WorldWideScience

Sample records for common wrist injury

  1. Hand and Wrist Injuries in Boxing and the Martial Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Benjamin Todd; Lehman, Thomas P; Rayan, Ghazi

    2017-02-01

    Hand and wrist injuries in martial arts are typically a reflection of the combat nature of this discipline. In striking sports, the axial load mechanism of injury is common and causes fractures and dislocations; in grappling sports, sprain injuries and degenerative changes predominate. There is clear evidence to support that hand protection reduces the risk of hand injury. Traditional training in martial arts on proper technique and target selection in striking sports reduces the risk of hand injury, and is an important component of hand and wrist injury prevention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Wrist Injuries in Elderly Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wrange, Erik Kristian Maurice; Brix, Lau

    Keywords Extremities, Musculoskeletal bone, Trauma, Conventional radiography, MR, Outcomes analysis, Acute, Osteoporosis Aims and objectives The purpose of this study was to compare diagnostic X-rays and MRI of the injured wrist in female patients aged 50 years or more. Methods and materials Fift...

  3. Golf Injuries to the Hand, Wrist, or Elbow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Golf Injuries to the Hand, Wrist or Elbow Email ... enjoyment of the game injury free. Types of Golf Injuries Golf injuries can include tendonitis, sprains or ...

  4. Acute hand and wrist injuries in athletes: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W J; Slowman, L S

    2001-01-01

    Acute hand and wrist injuries in the athlete constitute a unique orthopaedic challenge. Because of the particular demands on the athlete (e.g., financial implications, coaching and administration pressures, self-esteem issues), a specialized management approach is often necessary. Common sites of injury include the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, metacarpals and phalanges, scaphoid, hamate, and distal radius. Treatment of these injuries varies depending on the patient's age, sport, position played, and level of competition, but departures from standard practice as regards surgery, rehabilitation, and return to competition should never compromise care.

  5. ELBOW AND WRIST INJURIES IN SPORTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmor, Leonard; Bechtol, Charles O.

    1960-01-01

    Any disabling injury of the elbow or wrist should be studied roentgenographically for evidence of fracture which may not be otherwise evident but which may cause permanent disability unless the joint is immobilized for healing. “Tennis elbow” may be treated with physical therapy and analgesic injection but may require splinting or tendon stripping. Elbow sprain can occur in the growing epiphysis but is rare in adults. A jarring fall on the hand may cause fracture or dislocation at the elbow. Full extension of the joint should be restored gradually by active exercise rather than passive or forcible stretching. Fracture at the head of the radius may cause joint hemorrhage with severe pain which can be relieved by aspiration. A displacing fracture at the head of the radius requires removal of the head to prevent arthritic changes. Myositis ossificans contraindicates operation until after it has cleared. Healing of wrist fractures may be facilitated by exercise of the shoulder and elbow while the wrist is still in a cast. Fractures of the navicular bone are difficult to detect even roentgenographically and splinting may have to be done on clinical evidence alone. PMID:14421374

  6. Elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand injuries among sport rock climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzhausen, L M; Noakes, T D

    1996-07-01

    Sport rock climbing with its repetitive high-torque movements in gaining the ascent of a rock face or wall, often in steep overhanging positions, is associated with a unique distribution and form of upper limb injuries. In this article, we review the biomechanical aspects of sport rock climbing and the types of injuries commonly encountered in the forearm, wrist, and hand regions of elite sport rock climbers. Because elbow, forearm, wrist, and hand injuries predominate, representing 62% of the total injuries encountered, these anatomical areas have been selected for review. The predominant source of data are the published work of Bollen et al. The remaining sources were obtained through electronic search of the Medline and Current Contents Databases (last searched May 1995). German and French articles were included in the search criteria. Only studies dealing with acute soft tissue and overuse injuries amongst sport rock climbers were selected. Data were extracted directly from the sourced articles. The following injuries have been described in detail with regard to their presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention amongst sport rock climbers: medial epicondylitis, brachialis tendonitis, biceps brachii tendonitis, ulnar collateral ligament sprain of the elbow, carpal tunnel syndrome, digital flexor tendon pulley sheath tears, interphalangeal joint effusions, fixed flexion deformities of the interphalangeal joints, and collateral ligament tears of the interphalangeal joints. Many of the injuries are specific to the handhold types used by the rock climber. Accurate diagnosis and effective treatment of these unique injuries will be facilitated by a wider understanding of the biomechanical aspects of rock climbing and an awareness of the patterns and incidence of injuries in this sport.

  7. Acute hand and wrist injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Kevin; Meredith, Steve; Demsey, Daniel

    2013-12-01

    Recreational mountain biking continues to increase in popularity and is a significant source of traumatic injury, including injuries to the hand and wrist. A prospective survey of all hand and wrist injuries sustained while participating in recreational mountain biking presenting to the emergency department at the Municipality of Whistler and the District of Squamish was conducted over a 12-month consecutive period. An analysis of 765 unique emergency department visits with 1,079 distinct injuries was performed. Of these injuries, 511 were sustained to the upper limb. Injury to the metacarpal and metacarpal phalangeal joints was the most common hand injury (52) followed by proximal phalanx and proximal interphalangeal joint (20). Mountain biking is a frequent source of a variety of upper limb trauma, and preventative efforts are necessary to minimize the burden of these injuries.

  8. Direct, indirect and intangible costs of acute hand and wrist injuries: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Luke Steven; Sarkies, Mitchell; Brown, Ted; O'Brien, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Injuries sustained to the hand and wrist are common, accounting for 20% of all emergency presentations. The economic burden of these injuries, comprised of direct (medical expenses incurred), indirect (value of lost productivity) and intangible costs, can be extensive and rise sharply with the increase of severity. This paper systematically reviews cost-of-illness studies and health economic evaluations of acute hand and wrist injuries with a particular focus on direct, indirect and intangible costs. It aims to provide economic cost estimates of burden and discuss the cost components used in international literature. A search of cost-of-illness studies and health economic evaluations of acute hand and wrist injuries in various databases was conducted. Data extracted for each included study were: design, population, intervention, and estimates and measurement methodologies of direct, indirect and intangible costs. Reported costs were converted into US-dollars using historical exchange rates and then adjusted into 2015 US-dollars using an inflation calculator RESULTS: The search yielded 764 studies, of which 21 met the inclusion criteria. Twelve studies were cost-of-illness studies, and seven were health economic evaluations. The methodology used to derive direct, indirect and intangible costs differed markedly across all studies. Indirect costs represented a large portion of total cost in both cost-of-illness studies [64.5% (IQR 50.75-88.25)] and health economic evaluations [68% (IQR 49.25-73.5)]. The median total cost per case of all injury types was US$6951 (IQR $3357-$22,274) for cost-of-illness studies and US$8297 (IQR $3858-$33,939) for health economic evaluations. Few studies reported intangible cost data associated with acute hand and wrist injuries. Several studies have attempted to estimate the direct, indirect and intangible costs associated with acute hand and wrist injuries in various countries using heterogeneous methodologies. Estimates of the economic

  9. Hand and Wrist Injuries in Elite Boxing: A Longitudinal Prospective Study (2005-2012) of the Great Britain Olympic Boxing Squad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosemore, Michael; Lightfoot, Joseph; Gatt, Ian; Hayton, Mike; Beardsley, Chris

    2017-03-01

    Background: The purpose of this investigation was to explore prospectively the nature and duration of hand and wrist injuries in training and competition in the Great Britain (GB) amateur boxing squad between 2005 and 2012. Methods: Longitudinal prospective injury surveillance of the GB boxing squad was performed from 2005 to 2012. The location, region affected, description, and the duration of each injury were recorded by the team doctor and team physiotherapist. We recorded whether the injury occurred during competition or training and also whether it was a new or a recurrent injury. The injury rate during competition was calculated as the number of injuries per 1000 hours. Results: Finger carpometacarpal instability and finger metacarpophalangeal joint extensor hood and capsule sprain also known as "boxer's knuckle" injuries were significantly more common than other injury diagnoses. The number of injuries during training or competition was similar, which is remarkable given the far greater number of training hours than competition hours performed. Injury rate for hand and wrist injuries in competition was 347 injuries per 1000 hours, while the estimated injury rate in training was <0.5 injuries per 1000 hours. Conclusion: Carpometacarpal instability and boxer's knuckle were more common than any other kind of hand and wrist injury in this cohort of elite amateur boxers. The rate of hand and wrist injuries was higher in competition than in training. Our study highlights the importance of hand and wrist injury prevention in the competition environment.

  10. Wrist ligament injuries: value of post-arthrography computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theumann, N.; Schnyder, P.; Meuli, R. [Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital, CHUV, Lausanne (Switzerland); Favarger, N. [Clinique Longeraie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2001-02-01

    Objective: To evaluate the use of post-arthrography high-resolution computed tomography in wrist ligament injuries.Design and patients: Thirty-six consecutive patients who had a history and clinical findings suggestive of ligamentous injuries of the wrist were prospectively studied. The findings of three-compartment arthrography and post-arthrography computed tomography (arthro-CT) were compared with those of arthroscopy. The evaluation concentrates on the detection and precise localization of ligament lesions in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC), the scapholunate ligament (SLL) and the lunotriquetral ligament (LTL).Results: For TFC, SLL and LTL lesions, standard arthrography responded with a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 85% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively, while arthro-CT showed a sensitivity and specificity of 85% and 100%, 100% and 100%, 80% and 100% respectively. The precise localization of the lesions was possible only with arthro-CT.Conclusion: The sensitivity and specificity of standard arthrography and arthro-CT are similar, although the latter shows the site of tears or perforation with greater precision, while conventional arthrography demonstrates them indirectly. This precision is essential and may have clinical implications for the success of treatment procedures. (orig.)

  11. Extrinsic wrist ligaments: prevalence of injury by magnetic resonance imaging and association with intrinsic ligament tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, Atul K; Bredella, Miriam A; Chang, Connie Y; Joseph Simeone, F; Kattapuram, Susan V; Torriani, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of extrinsic wrist ligament injury by magnetic resonance imaging and its association with intrinsic ligament tears. We reviewed conventional magnetic resonance images performed over a 5-year period from adult patients in the setting of wrist trauma. Two musculoskeletal radiologists examined the integrity of wrist ligaments and presence of bone abnormalities. In a cohort of 75 subjects, extrinsic ligament injury was present in 75%, with radiolunotriquetral being most frequently affected (45%). Intrinsic ligament injury was present in 60%. Almost half of subjects had combined intrinsic and extrinsic ligament injury. Bone abnormalities were seen in 69%. The rate of extrinsic injury was higher in subjects with bone injury (P = 0.008). There is high prevalence of extrinsic ligament injury in the setting of wrist trauma, especially in the presence of bone abnormalities, with combined injury of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments in about half of cases.

  12. Subcutaneous emphysema of the upper extremity following penetrating blackthorn injury to the wrist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, W H C

    2009-02-01

    SUMMARY: Noninfective subcutaneous emphysema of the upper extremity, albeit rare, has to be borne in mind when treating patients with subcutaneous emphysema. The misdiagnosis of this condition as its serious infective counterpart often leads to unnecessary aggressive treatment. Noninfective subcutaneous emphysema often accompanies a patient who has no systemic symptoms of illness. Unfortunately, the distinction is not always easy especially when history of injury suggests involvement of an infective or reactive element. Penetrating blackthorn injury is common, especially in rural communities, and often occurs from farming or gardening activities. Blackthorn penetration can cause numerous tissue reactions once embedded under the skin and they are often contaminated with soil. Here we present, for the first time, a case where penetrating blackthorn injury to the wrist resulted in noninfective subcutaneous emphysema involving the whole upper limb and neck, and its subsequent management.

  13. Current role of multidetector computed tomography in imaging of wrist injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Mohd Arif; Raj, Vimal; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam

    2013-01-01

    Imaging of the wrist is challenging to both radiologists and orthopedic surgeons. This is primarily because of the complex anatomy/functionality of the wrist and also the fact that many frequent injuries are sustained to the hands. On going developments in multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) technology with its "state of the art" postprocessing capabilities have revolutionized this field. Apart from routine imaging of wrist trauma, it is now possible to assess intrinsic ligaments with MDCT arthrography, thereby avoiding invasive diagnostic arthroscopies. Postoperative wrist imaging can be a diagnostic challenge, and MDCT can be helpful in assessment of these cases because volume acquisition and excellent postprocessing abilities help to evaluate these wrists in any desired plane and thinner slices. This article pictorially reviews the current clinical role of MDCT imaging of wrist in our practice. It also describes arthrography technique and scanning parameters used at our center. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR TRIQUETROUS FIBROCARTILAGE COMPLEX DAMAGES AT WRIST JOINT INJURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kadubovskaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the literature on normal anatomy and pathological changes of trihedral fibro-cartilage complex of wrist. The authors described in detail a method of wrist MRI, MR-image of normal and damaged articular disk, considered possible variants for his injuries. The results of MRI of wrist in 110 people including 40 patients with suspected damage were analyzed. At present MRI is the only available non-invasive method for diagnosing injuries of intraarticular structures, in particular trihedral fibro-cartilage complex.

  15. Arthroscopic Wrist Anatomy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    .... Arthroscopy of the wrist is now a primary method of evaluating and treating many intra-articular wrist conditions including triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, chondral injuries, distal radius...

  16. Economic impact of hand and wrist injuries: Health-care costs and productivity costs in a population-based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. de Putter (Dennis); R.W. Selles (Ruud); S. Polinder (Suzanne); M.J.M. Panneman (Martien); S.E.R. Hovius (Steven); E.F. van Beeck (Ed)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Injuries to the hand and wrist account for approximately 20% of patient visits to emergency departments and may impose a large economic burden. The purpose of this study was to estimate the total health-care costs and productivity costs of injuries to the hand and wrist and

  17. A comparison of MRI and wrist arthrography in the diagnosis of TFC injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shionoya, Kaori; Nakamura, Ryogo; Imaeda, Toshihiko [Nagoya Univ., Aichi (Japan). Branch Hospital; Tsunoda, Kenji; Makino, Naoki

    1995-08-01

    The present study compared the diagnostic usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and wrist arthrography in triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injuries. The subjects were 102 wrists with arthroscopically confirmed presence or absence of TFC perforation. TFC perforation was present in 35 and 47 wrists and absent in the other 67 and 55 wrists on arthrography and MRI, respectively. Using arthroscopy as the reference standard, arthrography for the detection of TFC perforation had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 100%. All 6 false negative cases on arthrography had scarring adhesions of the TFC in the wrist. On the other hand, the sensitivity and specificity of MRI were 73% and 72%, respectively. An accuracy was 94% for arthrography and 73% for MRI. It was difficult to detect qualitative TFC injury and the presence or absence of TFC perforation on MRI. Arthrography is thus superior to MRI in both sensitivity and specificity. The complementary use of arthrography and MRI is considered to increase the diagnostic accuracy. (S.Y.).

  18. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Hochholzer, T.; Keinath, C.

    1992-01-01

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.) [de

  19. Immediate effect of a functional wrist orthosis for children with cerebral palsy or brain injury: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Michelle; Novak, Iona; Lannin, Natasha; Galea, Claire

    2017-10-28

    Two-group randomized controlled trial. Upper limb orthoses worn during functional tasks are commonly used in pediatric neurologic rehabilitation, despite a paucity of high-level evidence. The purpose of this study was to investigate if a customized functional wrist orthosis, when placed on the limb, leads to an immediate improvement in hand function for children with cerebral palsy or brain injury. A 2-group randomized controlled trial involving 30 children was conducted. Participants were randomized to either receive a customized functional wrist orthosis (experimental, n = 15) or not receive an orthosis (control, n = 15). The box and blocks test was administered at baseline and repeated 1 hour after experimental intervention, with the orthosis on if randomized to the orthotic group. After intervention, there were no significant differences on the box and blocks test between the orthotic group (mean, 10.13; standard deviation, 11.476) and the no orthotic group (mean, 14.07; standard deviation, 11.106; t[28], -0.954; P = .348; and 95% confidence interval, -12.380 to 4.513). In contrast to the findings of previous studies, our results suggest that a functional wrist orthosis, when supporting the joint in a 'typical' position, may not lead to an immediate improvement in hand function. Wearing a functional wrist orthosis did not lead to an immediate improvement in the ability of children with cerebral palsy or brain injury to grasp and release. Further research is needed combining upper limb orthoses with task-specific training and measuring outcomes over the medium to long term. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. All rights reserved.

  20. Wrist arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrist surgery; Arthroscopy - wrist; Surgery - wrist - arthroscopy; Surgery - wrist - arthroscopic; Carpal tunnel release ... You might need wrist arthroscopy if you have one of these problems: Wrist pain . Arthroscopy allows the surgeon to explore what is causing your wrist ...

  1. Wrist Injuries in Elderly Women is Overlooked when Using X-ray in Comparison to MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckmann, Johan Høising; Brix, Lau; Nielsen, Randi

    to generate diagnosticimages even in patients which cannot hold still for very long due to painrelated issues. However, this study indicate that in those cases in which nopathology can be established, a supplemental MRI can detect issues invisible toX-ray. Furthermore, MRI is also able to demonstrate bone......Introduction:Women aged 50 and above have a reduced bone density which increases the risk ofwrist injuries when exposed to traumas. Diagnosing wrist fractures and strainsof the ligaments is important as a delay may lead to a prolonged healingprocess, permanent pain problems, reduced gripping...

  2. Wrist arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fransson, S.G. (Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Linkoeping (Sweden))

    1993-03-01

    The ligaments of the proximal row of carpal bones and the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) strongly influence the function and stability of the wrist. Injury to the ligaments may result in chronic wrist pain or instability. Wrist arthrography is valuable in the investigation of such damage when surgical intervention is considered and plain radiography is unrewarding. There are also several technical modifications of the standard radiocarpal arthrography available. Owing to the possibility of congential perforations and degenerative changes in these ligaments the arthrographic findings should be related to the clinical signs and the age of the patient. CT has less diagnostic importance in this respect while MR imaging is an alternative and may become the method of choice. Both these methods have great potential in the evaluation of soft tissues of the wrist other than the TFC. (orig.).

  3. Accuracy of simple plain radiographic signs and measures to diagnose acute scapholunate ligament injuries of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dornberger, Jenny E. [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Department of Plastic Surgery and Burn Care, Berlin (Germany); Rademacher, Grit; Mutze, Sven [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Institute of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Eisenschenk, Andreas [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Department of Hand-, Replantation- and Microsurgery, Berlin (Germany); University Medicine Greifswald, Department of Hand Surgery and Microsurgery, Greifswald (Germany); Stengel, Dirk [Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Centre for Clinical Research, Berlin (Germany); Charite Medical University Centre, Julius Wolff Institute, Centre for Musculoskeletal Surgery, Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    To determine the accuracy of common radiological indices for diagnosing ruptures of the scapholunate (SL) ligament, the most relevant soft tissue injury of the wrist. This was a prospective diagnostic accuracy study with independent verification of index test findings by a reference standard (wrist arthroscopy). Bilateral digital radiographs in posteroanterior (pa), lateral and Stecher's projection were evaluated by two independent expert readers. Diagnostic accuracy of radiological signs was expressed as sensitivity, specificity, positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values with 95 % confidence intervals (CI). The prevalence of significant acute SL tears (grade ≥ III according to Geissler's classification) was 27/72 (38 %, 95 % CI 26-50 %). The SL distance on Stecher's projection proved the most accurate index to rule the presence of an SL rupture in and out. SL distance on plain pa radiographs, Stecher's projection and the radiolunate angle contributed independently to the final diagnostic model. These three simple indices explained 97 % of the diagnostic variance. In the era of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, plain radiographs remain a highly sensitive and specific primary tool to triage patients with a suspected SL tear to further diagnostic work-up and surgical care. (orig.)

  4. Common Injuries of Collegiate Tennis Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Wisdom Magtajas Valleser

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the common injuries of Filipino collegiate tennis players; 110 varsity tennis players with a mean of 20 years old (SD ± 1.7 with an average playing experience of 12 years participated in the study. There was a 100% occurrence of at least one injury with an average rate of 5.98 injuries per person. The authors observed that the most commonly injured anatomical region is the lower extremity; ankles were recorded as the most commonly injured part. Other commonly injured areas included the shoulders and lower back. Furthermore, the most common injury type is tendinitis, sprains, and strains. The recorded injuries were mostly associated with overuse injuries, and the findings were similar to those of most other studies on tennis injuries. A larger sample size may provide more conclusive findings on tennis injuries, particularly in different levels of competition, such as recreational or professional athletes.

  5. The hand and wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.B.; Berquist, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    Trauma is the most common etiologic factor leading to disability in the hand and wrist. Judicious radiographic evaluation is required for accurate assessment in practically all but the most minor of such injuries. Frequently serial radiographic evaluation is essential for directing the course of treatment and for following the healing process. A meaningful radiographic evaluation requires a comprehensive knowledge of the normal radiographic anatomy, an overview of the spectrum of pathology, and an awareness of the usual mechanisms of injury, appropriate treatment options, and relevant array of complications

  6. Complications of wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Zahab S; Yao, Jeffrey

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to address the incidence of complications associated with wrist arthroscopy. Given the paucity of information published on this topic, an all-inclusive review of published wrist arthroscopy complications was sought. Two independent reviewers performed a literature search using PubMed, Google Scholar, EBSCO, and Academic Megasearch using the terms "wrist arthroscopy complications," "complications of wrist arthroscopy," "wrist arthroscopy injury," and "wrist arthroscopy." Inclusion criteria were (1) Levels I to V evidence, (2) "complication" defined as an adverse outcome directly related to the operative procedure, and (3) explicit description of operative complications in the study. Eleven multiple-patient studies addressing complications of wrist arthroscopy from 1994 to 2010 were identified, with 42 complications reported from 895 wrist arthroscopy procedures, a 4.7% complication rate. Four case reports were also found, identifying injury to the dorsal sensory branch of the ulnar nerve, injury to the posterior interosseous nerve, and extensor tendon sheath fistula formation. This systematic review suggests that the previously documented rate of wrist arthroscopy complications may be underestimating the true incidence. The report of various complications provides insight to surgeons for improving future surgical techniques. Level IV, systematic review of Levels I-V studies. Copyright © 2012 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Persistent pain is common 1 year after ankle and wrist fracture surgery: a register-based questionnaire study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friesgaard, Kristian Dahl; Gromov, Kirill; Knudsen, Lone

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Substantial literature documents that persistent postsurgical pain is a possible outcome of many common surgical procedures. As fracture-related surgery implies a risk of developing neuropathic pain and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), further studies investigating the prevalence...... and pain characteristics are required. METHODS: All patients undergoing primary surgery because of ankle or wrist fracture at Hvidovre and Odense University Hospitals, Denmark, between April 15, 2013 and April 15, 2014, were identified from the Danish Fracture Database. A questionnaire regarding pain...... be informed about the substantial risk of developing persistent postsurgical pain. Future studies investigating risk factors for persistent postsurgical pain that include both surgically and conservatively treated fractures are required....

  8. Common Running Overuse Injuries and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žiga Kozinc

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Runners are particularly prone to developing overuse injuries. The most common running-related injuries include medial tibial stress syndrome, Achilles tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, patellar tendinopathy, iliotibial band syndrome, tibial stress fractures, and patellofemoral pain syndrome. Two of the most significant risk factors appear to be injury history and weekly distance. Several trials have successfully identified biomechanical risk factors for specific injuries, with increased ground reaction forces, excessive foot pronation, hip internal rotation and hip adduction during stance phase being mentioned most often. However, evidence on interventions for lowering injury risk is limited, especially regarding exercise-based interventions. Biofeedback training for lowering ground reaction forces is one of the few methods proven to be effective. It seems that the best way to approach running injury prevention is through individualized treatment. Each athlete should be assessed separately and scanned for risk factors, which should be then addressed with specific exercises. This review provides an overview of most common running-related injuries, with a particular focus on risk factors, and emphasizes the problems encountered in preventing running-related injuries.

  9. Cone-beam computed tomography arthrography: an innovative modality for the evaluation of wrist ligament and cartilage injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramdhian-Wihlm, Reeta [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Strasbourg (France); Le Minor, Jean-Marie [University of Strasbourg, Institute of Anatomy, Strasbourg (France); University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Dentistry, Strasbourg (France); Schmittbuhl, Matthieu [University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Dentistry, Strasbourg (France); Jeantroux, Jeremy; Veillon, Francis; Dosch, Jean-Claude; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Bierry, Guillaume [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Radiology, Strasbourg (France); Mahon, Peter Mac [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) has become an important modality in dento-facial imaging but remains poorly used in the exploration of the musculoskeletal system. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate the performance and radiation exposure of CBCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligament and cartilage injuries in cadaveric wrists, with gross pathology findings as the standard of reference. Conventional arthrography was performed under fluoroscopic guidance on 10 cadaveric wrists, followed by MDCT acquisition and CBCT acquisition. CBCT arthrography and MDCT arthrography images were independently analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists working independently and then in consensus. The following items were observed: scapholunate and lunotriquetral ligaments, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) (tear, integrity), and proximal carpal row cartilage (chondral tears). Wrists were dissected and served as the standard of reference for comparisons. Interobserver agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were determined. Radiation dose (CTDI) of both modalities was recorded. CBCT arthrography provides equivalent results to MDCT arthrography in the evaluation of ligaments and cartilage with sensitivity and specificity between 82 and 100%, and interobserver agreement between 0.83 and 0.97. However, radiation dose was significantly lower (p < 0.05) for CBCT arthrography than for MDCT arthrography with a mean CTDI of 2.1 mGy (range 1.7-2.2) versus a mean of 15.1 mGy (range 14.7-16.1). CBCT arthrography appears to be an innovative alternative to MDCT arthrography of the wrist as it allows an accurate and low radiation dose evaluation of ligaments and cartilage. (orig.)

  10. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Huili; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng [Peking University Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Zhang, Huibo [Beijing Chaoyang Hospital of Capital Medical University, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua [Peking University Fourth School of Clinical Medicine, Department of Radiology, Beijing (China); Beijing Institute of Traumatology and Orthopedics, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China); Yin, Yuming [Radiology Associates, LLP, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    2017-12-15

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification. (orig.)

  11. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Huili; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Huibo; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Yin, Yuming

    2017-01-01

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification. (orig.)

  12. High-resolution 3-T MRI of the triangular fibrocartilage complex in the wrist: injury pattern and MR features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Huili; Zhang, Huibo; Bai, Rongjie; Qian, Zhanhua; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Heng; Yin, Yuming

    2017-12-01

    To investigate if using high-resolution 3-T MRI can identify additional injuries of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) beyond the Palmer classification. Eighty-six patients with surgically proven TFCC injury were included in this study. All patients underwent high-resolution 3-T MRI of the injured wrist. The MR imaging features of TFCC were analyzed according to the Palmer classification. According to the Palmer classification, 69 patients could be classified as having Palmer injuries (52 had traumatic tears and 17 had degenerative tears). There were 17 patients whose injuries could not be classified according to the Palmer classification: 13 had volar or dorsal capsular TFC detachment and 4 had a horizontal tear of the articular disk. Using high-resolution 3-T MRI, we have not only found all the TFCC injuries described in the Palmer classification, additional injury types were found in this study, including horizontal tear of the TFC and capsular TFC detachment. We propose the modified Palmer classification and add the injury types that were not included in the original Palmer classification.

  13. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaar, Annelie; Maas, Mario; Rijn, Rick R. van [University of Amsterdam, Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, Meibergdreef 9, 1105, AZ, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Walenkamp, Monique M.J.; Bentohami, Abdelali; Goslings, J.C. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Steyerberg, Ewout W. [Erasmus MC - University Medical Centre, Department of Public Health, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jager, L.C. [University of Amsterdam, Emergency Department, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sosef, Nico L. [Spaarne Hospital, Department of Surgery, Hoofddorp (Netherlands); Velde, Romuald van [Tergooi Hospitals, Department of Surgery, Hilversum (Netherlands); Ultee, Jan M. [Sint Lucas Andreas Hospital, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, Niels W.L. [University of Amsterdam, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maasstadziekenhuis Rotterdam, Department of Surgery, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  14. A clinical decision rule for the use of plain radiography in children after acute wrist injury: development and external validation of the Amsterdam Pediatric Wrist Rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaar, Annelie; Maas, Mario; Rijn, Rick R. van; Walenkamp, Monique M.J.; Bentohami, Abdelali; Goslings, J.C.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Jager, L.C.; Sosef, Nico L.; Velde, Romuald van; Ultee, Jan M.; Schep, Niels W.L.

    2016-01-01

    In most hospitals, children with acute wrist trauma are routinely referred for radiography. To develop and validate a clinical decision rule to decide whether radiography in children with wrist trauma is required. We prospectively developed and validated a clinical decision rule in two study populations. All children who presented in the emergency department of four hospitals with pain following wrist trauma were included and evaluated for 18 clinical variables. The outcome was a wrist fracture diagnosed by plain radiography. Included in the study were 787 children. The prediction model consisted of six variables: age, swelling of the distal radius, visible deformation, distal radius tender to palpation, anatomical snuffbox tender to palpation, and painful or abnormal supination. The model showed an area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of 0.79 (95% CI: 0.76-0.83). The sensitivity and specificity were 95.9% and 37.3%, respectively. The use of this model would have resulted in a 22% absolute reduction of radiographic examinations. In a validation study, 7/170 fractures (4.1%, 95% CI: 1.7-8.3%) would have been missed using the decision model. The decision model may be a valuable tool to decide whether radiography in children after wrist trauma is required. (orig.)

