18. 45 CFR 2515.10 - What are the service-learning programs of the Corporation for National and Community Service?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What are the service-learning programs of the... Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAM PURPOSES § 2515.10 What are the service-learning programs of the Corporation for National and Community...

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR: A Scale Development Study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Heidarzadeh Hanzaee

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to explore a scale of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR in Iran. In this way, it reviews the literature exist on corporate social responsibility, gathers data and analyzes the data to test the emerging trends. After confirmation of reliability, factor analysis and multi dimensional scaling are used to an established survey instrument. Finally CSR was achieved as a construct with five dimensions: obligation to employees, obligation to customers and markets, obligation to social programs and natural environment, obligation to laws and regulations and obligation to society. These five dimensions represent the corporate accountability to some different groups of its stakeholders. In this study the convenient samples of managers and employees used in collecting data and developing the scale, however in exploratory studies, this type of sampling can be acceptable. Nevertheless, some limitations should be taken into consideration, while interpreting the findings of the study and generalizing them to general business environment. Therefore enlarging the sample size and using a random sampling method of managers and employees in future studies has to make Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR scale more useful and enhance the generalization.

  20. THE ASSESSMENT OF THE DEVELOPMENT PHASES OF TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru SARCO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on the analysis of the particularities of the development of the transnational corporations starting with their appearance, which from the historical point of view has passed through several phases. Generalizing the scientific literature study that has been done, was identified the consecutiveness development of the transnational corporations in five major phases. Thus, all large companies are treated as international companies, because by increasing the liberalization of international economic relations is triggered the process of opening the global market and international division of labour. Along with financial capital and technology, TNC transfer through the entrepreneurial capital of the receiver economy and managerial-organizational skills, influencing the competitiveness of firms and the economic performance of host countries.

  1. Corporate Identity as a Factor of Corporate Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena B. Perelygina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Forming-upof the corporate identity is based on cognitive, affective and conative elements of corporate culture. The group as an entity choosing goals and values ensures a certain response to standards and values of corporate culture within the parameters of its social responsibility. Corporate security as security of community and cooperation acts as a form of organizational and ethical approach to developing socially responsible attitude of government and business.

  2. CORPORATE IDENTITY AS A FACTOR OF CORPORATE SECURITY

    OpenAIRE

    Perelygina, Elena B.

    2011-01-01

    Forming-up of the corporate identity is based on cognitive, affective and conative elements of corporate culture. The group as an entity choosing goals and values ensures a certain response to standards and values of corporate culture within the parameters of its social responsibility. Corporate security as security of community and cooperation acts as a form of organizational and ethical approach to developing socially responsible attitude of government and business.

  3. Development of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in India

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Shankar; Leslie Chadwick; Shahzad Ghafoor; Farooq Khan

    2011-01-01

    The interest in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), which recognizes thatcompanies have obligations that extend beyond short-run profit maximization toinclude notions of social and environmental concern, has increased considerably inrecent decades. The globalization of the world economy and the related tradeliberalization has brought forward a discussion of the importance of business as anactor in the development of society. The aim of this research is to analyse theeffectiveness of the CS...

  4. Impact of corporate social responsibility on sustainable enterprise development

    OpenAIRE

    Danubianu Mirela; Teodorescu Cristian

    2017-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is a recent entry in the economy of modern enterprise both at global level and for Romanian companies. CSR adds a new dimension to the enterprise’s performance in the social fields, contributing to the sustainable development of economic entities. CSR components are included in an international standard – ISO 26000. The paper presents authors’ experience in implementing this standard. Possible steps of a roadmap for CSR implementation: Top management e...

  5. An intelligent management system for corporate information- calculating network development

    CERN Document Server

    Pirogov, V V; Khristenko, D V

    2001-01-01

    An approach to solving the problem of managerial control quality improvement corporate information-calculating networks (CICN) is proposed. The approach is based on the concept of a flexible toolkit. A macro-model, system-science and system-engineering models of an intelligent managerial control system (IMCS) for CICN development are considered as well as its dynamics. The practical opportunity of IMCS implementation is assessed. (5 refs).

  6. 26 CFR 1.851-6 - Investment companies furnishing capital to development corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... development corporations. 1.851-6 Section 1.851-6 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Investment Trusts § 1.851-6 Investment companies furnishing capital to development corporations. (a... development corporations, section 851 (e) provides an exception to the rule relating to the diversification...

  7. From Companies to Markets--Global Developments in Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2016-01-01

    In May 2015, the IFC Corporate Governance Group called together 40 experts in the field and members of the IFC Corporate Governance Private Sector Advisory Group. These participants explored key changes in international corporate governance standards and codes of best practice in the wake of the recent global financial crisis and how these changes have helped draw corporate attention to su...

  8. State corporations and resource based development in Quebec, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    A case study of state corporations in the forestry, mining, and petroleum sectors in resource frontier regions reveals the extent of state involvement in infrastructure and production in Quebec. The intention of government corporations was to encourage Quebec enterprise, to promote resource extraction in hinterland regions, and to contribute to the ''economic liberation'' of Quebec, as part of a regional policy of ''maitres chez nous.'' A complex set of relationships involving regional and international investments, ideology, and economic nationalism are discussed for the period 1960-1980. It is concluded that the state has become an integral part of regional development in selected resource frontier regions in Quebec.

  9. 29 January 2013 - Japanese Toshiba Corporation Executive Officer and Corporate Senior Vice President O. Maekawa in the ATLAS visitor centre with representatives of the CERN-Japanese community led by Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    29 January 2013 - Japanese Toshiba Corporation Executive Officer and Corporate Senior Vice President O. Maekawa in the ATLAS visitor centre with representatives of the CERN-Japanese community led by Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  10. Corporate Branding and Corporate Reputation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmark, Esben

    2013-01-01

    Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through o...... for corporate brands and corporate communication.......Corporate branding has been seen as developing in “waves”. This chapter explores the links between corporate branding and corporate reputation as they emerge in the context of three waves of corporate branding. It highlights the way in which the two constructs have related to each other through...... organizational culture and identity, and how, although characterized by parallel developments, new ideas and models from a “third” wave of corporate branding challenge prevailing assumptions of corporate reputation particularly in terms of the assumptions that reputations emerge from authentic and transparent...

  11. Industrial Clusters and Corporate Social Responsibility in Developing Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Thomsen, Peter; Lindgreen, Adam; Vanhamme, Joelle

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a review of what we know, what we do not know, and what we need to know about the relationship between industrial clusters and corporate social responsibility (CSR) in developing countries. In addition to the drivers of and barriers to the adoption of CSR initiatives...... focus on export-oriented industrial clusters, the risk that CSR becomes a form of economic and cultural imperialism, and the potential for joint-action CSR initiatives in clusters of small and medium-sized enterprises to offer a new form of greenwashing. From this review, the authors develop...

  12. The relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Financial Performance in developing countries. Case of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adham Genedy

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study explores and tests the relationship between corporate social responsibility (CSR and corporate financial performance (CFP in developing countries, focusing mainly to examine the financial aspects of high vs low-ranked firms in the CSR Index in Egypt for eight consecutive years (excluding 2011 because of its special situation due to instability caused by the revolution. Moreover, this study empirically examines different financial ratios for 18 firms listed in Egyp-tian Stock Exchange EGX 30 for eight years, 2007 – 2015. Using the Standard and Poor’s index (S&P/EGX ESG Index to measure the CSR, and using accounting based measures (from Egypt for information Dissemination (EGID database and the Cairo and Alexandria Stock Exchange Disclosure book. This study’s purpose is to find the suitable measures of the CFP along with CSR, as well as, the relationship between them, to conclude whether CSR is beneficial for compa-nies or not. The main question here is: What is the type and significance of the relationship be-tween CSR and the CFP in Egypt? the ANOVA analysis was chosen and used on both compa-ny’s CSR and CFP variables, also constructed a Pearson Correlation between CSR and CFP va-riables and examined the multiple regression model to discriminate between the CFP of high and low-ranked firms in the CSR Index and recognize the type and significance of the relationship be-tween CSR and CFP. The results show that CSR has a positive significant relation with the CFP. The paper has implications for enhancing the understanding of performance management by understanding the relationship between CSR and CFP.

  13. Jane Addams Resource Corporation: A Case Study of a Sectoral Employment Development Approach. Sectoral Employment Development Learning Project Case Studies Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasmeier, Amy K.; Nelson, Candace; Thompson, Jeffery W.

    This case study on the Jane Addams Resource Corporation (JARC) is the third of six sectoral studies to provide an in-depth look at individual sectoral employment development programs and their interaction within distinct economic and industry environments. It explores a community-based organization that developed specialized metalworking and…

  14. The corporation and the community: Credibility, legitimacy, and imposed risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, C. (ed.) (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Rosenthal, I. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Center for Risk and Decision Processes)

    1991-10-01

    In this age of rapid changes, large segments of society no longer trust any institution or authority in regard to pronouncements on what is safe. Because of this distrust, the public has demanded and obtained increased rights for individuals to intervene directly in decisions affecting them. Rosenthal warns that an organization that just fulfills its legal requirements for safety is no longer doing enough. Industry leaders must work toward re-establishing credibility by identifying persons who are potentially at risk as a result of industry activities, involving them in the communication process, and justifying the firm's social benefits. Seeking social legitimacy, chemical manufacturers have formed self-assessment groups and community councils, which have reaped unexpected benefits but have forced them to deal with issues they would have preferred to avoid. To industry leaders who contend that these types of activities are not worth the effort, Rosenthal presents a timely warning. Government and business must reduce public concerns significantly and make stakeholders more willing to tolerate imposed risk because of perceived benefits. It the public's concern is not reduced, we will all be required to make greater and greater investments in an inefficient and largely fruitless pursuit of absolute safety. 16 refs.

  15. THE INFLUENCE OF CORRUPTION ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE STANDARDS: SHARED CHARACTERISTICS OF RAPIDLY DEVELOPING ECONOMIES

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle I. Caron; Aysun Ficici; Christopher L. Richter

    2012-01-01

    This article evaluates the relationship between the level of corruption in rapidly developing economies and corporate governance processes therein.  Previous literature illustrates a strong relationship between corporate governance and corruption and suggests that in countries with high levels of corruption, firms lack efficient corporate governance practices.  Similarly, countries with deficient corporate governance practices and low levels of compliance to these standards breed corruption l...

  16. How Can Corporations Contribute to the Community through Environmental Education?: Focusing on Partnerships between Corporations and Universities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Eunjeong; Jang, Shinho

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was twofold: first, to determine the effectiveness of providing environmental education in collaboration between a company and a university, and, second, to describe perspective that the environmental education community has developed through close communication with stakeholders in environmental education. For the study, we…

  17. Community rights and corporate responsibility : Canadian mining and oil companies in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    North, L.; Clark, T.D.; Patroni, V. (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    This book presented papers given at a conference on Canadian mining companies in Latin America which was held at York University in 2002. The conference raised awareness about the impact of mining on the ecosystems and communities of Latin America. The conference provided a forum for non governmental organizations (NGOs), social activists, and academics to debate the growth of the mining industry in various Latin American countries. Issues related to international mining and community relations were discussed, and strategies for resolving conflicts between mining companies and communities were examined. The current regulatory environment surrounding mining was reviewed. Issues related to oppression and social resistance were also discussed. The activities of various Canadian mining companies were also discussed, as well as Canadian oil investment in Colombia. Issues related to corporate responsibility were also examined. refs., tabs., figs.

  18. THE ROLE OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN TRANSITION ECONOMIES: CONTRIBUTION AND DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    OLIVERA GJORGIEVA-TRAJKOVSKA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available With more evident process of globalization of the world market, the concept of corporate governance gains importance. The global economic crisis highlighted the problems of corporate governance both in developed countries and developing economies. Analyzing the effects of the global economic crisis, including striking collapse of many companies, the huge increase in unemployment and the increased number of people living on the poverty line and below, it can be concluded that some of these problems are result of various weaknesses and failures of corporate governance. Even though the introduction of a number of rules, codes and practices of corporate governance have been made, the global economic crisis has shown that more effective application of the standards of corporate governance is necessary. Corporate governance issues are especially important in transition economies, since these countries do not have the long-established financial institution infrastructure to deal with corporate governance issues. Before 1989 there was no need to discuss corporate governance issues, because all enterprises were owned by the state and there were no shareholders. All that has changed. This paper discusses the importance of corporate governance, with special reference to transition economies. Directors, owners and corporate managers have started to realize that there are benefits that can accrue from having a good corporate governance structure. Good corporate governance helps to increase share price and makes it easier to obtain capital. International investors are hesitant to lend money or buy shares in a corporation that does not subscribe to good corporate governance principles. Transparency, independent directors and a separate audit committee are especially important.

  19. A review of Dutch corporate sustainable development reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asif, M.; Searcy, C.; Santos, P.D.; Kensah, D.K.

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing pressure on corporations for sustainability reporting. However, current patterns in corporate sustainability reporting are not well understood. Additional research is needed to identify the contents of current reports and to provide a basis for improvement. The aim of this resear

  20. A review of Dutch corporate sustainable development reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asif, Muhammad; Searcy, C.; dos Santos, Paulo; Kensah, D.K.

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing pressure on corporations for sustainability reporting. However, current patterns in corporate sustainability reporting are not well understood. Additional research is needed to identify the contents of current reports and to provide a basis for improvement. The aim of this

  1. The Taxonomy of Corruption on the relation of Public corporation-Local community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Šuman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are many researches of corruption inpublic sector, especially in the health care and in the public management. But in public corporations that areimportant part of the public sector, it cannot be found. That is the reason that according to the research of different archives the primary taxonomy of corruption has been done and it can appear in relationship between the Public sector and Local community, where many authors detect the possibility of creation of corruption risks. In taxonomy we can find the most common examples of corruption, as well as forms of those and the areas where they appear.

  2. The Spread of Neoliberalism in US Community Colleges: TQM Accreditation, "Consumers," and Corporate Sponsored Non-Profits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the extent of neoliberalism's influence within US community colleges during the last decade. It argues that such influence is changing non-profit, publicly funded community colleges into consumer colleges, serving the needs of corporations and "customers" at the expense of civic responsibility. Educating 46% of all…

  3. The Spread of Neoliberalism in US Community Colleges: TQM Accreditation, "Consumers," and Corporate Sponsored Non-Profits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Scott H.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the extent of neoliberalism's influence within US community colleges during the last decade. It argues that such influence is changing non-profit, publicly funded community colleges into consumer colleges, serving the needs of corporations and "customers" at the expense of civic responsibility. Educating 46% of all…

  4. Development of Corporate Governance Performance Indicators for Czech Manufacturing Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavláková Docekalová Marie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Effective corporate governance is a key element in achieving long-term success for any company. The codes of conduct that corporate governance adopts directly determine the sustainability of business activities. With this in mind, this paper aims to demonstrate the results of research that identifies a set of key indicators of corporate governance performance. The presented research is quantitative. In order to identify key performance indicators, factor analysis was employed. It was found that corporate governance performance is influenced by two factors. For the first factor, the relationship between corporate governance and stakeholders is measured by key indicators: percentage of women within CG, contributions to political parties, politicians and related institutions and number of complaints received from stakeholders. The second factor, strategy & compliance, is generated from the following: percentage of strategic objectives met and total number of sanctions for breaching the law. This research aims to assist both academic and corporate practitioners who want to improve corporate governance performance and, through the use of key performance indicators, support the transparency and sustainability of their business.

  5. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Austin, Robert A. [Constellation Technology Corporation, 7887 Bryan Dairy Road, Suite 100, Largo, FL 33777 (United States)], E-mail: austin@contech.com

    2007-08-21

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas (Z=54), moderate densities ({approx}0.3-0.5 g/cm{sup 3}) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  6. High-pressure xenon detector development at Constellation Technology Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Robert A.

    2007-08-01

    Xenon-filled ionization detectors, due to their high atomic number fill gas ( Z=54), moderate densities (˜0.3-0.5 g/cm 3) and good energy resolution (2-4% at 662 keV), fill an important niche between more familiar technologies such as NaI(Tl) scintillators and germanium detectors. Until recently, difficulties with obtaining sufficient xenon purity, reducing microphonic sensitivity, and developing low-noise electronics compatible with small ionization signals have hampered the development of this nuclear detection field. Constellation Technology Corporation, whose experience with xenon detectors goes back to the mid 1990s, has made significant progress in these areas and has developed a commercial line of detectors with active volumes ranging from small (35 g Xe) to large (1400 g Xe). Current applications for Constellation's detectors are principally in the area of defense (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and Advanced Spectroscopic Portals), but as awareness of this technology grows, it will surely find applications in a much expanded range of fields.

  7. Rand Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Toggle Search Site-wide Search Search RAND RAND Corporation Provides Objective Research Services and Public Policy Analysis ... on Twitter Share on LinkedIn About The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to ...

  8. The historical development of business philanthropy: social responsibility in the new corporate economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetto, M

    1999-01-01

    According to neo-liberal economists such as Friedman and Hayek, the prime function of any business enterprise is to generate profits; its central responsibility is to shareholders. The idea that business owners should also seek to perform social tasks is regarded as completely erroneous. Historical evidence suggests that not all business leaders have been content simply to perform a commercial role in society. Numerous industrialists and entrepreneurs throughout the nineteenth century made significant contributions to their local communities. The early efforts of socially responsible business leaders are well documented. This paper aims to build on existing historical analysis of business philanthropy and social involvement by analysing developments in post-war Britain. Three main historical developments are outlined. Firstly, the early post-war years, despite the formation of the welfare state, witnessed some notable efforts to engage business in society. These were mainly inspired by church-led organisations and Christian entrepreneurs. Second, the expansion of the corporate economy throughout the 1940s and 1950s placed increasing constraints on the social aspirations of businesses. Finally, from the mid-1970s onwards there grew a more general interest in corporate responsibility. This was consolidated in the 1980s. As part of the general redefinition of state functions in this period, the role of business in addressing social problems became more prominent. Such political and policy developments, it is argued, have made a significant contribution towards enhancing the social role of business.

  9. Creativity development in community contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glaveanu, Vlad Petre

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the development of creativity in the context of folk art within an urban and rural community in Romania. It adopts a cultural psychological perspective on development, linking it to children's participation in community activities, as well as creativity, considered in relation...... of developmental tendencies and socialisation practices, as well as their implications for how we understand and foster children's creative expression....

  10. CORPORATE BOND MARKET OF REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT COMPANIES IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Gostkowska-Drzewicka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article examines the features that determine the attractivenessof bonds as a financing instrument for real estate development projects in Poland, and the share of debt securities and bonds in the financing structure of real estate development companies. The implementation of such a formulated purpose required the application of methods of statistical description. Research was conducted on the basis of data from the statistics made by Fitch Ratings Polska, Catalyst, Narodowy Bank Polski, Związek Banków Polskich and the financial statements of bond issuers. The basic research period covers the years 1998-2012. However, due to the lack of published data about the structure of financing of development companies, interest rates, the nominal value, the bond structure by the buyers, the type, the purpose of issuance and the form of security, long-term studies were reduced to shorter periods. Results of the research indicate that the corporate bond market of development companies was in the phase of intensive growth in 2004-2012. Availability of funds obtained through the issuance of bonds increased by the establishment of appropriate infrastructure in 2009. The downturn in the real estate market initiated a series of structural changes in the financing of development companies in 2008- 2009. High margins and restrictive creditworthiness assessment brought on a search for alternative sources of financing. Due to restrictions imposed by the Act of 29th April 2012on the protection of the buyer of a dwelling or a single-family-house, it became important to provide flexible funding sources for development projects, including bond issuances.

  11. Corporate Social Responsibility Applied for Rural Development: An Empirical Analysis of Firms from the American Continent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Arato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility has been recognized by policymakers and development specialists as a feasible driver for rural development. The present paper explores both theoretically and empirically how firms involved in CSR provide development opportunities to rural communities. The research first evaluates the applied literature on the implementation of CSR by private firms and policymakers as means to foster sustainable rural development. The empirical research analyses the CSR activities of 100 firms from a variety of industries, sizes, and countries to determine the type of companies who are involved in rural development and the kind of activities they deployed. Results from the empirical research show that although rural development initiatives are not relevant for all types of companies, a significant number of firms from a variety of industries have engaged in CSR programs supporting rural communities. Firms appear to be interested in stimulating rural development and seem to benefit from it. This paper also includes an exploration of the main challenges and constraints that firms encounter when encouraging rural development initiatives.

  12. 20 Year Snap-Shot of the Developments in the Regulation of Small Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Adams

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explored the history of the regulation of corporate bodies through State and Commonwealth systems beginning in 1989 that resulted in the development of the legislation impacting on small proprietary company for over 20 years. The introduction of the Corporate Governance Principles for listed companies by the Australian Securities Exchange added another layer of regulation intended to promote transparency and accountability. Research into corporate governance in small companies showed that, in contrast to opinions about the US Legislation, very few Australian companies expressed negative views about corporate governance regulation. The most recent addition to corporate governance regulation has been the expectation that companies have a responsibility for corporate social responsibility. This was illustrated by the James Hardy Industries case.

  13. Corporate finding and development costs, 1984-1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecu, J.; Ziff, P.H.

    The purpose of this study is to compare the relative efficiency of 42 leading oil and gas producers in finding and developing new hydrocarbon reserves in western Canada over 1984-1986. In the absence of established and widely accepted Canadian norms for individual performance, a uniform methodology and calculated consistent corporate performance standards have been defined. The study focuses on full-cycle economics, and the study approach includes both exploration and development costs providing the most relevant measure for total company performance. Finding cost is also presented throughout the study as a special sub-case. The aggregate finding and development cost results of bbl oil equivalent (BOE) for the 1984-1986 period was higher than expected. There seems to be a significant gap between that figure and the going concern value of typical reserves in western Canada. It is calculated that a large number of companies were unable to replace their depleting hydrocarbon reserves at cost levels which would assure a 12% after-tax return on investment. Over the 3 year period analyzed, the finding and development cost figures rose steadily, while the BOE replacement ratios dropped. The revisions recorded between 1984-1986 were very significant, influencing materially both the costs and reserve additions. While oil discoveries and extensions were dropping, but revisions were strongly positive, the gas discoveries were on the rise and had substantial negative revisions. There are significant variations between the efficiencies of the 3 industry sectors. Each sector tends to have a characteristic cost and replacement profile, but within each group there are companies with unique strategies which outperform their peers. 9 figs.

  14. Linking public sector corporate social responsibility with sustainable development: lessons from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhasis Ray

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Economic think tanks predict India to be the world’s largest economy by 2050. This would require India to accelerate its industrial and infrastructure development. Industrialization based economic development will have a negative impact on the environment and hence sustainable development. Such steps could affect the social and environmental bottom line of the national economy. In recent years, a number of regulatory measures have been proposed by the Indian government to ensure corporate support to the goals of sustainable and inclusive development. The objective of these regulations is to achieve triple bottom line based growth. Notable among them is the mandatory Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR guidelines for public sector undertakings, first issued in April, 2010. I study the possibility and problems created by this effort by analyzing the policy documents and interviewing managers responsible for implementing CSR programmers in Indian public sector. Managers interviewed came from hydropower, coal, power distribution and shipping industries. Based on the study, four areas are identified that requires attention for effective linking between sustainable development and CSR; stakeholder engagement, institutional mechanisms, capacity building and knowledge management. Both government-public sector and public sector-community engagements have to be more streamlined. Institutional mechanisms have to be developed to see that CSR projects are effective and delivering. Importantly, managers at all levels need a better understanding of CSR and sustainable development. Since most projects are in rural areas, understanding of rural issues and sustainability is very important. Finally, such a large scale exercise in CSR should have a knowledge management mechanism to learn from the achievements and mistakes of the early years. I discuss the implication of the findings on India and other emerging economies many of which are struggling to balance

  15. Communicating Community at Tesla Motors: Maintaining Corporate Values in Blogging Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Lashley, Brandon Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Knowing how organizations engage employees can help researchers and practitioners better understand how to effectively communicate and engage employees to create an efficient and collaborative work environment. This research sought to discover if Tesla Motors strategically communicated values from its Master Plan through company blogs to create an imagined community. The theory of imagined communities provided the theoretical foundation. This research used a content analysis of words and phra...

  16. Corporate social responsibility for implementation of sustainable energy development in Baltic States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streimikiene, Dalia [Vilnius M. Romeris University, Ateities g., LT-08303 Vilnius (Lithuania); Simanaviciene, Zaneta; Kovaliov, Ruslan [Kaunas Technological University, Faculty of Economics and Management, Laisves al. 55, LT-44309 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2009-05-15

    This article analyses the main problems and challenges of corporate social responsibility in energy sector in Baltic States. Development of socially responsible business in energy sector can provide for the implementation of sustainable energy development without state interventions. This voluntary measure implemented by energy enterprises can ensure efficient public-private partnership in achieving sustainable development targets. The analysis of corporate social responsibility development in energy sector of Baltic States is provided and positive impact of corporate social responsibility on sustainable energy development is evaluated. (author)

  17. Wiki as a Corporate Learning Tool: Case Study for Software Development Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Milos; Minovic, Miroslav; Stavljanin, Velimir; Savkovic, Marko; Starcevic, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    In our study, we attempted to further investigate how Web 2.0 technologies influence workplace learning. Our particular interest was on using Wiki as a tool for corporate exchange of knowledge with the focus on informal learning. In this study, we collaborated with a multinational software development company that uses Wiki as a corporate tool…

  18. Governance through learning: making corporate social responsibility in dutch industry effective from a sustainable development perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, J.M.; Loeber, A.

    2004-01-01

    An increasing number of firms try to implement corporate social responsibility (CSR) from the perspective of sustainable development. This article considers these efforts in the light of the changing relation between the state, society and the corporate sector, as a result of which governance

  19. Wiki as a Corporate Learning Tool: Case Study for Software Development Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Milos; Minovic, Miroslav; Stavljanin, Velimir; Savkovic, Marko; Starcevic, Dusan

    2012-01-01

    In our study, we attempted to further investigate how Web 2.0 technologies influence workplace learning. Our particular interest was on using Wiki as a tool for corporate exchange of knowledge with the focus on informal learning. In this study, we collaborated with a multinational software development company that uses Wiki as a corporate tool…

  20. Sustainable Development: The Challenge for Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Dorothy N.; Weil, Marie O.

    1997-01-01

    Five areas of inquiry shape the sustainable development movement: environmental movement, women's movement, overpopulation concerns, critique of development models, and new indicators of social progress. Community development workers are challenged to prepare local development projects within a sustainable development framework. (SK)

  1. Sustainable Development: The Challenge for Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Dorothy N.; Weil, Marie O.

    1997-01-01

    Five areas of inquiry shape the sustainable development movement: environmental movement, women's movement, overpopulation concerns, critique of development models, and new indicators of social progress. Community development workers are challenged to prepare local development projects within a sustainable development framework. (SK)

  2. Educating the Engineer for Sustainable Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, D. R.

    2008-12-01

    More than ever before, we are confronting the challenges of limited resources (water, food, energy and mineral), while also facing complex challenges with the environment and related social unrest. Resource access problems are exacerbated by multi-scale geopolitical instability. We seek a balance that will allow profit but also leave a world fit for our children to inherit. Many are working with small groups to make positive change through finding solutions that address these challenges. In fact, some say that in sum, it is the largest human movement that has ever existed. In this talk I will share our experiences to alleviate vulnerabilities for populations of humans in need while working with students, corporate entities and non governmental organizations. Our main focus is to educate a new cadre of engineers that have an enhanced awareness of and better communication skills for a different cultural environment than the one in which they were raised and are hungry to seek new opportunities to serve humanity at a basic level. The results of a few of the more than forty humanitarian engineering projects completed since 2003 will be superimposed on a theoretical framework for sustainable community development. This will be useful information to those seeking a social corporate position of responsibility and a world that more closely approaches a sustainable equilibrium.

  3. Faculty development for community practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, T G

    1996-12-01

    Developing the academic skills of the individuals who will serve as educators and role models in the community is critical to pediatric resident education in community settings. The main focus of any faculty development program must be on teaching, although for a subset of individuals, the development of research skills should also be a consideration. The three key elements that must be considered for an effective faculty development program include: (1) creating a culture of mutual respect between full-time and community faculty; (2) basing the program on sound principles of education theory, especially adult learning theory, using appropriately trained faculty; and (3) establishing ongoing institutional financial and philosophical support. Effectively addressing these elements should create a faculty development program that will help the community practitioner become an effective role model and practitioner- preceptor-educator.

  4. Corporate social responsibility: Benefits for youth in hydropower development in Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Stephen

    2014-04-01

    The role of the state as regulator combined with policies on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) that go beyond legal requirements to establishing programmes that promote development and good international business practice is an emerging new paradigm. In this paper, the example of a state-owned company, Statkraft A.S. of Norway, and its recent hydropower investment in central Laos illustrates how policy, implementation and follow-up can lead to benefits for local communities in the impacted area of the Theun-Hinboun Expansion Project (THXP). Programmes include both support for and improvement of existing government education programmes, employment opportunities and specific programmes for youth. They have been designed to mitigate possible negative effects of the influx of workers and rapid socio-economic change in the affected area. Young people continue to have a central role in the implementation of these programmes as peer educators under the supervision of project staff and non-governmental organisations (NGOs).

  5. Corporate social responsibility and sustainable development. A Schaeffler Romania case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Florina Iuga; Ruxandra-Gabriela Albu

    2016-01-01

      The aim of this paper is to analyse corporate social responsibility and sustainable development at Schaeffler Romania, in the light of the educational programmes the company has designed and developed over the years...

  6. New Product Development. Engineering and Commerce Students Join Forces with a Corporate Sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Josee; Pegna, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical engineering and business student teams developed new products using a corporate sponsor's technology in a simulated business setting. Students learned about product development and venture start-up, and the sponsor gained new applications for its patented technology. (SK)

  7. New Product Development. Engineering and Commerce Students Join Forces with a Corporate Sponsor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audet, Josee; Pegna, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Mechanical engineering and business student teams developed new products using a corporate sponsor's technology in a simulated business setting. Students learned about product development and venture start-up, and the sponsor gained new applications for its patented technology. (SK)

  8. THE FORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF CORPORATE CULTURE OF THE MEDICAL ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Zadvornaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of formation and development of corporate culture as the main factor of the successful functioning of medical organization in terms of optimization of activity of the health system. Discusses the importance and main directions of development of corporate culture for personal and organizational development. The authors identified features of the corporate culture of healthcare organizations, the approaches, showing the sequence and contents of the main practical activities on the formation, maintenance and development of corporate culture. Emphasized the need for further research and introduction of corporate culture and cultural values in health care organizations. Purpose/ objectives: to Study and evaluate the corporate culture of healthcare organizations to improve institutional management and increase of efficiency activity of medical organizations. Materials and methods: For data collection methods were used: direct observation, interviews, questionnaires. In conducting this study used data from official sources, a literature review, a systematic approach, comparative analysis, historical, sociological, statistical research methods. The results of the study indicate the need for concept development, tools implementation and development of corporate culture in the practice of the medical organizations.Conclusions/Significance: Corporate culture – the system of collectively shared values, symbols, beliefs, standards of behaviour employees of the organization that contributes to the originality and uniqueness of the activities of medical organizations that promote the identification of employees with the organization; Corporate culture is formed with the influence of factors external and internal environment of the organization, solving problems, external adaptation  and internal integration in the environment; Generated and promoted by the corporate culture is an important management tool, creates

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF CORRUPTION ON CORPORATE GOVERNANCE STANDARDS: SHARED CHARACTERISTICS OF RAPIDLY DEVELOPING ECONOMIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle I. Caron

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates the relationship between the level of corruption in rapidly developing economies and corporate governance processes therein.  Previous literature illustrates a strong relationship between corporate governance and corruption and suggests that in countries with high levels of corruption, firms lack efficient corporate governance practices.  Similarly, countries with deficient corporate governance practices and low levels of compliance to these standards breed corruption leading to a wide range of transparency dilemmas.  This study delves deeper through careful examination regarding the level of compliance with corporate governance standards and the pervasive effects of corruption on the governance processes of firms with specific regard to rapidly developing economies as well as offering comparisons and similarities of shared characteristics among these countries.

  10. Corporate Povery Reduction : Perspectives on collaboration between CSR and Development Assistance

    OpenAIRE

    Bengtsson, Sophia; Hansson, Kajsa

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, governments are the main providers of development assistance and re-sponsible for stimulating social development in the third world. In recent years, Corpo-rate Social Responsibility has gained considerable ground and it is now common for corporations to get involved in activities resembling those carried out in the name of development assistance. A deconstruction of these two activities shows that they could be described as two definitions of the same concept. Through a set of...