  15. MR imaging of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature gymnast: spectrum of soft-tissue and osseous lesions in the hand and wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwek, Jerry R.; Cardoso, Fabiano; Chung, Christine B.

    2009-01-01

    In the pediatric gymnast, stress-related physeal injuries have been well described with characteristic imaging findings. However, a spectrum of overuse injuries, some rarely reported in the literature, can be encountered in the gymnast's hand and wrist. To demonstrate the MR appearance of a spectrum of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature wrist and hand of pediatric gymnasts. A total of 125 MR exams of the hand and wrist in skeletally immature children were performed at our institution during a 2-year period. Clinical histories were reviewed for gymnastics participation. MR studies of that subpopulation were reviewed and abnormalities tabulated. Of the MR studies reviewed, ten gymnasts were identified, all girls age 12-16 years (mean age 14.2 years) who presented with wrist or hand pain. Three of these children had bilateral MR exams. Abnormalities included chronic physeal injuries in three children. Two girls exhibited focal lunate osteochondral defects. Triangular fibrocartilage tears were present in three girls, one of whom had a scapholunate ligament tear. Two girls manifested metacarpal head flattening and necrosis. A variety of soft-tissue and osseous lesions can be encountered in the skeletally immature gymnast. Familiarity with these stress-related injuries is important for accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  16. MR imaging of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature gymnast: spectrum of soft-tissue and osseous lesions in the hand and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwek, Jerry R. [Department of Radiology, Rady Children' s Hospital and Health Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Cardoso, Fabiano; Chung, Christine B. [University of California at San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    In the pediatric gymnast, stress-related physeal injuries have been well described with characteristic imaging findings. However, a spectrum of overuse injuries, some rarely reported in the literature, can be encountered in the gymnast's hand and wrist. To demonstrate the MR appearance of a spectrum of overuse injuries in the skeletally immature wrist and hand of pediatric gymnasts. A total of 125 MR exams of the hand and wrist in skeletally immature children were performed at our institution during a 2-year period. Clinical histories were reviewed for gymnastics participation. MR studies of that subpopulation were reviewed and abnormalities tabulated. Of the MR studies reviewed, ten gymnasts were identified, all girls age 12-16 years (mean age 14.2 years) who presented with wrist or hand pain. Three of these children had bilateral MR exams. Abnormalities included chronic physeal injuries in three children. Two girls exhibited focal lunate osteochondral defects. Triangular fibrocartilage tears were present in three girls, one of whom had a scapholunate ligament tear. Two girls manifested metacarpal head flattening and necrosis. A variety of soft-tissue and osseous lesions can be encountered in the skeletally immature gymnast. Familiarity with these stress-related injuries is important for accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  17. MRI of the hand and wrist joint of climbers. Imaging of lesions and overstrain injury. Die MRT von Hand und Handgelenk bei Sportkletterern. Darstellung von Verletzungen und Ueberlastungsfolgen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heuck, A. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie); Hochholzer, T.; Keinath, C. (Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Sportverletzungen)

    1992-05-01

    The hands and wrists of 20 top-level rock climbers with sports injuries and overstress abnormalities were compared with the hands and wrists of 10 normal volunteers. They were all studied with MR imaging at 1.5 T. The imaging protocol included spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences with 1- to 5-mm-thick contiguous slices in the axial, coronal and/or sagittal planes, depending on the location and nature of the suspected injury. Typical hand and wrist lesions depicted with MRI in climbers consisted of annular ligament tears, lesions of the flexor tendons, tenosynovitis, ganglion cysts, joint effusion and functional carpal tunnel syndrome. The MRI findings on these abnormalities were compared to normal findings and those with ultrasound and plain films. In addition, hypertrophic changes in the muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bones of top-level rock climbers were assessed morphometrically. MRI proved to be the superior imaging modality in the diagnosis of sports injuries and overstress abnormalities of the hand the wrist in rock-climbing athletes. (orig.).

  18. MRI of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dick, Elizabeth A. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)], E-mail: dickelizabeth@hotmail.com; Burnett, Carole; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw M.W. [Department of MRI, St Mary' s Hospital, Praed St, London W2 1NY (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist is increasingly recognised as the imaging modality of choice in wrist disorders as image resolution improves and clinicians realise its potential. Consequently the ability to confidently interpret such imaging will become more important to both general and musculoskeletal radiologists. This article reviews current optimal imaging protocols and describes common abnormalities with a particular emphasis on less well understood topics such as intercalated segment instability, the triangular fibrocartilage complex and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. Kinematics of Hooke universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinney, William S., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The singularity problem associated with wrist mechanisms commonly found on industrial manipulators can be alleviated by redesigning the wrist so that it functions as a three-axis gimbal system. This paper discussess the kinematics of gimbal robot wrists made of one and two Hooke universal joints. Derivations of the resolved rate motion control equations for the single and double Hooke universal joint wrists are presented using the three-axis gimbal system as a theoretical wrist model.

  20. The most common types of injuries in judo

    OpenAIRE

    Ječmínek, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Title: The most common types of injuries in judo Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the most common injuries that occur during training and judo competitions. Identify treatment options, prevention and identify most common causes of injury. Methods: The chosen method was theoretical and empirical, ie collecting data and information from other publications and conduct its own research. Selecting what is relevant for judo injuries and comparsion whith author's experience and res...

  1. Isolated fracture of pisiform: case report of a rare injury of wrist

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    ABSTRACT: Isolated fracture of the pisiform is an extremely rare injury. Generally fractures of the pisiform are associated with fractures of other carpal bones or the distal radius. Fractures of the carpals and metacarpals account for roughly 6% of all fractures. The average incidence of pisiform fractures is 0.2% of all carpal ...

  2. Common running musculoskeletal injuries among recreational half ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    probing the prevalence and nature of running musculoskeletal injuries in the 12 months preceding ... or agony, and which prevented them from physical activity for ..... injuries to professional football players: Developing the UEFA model.

  3. Common Injuries in Professional Football Quarterbacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Jacob M; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Bedi, Asheesh

    2018-03-01

    Professional football quarterbacks are at particular risk for upper extremity injuries due to the physical demands of their position coupled with the inherent risks associated with professional football. This review sought to evaluate current clinical literature to better characterize the injury profile unique to this athletic population. Shoulder injuries are the most prevented upper extremity injury among professional football quarterbacks. The quarterback position is disproportionately impacted by shoulder injuries when compared to professional athletes at other positions. Moreover, contrary to other professional throwing athletes, the majority of upper extremity injuries in the professional quarterback result from direct contact as opposed to the throwing motion. The injury profile among professional quarterbacks is unique compared to other positions and other overhead professional throwing athletes. Overall, a paucity of high quality clinical evidence exists to support the management of injuries in this elite population.

  4. Design of a 3D-printed, open-source wrist-driven orthosis for individuals with spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra A Portnova

    Full Text Available Assistive technology, such as wrist-driven orthoses (WDOs, can be used by individuals with spinal cord injury to improve hand function. A lack of innovation and challenges in obtaining WDOs have limited their use. These orthoses can be heavy and uncomfortable for users and also time-consuming for orthotists to fabricate. The goal of this research was to design a WDO with user (N = 3 and orthotist (N = 6 feedback to improve the accessibility, customizability, and function of WDOs by harnessing advancements in 3D-printing. The 3D-printed WDO reduced hands-on assembly time to approximately 1.5 hours and the material costs to $15 compared to current fabrication methods. Varying improvements in users' hand function were observed during functional tests, such as the Jebsen Taylor Hand Function Test. For example, one participant's ability on the small object task improved by 29 seconds with the WDO, while another participant took 25 seconds longer to complete this task with the WDO. Two users had a significant increase in grasp strength with the WDO (13-122% increase, while the other participant was able to perform a pinching grasp for the first time. The WDO designs are available open-source to increase accessibility and encourage future innovation.

  5. Wrist Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at a keyboard, take regular breaks. When you type, keep your wrist in a relaxed, neutral position. An ergonomic ... of Nondiscrimination Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  6. Weight-training injuries. Common injuries and preventative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, L J; Yetman, R J; Risser, W L

    1993-07-01

    The use of weights is an increasingly popular conditioning technique, competitive sport and recreational activity among children, adolescents and young adults. Weight-training can cause significant musculoskeletal injuries such as fractures, dislocations, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, intervertebral disk herniation, and meniscal injuries of the knee. Although injuries can occur during the use of weight machines, most apparently happen during the aggressive use of free weights. Prepubescent and older athletes who are well trained and supervised appear to have low injury rates in strength training programmes. Good coaching and proper weightlifting techniques and other injury prevention methods are likely to minimise the number of musculoskeletal problems caused by weight-training.

  7. Epidemiology of acute wrist trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C F; Lauritsen, Jens

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological data on wrist injuries in a population can be used for planning by applying them to criteria for care and thus deriving estimates of provisions for care according to currently desirable standards. In a 1-year study all patients > or = 15 years with acute wrist trauma and treated...... in the emergency room were examined according to an algorithm until a diagnosis was established. The overall incidence of wrist trauma was 69 per 10,000 inhabitants per year. Incidence of wrist trauma requiring x-ray examination was 58 per 10,000 per year. The incidence of distal radius fractures was 27 per 10...... using data from a population-based study. A completeness rate of 0.56 (95% confidence interval: 0.31-0.78) was found. An x-ray had been taken for all patients reporting a fracture thus justifying the use of fractures as an incidence measure when comparing groups of patients with wrist trauma....

  8. Wrist Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Fractures Email to a friend * required fields ...

  9. Wrist Sprains

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Sprains Email to a friend * required fields ...

  10. Wrist Arthroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Wrist Arthroscopy Email to a friend * required fields ...

  11. Common rugby league injuries. Recommendations for treatment and preventative measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, N

    1994-12-01

    Rugby league is the main professional team sport played in Eastern Australia. It is also very popular at a junior and amateur level. However, injuries are common because of the amount of body contact that occurs and the amount of running that is required to participate in the game. Injuries to the lower limbs account for over 50% of all injuries. The most common specific injuries are ankle lateral ligament tears, knee medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, groin musculotendinous tears, hamstring and calf muscle tears, and quadriceps muscle contusions. Head injuries are common and consist of varying degrees of concussion as well as lacerations and facial fractures. Serious head injury is rare. Some of the more common upper limb injuries are to the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints. Accurate diagnosis of these common injuries using appropriate history, examination and investigations is critical in organising a treatment and rehabilitation plan that will return the player to competition as soon as possible. An understanding of the mechanism of injury is also important in order to develop preventative strategies.

  12. Common game injury scenarios in men's and women's lacrosse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Elizabeth A; Westerman, Beverly J; Lincoln, Andrew E; Hunting, Katherine L

    2010-06-01

    Previous research has found that the location, type and mechanisms of injuries in lacrosse players vary by gender. The patterns and risk factors of injuries in lacrosse players are still not well known. The study population consists of lacrosse players who utilised the accident medical insurance provided to US Lacrosse members. Cluster analysis was used to explore the aetiology of lacrosse-related injuries. Between 2002 and 2006 there were 593 game injuries, 496 in men and 97 in women. There were six clusters of injuries in women and five clusters of injuries in men. Play scenarios resulting in injury differed by the position played. In all the five injury clusters in males, the primary injury mechanism was by contact, either with another player, a stick or a ball. In women, body-to-body and stick-to-body, and no contact were the most common injury mechanisms. In both genders, the majority of injuries occurred during legal play. These results provide a picture of high-risk situations that lead to injuries in male and female lacrosse players. Future efforts should be made to confirm these results through epidemiologic studies. Further research should also address the effectiveness of interventions that could reduce the risk of injury in these situations.

  13. Treatment for Common Running/Walking Foot Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Haar, Calin; Ihlers, Matt; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Whether you are a weekend warrior or a serious athlete, most runners fear the possibility of being injured. For those who are physically active or stand on their feet all day, healthy feet are important Highly conditioned runners spend many hours performing foot maintenance to prevent unnecessary injuries. Some of the common foot injuries are:…

  14. Isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis: Prevalence, symptomatology and associated scapholunate ligament disruption in a population presenting to an accident and emergency department with acute wrist injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higginson, Antony P.; Braybrook, Jason; Williams, Stephen; Finlay, David

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis in a population presenting to an Accident and Emergency Department of Leicester Royal Infirmary with acute wrist injuries. Also to identify the presence of scapholunate ligament disruption in this patient group and quantify symptoms and loss of function in terms of the modified system of Green and O'Brien, a recognized clinical scoring system. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1711 radiographs of patients attending the Accident and Emergency Department were prospectively reviewed over a 5-month period. Those patients with isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis were invited for clinical review. RESULTS: Sixteen patients were identified with isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis. Two had a poor Green and O'Brien score and evidence of scapholunate ligament disruption (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis has a prevalence of 1% in a population presenting to an Accident and Emergency Department with acute wrist injuries over the age of 30 years. Isolated scaphotrapeziotrapezoid osteoarthritis may be asymptomatic even though the changes in the joint are severe. Scapholunate ligament disruption is associated with a poor Green and O'Brien score, but is not present in the majority of cases. Higginson, A.P. et al. (2001)

  15. Shoulder Acromioclavicular and Coracoclavicular Ligament Injuries: Common Problems and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, James D; Johnson, Jeremiah D; DiVenere, Jessica; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2018-04-01

    Injuries to the acromioclavicular joint and coracoclavicular ligaments are common. Many of these injuries heal with nonoperative management. However, more severe injuries may lead to continued pain and shoulder dysfunction. In these patients, surgical techniques have been described to reconstruct the function of the coracoclavicular ligaments to provide stable relationship between the clavicle and scapula. These surgeries have been fraught with high complication rates including clavicle and coracoid fractures, infection, loss of reduction and fixation, hardware migration, and osteolysis. This article reviews common acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular repair and reconstruction techniques and associated complications, and provides recommendations for prevention and management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Survey on Common Injuries in Recreational Badminton Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Muttalib

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this descriptive study is to determine the incidence of injuries among recreational badminton players. We evaluated 86 recreational badminton players in the city of Malacca; 35 were excluded for fitting the exclusion criteria. The average recreational badminton player was 36.13 years old and had been playing badminton for the past 17.84 years at a frequency of 2.11 times per week. 39.21% of the recreational badminton players complained of recent injuries in relation to playing badminton. Our data showed that the most common injury sustained by recreational badminton players was pain and stiffness at the shoulder joint. None of the injuries sustained by the players in our data were serious enough to warrant any form of surgical intervention. We conclude that badminton is a sport of relatively low risk and that the majority of related injuries were chronic overuse injuries.

  17. Evaluation and diagnosis of wrist pain: a case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehab, Ramsey; Mirabelli, Mark H

    2013-04-15

    Patients with wrist pain commonly present with an acute injury or spontaneous onset of pain without a definite traumatic event. A fall onto an outstretched hand can lead to a scaphoid fracture, which is the most commonly fractured carpal bone. Conventional radiography alone can miss up to 30 percent of scaphoid fractures. Specialized views (e.g., posteroanterior in ulnar deviation, pronated oblique) and repeat radiography in 10 to 14 days can improve sensitivity for scaphoid fractures. If a suspected scaphoid fracture cannot be confirmed with plain radiography, a bone scan or magnetic resonance imaging can be used. Subacute or chronic wrist pain usually develops gradually with or without a prior traumatic event. In these cases, the differential diagnosis is wide and includes tendinopathy and nerve entrapment. Overuse of the muscles of the forearm and wrist may lead to tendinopathy. Radial pain involving mostly the first extensor compartment is commonly de Quervain tenosynovitis. The diagnosis is based on history and examination findings of a positive Finkelstein test and a negative grind test. Nerve entrapment at the wrist presents with pain and also with sensory and sometimes motor symptoms. In ulnar neuropathies of the wrist, the typical presentation is wrist discomfort with sensory changes in the fourth and fifth digits. Activities that involve repetitive or prolonged wrist extension, such as cycling, karate, and baseball (specifically catchers), may increase the risk of ulnar neuropathy. Electrodiagnostic tests identify the area of nerve entrapment and the extent of the pathology. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Family Physicians.

  18. Are Tendinopathies really a common injury in volleyball?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustos, Aldo; Locaso, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a description of tendinopathies as an injury in volleyball high performance. Methods: An observational and prospective study was conducted from 2014-2016 in the senior Argentinian volleyball team. The same was held by two observers. Moreover, 78 athletes were evaluated. We support Dvorak’s claims that an injury is determined by the loss of at least one training session or a match. Results: 78 players were exposed to 21812 hours of training and matches. As a result 37 injuries were evaluated in 31 players. Taking into account tendinopathies, it can be said that 34 players consulted 412 times, showing a prevalence of 43.5% of the whole enquires but when we refer to the same pathology as injury the average lowers, presenting 8 lesions in 6 players and showing a prevalence of 7.6% as injuries. Incidence of tendon injuries is 0.32 per 1000 hours of exposure Tendon Injuries: 5 were patellar, 2 supraspinatus, 1 aquiles. 5 Slight, 2 moderate, 1 severe. Conclusion: Clearly, tendinopathy is a common problem in this sport but it is not a common cause of injury. This is demonstrated in prevalence rates whereas 43.5 % just consulted and 7,6 % suffer from real injuries. We think this might be due to several factors such as, advances in medical therapy, preventive protocols and increase in thresholds of pain that high-performance athletes can bear. In our experience this pathology was shown to be the third leading cause of injuries. In 2016 we did not deal with any case of injury for tendinopathy.

  19. Common injuries related to weightlifting: MR imaging perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Joseph S; Habib, Paula A

    2005-12-01

    Weightlifting has evolved to become a ubiquitous form of exercise. Resistance training has been shown to have beneficial effects on both muscle and osseous maintenance and development. Competitive weightlifting sports continue to enjoy tremendous popularity, with participants striving to establish new standards in performance and more demanding personal goals. Thus, it is not surprising that we have also seen an increase in injuries related to weightlifting. Many of these injuries are radiographically occult and are best suited for evaluation by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging because many involve the soft tissues. In this article, we discuss some of the factors that contribute to these injuries and address the mechanisms of injury and the MR imaging manifestations of the more common injuries.

  20. Common Ice Hockey Injuries and Treatment: A Current Concepts Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosenthal, William; Kim, Michael; Holzshu, Robert; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Athiviraham, Aravind

    Injuries are common in ice hockey, a contact sport where players skate at high speeds on a sheet of ice and shoot a vulcanized rubber puck in excess of one hundred miles per hour. This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of concussions, injuries to the cervical spine, and lower and upper extremities as they pertain to hockey players. Soft tissue injury of the shoulder, acromioclavicular joint separation, glenohumeral joint dislocation, clavicle fractures, metacarpal fractures, and olecranon bursitis are discussed in the upper-extremity section of the article. Lower-extremity injuries reviewed in this article include adductor strain, athletic pubalgia, femoroacetabular impingement, sports hernia, medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, skate bite, and ankle sprains. This review is intended to aid the sports medicine physician in providing optimal sports-specific care to allow their athlete to return to their preinjury level of performance.

  1. How evidence based is the management of two common sports injuries in a sports injury clinic?

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, I; Murray, S; MacKenzie, K; Coleman, S; Cullen, M

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the diagnosis and management of adults attending a sports injury clinic, to establish to what extent the management of the two most common injuries treated at this clinic is evidence based, and to explore factors that affect management.

  2. Wrist loading patterns during pommel horse exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markolf, K L; Shapiro, M S; Mandelbaum, B R; Teurlings, L

    1990-01-01

    Gymnastics is a sport which involves substantial periods of upper extremity support as well as frequent impacts to the wrist. Not surprisingly, wrist pain is a common finding in gymnasts. Of all events, the pommel horse is the most painful. In order to study the forces of wrist impact, a standard pommel horse was instrumented with a specially designed load cell to record the resultant force of the hand on the pommel during a series of basic skills performed by a group of seventeen elite male gymnasts. The highest mean peak forces were recorded during the front scissors and flair exercises (1.5 BW) with peaks of up to 2.0 BW for some gymnasts. The mean peak force for hip circles at the center or end of the horse was 1.1 BW. The mean overall loading rate (initial contact to first loading peak) ranged from 5.2 BWs-1 (hip circles) to 10.6 BW s-1 (flairs). However, many recordings displayed localized initial loading spikes which occurred during 'hard' landings on the pommel. When front scissors were performed in an aggressive manner, the initial loading spikes averaged 1.0 BW in magnitude (maximum 1.8 BW) with an average rise time of 8.2 ms; calculated localized loading rates averaged 129 BW s-1 (maximum 219 BW s-1). These loading parameters are comparable to those encountered at heel strike during running. These impact forces and loading rates are remarkably high for an upper extremity joint not normally exposed to weight-bearing loads, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of wrist injuries in gymnastics.

  3. Near miss and minor occupational injury: Does it share a common causal pathway with major injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Hasanat; Yu, Shicheng; Gorman, Erin; Ngan, Karen; Guzman, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    An essential assumption of injury prevention programs is the common cause hypothesis that the causal pathways of near misses and minor injuries are similar to those of major injuries. The rates of near miss, minor injury and major injury of all reported incidents and musculoskeletal incidents (MSIs) were calculated for three health regions using information from a surveillance database and productive hours from payroll data. The relative distribution of individual causes and activities involved in near miss, minor injury and major injury were then compared. For all reported incidents, there were significant differences in the relative distribution of causes for near miss, minor, and major injury. However, the relative distribution of causes and activities involved in minor and major MSIs were similar. The top causes and activities involved were the same across near miss, minor, and major injury. Finding from this study support the use of near miss and minor injury data as potential outcome measures for injury prevention programs. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Preventing musculoskeletal injuries among recreational adult volleyball players : design of a randomised prospective controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Both acute and overuse injuries are common among recreational volleyball players, especially finger/wrist, ankle, shoulder and knee injuries. Consequently, an intervention ('VolleyVeilig') was developed to prevent or reduce the occurrence of finger/wrist, shoulder, knee and ankle

  5. Preventing musculoskeletal injuries among recreational adult volleyball players: design of a randomised prospective controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert

    2017-01-01

    Background: Both acute and overuse injuries are common among recreational volleyball players, especially finger/wrist, ankle, shoulder and knee injuries. Consequently, an intervention ('VolleyVeilig') was developed to prevent or reduce the occurrence of finger/wrist, shoulder, knee and ankle

  6. Needlestick Injuries in Interventional Radiology Are Common and Underreported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deipolyi, Amy R; Prabhakar, Anand M; Naidu, Sailendra; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-12-01

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for needlesticks in interventional radiology physicians, as well as the attitudes, behaviors, and conditions that promote or interfere with reporting of these injuries. Materials and Methods A total of 3889 interventional radiologists from academic and private practice in the United States were surveyed by emailing all interventional radiologist members of the Society of Interventional Radiology, including attending-level physicians and trainees (April-August 2016). The institutional review board waived the need for consent. Questions inquired about the nature, frequency, and type of needlestick and sharps injuries and whether and to whom these incidents were reported. Stepwise regression was used to determine variables predicting whether injuries were reported. Results In total, 908 (23%) interventional radiologists completed at least a portion of the survey. Eight hundred fourteen (91%) of 895 respondents reported a prior needlestick injury, 583 (35%) of 895 reported at least one injury while treating an HIV-positive patient, and 626 (71%) of 884 reported prior training regarding needlestick injury. There was, on average, one needlestick for every 5 years of practice. Most needlestick or sharps injuries were self inflicted (711 [87%] of 817) and involved a hollow-bore device (464 [56%] of 824). Only 566 (66%) of 850 injuries were reported. The most common reasons for not reporting included perceived lack of utility of reporting (79 [28%] of 282), perceived low risk for injury (56 [20%] of 282), noncontaminated needle (53 [19%] of 282), too-lengthy reporting process (37 [13%] of 282), and associated stigma (23 [8%] of 282). Only 156 (25%) of 624 respondents informed their significant other. Stepwise regression assessing variables affecting the likelihood of reporting showed that male sex (P = .009), low-risk patient (P < .0001), self injury (P = .010), trainee status (P < .0001), and the total number of prior

  7. Arthroscopic Synovectomy of Wrist in Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jae Woo; Park, Min Jong

    2017-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic inflammatory disorder affecting multiple joints. Wrist involvement is common. Patients with persistent symptoms despite medical management are candidates for surgery. Synovectomy can provide pain relief and functional improvement for rheumatoid wrist. Arthroscopic synovectomy is a safe and reliable method, with minimal postoperative morbidity. This article reviews the role, technique, and results of arthroscopic synovectomy in the rheumatoid wrist. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiologic evaluation of wrist arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Hee; Seong, Hyeun Lim; Yang, Jae Beom; Park, Chan Sup; Lee, Sang Seun

    1991-01-01

    Wrist arthrography allows direct visualization of the cartilage and synovial structure not seen in plain film. Arthrography of the wrist is valuable in evaluating patients with persistent wrist pain and limitation of motion after trauma. Wrist arthrography was performed in the evaluation of 30 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (2 cases), ganglions (12 cases), and wrist trauma (16 cases), and contrast media was injected in radiocarpal joint. The arthrographic findings were analyzed, and the results were as follows: In 16 patients with wrist trauma, 12 cases (75%) of compartment communication was seen including communication with distal radioulnar joint (44%), midcarpal joint (69%), and common carpometacarpal joint (63%). Of the total 30 patients, the pisiform-triquetral joint communicated with the radio carpal joint in 9 cases (30%). In 16 patients with trauma, the findings of post-traumatic arthritis included tendon communication (50%), irregular synovium (31%), and rupture of the joint capsule (25%). There was no lymphatic filling. Of 3 scaphoid fracture patients without bony callus formation, fibrous union was verified in one patient and nouncion in 2. O 12 patients with ganglion, communication between the ganglion and radiocarpal joint was seen in 2 cases and no communication in 10 cases

  9. Evaluation of wrist arthroscopy outcomes in patients with chronic wrist pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shahryar Kamrani

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: According to our results, wrist arthroscopy have acceptable outcome in TFCC injuries and Kienbock disease. With the ever-expanding list of indications and procedures that can be performed with wrist arthroscopy, it can be considered as an essential diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the orthopedic surgeon.

  10. Subsequent Injuries Are More Common Than Injury Recurrences: An Analysis of 1 Season of Prospectively Collected Injuries in Professional Australian Football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Caroline F; Cook, Jill; Kunstler, Breanne E; Akram, Muhammad; Orchard, John

    2017-07-01

    It is known that some people can, and do, sustain >1 injury over a playing season. However, there is currently little high-quality epidemiological evidence about the risk of, and relationships between, multiple and subsequent injuries. To describe the subsequent injuries sustained by Australian Football League (AFL) players over 1 season, including their most common injury diagnoses. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. Within-player linked injury data on all date-ordered match-loss injuries sustained by AFL players during 1 full season were obtained. The total number of injuries per player was determined, and in those with >1 injury, the Subsequent Injury Classification (SIC) model was used to code all subsequent injuries based on their Orchard Sports Injury Classification System (OSICS) codes and the dates of injury. There were 860 newly recorded injuries in 543 players; 247 players (45.5%) sustained ≥1 subsequent injuries after an earlier injury, with 317 subsequent injuries (36.9% of all injuries) recorded overall. A subsequent injury generally occurred to a different body region and was therefore superficially unrelated to an index injury. However, 32.2% of all subsequent injuries were related to a previous injury in the same season. Hamstring injuries were the most common subsequent injury. The mean time between injuries decreased with an increasing number of subsequent injuries. When relationships between injuries are taken into account, there is a high level of subsequent (and multiple) injuries leading to missed games in an elite athlete group.

  11. Triangular fibrocartilage complex injury treated with prolotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serdar Kesikburun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Triangular fibrocartilage complex has a crucial role in stability and functionality of the wrist. Traumatic or degenerative injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex is a common cause of ulnar side wrist pain. Arthroscopic treatment has been offered in chronic triangular fibrocartilage complex injury. A 19-year old male patient presented with pain at ulnar side of the wrist. He was diagnosed as having triangular fibrocartilage complex injury after assessment with MR imaging. The patients who did not benefit from drugs underwent prolotherapy three times. After treatment, he had pain relief and reported that he could use his wrist better. In this case, triangular fibrocartilage complex injury improved with prolotherapy and arthroscopic treatment was not required. Further clinical trials are needed to show better the role of prolotherapy in the treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(2.000: 403-405

  12. Non-traumatic injury profile of amateur cyclists

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in respondents who experienced neck, back, hand/wrist, buttock/perineum and foot/ankle problems. Conclusion. Non-traumatic injuries in amateur cyclists are common, with back, hand/wrist and buttock/perineal symptoms the most frequent problems. Knee problems caused the greatest need to stop training and seek ...

  13. Personal trainer demographics, current practice trends and common trainee injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory R. Waryasz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Increasing emphasis on maintaining a healthy lifestyle has led many individuals to seek advice on exercise from personal trainers. There are few studies to date that evaluate personal trainer education, practice trends, and injuries they have seen while training clients. A survey was distributed to personal trainers using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA with 605 personal trainers accessing the survey. An exercise related bachelor’s degree was held by 64.2% of survey participants and a certification in personal training by 89.0%. The most common personal trainer certifications were from American College of Sports Medicine (59.2% and National Strength and Conditioning Association (28.9%. Only 2.9% of all personal trainers surveyed had no exercise-related bachelor’s degree and no personal trainer certification. The most common injuries seen by personal trainers during sessions were lumbar muscle strain (10.7%, rotator cuff tear/tendonitis (8.9%, shin splints (8.1%, ankle sprain (7.5%, and cervical muscle strain (7.4%. There is variability in the practices between different personal trainers when analyzing differences in collegiate education, personal trainer certifications, and strength and conditioning certifications. The clinical implication of the differences in practices is unknown as to the impact on injuries or exercise prescription effectiveness.