  11. Effective Regional Community Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Rebecca; Merkowitz, Rose Fisher

    2014-01-01

    Times are changing, and so are Extension programs. These changes affect every aspect of the educational effort, including program development, project funding, educational delivery, partnership building, marketing, sharing impacts, and revenue generation. This article is not about how Extension is restructuring to adapt to changes; instead, it…

  12. DEVELOPMENT OF A PERSONA METHOD FOR PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT IN LARGE CORPORATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Naenfeldt, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the goal and behaviour of end users is difficult. Moreover, silo thinking is common in large corporations. Needed are methods that support an understanding of the users’ needs as well as improve communication among development departments that require different needs and information. A Persona is a fictional person based on interviews or other data collecting methods, that describes the users’ needs, goals and issues with the product. This thesis describes a Persona method speci...

  13. Intellectual capital and relational capital: The role of sustainability in developing corporate reputation Intellectual capital and relational capital: The role of sustainability in developing corporate reputation Intellectual capital and relational capital: The role of sustainability in developing corporate reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Rodríguez del Bosque

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intellectual capital offers a potential source of sustainable competitive advantage and is believed to be the source from which economic growth may sprout. However, not many papers analyze the effect of sustainability in the elements involving intellectual capital. This paper seeks to highlight the key role played by corporate sustainability on corporate reputation as one of the key components of relational capital based on the knowledge-based theory.Design/methodology/approach: Authors develop a structural equation model to test the hypothesis. The study was tested using data collected from a sample of 400 Spanish consumers.Findings: The structural equation model shows that sustainability plays a vital role as antecedent of corporate reputation and relational capital. Findings suggest that economic, social and environmental domains of sustainability have a positive direct effect on corporate reputation. Additionally, this study shows that economic sustainability is considered to be the most important dimension to enhance corporate reputation.Research limitations/implications: The complicated economic environment currently experienced worldwide may affect the perceptions of Spanish consumers and their ratings. The crosscutting nature of this research inhibits an understanding of the variations in the perceptions of the customers surveyed over time, suggesting that this research could be expanded by a longitudinal study. Finally, the current study has been conducted with consumers of hotel companies in Spain and it is not clear in how far the findings can be generalized to other industries, stakeholders or countries.Practical implications: This research allows managers to identify the activities in which companies can devote resources to in order to increase firm´s reputation. By knowing these specific economic, social and environmental activities, companies can understand, analyze and make decisions in a better way about its sector and

  14. FMA Roundtable on New Developments in European Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elson, Charles; Berglund, Tom; Rapp, Marc Steffen

    2017-01-01

    -based system, with its dispersed share ownership, lots of takeovers, and an otherwise vigorous market for corporate control; and the relationship-based, or “main bank,” system associated with Japan, Germany, and continental Europe generally. The distinguishing features of the relationship-based system...... are large controlling shareholders, including the main banks themselves, and few takeovers or other signs of a well-functioning corporate control market. Given the steady increase in the globalization of business and international diversification by large institutional investors, the panelists were asked...... have already begun to look much like those in the U.S. and U.K., with much less reliance on bank loans and greater use of bonds and public equity. And these financing changes have resulted in major changes in ownership structures that have seen local main banks largely supplanted by foreign...

  15. The role of corporate governance in transition economies: contribution and development

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVERA GJORGIEVA-TRAJKOVSKA; KRUME NIKOLOSKI; BLAGICA KOLEVA; VESNA GEORGIEVA SVRTINOV

    2016-01-01

    With more evident process of globalization of the world market, the concept of corporate governance gains importance. The global economic crisis highlighted the problems of corporate governance both in developed countries and developing economies. Analyzing the effects of the global economic crisis, including striking collapse of many companies, the huge increase in unemployment and the increased number of people living on the poverty line and below, it can be concluded that some ...

  16. Impact of corporate social responsibility on sustainable enterprise development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danubianu Mirela

    2017-06-01

    Top management endorsement and nomination of a complex CSR teamDeveloping formal company CSR policy documentsSelecting and engaging the company’s stakeholders as early as possible.Building a Project Advisory Board – useful in every modern managerial tool application should guide the progress toward CSR.An external facilitator would help solve internal conflicts.An audit of what CSR represents for the Company, what are the CSR options, e.g., promoting a “green company” profile, what would be the best impact of philanthropy and community volunteering, etc.Generate a CSR portfolio of actions, setting deadlines, responsibilities and allocating resources, establishing communication, reporting, monitoring and corrective proceduresupgrading the sustainable enterprise strategy.

  17. CORPORATE BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AS A SET OF ECONOMIC CONDITIONS FOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A. Gusar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intellectual resources are widely used in the formation of corporate business environment. This environment is a new phenomenon in the system of socio-economic relations. The corporate business environment is a set of economic conditions for the development of entrepreneurship, business life. In this environment, exercise more incentives to work, increasing the level of economic freedom, including the freedom of movement of the resource, including intellectual, production components. It is therefore important and necessary to give its definition from the perspective of both economic and organizational-administrative relations, which is a key objective of this research. In addition, the article carried out a comprehensive assessment of how the corporate environment for the development of regional business and knowledge of the mechanisms of the effect of factors internal and external environment for the development of corporate business environment.

  18. Influences of Corporate Governance on the Relationship between Corruption and Economic Growth--Developed Countries versus Emerging Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Tzu-Yun Tseng; Tsaur-Chin Wu

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have proposed that corporate governance has a positive effect on anti-corruption. The paper further investigates the effects of corporate governance on the corruption-economic growth relationship at the national level. Three major corporate governance mechanisms are discussed: efficacy of corporate boards, strength of auditing and financial reporting standards, and protection of minority shareholders’ interests. Using a balanced panel data set of 55 countries (26 developed cou...

  19. Development of Public Market of Corporate Bonds in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Prewysz-Kwinto

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available By the end of 2010, corporate bonds had not been very popular in Poland. Most of the issues were not public, which limited their volume and value, and mainly resulted from the lack of a proper public market for trading. The situation changed in September 2009 when the Warsaw Stock Exchange launched the bond market Catalyst that is a public market for trading in debt instruments. The aim of this work is to analyse corporate bonds available on Catalyst to prove that this market has become a significant place for raising capital by companies and has influenced popularity of bonds as a source of financing business activity. The primary methods used during the preparation of this work included: analysis of legal acts and papers on the Catalyst market. The author also conducted an analysis of statistical data on, for example, number of issuers as well as the volume and value of issues over the whole period of Catalyst operations, i.e. from September 2009 until the end of the first half of 2014.The analysis allowed achieving the aim and confirmed that launching the Catalyst market encouraged companies to raise funding through issues of bonds.

  20. Corporate Universities and Corporation- University Partnerships in Thailand: Complimenting Education in Learning, Leadership and Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S. Crocco

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With an estimated workforce of 285 million and the establishment of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN Economic Community in 2015, ASEAN faces vast challenges in human resource development (HRD and higher education. These challenges in Thailand have resulted in the rise of corporate universities and corporation-university partnerships. Corporate partnerships in education adapt quickly to industry needs and are increasingly popular and complimentary to traditional higher education. This research looks at one corporate university and one corporation-university partnership to investigate how, if at all, corporate universities and partnerships address HRD issues such as adult learning, leadership development, organisational change, corporate social responsibility (CSR, as well as ethical and global issues. This research finds initial evidence that corporate educational strategies address a variety of HRD issues and have the potential to revolutionise and compliment higher education in Thailand in a way that drives the nation toward a more sustainable future.

  1. Influential Factors and Strategy of Sustainable Product Development under Corporate Social Responsibility in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Che Tu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to adopt the perspective of corporate social responsibility (CSR to explore the intention of sustainable product development in Taiwan, as well as leading to the creation of influential factors that affect corporate sustainable product development intention. In this research, the induction analysis was conducted to understand the implementation of sustainable product development, and this was supplemented with questionnaire surveys and in-depth interviews to evaluate developmental intention. In addition, principal component analysis was used for factor analysis and content analysis in the 6 W expression method, leading to the creation of the influential factors. The research results have demonstrated that the factors affecting the intention of corporate sustainable product development include having a sustainable design and a development purpose, a corporate development purpose, sustainable development concepts, a sustainable design value, a sustainability concept, and a manufacturing process quality. For sustainable product development, corporate social responsibility needs to be most concerned with the added value of products, regulation requirements, and accommodation of the industrial chain, costs, and quality.

  2. IMPROVED METHODS FOR EVALUATING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INNOVATION DEVELOPMENT IN RUSSIAN CORPORATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Dorzhieva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Innovative activity is a key factor in the effective development and growth of competitiveness in the Russian economy. An important role in this process is played by industrial corporations. Against this background, there is an increased need for improving the effectiveness of methods for evaluating the innovation development of Russian corporations. Methods. Formal logic as well as system analysis methods were used in the research, allowing us to consider the corporation as a system that includes a variety of innovational directions (elements. Results. The article discusses various approaches to the determination of the basic definitions of innovation; a classification of innovation is proposed. The attributes of innovative activity of industrial corporations are distinguished together with an outline of the possible causes of various innovative corporate activities; components of the system of indicators of innovation activity are isolated: financial; consumer; process; development and training; risk management. The need for the indices of the innovation activity of the risk component to be included in the composition of the system is substantiated. It is shown how the objectives for each area of innovation may be achieved in tandem with a methodological approach that allows continuous monitoring of the implementation of innovative development strategies. An algorithm for evaluating the implementation of innovative strategies contributing to the development of industrial corporations is presented. Conclusion. Theoretical and methodological development can be used not only to navigate the variety of innovations but also to determine and establish the relationship and interdependence between the various innovations as well as carry out analysis, assessment and forecasting for the effective development of innovative activity of Russian corporations

  3. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT IN FRESHWATER MICROCOSMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.

    1978-01-01

    Two cylindrical freshwater microcosms with a volume of 700 {ell} were maintained under controlled laboratory conditions for 190 days. The two microcosms were identical with regard to initial chemical composition and biological inocula, with the exceptions that in one microcosm (designated Tank 2) mosquitofish (Gambusia) and herbivorous catfish (Placostomas) were added. Three distinct communities developed in the tanks: (1) a phytoplankton-zooplankton assemblage and (2) two periphyton-zoobenthos communities associated with the sides and bottom of the tank, respectively. Community development and successional patterns were similar in both tanks. Major differences between the tanks involved timing of succession of the zooplankton and zoobenthos, attributable to predation by fish, principally Gambusia. A major drawback for these microcosms as use for experimental analogs such as lakes was a luxuriant periphyton growth which eventually overwhelmed the biomass of the system. The tanks displayed a degree of successional replicability, a large number of species, and a diversity of community development. Microcosms of this size could find use as experimental systems for higher level trophic manipulation and observation of life cycles not amenable to field studies.

  4. Sustainable development and communities : lessons from Yanacocha, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, G. [Newmont Mining Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The implications that the theory of enactment has for the way mining companies relate to communities were discussed with particular reference to Newmont Mining Corporation's experiences with the Yanacocha mine in Peru. The theory of enactment states that 'the environment that the organization worries about is put there by the organization'. Newmont is the world's largest gold company. It is relatively small with a capitalization of about $10 billion. Although company policies are carried out with the highest degree of sensitivity to local concerns, sometimes there is tension between corporate and site visions of reality. The paper referred to an event at Yanacocha mine in which a woman put a small amount of mercury in a glass of drinking water, claiming it had come from her kitchen tap. The event sparked an uprise from 400 members of the community who threatened the mine's administration offices. In another incident, a truck carrying mercury from Cajamarca to Lima accidentally spilled 150 kgs on the road through three communities. Newmont spent US$17 million to replace and repave roads and to bring in health experts, but as months passed, the people of the community were still upset. Tensions began to ease when Co-Development Canada, a small Vancouver-based NGO, got involved by working inside the community to help it identify what the issues were rather than try to fix parts of it.

  5. Community Development in Brazil: Two Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Frances; Speyer, Anne Marie; Tedrus, Maria Aparecida L.

    1998-01-01

    O'Gorman provides "Five Points for Reflection" on nongovernmental and community organizations in Brazil. Speyer and Tedrus discuss "Community Libraries: An Experience in Community Development in the Periphery of Sao Paulo." (SK)

  6. Developing Learning Communities: Using Communities of Practice within Community Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawthom, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The idea that communities need to be inclusive is almost axiomatic. The process, whereby, community members engage in inclusive practices is far less understood. Similarly, UK universities are being encouraged to include the wider community and extent campus boundaries. Here, I suggest a particular theoretical lens which sheds light on engagement…

  7. Exploring opportunities for collaboration between the corporate sector and the dental education community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, D; Clarkson, J; Buchanan, R

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate purpose of both dental industry and dental education is to improve the oral health of the public. This report provides background information on the different roles and objectives of the dental industry and dental education communities, the different operating environment of each...... sector and also areas of common interest where collaboration will be of mutual benefit. The report addresses five areas for potential collaboration between the dental industry and the dental education communities: 1. Contribution to joint activities. 2. Effectiveness and efficiency. 3. Workforce needs. 4...... develop best business practices should be explored. Industry has responded well to the oral health needs of the public through the development of new products and technologies. The education community needs to respond in a similar way by examining different healthcare delivery models worldwide...

  8. Lurking: a challenge or a fruitful strategy? A comparison between lurkers and active participants in an online corporate community of practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirjam, Neelen; Sibren, Fetter

    2011-01-01

    Neelen, M., & Fetter, S. (2010). Lurking: a challenge or a fruitful strategy? A comparison between lurkers and active participants in an online corporate community of practice. International Journal of Knowledge and Learning, 6(4), 269-284.

  9. Corporate information management guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

  10. Biofilms: a developing microscopic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivera Sandra Patricia

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are microbial communities composed by different microbiota embebbed in a special adaptive environment. These communities show different characteristics such as heterogeneity, diversity in microenvironments, capacity to resist antimicrobial therapy and ability to allow bacterial communication. These characteristics convert them in complex organizations that are difficult to eradicate in their own environment. In the man, biofilms are associated to a great number of slow-development infectious processes which greatly difficulties their eradication. In the industry and environment, biofilms are centered in processes known as biofouling and bioremediation. The former is the contamination of a system due to the microbial activity of a biofilm. The latter uses biofilms to improve the conditions of a contaminated system. The study of biofilms is a new and exciting field which is constantly evolving and whose implications in medicine and industry would have important repercussions for the humankind.

  11. Perceived social norms, expectations, and attitudes toward corporal punishment among an urban community sample of parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine A; Hamvas, Lauren; Rice, Janet; Newman, Denise L; DeJong, William

    2011-04-01

    Despite the fact that corporal punishment (CP) is a significant risk factor for increased aggression in children, child physical abuse victimization, and other poor outcomes, approval of CP remains high in the United States. Having a positive attitude toward CP use is a strong and malleable predictor of CP use and, therefore, is an important potential target for reducing use of CP. The Theory of Planned Behavior suggests that parents' perceived injunctive and descriptive social norms and expectations regarding CP use might be linked with CP attitudes and behavior. A random-digit-dial telephone survey of parents from an urban community sample (n = 500) was conducted. Perceived social norms were the strongest predictors of having positive attitudes toward CP, as follows: (1) perceived approval of CP by professionals (β = 0.30), (2) perceived descriptive norms of CP use (β = 0.22), and (3) perceived approval of CP by family and friends (β = 0.19); also, both positive (β = 0.13) and negative (β = -0.13) expected outcomes for CP use were strong predictors of these attitudes. Targeted efforts are needed to both assess and shift the attitudes and practices of professionals who influence parents regarding CP use; universal efforts, such as public education campaigns, are needed to educate parents and the general public about the high risk/benefit ratio for using CP and the effectiveness of non-physical forms of child discipline.

  12. Developing Managerial Talent: Exploring the Link between Management Talent and Perceived Performance in Multinational Corporations (MNCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Maura

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between talent management (TM) and perceived subsidiary performance. Focus is given to the development of one key talent group--line managers--in subsidiaries of multinational corporations (MNCs). Specifically, the paper examines: whether there is a positive relationship between Management Development (MD) and…

  13. Adult Education and Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Krajnc

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Community education means a new way of connecting knowledge with what people create. It increases the applicability of knowledge and con­ nects education with the direct needs of people. There are quite few things one can do by him/her­ self. Mainly one is dependent on the things he/she can create together with others. In non-democratic societies people get used to being given solutions from above, which is why they can wait for some­ one else (especially institutions to solve their problems while they remain passive. Socio-economic and political changes require from the people in Slovenia to redefine their attitude to the environment and life in general and to assume an active role. Community education means learning in groups of interested people in order to reach a certain goal or find a solution to a certain problem, e. g. establishing a local museum, publishing a tourist guide, constructing a bypass to decrease the traffic in town, erecting a monument, protecting green areas, introducing new forms of child care, solving problems of the disabled, unemployment and income maintenance, etc. People leam in order to be able to work. There are two goals which are always present: product and knowledge. People leam parallelly with the phases of work in order to achieve certain goal. It is typical of community education that it was developed in order to meet the needs of local people explicitly. It is therefore of great importance for adult educators facilitating problem-solving based on knowledge to get to know the real needs of people first. Generallack of knowledge is manifested in functional illiteracy. As long as people are unable to communicate orally or by writing with the others, their activities are blocked and they cannot help themselves. They can only live a dependent life, based on help expected from others, which nowadays is not possible any more. Each individual has to be responsible for his/her own survival. In the present

  14. REVEALING THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT EQUILIBRIUM THROUGH CATASTROPHE BONDS, SOCIAL CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE FOR THE EUROPEAN REINSURANCE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTIN LAURA-GABRIELA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper investigates the equilibrium for the three components of corporate sustainable development (SD by focusing on a sample of EU-based reinsurance companies, for the 2010-2013 period, while proposing, to our knowledge, an innovative approach from the perspective of the environmental and social components. In order to represent these two edges, two indexes are developed. The index representing the environmental component mirrors the presence on the catastrophe bonds market of the analysed companies. The second index revolves around the social component and concentrates on those achievements regarding the corporate support for the general community social advance. In methodological terms, the analysis is developed by considering both a static and a dynamic outline. The dynamic analysis is developed within a comparative framework for analysing the SD equilibrium, both at the level of the two indices and at the level of their main components. The static outline considers the cluster analysis in order to capture the SD balanced by grouping the companies in line with their social and environmental accomplishments and comparing the outcomes according to their economic performance. The main results reveal good social development equilibrium at the level of the analysed companies reflected through the association between better environmental and social achievements and higher economic performance.

  15. REVEALING THE SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT EQUILIBRIUM THROUGH CATASTROPHE BONDS, SOCIAL CORPORATE ENGAGEMENT AND ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE FOR THE EUROPEAN REINSURANCE INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CONSTANTIN LAURA-GABRIELA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper investigates the equilibrium for the three components of corporate sustainable development (SD by focusing on a sample of EU-based reinsurance companies, for the 2010-2013 period, while proposing, to our knowledge, an innovative approach from the perspective of the environmental and social components. In order to represent these two edges, two indexes are developed. The index representing the environmental component mirrors the presence on the catastrophe bonds market of the analysed companies. The second index revolves around the social component and concentrates on those achievements regarding the corporate support for the general community social advance. In methodological terms, the analysis is developed by considering both a static and a dynamic outline. The dynamic analysis is developed within a comparative framework for analysing the SD equilibrium, both at the level of the two indices and at the level of their main components. The static outline considers the cluster analysis in order to capture the SD balanced by grouping the companies in line with their social and environmental accomplishments and comparing the outcomes according to their economic performance. The main results reveal good social development equilibrium at the level of the analysed companies reflected through the association between better environmental and social achievements and higher economic performance

  16. 26 CFR 1.955-2 - Amount of a controlled foreign corporation's qualified investments in less developed countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... qualified investments in less developed countries. 1.955-2 Section 1.955-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE...'s “qualified investments in less developed countries” are items of property (other than property... following: (1) Stock of a less developed country corporation if the controlled foreign corporation...

  17. Developing a sense of virtual community measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Anita L

    2007-12-01

    Sense of virtual community is an important feature of virtual communities. This study develops a sense of virtual community (SOVC) measure, building off the strengths of a widely used measure of sense of community (SOC) for face-to-face communities. Although there is overlap between the senses of community for face-to-face and virtual communities, there are significant differences. The new SOVC measure is compared to the SOC measure on 265 members of seven online groups, explaining at least 7% more of the variance from exchanging support and member identification. This study represents an important step in developing a valid measure of SOCV.

  18. TRAINING OF RURAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AGENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Ionescu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Community development might be a solution to reduce delays, and it was implemented by the involved players of the community. It asks to identify the common problems, community response, and network partnership. Sustainable development means to refuse fatality, community entropy and to undertake negentropic actions. Its finality is the respect for the human being, not compromising the capacity of the future generations to live at least as we do, if not better. We can identify on the field the necessary elements for (reconstructing some sustainable developed communities. The author identifies successful experiences, examples of good practices in the context of globalization and communitization, homogenization and heterogenization. Rural community development starts with acknowledging importance of the village and of its capacities to use opportunities to act in a constructive manner. After providing definitions for community development, social and solidary economy and sustainable development, the associations` role, the author dwells on the training, profile and tasks of the rural community development agent.

  19. Corporate Taxation and BEPS : A Fair Slice for Developing Countries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgers, Irene; Mosquera, Irma

    The aim of this article is to examine the differences in perception of ‘fairness’ between developing and developed countries, which influence developing countries’ willingness to embrace the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) proposals and to recommend as to how to overcome these differences.

  20. Corporate Taxation and BEPS: A Fair Slice for Developing Countries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Burgers (Irene); I. Mosquera (Irma)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this article is to examine the differences in perception of ‘fairness’ between developing and developed countries, which influence developing countries’ willingness to embrace the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) proposals and to recommend as to how to overcome these

  1. Issues for Community Development: Some Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Quintin; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Includes "Community Development in Areas of Political and Social Conflict" (Oliver); "Women and Development in Peru" (Barrig); "Some Reflections on Community Development Experiences in Brazil" (O'Gorman); "Informal Networks for Pre-School Children in a Black Community in South Africa" (Lines); "The…

  2. Studies on the Development of Interest Group Populations in Corporative Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisker, Helene Marie

    This dissertation investigates how the Danish population of interest groups develops over time and whether population mechanisms, societal factors, and corporative institutions can explain this development. How interest group populations develop and which factors explain this development...... are important questions with implications for the quality of democracy. The answers can indicate the degree of bias and diversity in interest group populations. Earlier studies have especially focused on snapshots of the composition of interest group populations and not on the dynamics and development...... of populations. The dissertation attempts to fill this gap in the literature by investigating the development of a total interest group population. The central claim of the dissertation is that societal factors and population dynamics can explain how a population develops and that corporative institutions...

  3. Corporate Social Responsibility: Benefits for Youth in Hydropower Development in Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The role of the state as regulator combined with policies on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) that go beyond legal requirements to establishing programmes that promote development and good international business practice is an emerging new paradigm. In this paper, the example of a state-owned company, Statkraft A.S. of Norway, and its recent…

  4. The Effect of Program Setting and Duration on Corporate Team Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, Simon

    1998-01-01

    This study determined whether program setting (camp versus hotel) and program duration (five one-day sessions or a single five-day session) had any impact on development of teamwork in a corporate adventure training program. Results showed program setting had no effect, but short programs appeared to provide slower but greater overall gains in…

  5. Corporate Social Responsibility: Benefits for Youth in Hydropower Development in Laos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The role of the state as regulator combined with policies on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) that go beyond legal requirements to establishing programmes that promote development and good international business practice is an emerging new paradigm. In this paper, the example of a state-owned company, Statkraft A.S. of Norway, and its recent…

  6. 75 FR 65517 - Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... Employment and Training Administration Western Digital Technologies, Inc., Corporate Headquarters/Hard Drive Development Division, Lake Forest, CA; Notice of Affirmative Determination Regarding Application for... determination was issued on August 5, 2010 and published in the Federal Register on August 23, 2010 (75 FR...

  7. METHODS OF INCREASING THE ROLE OF THE CORPORATE TAX IN THE ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrudan Leonard Calin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will discuss about the implications of the corporate tax in the field of economical and social development. In the beginning we will present the results of the introduction of the new quota (16% as budgetary receipts and after that we wi

  8. APL: a corporate strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J; Nyatanga, L; Ringer, C; Greaves, J

    1992-06-01

    This paper is based on, and summarises, papers read at the second annual international conference of Nurse Education Tomorrow held at the University of Durham (UK) September 1991. To this end this paper will offer: Some Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL) definition and process as reflected in the literature available. A distinction will be made between APL and Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL) although the procedures and processes for assessing them will be shown to be the same. A brief outline of corporate strategy, as it applies to APL, will be given to form the basis for logical demonstration of how Derbyshire Institute of Health and Community Studies has employed such a corporate strategy. Insights developed and gained from APL research currently being undertaken through the college of nursing and midwifery will be used to inform the development and nature of corporate strategy. A flowchart of the operationalisation of the corporate strategy is offered as an integrative summary of how all the APL ideas have had a positive cumulative effect. The paper finishes by highlighting the possible strengths and limitations of APL corporate strategy.

  9. Developing Digital Aerospace to Build The Advanced Aerospace Corporation in The World

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HouJunjie; LiuHaibin; GaoShiwen

    2005-01-01

    It is the strategic goal to develop digital aerospace for ChinaAerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC) to realize its leap development. In the paper, we expound the connotation of developing digital aerospace, i.e. the digitization of aerospace products, the informatization of R&D and manufacturing, the industrialization of software products, and the integration of information of ground and space sectors.

  10. Toward the development of a corporate social responsibility leadership questionnaire: An adaptation of the LBI-2

    OpenAIRE

    Ronel du Preez; Liam T. van Zyl

    2015-01-01

    Orientation: Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has grown exponentially in South African organisations, making leadership in CSR crucial. This article describes the first phase towards the development of a CSR leadership questionnaire (CSR-LQ), based on the Leadership Behaviour Inventory version 2 (LBI-2). Research purpose: To develop a CSR leadership questionnaire (the CSR-LQ) that would serve as a basis for developing a CSR leadership competency model in future.Motivation for the study: ...

  11. Developing knowledge cities : aligning urban, corporate and university strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Heijer, A.C.; De Vries, J.C.; De Jonge, H.

    2011-01-01

    The successful development of knowledge cities increasingly depends on collaboration between urban and regional authorities, knowledge institutions and businesses. Policy makers and business strategists do acknowledge the interrelated objectives of these actors in the knowledge economy and their dif

  12. RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN CORPORATE SUSTAINABILITY REPORTING IN CHINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Braendle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability reports contain important information for the stakeholders. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of recent developments in the area of sustainability reporting in China. The paper presents useful insights into sustainability reporting in China and helps to better navigate the future trends in sustainability reporting practices. The sustainability reporting rules in China should not rely on a basis of broad standards but on legally enforced binding rules.

  13. Developing and establishing online student learning communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Donna Scott; Boswell, Carol; Cannon, Sharon

    2006-01-01

    Developing effective learning communities is an important component of Web-based courses. Learning communities offer a social context for learning that greatly enhances the knowledge acquisition of all involved parties. This article describes the development of an effective learning community among Web-based RN-BSN students. The characteristics of the cohort leading to an effective learning community included supportiveness, open sharing of oneself, and socialization.

  14. 78 FR 42051 - Proposed Revision of the Corporation for National and Community Service Strategic Plan; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-15

    ... service so that participants engaged in CNCS-supported programs consistently find satisfaction, meaning... Plan will reflect the broad, long term outcomes that the CNCS aspires to achieve by implementing its... may submit comments by any of the following methods: (1) Electronically through the Corporation's...

  15. Destination Unknown? The Emergence of Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainable Development of Tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Tepelus, Camelia

    2008-01-01

    This dissertation explores the nexus between sustainable tourism development and corporate social responsibility (CSR). It addresses the scope for CSR to promote sustainable tourism in an international development context. This objective was pursued by exploring three sub-questions: what tools have been used to stimulate social responsibility in tourism; how has ecotourism influenced social responsibility in tourism; and finally, how have various stakeholders approached CSR in tourism? These ...

  16. Daybreak - a corporation plan of development and capacitation; Amanecer - un plan corporativo de desarollo y capacitacion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pellegrini, Enzo [REPSOL Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales S.A. (Argentina)

    2000-07-01

    The current growth in production investments is motivating a war for talent which demands from companies a serious compromise to the recruiting of personnel as well as development and training policies that will build: technical competencies related to teamwork; high tech tools and knowledge; general training that will nourish employability in an increasingly competitive environment. Repsol YPF Group, within its Corporate Plan for Development and Training, implemented Plan Amanecer. Following is a general outline of the Plan. (author)

  17. Corporate communication positioned with communication studies: Corporate Communications, an International Journal: The Journal and its history, scope and future developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.L. Elving

    2012-01-01

    Studies of communication by and inside organizations are conducted within various fields, including the field of corporate communication. In this manuscript, the author presents the journal and positions the various fields of study that are represented within it. The theoretical foundations of corpo

  18. The Employees of Baby Boomers Generation, Generation X, Generation Y and Generation Z in Selected Czech Corporations as Conceivers of Development and Competitiveness in their Corporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bejtkovský Jiří

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The corporations using the varied workforce can supply a greater variety of solutions to problems in service, sourcing, and allocation of their resources. The current labor market mentions four generations that are living and working today: the Baby boomers generation, the Generation X, the Generation Y and the Generation Z. The differences between generations can affect the way corporations recruit and develop teams, deal with change, motivate, stimulate and manage employees, and boost productivity, competitiveness and service effectiveness. A corporation’s success and competitiveness depend on its ability to embrace diversity and realize the competitive advantages and benefits. The aim of this paper is to present the current generation of employees (the employees of Baby Boomers Generation, Generation X, Generation Y and Generation Z in the labor market by secondary research and then to introduce the results of primary research that was implemented in selected corporations in the Czech Republic. The contribution presents a view of some of the results of quantitative and qualitative research conducted in selected corporations in the Czech Republic. These researches were conducted in 2015 on a sample of 3,364 respondents, and the results were analyzed. Two research hypotheses and one research question have been formulated. The verification or rejection of null research hypothesis was done through the statistical method of the Pearson’s Chi-square test. It was found that perception of the choice of superior from a particular generation does depend on the age of employees in selected corporations. It was also determined that there are statistically significant dependences between the preference for eterogeneous or homogeneous cooperation and the age of employees in selected corporations.

  19. THE ROLE OF SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY STRATEGIES EMPLOYED BY EUROPEAN AUTOMOTIVE CORPORATIONS IN DEVELOPING SUSTAINABLE BUSINESSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Gănescu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate social responsibility strategies are a topic of great interest for both researchers and practitioners, and require the development of interdisciplinary approaches: economic, ethical and social. The paper analyses the social responsibility strategies employed by European automotive businesses and highlights their impact on business sustainability. From a theoretical perspective, applying the content analysis method on sustainability or social responsibility reports revealed a variety of social responsibility strategies. The utility of the research is supported by formulating a typology of social responsibility strategies, based on objectives of sustainable development and by establishing arguments concerning the impact of these strategies on automotive businesses’ sustainability in the following areas: social and societal, ecological and environmental, distribution chains and suppliers, corporate image, position in relation to competitors and financial performance.

  20. An Overview on Corporate Social Responsibility and Sustainable Development in India

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. R. Uma Devi

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays due to globalization, the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has gained utmost importance and has become a worldwide concept whereby organisations consider the interests of society by taking responsibility for the impact of their activities. In India CSR is in a budding stage and facing daunting social and environmental challenges due consider social and environmental aspects through their CSR for their sustainability and development. CSR covers almost all issues like t...

  1. Eurasian Economic Union and prospects of development of transnational corporations in the frame of the globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Anatoliy Tikhonovitch Spitsyn; Galiya Aidarovna Kulubekova

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study the processes of regional integration and its particular features in the frame of the Eurasian Economic Union formation and their impact on the development of transnational corporations in the region. The authors used the scientific and methodological basis including an integrated approach and economic, institutional and organizational methods, theoretical and methodological studies of domestic and foreign scientists. In order to achieve the defined aim...

  2. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AS AN INSTRUMENT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF PRODUCTION ENTERPRISES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina GAWEŁ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of corporate social responsibility as an instrument of operationalising the paradigm of sustainable development on the microeconomic level in the sector of production enterprises. It presents a genesis and importance of CSR and indicates the most relevant essential instruments of CSR implementation on an enterprise level. The paper also analyses endogenous and exogenous benefits from implementing CSR into the business practice.

  3. Eurasian Economic Union and Prospects of Development of Transnational Corporations in the Frame of the Globalization

    OpenAIRE

    Anatoliy Tikhonovitch Spitsyn; Galiya Aidarovna Kulubekova

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to study the processes of regional integration and its particular features in the frame of the Eurasian Economic Union formation and their impact on the development of transnational corporations in the region. The authors used the scientific and methodological basis including an integrated approach and economic, institutional and organizational methods, theoretical and methodological studies of domestic and foreign scientists. In order to achieve the defined aim...

  4. Premises of Sustainable Development on Rural Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Turtureanu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors want to highlight the opportunity on rural areas and development in termsof durability. The content of sustainable development offers to local communities real and lasting solutions.In this sense for a community to be truly sustainable, it must adopt a holistic approach, taking into accountshort-term environmental and economic sustainability of natural and cultural resources. The authors believethat a sustainable community among its objectives to include their major environmental issues, povertyeradication, improvement of quality of life, developing and maintaining an effective and viable localeconomies, leading to a global vision of sustainable development of all sectors of the community.

  5. Corporate Crime and Restitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Charles F.

    1985-01-01

    Articulates need, nature, and form of a restitutionary approach to corporate crime. Considers small, in-prison production-oriented programs; residential in-community programs, and nonresidential in-community programs for individual offenders; also considers lump sum and continuous payments for corporations to make restitution. (NRB)

  6. Economic Development Capacity amongst Small Rural Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J.

    1990-01-01

    Examines indigenous capacity for local community development. Examines new economic development initiatives by communities, nature of relationships between local and larger economies, and how relationships affect local capacity for new economic activities. Discusses benefits of spatial framework in rural development and planning. (TES)

  7. 75 FR 10561 - Request for Public Comment: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Request for Public Comment: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Community Development Financial and Technical Assistance Awards, Native Initiatives, and Bank Enterprise Awards AGENCY: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund,...

  8. Corporate Responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waddock, Sandra; Rasche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We define and discuss the concept of corporate responsibility. We suggest that corporate responsibility has some unique characteristics, which makes it different from earlier conceptions of corporate social responsibility. Our discussion further shows commonalities and differences between corporate...... responsibility and related concepts, such as corporate citizenship and business ethics. We also outline some ways in which corporations have implemented corporate responsibility in practice....

  9. Development of closed-loop supply chain network in terms of corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedram, Ali; Pedram, Payam; Yusoff, Nukman Bin; Sorooshian, Shahryar

    2017-01-01

    Due to the rise in awareness of environmental issues and the depletion of virgin resources, many firms have attempted to increase the sustainability of their activities. One efficient way to elevate sustainability is the consideration of corporate social responsibility (CSR) by designing a closed loop supply chain (CLSC). This paper has developed a mathematical model to increase corporate social responsibility in terms of job creation. Moreover the model, in addition to increasing total CLSC profit, provides a range of strategic decision solutions for decision makers to select a best action plan for a CLSC. A proposed multi-objective mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model was solved with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II). Fuzzy set theory was employed to select the best compromise solution from the Pareto-optimal solutions. A numerical example was used to validate the potential application of the proposed model. The results highlight the effect of CSR in the design of CLSC.

  10. Role of Adult Learning Theories in the Development of Corporate Training in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Lytovchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the analysis of the role of adult learning theories in the development of corporate training in the USA. Considering that corporate education is part of the adult education system in this country, the author examines theories of organizational learning in the context of adult learning. The results of the study have revealed that adult education in the US is based on dif erent learning theories which should be viewed from the perspective of several main orientations: behaviorism, cognitivism, humanism, developmental theories, social learning, constructivism, which have dif erent philosophical background and, accordingly, different understanding of the nature and methodology of adult learning. Based on the results of the study it has been concluded that theories of organizational learning which explain motivation of students, their needs and goals, cognitive processes and other aspects of the learning in organizations and have had the main influence on the development of corporate education in the United States should be viewed in the context of the above-mentioned basic orientations to learning, too. From the methodological perspective, the research was based on interdisciplinary and systemic approaches. Thus, we used a set of interrelated research methods: comparative, structural, systemic-functional analyses, comparison and synthesis.

  11. Emotional Intelligence and Personal Development in Employees: A Case Study of Zigron Corporation, Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyaba Akram

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Article sought to explore the potential role of Emotional Intelligence (EI in the personal development of organizational employees and to find out the scope of emotional intelligence for personal development of individuals. This study was qualitative in nature; however, to ensure the authenticity and generalizability of the results some quantitative analysis analyses were applied. Using case study method and taking interviews from 17 software house engineers of Zigron Corporation in Pakistan, this study suggests that emotional intelligence plays a crucial role in the personal development of individuals. 

  12. Managing Corporate Reputation Through Corporate Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Majken; Hatch, Mary Jo; Adams, Nick

    2012-01-01

    This article, which concentrates on symbolic management by explaining the role of corporate branding in managing corporate reputation, using Novo Nordisk as a case study, presents three perspectives on corporate branding: the marketing perspective, the organisational perspective and the co......-creation perspective. The three perspectives reviewed show the possibility of developing a multidisciplinary conceptualisation of corporate branding. They all offer insights important to managing organisations as corporate brands in a multi-stakeholder context and thus to the likelihood that corporate branding...... is a way to influence corporate reputation. The Novo Nordisk management believes the data indicate that corporate branding influenced reputation more than the other way around. Formal brand management practices may work considerably better when they complement rather than try to control existing forces...

  13. Managing Corporate Reputation Through Corporate Branding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Majken; Hatch, Mary Jo; Adams, Nick

    2012-01-01

    -creation perspective. The three perspectives reviewed show the possibility of developing a multidisciplinary conceptualisation of corporate branding. They all offer insights important to managing organisations as corporate brands in a multi-stakeholder context and thus to the likelihood that corporate branding......This article, which concentrates on symbolic management by explaining the role of corporate branding in managing corporate reputation, using Novo Nordisk as a case study, presents three perspectives on corporate branding: the marketing perspective, the organisational perspective and the co...... is a way to influence corporate reputation. The Novo Nordisk management believes the data indicate that corporate branding influenced reputation more than the other way around. Formal brand management practices may work considerably better when they complement rather than try to control existing forces...

  14. Territorial development and Community currencies : Symbolic meanings in Brazilian Community development banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fare (Marie); C. de Freitas (Carlos); C. Meyer (Camille)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBrazilian community development banks (CDBs) have established various coordinated financial mechanisms aiming to restructure poor and peripheral local economies. Their development strategy includes an instrument to facilitate access to microfinance and a community currency, combined with

  15. Territorial development and Community currencies : Symbolic meanings in Brazilian Community development banks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Fare (Marie); C. de Freitas (Carlos); C. Meyer (Camille)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBrazilian community development banks (CDBs) have established various coordinated financial mechanisms aiming to restructure poor and peripheral local economies. Their development strategy includes an instrument to facilitate access to microfinance and a community currency, combined with

  16. Cable Television: Developing Community Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter-Huffman, Polly; And Others

    The final volume of a four-volume study focuses on community use of cable television systems. Four separate aspects are discussed extensively: the possibilities of public access, use in municipal service applications, uses in education, and a guide for education planners. Each section contains several appendixes and the education sections include…

  17. Community Sustainability and Adult Education: Learning To Build Civil Capital and Resist Corporate Globalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    Adult educators can support communities in search of sustainability by helping them resist globalization and build civil capital (community action that blocks or challenges unsustainable activities). Grounded in life values, civil capital can form the basis of a civil society. (SK)

  18. Exploration Into the Business Priorities Related to Corporate Engagement in Community Health Improvement Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronk, Nicolaas P; Baase, Catherine; May, Jeanette; Terry, Paul; Moseley, Karen

    2017-07-24

    To explore factors that matter to business in making decisions regarding engagement in community health improvement efforts. Using qualitative methods, domains of interest were identified through literature reviews and expert interviews. Relevance of the domains in terms of potential priorities for action was tested through employer and community stakeholder interviews. Factors that employers considered important to sustained community collaboration as a business priority included (1) credibility of the convener, (2) broad representation of the community, (3) strong mission and goals, (4) individual commitment to health, (5) organizational commitment to health, and (6) demonstrated commitment from leadership. Priorities have been identified for engaging business in community health efforts. Implications for research, practice, and policy include the need for measurement, transparency in reporting, and agreement on principles for public-private partnership in this area.

  19. ON-LINE PLATFORM FOR COMPETENCES DEVELOPMENT IN CORPORATE EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Andreeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to present the model of interaction of university and business corporations in uniform information and educational space, which consists of the uniform requirements to the contents and quality of education and requirements of science; education and business are equally satisfied.Methods. The methods involve summing up the results of the national and international researchers’ findings on the problem of vocational pedagogical education; methods of expert survey and system analysis.Results. The information research results disclosing the drawbacks of the existing online-education technologies are presented. There is also a presentation of online-platform concept «The University of the 3rd Millennium» where modern university is considered as a service provider responsible for corporate education. Outsourcing will allow the companies to cut their expenses on employee education programs, while universities will accumulate additional resources by means of developing and selling innovative educational products. The additional funds will enable the university to carry out scientific research, to effectively implement post graduates’ employment programs, to introduce innovations.Scientific novelty. The authors define «as is» competences, which the university must have to launch this online-platform project, and «as to be» competences, which every university is to master to successfully implement the project. Internal high-risk systemic tensions and external challenges facing the platform are defined; strategic matrix of their intersection is developed. The latter allowed the authors to specify essential tasks which demand solution within the project. There is also a description of interconnection of the defined tasks with the «as to be» competences, and a Canvas model of the suggested online platform.Practical significance: The authors of the article propose the model of business and education interaction, within which

  20. Best Practices in Weathering Climate Risks: Advancing Corporate and Community Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, K.; Winkelman, S.

    2012-12-01

    As the annual costs of severe weather events in the US grow into the billions of dollars, companies and communities are examining how best to plan ahead to protect their assets and bolster their bottom line. The Center for Clean Air Policy's Weathering Climate Risks program aims to help cities and companies enhance resilience to the economic impacts of severe weather and a changing climate. This presentation will highlight three communication techniques aimed at different types of audiences such as businesses, policymakers, the media, and society. First, we find that although planning for natural hazards now saves money later, stakeholders must fi¬nd their own self-interest if they are going to engage in a solution. Thus we research best practices and hold informational, off-the-record interviews to better understand the different stakeholders' perspectives, key concerns, and issues surrounding adaptation, resilience, and/or hazard mitigation. Diverse stakeholders find it attractive when a solution has multiple co-benefits such as climate resilience, greenhouse gas reduction, reduced costs, and social benefits. Second, we use off-the-record dialogues emphasizing candid public-private discussion to promote collaborative problem solving. Our high-level workshops typically consist of 30-40 scientists, companies, communities, and policymakers. We begin with presenting background material, such as geographic information systems (GIS) maps. Then we move to informal conservation. Topics include ideas such as "Ask the Climate Question": How will infrastructure, land development, and investment decisions affect GHG emissions and resilience to climate change impacts? We find these dialogues help stakeholders share their perspectives and advance public-private collaboration on climate resilience to protect critical urban infrastructure, ensure business continuity, and increase extreme weather resilience. Third, we find that communication to the general public must capture

  1. Corporate Venturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vintergaard, Christian

    From the perspective of Austrian economics, this paper develops a conceptual understanding ofhow corporate venture managers recognize and discover opportunities in a network environment.In an effort to create a better understanding of who is involved in process, this paper reports onthe development...... path of an entrepreneurial opportunity of the Danish corporate venture capitalist,Danfoss A/S. This paper distinguishes itself from previous research done on entrepreneurialopportunities by creating a holistic and conceptual framework, which broadens and expands theperception of the market participants...... involved in recognition and discovery. Consequently thepaper offers insight to a diversified group of actors who mix and match technological and marketcapabilities in a constant process of recognition and discovery.Key words: Corporate venturing, entrepreneurship, discovery, networks, opportunities,recognition....

  2. Essence of Black Colleges in Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Assistance Consortium To Improve Coll. Services, Washington, DC.

    The response of black colleges and universities in the area of community development are discussed in relation to management and organization development, telecommunication, human resource development, educational innovations, and environmental services. Management and organization development encompasses small business development, public service…

  3. Community investment in wind farms: funding structure effects in wind energy infrastructure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beery, Joshua A; Day, Jennifer E

    2015-03-03

    Wind energy development is an increasingly popular form of renewable energy infrastructure in rural areas. Communities generally perceive socioeconomic benefits accrue and that community funding structures are preferable to corporate structures, yet lack supporting quantitative data to inform energy policy. This study uses the Everpower wind development, to be located in Midwestern Ohio, as a hypothetical modeling environment to identify and examine socioeconomic impact trends arising from corporate, community and diversified funding structures. Analysis of five National Renewable Energy Laboratory Jobs and Economic Development Impact models incorporating local economic data and review of relevant literature were conducted. The findings suggest that community and diversified funding structures exhibit 40-100% higher socioeconomic impact levels than corporate structures. Prioritization of funding sources and retention of federal tax incentives were identified as key elements. The incorporation of local shares was found to mitigate the negative effects of foreign private equity, local debt financing increased economic output and opportunities for private equity investment were identified. The results provide the groundwork for energy policies focused to maximize socioeconomic impacts while creating opportunities for inclusive economic participation and improved social acceptance levels fundamental to the deployment of renewable energy technology.

  4. Communicating Corporate Community Involvement: Partnership, sponsorship, or donation? A study of companies’ relationships with sports, culture and non-profit organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Clementsen, Margrethe Tombre

    2014-01-01

    This thesis studies how companies communicate their corporate community involvement (CCI), and how consumers’ respond to various communication strategies in this regard. Companies’ CCI may entail relationships with different organizations in the community. It is common for companies to have relationships with different organizations within sports and culture, as well as non-profit organizations. These relationships may vary according to the scope of activities and the company’s involvement. S...

  5. Developing Community Health Worker Diabetes Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, W. J.; Lemay, C. A.; Hargraves, J. L.; Gorodetsky, T.; Calista, J.

    2012-01-01

    We designed, implemented and evaluated a 48-hour training program for community health workers (CHWs) deployed to diabetes care teams in community health centers (CHCs). The curriculum included core knowledge/skills with diabetes content to assist CHWs in developing patient self-management goals. Our qualitative evaluation included…

  6. 75 FR 7990 - Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure Advances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ...'s separate rulemaking addressing Bank membership for community development financial institutions... Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure Advances; Secured... eligible collateral that community financial institution (CFI) members may pledge to secure Federal...

  7. Sustainable Development and Corporate Social Responsibility in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Industries in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyewole Simon Oginni

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Present technological innovations and social organizations continue to impose risks and limitations on the efficient performance of the biosphere. Human activities have increasingly short-lived sustainable natural endowments, to the extent that, the multiplier effects have ripples beyond the traditional benefits of economic production and consumption. Therefore, this study addressed practical concerns on how industries in Sub-Saharan Africa promote sustainable development in their corporate social responsibility models, using industries in Cameroon as a case study; it examined economic, social, and environmental components of sustainable development and corporate social responsibility (CSR. Our sample consists of 335 business enterprises from the last Censure Survey of Enterprises in Cameroon. The study adopted a systematic analysis through the Adjusted Residual Test, and the Phi and Cramer’s V tests. Findings revealed that industries in Cameroon prioritize environmental and social dimensions over economic dimensions. However, a few large enterprises implement a broad CSR that promotes sustainable business practices, whereas smaller ones do not; industries in Cameroon implement environmental dimensions of CSR as a safe buffer and a social dimension as philanthropy. Hence, there is no concrete evidence that industries promote sustainable development via CSR in Cameroon. The implementation of a sustainable business model is a precondition for promoting sustainable development via CSR. Industries should realize the concrete value in implementing a sustainable business model that helps to adjust to the complex and increasingly changing business environment.

  8. DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH MODELS OF BUSINESS ARCHITECTURE OF SUBSYSTEM SALES OF CORPORATE INTEGRATED STRUCTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranovskaya T. P.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes basic principles and the results of modeling the business architecture of the company on the example of the subsystem sales of integrated corporate structures. As the object of investigation we have chosen the company called Dinskoy Meatprocessing complex, which is part of Southern diversified Corporation. The main artifacts of the conducted research are: graphical layout of business processes of a subsystem of the sales made in the instrumental environment of All Fusion Process Modeler (BPWin and developed a model of decomposition of business processes, a model of business event, a model for the location of functions and integration model, and to evaluate the relationship between the business processes with the strategic direction of the organization. The source data for the study were collected by conducting a special survey of the organization within which the surveys were conducted, and interviewing of managers and employees of relevant structures of the research object, the study of local normative documents, regulations on departments, job descriptions, etc. The resulting set of artifacts of business architecture can be used further in the process of re-engineering business processes, developing indicators for the effectiveness functions, business processes, organization, and development of requirements for the application systems that automate the processing of data and development of subsequent domains of enterprise architecture

  9. Current status and human resources development strategy of the Vietnam National Coal Corporation (VINACOAL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doc, V.V. [VINACOAL (Vietnam). Technology, Technique and Environment Dept.

    2002-09-01

    In 1994, the Government of Vietnam decided to establish the Vietnam National Coal Corporation (VINACOAL) to control in a comprehensive manner to the coal industry. With 19 coal producing companies, in 2001 VINACOAL produced 14.6 million tons of coal, in which 13.1 million tons were sold. According to the 2002 plan, 17 million tons of coal will be produced of which 14.5-15 million tons will be sold. This paper briefly outlines VINACOAL's development plan for coal production until 2010 and forecasts the future toward 2020. 2 tabs.

  10. Discussion on the Formation and Development of Corporate Culture%论企业文化的形成和发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常琦

    2011-01-01

    在激烈竞争下存活下来的精英企业,不仅为社会提供优质的产品或服务,创造先进的管理理念,还涌现出有影响力的优秀管理者,具有很强的市场竞争力.但是能够使企业持续做强的关键是企业文化.优秀的企业文化能够提高企业内部约束力和效率,使其拥有强大的生命力和适应能力.文章探讨了企业文化的产生和发展过程,及对企业发展的作用.%The elite company survived in ihe fierce competition not only provides the quality products and services to community, creates advanced management concepts, but also develops influential excellent managers who have strong market competitiveness. However, corporate culture is the key to keep strong strength of business. Excellent corporate culture can improve the internal sanction and efficiency and make it company have a strong vitality and adaptability. This paper discusses the emergence and development process of corporate culture and the role in enterprise development.

  11. The phenomenon of sustainable development and financial and economic stabilization of transna-tional corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Rudenko

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the author proves the urgency and importance of studying transnational corporations when global markets are shaped by a new quality of competition and regulation. The author frames the concept of an effective business model of development of transnational corporations that makes it possible to optimize the constantly growing cash flows in their dynamically evolutive structures. She confirms the hypothesis of the twenty-first century changes in the motivational reasons of transnational accumulation of capital with the consequences geared to modern priorities of development (economic democratization, socialization, and ecologization. She shows that when, apart from the traditional approach (predominantly marketing-based, the financial approach is applied, which takes into account the cyclical nature of the process of capital turnover, the architecture of the business models in their key components are substantially adjusted: the internal potential of self-development must include a system of resources provision, efficient capital management and forms of business organization, while allowance for the changes in the external environment requires constant upgrading of the business model with modifications, scenarios which illustrate graphically the methods proposed by the author from the prognostic view.

  12. Fun, animal welfare or community development? Understanding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding young tourists' preferences for a wildlife tourism package. ... This paper explores the impact of young travellers' value orientations on their ... to biospheric values; one enhancing the cultural and community development aspect ...

  13. Participatory Research for a Radical Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulenga, Derek C.

    1994-01-01

    Critically examines community development assumptions through historical analysis and mapping of political discourse. Using the methods of Foucault, Said, and Gramsci, demonstrates how participatory research, concerned with releasing people's knowledge through transformation, can expose and resist dominant discourses. (SK)

  14. Community Participation and Sustainable Development of Ecotourism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community Participation and Sustainable Development of Ecotourism: The Case of the ... and sustainable use of the naturebased tourism resources of Wechiau. ... conservation and sustainable ecotourism but exhibit a negative relationship ...

  15. Uplifting developing communities through sustained technology transfer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mashiri, M

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available feedback mechanisms to both the local Integrated Development Plan and the Provincial Growth and Development Strategy, was able to navigate potential conflict areas such as negotiating acceptable wage rates [below minimum wage] with the community... to mobilize and galvanize the community around the benefits of the project, as well as to explain and to iron out potential mine fields, such as the level of funding available, wage rate and payment policy, technology issues and project implementation...

  16. Elderly migration and development in small communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowles, G D; Watkins, J F

    1993-01-01

    "This paper develops a conceptual model of the process of community change [in the United States] in response to elderly inmigration. Analysis of intra-regional variation in elderly migration patterns in Appalachia, and synthesis of an emergent literature on the benefits and costs of attracting elderly migrants, serve as a backdrop for case studies, based on field observations and interviews, of three contrasting Appalachian communities at different stages of development as retirement destinations."

  17. Multivariate Analysis of Short and Long-Impact Indicators for Corporate Bond Market Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ieva Astrauskaitė

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An additional instrument or established access to the capital market funding would increase business opportunities for performance, development, growth, channeling financing for sustainable and long-term economic growth and job creation. Capital market and its level of development or further development opportunities are exposed to different factors. Clear identification of them mobilizes the attention of accurate and useful decisions or actions influencing the expected results, their adoption and implementation, monitoring. With the purpose to identify a set of factors influencing the capital market deve lopment as well as to introduce a model of their short term and long term impact projections, the ARDL model for the US and Lithuanian cases is introduced. The concluding remarks state on different legal and regulatory framework, banking sector and ICT measures exposures to the different stages of the corporate bond market development.

  18. The Resilient Society: On volunteering, civil society and corporate community involvement in transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.P.M. Meijs (Lucas)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractChanges in the Dutch non-profit regime necessitate the direct participation of citizens and businesses in non-profit organisations. Dutch society must re-invent the commitment of citizens, businesses, foundations, universities and various other organisations by increasing both ‘community

  19. THE ROLE OF THE SOCIAL-ENTREPRENEURSHIP CORPORATIONS IN KAZAKHSTAN IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Taubayev

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the features of the establishment and functioning of the specialized institutions of the public-private partnership – the social-entrepreneurship corporations in Kazakhstan. Based on the study of foreign experience of the creation of similar organizations, the advantages and problems of their functioning have been determined. The social-entrepreneurship corporations of Kazakhstan have a non-profit corporation model, but their mission is to meet the challenges of gaining profit and investments for the socio-economic development of the regions. This article describes the functioning activities of the socialentrepreneurship corporation "Saryarka" of Karaganda region, the dynamics and structure of its investment portfolio and the main problems are determined in it.

  20. Community OR and OR for development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. du T. Fourie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of Community Operations Research and of the connection between OR and development. The RDP is the main framework for development in South Africa, and its present state is described. Some suggestions are made as to ways in which ORSSA could support the RDP and development in South Africa.

  1. Are Big Food's corporate social responsibility strategies valuable to communities? A qualitative study with parents and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Zoe; Phillipson, Lyn

    2017-08-29

    Recent studies have identified parents and children as two target groups whom Big Food hopes to positively influence through its corporate social responsibility (CSR) strategies. The current preliminary study aimed to gain an in-depth understanding of parents and children's awareness and interpretation of Big Food's CSR strategies to understand how CSR shapes their beliefs about companies. Community-based qualitative semi-structured interviews. New South Wales, Australia. Parents (n 15) and children aged 8-12 years (n 15). Parents and children showed unprompted recognition of CSR activities when shown McDonald's and Coca-Cola brand logos, indicating a strong level of association between the brands and activities that target the settings of children. When discussing CSR strategies some parents and most children saw value in the activities, viewing them as acts of merit or worth. For some parents and children, the companies' CSR activities were seen as a reflection of the company's moral attributes, which resonated with their own values of charity and health. For others, CSR strategies were in conflict with companies' core business. Finally, some also viewed the activities as harmful, representing a deceit of the public and a smokescreen for the companies' ultimately unethical behaviour. A large proportion of participants valued the CSR activities, signalling that denormalising CSR to sever the strong ties between the community and Big Food will be a difficult process for the public health community. Efforts to gain public acceptance for action on CSR may need greater levels of persuasion to gain public support of a comprehensive and restrictive approach.

  2. A holistic approach to corporate social responsibility as a prerequisite for sustainable development: Empirical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatanović Dejana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing importance of sustainable development and corporate social responsibility (CSR for contemporary organizations demands appropriate holistic tools. The paper highlights how Soft Systems Methodology (SSM, a relevant holistic, i.e., soft systems approach, supports the conceptualization and management of the complex issues of CSR and sustainable development. The SSM’s key methodological tools are used: rich picture, root definitions, and conceptual models. Empirical research compares a selected sample of enterprises in the automotive industry in the Republic of Serbia, to identify possible systemically desirable and culturally feasible changes to improve their CSR behaviour through promoting their sustainable development. Some limitations of this research and of SSM application are discussed. Combining SSM with some other systems approaches, such as System Dynamics or Critical Systems Heuristics, is recommended for future research.

  3. Transnational corporations from Asian developing countries: The internationalisation characteristics and business strategies of Sime Darby Berhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad, S.Z.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited empirical research on the internationalisation processes, strategies and operations of Asian multinational corporations (MNCs, particularly MNC’s based in Malaysia. The emergence and development of an MNC from this developing country represents a significant addition to the literature on this topic which augments and supplements the information already available with regard to nascent MNCs from Asian Newly Industrialised Countries (NIC’s. Drawing on primary data from in-depth interviews with 12 key executives from Sime Darby Berhad (SDB, a developing Malaysian-based MNC, this paper will examine and investigate the firm’s internationalisation process, its characteristics and strategies, including motivations, patterns, and sources of competitive advantage. The empirical findings, limitations and areas for further research are discussed.

  4. Development of closed–loop supply chain network in terms of corporate social responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedram, Payam; Yusoff, Nukman Bin; Sorooshian, Shahryar

    2017-01-01

    Due to the rise in awareness of environmental issues and the depletion of virgin resources, many firms have attempted to increase the sustainability of their activities. One efficient way to elevate sustainability is the consideration of corporate social responsibility (CSR) by designing a closed loop supply chain (CLSC). This paper has developed a mathematical model to increase corporate social responsibility in terms of job creation. Moreover the model, in addition to increasing total CLSC profit, provides a range of strategic decision solutions for decision makers to select a best action plan for a CLSC. A proposed multi-objective mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) model was solved with non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II). Fuzzy set theory was employed to select the best compromise solution from the Pareto-optimal solutions. A numerical example was used to validate the potential application of the proposed model. The results highlight the effect of CSR in the design of CLSC. PMID:28384250

  5. Service delivery, community development, and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John W

    2010-01-01

    Service delivery has traditionally been based on market forces. When this is the case, the community becomes a silent partner in this process. Services, accordingly, are directed mostly to correcting personal ills and have little to do with community uplift. Another model, based on the work of Amartya Sen, is available that conceptualizes interventions in a very different way. If understood in the context of community development, the focus of services is social change, rather than merely personal rehabilitation. This reorientation is discussed in this article.

  6. Community nutrition programmes, globalization and sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Herrera, José Carlos

    2006-08-01

    On an international scale, the last seventy-five years have been a period of deep social, economic and political transformation for the developing countries. They have been especially influenced by the international phenomenon of globalization, the benefits of which have been unequally distributed among countries. In this context, the strategies used to improve the general nutritional health of the population of developing countries include broad approaches integrating nutritional interventions in a context of sustainable community development, while valuing the existing relations between fields as diverse as agriculture, education, sociology, economy, health, environment, hygiene and nutrition. The community nutrition programmes are emblematic of these initiatives. Nevertheless, in spite of the increasing evidence of the potential possibilities offered by these programmes to improve the nutritional status and contribute to the development and the self-sufficiency of the community, their success is relatively limited, due to the inappropriate planning, implementation and evaluation of the programmes. In the present article, I attempt to emphasie the importance of community participation of the population of developing countries in the community nutrition programmes within the context of globalization. This process is not only an ethical imperative, but a pragmatic one. It is a crucial step in the process of liberation, democratization and equality that will lead to true sustainable development.

  7. Eurasian Economic Union and Prospects of Development of Transnational Corporations in the Frame of the Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoliy Tikhonovitch Spitsyn

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to study the processes of regional integration and its particular features in the frame of the Eurasian Economic Union formation and their impact on the development of transnational corporations in the region. The authors used the scientific and methodological basis including an integrated approach and economic, institutional and organizational methods, theoretical and methodological studies of domestic and foreign scientists. In order to achieve the defined aim of this research, the authors used the retrospective method and method of comparative analysis, studied the statistical data, including the reports of the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development and the World Bank’s ratings. The authors studied the historical background of the Eurasian Economic Union, analyzed the current economic situation in its Member States, and considered the experience of other regional alliances. According to the results of the research, the authors formulated the conclusions in the context of the most likely prospects for the development of transnational corporations in the frame of the integration of the Member States of the Eurasian Economic Union. In particular, the study of the experience of other regional associations presumes that the process of regional economic integration will have a positive impact on the dynamics of the attraction of foreign direct investment inflows in the region. In addition, regional integration will mitigate the problem of “limited” markets of the Member States of the Economic Union and, therefore, will help to increase the amount of investment resources in the manufacturing industry and services sector of the economy. The creation of the common energy markets in the framework of the new regional association would strengthen the resource-oriented domestic large-scale business and prepare the groundwork for the emergence of new transnational corporations, cooperating within the

  8. Diaspora-led development through the corporate social responsibility initiatives of talented migrants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Chávez, Juan Enrique

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we explore the idea that talented migrants can assist in the development andgrowth of their economies of origin through brain-circulation dynamics, linking the developedworld where they live and developing homelands they (or their ancestors in the case of latergenerationdiasporans left behind. Depending on the roles these talented people play in theorganizational (and institutional environment at both ends of the migratory trail, differentalternatives of diaspora-led initiatives are available to them. When these roles are attached tothe private sector, the introduction of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR initiativespiggybacking preexisting diaspora tools (such as talent networks, open migration chains,diaspora-oriented institutions, etc. might be the more appropriate and efficient channels.

  9. Sustainability reporting in the light of corporate social responsibility development: economic and legal issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Sukhonos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Independent audit assurance of sustainability reporting is the basis for increasing the credibility of the stakeholders, its transparency and reliability; it is a means of implementing legal liability of the company and the evidence of achievement of its legitimacy to the public. The bases for providing such assurance are the standards of implementation of audit tasks in the sphere of sustainable development. Comparative analysis of international practice as for assurance regarding the SR with local realities, based on the reporting database of Ukrainian GRI companies for the 2005-2014 years, witnessed the initial phase of such practices among Ukrainian companies, and the need to strengthen regulatory efforts to determine the legal status of SR auditing standards in Ukraine, ensuring a legal environment and the development of corporate social responsibility initiatives.

  10. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CORPORATE VOLUNTEERING AND CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY: RESULTS OF AN EMPIRICAL STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Licandro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Volunteering (CV is a phenomenon that emerged in the second half of the 20th century and began to grow and globalize at the beginning of the 21st century. There seems to be a consensus that the recent growth of Corporate Volunteering is related to the development and growing legitimacy of the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR. Nevertheless, the theoretical discussion on how the two concepts (Corporate Volunteering and Corporate Social Responsibility are related is just beginning, while empirical research on how this relationship operates in corporate practice is still incipient. This paper presents preliminary results of a research on this subject carried out in Uruguay in 2016. This is a statistical study that analyses the relationship between the application of corporate volunteering activities and the incorporation of a CSR approach to the management of companies. The incorporation of both types of practices is measured by a self-assessment questionnaire that includes 81 indicators (using a Likert scale to assess them, which were designed based on ISO 26000 Guidance of Social Responsibility. The questionnaire was administered to 96 companies, using a comparative analysis between those that practice Corporate Volunteering and those which do not. The results obtained allow us to support the hypothesis that the application of Corporate Volunteering is positively associated with the incorporation of CSR when managing the relationship between the company and its employees and also with the community. Moreover, these results contribute to a better understanding on how both concepts are related.