  14. Personal Trainer Demographics, Current Practice Trends and Common Trainee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waryasz, Gregory R.; Daniels, Alan H.; Gil, Joseph A.; Suric, Vladimir; Eberson, Craig P.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing emphasis on maintaining a healthy lifestyle has led many individuals to seek advice on exercise from personal trainers. There are few studies to date that evaluate personal trainer education, practice trends, and injuries they have seen while training clients. A survey was distributed to personal trainers using Survey Monkey® (Palo Alto, CA, USA) with 605 personal trainers accessing the survey. An exercise related bachelor’s degree was held by 64.2% of survey participants and a certification in personal training by 89.0%. The most common personal trainer certifications were from American College of Sports Medicine (59.2%) and National Strength and Conditioning Association (28.9%). Only 2.9% of all personal trainers surveyed had no exercise-related bachelor’s degree and no personal trainer certification. The most common injuries seen by personal trainers during sessions were lumbar muscle strain (10.7%), rotator cuff tear/tendonitis (8.9%), shin splints (8.1%), ankle sprain (7.5%), and cervical muscle strain (7.4%). There is variability in the practices between different personal trainers when analyzing differences in collegiate education, personal trainer certifications, and strength and conditioning certifications. The clinical implication of the differences in practices is unknown as to the impact on injuries or exercise prescription effectiveness. PMID:27761219

  15. Trends in wrist arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, Miryam C.; Tuijthof, Gabrielle J. M.; van der Horst, Chantal M. A. M.; Mathoulin, Christophe; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Wrist arthroscopy plays a role in both the diagnosis and the treatment of wrist pathology. It has evolved in the last three decades. Questions The present status of wrist arthroscopy was investigated by answering the following questions: -What is its current position in the treatment

  16. Aging, physical activity and sports injuries. An overview of common sports injuries in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallinen, M; Markku, A

    1995-07-01

    Illness and aging both cause many structural and functional alterations in the human body, rendering elderly people liable to overloading of the musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. It should, however, be kept in mind that immobilisation and inactivity have even more deleterious effects on structures and functions in the elderly than in younger adults. Most physically active elderly people are selected individuals with respect to their superior health and physical capacity compared with inactive persons of the same age, thus making it possible to further improve their physical capacity. They will, however, be affected by some of the drawbacks of physical overloading, mostly due to the diminished ability of aging body systems to adapt to high levels of loading. The safety margin of an exercise dose tends to decline with aging. Exertional injuries are common among the elderly, and are connected mostly with degenerative aging processes. Acute injuries are common in those elderly people participating in sport activities which demand high coordination, reaction time, and balance capabilities, such as ball games, down-hill skiing, and gymnastics. Muscle has been reported to be the most commonly acutely injured tissue among active elderly athletes. The lower extremities are the most susceptible to injury. A large proportion of injuries (acute and exertional) are mild and can be treated by brief cessation of training and competition activities. Some of the injuries are, however, long term and cause disability not only during training and competition, but also in the normal activities of daily living. It is important that these injuries are treated as soon as possible and in the most effective way, similarly to injuries suffered by younger people. In treating elderly people, it is most important to avoid the detrimental effects of immobilisation; this requires active treatment and rehabilitation with compensatory exercise therapy. The best 'treatment' for sports

  17. Design and characterization of the OpenWrist: A robotic wrist exoskeleton for coordinated hand-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezent, Evan; Rose, Chad G; Deshpande, Ashish D; O'Malley, Marcia K

    2017-07-01

    Robotic devices have been clinically verified for use in long duration and high intensity rehabilitation needed for motor recovery after neurological injury. Targeted and coordinated hand and wrist therapy, often overlooked in rehabilitation robotics, is required to regain the ability to perform activities of daily living. To this end, a new coupled hand-wrist exoskeleton has been designed. This paper details the design of the wrist module and several human-related considerations made to maximize its potential as a coordinated hand-wrist device. The serial wrist mechanism has been engineered to facilitate donning and doffing for impaired subjects and to insure compatibility with the hand module in virtual and assisted grasping tasks. Several other practical requirements have also been addressed, including device ergonomics, clinician-friendliness, and ambidextrous reconfigurability. The wrist module's capabilities as a rehabilitation device are quantified experimentally in terms of functional workspace and dynamic properties. Specifically, the device possesses favorable performance in terms of range of motion, torque output, friction, and closed-loop position bandwidth when compared with existing devices. The presented wrist module's performance and operational considerations support its use in a wide range of future clinical investigations.

  18. Pre-Clinical Traumatic Brain Injury Common Data Elements: Toward a Common Language Across Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas H; Hicks, Ramona R; Johnson, Victoria E; Bergstrom, Debra A; Cummings, Diana M; Noble, Linda J; Hovda, David; Whalen, Michael; Ahlers, Stephen T; LaPlaca, Michelle; Tortella, Frank C; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Dixon, C Edward

    2015-11-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major public health issue exacting a substantial personal and economic burden globally. With the advent of "big data" approaches to understanding complex systems, there is the potential to greatly accelerate knowledge about mechanisms of injury and how to detect and modify them to improve patient outcomes. High quality, well-defined data are critical to the success of bioinformatics platforms, and a data dictionary of "common data elements" (CDEs), as well as "unique data elements" has been created for clinical TBI research. There is no data dictionary, however, for preclinical TBI research despite similar opportunities to accelerate knowledge. To address this gap, a committee of experts was tasked with creating a defined set of data elements to further collaboration across laboratories and enable the merging of data for meta-analysis. The CDEs were subdivided into a Core module for data elements relevant to most, if not all, studies, and Injury-Model-Specific modules for non-generalizable data elements. The purpose of this article is to provide both an overview of TBI models and the CDEs pertinent to these models to facilitate a common language for preclinical TBI research.

  19. MR Imaging and US of the Wrist Tendons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotkin, Benjamin; Sampath, Srihari C; Sampath, Srinath C; Motamedi, Kambiz

    2016-10-01

    The tendons of the wrist are commonly symptomatic. They can be injured, infected, or inflamed. Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography are useful tools for evaluating the wrist. Pathologic conditions of the wrist tendons include de Quervain tenosynovitis, extensor carpi ulnaris tendinopathy, rheumatoid tenosynovitis, infectious synovitis, tendon tears, hydroxyapatite deposition disease, intersection syndrome, tenosynovial giant cell tumor, and fibroma of the tendon sheath. In this article, we review the normal appearance of the wrist tendons, discuss relevant anatomy, and give an overview of common pathologic conditions affecting the wrist tendons. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2016.

  20. ARTHROSCOPIC FOR TREATMENT OF WRIST PATHOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Golubev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnostics and treatment of wrist joint pathologies still remain one the key problems in hand traumatology and orthopaedics. Extremal sports availability as well as new options for recreation transportation means only sustains the statistics of such injuries. On the other hand, the technological improvements allowed to develop precise optics for surgeries on small joints. Possibilities of minimally invasive closer visualization at magnification substantially changed not only the approach to treatment of wrist joint pathology but also allowed to describe types of lesions unknown earlier. The authors describe basic principles of wrist joint arthroscopy and features of its application in various injuries: scaphoid fractures, intraarticular fractures of distal radius metaepiphysis, triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries.

  1. Common types and countermeasures of ankle ligament injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize injury types, analyze the causes of injury, and put forward corresponding control measures. Methods: The author selected 3100 basketball players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to ...

  2. Common data elements for spinal cord injury clinical research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Alai, S; Anderson, K.

    2015-01-01

    Institutes of Health. SETTING: International Working Groups. METHODS: Nine working groups composed of international experts reviewed existing CDEs and instruments, created new elements when needed and provided recommendations for SCI clinical research. The project was carried out in collaboration...... of CDEs can facilitate SCI clinical research and trial design, data sharing and retrospective analyses. Continued international collaboration will enable consistent data collection and reporting, and will help ensure that the data elements are updated, reviewed and broadcast as additional evidence......OBJECTIVES: To develop a comprehensive set of common data elements (CDEs), data definitions, case report forms and guidelines for use in spinal cord injury (SCI) clinical research, as part of the CDE project at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) of the US National...

  3. Common Types and Countermeasures of Ankle Ligament Injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-09-14

    Sep 14, 2017 ... Objective: To analyze ankle ligament injury of basketball players caused during movement, summarize ... players with ankle ligament injury during basketball movement and admitted to different .... Road Success 2010;8:70. 5.

  4. Education in wrist arthroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    The subject of this thesis is an initiative for improving the education of residents in surgical skills and knowledge by using the current technical possibilities. The choice of wrist arthroscopy was driven by the fact that novel techniques have recently been developed within hand and wrist surgery

  5. Intersection Syndrome: The Subtle Squeak of an Overused Wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    Patient histories that include wrist pain can be pivotal in the distinction between intersection syndrome (IS) and the more common de Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT). Presented here is a 26-year-old pregnant woman with a history of rowing who developed left radial/dorsal wrist pain and a rubbing/squeaking sensation. Nine months of conservative DQT therapy and a landmark-guided corticosteroid injection failed to relieve her symptoms. An in-clinic ultrasound showed tenosynovitis at the intersection of the first and second compartments, confirming a diagnosis of IS. She found immediate relief with ultrasound-guided saline hydrodissection, the injection of saline into the intercompartmental space to reduce adhesions. Both DQT and IS are overuse injuries caused by repetitive wrist extension, as occurs in rowing, and either condition can worsen after pregnancy. Distinguishing the subtleties between DQT and IS can be challenging. Close attention to the patient's description of the pain can guide treatment, potentially expediting recovery. In addition, saline hydrodissection can be both a diagnostic tool and a potentially therapeutic alternative to steroid injections for such tendinopathies. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  6. Using the Spinal Cord Injury Common Data Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Charlifue, Susan; Devivo, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Data Sets include core, basic, and extended data sets. To date, 13 data sets have been published on the Web site of the International Spinal Cord Injury Society (ISCoS; www.iscos.org.uk), and several more are forthcoming. The data sets are constituted of data...

  7. Common acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hip/lower back was the most prevalent anatomical site of chronic musculoskeletal injury. (p<0.001). The intrinsic ..... Musculoskeletal disorders among nursing personnel in Korea. Int J ... Marieb E. Human Anatomy and Physiology. 7th ed.

  8. What Are Common Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sleep habits Behavior or mood changes Trouble with memory, concentration, attention, or thinking Loss of consciousness lasting a few ... may have caused a TBI should seek medical attention. 4 ... Traumatic brain injury information page . Retrieved May 4, 2018, from https://www. ...

  9. Common acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries among female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To document the prevalence and nature of musculoskeletal injuries among female adolescent hockey players over a 12-month period (1 November 2011 - 31 October 2012). Methods. Data were collected from 148 high school players who belonged to the KwaZulu-Natal Hockey League via voluntary, ...

  10. Trampoline-associated injuries are more common in children in spring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Michael S; Krishna, Sanjeev; Rahiri, Jamie-Lee; Hill, Andrew G

    2016-06-10

    Trampoline use is a popular pastime amongst children in New Zealand, and has many advantages for child development. However, recent reports claim that trampoline-associated injuries are still highly prevalent. In order to help prevent these injuries in the future, this study aims to provide more up-to-date epidemiological information in children, with emphasis on the time of year that injuries most commonly occur. A retrospective review was carried out utilising a prospective maintained trauma database. The database was searched electronically for injuries involving trampolines in children aged 0-15 years. Patient demographics and information regarding month of injury, injury type and management were extracted. There were 344 admissions to hospital for trampoline-related injuries between June 2000 and January 2015. Injuries were uncommon in winter, but rose in spring and summer. Fracture of the radius and/or ulna was the most common injury (34.0%), followed by humeral fracture (32.0%). The peak incidence of trampoline-related injuries occurred around the beginning of spring daylight savings time each year. This could therefore prove an opportune time to remind children and parents about trampoline safety at the same time as daylight savings reminders.

  11. Are Injuries More Common With CrossFit Training Than Other Forms of Exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimek, Chelsey; Ashbeck, Christopher; Brook, Alexander J; Durall, Chris

    2018-05-22

    Clinical Scenario: CrossFit is a form of exercise that incorporates rapid and successive high-intensity ballistic movements. As CrossFit is an increasingly popular fitness option, it is important to determine how rates of injury compare to more traditional forms of exercise. This review was conducted to ascertain the incidence of injury with CrossFit relative to other forms of exercise. Focused Clinical Question: Are injuries more common with CrossFit training than other forms of exercise? Summary of Key Findings: (1) The literature was searched for studies that compared injury rates among individuals who participated in CrossFit fitness programs to participants in other exercise programs. (2) The search initially yielded >100 results, which were narrowed down to 3 level 2b retrospective cohort studies that were deemed to have met inclusion/exclusion criteria. (3) In all 3 reviewed studies, the reported incidences of injuries associated with CrossFit training programs were comparable or lower than rates of injury in Olympic weightlifting, distance running, track and field, rugby, or gymnastics. Clinical Bottom Line: Current evidence suggests that the injury risk from CrossFit training is comparable to Olympic weightlifting, distance running, track and field, rugby, football, ice hockey, soccer, or gymnastics. Injuries to the shoulder(s) appear to be somewhat common with CrossFit. However, the certitude of these conclusions is questionable given the lack of randomization, control, or uniform training in the reviewed studies. Clinicians should be aware that injury is more prevalent in cases where supervision is not always available to athletes. This is more often the case for male participants who may not actively seek supervision during CrossFit exercise. Strength of Recommendation: Level 2b evidence from 3 retrospective cohort studies indicates that the risk of injury from participation in CrossFit is comparable to or lower than some common forms of exercise or

  12. Snowboarding injuries, a four-year study with comparison with alpine ski injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, T M; Laliotis, A T

    1996-03-01

    Snowboarding is a rapidly growing winter sport. Its unorthodox maneuvers and young participants raise many safety concerns. We examined injury patterns in recreational snowboarders, comparing these patterns with those found in alpine skiers. Snowboarding and skiing injury patterns differed significantly (P knee (17% versus 39%) or thumb (2% versus 4%) injuries than skiers. For snowboarders, wrist injuries were most common in beginners (30%), knee injuries in low intermediates (28%), ankle injuries in intermediates (17%), and shoulder or clavicle injuries in advanced snowboarders (14%). Most snowboarders (90%) wore soft-shelled boots, 73% of lower extremity injuries occurred to the lead-foot side, and 73% of wrist injuries occurred during backward falls; 67% of knee injuries occurred during forward falls. Of all injuries, 8% occurred while loading onto or unloading from a ski lift. The sport of snowboarding brings with it a different set of injuries from those seen in alpine skiing. The data focus attention on improvements such as wrist guards or splints, releasable front-foot bindings, and better instruction for beginner snowboarders to improve the safety of this sport. Finally, the data confirm that snowboarders and skiers may be safely combined on the same slopes.

  13. Most common sports-related injuries in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Kathy W; Thrash, Chris; Sorrentino, Annalise; King, William D

    2011-01-01

    Participation in sports is a popular activity for children across the country. Prevention of sports-related injuries can be improved if details of injuries are documented and studied. A retrospective medical record review of injuries that occurred as a direct result of sports participation (both organized and non-organized play) from November 2006 to November 2007. Because the vast majority of injuries were a result of participation in football or basketball, these injuries were focused upon. The injuries specifically examined were closed head injury (CHI), lacerations and fractures. There were 350 football and 196 basketball injuries (total 546). Comparing injuries between the two groups fractures were found to be more prevalent in football compared to basketball (z = 2.14; p = 0.03; 95%CI (0.01, 0.16)). Lacerations were found to be less prevalent among helmeted patients than those without helmets. (z = 2.39; p = 0.02; 95%CI (-0.17,-0.03)). CHI was more prevalent among organized play compared to non-organized (z = 3.9; pfootball related visits, organized play had a higher prevalence of injury compared to non-organized play (z = 2.87; p = 0.004; 95%CI (0.04.0.21)). No differences in fracture or laceration prevalence were found between organized and non-organized play. Football and basketball related injuries are common complaints in a pediatric Emergency Department. Frequently seen injuries include CHI, fractures and lacerations. In our institution, fractures were more prevalent among football players and CHI was more prevalent among organized sports participants.

  14. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C.; Carloni, S.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures [it

  15. [Dislocation of the PIP-Joint - Treatment of a common (ball)sports injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Seubert, Wibke; Bührer, Gregor; Horch, Raymund E

    2017-09-01

    Background  Fractures or fracture dislocations of the proximal interphalangeal joint often occur during sports or accidents. Dislocations of the PIP-joint are the most common ligamentary injuries of the hand. As this kind of injury is so frequent, hand surgeons and other physicians should be aware of the correct treatment. Objectives  This paper summarises the most common injury patterns and the correct treatment of PIP-joint dislocations. Materials and Methods  This paper reviews the current literature and describes the standardised treatment of PIP-joint dislocations. Results  What is most important is that reposition is anatomically correct, and this should be controlled by X-ray examination. Depending on the instability and possible combination with other injuries (e. g. injury to the palmar plate), early functional physiotherapy of the joint or a short immobilisation period is indicated. Conclusions  Early functional treatment of the injured PIP-joint, initially using buddy taping, is important to restore PIP-joint movement and function. Depending on the injury, joint immobilisation using a K-wire may be indicated. Detailed informed consent is necessary to explain to the patient the severity of the injury and possible complications, such as chronic functional disorders or development of arthrosis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Acute Effects of Hand Elevation and Wrist Position on Mean Arterial Pressure and Pulse Rate Measured in the Hand

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shibley, Lee

    2000-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) to the wrist and hand are common among workers, and are associated with working conditions that use forceful, repetitive and extreme wrist joint postures that including end range flexion...

  17. Diagnostic errors in interpretation of pediatric musculoskeletal radiographs at common injury sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, George S.; Crowe, James

    2014-01-01

    Extremity pain represents one of the most common reasons for obtaining conventional radiographs in childhood. Despite the frequency of these examinations little is known about the incidence of diagnostic errors by interpreting pediatric radiologists. The purpose of this study was to develop a standard error rate of pediatric radiologists by double-reading of extremity radiographs (elbow, wrists, knees and ankles) in children presenting with a history of trauma or pain. During a 6-month period all major extremity radiographs (excluding digits) obtained at a large pediatric referral hospital for evaluation of pain or trauma were reviewed by two senior pediatric radiologists and compared to the official interpretation. All radiographs were interpreted initially by a board-certified pediatric radiologist with a Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ). We reviewed 3,865 radiographic series in children and young adults 2-20 years of age. We tabulated misses and overcalls. We did not assess the clinical significance of the errors. There were 61 miss errors and 44 overcalls in 1,235 abnormal cases and 2,630 normal cases, for a 1.6% miss rate and a 1.1% overcall rate. Misses and overcalls were most common in the ankle. Interpretive errors by pediatric radiologists reviewing certain musculoskeletal radiographs are relatively infrequent. Diagnostic errors in the form of a miss or overcall occurred in 2.7% of the radiographs. (orig.)

  18. Delayed rupture of common carotid artery following rugby tackle injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Saleh

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common Carotid Artery (CCA is an uncommon site of injury following a blunt trauma, its presentation with spontaneous delayed rupture is even more uncommon and a rugby tackle leading to CCA injury is a rare event. What makes this case unique and very rare is combination of all of the above. Case presentation Mr H. presented to the Emergency Department with an expanding neck haematoma and shortness of breath. He was promptly intubated and had contrast CT angiography of neck vessels which localized the bleeding spot on posteromedial aspect of his Right CCA. He underwent emergency surgery with repair of the defect and made an uneventful recovery post operatively. Conclusion Delayed post traumatic rupture of the CCA is an uncommon yet potentially life threatening condition which can be caused by unusual blunt injury mechanism. A high index of suspicion and low threshold for investigating carotid injuries in the setting of blunt trauma is likely to be beneficial.

  19. Tubercular monoarthritis of wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Joshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB has been a major health concern since decades, and millions continue to be afflicted with this disease. Extrapulmonary sites of TB must not be neglected as there is paucity of systemic manifestations and absence of distinct clinical features which delay its diagnosis and can lead to functional disability and severe infirmities. Osteoarticular TB is an infrequent form of the disease and monoarthritis of the wrist accounts for 1% of all cases of skeletal involvement. Hereby, we report a 45-year-old female patient with history of progressive pain and swelling of right wrist joint which is refractory to analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. She was diagnosed to have tubercular monoarthritis after synovial fluid analysis and radiographic findings. Standard antitubercular treatment for 6 months was given. The joint was salvaged after 9 months from the start of the treatment. Pain and swelling of joint were subsided and joint was rehabilitated with full range of motion and weight bearing.

  20. Arthroscopic Resection of Wrist Ganglion Arising from the Lunotriquetral Joint

    OpenAIRE

    Mak, Michael C. K.; Ho, Pak-cheong; Tse, W. L.; Wong, Clara W. Y.

    2013-01-01

    The dorsal wrist ganglion is the most common wrist mass, and previous studies have shown that it arises from the scapholunate interval in the vast majority of cases. Treatment has traditionally been open excision, and more recently arthroscopic resection has been established as an effective and less invasive treatment method. However, application of this technique to ganglia in atypical locations has not been reported, where open excision is the usual practice. This report describes two cases...

  1. High-resolution 3T Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex in Chinese Wrists: Correlation with Cross-sectional Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Hui-Li; Li, Wen-Ting; Bai, Rong-Jie; Wang, Nai-Li; Qian, Zhan-Hua; Ye, Wei; Yin, Yu-Ming

    2017-04-05

    The injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) is a common cause of ulnar-sided wrist pain. The aim of this study was to investigate if the high-resolution 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could demonstrate the detailed complex anatomy of TFCC in Chinese. Fourteen Chinese cadaveric wrists (from four men and three women; age range at death from 30 to 60 years; mean age at 46 years) and forty healthy Chinese wrists (from 20 healthy volunteers, male/female: 10/10; age range from 21 to 53 years with a mean age of 32 years) in Beijing Jishuitan Hospital from March 2014 to March 2016 were included in this study. All cadavers and volunteers had magnetic resonance (MR) examination of the wrist with coronal T1-weighted and proton density-weighted imaging with fat suppression in three planes, respectively. MR arthrography (MRAr) was performed on one of the cadaveric wrists. Subsequently, all 14 cadaveric wrists were sliced into 2 mm thick slab with band saw (six in coronal plane, four in sagittal plane, and four in axial plane). The MRI features of normal TFCC were analyzed in these specimens and forty healthy wrists. Triangular fibrocartilage, the ulnar collateral ligament, and the meniscal homolog could be best observed on images in coronal plane. The palmar and dorsal radioulnar ligaments were best evaluated in transverse plane. The ulnotriquetral and ulnolunate ligaments were best visualized in sagittal plane. The latter two structures and the volar and dorsal capsules were better demonstrated on MRAr. High-resolution 3T MRI is capable to show the detailed complex anatomy of the TFCC and can provide valuable information for the clinical diagnosis in Chinese.

  2. Meta-analysis: association between wrist posture and carpal tunnel syndrome among workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Doohee; Smith, Allan H; Rempel, David

    2014-03-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a common work-related peripheral neuropathy. In addition to grip force and repetitive hand exertions, wrist posture (hyperextension and hyperflexion) may be a risk factor for CTS among workers. However, findings of studies evaluating the relationship between wrist posture and CTS are inconsistent. The purpose of this paper was to conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies to evaluate the evidence of the relationship between wrist posture at work and risk of CTS. PubMed and Google Scholar were searched to identify relevant studies published between 1980 and 2012. The following search terms were used: "work related", "carpal tunnel syndrome", "wrist posture", and "epidemiology". The studies defined wrist posture as the deviation of the wrist in extension or flexion from a neutral wrist posture. Relative risk (RR) of individual studies for postural risk was pooled to evaluate the overall risk of wrist posture on CTS. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All were cross-sectional or case-control designs and relied on self-report or observer's estimates for wrist posture assessment. The pooled RR of work-related CTS increased with increasing hours of exposure to wrist deviation or extension/flexion [RR = 2.01; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.646-2.43; p Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures.

  3. Wrist arthrography: a simple method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna-Serna, Juan D.; Reus, Manuel; Alonso, Jose [Virgen de la Arrixaca University Hospital, Department of Radiology, El Palmar (Murcia) (Spain); Martinez, Francisco; Domenech-Ratto, Gines [University of Murcia, Department of Human Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Murcia (Spain)

    2006-02-01

    A technique of wrist arthrography is presented using an adhesive marker-plate with radiopaque coordinates to identify precisely sites for puncture arthrography of the wrist and to obviate the need for fluoroscopic guidance. Radiocarpal joint arthrography was performed successfully in all 24 cases, 14 in the cadaveric wrists and 10 in the live patients. The arthrographic procedure described in this study is simple, safe, and rapid, and has the advantage of precise localisation of the site for puncture without need for fluoroscopic guidance. (orig.)

  4. Impairment of leaf photosynthesis after insect herbivory or mechanical injury on common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, K J; Haile, F J; Peterson, R K D; Higley, L G

    2008-10-01

    Insect herbivory has variable consequences on plant physiology, growth, and reproduction. In some plants, herbivory reduces photosynthetic rate (Pn) activity on remaining tissue of injured leaves. We sought to better understand the influence of leaf injury on Pn of common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca (Asclepiadaceae), leaves. Initially, we tested whether Pn reductions occurred after insect herbivory or mechanical injury. We also (1) examined the duration of photosynthetic recovery, (2) compared mechanical injury with insect herbivory, (3) studied the relationship between leaf Pn with leaf injury intensity, and (4) considered uninjured leaf compensatory Pn responses neighboring an injured leaf. Leaf Pn was significantly reduced on mechanically injured or insect-fed leaves in all reported experiments except one, so some factor(s) (cardiac glycoside induction, reproductive investment, and water stress) likely interacts with leaf injury to influence whether Pn impairment occurs. Milkweed tussock moth larval herbivory, Euchaetes egle L. (Arctiidae), impaired leaf Pn more severely than mechanical injury in one experiment. Duration of Pn impairment lasted > 5 d to indicate high leaf Pn sensitivity to injury, but Pn recovery occurred within 13 d in one experiment. The degree of Pn reduction was more severe from E. egle herbivory than similar levels of mechanical tissue removal. Negative linear relationships characterized leaf Pn with percentage tissue loss from single E. egle-fed leaves and mechanically injured leaves and suggested that the signal to trigger leaf Pn impairment on remaining tissue of an injured leaf was amplified by additional tissue loss. Finally, neighboring uninjured leaves to an E. egle-fed leaf had a small (approximately 10%) degree of compensatory Pn to partly offset tissue loss and injured leaf Pn impairment.

  5. Arthrography in lesions of triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, W.S.; Seifert, J.

    1982-01-01

    Arthography of the wrist is a safe method to demonstrate lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage. Indications are posttraumatic pain and restriction of movement of the wrist. Lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage are caused by a distal fracture of the radius with shortening, sudden drop on the overextended hand and work with rock drills. The extent of injury is quite different: small fissures and splits, detachment of the discus from the lower end of the ulna, fragmentation and destruction of the fibrocartilage. Problems of therapy, however, are greater than problems of diagnosis: actually there is no generally adopted surgical method for the treatment of discus lections. (orig./MG)

  6. Arthrography in lesions of triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, W.S.; Seifert, J.

    1982-05-01

    Arthography of the wrist is a safe method to demonstrate lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage. Indications are posttraumatic pain and restriction of movement of the wrist. Lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage are caused by a distal fracture of the radius with shortening, sudden drop on the overextended hand and work with rock drills. The extent of injury is quite different: small fissures and splits, detachment of the discus from the lower end of the ulna, fragmentation and destruction of the fibrocartilage. Problems of therapy, however, are greater than problems of diagnosis: actually there is no generally adopted surgical method for the treatment of discus lesions.

  7. 21 CFR 888.3810 - Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. 888.3810 Section 888.3810 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint ulnar (hemi-wrist) polymer prosthesis...