  11. Clinical skill development for community pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnette, D J; Murphy, C M; Carter, B L

    1996-09-01

    The importance of establishing clinical pharmacy services in the community cannot be understated in light of current challenges to the traditional dispensing role as the primary service of the community pharmacist. Advancements in automated dispensing technology and declining prescription fee reimbursement are rapidly forcing pharmacists to seek alternative sources of revenue. Providing pharmaceutical care is a viable option to increase customer loyalty job satisfaction, and reimbursement. To support the development of clinical services, academic institutions are forming partnerships with individual community practitioners to overcome perceived educational and training barriers. The authors describe the design and development of two unique clinical skill development programs at the University of Illinois at Chicago. This paper also outlines the patient focused services that the participants have established upon completing the training. These programs successfully enhanced participants' therapeutic knowledge base and facilitated development of the clinical skills necessary for direct patient care.

  12. SUSTAINABLE URBAN COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT THROUGH AGENDA 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Md Zan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The much-talked about issues such as the rising of heavy crime cases, problems in solid waste management, air and water pollution as well as traffic congestion detering the quality of life among urban community members. Urgent and proactive measure is highly desireable in order to preserve and maintain the integral parts of urban’s higher quality of life. All parties should take part in ongoing efforts to achieve sustainable development through various means. Local Agenda 21 (LA21 serves as one of the efforts in achieveing the ultimate goal of sustainable development through better collaboration and cooperation among stakeholders including local government, non-governmental organisations and the community at large. The core principle of the LA21 program lies in the spirit of cooperation among community members, local authorities and the private sectors. This could be achieved through various activities including from the beginning such as through a comprehensive planning for the local area to achieve the sustainable development. Community members should be involved in brainstorming of the ideas and expressing their views so that authorities would be able to identify the real and arising issues in the community. Through this way a sustainable town and municipal planning could be developed and initiated. This paper discusses the importance of urbancommunity participation in achieving sustainable development as practicedthrough LA21 in Seberang Perai Municipal Council, Penang.

  13. Developing a Discourse of the Postmodern Community Development Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Karen; Mansfield, Sue

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to promote the generation of a discourse of the postmodern community work professional. A shared discourse will lead, we propose to shared capital. We argue that there is a tension between the modern and postmodern for those of us engaged in the profession of community learning and development (CL&D). We need to value…

  14. Community and corporate social responsibility in sector of oil, gas and mining: short approach considering practice and theory aspects; Responsabilidade social corporativa e comunitaria nos setores de petroleo, gas e mineracao no Brasil: breve reflexao sobre a evolucao teorico-pratica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Edison D.R.; Danciguer, Lucilene; Macarini, Samuel; Pereira, Maira de S.; Lopes, Luciano E. [GAIA - Grupo de Aplicacao Interdisciplinar a Aprendizagem (GAIA), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The evolution of the debate about corporate and community social responsibility has been happening, in Brazil, with the implementation of programs for the quality of services and products; the improvement of the performance of activities related to environmental conservation, the increase in security and health of workers and communities; the intensification of communication and relationship with workers, communities, and other stakeholders. This work discusses the evolution of this culture in petroleum, gas and mining sectors in Brazil during the last 20 years. It was based on the experience of the Interdisciplinary Learning Application Group (GAIA) with both, the internal public (including all employees) and the communities directly or indirectly affected by old or new activities. The cases analyzed are good examples of this cultural change, which prioritizes the development of humanist and progressive approaches to corporate education. The results GAIA obtained actuating during the last 15 years in partnership with corporations from several sectors evidenced that the incorporation of social responsibility objectives and targets as part of corporation's business brought benefits for all stakeholders. To the managers it brought an improvement in administration considering the stakeholders. To the workers it helped developing their self-esteem and citizenship. To the communities it enhanced their capacity to dialogue and created sustainable initiatives that improve their quality of life. (author)

  15. Annual report of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, fiscal year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This was the Annual Report of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, Fiscal Year of 1994. In this report, the following 12 items are described: (1) Development of the fast breeding reactor; (a) operation of the fast experimental reactor, `Joyo`, (b) construction and trial operation of the fast breeding prototype reactor, `Monju`, and (c) R and D of FBR; (2) Development of the new type conversion reactor; (a) operation of prototype reactor, `Fugen`, and (b) R and D of ATR; (3) Development of uranium mining and conversion; (4) Development of uranium concentration technology; (5) Development of plutonium fuel; (a) preparation of the MOX fuel, (b) preparation facility construction of the MOX fuel, (c) R and D of plutonium fuel. and (d) technical development of plutonium mixing and conversion; (6) Reprocessing of spent fuel; (7) Environmental technology development of radioactive waste; (8) Creative and innovative R and D; (9) Management and nuclear non-proliferation countermeasure of nuclear matter; (10) Safety management and safety study; (11) Related common business; and (12) General management business. (G.K.)

  16. Linking case management and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Carol D; McClelland, Robert W; Gursansky, Di

    2006-01-01

    Case management, in various forms, is now institutionalized as a core part of policy and programs designed to deliver home- and community-based services to older adults. The case management role, in theory, requires attention to both client and system goals, although in practice the system goals that have received most attention have been gatekeeping and resource allocation. While case managers have been admonished to find and develop resources in the community, this has primarily taken the form of including informal services in individual client care plans. What has been missing is focused attention to the potential of the community as a nurturing environment with the capacity to support older adults and their caregivers. Sustainable care for older adults cannot be achieved by formal service and family support alone. This article proposes the creation of linkages between case managers, who build the service arrangements for older people, and community developers, who are responsible for building community capacity and social capital. It is argued that this linkage is essential for establishing the foundations of a caring community with the capacity to support older people.

  17. The Garment Industry Development Corporation: A Case Study of a Sectoral Employment Development Approach. Sectoral Employment Development Learning Project Case Studies Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Maureen

    The Garment Industry Development Corporation (GIDC) was founded in 1984 by a 3-member partnership that included the local union, industry associations, and local government. GIDC's goal was to support New York City's garment industry, which had been steadily losing jobs. GIDC exhibits the following characteristics of sectoral initiatives: it…

  18. PERANAN PROGRAM COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PERUSAHAAN BATUBARA MENINGKATKAN KESEJAHTERAAN MASYARAKAT (STUDI KASUS KABUPATEN TANAH BUMBU, KALIMANTAN SELATAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wulan Metafurry

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Community development (comdev is a form of corporate social responsibility program to increase community welfare. On the other side, comdev also aims to minimize the impact arising from mining activities. The present study aims to analyze the benefit of comdev and to calculate comdev contribution to increase community welfare. The method used to answer the research are Second Order Confirmatory Factor Analysis (2nd CFA and Multiple Linier Regression with Principal Component Analysis (PCA. The result show that benefit of comdev was perceived by community in Tanah Bumbu, South Kalimantan. Comdev also contributes positively to increase human resource development in Tanah Bumbu, but comdev not enough to compensate for the negative impact of mining especially enviromental issues.

  19. Corporate Social Responsibility and Poor’s Child Well Being in Developing Customer’s Loyalty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrial Mukhtar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to analyze the contribution of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR perceived motives in enhancing poor children's well being and consumer loyalty. CSR strategy studied were CSR strategies implemented by two companies, Garuda Indonesia and Pertamina, which are State Owned Companies (fully or partially owned by government of Indonesia. Garuda Indonesia is a service company engaged in airline industry, and Pertamina is a non service company engaged in oil and gas industry.Using factor analysis and multiple regression, the result indicates some differences between firms CSR activities in in developing children well being and customer loyalty. This result has implication for the firm that different type of CSR activities and different industry will reflect different motives, further have different impact in children’s well being.

  20. Social network sites in the corporate communication of the IBEX 35: uses, development and importance according to its leaders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia DURÁNTEZ-STOLLE

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Social media offer an opportunity for corporate communication in the context of Web 2.0, where image and reputation are affected by the delogue/conversations within virtual communities. Previous research on this issue, based on content analysis, points out the interest of companies to have a corporate presence in social networks, but at the same time they emphasize the lack of harnessing of the interactive and dialogical potential. In this article, we have conducted a survey to know the opinion of the most important Spanish companies about social network sites. With this method, we pretend to find out which professional profiles are in charge of the planning and management of the corporate presence in social media, to understand their uses and relevance and to study how the big companies are answering to the possibility of having dialogue relations with their publics. The results show that the IBEX 35 companies consider of great relevance their corporate profiles on social networks, as well as their frequent updating and professionalized management. Also, the respondents understand the conversational nature of social networks, however, they are using these channels mainly for informative goals. The findings allow us to see the lack of consistency between the understanding of the dialogical context, the importance given to social networking and the informational purposes that prevail in most of the cases.

  1. New Developments in Mental Health and Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Fazenda

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The community mental health model implies a bio‐psycho‐social perspective of mental health/illness issues, as well as a set of values that advocate equity in service access, community treatment, respect for human rights, a recovery vision, promotion of independent living, social integration and user and family participation. In accordance with the priorities set by the European Union, mental health services must guarantee that these principles are applied in the prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and promotion of mental health. Inter‐sector cooperation is an essential part of developing transversal policies that ensure society’s involvement in mental health promotion. Advances in community mental health in‐ dicate the relevance of considering human rights both in policy development and in practice, of the recovery perspective and of the need to promote the participation of user and carer organizations.

  2. Continuity and discontinuity in community development theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.W. Kuitenbrouwer (Joost)

    1973-01-01

    textabstractFew experienced fieldwerkers in community development who attend advanced training programmes have any expectation of acquiring a cut-and-dried solution that can be applied to problems in the field. Moreover, it is now wellknown that the advanced nations cannot provide the so-called dev

  3. Developing patient education in community pharmacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.T.G.

    2001-01-01

    This thesis deals with the development of patient education in the community pharmacy. The research questions concentrate on the determinants of technicians’ patient education behavior and the effects of a one-year lasting intervention program on the patient education activities in the pharmacy. Thi

  4. Towards a New Paradigm of Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The new model of community development focuses on the following: participatory methodologies of research; practical and generalist skills; local-driven revenues in small business and nongovernmental organizations; rethinking all products, processes, and services; international small business trade networks; and the integration of leisure and work.…

  5. Towards a New Paradigm of Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mike

    1995-01-01

    The new model of community development focuses on the following: participatory methodologies of research; practical and generalist skills; local-driven revenues in small business and nongovernmental organizations; rethinking all products, processes, and services; international small business trade networks; and the integration of leisure and work.…

  6. Toward the development of a corporate social responsibility leadership questionnaire: An adaptation of the LBI-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronel du Preez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Corporate social responsibility (CSR has grown exponentially in South African organisations, making leadership in CSR crucial. This article describes the first phase towards the development of a CSR leadership questionnaire (CSR-LQ, based on the Leadership Behaviour Inventory version 2 (LBI-2. Research purpose: To develop a CSR leadership questionnaire (the CSR-LQ that would serve as a basis for developing a CSR leadership competency model in future.Motivation for the study: Effective leadership in companies’ CSR undertakings is imperative. The development of a leadership measure is the first step toward the development of a CSR leadership competency framework.Research approach, design and method: A three-phase mixed-method ex post facto research approach (qualitative and quantitative was applied. Purposive sampling included CSR leaders in Phase 1 (n = 5 and Phase 2 (n = 13 to develop the CSR-LQ prior to empirical testing. Main findings: The CSR-LQ was developed based on the LBI-2. The final version of the CSR-LQ consists of 123 items measuring the leadership competencies in three stages. Stage 1 is creating a CSR vision and strategy (analysing and interpreting the CSR environment; formulating the CSR vision and strategy; Stage 2 is preparing the organisation for implementing the CSR vision and strategy (preparing the leader and organisation members; preparing the organisation and Stage 3 is implementing the CSR vision and strategy (sharing the CSR vision and inspiring organisation members; leading with integrity and courage; leading with compassion; Leading across boundaries; reviewing and rewarding CSR performance. Practical/managerial implications: The CSR-LQ could be used to obtain assessment and development of CSR leadership competencies after empirical testing. Contribution/value-add: This study is the first step towards developing a South African CSR leadership measure that could be used to obtain 360° assessments of the

  7. Developing Ornamental Plants for Promoting Community Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritsana Khonphian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: This study aimed to investigate the development of ornamental plants for promoting community economy in marketing and product selling. The study area was Ban Mai Udom, Tambon Ban Mai, Amphoe Nong Bunmak, Changwat Nakhon Ratchasima. Approach: This qualitative research study collected documentary data and field data using survey, observations, interviews and focused group discussion. The sample consisted of totally 33 community leaders, ornamental plant producers sellers and buyers and state and private sector officials involving promotion of ornamental plant production and selling, obtained using the simple random sampling technique. The collected data were checked using the triangulation technique. The data were analyzed and the study findings were presented by means of a descriptive analysis. Results: The study findings revealed that the production of ornamental plants in Ban Mai Udom community had 2 types of development for promoting community economy: At the household level and the organizational level. At the household kevel, the problems of marketing and selling, in which prices could be bargained, by selling by themselves and haring their relatives sell the products a local markets both inside and outside the community. At the organization level, the patterns of promoting community economy were developed. The marketing problems were solved by using the concept of media through indigenous knowledge, setting up groups as an organization through ethnicity of Thai Khorat and using the Thai Khorat dialect. Conclusion: In solving the selling problems, all of the group members sold the products at local markets and foreign markets such as France, Hong Kong and Dubai. When they had got money, every group member could borrow some money as welfare at an interest rate of 2% year. Dividends were given to all group members every year. The methods mentioned could solve different problems involved.

  8. Sustainable development and corporative information: evolution and actual situation; Desarrollo sostenible e informacion corporative. Evolucion y situacion actual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moneva, J. M.; Ortas, E.

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze the development of sustain ability reporting practices from a critical perspective. A global descriptive study has been raised, making special reference to the Spanish organizations. From the basic concepts of sustainable development, triple bottom line and accountability, a historical review has been carried out about social and environmental reporting by companies and other organizations. Furthermore, sustain ability reporting framework is revisited, focusing our study in the Global Reporting Initiative framework. These aspects configure the basis for a descriptive empirical research in a global and national context. (Author) 29 refs.

  9. Development of molten carbonate fuel cell technology at M-C Power Corporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilger, D. [M-C Power Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    M-C Power Corporation was founded in 1987 with the mission to further develop and subsequently commercialize molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC). The technology chosen for commercialization was initially developed by the Institute of Gas technology (IGT). At the center of this MCFC technology is the Internally Manifolded Heat EXchange (IMHEX) separator plate design. The IMHEX technology design provides several functions within one component assembly. These functions include integrating the gas manifold structure into the fuel cell stack, separating the fuel gas stream from the oxidant gas stream, providing the required electrical contact between cells to achieve desired power output, and removing excess heat generated in the electrochemical process. Development of this MCFC technology from lab-scale sizes too a commercial area size of 1m{sup 2} has focused our efforts an demonstrating feasibility and evolutionary progress. The development effort will culminate in a proof-of-concept- 250kW power plant demonstration in 1996. The remainder of our commercialization program focuses upon lowering the costs associated with the MCFC power plant system in low production volumes.

  10. International migration and development in Mexican communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, J; Kandel, W; Parrado, E A; Massey, D S

    1996-05-01

    The theoretical and empirical literature generally regards international migration as producing a cycle of dependency and stunted development in sending communities. Most migrants' earnings are spent on consumption; few funds are channeled into productive investment. We argue that this view is misleading because it ignores the conditions under which productive investment is likely to be possible and profitable. We analyze the determinants of migrants' savings and remittance decisions, using variables defined at the individual, household, community, and macroeconomic levels. We identify the conditions under which U.S. earnings are repatriated to Mexico as remittances and savings, and indicate the factors leading to their productive investment.

  11. Engaged anthropology and corporate volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Blahová

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present engaged anthropology and its methodological tools with a specific perspective of the research field and the position of the researcher with regard to research subjects. The study focuses on corporate volunteering as one of the forms of collaboration between the non-profit and the private sectors seeking solutions to social problems and community development. Volunteering projects contribute to the interlinking of the knowledge, skills, experience and resources of corporate employees and the representatives of the non-profit or the public sector. It is a part of the philanthropic strategy of companies which are willing to present themselves as entities responsible towards the environment in which they run their business, and towards their employees, partners and customers. Engaged anthropology can bring, through its methodological tools, a new perspective of corporate volunteering. Community-based participatory research on the process of knowledge creation includes all partners on an equal basis and identifies their unique contribution to problem solution and community development.

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility : Legal and semi-legal frameworks supporting CSR developments 2000-2010 and cases studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambooy, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has rapidly gained a foothold in business. In the last decade, many companies developed 'Planet, People, Profit' strategies, and put them into practice. Governments and civil society have called on private actors to contribute in resolving the difficulties of

  13. Human Value Management. The Influence of the Contemporary Developments of Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Capital on HRM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Michiel; Nijhof, A.H.J.; Jonker, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In both practice-oriented and academic discourses the concepts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human resource management (HRM) are often treated separately. It is argued here that this is an outdated approach. Starting from the observation that organisations develop towards open systems

  14. Human Value Management. The Influence of the Contemporary Developments of Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Capital on HRM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoemaker, Michiel; Nijhof, A.H.J.; Jonker, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In both practice-oriented and academic discourses the concepts of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and human resource management (HRM) are often treated separately. It is argued here that this is an outdated approach. Starting from the observation that organisations develop towards open

  15. Corporate Social Responsibility : Legal and semi-legal frameworks supporting CSR developments 2000-2010 and cases studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambooy, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has rapidly gained a foothold in business. In the last decade, many companies developed 'Planet, People, Profit' strategies, and put them into practice. Governments and civil society have called on private actors to contribute in resolving the difficulties of gl

  16. 75 FR 41531 - Hewlett Packard (HP) Global Product Development, Working On-Site at General Motors Corporation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Hewlett Packard (HP) Global Product Development, Working On-Site at General Motors Corporation, Milford, MI; Notice of Revised Termination of Investigation Pursuant to...

  17. E-Learning and the Changing Face of Corporate Training and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Zornada

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Internet technologies and the advent of e-learning applications inmany organisations have made a fundamental difference to the way organisations deliver training and development content, activities and experiences to their employees. Some of the organisations at the forefront of deploying e-learning technologies have been global corporations and/or transaction processing intensive organisations, who typically have difficulties assembling their staff for traditional classroom based training activities, either due to logistical difficulties or because of the impact this would have on work flows and business continuity. Such organisations have developed approaches to e-learning and competency development that overcome the logistical problems of conventional training by making innovative use of e-learning. This paper examines the approaches used by several leading global, Australian and Asian organisations, including Cisco Systems, Motorola, Qantas and several others by drawing on a field study conducted by the writer during 2003–2004. It attempts to identify some key emerging trends and practices in the field, and lessons that can be learnt from the experiences of organisations reviewed, for the successful deployment of e-learning strategies.

  18. Seizing Community Participation in Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev Clausen, Helene; Gyimóthy, Szilvia

    2015-01-01

    and cultural sustainability defined in the Mexican national tourism program Pueblos Mágicos are put into practice. The analysis is focused on how citizenship, local participation and democracy are operationalized and what are the local consequences of this governmental program in the community of Álamos......Despite ten years of strategic focus on growth through sustainable tourism, few research projects generated understanding of how development policy initiatives contributed to community benefits locally. This article addresses this research gap and explores how the aims of local development....... By following the constitution and decision-making processes in the local Pueblos Mágicos committee, we demonstrate how different groups bargain on behalf of the ‘community’ and how they seize the opportunity to promote different development priorities. In particular, we address the role of a North American...

  19. Philippines - KALAHI-CIDSS Community Development Grants

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — This study is an impact evaluation of the KALAHI-CIDSS (KC) program. The impact evaluation's key research questions can be divided into the following four themes: 1....

  20. Multinational corporations, the politics of the world economy, and their effects on women's health in the developing world: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hippert, Christine

    2002-12-01

    Presently, globalization and the world economy maintain power relations that hamper the economic integrity and the political autonomy of the developing world. My paper addresses specific economic conditions that perpetuate poverty and poor health. I examine multinational corporations and their effects on women's health, particularly in Mexico and parts of Asia. The advent of multinational corporate business in Mexico, Malaysia, Philippines, India, and Indonesia has led to increased poverty and human rights abuses. Women bear the brunt of this because of specific international economic arrangements and their low social status, both locally and globally. As a result, their physical, mental, and emotional health is suffering. Solutions to these health problems have been proposed on multiple levels: international top-down approaches (i.e., employing international protectionist regulatory standards, exposing multinationals who infringe on their workers' human rights), as well as local grassroots organizational campaigns (i.e., conducting informational human rights workshops for factory workers). Ultimately, the answers lie in holding corporations accountable to their laborers while developing countries maintain their comparative advantage; this is the only way women's health will improve and the developing world can entice corporate investment.

  1. THE INFLUENCE FACTORS OF POWER AND OWNERSHIP ON THE FORMATION OF CONFIGURATIONS OF THE CAPITALS OF THE MODERN CORPORATION, ADEQUATE TO THE CHARACTERISTICS OF DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yermolenko V. V.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the influence of key factors in the development of modern corporations – the authorities and property for the effective realization of the expanded reproduction of generative type. The article reveals a problem of building an effective configuration of capital (capitalograms and an adequate system of existing development strategies of a corporation. It also formulates research hypothesis

  2. Conceptualising Discursive Communities: Developing Community in Contemporary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    What happens when people find themselves left out of communities? Who is missing and why does it matter? What can one do to narrow the gap? What is community? How has community been represented in theory? The quality of life of a population is an important concern in so many areas, and a significant part of our standard of living is measured by…

  3. Retirement Migration as a Community Development Option. Attracting Retirees as a Community Development Option.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Annabel Kirschner; Glasgow, Nina L.

    1990-01-01

    Cook explores the feasibility of a strategy to attract retirees to rural areas using amenities, service availability, and cost-of-living factors. Glasgow examines growth in nonmetropolitan retirement counties and considers strategies for community development. (SK)

  4. Research of corporate social responsibility in an energy efficient technologies development section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyashenko O.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article considered the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR and its components. The Jevons paradox is examined, the mechanism of rebound effect on the example of energy efficient technologies is analyzed.

  5. Corporate Law and Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    Roberta Romano

    1998-01-01

    We have seen a revival in interest in corporate law and corporate governance since the 1980s, as researchers applied the tools of the new institutional economics and modern corporate finance to analyze the new transactions emerging in the 1980s takeover wave. This article focuses on three mechanisms of corporate governance to illustrate the analytical usefulness of transaction cost economics for corporate law. They are the board of directors; relational investing, a form of block ownership in...

  6. Development of the Corporal: The Embryo of the Army Missile Program. Volume 1. Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    1961-04-01

    11 BUMPER (V-2/WAC CORPORAL Combination) Firings at White Sands Proving Ground, New Mexico , and at Long Range...Proving Ground, 1945-1955," pp. 14-16, Historical Information Branch, WSMR, New Mexico , 1 October 1959. See Document 2 for addi- t~onal inforrnatio...ft/sec, ,. ~ .· . : · . ’"CORPORAL to the extent that the ba,ic des’ign of t~e propellant sys·~ . tem became fixed, although 3PL researchers

  7. PRIORITIES OF DEVELOPMENT OF THE EFFECTIVE SYSTEM OF CRISIS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Zhorova

    2014-01-01

    The study elucidates the reform of governance body of companies. Based on the research of the main problems of corporate governance, we propose to eliminate the Audit Committee as the governance entity and control body of corporate governance and create instead the Crisis Board. The main ways of achieving an efficient capital structure of the company are determined along with the basic features of an effective capital structure of the company.

  8. Social Aspects Of Rural Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majerová Věra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A well-balanced relationship between economic and social progress is the main prerequisite of rural community stability. Economic development is influenced by many factors. Some of these are statistically discoverable and quantifiable, while others, which fall within the sphere of social relations and their identification, are more difficult to measure and interpret. Czech rural areas face many problems which arise from their specific features – socio-demographic structure, job possibility of various social groups, provision of the proper level of public services, transport accessibility, etc. However, there is no direct connection between economic factors and mutual relations within the rural community. Values, opinions and the behavioural patterns of people are immediately displayed in a locality, but their character is shaped by the regional and national assumptions of every stage of development. Contributions are drawn from the accessible literature and secondary data of empirical research projects.

  9. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN DEVELOPING ECONOMIES: CASE STUDY OF A ROMANIAN TEXTILE COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POP Zenovia Cristiana

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores corporate governance issues like ownership structure, gender diversity accountability, risk management and internal audit at managerial level of a textile company listed on the Bucharest stock exchange. For this reason, secondary data was used as information collection tool. Results of the study underline the conclusion that, corporate governance is being implemented in companies belonging to the textile industry of Romania although correlated with some weaknesses. Analyzed documents confirm that the chosen textile company is trying to implement various accepted corporate governance policies, to stay competitive. The manufacturing processes were constantly improved involving a variety of techniques, with the purpose for diminishing environmental negative impact by eliminating waste. The board of directors as well as the top-management has a good understanding of the responsibilities for each member in order to ensure good corporate governance. The lack of a trade union could be the causative factor of wage inequality and loss of a stronger worker voice. Although the result of external constraints, we identified a process for constant enhancement of corporate governance in the company. The implementation of the code of corporate governance contributed to improvement in performance especially share value. Future research directions aimed extending the sample by selecting several other companies from different industries, for comparison.

  10. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Stephanie; Hassan, Ibrahim; Barker, Julian; Ashworth, Alan; Barnes, Anita; Fedor, Igor; Feddy, Lee; Hayes, Tim; Malagon, Ignacio; Stirling, Sarah; Szentgyorgyi, Lajos; Mutton, Ken; Richardson, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified. PMID:26236598

  11. Chronic mould exposure as a risk factor for severe community acquired pneumonia in a patient requiring extra corporeal membrane oxygenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A previously fit and well man developed acute respiratory failure due to environmental mould exposure from living in damp rental accommodation. Despite aggressive intensive care management he rapidly deteriorated and required respiratory and cardiac Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation. We hypothesize that poor domiciliary conditions may make an underestimated contribution to community respiratory disease. These conditions may present as acute and severe illness with non-typical pathogens identified.

  12. Financial development and investment market integration: An approach of underlying financial variables & indicators for corporate governance growth empirical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojinovič Borut

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Financial development is correlated with several underlying regulatory variables (such as indicators of investor protection, market transparency variables for corporate governance growth and rules for capital market development, which are under the control of national legislators and EU directives. This paper provides estimates of the relationship between financial market development and corporate growth and assesses the impact of financial market integration on this relationship with reference to European Union (EU countries. The regression results obtained using this panel support the hypothesis that financial development promotes growth particularly in industries that are more financially dependent on external finance. For policy purposes, analyzing changes in these regulatory variables may be a more interesting exercise than analyzing integration of the financial systems themselves. Since assuming that EU countries will raise its regulatory and legal standards to the U.S. standards appears unrealistic, in this case we examine a scenario where EU countries raise their standards to the highest current EU standard.

  13. Impact of Corporate Governance on Research and Development Investment in the Pharmaceutical Industry in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Munjae

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the influence of the corporate governance of pharmaceutical companies on research and development (R&D) investment. The period of the empirical analysis is from 2000 to 2012. Financial statements and comments in general, and internal transactions were extracted from TS-2000 of the Korea Listed Company Association. Sample firms were those that belong to the medical substance and drug manufacturing industries. Ultimately, 786 firm-year data of 81 firms were included in the sample (unbalanced panel data). The shareholding ratio of major shareholders and foreigners turned out to have a statistically significant influence on R&D investment (p < 0.05). No statistical significance was found in the shareholding ratio of institutional investors and the ratio of outside directors. The higher the shareholding ratio of the major shareholders, the greater the R&D investment. There will be a need to establish (or switch to) a holding company structure. Holding companies can directly manage R&D in fields with high initial risks, and they can diversify these risks. The larger the number of foreign investors, the greater the R&D investment, indicating that foreigners directly or indirectly impose pressure on a manager to make R&D investments that bring long-term benefits.

  14. The Development of Professional Learning Community in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sompong, Samoot; Erawan, Prawit; Dharm-tad-sa-na-non, Sudharm

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) To study the current situation and need for developing professional learning community in primary schools; (2) To develop the model for developing professional learning community, and (3) To study the findings of development for professional learning community based on developed model related to knowledge,…

  15. Corporation culture and its development%企业文化创新与企业发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹晋红

    2001-01-01

    从美、日经济发展差异的内在影响因素和我国部分企业成败的实践对比可知,企业文化对企业发展而言至关重要。通过从“管理职能”和“文化创新对企业创新的影响”方面进行理论分析,企业文化创新尤其是价值观念体系的建立与发展是影响企业经营业绩的根本。强力型企业文化虽然对不少企业的繁荣起了重要的作用,但目前对企业进一步的适应性发展也具有不可低估的阻碍作用;建立具有较强适应能力的企业文化势在必行。我国企业必须尽快扭转缺乏深层次企业文化建设的现状,以增强企业员工与群体的创新动力。%From the different economic features between America and Japanand the comparison of success-and-failure practice of some Chinese corporations,it is concluded that corporation culture is very important for its development.Through theoretical analyses of the management functions and the influence of cultural innovation on corporation innovation,corporation's cultural innovation is the foundation of its operation achievement. Strong corporation culture played an important role in its success, but it is obstructive to the corporation's adaptive development. It is necessary to build adaptive corporation culture.Chinese corporation must take measures to change present situation of lack of deep internal-cultural construction so as to stimulate the staff's innovative motivation.

  16. The Corporate Marketing Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Eggert, Andreas; Münkhoff, Eva

    it can best add value to the firm. Based on a qualitative study among B2B companies, we develop a conceptual framework highlighting the various parental roles through which corporate marketing can contribute to overall firm and business unit performance. In addition, we identify five gaps that restrain......Corporate marketing has been downsized or eliminated in many firms. At the same time, firms that still own a corporate marketing department struggle with organizing and positioning their commercial front‐end. The question arises whether firms need a corporate marketing department, and if so, how...... successful outcomes of corporate marketing activities. In sum, our framework provides important insights on how to successfully organize corporate marketing activities....

  17. Natural Resources Investment of Oil and Gas and Regional Development Impact on Community Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Nyak Baik

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was done in Bekasi district, at West Java, Indonesia, with the aims to analyze the management of upstream activities (exploration and production of oil and gas industry and its impact on improving the quality of infrastructure, the equal benefits proportion for the corporation, local government and society, and CSR programs that would affect the community empowerment. The analysis would be calculated based on the per capita income, the number of medical personals, and the number of teachers. Based on that calculation, this study analyzed the impact of oil and gas activities to the regional development of the area under this study. Analysis of regional development was calculated through number of industry in the area, the economic growth, and local government revenue that affects community empowerment in Bekasi.Analyzed by structural equation modeling (SEM, the results showed that: (1 management of upstream oil and gas activities in this area have a positive influence, but no significant effect on community empowerment; (2 management of upstream oil and gas activities have a significant positive impact on regional development; (3 regional development has a significant positive impact on community empowerment; (4 management of upstream oil and gas activities have a greater positive influence towards community empowerment through regional development, because of the multiplier effect of the development of the region.

  18. Corporate Governance

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation; UN Global Compact

    2017-01-01

    Corporate citizenship - a commitment to ethical behavior in business strategy, operations, and culture - has been on the periphery of corporate governance and board leadership, linked mainly to corporate reputation. However, in today’s globalized and interconnected world, investors, creditors, and other stakeholders have come to recognize that environmental, social, and governance responsi...

  19. "Corporate Social Responsibility” (CSR sebagai Aktivitas “Social Marketing Public Relations"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neni Yulianita

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR nowadays becomes indicator of corporate achievement. CSR activities, which commonly defined as corporate efforts to increase community and stakeholder life quality, open up relations between corporate and community. In turn, CSR would maintain good image and give posing the positive publicity toward corporate image. This article explores CSR activities as implied on PR marketing in some corporates.