  8. Double-compartment wrist arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, S.F.; Pittman, C.; Belsole, R.; Greene, T.L.; Rayhack, J.; Clark, R.A.; King, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    Seventy patients with clinical wrist problems were studied with double-compartment wrist arthrography. Midcarpal and radiocarpal compartment arthrograms were obtained in all patients. Digital subtraction technique was used to subtract out contrast from the first compartmental injection. Digital technique also allowed a dynamic record of each injection, which helped determine sites of intercompartmental communication. Postarthrography exercises recorded on videotape were performed after each injection. There were 34 normal studies. Abnormalities in the other 36 patients included: scapholunate communication (n = 9), lunatotriquetral communication (n = 6), communication with tendon sheaths (n = 4), communication with distal radioulnar compartment (n = 14), abnormal synovium process (n = 9), and communication through the radial or ulnar collateral ligament (n = 3). Double-compartment wrist arthrography may provide additional information for complex problems of the wrist

  9. Radiographically occult perforation and dissection of the common carotid artery following stab injury to the neck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gamba

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, many diagnostic algorithms have been devised to reduce the rate of negative explorations associated with indiscriminate surgical management of penetrating neck injuries. In hemodynamically stable patients, the need for surgical intervention is usually determined by integrating both clinical signs and radiological findings; if such investigations remain unremarkable, recommended treatment consists in close observation and sequential physical examinations. We report on a 29-year-old male who was admitted to a Swiss tertiary care hospital after sustaining a penetrating injury to his left neck following a knife attack. Disregarding a pre-hospital account of hemorrhage from the wound and slight dysphagia, no manifest symptoms or signs of internal organ damage were present on primary survey. Moreover, there was no evidence of vascular or aerodigestive tract injury on initial CT angiography. We nonetheless proceeded with immediate surgical exploration, exposing a significant perforation of the left common carotid artery with concomitant dissection of the said vessel. Surgical repair was successfully performed and the patient suffered no long-term sequelae. We thus recommend that a high level of suspicion be upheld in both asymptomatic and oligosymptomatic patients with PNI and that clinical practitioners remain cautious in the face of deceptively reassuring radiologic findings. Keywords: Penetrating neck injury, Carotid artery perforation, Carotid artery dissection, CT angiography

  10. The Traumatized TFCC: An Illustrated Review of the Anatomy and Injury Patterns of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, Matthew R; White, Eric A; Patel, Dakshesh B; Schein, Aaron J; RiveraMelo, Hector; Matcuk, George R

    2016-01-01

    The triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) plays an important role in wrist biomechanics and is prone to traumatic and degenerative injury, making it a common source of ulnar-sided wrist pain. Because of this, the TFCC is frequently imaged, and a detailed understanding of its anatomy and injury patterns is critical in generating an accurate report to help guide treatment. In this review, we provide a detailed overview of TFCC anatomy, its normal appearance on magnetic resonance imaging, the spectrum of TFCC injuries based on the Palmer classification system, and pitfalls in accurate assessment. Copyright © 2015 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid; Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John

    2008-01-01

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The ''rheumatoid'' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with PsA of

  12. Detailed analysis of contrast-enhanced MRI of hands and wrists in patients with psoriatic arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, Jamshid [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States); University of California Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences R-140, Orange, CA (United States); Ashikyan, Oganes; Anavim, Arash; Shin, John [University of California, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine (United States)

    2008-05-15

    The objective was to perform detailed analysis of the involved soft tissues, tendons, joints, and bones in the hands and wrists of patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA). We reviewed 23 contrast-enhanced MR imaging studies (13 hands and 10 wrists) in 10 patients with the clinical diagnosis of PsA. We obtained clinical information from medical records and evaluated images for the presence of erosions, bone marrow edema, joint synovitis, tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel, and soft tissue involvement. Two board-certified musculoskeletal radiologists reviewed all images independently. Differences were resolved during a subsequent joint session. The average duration of disease was 71.3 months, ranging from 1 month to 25 years. Eight of the 10 wrists (80%) and 6 of the 13 hands demonstrated bone erosions. Bone marrow abnormalities were shown in 5 of the 10 wrists (50%) and 4 of the 14 hands (31%). Triangular fibrocartilage tears were seen in 6 of the 10 wrists (60%). Wrist and hand joint synovitis were present in all studies (67 wrist joints and 101 hand joints). Wrist soft tissue involvement was detected in 9 of the 10 wrists (90%) and hand soft tissue involvement was present in 12 of the 13 wrists (92%). Findings adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement included synovitis (4 wrists) and tenosynovitis (3 wrists). Bone marrow edema adjacent to the region of soft tissue involvement was seen in one wrist. Bulge of the flexor retinaculum was seen in 4 of the 10 wrists (40%) and median nerve enhancement was seen in 8 of the 10 wrists (80%). Tenosynovitis was seen in all studies (all 10 of the hands and all 13 of the wrists). The 'rheumatoid' type of distribution of bony lesions was common in our study. Interobserver agreement for various findings ranged from 83% to 100%. Contrast-enhanced MRI unequivocally demonstrated bone marrow edema, erosions, tendon and soft-tissue disease, and median nerve involvement, with good interobserver reliability in patients with

  13. Watch your step! Common reef injuries in Hawaii and treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Mathew Jr.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available As more people flock to coastal areas such as Hawaii for vacation, many may find themselves coming into contact with coral reef for the first time. Whether it’s through snorkeling, swimming, scuba diving, or surfing, the reef can pose a serious danger to anyone not familiar with this delicate life form. While it may appear to be a rock, it is actually a living creature that is home to multiple strains of bacteria. These bacteria can quickly invade injuries sustained from contacting reef, leading to tissue infections ultimately require surgical intervention. In this review, we provide a background on coral reef and its common associated injuries. As there are no evidenced based treatments currently available, anecdotal interventions can be considered.

  14. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. Part I: anatomy and physical examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip; Yoshioka, Hiroshi; Han, Roger

    2010-01-01

    Ulnar-sided wrist pain is a common complaint, and it presents a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists. The complex anatomy of this region, combined with the small size of structures and subtle imaging findings, compound this problem. A thorough understanding of ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and a systematic clinical examination of this region are essential in arriving at an accurate diagnosis. In part I of this review, ulnar-sided wrist anatomy and clinical examination are discussed for a more comprehensive understanding of ulnar-sided wrist pain. (orig.)

  15. Analysis of Ocular Firework-Related Injuries and Common Eye Traumata: a 5-year Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimmel, S; Theusinger, O M; Kniestedt, C

    2017-04-01

    Background A comparative study of eye injuries related to fireworks or acts of violence around New Year's Eve and the Swiss National Day on August 1st. The two groups were compared with respect to the overall numbers of eye accidents within the period of review. Patients and Methods Retrospective analysis of emergency consultations at the Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Zurich with eye accidents around the Swiss National Day on August 1st and New Year's Eve over the last 5 years. Two subgroups were formed: (1) Firework-related eye traumata, (2) Eye injuries due to acts of violence. The groups were analysed by age, gender, active participant or bystander, eye involved, severity of trauma (from clinical findings), surgical interventions, time of follow-up and visits, visual acuity and outcome. Results The study included 97 patients (100 eyes) with 74 male (76 %) and 23 female (24 %) victims. After filtering out 67 common traumata cases (all unilateral), 17 patients (18 eyes) with firework-related injuries and 13 patients (15 eyes) with damage due to an act of violence remained. Firework injuries accounted for 18 % of cases (65 % men); eye injuries caused by an act of violence accounted for 15 % of cases (92 % men). In the fireworks group, women were significantly older than men (mean age men 32 ± 14 years versus women 38 ± 16 years, p = 0.002). 65 % of cases were bystanders. The two subgroups contained 30 patients (33 eyes) with 22 left eyes (67 %, p fireworks group (28 %), than in the violence group (13 %). 87 % of the victims in the group of common traumata were mild trauma, 10 % moderate and 3 % severe. In the fireworks group the distribution was 53 % mild, 12 % moderate and 35 % severe, in the violence group 46 %, 23 % and 31 % respectively. Severe trauma cases occurred significantly more often around the New Year, with 36 % versus August 1st with 18 % (p = 0.0028). They are more often

  16. Upper Extremity Injuries in Tennis Players: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Kevin C; Lark, Meghan E

    2017-02-01

    Upper extremity tennis injuries are most commonly characterized as overuse injuries to the wrist, elbow, and shoulder. The complex anatomy of these structures and their interaction with biomechanical properties of tennis strokes contributes to the diagnostic challenges. A thorough understanding of tennis kinetics, in combination with the current literature surrounding diagnostic and treatment methods, will improve clinical decision-making. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High-resolution MR imaging of wrist cartilage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rominger, M.B.; Bernreuter, W.K.; Listinsky, J.J.; Lee, D.H.; Kenney, P.J.; Colgin, S.L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports that cartilage is an important prognostic factor in arthritis. MR imaging can demonstrate both articular cartilage and subchondral bone. Our purpose was to compare various sequences, for wrist cartilage imaging and determine how extensive damage must be before it is detectable with MR imaging. Six cadaver wrists were imaged before and after arthroscopic cartilage injury (coronal and axial T1- and T2-weighted SE sequences, 3-mm sections; SPGR 45 degrees flip angle volume images with fat saturation. 1.2-mm sections; plus T1-weighted coronal images with fat saturation after injury; General Electric Signa, 1.5 T, with transmit-receive extremity coil). Twenty-two defects were created arthroscopically. Five normal volunteers were imaged for comparison. The greatest contrast among bone, cartilage, and synovial fluid was achieved with T1-weighted fat-suppressed SE image and SPGR. Gradient-recalled volume sequences generated very thin sections but were susceptible to artifact

  18. Computational Biomechanics of the Wrist Joint

    CERN Document Server

    Nazri Bajuri, Mohd

    2013-01-01

    This book presents an analysis of the stress distribution and contact stresses in severe rheumatoid wrist after total wrist arthroplasty. It assesses and compares the load transfer throughout the joint and contact pressure at the articulations. The data obtained from this study is of importance as this provide greater evidence to the benefits of total wrist arthroplasty in rheumatoid arthritis patients.

  19. X-Ray Exam: Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español X-Ray Exam: Wrist KidsHealth / For Parents / X-Ray Exam: ... Muscles, and Joints Broken Bones Getting an X-ray (Video) X-Ray (Video) View more Partner Message About Us ...

  20. Imaging of radial wrist pain. I. Imaging modalities and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ryan Ka Lok; Griffith, James F.; Ng, Alex Wing Hung [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Hong Kong, Shatin (China); Wong, Clara Wing Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Shatin (China)

    2014-06-15

    Radial wrist pain is a common clinical complaint. The relatively complex anatomy in this region, combined with the small size of the anatomical structures and occasionally subtle imaging findings, can pose problems when trying to localize the exact cause of pain. To fully comprehend the underlying pathology, one needs a good understanding of both radial-sided wrist anatomy and the relative merits of the different imaging techniques used to assess these structures. In part I of this review, these aspects will be discussed. (orig.)

  1. Ulnar-sided wrist pain. II. Clinical imaging and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsuya; Souza, Felipe [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Vezeridis, Peter S.; Blazar, Philip [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston, MA (United States); Yoshioka, Hiroshi [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of California-Irvine, Department of Radiological Sciences, Irvine, CA (United States); UC Irvine Medical Center, Department of Radiological Sciences, Orange, CA (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Pain at the ulnar aspect of the wrist is a diagnostic challenge for hand surgeons and radiologists due to the small and complex anatomical structures involved. In this article, imaging modalities including radiography, arthrography, ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT), CT arthrography, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and MR arthrography are compared with regard to differential diagnosis. Clinical imaging findings are reviewed for a more comprehensive understanding of this disorder. Treatments for the common diseases that cause the ulnar-sided wrist pain including extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendonitis, flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) tendonitis, pisotriquetral arthritis, triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) lesions, ulnar impaction, lunotriquetral (LT) instability, and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability are reviewed. (orig.)

  2. Radiographic findings in wrists and hands of patients with leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carreto, A.; Montero, F.; Garcia Frasquet, A.; Carpintero, P.

    1998-01-01

    Leprosy, like other neuropathic disorders, can involve the skeleton, affecting both bone and joints, especially those segments that have to withstand weight. To asses the osteoarticular involvement of the wrist and hand in 58 patients with leprosy. The radiographic images of wrist and hand of 58 patients with Hansen's disease were reviewed. The entire spectrum of specific and nonspecific bone lesions described in the literature is presented. Despite the fact that the upper limbs do not have to withstand the weight that the feet and ankles do, radiographic images show that gripping and other common motions can also produce lesions compatible with those of neuropathic arthropathy. (Author) 20 refs

  3. Synovial Chondrosarcoma in the Hand and Wrist: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Jee Young; Kang, Seok Jin; Kang, Yong Koo; Baik, Jun Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Synovial chondrosarcoma is extremely rare and arises de novo or from malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis. It commonly involves large joints, such as the knee or hip. Here, we present an unusual case of synovial chondrosarcoma from synovial chondromatosis in the hand and wrist, clearly demonstrating the characteristic findings on plain radiograph and MR imaging

  4. Synovial Chondrosarcoma in the Hand and Wrist: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Yeong Yi; Kim, Jee Young; Kang, Seok Jin; Kang, Yong Koo; Baik, Jun Hyun [Catholic University St. Vincent' s Hospital, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-15

    Synovial chondrosarcoma is extremely rare and arises de novo or from malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis. It commonly involves large joints, such as the knee or hip. Here, we present an unusual case of synovial chondrosarcoma from synovial chondromatosis in the hand and wrist, clearly demonstrating the characteristic findings on plain radiograph and MR imaging.

  5. Indirect MR arthrography of the wrist in the diagnosis of TFCC-lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herold, T.; Lenhart, M.; Held, P.; Feuerbach, S.; Link, J.; Babel, M.; Ruf, S.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this prospective study was to assess the value of the indirect MR arthrography (MR-AR) of the wrist in the detection of lesions of the TFCC. Material and methods: Indirect MR-AR was performed in 45 patients (23 f/22 m) with unclear ulnar wrist pain. After i.v. injection of 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA and after a motion-phase of the wrist (15 minutes) MRI was performed in a coronal plane. We used a STIR-, a fatsaturated (fs) T1-SE and a 3D-DESS sequence. The images were evaluated by two radiologists using a consensus score. The lesions were assigned to the system of Palmer and correlated with arthroscopy. Results: Indirect MR-AR showed in 35 of 45 patients a lesion of the TFCC, but arthroscopy only revealed a defect in 32 cases. This means three false positive but no false negative assessments by MRI. Using this MRI protocol sensitivity and specificity in the detection of TFCC lesions were calculated as 100% and 77%. The accuracy was 93%. Small degenerative changes of the fibres were most common (Palmer type IIA). In trauma patients the ligaments usually showed tears near the insertion at the ulna (Palmer type IB). The sensitivity and specificity was 88% and 95% for evaluation of the scapho-lunate (SL) ligament, the accuracy was 93%. Arthroscopy and MRI did not diagnose any rupture of the lunate-triquetral (LT) ligament. Conclusion: Indirect MR-AR is a non-invasive method with a high sensitivity in the evaluation of the TFCC and associated injuries. Therefore, it is an excellent screening procedure to assess the indication for therapeutic arthroscopy. (orig.) [de

  6. [Treatment of triangular fibrocartilage complex tear under wrist arthroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Kun; Liu, Wu; Liu, Pengfei; Feng, Zhibin; Li, Yuwen; Hui, Guisheng

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the treatment and effects of wrist arthroscopy in tear of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC). Between January 2006 and December 2008, 16 patients with tear of TFCC were treated. Of 16 patients, 11 were male and 5 were female with an average age of 32.5 years (range, 25-51 years). Injury was caused by sprain in 12 cases, and by falling in 4 cases. The locations were the left side in 10 cases and the right side in 6 cases. The mean injury duration was 3 months to 6 years and 2 months. The main clinical symptoms included wrist powerlessness and ulnar-sided wrist pain which was aggravated with clench fist and lifting heavy things. The results of the ulnar-sided wrist stress test were positive in 14 cases and negative in 2 cases. The preoperative values of wrist range of motion (ROM) were (45.58 +/- 5.18) degrees at volar flexion, (41.22 +/- 3.83) degrees at dorsal extension, (17.82 +/- 2.48) degrees at radial deviation, (21.35 +/- 4.61) degrees at ulnar deviation, (69.85 +/- 8.36) degrees at pronation, and (70.13 +/- 6.34) degrees at supination. According to Palmer standard, 10 cases of IA were treated with debridement; 3 cases of IB with suture and 1 of them failed and was partially excised; 2 cases of IC with debridement on triangular fibrocartilage disc, ulnolunate ligament, and ulnotriguetrum ligament; and 1 case of ID with trimming plastic operation. All incisions healed by first intention, and no complications of joint infection or neurovascular injury was found. All patients were followed up 14-38 months (mean, 18.5 months). Fifteen patients were restored to normal life and work without ulnar-sided wrist pain. One patient had no pain, but he had wrist powerless. The values of ROM at last follow-up were (50.16 +/- 6.21) degrees at volar flexion, (45.37 +/- 4.65) degrees at dorsal extension, (18.95 +/- 3.56) degrees at radial deviation, (26.28 +/- 5.09) degrees at ulnar deviation, (78.87 +/- 7.69) degrees at pronation, and (76.46 +/- 8

  7. Design of a Magnetic Resonance-Safe Haptic Wrist Manipulator for Movement Disorder Diagnostics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, Dyon; Mugge, Winfred; Schouten, Alfred C.; van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Bour, Lo J.; van der Helm, Frans C. T.; Lammertse, Piet

    2017-01-01

    Tremor, characterized by involuntary and rhythmical movements, is the most common movement disorder. Tremor can have peripheral and central oscillatory components which properly assessed may improve diagnostics. A magnetic resonance (MR)-safe haptic wrist manipulator enables simultaneous measurement

  8. Cilostazol attenuates cholestatic liver injury and its complications in common bile duct ligated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Kawy, Hala S

    2015-04-05

    Cilostazol is a phosphodiesterase III inhibitor increases adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) level which inhibits hepatic stellate cell activation. Its pharmacological effects include vasodilation, inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell growth, inhibition of platelet activation and aggregation. The aim of the current study was to determine the effects of early administration of low dose cilostazol on cholestatic liver injury induced by common bile duct ligation (CBDL) in rat. Male Wistar rats (180-200g) were divided into three groups: Group A; simple laparotomy group (sham). Group B; CBDL, Group C; CBDL rats treated with cilostazol (9mg/kg daily for 21 days). Six rats from each group were killed by the end of weeks one and three after surgery, livers and serum were collected for biochemical and histopathological studies. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gama glutamyl transferase, alkaline phosphatase and total bilirubin serum levels decreased in the cilostazol treated rats, when compared with CBDL rats. The hepatic levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, and platelet derived growth factor-B were significantly lower in cilostazol treated rats than that in CBDL rats. Cilostazol decreased vascular endothelial growth factor level and hemoglobin content in the livers. Cilostazol significantly lowered portal pressure, inhibited ductular proliferation, portal inflammation, hepatic fibrosis and decreased hepatic hydroxyproline contents. Administration of cilostazol in CBDL rats improved hepatic functions, decreased ductular proliferation, ameliorated portal inflammation, lowered portal hypertension and reduced fibrosis. These effects of cilostazol may be useful in the attenuation of liver injury in cholestasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Injuries and overuse syndromes in powerlifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siewe, J; Rudat, J; Röllinghoff, M; Schlegel, U J; Eysel, P; Michael, J W-P

    2011-09-01

    Powerlifting is a discipline of competitive weightlifting. To date, no investigations have focused on pain encountered during routine training. The aim of the study was to identify such pain, assign it to particular exercises and assess the data regarding injuries as well as the influence of intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Data of 245 competitive and elite powerlifters was collected by questionnaire. Information regarding current workout routines and retrospective injury data was collected. Study subjects were selected from 97 incorporated powerlifting clubs. A percentage of 43.3% of powerlifters complained of problems during routine workouts. Injury rate was calculated as 0.3 injuries per lifter per year (1 000 h of training=1 injury). There was no evidence that intrinsic or extrinsic factors affected this rate. Most commonly injured body regions were the shoulder, lower back and the knee. The use of weight belts increased the injury rate of the lumbar spine. Rate of injury to the upper extremities was significantly increased based on age >40 years (shoulder/p=0.003, elbow/p=0.003, hand+wrist/p=0.024) and female gender (hand+wrist/p=0.045). The daily workout of a large proportion of powerlifters is affected by disorders which do not require an interruption of training. The injury rate is low compared to other sports. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Evaluation of an Image-Based Tool to Examine the Effect of Fracture Alignment and Joint Congruency on Outcomes after Wrist Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalone, Emily A; Grewal, Ruby; King, Graham W; MacDermid, Joy C

    2015-01-01

    Some mal-alignment of the wrist occurs in up to 71% of patients following a distal radius fracture. A multiple case study was used to provide proof of principle of an image-based technique to investigate the evolution and impact of post-traumatic joint changes at the distal radioulnar joint. Participants who had a unilateral distal radius fracture who previously participated in a prospective study were recruited from a single tertiary hand center. Long term follow-up measures of pain, disability, range of motion and radiographic alignment were obtained and compared to joint congruency measures. The inter-bone distance, a measure of joint congruency was quantified from reconstructed CT bone models of the distal radius and ulna and the clinical outcome was quantified using the patient rated wrist evaluation. In all four cases, acceptable post-reduction alignment and minimal pain/disability at 1-year suggested good clinical outcomes. However, 10 years following injury, 3 out of 4 patients had radiographic signs of degenerative changes occurring in their injured wrist (distal radioulnar joint/radio-carpal joint). Proximity maps displaying inter-bone distances showed asymmetrical congruency between wrists in these three patients. The 10-year PRWE (patient rated wrist evaluation) varied from 4 to 60, with 3 reporting minimal pain/disability and one experiencing high pain/disability. These illustrative cases demonstrate long-term joint damage post-fracture is common and occurs despite positive short-term clinical outcomes. Imaging and functional outcomes are not necessarily correlated. A novel congruency measure provides an indicator of the overall impact of joint mal-alignment that can be used to determine predictors of post-traumatic arthritis and is viable for clinical or large cohort studies.

  11. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golding, Lauren P.; Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn; Gyr, Bettina M.; Gardner, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  12. Imaging of the elbow in children with wrist fracture: an unnecessary source of radiation and use of resources?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golding, Lauren P. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Triad Radiology Associates, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Yasin, Yousef; Singh, Jasmeet; Anthony, Evelyn [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Radiology, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gyr, Bettina M. [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Gardner, Alison [Wake Forest University Baptist Health, Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Anecdotally accepted practice for evaluation of children with clinically suspected or radiographically proven wrist fracture in many urgent care and primary care settings is concurrent imaging of the forearm and elbow, despite the lack of evidence to support additional images. These additional radiographs may be an unnecessary source of radiation and use of health care resources. Our study assesses the necessity of additional radiographs of the forearm and elbow in children with wrist injury. We reviewed electronic medical records of children 17 and younger in whom wrist fracture was diagnosed in the emergency department. We identified the frequency with which additional radiographs of the proximal forearm and distal humerus demonstrated another site of acute injury. We identified 214 children with wrist fracture. Of those, 129 received additional radiographs of the elbow. Physical examination findings proximal to the wrist were documented in only 16 (12%) of these 129 children. A second injury proximal to the wrist fracture was present in 4 (3%) of these 129 children, all of whom exhibited physical examination findings at the elbow. No fractures were documented in children with a negative physical examination of the elbow. Although elbow fractures occasionally complicate distal forearm fractures in children, our findings indicate that a careful physical evaluation of the elbow is sufficient to guide further radiographic investigation. Routine radiographs of both the wrist and elbow in children with distal forearm fracture appear to be unnecessary when an appropriate physical examination is performed. (orig.)

  13. Grip strength measurements at two different wrist extension positions in chronic lateral epicondylitis-comparison of involved vs. uninvolved side in athletes and non athletes: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargava Arti S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lateral epicondylitis is a common sports injury of the elbow caused due to altered muscle activation during repetitive wrist extension in many athletic and non-athletic endeavours. The amount of muscle activity and timing of contraction eventually is directly dependent upon joint position during the activity. The purpose of our study was to compare the grip strength in athletes with lateral epicondylalgia in two different wrist extension positions and compare them between involved and uninvolved sides of athletes and non-athletes. Methods An assessor-blinded case-control study of eight athletes and twenty-two non-athletes was done. The grip strength was measured using JAMAR® hand dynamometer in kilograms-force at 15 degrees (slightly extended and 35 degrees (moderately extended wrist extension positions (maintained by wrist splints on both involved and uninvolved sides of athletes and non-athletes with unilateral lateral epicondylitis of atleast 3 months duration. Their pain was to be elicited with local tenderness and two of three tests being positive- Cozen's, Mill's manoeuvre, resisted middle finger extension tests. For comparisons of grip strength, Wilcoxon signed rank test was used for within-group comparison (between 15 and 35 degrees wrist extension positions and Mann-Whitney U test was used for between-group (athletes vs. non-athletes comparisons at 95% confidence interval and were done using SPSS 11.5 for Windows. Results Statistically significant greater grip strength was found in 15 degrees (27.75 ± 4.2 kgms in athletes; 16.45 ± 4.2 kgms in non-athletes wrist extension than at 35 degrees (25.25 ± 3.53 kgm in athletes and 14.18 ± 3.53 kgm in non-athletes. The athletes had greater grip strength than non-athletes in each of test positions (11.3 kgm at 15 degrees and 11.07 kgm at 35 degrees measured. There was also a significant difference between involved and uninvolved sides' grip strength at both wrist

  14. The Potential Risk Factors Relevant to Lateral Epicondylitis by Wrist Coupling Posture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Ya Lee

    Full Text Available The use of awkward wrist postures and unskilled techniques might induce lateral epicondylitis. This study thus investigated the effects of wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity on the dynamic performances of the wrist muscles during the coupling posture via a custom-made bi-planar isokinetic dynamometer. Thirty subjects were recruited to perform the isokinetic testing. We measured the muscle strengths and activities for the wrist extensors and flexors during concentric and eccentric contractions at three movement velocities, 30°s-1, 90°s-1, and 180°s-1, combined with three wrist postures, neutral position (NP, radial deviation (RD, and ulnar deviation (UD. The root mean square (RMS of the electromyographic signal in the extensor digitorum communis (EDC, normalized peak torque of extensors, and ratio of normalized peak torque between wrist extensors and flexors, were all greater in the NP than RD and UD in both contractions. The ratio of RMS between EDC and flexor digitorum superficialis (FDS had a significantly greater value in RD than UD during the concentric contraction. The EDC showed significantly higher activity at the fast velocity in both contractions. Nevertheless, a significantly higher RMS of the electromyographic signal between EDC and FDS and the ratio of strength between wrist extensors and flexors were found at slow velocity in both contractions. The wrist deviation combined with extension and movement velocity of the wrist joint should thus be considered as influential factors which might alter the dynamic performances, and may result in further injury of the elbow joint.

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury: At the Crossroads of Neuropathology and Common Metabolic Endocrinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Building on the seminal work by Geoffrey Harris in the 1970s, the neuroendocrinology field, having undergone spectacular growth, has endeavored to understand the mechanisms of hormonal connectivity between the brain and the rest of the body. Given the fundamental role of the brain in the orchestration of endocrine processes through interactions among neurohormones, it is thus not surprising that the structural and/or functional alterations following traumatic brain injury (TBI can lead to endocrine changes affecting the whole organism. Taking into account that systemic hormones also act on the brain, modifying its structure and biochemistry, and can acutely and chronically affect several neurophysiological endpoints, the question is to what extent preexisting endocrine dysfunction may set the stage for an adverse outcome after TBI. In this review, we provide an overview of some aspects of three common metabolic endocrinopathies, e.g., diabetes mellitus, obesity, and thyroid dysfunction, and how these could be triggered by TBI. In addition, we discuss how the complex endocrine networks are woven into the responses to sudden changes after TBI, as well as some of the potential mechanisms that, separately or synergistically, can influence outcomes after TBI.

  16. Kinematic control of robot with degenerate wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. K.; Moore, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Kinematic resolved rate equations allow an operator with visual feedback to dynamically control a robot hand. When the robot wrist is degenerate, the computed joint angle rates exceed operational limits, and unwanted hand movements can result. The generalized matrix inverse solution can also produce unwanted responses. A method is introduced to control the robot hand in the region of the degenerate robot wrist. The method uses a coordinated movement of the first and third joints of the robot wrist to locate the second wrist joint axis for movement of the robot hand in the commanded direction. The method does not entail infinite joint angle rates.

  17. Injuries in Competitive Dragon Boating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Swarup; Leong, Hin Fong; Chen, Simin; Foo, Yong Xiang Wayne; Pek, Hong Kiat

    2014-11-01

    Dragon boating is a fast-growing team water sport and involves forceful repetitive motions that predispose athletes to overuse injuries. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is a lack of studies on injury epidemiology in dragon boating. To investigate the injury epidemiology in competitive dragon boating athletes. Descriptive epidemiological study. A total of 95 dragon boaters (49 males, 46 females) representing their respective universities took part in this study. Data were collected retrospectively using a reliable and valid self-report questionnaire. The study period was from August 2012 to July 2013. A total of 104 musculoskeletal injuries were reported (3.82 injuries/1000 athlete-exposures), 99% of which occurred during training. The most commonly injured regions were the lower back (22.1%), shoulder (21.1%), and wrist (17.3%). The majority of injuries were due to overuse (56.3%), and incomplete muscle-tendon strain was the most prevalent type of injury (50.5%). The time loss from injuries varied. In addition, a significant majority of the dragon boating athletes incurred nonmusculoskeletal injuries, with abrasions (90.5%), blisters (78.9%), and sunburns (72.6%) being the most common. Competitive dragon boating has a moderately high injury incidence, and there seems to be a direct relationship between exposure time and injury rate. A majority of the injuries are overuse in nature, and the body parts most actively involved in paddling movement are at higher risk of injuries. The high incidence of nonmusculoskeletal injuries in dragon boaters suggested that these injuries are likely outcomes of participation in the sport.