  20. Corporate citizenship: Statoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjell, Olav

    2003-01-01

    Open markets alone do not guarantee equitable and sustainable development. Income disparities are growing both within and between countries to the extent that the marginalization of the poor has become a key challenge of globalization. To meet this challenge, the global community must address the governance gap between global finance/economics and local or national politics in world affairs. This article discusses how globalization is shaping Statoil's approach to corporate citizenship. The Norwegian firm, with 17,000 workers in some 25 countries, is one of the major net sellers of crude oil and supplies Europe with natural gas. Statoil maintains that corporations can contribute to global governance by conducting business in a manner that is ethical, economically viable, environmentally sound, and socially responsible. This contribution can be achieved through development partnerships with national governments, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental organizations. Norway's Statoil ASA is one of the world's largest net sellers of crude oil and a major supplier of natural gas to Europe. It is the leading Scandinavian retailer of petroleum and other oil products. Statoil employs approximately 17,000 workers and operates in 25 countries.

  1. Building Corporate Reputation through Corporate Governance = Krepitev ugleda korporacij skozi njihovo vodenje

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedomir Ljubojevic

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors of the article deal with mutual relations of corporate governance and corporate reputation. The aim of this paper is to show that corporate governance design is in the function of better corporate reputation and to test the perceived relation between corporate governance and corporate reputation. The research expect to show: the necessity for integration of corporate strategy into business strategy (this issue will be even more present in the future and to prove the opinion of consumers and corporations who claim that corporate governance is a necessity for corporate reputation development.

  2. Corporate Social Responsibility in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer

    This doctoral dissertation examines the business-development relations in Afghanistan by focusing on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and other related practices from corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. More concretely, the study aims to explore the characteristics...

  3. Communication and community development: early child development programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, F; Reinhold, A J

    1993-01-01

    Community-based groups are organized around particular aspects of early childhood development (ECD), such as literacy, parent education, and early childhood activities. In the Colombian national program, community households call upon women to devote a portion of their home to organized child care for minimal material reward. The Indian Child Development Service subsidizes the payment of organizers; and Kenyan parents construct basic preschool facilities, provide school lunches, and subsidize a teacher. In such cases the government plays a subordinate role, while the burden of program maintenance is carried by the community. These programs share the characteristics that children and adults learn side by side; adult learning ranges from women's literacy, to health, organizational issues, or small-scale economic development; a strong cultural component emphasizes mother tongue language learning, indigenous child-rearing practices, and local working models; physical structures are in homes; capacity-building for the adults is central which will be transferred to other spheres of community life. In the remote coastal villages of Colombia, an organization called Promesa works with mothers on designing their preschool children's educational activities. Promesa began to confront other priority needs in the villages, especially in environmental health and malaria control. A 1990 assessment related that participants' pride, self-confidence, and ability to solve problems regarding the healthy development of their children increased; groups learned to make use of the physical, human, and institutional resources from their environments; and participants' children remained in school and performed better. Conclusions from a decade of loose experimentation suggest that through communication community women can be organized to provide basic early education and early childhood activities can help rural children over the cultural barrier of school.

  4. The Culture of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the Academic Framework: Some Literary Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sandhya Rao

    2011-01-01

    Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) is swiftly emerging as an integral part of corporate culture and discourse. Associated with notions of responsibility, accountability and community involvement, it remains privileged with concerns that increasingly define the new millennium. Less developed, however, is the relevance of CSR ideas to academic…

  5. Corporate attributes and corporate accruals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Md Shamimul Hasan; Normah Omar; Rashidah Abdul Rahman; Syed Zabid Hossain

    2016-01-01

    ... (discretionary accruals) in Bangladesh. The behaviour of corporate accruals is explained by corporate attributes such as asset size, turnover, earnings per share, number of shareholders, year of listing, international link of audit firm...

  6. Corporate governance and public corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Cusolito, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Corporate governance in the private sector and corruption are important for economic development and private sector development. This paper investigates how corporate governance in private-sector media companies can affect public corruption. The analytical framework, based on models of corporate governance, identifies two channels through which media ownership concentration affects corrupt...

  7. 76 FR 67021 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-28

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice and... Financial Institutions Fund (the ``CDFI Fund'') within the Department of the Treasury is soliciting comments... Mia Sowell, Policy and Program Officer, at the Community Development Financial Institutions Fund,...

  8. 基于不同视角的企业社会责任履行对企业发展的影响%The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility Fulfillment on Corporate Development Based on Different Perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尚振生

    2013-01-01

    本文在通过分析国内外企业社会责任的履行情况,然后从利益相关者、公司绩效、核心竞争力、贸易与投资、可持续发展战略六个视角分析企业社会责任履行对企业未来发展的影响,并得出我国企业预长远发展就必须加强社会责任意识。%In this paper, by analyzing the domestic and international fulfillment status of corporate social responsibility, the impact of fulfillment of corporate social responsibility on the future development of corporate is analyzed from stakeholders, corporate performance, the core competitiveness, trade and investment, sustainable development strategies six perspective and the conclusion that the China's corporate must enhance awareness of social responsibility for the long-term development.

  9. Preparing and Developing Community College International Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raby, Rosalind Latiner; Valeau, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership training for future senior United States (US) community college leaders is an ongoing focus of US community college education. Leadership training is also a focus of US university international educators. Community college literature has assumed that full-time positions at community colleges devoted to overseeing and implementing…

  10. Achieving Flourishing City Schools and Communities--Corporate Reform, Neoliberal Urbanism, and the Right to the City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This essay critiques the ideological assertions of corporate school reform and discusses how these logics perpetuate failure in urban education. Drawing on theories of neoliberal urbanism, the right to the city, and the commons, the essay argues that educational researchers and advocates need to reframe the values of urban education in line with a…

  11. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities. This study used 454-pyrosequencing of the V1-V3 region of 16S rRNA genes (approximately 500 bp), and bacterial culture, to characterize the composition of plaque during the transition from periodontal health to gingivitis. A total of 20 healthy volunteers abstained from oral hygiene for two weeks, allowing plaque to accumulate and gingivitis to develop. Plaque samples were analyzed at baseline, and after one and two weeks. In addition, plaque samples from 20 chronic periodontitis patients were analyzed for cross-sectional comparison to the experimental gingivitis cohort. All of the healthy volunteers developed gingivitis after two weeks. Pyrosequencing yielded a final total of 344,267 sequences after filtering, with a mean length of 354 bases, that were clustered into an average of 299 species-level Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) per sample. Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) plots revealed significant shifts in the bacterial community structure of plaque as gingivitis was induced, and community diversity increased significantly after two weeks. Changes in the relative abundance of OTUs during the transition from health to gingivitis were correlated to bleeding on probing (BoP) scores and resulted in the identification of new health- and gingivitis-associated taxa. Comparison of the healthy volunteers to the periodontitis patients also confirmed the association of a number of putative periodontal pathogens with chronic periodontitis. Taxa associated with gingivitis included Fusobacterium nucleatum subsp. polymorphum, Lachnospiraceae [G-2] sp. HOT100, Lautropia sp. HOTA94, and Prevotella oulorum, whilst Rothia dentocariosa was associated with periodontal health. Further study of these taxa is warranted and may lead to new therapeutic approaches

  12. Corporate social responsibility in the coffee sector: The dynamics of MNC responses and code development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Kolk

    2005-01-01

    Since the collapse of the international coffee agreement in 1989, attention has increasingly focused on the role of multinational corporations in this sector. As the main actors in the international coffee chain, companies such as Sara Lee/Douwe Egberts, Nestlé and Kraft have been pressurised to sho

  13. Trends and developments within corporate communication: an analysis of ten years of CCIJ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elving, W.J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This paper aims to analyse the trends in the papers which have been published in Corporate Communications: An International Journal (CCIJ ) over the past ten years. The analysis will focus on the region of the world the (first) authors come from and on the topics of the paper. Design/methodo

  14. Corporate psychopathy: Talking the walk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiak, Paul; Neumann, Craig S; Hare, Robert D

    2010-01-01

    There is a very large literature on the important role of psychopathy in the criminal justice system. We know much less about corporate psychopathy and its implications, in large part because of the difficulty in obtaining the active cooperation of business organizations. This has left us with only a few small-sample studies, anecdotes, and speculation. In this study, we had a unique opportunity to examine psychopathy and its correlates in a sample of 203 corporate professionals selected by their companies to participate in management development programs. The correlates included demographic and status variables, as well as in-house 360 degrees assessments and performance ratings. The prevalence of psychopathic traits-as measured by the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised (PCL-R) and a Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version (PCL: SV) "equivalent"-was higher than that found in community samples. The results of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and structural equation modeling (SEM) indicated that the underlying latent structure of psychopathy in our corporate sample was consistent with that model found in community and offender studies. Psychopathy was positively associated with in-house ratings of charisma/presentation style (creativity, good strategic thinking and communication skills) but negatively associated with ratings of responsibility/performance (being a team player, management skills, and overall accomplishments).

  15. Developing communities of practice in health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus; Edwards, Kasper

    the use of SOPs. A CoP is a social community formed around a practice (e.g. ICU nursing) which induce a propensity to share experiences and thereby constitute knowledge sharing (Lave & Wenger 1991; Brown & Duguid 1991). CoP was conceived as a descriptive construct but has gained popularity and is found...... to improve practice performance, but knowledge about developing and measuring CoP is lacking (Ison et al. 2014). We propose a method to develop a CoP and the method is tested in a blood analysis unit at ‘Nordsjællands Hospital’ in Denmark. Design/methodology/approach The interventions were identified from...... current CoP research. Interventions were initiated just after baseline measurement.  The following interventions took place: The practice was operationalized narrowly as employees performing a specific operational task. The practice was chosen due to a high frequency and recurring problems. A voluntary Co...

  16. Leading quality through the development of a multi-year corporate quality plan: sharing The Ottawa Hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Linda; Myles, Joanne; Worthington, James R; Lebrun, Monique

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the background and process for developing a multi-year corporate quality plan. The Ottawa Hospital's goal is to be a top 10% performer in quality and patient safety in North America. In order to create long-term measurable and sustainable changes in the quality of patient care, The Ottawa Hospital embarked on the development of a three-year strategic corporate quality plan. This was accomplished by engaging the organization at all levels and defining quality frameworks, aligning with internal and external expectations, prioritizing strategic goals, articulating performance measurements and reporting to stakeholders while maintaining a transparent communication process. The plan was developed through an iterative process that engaged a broad base of health professionals, physicians, support staff, administration and senior management. A literature review of quality frameworks was undertaken, a Quality Plan Working Group was established, 25 key stakeholder interviews were conducted and 48 clinical and support staff consultations were held. The intent was to gather information on current quality initiatives and challenges encountered and to prioritize corporate goals and then create the quality plan. Goals were created and then prioritized through an affinity exercise. Action plans were developed for each goal and included objectives, tasks and activities, performance measures (structure, process and outcome), accountabilities and timelines. This collaborative methodology resulted in the development of a three-year quality plan. Six corporate goals were outlined by the tenets of the quality framework for The Ottawa Hospital: access to care, appropriate care (effective and efficient), safe care and satisfaction with care. Each of the six corporate goals identified objectives and supporting action plans with accountabilities outlining what would be accomplished in years one, two and three. The three-year quality plan was approved by senior

  17. Development of Physical Protection Regulations for Rosatom State Corporation Sites under the U.S.-Russian MPC&A Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izmaylov, Alexander; Babkin, Vladimir; Shemigon, Nikolai N.; O' Brien, Patricia; Wright, Troy L.; Hazel, Michael J.; Tuttle, John D.; Cunningham, Mitchel E.; Lane, Melinda; Kovchegin, Dmitry

    2012-07-14

    This paper describes issues related to upgrading the physical protection regulatory basis for Rosatom State Corporation sites. It is underlined that most of the regulatory and methodological documents for this subject area have been developed under the U.S.-Russian MPC&A Program. According to the joint management plan developed and agreed upon by the parties in 2005, nearly 50 physical protection documents were identified to be developed, approved and implemented at Rosatom sites by 2012. It is also noted that, on the whole, the plans have been fulfilled.

  18. 1 COMMUNITY THEATRE AND DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Alex C Asigbo

    Critical Foundations of Community Theatre. Theatre was born societal. ... analysis-which treats theatre as if it were independent of its social ... community predicated on highly participatory methodologies. This ..... discourses. This implies that ...

  19. Skill Development for Volunteering in Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Sue; Stirling, Christine; Orpin, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines the skills required of volunteers in the voluntary sector organisations that operate in three rural Tasmanian communities. It reports how volunteers acquire those skills and reveals the challenges faced by voluntary sector organisations in rural communities whose industries and, following from this, community members have a…

  20. Corporate Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlin, Heidi; Thusgaard Pedersen, Janni

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to explore the potential of Danish corporate foundations as boundary organizations facilitating relationships between their founding companies and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Hitherto, research has been silent about the role of corporate foundations in relation to cross......-sector partnerships. The results of this paper are based on interviews, participant observations, and organizational documents from a 19-month empirical study of a Danish corporate foundation. Findings suggest that corporate foundations have potential to act as boundary organizations and facilitate collaborative...... action between business and NGOs through convening, translation, collaboration, and mediation. Our study provides valuable insights into the tri-part relationship of company foundation NGO by discussing the implications of corporate foundations taking an active role in the realm of corporate social...

  1. 75 FR 76617 - Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure Advances...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-09

    ... community financial institution (CFI) members may pledge to secure Federal Home Loan Bank (Bank) advances to... RIN 2590-AA24 Use of Community Development Loans by Community Financial Institutions To Secure... development financial institutions, FHFA included a technical amendment to the definition of ``CFI''...

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF MARKETING STRATEGY AND ORGANIZATION OF THE TRADE-MARKETING EVENTS FOR CORPORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroshnichenko M. A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article defines the feature of marketing activity focused on the future, in which the two sides are interested: producers and consumers. Five concepts of a resolution of conflict of interests of the company and clients are established. The essence and the content of marketing in corporation are considered, the plan of organization of the trade - marketing events in corporation is offered. On the basis of market research it is recommended to conduct local events with mechanisms aimed at final customer in the point of sale, on increasing the presence of the products of key customers in the point of sale in various formats: additional space sales, bandling or a gift for a purchase, discount or flyer

  3. Role of the multinational corporations in Nigeria's development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okonkwo, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    A dominant characteristic of the decades immediately following World War II is the evolution of the multinational corporation. This evolution necessitated a change in the perspective of the international companies. The survival of the multinational corporations depended on its world profit perspective. Initially, the European countries provided the American multinational with world trade avenues while the European multinationals established subsidiaries in Africa. Recently, both the American and the European subsidiares have become interested in Nigeria because of its prospect as a potential market in Africa. The major objective of the research is to inquire about executive judgements and decision criteria for marketing mix considerations and decisions. Also because of the uniqueness of Nigeria from the Western World in terms of its socio-cultural, legal, economic and political environments,executive decision criteria in the area of manufacturing was also investigated.

  4. The Development of Forms of Corporate Social Responsibility in Russia in the Current Economic Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Arzumanova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article reveals the characteristic features of modern trends in the formation and implementation of corporate social responsibility in Russia in the current economic conditions, which is based on the fact that reasonable economic interests oriented business not only on maximizing profits, but also to improve their own macro - socio-economic, natural, political, through voluntary investment profits in the respective areas.

  5. Procedure for the development of a corporate profile in the CIGET of Sancti Spiritus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carelys Elina Sacerio Castro

    2012-04-01

    Taking into account the necessity mentioned by the CIGET and the demand of this service in the province is proposed a procedure by means of which can be characterized the entity using a corporate profile, need by the high direction as an instrument for decision making. This procedure was made having as a guide The Quality Management System that exists in the CIGET. This service will constitute one more of the services that give the CIGET.

  6. The local community development and the community-based tourism : a comparative conceptual analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie PARENT

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the authors of this paper, mass tourism does not generate the development of local communities but rather their devitalization. This paper presents a cross-literature survey on community-based tourism and local community development. It proposes some links between these two approaches and asserts that community-based tourism can be a strategy to trigger local community development. It address the conditions under which the convergence of these two approaches may allow the launching of development initiatives liable to counter the devitalization and impoverishment process which characterizes certain mass tourism oriented places.

  7. Audience Participation in Television Websites: a case study of the public broadcasting corporations of the autonomous communities in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYERDI, Koldobika Meso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of Internet and the Web 2.0 have multiplied the possibilities available to the television audience for dialoguing with the medium, beyond the television screen. This is in spite of the fact that interactivity in television is not something new. Participatory forms like electronic mail, chat, SMSs, forums, virtual meetings, surveys, blogs or social networks are acquiring a special relevance. At present, these tools are being preferentially incorporated by televisions and aimed at the younger public, given its special predilection for changes and for the use of new technologies. This communication analyses the incorporation of these new forms on the basis of a case study centred on the public televisions of the autonomous communities in Spain.

  8. THEORIES OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Nicolae BORLEA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study attempts to provide a theoretical framework for the corporate governance debate. The review of various corporate governance theories enhances the major objective of corporate governance which is maximizing the value for shareholders by ensuring good social and environment performances. The theories of corporate governance are rooted in agency theory with the theory of moral hazard’s implications, further developing within stewardship theory and stakeholder theory and evolving at resource dependence theory, transaction cost theory and political theory. Later, to these theories was added ethics theory, information asymmetry theory or the theory of efficient markets. These theories are defined based on the causes and effects of variables such as: the configuration of the board of directors, audit committee, independence of managers, the role of top management and their social relations beyond the legal regulatory framework. Effective corporate governance requires applying a combination

  9. The development of quality indicators for community pharmacy care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bie, J. de; Kijlstra, N.B.; Daemen, B.J.G.; Bouvy, M.L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To develop a national system of quality indicators for community pharmacy care, reported by community pharmacies. Methods: After preliminary validation, an online consensus study was conducted. Pharmacy practice experts (round 1) and practising pharmacists (round 2) were approached.

  10. 77 FR 37742 - Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Investments. Service Activities (12 CFR 1806.103(nn)) include Deposit Liabilities, Financial Services, Community Services, Targeted Financial Services, and Targeted Retail Savings/Investment Products. When... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Funding Opportunity Title: Notice of Funds Availability...

  11. The business case for corporate social responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlastelica-Bakić Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to generating economic growth and competitiveness, modern society expects from companies active contribution to sustainable development of economy and society, as well as preservation of the environment. Corporate social responsibility as a business philosophy aims at achieving long-term benefits for the company and the society in which it operates. Although the concept of corporate social responsibility has already been accepted in both theory and practice, the goal of this paper is to underline the arguments and benefits of introducing the concept in business community. The paper presents the business case for corporate social responsibility through the presentation of the impact on the financial performance of the company, consumer behavior and ultimately on its reputation.

  12. Corporate Taxation and Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köthenbürger, Marko; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2009-01-01

    interests between shareholders and managers. We set up an agency model and analyze the crucial issue in corporate taxation of whether the normal return on investment should be exempted from taxation. The findings suggest that the divergence of interests may be intensified and welfare reduced...... if the corporate tax system exempts the normal return on investment from taxation. The optimal system may well use the full return on investment as a tax base. Hence, tax systems such as an Allowance for Corporate Equity (ACE) or a Cash-flow tax do not have the familiar efficiency-enhancing effects in the presence......The effects of corporate taxation on firm behavior have been extensively discussed in the neoclassical model of firm behavior which abstracts from agency problems. As emphasized by the corporate governance literature, corporate investment behavior is however crucially influenced by diverging...

  13. Corporate Taxation and Corporate Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köthenbürger, Marko; Stimmelmayr, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The effects of corporate taxation on firm behavior have been extensively discussed in the neoclassical model of firm behavior which abstracts from agency problems. As emphasized by the corporate governance literature, corporate investment behavior is however crucially influenced by diverging...... interests between shareholders and managers. We set up an agency model and analyze the crucial issue in corporate taxation of whether the normal return on investment should be exempted from taxation. The findings suggest that the divergence of interests may be intensified and welfare reduced...... if the corporate tax system exempts the normal return on investment from taxation. The optimal system may well use the full return on investment as a tax base. Hence, tax systems such as an Allowance for Corporate Equity (ACE) or a Cash-flow tax do not have the familiar efficiency-enhancing effects in the presence...

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility in Afghanistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Sameer

    This doctoral dissertation examines the business-development relations in Afghanistan by focusing on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and other related practices from corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry. More concretely, the study aims to explore the characteristics...... provides a relevant empirical focus that can enrich the theoretical debates about CSR in developing countries. The study thereby stresses on the importance of context, and integrates both the societal and corporate dimensions to study CSR by corporations in the Afghan mobile telecommunications industry...... in Afghanistan, and a study of secondary data from the corporations, Afghan state institutions, civil society and other relevant actors....

  15. The rewards of corporate giving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Roza (Lonneke); L.C.P.M. Meijs (Lucas); P.W.J. Verlegh (Peter)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWhen conducted through a well-designed programme, corporate community involvement, such as employee volunteering, will benefit both the company and volunteers. In particular, these programmes can be useful to marketing and human resource managers.

  16. Developing Community Health Conditions for Happiness, Phase 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalard Chantarasombat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Complete health of physical, social and intellectual development is an appropriate plan of human development and raises the quality of life in communities. If the development plan is integrated into the local community it will create peace and generosity. Good health is also fundamental to sustainable development which will create a peaceful society where community members are happy and content. Approach: The purpose of this research in Phase 1, is to (1 Identify leaders in communities at village and sub-district level to drive the ongoing research study and development to achieve good community health conditions in all aspects and dimensions. (2 To have the participants and researchers identify the key elements and indicators of health issues that communities feel are most important to their way of life. Results: Village communities were selected by cluster sampling from the provinces of Roi-Et and Maha Sarakham. The developed model for developing community health for living happily in communities is an appropriate and practical method that can be utilized in other communities. Conclusion: The model is in accordance with Participatory Action Research (PAR and the procedures are flexible and the development plans which are the results of Phase 1 can be extended to other communities and backgrounds.

  17. EXPANDING DEVELOPING COUNTRIES´ EXPORTS IN A GLOBAL ECONOMY THE NEED TO EMULATE THE STRATEGIES USED BY TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Rubens LOPES BRAGA

    1998-01-01

    World exports have expanded considerably during the past three decades. Developed countries gained more than other countries from this increase because of the strategies adopted by their transnational corporations (TNCs). The strategies of TNCs for international business emphasizes key elements for strengthening the competitiveness of enterprises, especially technology creation and outward foreign direct investment (FDI) to access resources and markets. Most export promotion and development a...

  18. Community Vitality: The Role of Community-Level Resilience Adaptation and Innovation in Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenore Newman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Community level action towards sustainable development has emerged as a key scale of intervention in the effort to address our many serious environmental issues. This is hindered by the large-scale destruction of both urban neighbourhoods and rural villages in the second half of the twentieth century. Communities, whether they are small or large, hubs of experimentation or loci of traditional techniques and methods, can be said to have a level of community vitality that acts as a site of resilience, adaptation and innovation in the face of environmental challenges. This paper outlines how community vitality acts as a cornerstone of sustainable development and suggests some courses for future research. A meta-case analysis of thirty-five Canadian communities reveals the characteristics of community vitality emerging from sustainable development experiments and its relationship to resilience, applied specifically to community development.

  19. Key directions of the Russian economy innovative development with the innovative activity practice of the integrated corporate structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. I. Shamhalov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problems and the key directions of The article deals with the problems and key directions of innovative development of the Russian industry in connection with the need to reduce the dependence of the national economy on the situation on world commodity markets, as well as to create the conditions and incentives for the introduction and modern technologies development, improving energy and environmental efficiency of the economy and productivity for the development of economic sectors and industries, producing goods with high added value for the implementation of innovative projects and in general - to upgrade the socio-economic system of the country.The following statement is given: the development of innovative high-tech and knowledge-intensive industries must ensure import substitution products at the first stage, primarily in the militaryindustrial complex, and in the future - export-oriented competitive product.The article analyzes the experience of innovative activity of the integrated corporate structures with the participation of the state in the following areas: the integration of the industrial and financial capital; the concentration of capital (through the merger and acquisition of enterprises, strategic alliances; diversification of forms and fields of activity; globalization of activities (creation of subsidiaries in the most attractive countries and working on promising markets; capital internationalization (through the creation of transnational companies.On the basis of generalization of global corporate management experience in the state corporations the article analyzes key conditions and factors that determine the efficiency of the state-owned companies as a whole: a clear statement of goals and objectives of the state as the owner, whose interests go beyond the usual business purposes; fixing of these goals and objectives in the regulations, in the concepts and programs of long-term socioeconomic

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY UNDER AGGRAVATION OF THE CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Grazhevska

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the role and importance of corporate social responsibility as an important mechanism for overcoming the crisis of the welfare state and to mitigate the social problems caused by the world globalization processes. The experience of post-socialist countries, the Baltic States and Ukraine in this field is analyzed and barriers to effective implementation of CSR in the national economy are identified. The priority of the state policy to promote socially responsible business behavior in Ukraine is proved.

  1. Developing Communities: Serving ACE through Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofo, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the focus and practice of Adult and Community Education (ACE) as well as its conceptualization and delivery and to suggest parameters for an approach based on excellence, a balanced scorecard and performance to meet community needs. Design/methodology/approach: The review examines key aspects of the…

  2. The effect of post employment interventions : the case of ex-employees of the erstwhile Mpumalanga Development Corporation

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Phil. The Social Plan is an alternative retrenchment process to section 189 of the Labour Relations Act No. 66 of 1995 as amended. When the now defunct Mpumalanga Development Corporation was dismantled in 1997, following the speech of the then Premier of the Province, of the 5 th December 1996, South Africa saw the Social Plan route being followed for the first time in its short democratic history. While the Social plan is the better of the two routes, it still looks good on paper, but h...

  3. Developing Interactive Video Resource Materials for Community Dental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Claire; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the creation of a series of interactive video modules on dental hygiene at Luzerne County Community College. These modules are intended to supplement instruction in a community dentistry and health education course and to guide students in an assignment to develop and implement dental health projects in their community. (MBR)

  4. Theoretical versus Grass-Roots Development of a Community Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escandon, Socorro

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine Bracht, Kingbury, and Rissel's five-stage community development model as applied to a grass-roots community action group. The sample consisted of low-income, predominantly Hispanic women in a community action group in a Southwestern barrio, some of whom were experiencing domestic violence. The…

  5. Health insurance and corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Tony

    2009-01-01

    Innovation drives productivity in the nonprofit sector as well as in the commercial sector. The greatest advances come not from incremental improvements in efficiency but from new and better approaches. The most powerful way to create social value, therefore, is by developing a new means to address social problems and putting it into widespread practice. The expertise, research capacity, and reach that companies bring to philanthropy can help nonprofits create new solutions that they could never afford to develop on their own. Corporate managers sometimes work directly with faculty and community residents to implement local business projects. These projects often have significant societal benefits, especially since student collaboration and involvement extend to communities in many different inner cities. These projects are incredibly diverse and through such initiatives, management education not only provides an educationally rewarding outlet for students but also endows and enriches inner city communities. Management students sometimes work directly with faculty and community residents to implement local business projects. These projects often have significant societal benefits, especially since student collaboration and involvement extend to communities in many different inner cities. These projects are incredibly diverse and through such initiatives, management education not only provides an educationally rewarding outlet for students but also endows and enriches inner city communities. This article looks at how to use corporate social responsibility and service learning to drive innovation for local inner-city economic development.

  6. Transnational Corporations in World Development – Still the Same Harmful Effects in an Increasingly Globalized World Economy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Herkenrath

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Transnational corporations (TNCs have reached historically unprecedented weight and power in the world’s political economy. Thus, the old question of how these corporations a?ect global development is nowadays more signi?cant than ever. While some scholars claim that corporate globalization will eventually close the worldwide development gap, many others contend that TNC activities lead to insu?cient exploitation of growth potentials within the host country, thereby hindering convergence of national income levels. The present study aims at assessing the validity of these controversial positions by confronting them with the results of past and present empirical research. In the ?rst part, we examine the e?ect of TNC presence on intra-national income inequality by reviewing the most recent cross-national studies dealing with this issue. In the second part, we present the results of our own research, which analyzes the e?ect of TNC presence on economic growth in a sample of 84 countries. The contemporary empirical evidence discussed in the ?rst part as well as the results of our own analyses tend to con?rm earlier ?ndings. They suggest that dependence on TNC activities increases inequality without adding to economic growth. However, the strong negative e?ect of TNC presence on growth found in analyses of data from the late 1960s cannot be reproduced in our contemporary analysis. In a signi?cant number of cases, the potentially harmful consequences of TNC activities seem to have been overcome by adequate countervailing state actions.

  7. Managing corporate governance risks in a nonprofit health care organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Glenn T; Brashear, Andrea D; Green, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    Triggered by corporate scandals, there is increased oversight by governmental bodies and in part by the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Corporations are developing corporate governance compliance initiatives to respond to the scrutiny of regulators, legislators, the general public and constituency groups such as investors. Due to state attorney general initiatives, new legislation and heightened oversight from the Internal Revenue Service, nonprofit entities are starting to share the media spotlight with their for-profit counterparts. These developments are changing nonprofit health care organizations as well as the traditional role of the risk manager. No longer is the risk manager focused solely on patients' welfare and safe passage through a complex delivery system. The risk manager must be aware of corporate practices within the organization that could allow the personal objectives of a few individuals to override the greater good of the community in which the nonprofit organization serves.

  8. Strategic corporate sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grewatsch, Sylvia; Rohrbeck, René; Madsen, Henning

    This paper aims to advance the understanding of the circumstances under which corporate sustainability (CS) pays off. On the basis of a review of 129 major papers from both the sustainability and general management literature, we discuss the development of the research field. In addition we discuss...... antecedents and outcomes. To overcome this limitation we propose an integrated typology which may facilitate more research on the link between corporate sustainability performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). Our expectation is that the strategy type might play a moderating or mediating...

  9. Corporate Social Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Peter; Rahbek Pedersen, Esben

    2003-01-01

    , human rights and environmental protection. Without a common point of reference in national regulation, managers in multinational enterprises now have to develop their own codes of corporate social behaviour. This has created a growing market for private standards within the field of environmental...... management systems, social accountability, corporate citizenship, occupational health and safety and so forth. However, both the idea of government regulation and the literature acclaiming corporate self-regulation should be met with some scepticism. This paper offers a short assessment of the potentials...

  10. Strategic corporate sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grewatsch, Sylvia; Rohrbeck, René; Madsen, Henning

    This paper aims to advance the understanding of the circumstances under which corporate sustainability (CS) pays off. On the basis of a review of 129 major papers from both the sustainability and general management literature, we discuss the development of the research field. In addition we discuss...... antecedents and outcomes. To overcome this limitation we propose an integrated typology which may facilitate more research on the link between corporate sustainability performance (CSP) and corporate financial performance (CFP). Our expectation is that the strategy type might play a moderating or mediating...

  11. Corporate Language and Corporate Talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    2013-01-01

    the geographical borders by the medium of common corporate values for knowledge management, collection of data and analysis in these studies inspired by approach of ground theory and presents a usefulness of distinguishing between corporate language and talks to enable the headquarters learning. Also it concludes...

  12. Foreign direct liability and beyond. Exploring the role of tort law in promoting international corporate social responsibility and accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneking, L.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Western societies are witnessing an emerging socio-legal trend towards transnational civil litigation against multinational corporations in relation to harm caused to people and planet abroad. Increasingly, individuals and communities from developing host countries who have been detrimentally impact

  13. Foreign direct liability and beyond. Exploring the role of tort law in promoting international corporate social responsibility and accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enneking, L.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Western societies are witnessing an emerging socio-legal trend towards transnational civil litigation against multinational corporations in relation to harm caused to people and planet abroad. Increasingly, individuals and communities from developing host countries who have been detrimentally

  14. Developing a community multiple sclerosis nursing service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Debbie; Adams, John

    2014-05-20

    Reforms to the NHS following the passing of the Health and Social Care Act 2012 have created new purchaser organisations with responsibility for planning the configuration of healthcare services in their geographic areas. If a community multiple sclerosis (MS) nursing service is to survive in this environment, it must demonstrate its ability to contribute to achieving the purchaser organisations' objectives. Evaluation data, such as hospital admission avoidance and patient satisfaction, will be crucial in demonstrating the community MS nursing service's clinical and economic effectiveness. A strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) analysis of the issues facing a community MS service in this environment is provided.