  18. Reliability of the NINDS common data elements cranial tomography (CT) rating variables for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harburg, Leah; McCormack, Erin; Kenney, Kimbra; Moore, Carol; Yang, Kelly; Vos, Pieter; Jacobs, Bram; Madden, Christopher J; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R; Bogoslovsky, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-contrast head computer tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate eligibility of patients after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) for clinical trials. The NINDS Common Data Elements (CDEs) TBI were developed to standardize collection of CT variables. The objectives of this study

  19. Evaluating the Ergonomic Benefit of a Wrist Brace on Wrist Posture, Muscle Activity, Rotational Stiffness, and Peak Shovel-Ground Impact Force During a Simulated Tree-Planting Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheahan, Peter J; Cashaback, Joshua G A; Fischer, Steven L

    2017-09-01

    Background Tree planters are at a high risk for wrist injury due to awkward postures and high wrist loads experienced during each planting cycle, specifically at shovel-ground impact. Wrist joint stiffness provides a measure that integrates postural and loading information. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate wrist joint stiffness requirements at the instant of shovel-ground impact during tree planting and determine if a wrist brace could alter muscular contributions to wrist joint stiffness. Method Planters simulated tree planting with and without wearing a brace on their planting arm. Surface electromyography (sEMG) from six forearm muscles and wrist kinematics were collected and used to calculate muscular contributions to joint rotational stiffness about the wrist. Results Wrist joint stiffness increased with brace use, an unanticipated and negative consequence of wearing a brace. As a potential benefit, planters achieved a more neutrally oriented wrist angle about the flexion/extension axis, although a less neutral wrist angle about the ulnar/radial axis was observed. Muscle activity did not change between conditions. Conclusion The joint stiffness analysis, combining kinematic and sEMG information in a biologically relevant manner, revealed clear limitations with the interface between the brace grip and shovel handle that jeopardized the prophylactic benefits of the current brace design. This limitation was not as evident when considering kinematics and sEMG data independently. Application A neuromechanical model (joint rotational stiffness) enhanced our ability to evaluate the brace design relative to kinematic and sEMG parameter-based metrics alone.

  20. Family medicine residents’ perceived level of comfort in treating common sports injuries across residency programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoako AO

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Adae O Amoako,1 Agyenim B Amoako,2 George GA Pujalte3 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA; 2Department of Family Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences Northwest, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 3Sports Medicine, Divisions of Primary Care, and Orthopedics, Mayo Clinic Health System, Waycross, GA, USA Background and objective: Family physicians are expected to be comfortable in treating common sports injuries. Evidence shows a limited level of comfort in treating these injuries in pediatric and internal medicine residents. Studies are lacking, however, in family medicine residents. The purpose of this study is to assess the comfort level of family medicine residents in treating common sports injuries in adults and children based on their perceived level of knowledge and attitudes. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study of family medicine residents in the United Sates. A written survey of 25 questions related to sports injury knowledge and factors affecting comfort level were collected. A chi-square test was implemented in calculating P-values. Results: Five hundred and fifty-seven residents responded to the survey. A higher percentage of doctors of osteopathy (86.6%, 82.5%, 69.6%, and 68.7% compared to doctors of medicine (78.5%, 71.6%, 53.4%, and 52.8% respectively identified ankle sprain, concussion, plantar fasciitis, and lateral epicondylitis as common injuries, and felt comfortable in treating them (P-values =0.015, 0.004, 0.0001, and 0.0002, respectively. Residents with high interest in sports medicine correctly identified the injuries as common and felt comfortable treating them as well (knowledge, P=0.027, 0.0029, <0.0001, and 0.0001, respectively; comfort level, P=0.0016, <0.0001, 0.0897, and 0.0010, respectively. Conclusion: Medical education background, factors that affect training, and an interest in sports medicine contribute to residents' knowledge and comfort

  1. Common Peroneal Nerve Palsy with Multiple-Ligament Knee Injury and Distal Avulsion of the Biceps Femoris Tendon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Oshima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiple-ligament knee injury that includes posterolateral corner (PLC disruption often causes palsy of the common peroneal nerve (CPN, which occurs in 44% of cases with PLC injury and biceps femoris tendon rupture or avulsion of the fibular head. Approximately half of these cases do not show functional recovery. This case report aims to present a criteria-based approach to the operation and postoperative management of CPN palsy that resulted from a multiple-ligament knee injury in a 22-year-old man that occurred during judo. We performed a two-staged surgery. The first stage was to repair the injuries to the PLC and biceps femoris. The second stage involved anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The outcomes were excellent, with a stable knee, excellent range of motion, and improvement in the palsy. The patient was able to return to judo competition 27 weeks after the injury. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a return to sports following CPN palsy with multiple-ligament knee injury.

  2. Skateboarding injuries of today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, L; Eriksson, A

    2001-01-01

    Background—Skateboarding injuries have increased with the rise in popularity of the sport, and the injury pattern can be expected to have changed with the development of both skateboard tricks and the materials used for skateboard construction. Objective—To describe the injury pattern of today. Methods—The pattern of injuries, circumstances, and severity were investigated in a study of all 139 people injured in skateboarding accidents during the period 1995–1998 inclusive and admitted to the University Hospital of Umeå. This is the only hospital in the area, serving a population of 135 000. Results—Three of the 139 injured were pedestrians hit by a skateboard rider; the rest were riders. The age range was 7–47 years (mean 16). The severity of the injuries was minor (AIS 1) to moderate (AIS 2); fractures were classified as moderate. The annual number of injuries increased during the study period. Fractures were found in 29% of the casualties, and four children had concussion. The most common fractures were of the ankle and wrist. Older patients had less severe injuries, mainly sprains and soft tissue injuries. Most children were injured while skateboarding on ramps and at arenas; only 12 (9%) were injured while skateboarding on roads. Some 37% of the injuries occurred because of a loss of balance, and 26% because of a failed trick attempt. Falls caused by surface irregularities resulted in the highest proportion of the moderate injuries. Conclusions—Skateboarding should be restricted to supervised skateboard parks, and skateboarders should be required to wear protective gear. These measures would reduce the number of skateboarders injured in motor vehicle collisions, reduce the personal injuries among skateboarders, and reduce the number of pedestrians injured in collisions with skateboarders. Key Words: skateboard; injury; prevention PMID:11579065

  3. 11.361 sports injuries in a 15-year survey of a Level I emergency trauma department reveal different severe injury types in the 6 most common team sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutsch, Werner; Krutsch, Volker; Hilber, Franz; Pfeifer, Christian; Baumann, Florian; Weber, Johannes; Schmitz, Paul; Kerschbaum, Maximilian; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2018-06-01

     Severe sports-related injuries are a common affliction treated in Level I trauma departments. Detailed knowledge on injury characteristics from different medical settings is essential to improve the development of injury prevention strategies in different team sports.  Team sport injuries were retrospectively analysed in a Level I trauma department registry over 15 years. Injury and treatment data were compared with regard to competition and training exposure. Injury data such as "time of visitation", "type of injury", "multiple injured body regions" and "immediate hospitalisation" helped to define the severity level of each team sports injury.  At the Level I trauma department, 11.361 sports-related injuries were seen over 15 years, of which 34.0 % were sustained during team sports. Soccer injuries were the most common injuries of all team sports (71.4 %). The lower extremity was the most affected body region overall, followed by the upper extremity. Head injuries were mainly seen in Ice hockey and American football and concussion additionally frequently in team handball. Slight injuries like sprains or contusions occurred most frequently in all team sports. In soccer and team handball, injuries sustained in competition were significantly more severe (p team sports, injury prevention strategies should address competitive as well as training situations, whichmay need different strategies. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. MRI of the wrist and hand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reicher, M.A.; Kellerhouse, L.E.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is becoming the preferred technique for evaluating a wide range of wrist and hand disorders and has a crucial role in planning arthroscopic and nonarthroscopic wrist surgery. This book details the capabilities of MRI for detecting wrist, hand, and finger pathology; provides a complete understanding of examination techniques, imaging protocols, and anatomy; and contains nearly 400 clear, sharp scans and numerous line drawings showing examination techniques, anatomic structures, and pathologic findings. After an introductory review of MR physics, the book describes state- of-the-art MRI techniques and explains the rationale for selecting imaging protocols. A complete MRI examination of a normal wrist is presented, along with a multiplanar atlas of cross-sectional wrist anatomy

  5. Determination of common pathogenic bacteria of blast injury to the limbs in plateau area and related research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-lei WANG

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the common pathogenic bacteria and their drug susceptibility in the wounds in the limbs as a result of blast injury in plateau with a low temperature so as to provide a basis for prevention and treatment of war wound infection in such area. Methods The model of blast injury was reproduced to the hind legs of 800 rabbits in cold and dry plateau. 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96h after injury, the general condition and vital signs of the wounded were observed, and bacterial culture, flora analysis and drug susceptibility test of excretion from wound tract, air, surface of snow, soil and animal fur were performed. Results Micrococciand Bacilliwere found in air and snow. Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coliand Pseudomonas aeruginosawere found in soil, and Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacters, Pseudomonas aeruginosaand Escherichia coliin rabbit fur. The respiration and pulse became faster, and body temperature lowered after injury compared with that before injury. G+ bacteria were found in most wound tract secretions, and the frequency of the bacterial strains in descending order were Bacillus subtilis, coagulase-negative Staphylococci, E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophiliastrains. The sensitive antibiotics for these G+ bacteria were ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin. Susceptible G– bacteria were susceptible to ceftazidime, minocycline, sulfamethoxazole etc. Conclusions The growth of bacteria in the wounds as a result of blast injury grow slower in cold and dry alpine area. The time of debridement may be delayed for 2-3h. G+ bacteria were main susceptible flora to antibiotics, and it is related to the bacterial flora of the surrounding environment, thus it is suggested that a combination of different antibiotics (ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin or erythromycin alone combined with ceftazidime, minocycline or cotrimoxazole alone are needed to prevent infection after blast injury. DOI: 10.11855/j

  6. NMR findings in patients after wrist trauma with a negative plain radiographs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markuszewski, Maciej; Kraus, Alexandra; Studniarek, Michał; Zawadzka, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose was to assess the prevalence and location of the injuries of the carpal bones and soft tissue of the wrist on NMR in patients with negative radiographs. A total of 89 patients (9–81years) were consecutively examined after wrist trauma. Radiograms were performed in four projections: AP, PA, oblique and lateral. In 63 cases of negative radiographs and persistent clinical problem, simplified NMR (T1,T2, STIR; in coronal plane) was conducted with a 1.5 Tesla magnet. Results were evaluated by two independent observers. A positive X-ray result was stated when at least one observer suggested bone fracture. The MR images were viewed for detection of possible bone fracture, bone edema and soft tissue injuries. Cohen’s kappa coefficient was calculated to assess the quality of chosen criteria by means of agreement between both observers and both methods. As many as 26 X-ray studies were classified as positive. Substantial agreement between independent observers was found (kappa=0.63). In 17 cases out of 63 with two negative wrist radiogram, the NMR result was positive (19%). The most frequently fractured or injured bone was scaphoid (10 cases) and distal radius (5 cases). Fair agreement was found between X-ray and NMR studies (kappa=0.37) due to different diagnostic information received in both methods. Simplified NMR imaging of the wrist proved to be strongly efficient in the detection of pathological changes in injured wrists

  7. Risk factors and most common traumatic injuries in people who practice long-distance running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lewandowska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, the fashion of running comes. Initially people used to run for fun, pleasure, to forget about worries or problems. With time, however, was no longer just about the idea itself, people more and more fascinated with jogging went one step further. At the same time, not realizing how important changes may occur in their body. These are usually overload or inflammatory changes. The aim of this paper is to present the most frequent injuries of long distance runners and the main predisposing factors for their trauma. The work will also cover the possibility of prevention of these injuries. The most important factors predisposing to injury include: the awareness of running people, the overweight and obesity, the incorrect running pattern and the inappropriate training plan. The consequences of these factors may be: runner's knee, leg overload syndrome, Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, fatigue fractures, and iliotibial-band syndrome. The injuries are, unfortunately, inscribed into the life of every runner, regardless of the level of advancement. However, it is worth remembering that they can be effectively prevented, and at the moment of their appearance, effectively heal. The injuries of runners depend primarily on their approach to practicing this form of physical activity, to a lesser extent from genetic or mechanical factors.

  8. Investigation Of Wrist Flexor/Extensor Muscle Strength Following Arthroscopic Surgical Treatment Of Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Onur SERBEST

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Lateral epicondylitis is a common disease of elbow joint. Repetitive wrist activities and activities that requires strength are risk factors. Wrist extensor muscle strength are decreased in patients with lateral epicondylitis. Materials and Methods: Eight patients with a diagnosis of lateral epicondylitis enrolled to study. Wrist flexor and extensor muscle strength of patients who were completed one year after surgery were measured by isokinetic dynamometer. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the flexor and extensor muscle strength of the patients (p>0.05. Conclusion: In this study, arthroscopic extensor carpi radialis brevis tendon release in lateral epicondylitis has shown no negative effect on flexor and extensor wrist muscle stregth.

  9. Wrist muscle activity of khatrah approach in Mameluke technique using traditional bow archery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariffin, Muhammad Shahimi; Rambely, Azmin Sham; Ariff, Noratiqah Mohd

    2018-04-01

    An investigation of khatrah technique in archery was carried out. An electromyography (EMG) experiment was conducted towards six wrist muscles which are flexor carpi radialis, extensor carpi ulnaris and extensor digitorum communis for both arms. The maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and activity data were recorded. The bow arm produced a higher muscle force compared to draw arm muscles during release phase. However, the muscle forces produced by bow arm had a consistency in term of pattern throughout the phases. In conclusion, the forces generated by the professional archer produced a force benchmark at the wrist joint to alleviate the risk of injury.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis: a pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, N.R.; Crabbe, J.P.; McQueen, F.M.

    2001-01-01

    This pictorial essay describes the changes seen in the wrist in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI. Magnetic resonance imaging can demonstrate bone erosions, bone marrow signal changes, synovitis and tenosynovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist can identify erosions in RA earlier than plain radiographs and can detect more erosions. Common sites include the capitate, lunate and scaphoid. Bone marrow signal changes occur frequently and are most common in the capitate, lunate and triquetrum. Synovial thickening and enhancement are clearly demonstrated with MRI and are most commonly seen in the radiocarpal joint (RCJ). Tenosynovitis can be seen in the wrist in more than half of patients presenting with RA. This most commonly involves the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon and is seen as sheath fluid, thickening and enhancement. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  11. Forward and inverse kinematics of double universal joint robot wrists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Robert L., II

    1991-01-01

    A robot wrist consisting of two universal joints can eliminate the wrist singularity problem found on many individual robots. Forward and inverse position and velocity kinematics are presented for such a wrist having three degrees of freedom. Denavit-Hartenberg parameters are derived to find the transforms required for the kinematic equations. The Omni-Wrist, a commercial double universal joint robot wrist, is studied in detail. There are four levels of kinematic parameters identified for this wrist; three forward and three inverse maps are presented for both position and velocity. These equations relate the hand coordinate frame to the wrist base frame. They are sufficient for control of the wrist standing alone. When the wrist is attached to a manipulator arm; the offset between the two universal joints complicates the solution of the overall kinematics problem. All wrist coordinate frame origins are not coincident, which prevents decoupling of position and orientation for manipulator inverse kinematics.

  12. Ergonomic study on wrist posture when using laparoscopic tools in four different techniques regarding minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartnicka, Joanna; Zietkiewicz, Agnieszka A; Kowalski, Grzegorz J

    2018-03-19

    With reference to four different minimally invasive surgery (MIS) cholecystectomy the aims were: to recognize the factors influencing dominant wrist postures manifested by the surgeon; to detect risk factors involved in maintaining deviated wrist postures; to compare the wrist postures of surgeons while using laparoscopic tools. Video films were recorded during live surgeries. The films were synchronized with wrist joint angles obtained from wireless electrogoniometers placed on the surgeon's hand. The analysis was conducted for five different laparoscopic tools used during all surgical techniques. The most common wrist posture was extension. In the case of one laparoscopic tool, the mean values defining extended wrist posture were distinct in all four surgical techniques. For one type of surgical technique, considered to be the most beneficial for patients, more extreme postures were noticed regarding all laparoscopic tools. We recognized a new factor, apart from the tool's handle design, that influences extreme and deviated wrist postures. It involves three areas of task specification including the type of action, type of motion patterns and motion dynamism. The outcomes proved that the surgical technique which is most beneficial for the patient imposes the greatest strain on the surgeon's wrist.

  13. Bilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography in patients with unilateral wrist pain: findings and implications for management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romaniuk, C.S.; Butt, W.P.; Coral, A.

    1995-01-01

    Bilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography was performed in 30 patients with unilateral post-traumatic wrist pain to assess the incidence of bilateral findings. The mean age of patients was 30 (range 18-55) years. Thirty-three percent of patients were normal bilaterally, 30% had unilateral communication in the symptomatic wrist, 30% had communications in both the symptomatic and asymptomatic wrists and 7% had communication in the asymptomatic wrist only. Unilateral three-compartment wrist arthrography is not recommended in the assessment of unilateral post-traumatic wrist pain; no advantage of three-compartment injection over radiocarpal injection alone was shown. (orig.)

  14. PREVALENCE AND TYPES OF SPORTS INJURIES PRESENTING TO EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT SUEZ CANAL UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Hamed Elbaih

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Inroduction: regular physical activity is essential for the prevention of various diseases and reduces the risk of premature mortality in general and coronary heart disease, hypertension, colon cancer, obesity and diabetes mellitus in particular. Aim of this study was to assess the most common sports causing injuries and to assess the types and mechanisms of these injuries. Patients and methods: The researcher examined 250 patients attending emergency departmentl. Results: The study showed that the most common type of sports involved in injury was football .The ankle was the most common affected part in the whole body . Chest contusion and back contusion were the most common types of sports injuries in head, neck and trunk. Fracture scaphoid and fissure radius were the most common sport injuries. Ankle sprain was the most common injury. The study showed that (62.7% of the studied patients who were playing football had injuries in the lower limbs. Ankle sprain was the most common sport injury that was associated with wearing football shoes . Conclusion: Ankle sprain was the most common sport injury associated with artificial grass court . Wrist sprain was the common sport injury in the upper limbs associated with artificial grass court .

  15. High-resolution MRI of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Taiki; Wu, Wei Der; Kaneko, Yasuhito; Rafijah, Gregory; Yang, Lily; Hitt, Dave; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Background Accurate diagnosis of injuries to the collateral ligaments of the wrist is technically challenging on MRI. Purpose To investigate usefulness of high-resolution two-dimensional (2D) and isotropic three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for identifying and classifying the morphology of the ulnar and radial collateral ligaments (UCL and RCL) of the wrist. Material and Methods Thirty-seven participants were evaluated using 3T coronal 2D and isotropic 3D images by two radiologists independently. The UCL was classified into four types: 1a, narrow attachment to the tip of the ulnar styloid (Tip); 1b, broad attachment to the Tip; 2a, narrow attachment to the medial base of the ulnar styloid (Base); and 2b, broad attachment to the Base. The RCL was also classified into four types: 1a, separate radioscaphoid and scaphotrapezial ligaments (RS + ST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; 1b, RS + ST with broad scaphoid attachment; 2a, continuous radio-scapho-trapezial ligaments (RST) with narrow scaphoid attachment; and 2b, RST with broad scaphoid attachment. The inter-observer reliability of these classifications was calculated. Results Type 1a was the most common of both collateral ligaments. Of UCL classifications, 31.4% were revised after additional review of multiplanar reconstruction (MPR) images from isotropic data. The inter-observer reliability of UCL classification was substantial (k = 0.62) without MPR, and almost perfect (k = 0.84) with MPR. The inter-observer reliability of RCL classification was almost perfect (k = 0.89). Anatomic delineation between the two sequences was not statistically different. Conclusion The UCL and RCL were each identified on high-resolution 2D and isotropic 3D MRI equally well. MPR allows accurate identification of the UCL attachment to the ulnar styloid.

  16. The epidemiology of injuries at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willick, Stuart E; Webborn, Nick; Emery, Carolyn; Blauwet, Cheri A; Pit-Grosheide, Pia; Stomphorst, Jaap; Van de Vliet, Peter; Patino Marques, Norma Angelica; Martinez-Ferrer, J Oriol; Jordaan, Esmè; Derman, Wayne; Schwellnus, Martin

    2013-05-01

    The characteristics and incidence of injuries at the Summer Paralympic Games have not previously been reported. A better understanding of injuries improves the medical care of athletes and informs future injury prevention strategies. The objective of this prospective cohort study was to characterise the incidence and nature of injuries during the London 2012 Summer Paralympic Games. Injury information was obtained from two databases. One database was populated from medical encounter forms completed by providers at the time of assessment in one of the medical stations operated by the Organising Committee. The second database was populated daily with information provided by team medical personnel who completed a comprehensive, web-based injury survey. The overall injury incidence rate was 12.7 injuries/1000 athlete-days. Injury rates were similar in male and female athletes. The precompetition injury rates in women were higher than those in the competition period. Higher injury rates were found in older athletes and certain sports such as football 5-a-side (22.4 injuries/1000 athlete-days). Overall, 51.5% of injuries were new onset acute traumatic injuries. The most commonly injured region (percentage of all injuries) was the shoulder (17.7%), followed by the wrist/hand (11.4%), elbow (8.8%) and knee (7.9%). This is the largest and most comprehensive epidemiological report examining injuries in Paralympic athletes. Injury rates differ according to age and sport. Upper limb injuries are common. The knowledge gained from this study will inform future injury surveillance studies and the development of prevention strategies in Paralympic sport. The Epidemiology of Injuries at the London 2012 Paralympic Games.

  17. Surveillance of construction worker injuries through an urban emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunting, K L; Nessel-Stephens, L; Sanford, S M; Shesser, R; Welch, L S

    1994-03-01

    To learn more about the causes of nonfatal construction worker injuries, and to identify injury cases for further work-site investigations or prevention programs, an emergency department-based surveillance program was established. Construction workers with work-related injuries or illnesses were identified by reviewing the medical records of all patients treated at the George Washington University Emergency Department between November 1, 1990 and November 31, 1992. Information regarding the worker, the injury, and the injury circumstances were abstracted from medical records. Information was obtained on 592 injured construction workers from numerous trades. Lacerations were the most commonly treated injuries among these workers, followed by strains and sprains, contusions, and eye injuries. Injuries were most commonly caused by sharp objects (n = 155, 26%), falls (n = 106, 18%), and falling objects (n = 70, 12%). Thirty-five percent of injuries were to the hands, wrists, or fingers. Among the twenty-eight injuries severe enough to require hospital admission, eighteen (64%) were caused by falls. Laborers and Hispanic workers were overrepresented among these severe cases. Emergency Department records were a useful surveillance tool for the initial identification and description of work-related injuries. Although E codes were not that useful for formulating prevention strategies, detailed review of injury circumstances from Emergency Department records was valuable and has helped to establish priorities for prevention activities.

  18. Survey of upper extremity injuries among martial arts participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesselhorst, Matthew M; Rayan, Ghazi M; Pasque, Charles B; Peyton Holder, R

    2013-01-01

    To survey participants at various experience levels of different martial arts (MA) about upper extremity injuries sustained during training and fighting. A 21-s question survey was designed and utilised. The survey was divided into four groups (Demographics, Injury Description, Injury Mechanism, and Miscellaneous information) to gain knowledge about upper extremity injuries sustained during martial arts participation. Chi-square testing was utilised to assess for significant associations. Males comprised 81% of respondents. Involvement in multiple forms of MA was the most prevalent (38%). The hand/wrist was the most common area injured (53%), followed by the shoulder/upper arm (27%) and the forearm/elbow (19%). Joint sprains/muscle strains were the most frequent injuries reported overall (47%), followed by abrasions/bruises (26%). Dislocations of the upper extremity were reported by 47% of participants while fractures occurred in 39%. Surgeries were required for 30% of participants. Females were less likely to require surgery and more likely to have shoulder and elbow injuries. Males were more likely to have hand injuries. Participants of Karate and Tae Kwon Do were more likely to have injuries to their hands, while participants of multiple forms were more likely to sustain injuries to their shoulders/upper arms and more likely to develop chronic upper extremity symptoms. With advanced level of training the likelihood of developing chronic upper extremity symptoms increases, and multiple surgeries were required. Hand protection was associated with a lower risk of hand injuries. Martial arts can be associated with substantial upper extremity injuries that may require surgery and extended time away from participation. Injuries may result in chronic upper extremity symptoms. Hand protection is important for reducing injuries to the hand and wrist.

  19. Severe musculoskeletal time-loss injuries and symptoms of common mental disorders in professional soccer: a longitudinal analysis of 12-month follow-up data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiliç, Ö; Aoki, H.; Goedhart, E.; Hägglund, M.; Kerkhoffs, G. M. M. J.; Kuijer, P. P. F. M.; Waldén, M.; Gouttebarge, V.

    2018-01-01

    Psychological factors have shown to be predictors of injury in professional football. However, it seems that this is a two-way relationship, as severe musculoskeletal time-loss injuries have shown to be associated with the onset of symptoms of common mental disorders (CMD). There is no longitudinal

  20. Open extensor tendon injuries: an epidemiologic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillo, Dominic; Rayan, Ghazi M

    2012-01-01

    To report the epidemiology, mechanism, anatomical location, distribution, and severity of open extensor tendon injuries in the digits, hand, and forearm as well as the frequency of associated injuries to surrounding bone and soft tissue. Retrospective chart review was conducted for patients who had operative repair of open digital extensor tendon injuries in all zones within an 11-year period. Data was grouped according to patient characteristics, zone of injury, mechanism of injury, and presence of associated injury. Statistical analysis was used to determine the presence of relevant associations. Eighty-six patients with 125 severed tendons and 105 injured digits were available for chart reviews. Patients were predominantly males (83%) with a mean age of 34.2 years and the dominant extremity was most often injured (60%). The thumb was the most commonly injured (25.7%), followed by middle finger (24.8), whereas small finger was least affected (10.5%). Sharp laceration was the most common mechanism of injury (60%), and most of these occurred at or proximal to the metacarpophalangeal joints. Most saw injuries occurred distal to the metacarpophalangeal joint. Zone V was the most commonly affected in the fingers (27%) while zone VT was the most commonly affected in the thumb (69%). Associated injuries to bone and soft tissue occurred in 46.7% of all injuries with saw and crush/avulsions being predictive of fractures and damage to the underlying joint capsule. The extensor mechanism is anatomically complex, and open injuries to the dorsum of the hand, wrist, and forearm, especially of crushing nature and those inflicted by saws, must be thoroughly evaluated. Associated injuries should be ruled out in order to customize surgical treatment and optimize outcome.

  1. Tuberculous Tenosynovitis Presenting as Ganglion of Wrist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahaji Chavan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is still endemic in many developed countries. Involvement of the hand and wrist at presentation is extremely rare, and the diagnosis is often missed. A 57 years old male presented with swelling over the left wrist since 3 years Three swellings over dorsal aspect of the left wrist Soft in consistency Non tender Non compressible Mobile at right angles to the plane of the wrist joint. ESR: 45 mm in 1 hr and rest blood investigations were normal. Ultrsonography showed giant cell tumor of Extensor Digitorum sheath. X-ray: soft tissue swelling and MRI was suggestive of extensor tendon sheath extraskeletal synovial Koch’s, or giant cell tumor of tendon sheath. Excision of swelling was planned and intraoperatively, rice bodies were seen inside it. Histopathological examination showed caseous necrosis with granuloma formation. Patient was put on DOT1 therapy. Tuberculous tenosynovitis was first described by Acrel in 1777. Rice bodies occurring in joints affected by tuberculosis were first described in 1895 by Reise. Rice bodies will be diagnosed on plain radiographs when mineralization occurs. More than 50% of cases recur within 1 year of treatment. The currently recommended 6-month course is often adequate with extensive curettage lavage and synovectomy should be performed. Surgery is essential, but the extent of surgical debridement is still debatable. The surgeon has to be aware of the significance of loose bodies when performing routine excision of innocuous looking wrist ganglia.

  2. [Skiing and snowboarding trauma in children: epidemiology, physiopathology, prevention and main injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohin, B; Kohler, R

    2008-11-01

    Skiing and snowboarding are leading to a risk of injuries in children. Beginners and experienced have higher risk of injuries, however, the first have less severe injuries than the latest. Risk factors of injury are: ability and experience, binding adjustment, slope characteristics, speed, collisions with objects or jumping and risky behavior of the young skiers and snowboarders. Lower limb injuries are most common in skier, especially knee sprains, conversely snowboarders present more upper limb injuries, especially wrist fractures. The frequency of head injuries does not decrease while helmet use increases but severity decreases. Despite prevention and wearing protections, the frequency of trauma does not decrease significantly, which could be in relation with higher speed and increased risky behavior. Main prevention factors are safety knowledge and safety behavior, correct binding adjustment, and use of protections.

  3. Estimating anatomical wrist joint motion with a robotic exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Chad G; Kann, Claudia K; Deshpande, Ashish D; O'Malley, Marcia K

    2017-07-01

    Robotic exoskeletons can provide the high intensity, long duration targeted therapeutic interventions required for regaining motor function lost as a result of neurological injury. Quantitative measurements by exoskeletons have been proposed as measures of rehabilitative outcomes. Exoskeletons, in contrast to end effector designs, have the potential to provide a direct mapping between human and robot joints. This mapping rests on the assumption that anatomical axes and robot axes are aligned well, and that movement within the exoskeleton is negligible. These assumptions hold well for simple one degree-of-freedom joints, but may not be valid for multi-articular joints with unique musculoskeletal properties such as the wrist. This paper presents an experiment comparing robot joint kinematic measurements from an exoskeleton to anatomical joint angles measured with a motion capture system. Joint-space position measurements and task-space smoothness metrics were compared between the two measurement modalities. The experimental results quantify the error between joint-level position measurements, and show that exoskeleton kinematic measurements preserve smoothness characteristics found in anatomical measures of wrist movements.