  15. Role of Local Elected Leaders in Community Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Alam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the role of local elected leaders in community development at union council Katti Garhi, District Mardan. To collect the relevant data the researcher selected 60 community members and 12 elected union council members including Nazim and Niab Nazim of the area through purposive sampling basis. Questionnaire was used for the educated while interview schedule was used for un-educated respondents for data collection. The study indicates the role of local elected leaders in establishment of community organizations, mobilization of the community for community development, monitoring program for community development, provision of social services, sanitation, street pavements, streetlights, health facilities, education facilities (Free books, uniform and scholarships etc., adult education, provision of technical skill and vocational training center in the area. Community members mentioned that they are in need of public parks, playgrounds, public latrines, fire brigade, and waiting rooms for the passengers, pavement of roadsides and improvement in drinking and irrigation water.

  16. Epistemic Communities, Situated Learning and Open Source Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper

    2001-01-01

    This paper analyses open source software (OSS) development as an epistemic community where each individual project is perceived as a single epistemic community. OSS development is a learning process where the involved parties contribute to, and learn from the community. It is discovered that theory...... of epistemic communities does indeed contribute to the understanding of open source software development. But, the important learning process of open source software development is not readily explained. The paper then introduces situated learning and legitimate peripheral participation as theoretical...

  17. 24 CFR 570.415 - Community Development Work Study Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Community Development Work Study... Grants § 570.415 Community Development Work Study Program. (a) Applicability and objectives. HUD makes... students who participate in a work study program while enrolled in full-time graduate programs in...

  18. Initiatives for Sustainable Community Development in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, John M.; Kargbo, Stephen B.

    1999-01-01

    In Sierra Leone, two church-sponsored programs are focused on sustainable development. The Wesleyan Development Education and Awareness Programme trains people to initiate community projects. Women's Loan Scheme encourages development of small-scale enterprises. (SK)

  19. Bacterial community development in experimental gingivitis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kistler, James O; Booth, Veronica; Bradshaw, David J; Wade, William G

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge of the microbial composition of dental plaque in early gingivitis is based largely on microscopy and cultural methods, which do not provide a comprehensive description of oral microbial communities...

  20. Influence of Leadership Styles on Community Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    Data were analysed using descriptive and Pearson's Product Moment Correlation. ... forces to plan and take actions regarding community problems. They ... leadership traits. ... focus of group processes, as a matter of personality, as a matter of.

  1. The Role of Corporations in Ensuring Biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    KELLY; HODGE

    1996-11-01

    / Corporations own approximately 25% of all private land in the United States and, therefore, play an essential role in protecting biodiversity and maintaining natural habitats. The Wildlife Habitat Council (WHC) is a unique joint venture between conservation organizations and corporations to utilize corporate lands for ensuring biodiversity. The following case studies demonstrate how corporations have helped ensure healthy ecosystems and provided critical leadership in regional efforts. Amoco Chemical Company's Cooper River Plant has been instrumental in developing a cooperative project that involves numerous corporations, plantation owners, private citizens, nonprofit organizations, government agencies, and community groups to develop a comprehensive, ecosystem-based management plan for part of the Cooper River in Charleston, South Carolina, USA. The second case focuses on the Morie Company, a national sand quarry operator headquartered in southern New Jersey, USA. Morie Company is working with WHC, community groups, the Pinelands Commission, and other state regulatory agencies to explore sustainable development opportunities for companies within the Pinelands regulations. The third case takes us to DuPont Company's Asturias, Spain, site. A win-win success story of improved habitat and cost savings is the result of DuPont's concern for the environment, ability to work with a variety of groups, and willingness to consider innovative restoration techniques. The fourth case discusses Consumers Power Company's Campbell Plant in West Olive, Michigan, USA. In addition to implementing projects that contribute to biodiversity, Consumers Power has developed an environmental education field station to teach others about the importance of natural habitats. The final case highlights Baltimore Gas & Electric Company's efforts to maintain habitat for endangered species at their Calvert Cliffs site in Maryland.KEY WORDS: Partnerships; Stewardship; International; Habitats

  2. The Relationship between Corporate Governance and Value of the Firm in Developing Countries: Evidence from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdur Rouf

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to examine the relationship between four corporate governance mechanisms (board size, board independent director, chief executive officer duality and board audit committee and value of the firm (performance measures (return on assets, ROA and return on equity, ROE. The paper is based on a sample of 93 listed non-financial companies in Dhaka Stock Exchanges (DSE 2006. Using OLS as a method of estimation, the results provide evidence of a positive significant relationship between ROA and board independent director as well as chief executive officer duality. The results further reveal a positive significant relationship between ROE and board independent director as well as chief executive officer duality. The study, however, could not provide a significant relationship between the value of the firm measures (ROA and ROE and board size and board audit committee.

  3. Peculiarities of Corporate Governance Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Victoria Vladimirovna Prokhorova

    2016-01-01

    ... of shareholders in strategic management. At present, the companies from developed countries achieve higher economic performance through the introduction of modern methods of corporate governance...

  4. Corporate entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karina

    2005-01-01

    Corporate entreprenørskab kan blive svaret på, hvordan Danmark fremmer en mere videnintensiv produktion. Begrebet er blevet anvendt til at forklare forskellige organisatoriske fænomener alt fra strategi over ledelse i al almindelighed til innovation, hvilket har medført en mangfoldighed af begreber...... og perspektiver, som har skabt stor uklarhed omkring corporate entreprenørskab. Med henblik på at skabe fundamentet for et fælles fodslag redegøres der i denne artikel for corporate entreprenørskabsbegrebet ud fra forskellige perspektiver. Der gives i artiklen endvidere et overblik ved hjælp af en...... model, der indeholder intraprenørskab og exoprenørskab, samt fire organisatoriske perspektiver: corporate venturing, interne ressourcer, internationalisering og eksterne netværk....

  5. Effects of Stakeholder Conflicts on Community Development Projects in Kenyase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Gyan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the effects of stakeholder conflicts on community development. In particular, it analyzes the negative repercussions these conflicts have on projects drawing on primary research in Kenyase, one of the major mining communities in Ghana where community development processes are more structured. Using qualitative research methods, the research sought evidence of the negative effects stakeholder conflicts have on projects. This study revealed that financial and technical investments without adequate social capital have the potential of retarding community development projects. It was therefore recommended that project managers pay attention to stakeholder relationships in project initiation, design, and implementation.

  6. Corporate Responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    Appeals to corporate responsibility often simply take for granted that businesses have ethical responsibilities that go beyond just respecting the law. This paper addresses arguments to the effect that businesses have no such responsibilities. The interesting claim is not that businesses have no ethical responsibility at all but that their primal responsibility is to increase their profits. The extent to which there is reason to take such arguments seriously delineates the limits of corporate...

  7. Community health centers and community development financial institutions: joining forces to address determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelchuck, Ronda; Lowenstein, Daniel; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2011-11-01

    Community health centers and community development financial institutions share similar origins and missions and are increasingly working together to meet community needs. Addressing the social and economic determinants of health is a common focus. The availability of new federal grants and tax credits has led these financial institutions to invest in the creation and expansion of community health centers. This article reviews the most recent trends in these two sectors and explores opportunities for further collaboration to transform the health and well-being of the nation's low-income communities.

  8. Community Forestry and Sustainable Development in Rural Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    After analysis on the current situation of international forestry, this paper proposes that integration, coordination and sustainable development will be the general developing trend of forest in China, and commercial forest, ecological forest and community forest should be organically combined with integrative development and sustainable development in rural areas. This paper focuses especially on clarifying the importance of community forest to the social development or rural areas, and emphasizes tha...

  9. Community Development with Immigrant Women. A Resource Kit for Community Education and Organizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Veronica; Persad, Judy Vashti

    The primary objective of the kit is to present a model to assist Canadian community workers in developing a workshop or a course on community development working with or intending to work with immigrant women. The booklet provides a guide through the stages of needs assessment, outreach, selection of participants, program design, implementation,…

  10. A Community of Narratives: Developing Transracialized Selves through a Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laughter, Judson; Han, Keonghee Tao; King, Donna; Madhuri, Marga; Nayan, Rohany; Williams, Toni

    2015-01-01

    The story presented here developed from a study group where we found space to explore and analyze ourselves and each other. In recounting our development from a Community of Interest to a Community of Practice (CoP), we first introduce a guiding theoretical framework building on a foundation of two concepts: "CoP" and…

  11. The Development and Implementation of a Community Pharmacy Practice Clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, Fred G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    A clerkship at the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy was developed to provide students with (1) experience in the identification, development,, implementation, and evaluation of patient care services in community pharmacies and (2) the skills required to successfully operate a community pharmacy on a day-to-day basis.…

  12. The Development of Community Competence in the Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Vandyck, Inne; Akkerman, Sanne; Graaff, Rick de; Beishuizen, Jos; Pilot, Albert; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are expected to frequently collaborate within teacher communities in schools. This requires teacher education to prepare student teachers by developing the necessary community competence. The present study empirically investigates the extent to which teacher education programmes pay attention to and aim to stimulate the development of…

  13. The Development of Social Presence in Online Arabic Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Andrea; Herrington, Jan

    2010-01-01

    An effective online learning community requires the development of social presence, as this helps learners to project themselves online and feel a sense of community. A literature review found that cultural preferences are important in developing relationships online, which may explain why some learners in international contexts may not…

  14. The Development of Community Competence in the Teacher Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Vandyck, Inne; Akkerman, Sanne; Graaff, Rick de; Beishuizen, Jos; Pilot, Albert; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Teachers are expected to frequently collaborate within teacher communities in schools. This requires teacher education to prepare student teachers by developing the necessary community competence. The present study empirically investigates the extent to which teacher education programmes pay attention to and aim to stimulate the development of…

  15. Measuring Corporate Sustainability Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Nicolăescu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to examine and evaluate the evolving character of sustainability management in corporations, the significance of environmental protection and sustainability, and barriers to carrying out an incorporated and strategic firm-wide advance of social responsibility. In the present paper, we focus on the contribution of sustainability undertakings towards enhancing corporate performance, the financial involvements of sustainability position and operation, and the chief function of values in corporate policy. Our paper contributes to the literature by supplying proof of elements that lead to the triumph of business patterns for sustainable development, processes through which stakeholders are affecting corporate sustainability conduct, and the link between economic growth and the environment.

  16. Corporate Support of Education: No Strings Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Louis W.

    1978-01-01

    Nothing is better calculated to drive a wedge between the corporate community and our universities than efforts on the part of business to dictate to a community of scholars how it shall fulfill its mission. (Author)

  17. Corporate Support of Education: No Strings Attached

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabot, Louis W.

    1978-01-01

    Nothing is better calculated to drive a wedge between the corporate community and our universities than efforts on the part of business to dictate to a community of scholars how it shall fulfill its mission. (Author)

  18. Community health impacts from oil and gas development in Texas: The perspective of Sharon Wilson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Lourdes

    2016-08-30

    Sharon Wilson is a community organizer for the nonprofit organization Earthworks. After leaving her office job managing data for the oil and gas industry, she started organizing in response to negative impacts from unconventional oil and gas extraction methods near her Texas home and throughout the state. She describes the environmental health impacts of oil and gas development aided by new technologies and regulatory exemptions set forth by the 2005 Energy Policy Act. Production has spread to previously unexplored regions over the last decade, including her property on the Barnett Shale in North Texas, where she has interacted with energy corporations and observed the intensification of residents' health issues. I structured the questions in this interview to highlight her unique perspective on organizing in relation to current regulatory loopholes, health impacts of oil and gas development, and the experiences individuals have had with representatives from the industry. © The Author(s) 2016.

  19. Examining corporate governance and corporate tax management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Surya Mulyadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Taxation play an essential role both in a country and in a corporation. For a country it is one of the primary income source, while for the corporation taxes will reduce corporate net income. To minimize the tax payment, corporation conduct a corporate tax management. According to some of previous research, there is a correlation between corporate governance and corporate tax management. While there are many corporate governance proxies could be used in corporate governance research, in this research we are focusing on three: number of board, number of independent board and board compensation. We measure corporate tax management by using effective tax rate (GAAP ETR and current ETR are used in this research. By using several other control variables, we run the regression and conduct the statistical analysis to examine the correlation between corporate governance and corporate tax management. Our result show that corporate governance have a significant correlation to corporate tax management.

  20. Rural Community Development Strategy beyond the Access to Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akther, Farzana

    2012-01-01

    Telecenters is one of the promising models recognized by the United Nations (UN) to achieve the global access of ICTs. This paper provides insight in the role and usages of Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) projects with a specific focus of telecenters in developing...... for development with impact analysis of ICT4D project. The understanding of community capability building is addressed by identifying core capabilities of ICT for the rural community, and highlighting the relationship between the ICT and development. The study also demonstrates how ICT may bridge the gap between...... the policy and actual practices of rural community with respect of ICT development....

  1. Corporate Brand Trust as a Mediator in the Relationship between Consumer Perception of CSR, Corporate Hypocrisy, and Corporate Reputation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to investigate the relationship between consumer perception of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR, corporate brand trust, corporate hypocrisy, and corporate reputation. Based on the one-to-one interview method using a structured questionnaire of 560 consumers in South Korea, the proposed model was estimated by structural equation modeling analysis. The model suggests that consumer perception of CSR influences consumer attitudes toward a corporation (i.e., perceived corporate hypocrisy and corporate reputation by developing corporate brand trust. This in turn further enhances corporate reputation while decreasing corporate hypocrisy. The findings of our study demonstrate that consumer perception of CSR is an antecedent to corporate brand trust, which fully mediates the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and corporate reputation. In addition, corporate brand trust has the role of partial mediator in the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and corporate hypocrisy. These results imply that to better understand the relationship between consumer perception of CSR and consumer attitudes toward a corporation, it is necessary to consider corporate brand trust as an important mediating variable. The theoretical and practical implications of this study are discussed, together with its limitations and potential for future research.

  2. Influence of Leadership Styles on Community Development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toshiba

    the quality of life in the community in terms of economy, social, culture, spiritual ... leadership as an interaction between two or more members of a group that often ... focus of group processes, as a matter of personality, as a matter of inducing ...

  3. Voluntary Community Organisations in Metropolitan Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    While short-term enrolling of citizens in urban regeneration projects often has proven quite successful, permanent embedding of projects in voluntary community-based settings seems to be much more difficult to obtain. This has implications for long term sustainability of urban regeneration projec...

  4. A survey of community gardens in upstate New York: implications for health promotion and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D

    2000-12-01

    Twenty community garden programs in upstate New York (representing 63 gardens) were surveyed to identify characteristics that may be useful to facilitate neighborhood development and health promotion. The most commonly expressed reasons for participating in gardens were access to fresh foods, to enjoy nature, and health benefits. Gardens in low-income neighborhoods (46%) were four times as likely as non low-income gardens to lead to other issues in the neighborhood being addressed; reportedly due to organizing facilitated through the community gardens. Additional research on community gardening can improve our understanding of the interaction of social and physical environments and community health, and effective strategies for empowerment, development, and health promotion.

  5. Where Is Community Development Going in Latin America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Frances

    1994-01-01

    Reviews community development in Latin America (self-help local improvement projects, popular education, nongovernmental organizations). Identifies challenges--increasing the participation of all levels, reorganizing priorities, and supporting the development of economic democracy. (SK)

  6. Where Is Community Development Going in Latin America?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Frances

    1994-01-01

    Reviews community development in Latin America (self-help local improvement projects, popular education, nongovernmental organizations). Identifies challenges--increasing the participation of all levels, reorganizing priorities, and supporting the development of economic democracy. (SK)

  7. Antecedents of Corporate Reputation in the Hotel Industry: The Moderating Role of Transparency

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sung-Bum Kim; Dae-Young Kim

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we developed a theoretical framework in which corporate social responsibility, corporate ability, customer trust and satisfaction, and corporate reputation by considering the influence...

  8. The Proposal Concept of Development and Implementation in Strategy of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility in the Context of the HCS Model 3E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakál, Peter; Hrdinová, Gabriela

    2016-06-01

    This article is the result of a conceptual design methodology for the development of a sustainable strategy of sustainable corporate social responsibility (SCSR) in the context of the HCS model 3E formed, as a co-author within the stated grants and dissertation. On the basis of the use of propositional logic, the SCSR procedure is proposed for incorporation into the corporate strategy of sustainable development and the integrated management system (IMS) of the industrial enterprise. The aim of this article is the proposal of the concept of development and implementation strategy of SCSR in the context of the HCS model 3E.

  9. The Proposal Concept of Development and Implementation in Strategy of Sustainable Corporate Social Responsibility in the Context of the HCS Model 3E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakál Peter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of a conceptual design methodology for the development of a sustainable strategy of sustainable corporate social responsibility (SCSR in the context of the HCS model 3E formed, as a co-author within the stated grants and dissertation. On the basis of the use of propositional logic, the SCSR procedure is proposed for incorporation into the corporate strategy of sustainable development and the integrated management system (IMS of the industrial enterprise. The aim of this article is the proposal of the concept of development and implementation strategy of SCSR in the context of the HCS model 3E.

  10. Interactive Development of Community Education and Migrant Workers’ Continuing Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning; WANG

    2015-01-01

    Community education is an essential carrier of continuing education and plays a positive role in promoting continuing education of migrant workers. On the one hand,it can raise employment quality and labor skills of migrant workers; on the other hand,it manifests function of serving society of community education. Besides,it is also an important measure for building learning society and lifelong learning system.From the perspective of interactive development,it discusses interactive relationship between community education and migrant workers’ continuing education,analyzes their interactive mechanism,and comes up with recommendations for developing community education and migrant workers’ continuing education.

  11. Community Strategic Relationship and Marketing to Foster the Development of communities and the sustainability of organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Juárez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to define community strategic relationship and marketing (CSRM as a relevant tool to foster the development of communities and the sustainability of organizations. The method was rationalist, theoretical, and conceptual; it comprised the analysis of a propositional structure. Articulated propositions provided a framework for analysis, discussion, and conclusions. After giving a definition of CSRM, several analyses were conducted that determined the uniqueness and usefulness of this approach. These analyses were: 1 the usefulness of the community concepts and strategies in CSRM, 2 the existence of a community approach to different strategic areas or marketing, and 3 the relevance of the use of community concepts and strategies to foster the development of communities and the sustainability of organizations. The conclusion was that CSRM and the use of these concepts and strategies have the potential to be a fruitful research and strategic approach in marketing and in all of organization activities

  12. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AS A FACTOR INFLUENCING THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOCIAL ACCOUNTING AND ASSESSMENT OF EMPLOYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Krasodomska

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The idea of corporate social responsibility (CSR is based on voluntary responsibility of companies for their operations in economic, social and environmental spheres as well as for ethical behavior. In accounting, it is reflected in the form of social accounting which deals with disclosing information on the organization’s achievements in respect of the CSR concept implementation. During the current economic crisis, company relationships with employees have become the most important of all the issues related to CSR. Additional challenges in this respect are posed by Generation Y comprising the people born after 1980 who enter the labor market. For them, the socially responsible employer is even more important than high earnings. The main aim of this paper is to present the results of the research carried out at the end of 2010 among a group of external students at Cracow University of Economics. The research was conducted one month before the students obtained their Bachelor’s degrees. The survey focused on determining how much knowledge the prospective graduates had about CSR, how important CSR was to them as a criterion for selection of their workplace and how they regarded the inclusion of information on CSR in the framework of the company’s accounting system

  13. The Development of Auditing Arena and Corporate Governance Landscape in Malaysia: An Initiative to Combat Fraud and Corruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Noruddin Nur Adura; Norziaton I.K.

    2017-01-01

    This research provides two phases of discussions on the evolution in auditing arena and corporate governance (CG) landscape in Malaysia. Phase 1: Pre-Malaysian Code of Corporate Governance (MCCG) (1957-2000) and Phase 2: Post-Malaysian Code of Corporate Governance (2001-2015). MCCG was designed to increase oversight and regulation of the accounting profession and to strengthen CG practices and increase transparency of financial audits. The emergence of audit failures has focused the world’s a...

  14. ATTITUDE OF CORPORATE MANAGERS AND STOCKHOLDERS WITH RESPECT TO GOOD GOVERNANCE IN A DEVELOPING COUNTRY: A CASE STUDY OF BANGLADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Z. Mamun; Mohammad Aslam

    2005-01-01

    This study showed the perceptional differences between corporate managers1 and stockholders2 regarding good governance. The study is conducted among 25 pairs of senior managers and stockholders from 25 randomly chosen corporations3 in Bangladesh. Different statistical tools like numeric scale, discriminant analysis, descriptive analysis, t-test, F-test were used for the comparative analysis. Regarding good governance, it is found that the corporate managers and stockholders possess opposing v...

  15. Corporate Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoș-Mihail Daghie

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze and understand the recently introduced form of managementof a company limited by shares. The Law no. 441/2006, which fundamentally amended Company Law,created this form of controlling the company, the corporate governance, but the legislation does not explicitlydefine what it wants to achieve through this instrument. This topic is recent in research as the theme ofgerman-roman commercial law systems (in French corporate governance system was introduced in 1966 andin Romania in 2006 but in terms of Anglo-Saxon law, the topic has been addressed years since 1776 (AdamSmith: The Wealth of Nations The concept of corporate governance would like, as a result, to establish somerules that companies must comply in order to achieve effective governance, transparent and beneficial forboth shareholders and for the minority. Corporate governance is a key element with an aim at improvingefficiency and economic growth in full accordance with the increase of investors’ confidence. Corporategovernance assumes a series of relationship between the company management, leadership, shareholders andthe other people concerned. Also corporate governance provides for that structure by means of which thecompany’s targets are set out and the means to achieve them and also the manner how to monitor such.

  16. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Alexandru SITARU

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The work is aimed to examine the issues “corporate governance” involves, with the goal set to clarify the meanings of such notion, and to provide an overall image of the positive effects arising implementing the corporate governance principles. The first section includes a series of definitions for the purpose of explaining and outlining the concept of “corporate governance”, subsequently giving a definition that appears adequate to us, from the legal standpoint pre eminently. The second section has for purpose to state the corporate governance Principles, and briefly examine the same. Its purpose also includes concretely illustrating the efficient operation methods for a “corporation”, as well as the main dilemmas, and the existing solutions for the same within the internal structure of a joint stock company to adopt, and subject itself to, such principles. Finally, the last section of the work underlines the corporate governance importance, and states the goals to be attained for purposes of securing effective, balanced, and not in the last place profitable management.

  17. Developing a Strategy Menu for Community-Level Obesity Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, Christopher; Wells, Alexandra; Christens, Brian D; Pollard, Ethen; LaGro, James; Morales, Alfonso; Dennis, Samuel; Hilgendorf, Amy; Meinen, Amy; Korth, Amy; Gaddis, Jennifer; Schoeller, Dale; Tomayko, Emily J; Carrel, Aaron; Adams, Alexandra

    2016-11-01

    Childhood obesity is a complex problem influenced by policies, systems, and environments across multiple settings. The prevention of childhood obesity requires changes across a range of community settings. To describe the development of an obesity prevention strategy menu that incorporates effective policy, systems, and environmental changes for reducing and preventing childhood obesity, and which offers the flexibility to consider local community needs and capacity. We describe the development of a strategy menu and some of the challenges of this process. We then elaborate on how communities will interact with the strategy menu and the development of a website to facilitate this interaction. No single discipline has all of the expertise needed to identify strategies for childhood obesity prevention. Therefore, a multidisciplinary team of researchers and practitioners reviewed evidence and organized a menu that assists communities in choosing complementary strategies tailored for efficacy in specific community settings. The strategies will eventually be part of a web-based point of access that complements the foundational relationships built between communities, researchers, and practitioners. The strategy menu is comprised of a set of effective approaches that communities can use to develop tailored, context-specific health interventions. By developing a framework to engage communities in the selection and implementation of multi-setting obesity prevention strategies, we aim to create and sustain momentum toward a long-term reduction in obesity in Wisconsin children.

  18. Human Capital Development (HCD) through Open, Distance and E-Learning: Evidence from Corporate Annual Reports (CARs) of Top South African Listed Companies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelowotan, Mo

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of open, distance and e-learning in the development of human resources by examining human capital development related disclosures in the corporate annual reports (CARs) of top South African listed companies. The study employed content analysis method to analyse the CARs of these companies with the aid of qualitative…

  19. Austin Community College Video Game Development Certificate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGoldrick, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The Video Game Development program is designed and developed by leaders in the Austin video game development industry, under the direction of the ACC Video Game Advisory Board. Courses are taught by industry video game developers for those who want to become video game developers. The program offers a comprehensive approach towards learning what's…

  20. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    Corporate entrepreneurship is often highlighted as being more relevant than ever, as a viable means for existing organizations to pursue creative new solutions to the complex challenges facing firms today. This includes continuously exploring and exploiting previously unexploited opportunities, a...... entrepreneurship and innovation, and identifying management practices supportive of these particular innovation processes.......Corporate entrepreneurship is often highlighted as being more relevant than ever, as a viable means for existing organizations to pursue creative new solutions to the complex challenges facing firms today. This includes continuously exploring and exploiting previously unexploited opportunities......, and thereby moving the organization to a new state of being. In spite of a general consensus on a strong interlinkage between the concepts of innovation and corporate entrepreneurship, the nature of this linkage is rarely addressed directly. This has made further research in the two areas problematic, mainly...

  1. Sustainable local development in citizen and community spheres. Implications for the governance of natural resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Carreón Guillén

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The economic, political, citizen, and community spheres, whether global or local, are regulated by systems of governance, which create public interest agendas including tariffs for public services derived from the use of natural resources. In this regard, this paper presents the agreements and disagreements between entrepreneurial, municipal, citizen, and community organizations to establish local development scenarios in reference to the global market. This discussion will create a series of representations that symbolize the dissonance between prosperity and austerity in order to contrast lifestyles oriented towards globalization and livelihoods aimed at sustainability. In this context, different identities have emerged from the alliances between civil and business organizations, in which development is not necessarily a priority; however, such vicissitudes provide central themes for the discussion of economic models.  This paper is important because it envisages a governance scheme that permits including natural resources in the civil, political, and business agenda.  In other words, governance regulates the intrusion of transnational corporations in communities and the inclusion of SMEs in the international market.

  2. Reference Communities: Applying the Community of Practice Concept to Development of Reference Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robin E.

    2011-01-01

    Communities of practice offer reference librarians a conceptual model through which to develop and maintain general and subject specific knowledge. Reference librarians acquire general and subject-specific knowledge in many ways, sometimes independently and sometimes collaboratively. Applying the concept of the "community of practice" to reference…

  3. Keys to the Community : A multiple case study into professional legitimation in community development practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradener, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how community development professionals obtain a sense of legitimacy in their work with local communities. In a comparative study derived from field research in Chelsea (USA), Amsterdam (The Netherlands ) and Doornkop (South Africa) the building blocks of their sense of

  4. Keys to the Community : A multiple case study into professional legitimation in community development practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradener, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how community development professionals obtain a sense of legitimacy in their work with local communities. In a comparative study derived from field research in Chelsea (USA), Amsterdam (The Netherlands ) and Doornkop (South Africa) the building blocks of their sense of legitimac

  5. Developing communities of interprofessional practice: using a communities of practice framework for interprofessional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett, Susan E; Hawkins, Susan R; Hertweck, Mark L; Schreiber, Jodi

    2015-01-01

    Development of interprofessional education programs that meet new Interprofessional Education Collaborative competencies is a challenge for faculty and administrators. This article describes a curricular design that places students in learning communities over a 2-year period with a plan for 5 learning sessions. Communities of practice is the theoretical framework of the curricular design, creating interprofessional clinicians capable of effective collaborative practice.

  6. Keys to the Community : A multiple case study into professional legitimation in community development practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gradener, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how community development professionals obtain a sense of legitimacy in their work with local communities. In a comparative study derived from field research in Chelsea (USA), Amsterdam (The Netherlands ) and Doornkop (South Africa) the building blocks of their sense of legitimac

  7. Developing Accessible Cyberinfrastructure-Enabled Knowledge Communities in the National Disability Community: Theory, Practice, and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myhill, William N.; Cogburn, Derrick L.; Samant, Deepti

    2008-01-01

    Since publication of the Atkins Commission report 2003, the national scientific community has placed significant emphasis on developing cyberinfrastructure-enabled knowledge communities, which are designed to facilitate enhanced efficiency and collaboration in geographically distributed networks of researchers. This article suggests that the new…

  8. Corporate social responsibility in Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Polyakova, E.

    2013-01-01

    In the article are considered essence of corporate social responsibility and terms necessary for realization of social activity management subjects. Hikes over are brought to realization of corporate social responsibility, meaningfulness of large and middle business is certain in becoming of social responsibility of enterprises. It is set that exactly midsize business must come forward as a main motor of economic development of Ukraine. Becoming features and modern state of corporate social r...

  9. Corporate responsibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karsten Klint

    2007-01-01

    Is it legitimate for a business to concentrate on profits under respect for the law and ethical custom? On the one hand, there seems to be good reasons for claiming that a corporation has a duty to act for the benefit of all its stakeholders. On the other hand, this seems to dissolve the notion...... to this paradox as Goodpaster, namely that a corporation is the instrument of the shareholders only, but that shareholders still have an obligation to act ethically responsibly. To this, I add discussion of Friedman's claim that this responsibility consists in increasing profits. I show that most of his arguments...

  10. Community Psychology in South Africa: Origins, Developments, and Manifestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seedat, Mohamed; Lazarus, Sandy

    2011-01-01

    This article represents a South African contribution to the growing international body of knowledge on histories of community psychology. We trace the early antecedents of social-community psychology interventions and describe the social forces and academic influences that provided the impetus for the emergence and development of community…

  11. A Career Development Plan for Community Action Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartner, Alan; Jones, Nina

    A system for career advancement in the community action agency must be based on the fundamental principle that it is the responsibility of the community action agency to develop the full potential of the nonprofessional staff. The agency must take the initiative on several aspects of its policy and program. Nonprofessional employees must be able…

  12. It Comes from the People: Community Development and Local Theology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinsdale, Mary Ann; And Others

    The closing of local mines and factories collapsed the economic and social structure of Ivanhoe, Virginia, a small rural town once considered a dying community. This book is a case study that tells how the people of Ivanhoe organized to revitalize their town. It documents the community development process--a process that included hard work, a…

  13. A Process-Discursive Approach to Community Economic Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, G. R.

    2003-01-01

    When market-based growth fails to improve community economic development, an alternative approach to economic analysis is a process-discursive method, which considers the roles of human agents and importance of information about reality as experienced by individuals. The process model of community-sensitive transformation is participatory and can…

  14. Christianity and Community development in Igboland, 1960-2000

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FEN

    will always be a force sensitive to issues, questions, problems and needs of the masses ... community development vis-à-vis Christianity in Igboland, this paper seeks to examine ... of life, a community could be urban or rural – hence the concepts urban ..... Through the radio and .... Indian missiological Review (Delhi), 30-38.

  15. Local alternative energy futures: developing economies/building communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totten, M.; Glass, B.; Freedberg, M.; Webb, L.

    1980-12-01

    A separate abstract was prepared for each of the three parts of the conference. A sufficient range of information is presented to enable interested parties to explore the viable alternatives for community self-sufficiency. The parts are entitled: Financial Incentives and Funding Sources; Standards, Regulations, Mandates, Ordinances, Covenants; and Community/Economic Development. (MCW)

  16. Corporate governance of the environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Purvis, B.

    2005-01-01

    The global pursuit of a more sustainable future cannot be achieved without the active engagement of the business community. The challenge for business has been to strategically engage with and embed environmental responsibility within their wider corporate governance to create effective corporate governance of the environment. The assumption would appear to be, that we have already witnessed the construction of such governance, delivered through the attainment of a paradigmatic shift in corpo...

  17. Corporate social responsibility in hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Responsible management of global hospitality companies increasingly recognizes how important are concerns about the society, the environment as well as all stakeholders in maintaining a good market position. In Serbia, the concept of corporate social responsibility is relatively unknown and insufficiently researched in all business areas, especially in the hospitality industry where small businesses are dominated. The papers task is to present particular activities that demonstrate social responsibility to employees, customers-guests, local communities as well as the environment. The paper aims to highlight the benefits of adopting the principles of corporate social responsibility and innovation applied in catering enterprises as an example of good corporate social responsibility practices.