  4. Neglected ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon mimics a soft tissue tumor in the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Chi-Lun; Yen, Tze-Hsun; Wu, Lien-Chen; Huang, Yi-You; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Liou, Tsan-Hon

    2014-04-01

    A wrist mass is rarely caused by a ruptured tendon in the forearm. The common pathologies are ganglia, tendon tenosynovitis, and giant cell tumors of tendon sheaths. Less common causes are nerve sheath tumors, vascular lesions, or an accessory muscle belly. The authors investigated a case of neglected ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon that mimics a mass in the wrist. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report in relevant literature. During investigation, the high-resolution musculoskeletal ultrasound suggested a soft tissue tumor or a ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon. The magnetic resonance imaging scan indicated an accessory flexor carpi ulnaris muscle belly. The diagnosis of ruptured flexor carpi ulnaris tendon was confirmed by surgical exploration. This case indicates that ultrasound may be better suited than magnetic resonance imaging in evaluating a wrist mass for its accuracy, availability, and portability.

  5. The effect of education type on common misconceptions of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iorio, Monica L; Nolan, Susan A; Teague, Susan

    2017-11-01

    In the current study, we investigated the effects of existing education materials-either a Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) factsheet or personal stories of people with TBI-on undergraduate students' misconceptions and attributions about the causes of TBI-related behavior. Undergraduate students (N = 164) were recruited through the university participant pool. The participants were randomly assigned to receive either a factsheet about TBI, personal stories of people with TBI, or a control reading. Groups were compared on the number of TBI misconceptions endorsed, scores on an attribution measure, and their willingness to interact with people who have TBIs. Both the TBI factsheet group and the personal stories group endorsed fewer misconceptions, on average, than the control group (p = .02). Additionally, those who read either the personal stories or the factsheet had significantly lower attribution scores, on average, than the control group (p = .001; p = .03). That is, those who read either of the educational materials were more likely to endorse a TBI explanation over an adolescent explanation, compared to those who read a control reading. The groups did not significantly differ on their willingness for social interaction. Results suggest that, on average, factsheets and personal stories are effective for increasing knowledge about moderate-to-severe TBI as compared to a control group. Personal stories and factsheets may also be useful, on average, for addressing tendencies to discount TBIs as explanations for behavioral change, as compared to a control group. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Common resting brain dynamics indicate a possible mechanism underlying zolpidem response in severe brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shawniqua T; Conte, Mary M; Goldfine, Andrew M; Noirhomme, Quentin; Gosseries, Olivia; Thonnard, Marie; Beattie, Bradley; Hersh, Jennifer; Katz, Douglas I; Victor, Jonathan D; Laureys, Steven; Schiff, Nicholas D

    2013-01-01

    Zolpidem produces paradoxical recovery of speech, cognitive and motor functions in select subjects with severe brain injury but underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In three diverse patients with known zolpidem responses we identify a distinctive pattern of EEG dynamics that suggests a mechanistic model. In the absence of zolpidem, all subjects show a strong low frequency oscillatory peak ∼6–10 Hz in the EEG power spectrum most prominent over frontocentral regions and with high coherence (∼0.7–0.8) within and between hemispheres. Zolpidem administration sharply reduces EEG power and coherence at these low frequencies. The ∼6–10 Hz activity is proposed to arise from intrinsic membrane properties of pyramidal neurons that are passively entrained across the cortex by locally-generated spontaneous activity. Activation by zolpidem is proposed to arise from a combination of initial direct drug effects on cortical, striatal, and thalamic populations and further activation of underactive brain regions induced by restoration of cognitively-mediated behaviors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01157.001 PMID:24252875

  7. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, G.; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    survival was 0.9 at 5–9 years. Interpretation The clinical results in terms of pain, motion, strength, and function were similar to those in previous reports. The implant survival was 0.9 at 9 years, both in rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid cases, which is an important improvement compared to the earlier......Background and purpose During the past 40 years, several attempts have been made with total wrist arthroplasty to avoid fusion in severely destroyed wrists. The results have often been disappointing. There is only modest clinical documentation due to the small number of patients (especially non......-rheumatoid cases) and short follow-up times. Here we report a multicenter series using a third-generation implant with a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. Methods In 2012, data were retrieved from a registry of consecutive wrist operations at 7 centers with units specialized in hand surgery, between 2003 and 2007...

  8. Use of wrist albedo neutron dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankins, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    We are developing a wrist dosimeter that can be used to measure the exposure at the wrist to x-rays, gamma rays, beta-particles, thermal neutrons and fast neutrons. It consists of a modified Hankins Type albedo neutron dosimeter and also contains three pieces of CR-39 plastic. ABS plastic in the form of an elongated hemisphere provides the beta and low energy x-ray shielding necessary to meet the requirement of depth dose measurements at 1 cm. The dosimeter has a beta window located in the side of the hemisphere oriented towards an object being held in the hands. A TLD 600 is positioned under the 1 cm thick ABS plastic and is used to measure the thermal neutron dose. At present we are using Velcro straps to hold the dosimeter on the inside of the wrist. 9 figures

  9. Preventing musculoskeletal injuries among recreational adult volleyball players: design of a randomised prospective controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouttebarge, Vincent; Zwerver, Johannes; Verhagen, Evert

    2017-08-02

    Both acute and overuse injuries are common among recreational volleyball players, especially finger/wrist, ankle, shoulder and knee injuries. Consequently, an intervention ('VolleyVeilig') was developed to prevent or reduce the occurrence of finger/wrist, shoulder, knee and ankle injuries among recreational volleyball players. This article describes the design of a study evaluating the effectiveness of the developed intervention on the one-season occurrence of finger/wrist, shoulder, knee and ankle injuries among recreational adult volleyball players. A randomized prospective controlled trial with a follow-up period of one volleyball season will be conducted. Participants will be healthy recreational adult volleyball players (18 years of age or older) practicing volleyball (training and/or match) at least twice a week. The intervention ('VolleyVeilig') consists of a warm-up program based on more than 50 distinct exercises (with different variations and levels). The effect of the intervention programme on the occurrence of injuries will be compared to volleyball as usual. Outcome measures will be incidence of acute injury (expressed as number of injuries per 1000 h of play) and prevalence of overuse injuries (expressed as percentage). This study will be one of the first randomized prospective controlled trials evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention on the occurrence of both acute and overuse injuries among recreational adult volleyball players. Outcome of this study could possibly lead to the nationwide implementation of the intervention in all volleyball clubs in The Netherlands, ultimately resulting in less injuries. Dutch Trial Registration NTR6202 , registered February 1st 2017. Version 3, February 2017.

  10. Management of High-Voltage Burns of the Hand and Wrist with Negative Pressure Dressing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazım Gümüş

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Negative pressure dressing stimulates wound healing by promoting cellular proliferation and regeneration. It also removes interstitial edema and increases local blood flow, resulting in rapid growth of the granulation tissue. We used the dressing method in deep hand and wrist burns caused by high-voltage electrical current, which leads to progressive tissue necrosis, elevated compartment pressure, and deep tissue edema, to reveal if subatmospheric pressure could limit the zone of injury or ongoing tissue necrosis after electrical burn. Material and Methods: Six hands of five patients, who came in contact with high-voltage electrical wire carrying more than 1000 volts, are presented in this study. Hands and wrists were seriously injured and contracted. After the initial treatment involving fluid resuscitation, fasciotomy, carpal tunnel release, and debridement, a negative pressure dressing was applied to the wounds of hand, wrist, and forearm with 125 mm Hg continuous pressure, and maintained for 20 days. Results: When negative pressure dressing was stopped on the 20th day, significant granulation tissue developed over the hand and forearm wounds. However, wrist wounds needed more debridement and repeated dressings because of the presence of necrosis. Edema of the hands subsided significantly during the use of negative pressure dressing. Time to closure for hand and forearm wounds decreased considerably. Moreover, in one wrist, spontaneous closure was achieved at about one month. All hands except one treated with negative pressure dressing could be saved from amputation; however, significant tissue loss developed, needing complex reconstruction procedures. One hand was amputated because of the permanent loss of blood perfusion. Conclusion: The management of high-voltage burns of hand and wrist with subatmospheric pressure appears to be capable of reducing hand edema and accelerating closure of the wounds. It seems that negative

  11. Smartphone photography utilized to measure wrist range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Eric R; Conti Mica, Megan; Shin, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    The purpose was to determine if smartphone photography is a reliable tool in measuring wrist movement. Smartphones were used to take digital photos of both wrists in 32 normal participants (64 wrists) at extremes of wrist motion. The smartphone measurements were compared with clinical goniometry measurements. There was a very high correlation between the clinical goniometry and smartphone measurements, as the concordance coefficients were high for radial deviation, ulnar deviation, wrist extension and wrist flexion. The Pearson coefficients also demonstrated the high precision of the smartphone measurements. The Bland-Altman plots demonstrated 29-31 of 32 smartphone measurements were within the 95% confidence interval of the clinical measurements for all positions of the wrists. There was high reliability between the photography taken by the volunteer and researcher, as well as high inter-observer reliability. Smartphone digital photography is a reliable and accurate tool for measuring wrist range of motion. II.

  12. Risk factors for hand-wrist disorders in repetitive work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, J. F.; Mikkelsen, S.; Andersen, JH

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify the risk of hand-wrist disorders related to repetitive movements, use of hand force and wrist position in repetitive monotonous work. METHODS: Using questionnaires and physical examinations, the prevalence and incidence of hand-wrist pain and possible extensor tendonitis...... (wrist pain and palpation tenderness) were determined in 3123 employees in 19 industrial settings. With the use of questionnaires and video recordings of homogenous work tasks number of wrist movements, hand force requirements and wrist position were analysed as risk factors for hand-wrist disorders......, controlling for potential personal and psychosocial confounders. All participants were re-examined three times during a follow-up period of three years. RESULTS: Force but not repetition and position was related to hand-wrist pain and possible tendonitis in the baseline analyses showing an exposure...

  13. Coordination of intrinsic and extrinsic hand muscle activity as a function of wrist joint angle during two-digit grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jamie A; Bobich, Lisa R; Santello, Marco

    2010-04-26

    Fingertip forces result from the activation of muscles that cross the wrist and muscles whose origins and insertions reside within the hand (extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles, respectively). Thus, tasks that involve changes in wrist angle affect the moment arm and length, hence the force-producing capabilities, of extrinsic muscles only. If a grasping task requires the exertion of constant fingertip forces, the Central Nervous System (CNS) may respond to changes in wrist angle by modulating the neural drive to extrinsic or intrinsic muscles only or by co-activating both sets of muscles. To distinguish between these scenarios, we recorded electromyographic (EMG) activity of intrinsic and extrinsic muscles of the thumb and index finger as a function of wrist angle during a two-digit object hold task. We hypothesized that changes in wrist angle would elicit EMG amplitude modulation of the extrinsic and intrinsic hand muscles. In one experimental condition we asked subjects to exert the same digit forces at each wrist angle, whereas in a second condition subjects could choose digit forces for holding the object. EMG activity was significantly modulated in both extrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a function of wrist angle (both pextrinsic and intrinsic muscles as a muscle synergy. These findings are discussed within the theoretical frameworks of synergies and common neural input across motor nuclei of hand muscles. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Role of Wrist Magnetic Resonance Arthrography in Diagnosing Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tears; Experience at King Hussein Medical Center, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem A. Al-Hiari

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aims of the study were to evaluate the role of magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA of the wrist in detecting full-thickness tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC and to compare the results of the magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA with the gold standard arthroscopic findings. Methods:The study was performed at King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan, between January 2008 and December 2011. A total of 42 patients (35 males and 7 females who had ulnar-sided wrist pain and clinical suspicions of TFCC tears were included in the study. All patients underwent wrist magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA and then a wrist arthroscopy. The results of MRA were compared with the arthroscopic findings. Results: After comparison with the arthroscopic findings, the MRA had three false-negative results (sensitivity = 93% and no false-positive results. A total of 39 patients were able to return to work. Satisfaction was high in 38 of the patients and 33 had satisfactorypain relief. The sensitivity of the wrist MRA in detecting TFCC full-thickness tears was 93% (39, and specificity was 80% (16/20. The overall accuracy of wrist arthroscopy in detecting a full-thickness tear of the TFCC in our study was 85% (29/34. Conclusion: These results illustrate the role of wrist MRA in assessing the TFCC pathology and suggest its use as the first imaging technique, following a plain X-ray, in evaluating patients with chronic ulnar side wrist pain with suspected TFCC injuries.

  15. [Injury patterns and prophylaxis in inline skating].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerosch, J; Heck, C

    2005-05-01

    Inline skating has become one of the fastest growing sports since its appearance in 1980. The increasing number of inline skaters has also led to a rising incidence of injuries. The most common injury is the distal fracture of the radius, which occurs in 50% of all fractures. There are several reasons for increasing serious injuries in inline skating. The majority of skaters do not wear proper protective equipment (helmet, elbow, knee and wrist protectors), however, many users can not handle their inline skates in dangerous situations. All skaters should take care by buying industrially tested inline skates and appropriate protective equipment; novice skaters should additionally attend special skating schools to learn skating, braking and the the correct falling techniques.

  16. Ultrasound guided synovial biopsy of the wrist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; van Dalen, A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1997-01-01

    Seven patients (4 female and 3 male, mean age 46) with arthritis of the wrist (n = 7) without known etiology were evaluated. High-definition ultrasound equipment was used for localization of synovial hypertrophy, suitable for ultrasound guided biopsy without risk. A 18-gauge diameter Tru-cut biopsy

  17. PERIMENOPAUSAL WRIST FRACTURE - AN OPPORTUNITY FOR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Review of Medscheme's administrative databases to study ... management of a wrist fracture between 1995 and 1998, and ... reviewed dual-energy ... from three general practices in the UK. ... and Torgerson6 estimated the total cost of treating osteoporotic .... us adults from fHANES Ill. / Bone Miner Res 1997; U, 1761-1768.

  18. Positioning of the wrist for scaphoid radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toth, Ferenc; Sebestyen, Andor; Balint, Lehel; Mester, Sandor; Szabo, Gyorgy; Nyarady, Jozsef; Weninger, Csaba; Angyal, Miklos; Lovasz, Gyorgy

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this cadaver study was to determine the ideal position of the wrist for scaphoid radiography. Materials and methods: Four cadaver wrists were rotated around their longitudinal axis in 15 deg. increments and exposures were taken. Seven postero-anterior images were taken as well. Thus, 18 images of each wrist were available for assessment. Views were determined in which the main anatomic regions of the scaphoid were visualized undistorted. The size and localization of the overlap of other carpal bones were also evaluated. Finally, views with the best visualization of anatomic landmarks were selected. The results of these three investigations were compared to literature data. Results: We consider the following four images the most valuable in the diagnostic imaging of scaphoid bone: (1) Postero-anterior view in ulnar deviation of wrist and fist position of the hand; (2) oblique view in 60 deg. of pronation; (3) oblique view in 60 deg. of supination; (4) lateral view. Conclusion: We concluded that our four views are sufficient for proper radiographic evaluation of the scaphoid

  19. Can total wrist arthroplasty be an option in the treatment of the severely destroyed posttraumatic wrist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume; Sørensen, Allan Ibsen

    2013-01-01

    -generation total wrist arthroplasty was used as a salvage procedure for wrists with severe arthritis due to traumatic causes. The data were prospectively recorded in a web-based registry. Seven centers participated. Thirty-five cases had a minimum follow-up time of 2 years. Average follow-up was 39 (24-96) months...... procedure and gives results that are comparable to those obtained in rheumatoid cases. Level IV Case series....

  20. Diagnosis and management of intersection syndrome as a cause of overuse wrist pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Robin; Vyas, Jay

    2016-09-28

    Wrist pain due to repetitive motion or overuse is a common presentation in primary care. This case reports the rare condition of intersection syndrome as the cause of the wrist pain in an amateur tennis player. This is a non-infectious, inflammatory process that occurs where tendons in the first extensor compartment intersect the tendons in the second extensor compartment. Suitable history and examination provided the diagnosis, which was confirmed by MRI. Management consisted of early involvement of the multidisciplinary team, patient education, workplace and sporting adaptations, rest, analgesia, reduction of load, protection and immobilisation of the affected joint followed by a period of rehabilitation. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Three-dimensional Doppler ultrasound findings in healthy wrist and finger tendon sheaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammitzboll-Danielsen, Mads; Janta, Iustina; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    interpretation of Doppler signals when diagnosing tenosynovitis. Method Forty healthy participants (20 women and 20 men age 23-67 years) without prior history of arthritis, tendon diseases or present pain in their hands were included. Twenty participants had 3D Doppler US of the second and third finger...... participant. No significant difference in feeding vessels was seen between the radial and carpal level in the wrist (p = 0.06) or between the second and third flexor tendon sheath (p = 0.84). Conclusion Doppler findings in or in close proximity to the tendon sheaths were common in wrists and fingers...

  2. Barking up the wrong tree: injuries due to falls from trees in Solomon Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negin, Joel; Vizintin, Pavle; Houasia, Patrick; Martiniuk, Alexandra L C

    2014-12-11

    To investigate tree-related injuries in Solomon Islands by the types of trees involved, who is affected and the types of injuries caused. Descriptive case series of all cases of injuries related to trees presenting to the National Referral Hospital in Honiara from 1994 to 2011. Data were collected by the attending clinician using a Trauma Epidemiology form, which provides information on age, sex, cause of injury and type of fracture. Number of injuries by tree type, sex and age. Of the 7651 injuries in the database, 1107 (14%) were caused by falls from trees. Falls from coconut trees led to the highest number of injuries, followed by falls from mango, guava, apple and nut trees. Overall, 85% of injuries occurred in individuals aged trees, 77% of patients were aged tree types. Overall, 71% of injuries occurred among males. Of all injuries, 92% were fractures, 3% were dislocations and 5% were non-fracture, non-dislocation injuries. The arm (including wrist, elbow and hand) was the most common location of injury across all tree types. Distal radius fractures in the forearm were particularly common, as were ulna fractures. While mangos and guavas are undeniably delicious, the quest for their flesh can be hazardous. Children will always climb trees, but the search for food among children in lower-income settings may lead to higher rates of injury.

  3. Musculoskeletal injuries in break-dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chul Hyun; Song, Kwang Soon; Min, Byung Woo; Lee, Sung Moon; Chang, Hyuk Won; Eum, Dae Seup

    2009-11-01

    Since no epidemiologic studies have been reported about musculoskeletal injuries in break-dancers, there are no data on the rates and patterns of musculoskeletal injuries in this population that clinicians can use to find ways to decrease injury rate. We believe that the incidence of injuries in break-dancers is higher than assumed and that injury rates and patterns differ between professional and amateur dancers. Descriptive epidemiologic study. Of a total of 42 study subjects, 23 were professional dancers and 19 were amateur dancers. Injury frequency, site and type, along with the presence of supervised training, the use of protective devices and warm-up exercises done were recorded. Of the 42 study subjects, excluding two amateur dancers, 40 (95.2%) had had musculoskeletal injuries at more than one site. The mean number of sites per dancer was 4.60. The frequency of injury depended on the site and was as follows: wrist (69.0%), finger (61.9%), knee (61.9%), shoulder (52.4%), lumbar spine (50.0%), elbow (42.9%), cervical spine (38.1%), ankle (38.1%), foot (28.6%) and hip (16.7%). Sprain, strain and tendinitis were the most common injuries, accounting for the most cases. Of the 42 dancers, 13 (31%) had had fractures or dislocations. Eight (19.1%) learned break-dancing under supervised instruction, 17 (40.5%) used protective devices and 28 (66.7%) performed warm-up exercises before dancing. There were significant differences in age, dance career length, amount of dance training, mean number of injury sites and the presence of supervised training between professionals and amateurs (Pnature of the activities that result in both unusual and common injuries in break-dancers and educate them about safety. Careful screening, instruction and supervised training of break-dancers will help to prevent injuries.

  4. The epidemiology of injury in skateboarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review the available literature to provide an epidemiological overview of skateboarding injuries, as well as to suggest possible areas for future research. A literature search was performed with the databases of PubMed, Sport Discus, Google and Google Scholar using the search terms 'skateboard', 'skateboarding', 'injury' and 'injuries', with all articles published in refereed journals in the English language being considered. An ancestry approach was also used. Articles from non-juried journals were also infrequently included to provide anecdotal information on the sport. Comparison of study results was compromised by the diversity of different study populations and variability of injury definitions across studies. The majority of injuries affect young males although conflicting arguments arise over the issues of age and experience in relation to injury severity. Most injuries are acutely suffered, and the most commonly affected body part was the wrist and forearm, with lower leg and ankle injuries also common. The incidence was relatively high but reports on severity differed. Clear conclusions could not be drawn on environmental location and risk factors. Most injuries tend to occur from a loss of balance leading to a fall, in more recent times due to a failed trick. Research on injury prevention is not conclusive although protective equipment and skatepark use are recommended. Further research using more rigorous study designs is required to gain a clearer picture of the incidence and determinants of injury, and to identify risk factors and viable injury countermeasures. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. The Takei Handheld Dynamometer: An Effective Clinical Outcome Measure Tool for Hand and Wrist Function in Boxing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatt, Ian; Smith-Moore, Sophie; Steggles, Charlie; Loosemore, Mike

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this article was to explore retrospectively the Takei dynamometer as a valid and reliable outcome measure tool for hand and wrist pathology in the Great Britain amateur boxing squad between 2010 and 2014. Longitudinal retrospective injury surveillance of the Great Britain boxing squad was performed from 2010 to 2014. The location, region affected, description, and duration of each injury were recorded by the team doctor and team physiotherapists. For each significant injury, we recorded hand grip scores using the Takei handheld dynamometer and compared the scores with baseline measures. At the hand, fractures and dislocations were highly detected with an average difference of 40.2% ( P 20% should be highly considered for significant pathology. The Takei dynamometer is a valid and reliable outcome measure tool for hand and wrist pathologies in boxing. Our study highlights the importance of appropriate clinical tools to guide injury management in this sport.

  6. A Prospective Observational Comparison Between Arm and Wrist Blood Pressure During Scheduled Cesarean Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbag, Ilana; Massey, Simon R; Albert, Arianne Y K; Dube, Alison; Gunka, Vit; Douglas, M Joanne

    2015-09-01

    Shivering is common during cesarean delivery (CD) under neuraxial anesthesia and may disrupt the measurement of noninvasive blood pressure (BP). BP measured at the wrist may be less affected by shivering. There have been no studies comparing trends in BP measured on the upper arm and wrist. We hypothesized that wrist systolic blood pressure (sBP) would accurately trend with upper arm sBP measurements (agree within a limit of ±10%) in parturients undergoing elective CD under spinal anesthesia or combined spinal-epidural anesthesia. After initiation of spinal anesthesia, BP measurements were obtained simultaneously from the upper arm and wrist on opposite arms. The interval between measurements was 1 to 2 minutes, and data were collected for 20 minutes or until delivery. The primary outcome was agreement in dynamic changes in sBP measurements between the upper arm and the wrist. Bland-Altman plots indicating the levels of agreement between the methods were drawn for baseline measurements, over multiple measurements, and over multiple measurements on percentage change from baseline. Forty-nine patients were recruited and completed the study. The wrist sBP tended to overestimate the upper sBP for both baseline data (sBP bias = 13.4 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval = +10.4 to +16.4 mm Hg) and data obtained over multiple measurements (sBP bias = 12.8 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval = +9.3 to +16.3 mm Hg). For change in sBP from baseline over multiple measurements, the mean difference between the wrist and the arm sBP was -0.2 percentage points (99% limits of agreement -25 to +25 percentage points). The wrist measurement overestimated the reading relative to the upper arm measurement for multiple measurements over time. However, when the time series for each subject was examined for percentage change from baseline, the 2 methods mirrored each other in most cases. Nevertheless, our hypothesis was rejected as the limits of agreement were higher than ±10%. This finding

  7. Current Trends in the Management of Ballistic Fractures of the Hand and Wrist: Experiences of a High-Volume Level I Trauma Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghareeb, Paul A; Daly, Charles; Liao, Albert; Payne, Diane

    2018-03-01

    Ballistic fractures of the carpus and hand are routinely treated in large urban centers. These injuries can be challenging due to many factors. Various treatment options exist for these complicated injuries, but there are limited data available. This report analyzes patient demographics, treatments, and outcomes at a large urban trauma center. All ballistic fractures of the hand and wrist of the patients who presented to a single center from 2011 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, injury mechanism, treatment modalities, and outcomes were analyzed. Seventy-seven patients were identified; 70 were male, and 7 were female. Average age of the patients was 29.6 years. Seventy-five injuries were low velocity, whereas 2 were high velocity. Sixty-seven patients had fractures of a metacarpal or phalanx, whereas 4 had isolated carpal injuries. Six had combined carpal and metacarpal or phalanx fractures. Thirty-six patients had concomitant tendon, nerve, or vascular injuries requiring repair. Sixty-three patients underwent operative intervention, with the most common intervention being percutaneous fixation. Sixteen patients required secondary surgery. Eighteen complications were reported. The majority of patients in this report underwent early operative intervention with percutaneous fixation. Antibiotics were administered in almost all cases and can usually be discontinued within 24 hours after surgery. It is important to consider concomitant nerve, vascular, or tendon injuries requiring repair. We recommend early treatment of these injuries with debridement and stabilization. Due to lack of follow-up and patient noncompliance, early definitive treatment with primary bone grafting should be considered.

  8. Amsterdam wrist rules: A clinical decision aid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bentohami Abdelali

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute trauma of the wrist is one of the most frequent reasons for visiting the Emergency Department. These patients are routinely referred for radiological examination. Most X-rays however, do not reveal any fractures. A clinical decision rule determining the need for X-rays in patients with acute wrist trauma may help to percolate and select patients with fractures. Methods/Design This study will be a multi-center observational diagnostic study in which the data will be collected cross-sectionally. The study population will consist of all consecutive adult patients (≥18 years presenting with acute wrist trauma at the Emergency Department in the participating hospitals. This research comprises two components: one study will be conducted to determine which clinical parameters are predictive for the presence of a distal radius fracture in adult patients presenting to the Emergency Department following acute wrist trauma. These clinical parameters are defined by trauma-mechanism, physical examination, and functional testing. This data will be collected in two of the three participating hospitals and will be assessed by using logistic regression modelling to estimate the regression coefficients after which a reduced model will be created by means of a log likelihood ratio test. The accuracy of the model will be estimated by a goodness of fit test and an ROC curve. The final model will be validated internally through bootstrapping and by shrinking it, an adjusted model will be generated. In the second component of this study, the developed prediction model will be validated in a new dataset consisting of a population of patients from the third hospital. If necessary, the model will be calibrated using the data from the validation study. Discussion Wrist trauma is frequently encountered at the Emergency Department. However, to this date, no decision rule regarding this type of trauma has been created. Ideally, radiographs are

  9. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  10. Golf Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Golf Injuries Golf looks like an easy game to ... WHAT TYPES OF INJURIES ARE MOST COMMON IN GOLF? Acute injuries are usually the result of a ...

  11. Architectures for wrist-worn energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantz, R.; Halim, M. A.; Xue, T.; Zhang, Q.; Gu, L.; Yang, K.; Roundy, S.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the simulation-based analysis of six dynamical structures with respect to their wrist-worn vibration energy harvesting capability. This work approaches the problem of maximizing energy harvesting potential at the wrist by considering multiple mechanical substructures; rotational and linear motion-based architectures are examined. Mathematical models are developed and experimentally corroborated. An optimization routine is applied to the proposed architectures to maximize average power output and allow for comparison. The addition of a linear spring element to the structures has the potential to improve power output; for example, in the case of rotational structures, a 211% improvement in power output was estimated under real walking excitation. The analysis concludes that a sprung rotational harvester architecture outperforms a sprung linear architecture by 66% when real walking data is used as input to the simulations.

  12. Common Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... season. For example, instead of playing year-round soccer, play soccer in the spring, baseball in the summer and ... Crisis Situations Pets and Animals myhealthfinder Food and Nutrition Healthy Food Choices Weight Loss and Diet Plans ...

  13. Estimation of Physical Activity Energy Expenditure during Free-Living from Wrist Accelerometry in UK Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom White

    Full Text Available Wrist-worn accelerometers are emerging as the most common instrument for measuring physical activity in large-scale epidemiological studies, though little is known about the relationship between wrist acceleration and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE.1695 UK adults wore two devices simultaneously for six days; a combined sensor and a wrist accelerometer. The combined sensor measured heart rate and trunk acceleration, which was combined with a treadmill test to yield a signal of individually-calibrated PAEE. Multi-level regression models were used to characterise the relationship between the two time-series, and their estimations were evaluated in an independent holdout sample. Finally, the relationship between PAEE and BMI was described separately for each source of PAEE estimate (wrist acceleration models and combined-sensing.Wrist acceleration explained 44-47% between-individual variance in PAEE, with RMSE between 34-39 J•min-1•kg-1. Estimations agreed well with PAEE in cross-validation (mean bias [95% limits of agreement]: 0.07 [-70.6:70.7] but overestimated in women by 3% and underestimated in men by 4%. Estimation error was inversely related to age (-2.3 J•min-1•kg-1 per 10y and BMI (-0.3 J•min-1•kg-1 per kg/m2. Associations with BMI were similar for all PAEE estimates (approximately -0.08 kg/m2 per J•min-1•kg-1.A strong relationship exists between wrist acceleration and PAEE in free-living adults, such that irrespective of the objective method of PAEE assessment, a strong inverse association between PAEE and BMI was observed.