  18. Theoretical basis of the community effect in development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuttler Celine

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically identical cells often show significant variation in gene expression profile and behaviour even in the same physiological condition. Notably, embryonic cells destined to the same tissue maintain a uniform transcriptional regulatory state and form a homogeneous cell group. One mechanism to keep the homogeneity within embryonic tissues is the so-called community effect in animal development. The community effect is an interaction among a group of many nearby precursor cells, and is necessary for them to maintain tissue-specific gene expression and differentiate in a coordinated manner. Although it has been shown that the cell-cell communication by a diffusible factor plays a crucial role, it is not immediately obvious why a community effect needs many cells. Results In this work, we propose a model of the community effect in development, which consists in a linear gene cascade and cell-cell communication. We examined the properties of the model theoretically using a combination of stochastic and deterministic modelling methods. We have derived the analytical formula for the threshold size of a cell population that is necessary for a community effect, which is in good agreement with stochastic simulation results. Conclusions Our theoretical analysis indicates that a simple model with a linear gene cascade and cell-cell communication is sufficient to reproduce the community effect in development. The model explains why a community needs many cells. It suggests that the community's long-term behaviour is independent of the initial induction level, although the initiation of a community effect requires a sufficient amount of inducing signal. The mechanism of the community effect revealed by our theoretical analysis is analogous to that of quorum sensing in bacteria. The community effect may underlie the size control in animal development and also the genesis of autosomal dominant diseases including tumorigenesis.

  19. 12 CFR 1710.10 - Law applicable to corporate governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Law applicable to corporate governance. 1710.10... AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SAFETY AND SOUNDNESS CORPORATE GOVERNANCE Corporate Practices and Procedures § 1710.10 Law applicable to corporate governance. (a) General. The corporate governance practices...

  20. Recent Developments in the Management of Cameco Corporation's Fuel Services Division Waste - 13144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Thomas P. [Cameco Corporation, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Cameco Corporation is a world leader in uranium production. Headquartered in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan our operations provide 16% of the world uranium mine production and we have approximately 435 million pounds of proven and probable uranium reserves. Cameco mining operations are located in Saskatchewan, Wyoming, Nebraska and Kazakhstan. Cameco is also a major supplier of uranium processing services required to produce fuel for the generation of clean energy. These operations are based in Blind River, Cobourg and Port Hope, Ontario and are collectively referred to as the Fuel Services Division. The Fuel Services Division produces uranium trioxide from uranium ore concentrate at the Blind River Refinery. Cameco produces uranium hexafluoride and uranium dioxide at the Port Hope Conversion Facility. Cameco operates a fuel manufacturing facility in Port Hope, Ontario and a metal fabrication facility located in Cobourg, Ontario. The company manufactures fuel bundles utilized in the Candu reactors. Cameco's Fuel Services Division produces several types of low-level radioactively contaminated wastes. Internal processing capabilities at both the Blind River Refinery and Port Hope Conversion Facility are extensive and allow for the recycling of several types of waste. Notwithstanding these capabilities there are certain wastes that are not amenable to the internal processing capabilities and must be disposed of appropriately. Disposal options for low-level radioactively contaminated wastes in Canada are limited primarily due to cost considerations. In recent years, Cameco has started to ship marginally contaminated wastes (<500 ppm uranium) to the United States for disposal in an appropriate landfill. The landfill is owned by US Ecology Incorporated and is located near Grand View, Idaho 70 miles southeast of Boise in the Owyhee Desert. The facility treats and disposes hazardous waste, non-hazardous industrial waste and low-activity radioactive material. The site

  1. Development of Community Forest in South Kalimantan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Syahrany Noor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to provide an overview of the development of community forests in South Kalimantan and information about the properties and benefits of community forest timber, the hopes community forests timber can be developed into a source of raw materials of natural forest wood substitute that can support the development of the wood processing industry in South Kalimantan. The result showed that Community forest proved to be very useful both for the owner, the community and the environment as well as for the government especially in order to meet the timber supply for local. Until the year 2011 the community forest area that was developed by the government in South Kalimantan has reached 2,895 ha, and the most widely are the Tanah Laut district covering 935 ha. The wood species that developed is sengon, jati, mahoni, karet, petai, akasia, galam, kemiri. The properties of the wood need to be understood and known before the relevant timber used both as a building material or as raw material for the industry, because these properties are basically determining the quality of wood products that will be produced. Technically private community forest wood can be used for building materials, components boat/ship and industrial raw materials.

  2. Corporate Governance and Corporate Creditworthiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dror Parnes

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the relation between corporate governance and bankruptcy risk as an underlying force affecting a bond’s yield. The level of corporate governance is captured by the G-index, along with the explicit groups of governance provisions. We estimate bankruptcy risk by Z-score, by cash-flow-score, by O-score, through Merton structural model default probabilities, and by S&P credit ratings. After addressing endogeneity and while controlling for firm-specific factors, based on the four objective methodologies we find that corporate governance is inversely related to bankruptcy risk. Yet, rating agencies take a mixed approach towards this association likely because of the conflicting impact of different governance provisions.

  3. Connecting youth violence prevention, positive youth development, and community mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Kevin W; Edmonds, Torey; Wilson, Karen; Pope, Michell; Farrell, Albert D

    2011-09-01

    Several disconnects serve to weaken the use of evidence based programming in community settings. Communities face the need to address the challenges of multiple risk behaviors faced by adolescents in their communities, but must also work to support successful transitions to adulthood and the broader positive development of their youth. The stronger integration of positive youth development and prevention of youth risk at the community level may offer an opportunity to support the implementation and ongoing development of evidence-based practices (EBPs). This article provides an overview of the VCU Clark-Hill Institute for Positive Youth Development Institute's community mobilization effort in Richmond, Virginia and reports preliminary findings from our integrated mobilization efforts. First, we review the role of our Community Advisory Council in their collaborative work to support positive youth development and reduce risk for youth violence. Next, we present examples of institute efforts in providing technical assistance relevant to supporting the use and development of EBPs. We then discuss the adaptation of an evidence-based program to target positive youth development. We also present overviews from qualitative investigations examining barriers and supports that inform and are relevant to the implementation of EBPs. Finally, we consider ways in which community efforts inform and shape institute efforts to develop EPBs. Taken together, these activities provide examples of how community-based mobilization efforts can integrate and inform the implementation of EBPs and the role and use of prevention science as a tool in supporting effective programming to promote positive youth development and prevent youth violence.

  4. Tourism and rural community development in Namibia: policy issues review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Kavita

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available During the past decades, the tourism sector has become an increasing important issue for governments and regional agencies searching for socio-economic development. Especially in the Global South the increasing tourism demand has been seen highly beneficial as evolving tourism can create direct and indirect income and employment effects to the host regions and previously marginalised communities, with potential to aid with the poverty reduction targets. This research note reviews the existing policy and planning frameworks in relation to tourism and rural development in Namibia. Especially the policy aims towards rural community development are overviewed with focus on Community-Based Tourism (CBT initiatives. The research note involves a retrospective review of tourism policies and rural local development initiatives in Namibia where the Ministry of Environment and Tourism (MET initiated a community-based tourism policy. The policy emphasises structures and processes helping local communities to benefit from the tourism sector, and the active and coordinating involvement of communities, especially, is expected to ensure that the benefits of tourism trickle down to the local level where tourist activities take place. However, it is noted that in addition to public policy-makers also other tourism developers and private business environment in Namibia need to recognize the full potential of rural tourism development in order to meet the created politically driven promises at the policy level. In this respect, a national tourism policy could provide an enabling framework, integrating the tourism sector’s development aims to rural and community development needs in future. In addition, there is a need to coordinate a comprehensive vision of what type of rural tourism development or tourism in rural environments holds the most potential to benefit both local communities and the mainstream sector.

  5. Creditor Governance and Corporate Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnold, Marc; Westermann, Ramona

    This paper analyzes the impact of debt covenant renegotiations on corporate policies. We develop a structural model of a levered firm that can renegotiate debt both at investment and in corporate distress. Covenant renegotiation at investment disciplines equity holders in their financing...... and investment decisions and, hence, mitigates the agency cost of debt. Our model explains the empirical intensity and patterns of the occurrence of debt renegotiation. We also quantify the role of debt covenant renegotiations as a governance channel on corporate financial policies and on the value of corporate...

  6. Model Youth Programs: A Key Strategy for Developing Community-University Partnerships Using a Community Youth Development Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Anyon

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Universities across the nation face the charge of enhancing their intellectual capital as a learning institution while also contributing to the greater social good. While there is great potential for university-community partnerships to generate lessons for youth workers and policy makers, create powerful new knowledge for the academic field, and provide transformative experiences for community members, partnerships often fail to produce such meaningful results. In the San Francisco Bay Area, community residents who have been involved in such unsuccessful initiatives frequently perceived that university partners spent insufficient time learning about the community context, prioritized research objectives over community needs and did not make long-term commitments. Despite these challenges, community-university partnerships can be useful strategies for advancing the field of youth development by strengthening research and practice in local contexts. This paper presents how the design and implementation of model youth programs served as an effective strategy in developing a partnership between a university-based center and two local communities over a 5-year period. It also describes essential lessons that other communities, research institutions or universities may use to launch, implement, expand and sustain their own successful partnerships to build local capacity to implement youth development practices, promote positive outcomes for young people, and generate knowledge about the impact of youth development approaches.

  7. Editorial Introduction. After the Carnival: Tourism and Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovel, Hermione; Feuerstein, Marie-Therese

    1992-01-01

    Considers the following questions: How is tourism linked to community development? Who benefits economically? What is the impact on the environment? Does tourism promote respect for other cultures, or does it trivialize cultural differences? (SK)

  8. The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madukwe

    community development in the area constituted about 78% of the perceived roles and .... properly used due to corruption and lack of transparency. This has .... Leaders should therefore ensure that they gain the credibility of their subjects and.

  9. The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Role of Local Leaders in Community Development Programmes in Ideato Local Government ... (= 3.80); monitoring and evaluation of projects (= 3.78); and fund raising for projects (= 3.76). ... It was concluded that for sustained success to

  10. Neighborhoods, comm development communities, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Neighborhoods dataset, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2006. It is described as 'comm development communities'. Data...

  11. Involvement of Women In Community Development Process In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Involvement of Women In Community Development Process In Ikeduru Local Government Area Of Imo State. ... between 31 and 40 years majority (47%) had primary education, majority (73.64%) were not involved in decision making process ...

  12. AKRO/SF: Community Development Quota (CDQ) System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Western Alaska Community Development Quota (CDQ) Program allocates a percentage of all Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands quotas for groundfish, prohibited species,...

  13. Growing industrialization and our damaged planet. The extraterritorial application of developed countries’ domestic environmental laws to transnational corporations abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Morimoto

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available There is serious concern over environmental devastation caused by commercial activities worldwide. Transnational corporations (TNCs have substantially contributed to such devastation through their ‘double standards’ practice. TNCs have been conducting their operations in developing host countries in accordance with much lower environmental standards than those adopted in their home countries or in developed host countries. Considering the seriousness of environmental destruction and the social responsibility of TNCs, it is argued that TNCs should be subject to the same stringent environmental standards in developing host countries as well. Recently, foresighted TNCs have voluntarily adopted uniform stringent environmental standards; however, it seems unlikely that the majority of TNCs will follow suit. The international harmonization of environmental standards also appears unlikely due to irreconcilable national interests. Given the economic dependence on TNCs and the lack of enforcement mechanisms, developing countries do not seem to be able to regulate TNCs effectively. The only remaining possible solution seems to be the extraterritorial application of the environmental rules of the TNCs’ home countries. Although controversial, this approach would be viable if the rules in question would not directly apply to foreign affiliates of TNCs and if it were implemented through multilateral action by the OECD member states.

  14. Corporate Social Responsibility through Education and Sport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Eugenia Iamandi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the need to tackle in a sustainable way the new economic and social requirements particularly induced by the recent financial crisis, corporate social responsibility (CSR is one envisaged solution at community and organizational level, because of its win-win strategic potential. More than that, acknowledging the economic impact of strongly supporting social domains like education and sport, the European Union (EU has designed new measures for developing the human potential during 2014-2020 period. Following these two rationales, the main research objective is to emphasize the relationship between CSR and corporate support for educational and sport projects of top performing companies in Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia in the post-crisis period. Four main issues are investigated in detail regarding the corporate support for education and sport areas through CSR initiatives, namely existence of corporate involvement, forms of commitment, reasons for engagement, and main beneficiaries of implication. The research methodology focuses on empirical and analytical perspectives, while the results show new facets and implications of CSR initiatives in education and sport domains, but also a set of similarities and differences between the analysed EU countries. Economic and social impacts are also examined, as well as future research directions.

  15. Stakeholder approach to corporate social responsibility: recipe for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stakeholder approach to corporate social responsibility: recipe for ... of not just improving corporate-community relations but acts as a strategic roadmap to allow ... and militant groups who perennially feel left out of topdown CSR initiatives.

  16. The Vulnerability of Community Capitals as a Threat to Orang Kuala Community Development in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Amir Zal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Community development emphasizes the utilization of community resources, also known as community capitals. However, it is often difficult for the community to access these resources; this difficulty retards development. Such is the predicament faced by the Orang Kuala, for whom coastal changes have resulted in greater difficulty in accessing their community resources. Nor is that the only threat that they face. For affirmation of these threats, this article lists two objectives, that is, to identify the accessibility of marine resources and to explain the types of threats faced by the Orang Kuala. To achieve these objectives, a study was conducted involving 51 household heads and 5 Orang Kuala informants, all of whom are residents of Sungai Layau village in Johor, Malaysia. This study uses a mixed-method approach, the concurrent embedded design, and also interview-based questionnaires and in-depth interviews simultaneously. For the first objective, the results show that the Orang Kuala can still attain community resources in the form of marine products. However, the Orang Kuala faced three types of threats: trends, shocks, and seasonal changes. The most significant threat to the Orang Kuala is the trend, that is, cost of living and social problems. These threats can reduce their chances of acquiring benefits from these community resources. This condition is called “vulnerability of community capitals.” The objective of this article is to put forth proposals on how to increase the capacity of community resources for the Orang Kuala so that their community can attain sustainable development. This proposal is based on the reality that the threats facing the Orang Kuala are at a critical level and that they are ready to accept changes.

  17. COULD THE CORPORATIONS BECOME ENGINES FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Costea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the international market is crossed by complex operations and relations proving a large variety activity of companies. From all of them, the transnational corporation behaviors have caught the specialists’ interest, with their challenging particularities that enable for to designating the keyentities of global economic activity. The transnational corporations, the core of a creative and strong super network is worth becoming the engagement and devotion for a large proportion of global resources claimed to sustaining the sound growth processes. The organization and development of transnational corporations could also be considered as a boost in promotion international retailing companies in particular inter-trade. Traders have subsequently developed new techniques that revealed on the one hand the capital from developed countries, the mother country of transnational corporation, and on the other hand the resources from the host countries. As the world crisis has affected the large corporations through insufficient liquidity, the moment could help in developing those techniques to apply them for stimulating the emergence of alternative methods of financing business operations and cooperation in production and sales. Our paper is developed on research documentation and intends to bring some new contribution to the above mentioned topics, sustaining the sound farther development based on alternative tools and techniques that could give a lift face to the efforts incorporated and another image to the big economic communities.

  18. Corporate Governance, Investment And Business Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tarek Miloud

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to bridge the gap between theory and corporate governance practices in selected emerging and developed economies, and assess its impact on corporate growth and productivity...

  19. IMPACT OF SRI ORGANIC AS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM OF PT MEDCO E&P INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lita Ayudia Fitriyani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia is an agricultural country that has majority occupation as farmer. Unfortunately, farmers still become the biggest contributor to poverty in Indonesia around 62.25% in 2012. As a country that has a vision to become an independent country, Indonesia should be able to meet the welfare of its people, including farmers. This can be achieved if the cooperation between the government and the perpetrators of activities in Indonesia; such as natural resource companies that perform social responsibility programs as a contribution to society. One form of social responsibility is a community development program which is considered to be more useful. System of Rice Intensification or SRI Organic Organic is one of the community development programs that were developed to improve the welfare of farmers. The aim of this study were 1 to evaluate the impact of a given Organic SRI as a community development programs; 2 measuring the level of Organic SRI farmers' income; 3 Organic SRI analyze opportunities in the future as an independent and sustainable program. By doing a case study on community development programs conducted by PT Medco E & P Indonesia in the dusun parit 9, Banyuasin District, the authors analyze and evaluate the impact of using SEAGA to 20 respondents. The results of these studies are intended to provide input in order to make the community development program more effective in the future.Keywords: welfare, corporate social responsibility, community development, SRI organic, SEAGAABSTRAKIndonesia adalah negara agraris dimana petani merupakan mayoritas pekerjaan namun menjadi penyumbang kemiskinan terbesar di Indonesia sekitar 62,25% pada 2012.  Sebagai negara yang memiliki visi untuk menjadi negara mandiri, Indonesia harus mampu memenuhi kesejahteraan rakyatnya termasuk petani. Hal tersebut dapat tercapai jika adanya kerjasama antara pemerintah dan pelaku aktivitas di Indonesia; seperti perusahaan sumber daya alam yang melakukan

  20. Management Development Programs: The Effects of Management Level and Corporate Strategy. [and] Invited Reaction: Level and Strategy Should and Do Make a Difference!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Gerald L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Consensus of survey responses from 155 of 600 human resource managers was as follows: management development programs emphasized technical skills at lower levels, entrepreneurial skills at senior levels; organizations with corporate growth strategies focused on more areas than those with stability or retrenchment strategies. (Muschewske's reaction…

  1. Towards a Guideline for Design of a Corporate Entrepreneurship Function for Business Development in Medium-Sized Technology-Based Companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uittenbogaard, Boaz; Broens, Lute; Groen, Aard J.

    2005-01-01

    The speed with which global high-technology markets evolve makes companies recognize that an effective innovation process is the best way to guarantee competitiveness. However, when (medium-sized) companies then wish to set up a corporate entrepreneurship function to enhance business development pro

  2. Management Development Programs: The Effects of Management Level and Corporate Strategy. [and] Invited Reaction: Level and Strategy Should and Do Make a Difference!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Gerald L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Consensus of survey responses from 155 of 600 human resource managers was as follows: management development programs emphasized technical skills at lower levels, entrepreneurial skills at senior levels; organizations with corporate growth strategies focused on more areas than those with stability or retrenchment strategies. (Muschewske's reaction…

  3. Corporate Strategies in Global Investment Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana Frolova

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with topical issues of the development of corporate strategies for businesses. We proposed the classification and defined the ways to implement corporate strategies. We also analysed the current trends in the development of global corporate strategies mainly implemented through mergers and acquisitions.

  4. Community Radio in Political Theory and Development Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    zeleza

    development problems, as part of development projects communication strategy, and ... community radio stations citizens and non-citizens can develop their political ..... Radio has the power to reach people in rural settings, people who may not ... Sandip Das notes that in India, radio reaches 90 percent of India's population.

  5. Learning community and teachers professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Škodnik, Ana Mari

    2017-01-01

    We live in a time of many social, economic and technological changes, there is a variety of new novelties, various introduction of innovations. All this is reflected in the schools which requires changes both in the teaching of teachers and in their own learning and professional development. The learning organization represents a good response to the demands of teacher continuing learning, as it is the basis for promoting professional development and thus quality teaching of teachers. School...

  6. Communities of Practice: Professional Development Through Fostering Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, N. A.; Raftery, C.; Shackleford, R.; Nelson, A.; Turney, D.

    2015-11-01

    A community of practice is a group of people informally bound together by shared expertise and passion for a joint enterprise. Through facilitated discussion, we will share best practices and research about communities of practice, and explore how they evolve as they grow. The target audience for this Special Interest Group session is Education and Public Outreach professionals who are interested in using communities of practice as a way to support the professional development of their audiences. This session will be of interest to people who want to learn more about communities of practice as well as those who are currently coordinating similar efforts. Participants will have the opportunity to share their challenges and success, as well as gain new ideas for the planning, implementation, and expansion of efforts. This session will be facilitated by the coordinators of NASA's SMD Heliophysics EPO Forum online community of practice for middle and high school science teachers.

  7. Peculiarities of Corporate Governance Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Vladimirovna Prokhorova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the study of the quality and identification of priorities of institutional investors in corporate governance in Russia. The authors conclude that the main task of the corporate governance system is to create favorable conditions for broad attraction of foreign investments in Russian companies and to increase the role of shareholders in strategic management. At present, the companies from developed countries achieve higher economic performance through the introduction of modern methods of corporate governance. The adoption of the new Code of Corporate Governance in the Russian Federation in 2014 will create an opportunity to improve the efficiency of Russian companies and to conduct their activities in accordance with international standards through the introduction of modern corporate governance practices, including ensuring transparency of activities for investors. At the same time, despite significant improvements in corporate governance practices of Russian companies, the level of its quality in comparison with foreign countries remains low. The article highlights both positive and negative trends in the Russian practice of corporate governance. One of the effective corporate governance methods is to ensure feedback between Russian companies and institutional investors. The article presents the results of a survey of opinions of investors that allow to identify the main factors of corporate governance that motivate them to take investment decisions on the Russian market.

  8. Corporate Initiatives and Strategies to Meet the Environmental Challenges – Contributions Towards a Green Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Ogrean

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to emphasize, based on an interdisciplinary and multi-level approach, on the actual and potential contributions of businesses towards a green economic development - through the positive integration of the environmental challenges within their initiatives and strategies. The main objectives that the paper will target in order to accomplish this mission are: (1. to outline the general framework of the green economic development; (2. to identify the specific environmental challenges businesses could and have to address in order to support the green economic development; (3. to analyze particular initiatives and strategies which have been successfully developed by companies aiming at internalizing the environmental imperative - and to argue in favor of a new business model, able to end, through the green economic development, a virtuous circle of co-evolution between businesses and the environment.

  9. ISO 26000 – An Integrative Approach of Corporate Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herciu Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ISO 26000 represents a guidance on corporate social responsibility and it is, at the present time, one of the most important document on CSR in the world. Without being mandatory or regulated, ISO 26000 is focus on seven core subjects that have to be approached synergistic – governance, human right, labor, environment, business practices, consumer, and community – in order to achieve its goal. The present paper intends to present and analyze the seven core subjects of ISO 26000 from tow perspectives: by emphasizing the benefits of implementing the standard into the business strategy and by revealing the correlation between corporate social responsibility and sustainable development.

  10. Corporate Social Responsibility” (CSR Antara Publisitas, Citra, dan Etika dalam Profesi Public Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Yuningsih

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The field of PR activities are commonly focused on efforts to build strong brand image, product positioning, advertising, promotion and publicity. In the world of high competition, this strategy is not enough. Many multinational corporate nowadays choose Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR as new strategy to build positive image and gaining good reputation. The existence of CSR program indicate corporate sense of social responsibility toward public interests. In practice, a tension between corporate need to build image and its consistencies toward moral integrity and social commitment was often found. Corporate often use its CSR program as a momentum of publicity instead of showing a real and genuine interest in community development. Therefore, an understanding to PR values and ethics was needed to plan and implement CSR program.

  11. NikeGO: a Corporate-Sponsored Program to Increase Physical Activity and Foster Youth Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Levin Martin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available NikeGO was initiated in 2002 by the Nike US Community Affairs Division to address a growing need: to provide youth a safe environment in which to be physically active. Nike collaborated with several organizations across the country and offered an array of programs to foster developmentally appropriate physical activity among youth through their influencers (e.g., teachers, coaches. These programs reached youth in underserved areas ranging from urban inner cities to rural Native lands through various channels and settings including schools, Boys and Girls Clubs, YMCA’s, youth sports organizations, and others. Objective and subjective measures were used to determine the reach of the program, the dose of physical activity, the “fun” level of the activities, changes in youths’ self-esteem and self-concept, and the likelihood of continued participation. Many older youth gained leadership skills in the process. Overall, the programs have been successful in reaching “hard to reach” youth and engaging them in the positive, developmentally sensitive, health behaviors.

  12. Neighborhood adversity, child health, and the role for community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jutte, Douglas P; Miller, Jennifer L; Erickson, David J

    2015-03-01

    Despite medical advances, childhood health and well-being have not been broadly achieved due to rising chronic diseases and conditions related to child poverty. Family and neighborhood living conditions can have lasting consequences for health, with community adversity affecting health outcomes in significant part through stress response and increased allostatic load. Exposure to this "toxic stress" influences gene expression and brain development with direct and indirect negative consequences for health. Ensuring healthy child development requires improving conditions in distressed, high-poverty neighborhoods by reducing children's exposure to neighborhood stressors and supporting good family and caregiver functioning. The community development industry invests more than $200 billion annually in low-income neighborhoods, with the goal of improving living conditions for residents. The most impactful investments have transformed neighborhoods by integrating across sectors to address both the built environment and the social and service environment. By addressing many facets of the social determinants of health at once, these efforts suggest substantial results for children, but health outcomes generally have not been considered or evaluated. Increased partnership between the health sector and community development can bring health outcomes explicitly into focus for community development investments, help optimize intervention strategies for health, and provide natural experiments to build the evidence base for holistic interventions for disadvantaged children. The problems and potential solutions are beyond the scope of practicing pediatricians, but the community development sector stands ready to engage in shared efforts to improve the health and development of our most at-risk children.

  13. User community vs. producer innovation development efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hienerth, Christoph; von Hippel, Eric; Jensen, Morten Berg

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report upon a first empirical exploration of the relative efficiency of innovation development by product users vs. product producers. In a study of over 50 years of product innovation in the whitewater kayaking field, we find users in aggregate were approximately 3× more efficient...... at developing important kayaking product innovations than were producers in aggregate. We speculate that this result is driven by what we term “efficiencies of scope” in problem-solving. These can favor an aggregation of many user innovators, each spending a little, over fewer producer innovators benefitting...... from higher economies of scale in product development. We also note that the present study explores only one initial point on what is likely to be a complex efficiency landscape....

  14. Development of lichen-rich communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketner-Oostra, R.; Sparrius, L.B.; Sýkora, K.V.; Fanta, J.; Siepel, H.

    2010-01-01

    The pioneer vegetation of inland dunes is known for its lichen diversity. The development of lichen-rich vegetation may take several decades after the first pioneer stage with Corynephorus canescens and Polytrichum piliferum. The neophytic moss Campylopus introflexus and atmospheric nitrogen deposit

  15. Developing a Virtual Engineering Management Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Bill; Kidd, Moray; Smith, Robin; Wearne, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The paper reviews the lessons of planning and running an "Engineering Management" practitioner development programme in a partnership between BP and the University of Manchester. This distance-learning programme is for professional engineers in mid-career experienced in the engineering and support activities for delivering safe,…

  16. A framework for community mobilization to promote healthy youth development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Thompson, Jomella; Fawcett, Stephen B; Schultz, Jerry A

    2008-03-01

    In community mobilization to prevent youth violence, local people take action to create conditions under which youth are healthy and safe. This manuscript outlines a framework for supporting and evaluating community mobilization to promote healthy youth development as an approach to preventing youth violence. The framework highlights 12 key community processes to facilitate change and improvement. A descriptive case study of the Ivanhoe Neighborhood Council Youth Project (INCYP) is used to illustrate the application of this framework in an inner-city, predominantly African-American neighborhood in Kansas City, Missouri. Data are presented on community change (i.e., new or modified programs, policies, and practices) facilitated by the INCYP between 2001 and 2003, as an intermediate measure used to assess the mobilization effort. The INCYP facilitated 26 community changes during the project period, and was an effective catalyst for mobilizing the community to support change in outcomes and conditions that support healthy youth development. This case study suggests the importance of early and ongoing engagement of youth as change agents in the community mobilization effort.

  17. THE ROLE OF THE SOCIAL-ENTREPRENEURSHIP CORPORATIONS IN KAZAKHSTAN IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP MECHANISMS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taubayev, A; Doskaliyeva, B; Akenov, S

    2016-01-01

    ... – the social-entrepreneurship corporations in Kazakhstan. Based on the study of foreign experience of the creation of similar organizations, the advantages and problems of their functioning have been determined...

  18. The ethics of corporate social responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Stanley M; Vernillo, Anthony T

    2014-01-01

    Corporations as well as individual professionals have an ethical obligation to help those in need. There is a sound tradition in American business for companies including social outreach as part of business strategy. This approach works best when corporations and community and professional experts work in partnership. Henry Schein's Corporate Social Responsibility program contributes expertise, logistics, connections, and funds to these partnerships in the United States and worldwide.

  19. Local Development Agents' Training for Sustainable and Endogenous Development: A Participatory Development Project among Mayan Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Margarita Rosales; Salgado, Margarita Ines Zarco

    2004-01-01

    This paper focuses on the capacity building of "local partnership" members or leaders as development agents in their Mayan communities. It relates to an education/training process started in 1995 in four different regions of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, which was carried out by Non Governmental Organizations (NGO) and academic…

  20. South Coastal Community Development: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imamudin Yuliadi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reality show that Indonesia is one country that have longest beach in the world. This fact give implication that economic potential of people life at the beach is important factor to indoors economic growth for improving walfare and equity economic development both national and regional scope. Research method that applied is desriptive investigative for obtain the fact about the economic problem of people at the beach especially beach potential economy for improving people economic welfare. Analitical methode at this research is location quotion (LQ, shift-share, and typology klassen. The output of this research is making the planning model of promotion system and integrated investment to realize the equality of development economic at beach are in Yogyakarta.

  1. 78 FR 38361 - Announcement of Funding Awards for the Rural Capacity Building for Community Development and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Announcement of Funding Awards for the Rural Capacity Building for Community... organizations with expertise in rural housing and community development to enhance the capacity and ability of local governments, Indian tribes, housing development organizations, rural community...

  2. Youth Empowerment in Higher Education for Sustainable Development of Developing Communities in Cross River State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpiken, William E.; Ukpabio, Godfrey U.

    2015-01-01

    This paper was an attempt to examine youth empowerment in higher education for sustainable development of developing communities in Cross River State in Nigeria. In Cross River State developing communities, youths are in the majority and form a very strong formidable force in the society we live, study, but are not empowered while in school nor…

  3. Annual report of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, fiscal year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The experimental FBR `Joyo` has continued the irradiation operation at 100 MWt. After the 11th periodic inspection, the 30th cycle operation was carried out. The cumulative operation time as of the end of the fiscal year was 51,630 hours, and the cumulative heat output was about 4.2 billion kWh. The prototype FBR `Monju` has succeeded in electric power generation in August, 1995, but the sodium leak accident occurred in December, 1995. The elucidation of the cause of the sodium leak accident and the total inspection for the safety have been carried out. As for FBRs, the research and development of the reactor physics, the design of a large FBR, the equipment systems, the fuel and materials, the structures and the safety have been advanced. The ATR `Fugen` Power Station has continued the operation smoothly, and as of the end of the fiscal year, the total generated electric power was about 17.3 billion kWh, and the capacity factor was 66.3%. It boasts about the result of using MOX fuel. The exploration of uranium resources, the development of uranium conversion, uranium enrichment and plutonium fuel, the reprocessing of spent fuel, the development of environmental technology for radioactive waste, creative and innovative research and development, safety control and safety research and others are reported. (K.I.)

  4. The development of permafrost bacterial communities under submarine conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzscherling, Julia; Winkel, Matthias; Winterfeld, Maria; Horn, Fabian; Yang, Sizhong; Grigoriev, Mikhail N.; Wagner, Dirk; Overduin, Pier P.; Liebner, Susanne

    2017-07-01

    Submarine permafrost is more vulnerable to thawing than permafrost on land. Besides increased heat transfer from the ocean water, the penetration of salt lowers the freezing temperature and accelerates permafrost degradation. Microbial communities in thawing permafrost are expected to be stimulated by warming, but how they develop under submarine conditions is completely unknown. We used the unique records of two submarine permafrost cores from the Laptev Sea on the East Siberian Arctic Shelf, inundated about 540 and 2500 years ago, to trace how bacterial communities develop depending on duration of the marine influence and pore water chemistry. Combined with geochemical analysis, we quantified total cell numbers and bacterial gene copies and determined the community structure of bacteria using deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. We show that submarine permafrost is an extreme habitat for microbial life deep below the seafloor with changing thermal and chemical conditions. Pore water chemistry revealed different pore water units reflecting the degree of marine influence and stages of permafrost thaw. Millennia after inundation by seawater, bacteria stratify into communities in permafrost, marine-affected permafrost, and seabed sediments. In contrast to pore water chemistry, the development of bacterial community structure, diversity, and abundance in submarine permafrost appears site specific, showing that both sedimentation and permafrost thaw histories strongly affect bacteria. Finally, highest microbial abundance was observed in the ice-bonded seawater unaffected but warmed permafrost of the longer inundated core, suggesting that permafrost bacterial communities exposed to submarine conditions start to proliferate millennia after warming.