  14. Decoupling the Wrist: A Cadaveric Experiment Examining Wrist Kinematics Following Midcarpal Fusion and Scaphoid Excision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jennifer A.; Bednar, Michael S.; Havey, Robert M.; Murray, Wendy M.

    2016-01-01

    At the wrist, kinematic coupling (the relationship between flexion-extension and radial-ulnar deviation) facilitates function. Although the midcarpal joint is critical for kinematic coupling, many surgeries, such as four-corner fusion (4CF) and scaphoid-excision four-corner fusion (SE4CF), modify the midcarpal joint. This study examines how 4CF and SE4CF influence kinematic coupling by quantifying wrist axes of rotation. Wrist axes of rotation were quantified in eight cadaveric specimens using an optimization algorithm, which fit a two-revolute joint model to experimental data. In each specimen, data measuring the motion of the third metacarpal relative to the radius was collected for three conditions (nonimpaired, 4CF, SE4CF). The calculated axes of rotation were compared using spherical statistics. The angle between the axes of rotation was used to assess coupling, as the nonimpaired wrist has skew axes (i.e., angle between axes approximately 60°). Following 4CF and SE4CF, the axes are closer to orthogonal than those of the nonimpaired wrist. The mean angle (±95 percent confidence interval) between the axes was 92.6° ± 25.2° and 99.8° ± 22.0° for 4CF and SE4CF, respectively. The axes of rotation defined in this study can be used to define joint models, which will facilitate more accurate computational and experimental studies of these procedures. PMID:27705062

  15. Compressed sensing approach for wrist vein biometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantsov, Aleksey; Ryabko, Maxim; Shchekin, Aleksey

    2018-04-01

    The work describes features of the compressed sensing (CS) approach utilized for development of a wearable system for wrist vein recognition with single-pixel detection; we consider this system useful for biometrics authentication purposes. The CS approach implies use of a spatial light modulation (SLM) which, in our case, can be performed differently-with a liquid crystal display or diffusely scattering medium. We show that compressed sensing combined with above-mentioned means of SLM allows us to avoid using an optical system-a limiting factor for wearable devices. The trade-off between the 2 different SLM approaches regarding issues of practical implementation of CS approach for wrist vein recognition purposes is discussed. A possible solution of a misalignment problem-a typical issue for imaging systems based upon 2D arrays of photodiodes-is also proposed. Proposed design of the wearable device for wrist vein recognition is based upon single-pixel detection. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Comparing two methods to record maximal voluntary contractions and different electrode positions in recordings of forearm extensor muscle activity: Refining risk assessments for work-related wrist disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlqvist, Camilla; Nordander, Catarina; Granqvist, Lothy; Forsman, Mikael; Hansson, Gert-Åke

    2018-01-01

    Wrist disorders are common in force demanding industrial repetitive work. Visual assessment of force demands have a low reliability, instead surface electromyography (EMG) may be used as part of a risk assessment for work-related wrist disorders. For normalization of EMG recordings, a power grip (hand grip) is often used as maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the forearm extensor muscles. However, the test-retest reproducibility is poor and EMG amplitudes exceeding 100% have occasionally been recorded during work. An alternative MVC is resisted wrist extension, which may be more reliable. To compare hand grip and resisted wrist extension MVCs, in terms of amplitude and reproducibility, and to examine the effect of electrode positioning. Twelve subjects participated. EMG from right forearm extensors, from four electrode pairs, was recorded during MVCs, on three separate occasions. The group mean EMG amplitudes for resisted wrist extension were 1.2-1.7 times greater than those for hand grip. Resisted wrist extension showed better reproducibility than hand grip. The results indicate that the use of resisted wrist extension is a more accurate measurement of maximal effort of wrist extensor contractions than using hand grip and should increase the precision in EMG recordings from forearm extensor muscles, which in turn will increase the quality of risk assessments that are based on these.

  17. Standardized combined cryotherapy and compression using Cryo/Cuff after wrist arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Marcotty, M; Jungling, O; Vaske, B; Vogt, P M; Knobloch, Karsten

    2011-02-01

    cryotherapy and compression as integral part of the RICE regimen are thought to improve treatment outcome after sport injuries. Using standardized cryotherapy and compression perioperatively has been reported with conflicting clinical results. The impact of combined cryotherapy and compression is compared to standard care among patients undergoing wrist arthroscopy. fifty-six patients undergoing wrist arthroscopy were assessed, 54 patients were randomized to either Cryo/Cuff (3 × 10 min twice daily) or standard care over 3 weeks. Follow-up clinical visits were at postoperative days 1, 8, and 21. One patient in each group was lost during follow-up. Fifty-two patients were analyzed. Statistics were performed as Intention-to-treat analysis. Outcome parameters were pain, three-dimensional volume of the wrist, range of motion, and DASH score. the Cryo/Cuffgroup had a 49% reduction in pain level (VAS 3.5 ± 0.4 vs. VAS 1.8 ± 0.2 on the 21st postoperative day) when compared to a reduction of 41% in the control group (VAS 5.1 ± 0.6 preoperatively vs. VAS 3.0 ± 0.5 on the 21st postoperative day). Swelling and range of motion were not as significantly different between the two groups as were DASH scores (DASH-score Cryo/Cuff group preoperatively 37.3 ± 3.5 and postoperatively 36.9 ± 3.5; DASH-score control group preoperatively 42.8 ± 4.3 and postoperatively 41.9 ± 4.9). The CONSORT score reached 17 out of 22. there was no significant effect of additional home-based combined cryotherapy and compression using the Cryo/Cuff wrist bandage, following wrist arthroscopy regarding pain, swelling, range of motion, and subjective impairment assessed using the DASH score over 3 weeks in comparison with the control group.

  18. Do instability markers predict satisfactory reduction and requirement for later surgery in emergency department patients with wrist fracture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winayak, Amar; Gossat, Alyza; Cooper, Jenny; Ritchie, Peter; Lim, Wei; Klim, Sharon; Kelly, Anne-Maree

    2018-02-01

    Research suggests that the presence of instability markers in patients with displaced distal radial fractures is associated with poorer outcome. Our aims were to determine whether the presence of previously defined instability markers could predict the likelihood of successful ED reduction and requirement for a secondary procedure after ED reduction. Retrospective cohort study performed by medical record review. Adult ED patients coded as having an isolated wrist fracture and having fracture reduction in ED were eligible for inclusion. Data collected included demographics, history of osteoporosis, mechanism of injury, radiological features on X-rays and performance of a secondary procedure. Outcomes of interest were the rate of successful fracture reduction in ED (against defined radiological criteria), the rate of secondary procedures and the association between the number of defined instability risk factors and successful reduction and performance of a secondary surgical procedure. Analysis was by χ 2 test, receiver operating characteristic curve, logistic regression analyses. Three hundred and nineteen patients were studied; median age 62 years, 77% female. Sixty-five per cent of patients had satisfactory fracture reduction in ED (95% CI 59%-70%). Eighty-six patients underwent a secondary procedure to reduce/stabilise their fracture (28%, 95% CI 23%-33%). Younger age, lack of satisfactory ED reduction and increased number of instability factors were independently predictive of the performance of a secondary procedure. Instability risk factors are common in patients with wrist fractures requiring reduction in ED. The number of instability factors is not a strong predictor of the performance of secondary procedures. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  19. Outcomes of Open Dorsal Wrist Ganglion Excision in Active-Duty Military Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazs, George C; Donohue, Michael A; Drake, Matthew L; Ipsen, Derek; Nanos, George P; Tintle, Scott M

    2015-09-01

    To examine the most common presenting complaints of active-duty service members with isolated dorsal wrist ganglions and to determine the rate of return to unrestricted duty after open excision. Surgical records at 2 military facilities were screened to identify male and female active duty service members undergoing isolated open excision of dorsal wrist ganglions from January 1, 2006 to January 1, 2014. Electronic medical records and service disability databases were searched to identify the most common presenting symptoms and to determine whether patients returned to unrestricted active duty after surgery. Postoperative outcomes examined were pain persisting greater than 4 weeks after surgery, stiffness requiring formal occupational therapy treatment, surgical wound complications, and recurrence. A total of 125 active duty military personnel (Army, 54; Navy, 43; and Marine Corps, 28) met criteria for inclusion. Mean follow-up was 45 months. Fifteen percent (8 of 54) of the Army personnel were given permanent waivers from performing push-ups owing to persistent pain and stiffness. Pain persisting greater than 4 weeks after surgery was an independent predictor of eventual need for a permanent push-up waiver. The overall recurrence incidence was 9%. No demographic or perioperative factors were associated with recurrence. Patients whose occupation or activities require forceful wrist extension should be counseled on the considerable risk of residual pain and functional limitations that may occur after open dorsal wrist ganglion excision. Therapeutic IV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Physical injury assessment of male versus female chiropractic students when learning and performing various adjustive techniques: a preliminary investigative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Laura L

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reports of musculoskeletal injuries that some chiropractic students experienced while in the role of adjustor became increasingly evident and developed into the basis of this study. The main objective of this study was to survey a select student population and identify, by gender, the specific types of musculoskeletal injuries they experienced when learning adjustive techniques in the classroom, and performing them in the clinical setting. Methods A survey was developed to record musculoskeletal injuries that students reported to have sustained while practicing chiropractic adjustment set-ups and while delivering adjustments. The survey was modeled from similar instruments used in the university's clinic as well as those used in professional practice. Stratified sampling was used to obtain participants for the study. Data reported the anatomical areas of injury, adjustive technique utilized, the type of injury received, and the recovery time from sustained injuries. The survey also inquired as to the type and area of any past physical injuries as well as the mechanism(s of injury. Results Data obtained from the study identified injuries of the shoulder, wrist, elbow, neck, low back, and mid-back. The low back was the most common injury site reported by females, and the neck was the most common site reported by males. The reported wrist injuries in both genders were 1% male complaints and 17% female complaints. A total of 13% of female respondents reported shoulder injuries, whereas less than 1% of male respondents indicated similar complaints. Conclusion The data collected from the project indicated that obtaining further information on the subject would be worthwhile, and could provide an integral step toward developing methods of behavior modification in an attempt to reduce and/or prevent the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries.

  1. Development and performance of a new prosthesis system using ultrasonic sensor for wrist movements: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The design and performance of a new development prosthesis system known as biomechatronics wrist prosthesis is presented in this paper. The prosthesis system was implemented by replacing the Bowden tension cable of body powered prosthesis system using two ultrasonic sensors, two servo motors and microcontroller inside the prosthesis hand for transradial user. Methods The system components and hand prototypes involve the anthropometry, CAD design and prototyping, biomechatronics engineering together with the prosthetics. The modeler construction of the system develop allows the ultrasonic sensors that are placed on the shoulder to generate the wrist movement of the prosthesis. The kinematics of wrist movement, which are the pronation/supination and flexion/extension were tested using the motion analysis and general motion of human hand were compared. The study also evaluated the require degree of detection for the input of the ultrasonic sensor to generate the wrist movements. Results The values collected by the vicon motion analysis for biomechatronics prosthesis system were reliable to do the common tasks in daily life. The degree of the head needed to bend to give the full input wave was about 45° - 55° of rotation or about 14 cm – 16 cm. The biomechatronics wrist prosthesis gave higher degree of rotation to do the daily tasks but did not achieve the maximum degree of rotation. Conclusion The new development of using sensor and actuator in generating the wrist movements will be interesting for used list in medicine, robotics technology, rehabilitations, prosthetics and orthotics. PMID:24755242

  2. Interleukin-1β overproduction is a common cause for neuropathic pain, memory deficit, and depression following peripheral nerve injury in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Wen-Shan; Wei, Xiao; Mai, Chun-Lin; Murugan, Madhuvika; Wu, Long-Jun; Xin, Wen-Jun; Zhou, Li-Jun; Liu, Xian-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pain is often accompanied by short-term memory deficit and depression. Currently, it is believed that short-term memory deficit and depression are consequences of chronic pain. Here, we test the hypothesis that the symptoms might be caused by overproduction of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) in the injured nerve independent of neuropathic pain following spared nerve injury in rats and mice. Mechanical allodynia, a behavioral sign of neuropathic pain, was not correlated with short-term memory deficit and depressive behavior in spared nerve injury rats. Spared nerve injury upregulated IL-1β in the injured sciatic nerve, plasma, and the regions in central nervous system closely associated with pain, memory and emotion, including spinal dorsal horn, hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and amygdala. Importantly, the spared nerve injury-induced memory deficits, depressive, and pain behaviors were substantially prevented by peri-sciatic administration of IL-1β neutralizing antibody in rats or deletion of IL-1 receptor type 1 in mice. Furthermore, the behavioral abnormalities induced by spared nerve injury were mimicked in naïve rats by repetitive intravenous injection of re combinant rat IL-1β (rrIL-1β) at a pathological concentration as determined from spared nerve injury rats. In addition, microglia were activated by both spared nerve injury and intravenous injection of rrIL-1β and the effect of spared nerve injury was substantially reversed by peri-sciatic administration of anti-IL-1β. Neuropathic pain was not necessary for the development of cognitive and emotional disorders, while the overproduction of IL-1β in the injured sciatic nerve following peripheral nerve injury may be a common mechanism underlying the generation of neuropathic pain, memory deficit, and depression. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. MRI on the tear of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Yoko; Sasaki, Taisuke; Sasaki, Yukio; Nishi, Naoko; Yodono, Hiraku; Takekawa, Shoichi; Toh, Satoshi; Harata, Seikou (Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-07-01

    MRI of the wrist joints in the normal volunteers and patients with triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) injury was performed and usefulness of MRI of TFC injury was discussed. Small FOV and thin slice thickness were selected. Normal TFCs were shown as low signal intensity areas. Injury of TFC was demonstrated as increased signal intensity areas. Diagnosis of TFC injury should be made after considering their ages and symptoms because TFC shows degenerative change with aging. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI in the detection of TFC tears were 80.0%, 81.8% and 81.0% respectively. MRI is considered to be a non-invasive good modality to demonstrate TFC tears. (author).

  4. Variants, pitfalls and asymptomatic findings in wrist and hand imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirrmann, Christian W.A. [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland)]. E-mail: christian@pfirrmann.ch; Zanetti, Marco [University Hospital Balgrist, Radiology, University of Zurich Switzerland, Forchstrasse 340, CH-8008 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-12-15

    Anatomic variants of the bones, ligaments, tendons and muscles are frequent findings in imaging of the wrist and hand. Many findings especially changes in the triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) and the interosseous ligaments are asymptomatic, their incidence is increasing with age, and they are frequently found bilaterally. Abnormalities such as increased signal within tendons are common in asymptomatic subjects. They may be explained by normal physiology, anatomical variability, MR artifacts or true abnormalities without clinical importance. Although it is not always possible to differentiate variants and artifacts from clinically relevant findings it is important to know their potential etiology and clinical importance and not to over report them as abnormality requiring additional imaging or treatment.

  5. Softball injuries treated in US EDs, 1994 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchak, John C; Rochette, Lynne M; Smith, Gary A

    2013-06-01

    Softball is a popular participant sport in the United States. This study investigated the epidemiology of softball injuries with comparisons between children and adults. Data from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System for patients 7 years and older treated in an emergency department (ED) for a softball injury from 1994 through 2010 were analyzed. An estimated 2107823 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1736417-2479229) patients were treated in US EDs for a softball injury during the 17-year study period. The annual number of injuries decreased by 23.0% from 1994 to 2010 (P softball injuries increased significantly during the study period (P = .035). The most commonly injured body regions were the hand/wrist (22.2%) and face (19.3%). Being hit by a ball was the most common mechanism of injury (52.4%) and accounted for most of face (89.6%) and head (75.7%) injuries. Injuries associated with running (relative risk, 2.36; 95% CI, 1.97-2.82) and diving for a ball (relative risk, 4.61; 95% CI, 3.50-6.09) were more likely to occur among adult than pediatric patients. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate softball injuries using a nationally representative sample. Softball is a common source of injury among children and adults. Increased efforts are needed to promote safety measures, such as face guards, mouth guards, safety softballs, and break-away bases, to decrease these injuries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Worsening cholestasis and possible cefuroxime-induced liver injury following "successful" therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for a distal common bile duct stone: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niriella, Madunil Anuk; Kumarasena, Ravindu Sujeewa; Dassanayake, Anuradha Supun; Pathirana, Aloka; de Silva Hewavisenthi, Janaki; de Silva, Hithanadura Janaka

    2016-12-21

    Cefuroxime very rarely causes drug-induced liver injury. We present a case of a patient with paradoxical worsening of jaundice caused by cefuroxime-induced cholestasis following therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography for a distal common bile duct stone. A 51-year-old, previously healthy Sri Lankan man presented to our hospital with obstructive jaundice caused by a distal common bile duct stone. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with stone extraction, common bile duct clearance, and stenting failed to improve the cholestasis, with paradoxical worsening of his jaundice. A liver biopsy revealed features of drug-induced intrahepatic cholestasis. Although his case was complicated by an episode of cholangitis, the patient made a complete recovery in 4 months with supportive treatment and withdrawal of the offending drug. This case highlights a very rare drug-induced liver injury caused by cefuroxime as well as our approach to treating a patient with paradoxical worsening of jaundice after therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography.

  7. Radiological evaluation of the skeleton: traumatology of the distal forearm, wrist, and hand; Radiologische Skelettdiagnostik: Traumatologie des distalen Unterarmes, der Handgelenke und der Hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, K. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Zentralinstitut fuer Roentgendiagnostik; Langer, R. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen (Germany). Zentralinstitut fuer Roentgendiagnostik

    1996-07-01

    Plain X-ray films including some special radiographic views are still the basis of the radiological evaluation of injuries of the distal forearm, the wrist, and the hand. Especially, in the diagnosis of fractures of the distal radius the exact positioning of the arm and hand is essential. For the description of fractures of the distal forearm the AO classification of fractures should be used, which is comprehensive and universally applicable. Conventional tomography and computed tomography (CT) of the radio-ulnar joint and the wrist are used in patients with persisting complaints or equivocal findings on plain radiographs, and difficult anatomical situations. Suspected ligamentous injuries of the wrist including tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) are evaluated by wrist arthrography or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the latter requiring a highly skilled imaging and interpretation technique. MRI is the method of choice for the detection of osteonecrosis. Ultrasound examinations are of minor importance in the work up of wrist and hand injuries. (orig.) [Deutsch] Fuer die radiologische Beurteilung von Verletzungen des distalen Unterarmes, des Handgelenkes und der Hand steht die konventionelle Roentgenuntersuchung einschliesslich einiger Spezialeinstellungen nach wie vor im Vordergrund. Bei der Beschreibung insbesondere der distalen Radiusfrakturen sollten die historische Benennung oder aeltere Einteilungen zugunsten der allgemeingueltigen und umfassenderen AO-Klassifikation verlassen werden. Die Computertomographie und Magnetresonanztomographie kommen in der Frakturdiagnostik bei unklaren anatomischen Verhaeltnissen oder konventionell nicht zufriedenstellend erklaerbaren Beschwerden zur Anwendung. Vermutete ligamentaere Verletzungen der Handwurzel lassen sich arthrographisch oder magnetresonanztomographisch abklaeren. (orig.)

  8. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-02-25

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated.

  9. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-01-01

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  10. Periprosthetic osteolysis after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Herzberg, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Background and Literature Review Periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO) after second- or third-generation total wrist arthroplasty (TWA), with or without evident loosening of the implant components, has previously been reported in the literature, but rarely in a systematic way. Purpose The purpose...... of this study was to analyze the prevalence, location, and natural history of PPO following a TWA and to determine whether this was associated with prosthetic loosening. Patients and Methods We analyzed 44 consecutive cases in which a RE-MOTION TWA (Small Bone Innovations Inc., Morrisville, PA, USA) had been...

  11. Wrist-worn pervasive gaze interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, John Paulin; Lund, Haakon; Biermann, Florian

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses gaze interaction for smart home control, conducted from a wrist-worn unit. First we asked ten people to enact the gaze movements they would propose for e.g. opening a door or adjusting the room temperature. On basis of their suggestions we built and tested different versions...... selection. Their subjective evaluations were positive with regard to the speed of the interaction. We conclude that gaze gesture input seems feasible for fast and brief remote control of smart home technology provided that robustness of tracking is improved....

  12. An injury equivalency system for establishing a common economic threshold for three species of rice planthoppers (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shou-Horng; Chen, Ching-Huan; Chen, Chiou-Nan; Wu, Wen-Jer

    2013-04-01

    The economic threshold (ET) for multiple pest species that share the same injury type on host plants (feeding guild) has been proposed for decision-making in integrated management framework of many defoliating insect pests. However, only a few consider agricultural pests with sucking mouthparts. This study presents the first injury equivalency system for the feeding guild made up of three rice (Oryza sativa L.) planthopper (Hemiptera: Delphacidae) species--Nilaparvata lugens (Stål), Sogatella furcifera (Harváth), and Laodelphax striatellus (Fallén)--by using relative amount of honeydew excretion of each species. The intraspecific injury equivalent coefficient was determined; this coefficient provides an exchange rate for different developmental stages in a species. N. lugens was chosen as the standard species to obtain interspecific injury equivalents for other individuals in the guild, allowing estimates of total guild injury feasible. For extension purposes, the injury equivalency was simplified by pooling all nymphs and adults in the guild to mitigate the potential confusion resulting from uncertainty of instars or wing form. A matrix of ETs established on previous studies and incorporating changes of management cost and rice price was used and served as a control decision guide for the guild samples. The validity of the proposed injury equivalency system was tested using several field data sets, and the results are generally promising and meaningfully elevate the accuracy of estimating combined injury and damage to rice, suggesting that the proposed system is a better integrated pest management decision-making system compared with conventional practices.

  13. Do nurse and patient injuries share common antecedents? An analysis of associations with safety climate and working conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jennifer A; Dominici, Francesca; Agnew, Jacqueline; Gerwin, Daniel; Morlock, Laura; Miller, Marlene R

    2012-02-01

    Safety climate and nurses' working conditions may have an impact on both patient outcomes and nurse occupational health, but these outcomes have rarely been examined concurrently. To examine the association of unit-level safety climate and specific nurse working conditions with injury outcomes for both nurses and patients in a single hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted using nursing-unit level and individual-level data at an urban, level-one trauma centre in the USA. Multilevel logistic regressions were used to examine associations among injury outcomes, safety climate and working conditions on 29 nursing units, including a total of 723 nurses and 28 876 discharges. Safety climate was measured in 2004 using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Working conditions included registered nursing hours per patient day (RNHPPD) and unit turnover. Patient injuries included 290 falls, 167 pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis (PE/DVT), and 105 decubitus ulcers. Nurse injury was defined as a reported needle-stick, splash, slip, trip, or fall (n=78). Working conditions and outcomes were measured in 2005. The study found a negative association between two SAQ domains, Safety and Teamwork, with the odds of both decubitus ulcers and nurse injury. RNHPPD showed a negative association with patient falls and decubitus ulcers. Unit turnover was positively associated with nurse injury and PE/DVT, but negatively associated with falls and decubitus ulcers. Safety climate was associated with both patient and nurse injuries, suggesting that patient and nurse safety may actually be linked outcomes. The findings also indicate that increased unit turnover should be considered a risk factor for nurse and patient injuries.

  14. Polish Adaptation of Wrist Evaluation Questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Piotr; Wawrzyniak-Bielęda, Anna; Romanowski, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Questionnaires evaluating hand and wrist function are a very useful tool allowing for objective and systematic recording of symptoms reported by the patients. Most questionnaires generally accepted in clinical practice are available in English and need to be appropriately adapted in translation and undergo subsequent validation before they can be used in another culture and language. The process of translation of the questionnaires was based on the generally accepted guidelines of the International Quality of Life Assessment Project (IQOLA). First, the questionnaires were translated from English into Polish by two independent translators. Then, a joint version of the translation was prepared collectively and translated back into English. Each stage was followed by a written report. The translated questionnaires were then evaluated by a group of patients. We selected 31 patients with wrist problems and asked them to complete the PRWE, Mayo, Michigan and DASH questionnaires twice at intervals of 3-10 days. The results were submitted for statistical analysis. We found a statistically significant (pquestionnaires. A comparison of the PRWE and Mayo questionnaires with the DASH questionnaire also showed a statistically significant correlation (pquestionnaires was successful and that the questionnaires may be used in clinical practice.

  15. Effect of an emergency department-based electronic system for musculoskeletal consultation on facilitating care for common injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mears, Simon C; Pantle, Hardin A; Bessman, Edward S; Lifchez, Scott D

    2015-05-01

    Access to musculoskeletal consultation in the emergency department (ED) is a nationwide problem. In addition, consultation from a subspecialist may be delayed or may not be available, which can slow down the ED flow and reduce patient satisfaction. The purpose of this study was to review the 1-year results of a change in the authors' institutional practice to reduce subspecialty consultation for select musculoskeletal problems while still ensuring adequate patient follow-up in orthopedic or plastic surgery clinics for patients not seen by these services in the ED. The authors hypothesized that select injuries could be safely managed in the ED by using an electronic system to ensure appropriate follow-up care. Using Kaizen methodology, a multidisciplinary group (including ED staff, orthopedics, plastic surgery, pediatrics, nursing, radiology, therapy, and administration) met to improve care for select musculoskeletal injuries. A system was agreed on in which ED providers managed select musculoskeletal injuries without subspecialist consultation. Follow-up was organized using an electronic system, which facilitated communication between the ED staff and the secretarial staff of the subspecialist departments. Over a 1-year period, 150 patients were treated using this system. Charts and radiographs were reviewed for missed injuries. Radiographic review revealed 2 missed injuries. One patient had additional back pain and a lumbar spine fracture was found during the subspecialist follow-up visit; it was treated nonoperatively. Another patient appeared to have scapholunate widening on the injury radiograph that was not appreciated in the ED. Of the 150 patients, 51 were seen in follow-up by a subspecialist at the authors' institution. An electronic system to organize follow-up with a subspecialist allowed the ED providers to deliver safe and effective care for simple musculoskeletal injuries. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Wrist stability after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Bo; Jensen, Steen Lund; Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in stability of the wrist after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions.......The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in stability of the wrist after experimental traumatic triangular fibrocartilage complex lesions....

  17. Estimation of Thermal Sensation Based on Wrist Skin Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Soo Young; Koh, Myung Jun; Joo, Kwang Min; Noh, Seungwoo; Park, Sangyun; Kim, Youn Ho; Park, Kwang Suk

    2016-01-01

    Thermal comfort is an essential environmental factor related to quality of life and work effectiveness. We assessed the feasibility of wrist skin temperature monitoring for estimating subjective thermal sensation. We invented a wrist band that simultaneously monitors skin temperatures from the wrist (i.e., the radial artery and ulnar artery regions, and upper wrist) and the fingertip. Skin temperatures from eight healthy subjects were acquired while thermal sensation varied. To develop a thermal sensation estimation model, the mean skin temperature, temperature gradient, time differential of the temperatures, and average power of frequency band were calculated. A thermal sensation estimation model using temperatures of the fingertip and wrist showed the highest accuracy (mean root mean square error [RMSE]: 1.26 ± 0.31). An estimation model based on the three wrist skin temperatures showed a slightly better result to the model that used a single fingertip skin temperature (mean RMSE: 1.39 ± 0.18). When a personalized thermal sensation estimation model based on three wrist skin temperatures was used, the mean RMSE was 1.06 ± 0.29, and the correlation coefficient was 0.89. Thermal sensation estimation technology based on wrist skin temperatures, and combined with wearable devices may facilitate intelligent control of one’s thermal environment. PMID:27023538

  18. Surgical Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome through a Minimal Incision on the Distal Wrist Crease: An Anatomical and Clinical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Mi Yoo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAn anatomical analysis of the transverse carpal ligament (TCL and the surrounding structures might help in identifying effective measures to minimize complications. Here, we present a surgical technique based on an anatomical study that was successfully applied in clinical settings.MethodsUsing 13 hands from 8 formalin-fixed cadavers, we measured the TCL length and thickness, correlation between the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL, and distance between the distal end of the TCL and the palmar arch; the TCL cross sections and the thickest parts were also examined. Clinically, fasciotomy was performed on the relevant parts of 15 hands from 13 patients by making a minimally invasive incision on the distal wrist crease. Postoperatively, a two-point discrimination check was conducted in which the sensations of the first, second, and third fingertips and the palmar cutaneous branch injuries were monitored (average duration, 7 months.ResultsIn the 13 cadaveric hands, the distal wrist crease and the proximal end of the TCL were placed in the same location. The average length of the TCL and the distance from the distal TCL to the superficial palmar arch were 35.30±2.59 mm and 9.50±2.13 mm, respectively. The thickest part of the TCL was a region 25 mm distal to the distal wrist crease (average thickness, 4.00±0.57 mm. The 13 surgeries performed in the clinical settings yielded satisfactory results.ConclusionsThis peri-TCL anatomical study confirmed the safety of fasciotomy with a minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease. The clinical application of the technique indicated that the minimally invasive incision of the distal wrist crease was efficacious in the treatment of the carpal tunnel syndrome.