  5. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Implementing a Learning Community Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…

  6. Development of a Community Pharmacy Management Elective Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgarrick, David P.; Talluto, Beverly A.

    1997-01-01

    Midwestern University-Chicago College of Pharmacy has developed a five-week elective community pharmacy management rotation in partnership with local pharmacies. Students work directly with district and pharmacy managers, covering a list of topics developed by faculty and preceptors and performing one major project and several smaller ones.…

  7. Developing a Community through Its Marketplace. Partnership Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Manuel Alcazar

    1999-01-01

    A partnership of nongovernmental organizations developed a model of integrated community development centers (CDICs) to address the lack of services and affordable basic necessities in poor barrios surrounding many Latin American cities. A CDIC in a Guayaquil (Ecuador) barrio provides wholesale goods and credit to barrio shopkeepers and…

  8. Development and Maintenance of Identity in Aging Community Music Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, William Leonard

    2016-01-01

    This ethnographic study contextualized identity development and maintenance within the field of community music through case studies of four performing groups and interviews with seven current members. The underlying question guiding this research was how does participatory music making contribute to the development and maintenance of identity in…

  9. Grant Proposal Development a la FLC (Faculty Learning Community) Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, Pollyanne S.

    2013-01-01

    Although the Faculty Learning Community is not a new structure or initiative in the higher education arena, adapting this model for faculty development focused on grant proposal writing is relatively new. This article describes how the concept developed by Milt Cox of Miami University has been successfully modified and implemented twice on the…

  10. Factors That Develop Effective Professional Learning Communities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peiying; Lee, Che-Di; Lin, Hongda; Zhang, Chun-Xi

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the key factors of developing effective professional learning communities (PLCs) within the Taiwanese context. Four constructs--supportive and shared leadership, shared visions, collegial trust, and shared practices--were adopted and developed into an instrument for measuring PLC function. A stratified random…

  11. Developing a Comprehensive Learning Community Program: Providing a Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, Jamie L.; Redington, Lyn

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of a three-part series which will share information about how a mid-size, comprehensive university developed a learning community program, including a residential curriculum. Through intentional collaboration and partnerships, the team, comprised of faculty and staff throughout the university, developed a "multi-year plan…

  12. Developing a Community through Its Marketplace. Partnership Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Manuel Alcazar

    1999-01-01

    A partnership of nongovernmental organizations developed a model of integrated community development centers (CDICs) to address the lack of services and affordable basic necessities in poor barrios surrounding many Latin American cities. A CDIC in a Guayaquil (Ecuador) barrio provides wholesale goods and credit to barrio shopkeepers and…

  13. Communities in Action: Lifelong Learning for Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Fumiko; Guevara, Jose Roberto; Yorozu, Rika

    2015-01-01

    This handbook identifies principles and policy mechanisms to advance community-based learning for sustainable development based on the commitments endorsed by the participants of the "Kominkan-CLC International Conference on Education for Sustainable Development," which took place in Okayama City, Japan, in October 2014. To inform…

  14. Book Review of : The Theory of Corporate Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Dionne

    2011-01-01

    The book proposes an original contribution to the economics and finance literature by developing the foundations of corporate finance. It also covers in detail various corporate governance issues faced by organizations. The common treatment of corporate finance and corporate governance started with the contribution of Williamson (Journal of Finance, 1988), who argued that corporate finance and corporate governance must be treated simultaneously because they are complementary. This book fills ...

  15. Analisis Pengaruh Penerapan Good Corporate Governance terhadap Kinerja Perusahaan

    OpenAIRE

    Rio Novianto Rossi; Rosinta Ria Panggabean

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the relationship between corporate governance with corporate performance and learns about the development and implementation of GCG in Indonesia. This study uses regression analysis to determine whether corporate governance has a positive influence. Sampling of Corporate Governance Perception Index (CGPI) for 2006 to 2009 from The Indonesian Institute for Corporate Governance (IICG) was used to measure the influence of corporate governance with Tobin’s Q on the performanc...

  16. Book Review of : The Theory of Corporate Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Georges Dionne

    2011-01-01

    The book proposes an original contribution to the economics and finance literature by developing the foundations of corporate finance. It also covers in detail various corporate governance issues faced by organizations. The common treatment of corporate finance and corporate governance started with the contribution of Williamson (Journal of Finance, 1988), who argued that corporate finance and corporate governance must be treated simultaneously because they are complementary. This book fills ...

  17. Can sustainable development save the rural coastal community?

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer E., 1982-

    2011-01-01

    The research is presented as the final component of a Master’s Degree in Natural Resource Management with a specialty in Coastal and Marine Management from the University of Akureyri in conjunction with the University of the Westfjords. It serves to answer if the theories of sustainable development can be used to assess the degree of sustainable development taking place in a rural coastal community in a meaningful way. Through the development of a Sustainable Development Assessment Tool for R...

  18. SYSTEM-COGNITIVE MODEL OF FORECASTING THE DEVELOPMENT OF DIVERSIFIED AGRO-INDUSTRIAL CORPORATIONS. PART II. SYNTHESIS AND MODEL VERIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsenko Y. V.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, in accordance with the methodology of the Automated system-cognitive analysis (ASCanalysis, we examine the implementation of the 3rd ASC-analysis: synthesis and verification of forecasting models of development of diversified agro-industrial corporations. In this step, we have synthesis and verification of 3 statistical and 7 system-cognitive models: ABS – matrix of the absolute frequencies, PRC1 and PRC2 – matrix of the conditional and unconditional distributions, INF1 and INF2 private criterion: the amount of knowledge based on A. Kharkevich, INF3 – private criterion: the Chi-square test: difference between the actual and the theoretically expected absolute frequencies INF4 and INF5 – private criterion: ROI - Return On Investment, INF6 and INF7 – private criterion: the difference between conditional and unconditional probability (coefficient of relationship. The reliability of the created models was assessed in accordance with the proposed metric is similar to the known F-test, but does not involve the performance of normal distribution, linearity of the object modeling, the independence and additivity acting factors. The accuracy of the obtained models was high enough to resolve the subsequent problems of identification, forecasting and decision making, as well as studies of the modeled object by studying its model, scheduled for consideration in future articles

  19. Community Development Strategic Planning with a Focus on Social Variables, Case study: Tollab Community of Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Mafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Extended abstract1- IntroductionThe world has encountered an urban revolution in the past 200 years. In 1800, the cities were a small island in rural ocean, now in 2000; half of world populations were living in cities. It has been stated that it reaches to 65 percent in 2025, While they occupied just 2 percent of the earth, and upon UN forecast, 80 percent of next decade population growth take place in cities, 90 percent from this rate will occur in cities of developing countries. Urbanization is growing fast in our countries and upon 1385 year census results, over 68 percent are civic, while just 10 percent of country population were living in cities in last century. However, the opportunities, sources and facilities do not distributed appropriate to improve human requirements in cities. Consequent to these changes in urban planning domain could be cited transition from comprehensive rational planning and related to it, detailed planning to strategic urban planning and transition from comprehensive plan to detailed plan, transition from modern urban and modern planning to post modern once. Therefore, this article tries to use new form of planning by stakeholder participation and exerting strategic planning in neighborhood scale. So, the aims are:-Recognizing Tollab strategic position-Recognizing pros and cons, opportunities and threats related to this neighborhood development-Reaching appropriate strategies to neighborhood development in Tollab community2-Theoretical bases2-1-Strategic PlanningGrowing urbanism and new scales of urban growth have caused current city and urbanism encounter new challenges in recent decades. For the wideness of dimensions and changes in urban problems essence, considering various aspects and dimensions of problem to stable solving is inevitable. In the late 1960s after change in management concept and spread of systemic theory, theoretical basics of traditional planning (executive planning have changed generally

  20. PENGEMBANGAN PAUD PRO-LINGKUNGAN HIDUP MELALUI SCALLING DALAM PROGRAM INTEGRATED COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT (ICD PT TIV. PANDAAN DI KABUPATEN PASURUAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulyono Wibisono

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available PT. Tirta Investama-Pandaan Factory (TIV-Pandaan Factory is one of the companies engaged in bottled water, developing programs Corporate Social Responsibily (CSR through the empowerment of the people concentrated in the region of the village of Jatianom Karangjati Pandaan District of Pasuruan. The form of empowerment by using an integrated community development (ICD approach, between economic empowerment, environment, and education. One form of activities in the field of education is the development of environmentally sound early childhood. The result of this activity is developed through programs of early childhood environmental Pro-scaling (Smart School, Care and cultured environment is already integrated with the Wanjati garbage bank. In its development, early childhood environmental concept located in the hamlet Jatianom Karangjati Pandaan Pasuruan become a pilot early childhood education in the district of Pasuruan.

  1. Old and Young Dogs Teaching Each Other Tricks: The Importance of Developing Agency for Community Partners in Community Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    This article covers the importance of creating and developing agency in community partners when engaging in community-based learning. Often when faculty incorporate service- or community-based learning into their classes, we measure the "learning" part but not the "service" or "community." Focusing more on the latter involves working "with"…

  2. Place, Purpose, and Role in Rural Community Development Outreach: Lessons from the West Virginia Community Design Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plein, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This essay examines how the social construction of community may influence faculty perceptions, roles, and actions in rural community development outreach. Special attention is given to the social construction of rural communities and how disciplinary perspective and popular culture influence these perceptions of community. The essay considers how…

  3. Developing a virtual engineering management community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Bill; Kidd, Moray; Smith, Robin; Wearne, Stephen

    2016-03-01

    The paper reviews the lessons of planning and running an Engineering Management practitioner development programme in a partnership between BP and the University of Manchester. This distance-learning programme is for professional engineers in mid-career experienced in the engineering and support activities for delivering safe, compliant and reliable projects and operations worldwide. The programme concentrates on the why and how of leadership and judgement in managing the engineering of large and small projects and operational support. Two intensive residential weeks are combined with a virtual learning environment over one year. Assessed assignments between and after the residential weeks provide opportunities for individual reflective learning for each delegate through applying concepts and the lessons of case studies to their experience, current challenges and expected responsibilities. This successful partnership between a major global company and a university rich in research and teaching required a significant dedication of intellectual and leadership effort by all concerned. The rewards for both parties and most importantly for the engineers themselves are extensive.

  4. Community-Academic Partnerships: Developing a Service-Learning Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Heather C; Mathews, Launa Rae; Fossen, Traci; Scott, Ginger; Schaefer, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Academic partnerships with hospitals and health care agencies for authentic clinical learning have become a major focus of schools of nursing and professional nursing organizations. Formal academic partnerships in community settings are less common despite evolving models of care delivery outside of inpatient settings. Community-Academic partnerships are commonly developed as a means to engage nursing students in service-learning experiences with an emphasis on student outcomes. The benefit of service-learning projects on community partners and populations receiving the service is largely unknown primarily due to the lack of structure for identifying and measuring outcomes specific to service-learning. Nursing students and their faculty engaged in service-learning have a unique opportunity to collaborate with community partners to evaluate benefits of service-learning projects on those receiving the service. This article describes the development of a service-learning framework as a first step toward successful measurement of the benefits of undergraduate nursing students' service-learning projects on community agencies and the people they serve through a collaborative community-academic partnership. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Public radiotelevision Corporations in European Union and the emerging use of Web 2.0 to communicate CSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania FERNÁNDEZ LOMBAO FERNÁNDEZ LOMBAO

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility is a concept that defines the model of corporate governance based on responsible, horizontal and interactive accountability as opposed to closed and rail control systems. This type of management has been associated, at an initial moment, with private enterprise in the context of globalization, although gradually being implemented in the public, and consequently in the state-owned broadcasting corporations of the European Union. The three first corporations who have introduced CSR in their management are the BBC in the UK, RTÉ in Ireland, and ZDF in Germany. They develop their strategies in the fields of governance, working conditions, human rights, consumer, good practices in the activity, environment and community involvement. Annually these three corporations publish memories to evaluate the success or failure of their CSR activities, in order to provide detailed information to its stakeholders or interest groups: managers, suppliers, employees, partners, local communities and international communities. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the way in which the three corporations use Web 2.0 through their corporate websites in order to spread their CSR activities. Thus, detail the peculiarities and possibilities offered by each of the spaces 2.0 and how it encourages interaction, understood as a pillar of the `social media 'against excessive elite control prevailing in the traditional media. Also, check if the three public broadcasting corporations use Web 2.0 share CSR as a management philosophy or whether, on the contrary, does not go beyond simple social marketing. To do this, we will identify the spaces dedicated to Corporate Social Responsibility, specify the category in which it is included and the importance given to it in the middle of other content contained in the corporate websites. Overall, we aim to find out if the web 2.0. is the method of choice for corporations to communicate their CSR

  6. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  7. Corporate Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Gemünden, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    Although in the last three decades much knowledge has been produced on how best to conduct foresight exercises, but little is known on how foresight should be integrated with the innovation effort of a company. Drawing on empirical evidence from 19 case studies and 107 interviews, we identify three...... roles that corporate foresight should play to maximize the innovation capacity of a firm: (1) the strategist role, which explores new business fields; (2) the initiator role, which increases the number of innovation concepts and ideas; and (3) the opponent role, which challenges innovation projects...

  8. Corporate Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    2006-01-01

    The recognition of the importance of entrepreneurial dynamics in corporate context is increasingly acknowledged in both entrepreneurship and strategic management literature, as firms today face a reality in which frame-breaking innovation is an important element of survival. From this understanding......, the concept of Strategic Entrepreneurship (SE) has arisen, arguing a logic of focusing on the intersections between the two fields. This paper sets out to explore the SE construct empirically. Through seven case studies evolving around radical technological innovations, evidence is found of the importance...

  9. Going Corporate

    CERN Document Server

    Kadre, Shailendra

    2011-01-01

    Going Corporate: A Geek's Guide shows technology workers how to gain the understanding and skills necessary for becoming an effective, promotable manager or sought-after consultant or freelancer. Technology professionals typically dive deeply into small pieces of technology - like lines of code or the design of a circuit. As a result, they may have trouble seeing the bigger picture and how their work supports an organization's goals. But ignoring or dismissing the business or operational aspects of projects and products can lead to career stagnation. In fact, understanding the larger business

  10. Corporate Fictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Søndergaard, D. M.

    2006-01-01

    The article describes a particular strategy of communication called a social science fiction. The strategy was taken up following an empirical research project on gender and management, in order to communicate results to the company's managers and Human Resource Staff. The research results showed...... fiction was the kind of narrative therapy, which aims to reconfigure the problem in focus by a process of externalisation that allows a reconstruction and retelling of the issue. The article describes how three cultural mechanisms in the company were condensed into three imaginary figures: Mr. Corporate...

  11. Corporate Foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Gemünden, Hans Georg

    2011-01-01

    Although in the last three decades much knowledge has been produced on how best to conduct foresight exercises, but little is known on how foresight should be integrated with the innovation effort of a company. Drawing on empirical evidence from 19 case studies and 107 interviews, we identify three...... roles that corporate foresight should play to maximize the innovation capacity of a firm: (1) the strategist role, which explores new business fields; (2) the initiator role, which increases the number of innovation concepts and ideas; and (3) the opponent role, which challenges innovation projects...

  12. Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Przychodzeń

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to is to provide insights on implementing corporate social responsibility for sustainability (CSRS concept and show how it differs from basic corporate social responsibility (CSR. Methodology: The paper discusses major issues with references to existing literature and real business cases from S&P500 consumer discretionary sector. Findings: The main fi nding of this paper is that CSRS could provide the company with a competitive advantage as a growing number of consumers become more sustainable conscious. It could also help to overcome the increasing consumers’ skepticism towards corporate social responsibility practices. Finally, it can also be seen as a step forward in defi ning what types of corporate activities are associated with desirable social and environmental gains. Research limitations: Our sample was restricted to the U.S. fi rms from the consumer discretionary sector. Therefore, conclusions should not be generalized to other markets. Our study is based on the analysis of environmental and social responsibility statements and assumes that they accurately represent corporate commitment in majority of the cases. Practical implications: CSRS offers corporations the opportunity to use their unique skills, culture, values, resources, and management capabilities to lead social progress by making sustainability part of its internal corporate logic. Originality: The paper raises the importance of the different conditions necessary for making sustainable development concept an important part of corporate strategy.

  13. The Economic Impact of Community College Capacity Development in Developing Countries: A Longitudinal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndorf, Darryl M., Jr.; Glass, Chris R.

    2017-01-01

    Developing countries have significantly expanded efforts to import more flexible short-cycle institutions based on the United States community college model. The U.S. community college model addresses human capital needs of the labor market in developing countries by increasing access to an affordable education. However, there is limited research…

  14. Ecotourism and community development: case studies from Hainan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Mike; Wall, Geoffrey

    2004-01-01

    The connections between people, parks, and tourism have received significant attention in recent years, recognizing the potential for mutually beneficial relationships. Ecotourism has been promoted and widely adopted as a strategy for funding conservation initiatives, while at the same time contributing to the socioeconomic development of host communities and providing for quality tourism experiences. Parks are among the most common ecotourism destinations. Employing interviews, observations and secondary sources, this study assesses the current status of ecotourism at two protected areas in Hainan, China, where it is being promoted as a strategy for balancing regional economic growth and conservation objectives. Through an evaluation of the existing tourism-park-community relationships, opportunities and constraints are identified. Ecotourism development was found to be at an early stage at both study sites. Socioeconomic benefits for the local communities have been limited and tourism activity has not contributed revenues towards conservation to date. Community residents, nevertheless, generally support conservation and are optimistic that tourism growth will yield benefits. In light of the study findings and the salient literature, planning direction is offered with the intention of enhancing the capacity of ecotourism to generate benefits for both communities and the parks, and thus contribute to the sustainable development of the region more generally. Lessons derived have broad applicability for ecotourism destinations elsewhere.

  15. Assessment of farmers perception to corporate institutional for the development of sheep farming in the village : Case study in the villages of Jambu sub district, district of Semarang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Pranadji

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to determine that sheep farming in the villages to increase farmers welfare could be developed taken into consideration of farmers perception and attitude which were included in the planning of development programme. In order to achieve the objective more effectively, the institutional system of sheep farming needs to be transformed into a corporate institution. Field study was conducted during the period of 1994-1997 in two villages of Jambu sub district, District of Semarang. Two approaches were used simultaneously, i.e. ideografis and nomotetis to analyze the data and information. Result s showed that, first, sheep farming in the villages still had big development opportunity .second, the threat of stagnation in the sheep farming may occur due to high dependency on family labor and lack of capital. Third, due to top down policy and lack of vision on the agrobusiness activities, the development of sheep farming could be hampered. Fourth, transforming into a corporate institution may increase economic profitability of sheep farming as well as performance of the farms. Fifth, in order to realize the development of corporate business systems, need to establish a pilot project. To implement the concept, support from banking institution especially for discount rate was necessary, along with the involvement of ATAI (Agricultural Technology Assessment Institutes, local livestock services, credit system and local government leader that has people oriented vision.

  16. Navy Community of Practice for Programmers and Developers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    design and sustainment of a Navy CoP for programmers and developers ? D. BENEFITS OF STUDY Organizations that have instituted well-designed and effective...Navy CoP for programmers and developers in order to make the Navy more combat effective. 5 E. ORGANIZATION OF STUDY Chapter II introduces...will refer to individuals who engage in this practice as programmers and developers . 9 Communities of Practice may self- organize or be sponsored

  17. Competitive advantage and corporate communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić Sanja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic importance of corporate communications and its role in the development of competitive advantage has attracted interest of numerous researchers in the fields of organization, management, marketing and public relations. Recent studies particularly emphasise the growing importance of soft factors, such as reputation in the development of competitive advantage. Concept of reputation is strongly connected with stakeholder theory, which stresses the importance of corporate communications for competitive advantage of firms. The paper focuses on competitive advantage and the link among strategy, reputation and corporate communications.

  18. 12 CFR 25.25 - Community development test for wholesale or limited purpose banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... development loans, and community development services that benefit areas outside the bank's assessment area(s... loans and other community development loan data provided by the bank, such as data on loans outstanding... investments, community development loans, and community development services that benefit areas within...

  19. MODEL CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY (CSR PERUSAHAAN TAMBANG BATUBARA DI KABUPATEN LAHAT TERHADAP PEMBERDAYAAN MASYARAKAT BERBASIS KEARIFAN LOKAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonius Suhadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corporate Social Responsibility  (CSR is a corporate responsibility. The research intends to inves-tigate how CSR program is implemented, the role of local administrative, and CSR alternative model on the coal mining company in Lahat District. This normative and empiric research is aimed at finding out the implementation of local government role, and to find out the alternative model of CSR. The CSR implementation of PT BA and PT BAU as a mining company in the cooperation program includes area and environmental development. The CSR program on community development, as the result of agreement among mining company, local people and related agency has to be based on the approval of local administrative. The best alternative model CSR is the collaborative model among corporation, local government and local people.   Key words: corporate social responsibility, community development, collaborative model.

  20. Corporate visual identity: a case in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkibay, Sanem; Ozdogan, F Bahar; Ermec, Aysegul

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to present a perspective to better understand corporate identity through examining the perceptions of Turkish patients and develop a corporate visual identity scale. While there is no study related to corporate identity research on hospitals in Turkey as a developing country, understanding consumer's perceptions about corporate identity efforts of hospitals could provide different perspectives for recruiters. When the hospitals are considered in two different groups as university and state hospitals, the priority of the characteristics of corporate visual identity may change, whereas the top five characteristics remain the same for all the hospitals.

  1. CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF TOURIST DESTINATIONS - AN ANALYSIS FROM THE PERSPECTIVE OF THE DEVELOPING REGIONS IN THE EUROPEAN CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Carmen Pascariu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Tourism is one of the most important industries in the European Union economy, with a great contribution to the general dynamic of the integration process and to the fulfillment of the Union strategic objectives. As a result, the last two decades have increasingly associated more tourism with the European policies, in a doctrinaire context defined by the option for sustainable development whichcorrelates sustainable regions, sustainable tourists and sustainable enterprises in an integrated concept in the field of tourism. This paper deeply analyses the way in which the tourism enterprise can be associated with the sustainable development pattern, by valorizing the corporate social responsibility (CSR principles. The analysis is qualitative, on the specific of the developing tourist destinations. The work is divided into three parts: explanation of the European context, insisting on the main tourism – regional developmentcorrelations, from the point of view of the sustainable development pattern; argumentation of the tourism enterprises necessity to take on economic, social and environment responsible practices in the sustainable development of the tourist destinations; the analysis of the advantages of being placed on the alternative markets from the perspective of ensuring the complementarity of the tourist actors and the receiving areas interests in an integrated system of sustainable and responsible management of the tourist region. The analysis leads to the better understanding of the potential contribution which the sustainable practices from the tourist industry can have to the sustainable growth of the developing regions.

  2. The concept of ‘smart cities’. Towards community development?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Stratigea

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The value of ICTs in support of a variety of functions in urban environments, serving people, businesses and governmental institutions is nowadays greatly acknowledged. The concept of ‘smart’ cities has emerged, where local innovation systems, largely supported by digital networks and their applications, are contributing to the: diffusion of knowledge and information, knowledgeable decision making, network cooperation, efficient interaction among various actors and intelligence gathering. The aim of the paper is to indulge in the concept of ‘smart’ cities for inclusive community development. The first part elaborates on the concept of ‘smart’ city, by exploring its various meanings, key dimensions, and potential for community development. In the second part, the Greek experience is presented, by means of a prominent example of a Greek ‘smart’ city, developing city-specific ICTs applications for inclusive community development. Finally, in the last part, some conclusions and future prospects of the concept of ‘smart’ cities for community development in Greece are drawn.

  3. Developing and implementing the community nursing research strategy for Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkre, Joyce; Wallace, Carolyn; Davies, Robyn; Bale, Sue; Thomas, Sue

    2013-11-01

    In order to obtain the best patient outcomes in community nursing, practice needs to be underpinned by robust research-based evidence. This article describes a Community Nursing Research Strategy developed and implemented in Wales to provide the nursing profession with the evidence to support future organisational and professional change in achieving excellence in the community. This was developed in partnership with education, research, health services, workforce planning and Government using consensus methodology (specifically, a nominal group technique). Consequently, the process was inclusive and included three steps: escalating presentation of ideas, topic debate and topic rating. The result was a strategy with four implementation strands, including a virtual network, research portfolio, application to practice and leadership.

  4. Does corporate governance shape the relationship between corporate social responsibility and financial performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabir, Rezaul; Thai Minh, Hahn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The theoretical and empirical relationships between corporate social responsibility (CSR) and corporate financial performance are not without controversy. Yet, CSR activities are increasingly undertaken by a large number of firms, not only in developed countries but also in emerging

  5. Community Capacity Development in Universities: Empowering Communities through Education Management Programmes in Strathmore University (A Pilot Study)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitawi, Alfred Kirigha

    2014-01-01

    This research examined the issue of community capacity development in a university. The main way communities were empowered was through the education management programmes offered at Strathmore University in Nairobi, Kenya. The research is among the first to examine the issue of community capacity development through university programmes. The…

  6. Transformational Learning and Community Development: Early Reflections on Professional and Community Engagement at Macquarie University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings-Sanaei, Felicity; Sachs, Judyth

    2014-01-01

    Professional and Community Engagement (PACE) at Macquarie University offers undergraduate students experiential learning opportunities with local, regional, and international partners. In PACE projects, students work toward meeting the partner's organizational goals while they develop their capabilities, learn through the process of engagement,…

  7. Cooperation and development in local communities of Spain and Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Quevedo Alejos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the world faces a scenario of growing competition between companies and territories. The challenges of globalization requires cities and regions to propose strategies that stimulate the processes of capital accumulation by the diffusion of innovation and knowledge, the adoption of more flexible forms of production organization and the development of economies of urbanization, between others. Therefore, in this paper three experiences of endogenous development represented by the Spanish Development Agency Iraurgi Lantzen (Spain, Finca Peru (Peruvian civil non-profit organization and the Rural Community of Cullpe (Peru will be analysed, in order to identify and compare the various aspects related to the autonomous development of communities. The dynamics of development in each region or city is directly related to investment decisions and the attractions of the dependent territories. For Iraurgi Lantzen improvement is reported in the region 1, medium 2 Urola with the construction of a new road, which encourages municipalities in the area to look for a consensus to help generate employment and wealth in line with the interests for development and promotion of the valley. On the other hand, the case of Finca Peru shows a joint initiative to foster progress and development in the hardest hit by poverty and subversion regions, as the provinces of Huancavelica and Ayacucho were, in the Peruvian Andes. This organization ensures the socio-economic improvement of the population, particularly women, through the creation of community bank, acting on the basis of three pillars: human development, credit and savings. Finally, the case of the Rural Community of Cullpe shows an example of social leadership, innovation, ability to call and ethical-moral principles resuscitating a community stricken by poverty and limited resources, creating comparative advantages and opportunities for development rural. In conclusion, the case studies

  8. Microbial community succession on developing lesions on human enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lino Torlakovic

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is one of the most common diseases in the world. However, our understanding of how the microbial community composition changes in vivo as caries develops is lacking.An in vivo model was used in a longitudinal cohort study to investigate shifts in the microbial community composition associated with the development of enamel caries.White spot lesions were generated in vivo on human teeth predetermined to be extracted for orthodontic reasons. The bacterial microbiota on sound enamel and on developing carious lesions were identified using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM, which permits the detection of about 300 of the approximate 600 predominant bacterial species in the oral cavity.After only seven weeks, 75% of targeted teeth developed white spot lesions (8 individuals, 16 teeth. The microbial community composition of the plaque over white spot lesions differed significantly as compared to sound enamel. Twenty-five bacterial taxa, including Streptococcus mutans, Atopobium parvulum, Dialister invisus, and species of Prevotella and Scardovia, were significantly associated with initial enamel lesions. In contrast, 14 bacterial taxa, including species of Fusobacterium, Campylobacter, Kingella, and Capnocytophaga, were significantly associated with sound enamel.The bacterial community composition associated with the progression of enamel lesions is specific and much more complex than previously believed. This investigation represents one of the first longitudinally-derived studies for caries progression and supports microbial data from previous cross-sectional studies on the development of the disease. Thus, the in vivo experiments of generating lesions on teeth destined for extraction in conjunction with HOMIM analyses represent a valid model to study succession of supragingival microbial communities associated with caries development and to study efficacy of prophylactic and restorative treatments.

  9. The Colorado Gambling Boom: An Experiment in Rural Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokowski, Patricia A.

    1992-01-01

    Three small Colorado towns that faced a declining economy as the mining resource ran out used gambling-based tourism as a strategy for community development. Although economic benefits to the towns have far exceeded expectations, negative social, environmental, and political changes, such as crime alcoholism, traffic problems, and conflicts…

  10. The Development of Indigenous Counseling in Contemporary Confucian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Kwang-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In view of the limitations of mainstream Western psychology, the necessity of indigenous psychology for the development of global community psychology is discussed in the context of multiculturalism. In addition to this general introduction, four articles underlying a common theme were designed to discuss (a) various types of value conflicts…

  11. Development of Communities of Practice in School Library Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth A.; Howard, Jody K.; Kimmel, Sue C.

    2016-01-01

    To properly prepare pre-service school librarians, school library educators in online courses must provide opportunities for collaborative engagement. This collaborative education should also recognize the pedagogical benefit of the organic formation of communities of practice that develop within areas outside of curriculum content. This…

  12. YELL/TELL: Online Community Platform for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenzi, Ivana; Bortoluzzi, Maria; Kalyani, Rishita

    2016-01-01

    The community platform "Young/Teen English Language Learners" (YELL/ TELL), as mentioned by Bortoluzzi and Marenzi (2014) was "developed to respond to the needs of collaboration and sharing among trainee teachers, school teachers, teacher trainers and researchers in the field of language learning for English [as a Foreign or Second…

  13. Development of Communities of Practice in School Library Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth A.; Howard, Jody K.; Kimmel, Sue C.

    2016-01-01

    To properly prepare pre-service school librarians, school library educators in online courses must provide opportunities for collaborative engagement. This collaborative education should also recognize the pedagogical benefit of the organic formation of communities of practice that develop within areas outside of curriculum content. This…

  14. Women, Poverty and Community Development in the Third World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovel, Hermione; Feuerstein, Marie-Therese

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the objectives of this special issue--women, poverty, and community development--and key issues raised by these subjects, including the changing role of the family, generating income through credit and savings, understanding women's fifth world, overcoming poverty and powerlessness, and changing stereotyped roles. (CT)

  15. Linguistic Struggles within and beyond the Southern African Development Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwasi, Mompoloki Mmangaka

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that the linguistic struggles faced by the Southern African Development Community (the SADC) represent common linguistic struggles found in Africa and the world where some languages are accused of dominating, stifling and suppressing others. However, the language situation within the SADC is interesting because it offers us a…

  16. Youth, Crime and Community Development: A Guide for Collaborative Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendel, Richard

    This report is designed to help community-based organizations, youth-serving agencies, and the criminal justice and juvenile justice systems recognize their common stake in supporting healthy and positive youth development, both to revitalize their neighborhoods and to control crime. It focuses on: "The Basics: Youth, Crime and Community…

  17. Growing Community Capacity in Energy Development through Extension Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romich, Eric; Bowen-Elzey, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    New energy policy, industry regulation, and market investment are influencing the development of renewable energy technologies, setting the stage for rural America to provide the energy of tomorrow. This article describes how Extension's renewable energy programming was implemented in two Ohio communities to engage elected officials and residents…

  18. The Colorado Gambling Boom: An Experiment in Rural Community Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokowski, Patricia A.

    1992-01-01

    Three small Colorado towns that faced a declining economy as the mining resource ran out used gambling-based tourism as a strategy for community development. Although economic benefits to the towns have far exceeded expectations, negative social, environmental, and political changes, such as crime alcoholism, traffic problems, and conflicts…

  19. Corporate Sponsorship in the Marketing Curriculum: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzma, Ann; Kuzma, John

    2009-01-01

    Corporate sponsorship of sports, the arts, community events, and causes has been recognized as a marketing communications tool. Corporations and organizations have embraced sponsorship as a vital component of their marketing strategy. The use of corporate sponsorship has increased over the last twenty years and it now provides an economic impact…

  20. Corporate ethic policy

    OpenAIRE

    Хадарцева, Лариса; Кайтмазов, Владимир

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the general concept of business ethics, a corporate code of ethics and corporate social responsibility. Corporations take pains to promote sustainability through codes of ethics and their efforts are positively received by consumers.