  19. Anterior wrist and medial malleolus as the novel sites of tissue selection: a retrospective study on electric shock death through the hand-to-foot circuit pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangtao; Su, Ruibing; Lv, Junyao; Hu, Bo; Gu, Huan; Li, Xianxian; Gu, Jiang; Yu, Xiaojun

    2017-05-01

    Our previous work demonstrated that characteristic changes could occur in the anterior wrist and medial malleolus in electric deaths through the hand-to-foot electric circuit pathway in an electric shock rat model. However, whether the same phenomenon occurs in humans is unknown. The aim of the present retrospective study was to ascertain whether the anterior wrist and medial malleolus could also be selected as the promising and significant sites in electric death through the hand-to-foot circuit pathway. Nineteen human cases from the autopsy and one clinical survivor who sustained a severe electric shock through the hand-to-foot circuit pathway were analyzed. Additional ten autopsy patients who died from traffic accidents and sudden cardiac attacks were used as the control group. Histopathological changes in the soft tissues of the anterior wrist and medial malleolus in all autopsy patients, as well as the electric current pathway of the survivor, were observed. The results showed that the nuclear polarizations in the anterior wrist and medial malleolus soft tissues of the electric death were extremely noticeable as compared with the controls. The most severe electrical injury in the survivor occurred in the anterior wrist. These findings suggest that the soft tissues of the anterior wrist and/or the medial malleolus as the narrowest parts of the limbs could be used as the complementary sites for tissue selection and considered as necessary locations for examinations to assess the electric death in medicolegal identification.

  20. Incorporation of tritium from wrist watches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenhofer, F.; Pock, K.

    1995-01-01

    Watches are consumer products and are subject to the regulations that control food and consumer products. Elevated concentrations of tritium were found in the urine of persons who wore wrist watches with luminous dials and plastic cases. High emission of tritium from these watches were observed. In an experiment, a volunteer wore a watch with high emissions and the build-up of the tritium concentration in urine was monitored, as well as the decline after removing the watch. Possible pathways for the incorporation and its mechanism are considered. In spite of the relatively high activity concentrations observed, the dose is negligible. On the other hand, the principle 'ALARA' can be achieved without any costs by simply choosing other types of watches. (author). 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Unusual Wrist Tremor: Unilateral Isometric Tremor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa A. Zesiewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tremors may be difficult to classify.Case Report: An 83‐year‐old male presented with an unusual left wrist tremor. The tremor could be reproducibly elicited by making a fist or carrying a weighted object (e.g., a shopping bag, bottle of water of approximately 1 lb or more, and it intensified with heavier weights. The tremor was difficult to classify, although it shared features with isometric tremor.Discussion: This specific presentation of tremor has not been reported previously. We hope that the detailed description we provide will aid other neurologists who encounter this or similar tremors in their clinics.

  2. Firefighter burn injuries: predictable patterns influenced by turnout gear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Steven A; Patel, Jignesh H; Lentz, Christopher W; Bell, Derek E

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 firefighters suffer fatal injuries annually and tens of thousands receive nonfatal injuries. Many of these injuries require medical attention and restricted activity but may be preventable. This study was designed to elucidate etiology, circumstances, and patterns of firefighter burn injury so that further prevention strategies can be designed. In particular, modification of protective equipment, or turnout gear, is one potential strategy to prevent burn injury. An Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective review was conducted with records of firefighters treated for burn injury from 2005 to 2009. Data collected included age, gender, TBSA, burn depth, anatomic location, total hospital days per patient, etiology, and circumstances of injury. Circumstances of injury were stratified into the following categories: removal/dislodging of equipment, failure of equipment to protect, training errors, and when excessive external temperatures caused patient sweat to boil under the gear. Over the 4-year period, 20 firefighters were treated for burn injury. Mean age was 38.9 ± 8.9 years and 19 of 20 patients were male. Mean burn size was 1.1 ± 2.7% TBSA. Eighteen patients suffered second-degree burns, while two patients suffered first-degree burns. Mean length of hospitalization was 2.45 days. Scald burns were responsible for injury to 13 firefighters (65%). Flame burns caused injury to four patients (20%). Only three patients received contact burns (15%). The face was the site most commonly burned, representing 29% of injuries. The hand/wrist and ears were the next largest groups, with 23 and 16% of the injuries, respectively. Other areas burned included the neck (10%), arm (6.5%), leg (6.5%), knees (3%), shoulders (3%), and head (3%). Finally, the circumstance of injury was evaluated for each patient. Misuse and noncontiguous areas of protective equipment accounted for 14 of the 20 injuries (70%). These burns were caused when hot steam

  3. Ganglion cysts in the paediatric wrist: magnetic resonance imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Jennifer; Bartlett, Murray [Royal Children' s Hospital, Medical Imaging Department, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2013-12-15

    The majority of published literature on ganglion cysts in children has been from a surgical perspective, with no dedicated radiologic study yet performed. Our aim was to assess the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging appearance of ganglion cysts in a series of paediatric MR wrist examinations. Ninety-seven consecutive paediatric MR wrist examinations were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of ganglion cysts. Only those studies with wrist ganglia were included. Cysts were assessed for location, size, internal characteristics and secondary effect(s). Forty-one ganglion cysts (2-32 mm in size) were seen in 35/97 (36%) patients (24 female, 11 male), mean age: 13 years 11 months (range: 6 years 3 months-18 years). The majority were palmar (63.4%) with the remainder dorsal. Of the cysts, 43.9% were related to a wrist ligament(s), 36.6% to a joint and 17.1% to the triangular fibrocartilage complex. Of the patients, 91.4% had wrist symptoms: pain (n=29, 82.9%), swelling (n=7, 20%) and/or palpable mass (n=4, 11.4%); 71.4% patients had significant additional wrist abnormalities. Ganglion cysts were frequently found in children referred for wrist MRI. (orig.)

  4. The epidemiology of wrist fractures in older men: the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, N C; Hooker, E R; Nielson, C M; Ensrud, K E; Harrison, S L; Orwoll, E S; Barrett-Connor, E

    2018-04-01

    There is limited wrist fracture information on men. Our goal was to calculate frequency and identify risk factors for wrist fracture in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. We confirmed that fracture history and certain medications are predictors, and identified novel predictors including markers of kidney function and physical performance. To calculate the incidence of wrist fractures and their risk factors in older community-dwelling men from the US Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. Using triannual postcards, we identified incident wrist fractures (centrally confirmed by radiology) in men aged ≥ 65. Potential risk factors included the following: demographics, lifestyle, bone mineral density (BMD), selected medications, biomarkers, and physical function and performance measures. Both baseline and time-varying models were adjusted for age, race/ethnicity, MrOS geographic location, and competing mortality risks. We observed 97 incident wrist fractures among 5875 men followed for an average of 10.8 years. The incidence of wrist fracture was 1.6 per 1000 person-years overall and ranged from 1.0 among men aged 65-69 to 2.4 among men age ≥ 80. Significant predictors included the following: fracture history after age 50 [hazard ratio (95% CI): 2.48 (1.65, 3.73)], high serum phosphate [1.25 (1.02, 1.53)], use of selective serotonin receptor inhibitor (SSRI) [3.60 (1.96, 6.63), decreased right arm BMD [0.49 (0.37, 0.65) per SD increase], and inability to perform the grip strength test [3.38 (1.24, 9.25)]. We did not find associations with factors commonly associated with wrist and other osteoporosis fractures like falls, diabetes, calcium and vitamin D intake, and alcohol intake. Among these older, community-dwelling men, we confirmed that fracture history is a strong predictor of wrist fractures in men. Medications such as SSRIs and corticosteroids also play a role in wrist fracture risk. We identified novel risk factors including kidney

  5. Dealing with Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Dealing With Sports Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Dealing With Sports Injuries ... a long way toward preventing injuries. Types of Sports Injuries Common reasons why teens get injured playing ...

  6. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work in certain jobs, you may need protection. The most common type of injury happens when something irritates the ...

  7. Imaging of hand injuries. Anatomic and radiodiagnostic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitt, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    Imaging recommendations for assessing injuries of the forearm, wrist, metacarpus and the digits are given with respect to anatomic considerations. Furthermore, dedicated algorithms of advanced imaging are introduced with radiography as the primary diagnostic tool. High-resolution CT is used for detecting and staging the complex fractures of the radius and the wrist, whereas contrast-enhanced MRI serves for depicting the injured soft tissues. At the wrist, tears of the intrinsic ligaments and the TFCC are assessed with high accuracy when applying MR arthrography or CT arthrography. Dedicated radiologic tools as well as comprehensive reports are suggested in the management of the various hand injuries. (orig.)

  8. Separating bedtime rest from activity using waist or wrist-worn accelerometers in youth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin J Tracy

    Full Text Available Recent interest in sedentary behavior and technological advances expanded use of watch-size accelerometers for continuous monitoring of physical activity (PA over extended periods (e.g., 24 h/day for 1 week in studies conducted in natural living environment. This approach necessitates the development of new methods separating bedtime rest and activity periods from the accelerometer recordings. The goal of this study was to develop a decision tree with acceptable accuracy for separating bedtime rest from activity in youth using accelerometer placed on waist or wrist. Minute-by-minute accelerometry data were collected from 81 youth (10-18 years old, 47 females during a monitored 24-h stay in a whole-room indirect calorimeter equipped with a force platform covering the floor to detect movement. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to determine the accelerometer cut points for rest and activity. To examine the classification differences, the accelerometer bedtime rest and activity classified by the algorithm in the development group (n = 41 were compared with actual bedtime rest and activity classification obtained from the room calorimeter-measured metabolic rate and movement data. The selected optimal bedtime rest cut points were 20 and 250 counts/min for the waist- and the wrist-worn accelerometer, respectively. The selected optimal activity cut points were 500 and 3,000 counts/min for waist and wrist-worn accelerometers, respectively. Bedtime rest and activity were correctly classified by the algorithm in the validation group (n = 40 by both waist- (sensitivity: 0.983, specificity: 0.946, area under ROC curve: 0. 872 and wrist-worn (0.999, 0.980 and 0.943 accelerometers. The decision tree classified bedtime rest correctly with higher accuracy than commonly used automated algorithm for both waist- and wrist-warn accelerometer (all p<0.001. We concluded that cut points developed and validated for waist- and wrist

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  10. Preventing Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Our Newsletter Donate Blog Skip breadcrumb navigation Preventing Knee Injuries Knee injuries in children and adolescent athletes ... this PDF Share this page: WHAT ARE COMMON KNEE INJURIES? Pain Syndromes One of the most common ...

  11. Hyperstaticity for ergonomie design of a wrist exoskeleton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeili, Mohammad; Jarrassé, Nathanaël; Dailey, Wayne; Burdet, Etienne; Campolo, Domenico

    2013-06-01

    Increasing the level of transparency in rehabilitation devices has been one of the main goals in robot-aided neurorehabilitation for the past two decades. This issue is particularly important to robotic structures that mimic the human counterpart's morphology and attach directly to the limb. Problems arise for complex joints such as the human wrist, which cannot be accurately matched with a traditional mechanical joint. In such cases, mechanical differences between human and robotic joint cause hyperstaticity (i.e. overconstraint) which, coupled with kinematic misalignments, leads to uncontrolled force/torque at the joint. This paper focuses on the prono-supination (PS) degree of freedom of the forearm. The overall force and torque in the wrist PS rotation is quantified by means of a wrist robot. A practical solution to avoid hyperstaticity and reduce the level of undesired force/torque in the wrist is presented, which is shown to reduce 75% of the force and 68% of the torque.

  12. MRI features in de Quervain's tenosynovitis of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glajchen, N.; Schweitzer, M.

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain's stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain's synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain's disease. De Quervain's tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  13. Hand and wrist arthritis of Behcet disease: Imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Shunsuke; Ehara, Shigeru; Hitachi, Shin; Sugimoto, Hideharu

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reports on arthritis in Behcet disease are relatively scarce, and imaging features vary. Purpose: To document the various imaging features of articular disorders of the hand and wrist in Behcet disease. Material and Methods: Four patients, four women aged 26 to 65 years, fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Behcet disease, with imaging findings of hand and wrist arthritis, were seen in two institutions. Radiography and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging were studied to elucidate the pattern and distribution. Results: Both non-erosive arthritis and erosive arthritis of different features were noted: one with non-erosive synovitis of the wrist, one with wrist synovitis with minimal erosion, and two with erosive arthritis of the distal interphalangeal joint. Conclusion: Imaging manifestations of arthritis of Behcet disease vary, and may be similar to other seronegative arthritides

  14. Treatment of wrist deformities in children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniya A Kochenova

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Patients with segmental lesions of the spinal cord at the С6-С7 and С5-С8 level were associated with restoration of active wrist extension up to the neutral position or more and were expected to achieve significant improvement of hand function. Patients with spinal cord lesions at the C5-Th1 level exhibited significant lesions of the muscles, along with bone deformities. Consequently, surgical treatment could only achieve functional wrist position with minimal improvement of hand function. Using differential approaches in the treatment of wrist contracture that are selected by determining the level of spinal cord lesion will enable physicians to predict the outcome and improve the function and appearance of the wrist.

  15. Kinematics and Dynamics of an Asymmetrical Parallel Robotic Wrist

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces an asymmetrical parallel robotic wrist, which can generate a decoupled unlimited-torsion motion and achieve high positioning accuracy. The kinematics, dexterity, and singularities of the manipulator are investigated to visualize the performance contours of the manipulator...

  16. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, A.L.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative

  17. Orthogonal views improves localisation in bone scans of wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, A.L.

    1997-09-01

    Full text: Of all nuclear medicine studies, bone scans are the most fundamental. However, straightforward these may seem, there are always mechanisms that can be implemented which assist in a more precise diagnosis, particularly in areas with an intricate bone structure. An 18-year-old right-handed student presented to her doctor with a one month history of pain over the right distal radio-ulna joint area. Clinically, she had prominence of the right ulna, which suggested that there may have been a previous injury to the wrist. Also, pronation/supination were painful where there was swelling of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon, as well as some discomfort with clicking in ulna deviation/rotation. The X-rays demonstrated some premature radial epiphysial closure. A bone scan was requested to attempt to localise the main inflammatory focus. The dynamic study was performed in the planar projection with an immediate blood pool for 300k being taken. These demonstrated a vascular blush medially. A medial blood pool image was acquired and it localised the abnormal vascularity as being dorsal. A separate focal area of less intense blood pooling was also noted in the line of the distal ulna. Delayed images showed increased uptake localised to the ulna styloid. Anatomically, the superficial vascular blush correlated with tenosynovitis. Hence, the orthogonal initial and delayed images were definitive in the diagnoses of tenosynovitis of the extensor carpi ulnaris tendon. This clearly complements the information provided by the palmar view. However, it is important to remember that an increased radiation dose to the technologist is incurred as a result of the extra orthogonal view, hence attention to technique is imperative.

  18. Social humanoid robot SARA: development of the wrist mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penčić, M.; Rackov, M.; Čavić, M.; Kiss, I.; Cioată, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a wrist mechanism for humanoid robots. The research was conducted within the project which develops social humanoid robot Sara - a mobile anthropomorphic platform for researching the social behaviour of robots. There are two basic ways for the realization of humanoid wrist. The first one is based on biologically inspired structures that have variable stiffness, and the second one on low backlash mechanisms that have high stiffness. Our solution is low backlash differential mechanism that requires small actuators. Based on the kinematic-dynamic requirements, a dynamic model of the robot wrist is formed. A dynamic simulation for several hand positions was performed and the driving torques of the wrist mechanism were determined. The realized wrist has 2 DOFs and enables movements in the direction of flexion/extension 115°, ulnar/radial deviation ±45° and the combination of these two movements. It consists of a differential mechanism with three spur bevel gears, two of which are driving and identical, while the last one is the driven gear to which the robot hand is attached. Power transmission and motion from the actuator to the input links of the differential mechanism is realized with two parallel placed identical gear mechanisms. The wrist mechanism has high carrying capacity and reliability, high efficiency, a compact design and low backlash that provides high positioning accuracy and repeatability of movements, which is essential for motion control.

  19. A digital database of wrist bone anatomy and carpal kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Douglas C; Crisco, Joseph J; Trafton, Theodore G; Leventhal, Evan L

    2007-01-01

    The skeletal wrist consists of eight small, intricately shaped carpal bones. The motion of these bones is complex, occurs in three dimensions, and remains incompletely defined. Our previous efforts have been focused on determining the in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) kinematics of the normal and abnormal carpus. In so doing we have developed an extensive database of carpal bone anatomy and kinematics from a large number of healthy subjects. The purpose of this paper is to describe that database and to make it available to other researchers. CT volume images of both wrists from 30 healthy volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were acquired in multiple wrist positions throughout the normal range of wrist motion. The outer cortical surfaces of the carpal bones, radius and ulna, and proximal metacarpals were segmented and the 3-D motion of each bone was calculated for each wrist position. The database was constructed to include high-resolution surface models, measures of bone volume and shape, and the 3-D kinematics of each segmented bone. The database does not include soft tissues of the wrist. While there are numerous digital anatomical databases, this one is unique in that it includes a large number of subjects and it contains in vivo kinematic data as well as the bony anatomy.

  20. A randomized single blind crossover trial comparing leather and commercial wrist splints for treating chronic wrist pain in adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiele, Jill; Nimmo, Rachel; Rowell, Wendy; Quinn, Stephen; Jones, Graeme

    2009-01-01

    Background To compare the effectiveness of a custom-made leather wrist splint (LS) with a commercially available fabric splint (FS) in adults with chronic wrist pain. Methods Participants (N = 25, mean age = 54) were randomly assigned to treatment order in a 2-phase crossover trial. Splints were worn for 2 weeks, separated by a one-week washout period. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and after each splint phase using the Australian/Canadian Osteoarthritis Hand Index (AUSCAN), the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and Jamar dynamometer by an observer blinded to treatment allocation. Results Both styles of wrist splint significantly reduced pain (effect size LS 0.79, FS 0.43), improved hand function and increased grip strength compared to baseline (all p leather splint compared to the commercially available splint. Conclusion Leather wrist splints were superior to a commercially available fabric splint for the short-term relief of pain and dysfunction. PMID:19843345

  1. [Relieving pre-exam anxiety syndrome with wrist-ankle acupuncture: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Shi; Li, Tong-ming; Fang, Fan-fu; He, Hou-luo; Zhou, Qing-hui; Gu, Wei; Zhou, Shuang

    2011-06-01

    Pre-exam anxiety syndrome is a common condition occurring in pre-exam students and directly affects their examination performance and physical state. Wrist-ankle acupuncture has significant therapeutic effects in treating mental disorders and may also relieve the symptoms of pre-exam anxiety syndrome. To assess the therapeutic effect of wrist-ankle acupuncture on pre-exam anxiety syndrome. A total of 60 students who met the inclusion criteria of pre-exam anxiety syndrome were enrolled from a university in Shanghai and they were randomly divided into treatment group and control group. There were 30 cases in each group, and no case failed to follow-up. In the treatment group, wrist-ankle acupuncture was adopted to point upper 1 bilaterally (impression between flexor carpi ulnaris tendon and ulnar margin), and there was no requirement for Deqi (arrival of qi). In the control group, sham acupuncture was adopted. The treatment was applied 3 times totally in both groups one week before the exam, once every other day, each time with the needles retained for 30 min. The therapeutic effects were compared between two groups. Before and after 3 treatments, Sarason Test Anxiety Scale (TAS) and Expectation and Treatment Credibility Scale (ETCS) were measured and evaluated. The therapeutic effect experienced by the treatment group was better than that of the control group (PETCS before treatment between the two groups. The scores of TAS after treatment in two groups were higher than those before treatment (PETCS than those in the control group (P<0.05, P<0.01). No adverse reaction was reported. Wrist-ankle acupuncture can relieve the symptoms of pre-exam anxiety syndrome significantly, and this therapy is highly safe.

  2. Use of the mini C-arm for wrist fractures - Establishing a diagnostic reference level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Love, G. J.; Pillai, A.; Gibson, S.

    2008-01-01

    The establishment of diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for all typical radiological examinations became mandatory following the implementation of the Ionising Radiations (Medical Exposure) Regulations Act 2000. At present, there are no national dosage guidelines in the UK regarding use of fluoroscopy in orthopaedic trauma. The increasing popularity of the mini C-arm image intensifier amongst surgeons has led to concerns regarding use of ionizing radiation by personnel who have not been trained in radiation protection. It is therefore essential to have formal protocols for use of the mini C-arm to comply with the law and to maintain safe clinical practice. It is attempted to provide dose data for wrist fracture manipulations that may be used as a basis for setting a DRL for this procedure. Screening times were recorded for 80 wrist manipulations in a fracture clinic setting using a mini C-arm image intensifier. A DRL was set using the third quartile value for screening time. The median screening time for wrist fractures was 20 s with a range from 1 to 177 s. The third quartile value for screening time was 34 s. This value can be used as a provisional DRL for wrist fracture manipulations. The DRL is a quantitative guide for the optimisation of radiological protection. IR(ME)R 2000 states that if it is consistently exceeded by an individual operator or a piece of equipment, investigation and remedial action must be taken. We recommend that trauma units establish their own local DRLs for common procedures as made mandatory by legislation. (authors)

  3. Pre-evaluated safe human iPSC-derived neural stem cells promote functional recovery after spinal cord injury in common marmoset without tumorigenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiomi Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Murine and human iPSC-NS/PCs (induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells promote functional recovery following transplantation into the injured spinal cord in rodents. However, for clinical applicability, it is critical to obtain proof of the concept regarding the efficacy of grafted human iPSC-NS/PCs (hiPSC-NS/PCs for the repair of spinal cord injury (SCI in a non-human primate model. This study used a pre-evaluated "safe" hiPSC-NS/PC clone and an adult common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus model of contusive SCI. SCI was induced at the fifth cervical level (C5, followed by transplantation of hiPSC-NS/PCs at 9 days after injury. Behavioral analyses were performed from the time of the initial injury until 12 weeks after SCI. Grafted hiPSC-NS/PCs survived and differentiated into all three neural lineages. Furthermore, transplantation of hiPSC-NS/PCs enhanced axonal sparing/regrowth and angiogenesis, and prevented the demyelination after SCI compared with that in vehicle control animals. Notably, no tumor formation occurred for at least 12 weeks after transplantation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed that mRNA expression levels of human neurotrophic factors were significantly higher in cultured hiPSC-NS/PCs than in human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs. Finally, behavioral tests showed that hiPSC-NS/PCs promoted functional recovery after SCI in the common marmoset. Taken together, these results indicate that pre-evaluated safe hiPSC-NS/PCs are a potential source of cells for the treatment of SCI in the clinic.

  4. The effect of wheelchair propulsion style on changes in time spent in extreme wrist orientations after a bout of fatiguing propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukowski, Lisa A; Hass, Chris J; Shechtman, Orit; Christou, Evangelos A; Tillman, Mark D

    2017-10-01

    This study compared how wheelchair propulsion styles affect changes in percentage of time spent in extreme wrist orientations, which have been associated with median nerve injury, after a fatiguing bout of propulsion. Twenty novice, non-disabled adult males learned arcing (ARC) and semicircular (SEMI) propulsion styles and utilised each to perform a wheelchair fatigue protocol. ARC and SEMI did not significantly differ in terms of changes after the fatigue protocol in percentage of time spent in extreme flexion/extension or radial/ulnar deviation at the push phase beginning or end. A pattern was observed, although not significant, of greater increases in percentage of time spent in extreme wrist extension and ulnar deviation during the push phase beginning and ulnar deviation during the push phase end while utilising SEMI relative to ARC. This study evinces that individual differences are greater than observed changes in extreme wrist orientations for both propulsion styles. Practitioner Summary: How wheelchair propulsion styles change with fatigue in terms of extreme wrist orientations was examined. This study evinces that individual differences are greater than observed changes in extreme wrist orientations for both propulsion styles and point towards the need for future research on individual differences utilising propulsion styles.

  5. Magnetic resonance arthrography in chronic wrist pain. Artografia con Risonanza Magnetica (arto-RM) nelle malattie dolorose croniche del polso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valeri, G.; Ferrara, C. (Ancona Univ. (Italy). Cattedra di Radiologia); Carloni, S. (Ancona Univ. (Italy). Cattedra di Ortopedia) (and others)

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the clinical role of Magnetic Resonance Arthrography (MRA) of the wrist in subjects with chronic pain. Thirty-five patients complaining of wrist pain for more than 6 months were submitted to MRI an MRA. All patients received and intra-articular injection of 2-10 mL of a 10 mmol saline solution of Gd-DPTA. The overall diagnostic accuracy rates of MRI and MRA were 40% and 81% respectively, with sensitivity and specificity of 63% and 39% (MRI) and of 82% and 79% (MRA). The conclusion is that compared with MRI, MRA can be considered a useful tool for the visualization of interosseus carpal ligaments and of the triangular fibrocartilage complex. MRA also helps detect injuries in these structures.

  6. Pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to Emergency Departments, United States 1990-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yard, Ellen E; Knox, Christy L; Smith, Gary A; Comstock, R Dawn

    2007-08-01

    Although an estimated 6.5 million United States (US) children aged 6-17 practiced a martial art in 2004, there have been no nationally representative studies comparing pediatric injuries among the three most popular disciplines, karate, taekwondo, and judo. Describe pediatric martial arts injuries presenting to a representative sample of US Emergency Departments (EDs) from 1990 to 2003. We reviewed all martial arts injuries captured by the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC), National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). An estimated 128,400 children injuries from 1990 to 2003. Injured tended to be male (73.0%) and had a mean age of 12.1 years. Most injuries were attributed to karate (79.5%). The most common mechanism of injury was being kicked (25.6%), followed by falling (20.6%) and kicking (18.0%). The majority of injuries occurred to the lower leg/foot/ankle (30.1%) and hand/wrist (24.5%). The most common injury diagnoses were sprains/strains (29.3%), contusions/abrasions (27.8%), and fractures (24.6%). Participants in judo sustained significantly higher proportions of shoulder/upper arm injuries than karate (IPR=4.31, 95% CI: 2.84-6.55) or taekwondo (IPR=9.75, 95% CI: 3.53-26.91) participants. There were also higher proportions of neck injuries sustained by judo participants compared to karate (IPR=4.73, 95% CI: 1.91-11.70) or taekwondo (IPR=4.17, 95% CI: 1.02-17.06) participants. Pediatric martial arts injuries differ by discipline. Understanding these injury patterns can assist with the development of discipline-specific preventive interventions.

  7. Permanent Injury and the Disability-Mitigating Effects of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Cater; Sohee Kang; Byron Lew; Marco Pollanen

    2013-01-01

    Using data from Ontario, we study the extent to which education mitigates the realized work-disabling effects of permanent occupational injury. Focusing first on the rates of post-injury employment, our results suggest that education has a strong disability-mitigating effect in cases of knee and shoulder injuries, but a smaller effect where workers have experienced permanent back or wrist/finger injuries. A comparison of pre- and post-injury occupations then reveals that education mitigates d...

  8. Wrist ultrasound analysis of patients with early rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Mendonça

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we evaluated 42 wrists using the semi-quantitative scales power Doppler ultrasound (PDUS and gray scale ultrasound (GSUS with scores ranging from 0 to 3 and correlated the results with clinical, laboratory and radiographic data. Twenty-one patients (17 women and 4 men with rheumatoid arthritis according to criteria of the American College of Rheumatology were enrolled in the study from September 2008 to July 2009 at Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP. The average disease duration was 14 months. The patients were 66.6% Caucasians and 33.3% non-Caucasians, with a mean age of 42 and 41 years, respectively. A dorsal longitudinal scan was performed by ultrasound on the radiocarpal and midcarpal joints using GE LOGIQ XP-linear ultrasound and a high frequency (8-10 MHz transducer. All patients were X-rayed, and the Larsen score was determined for the joints, with grades ranging from 0 to V. This study showed significant correlations between clinical, sonographic and laboratory data: GSUS and swollen right wrist (r = 0.546, GSUS of right wrist and swelling of left wrist (r = 0.511, PDUS of right wrist and pain in left wrist (r = 0.436, PDUS of right wrist and C-reactive protein (r = 0.466. Ultrasound can be considered a useful tool in the diagnosis of synovitis in early rheumatoid arthritis mainly when the anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide and rheumatoid factor are negative, and can lead to an early change in the therapeutic decision.

  9. Machine learning for activity recognition: hip versus wrist data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trost, Stewart G; Zheng, Yonglei; Wong, Weng-Keen

    2014-01-01

    Problem addressed: Wrist-worn accelerometers are associated with greater compliance. However, validated algorithms for predicting activity type from wrist-worn accelerometer data are lacking. This study compared the activity recognition rates of an activity classifier trained on acceleration signal collected on the wrist and hip. Methodology: 52 children and adolescents (mean age 13.7  ±  3.1 year) completed 12 activity trials that were categorized into 7 activity classes: lying down, sitting, standing, walking, running, basketball, and dancing. During each trial, participants wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ tri-axial accelerometer on the right hip and the non-dominant wrist. Features were extracted from 10-s windows and inputted into a regularized logistic regression model using R (Glmnet + L1). Results: Classification accuracy for the hip and wrist was 91.0% ± 3.1% and 88.4% ± 3.0%, respectively. The hip model exhibited excellent classification accuracy for sitting (91.3%), standing (95.8%), walking (95.8%), and running (96.8%); acceptable classification accuracy for lying down (88.3%) and basketball (81.9%); and modest accuracy for dance (64.1%). The wrist model exhibited excellent classification accuracy for sitting (93.0%), standing (91.7%), and walking (95.8%); acceptable classification accuracy for basketball (86.0%); and modest accuracy for running (78.8%), lying down (74.6%) and dance (69.4%). Potential Impact: Both the hip and wrist algorithms achieved acceptable classification accuracy, allowing researchers to use either placement for activity recognition. (paper)

  10. Sensory impairments and wrist fractures: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergthora Baldursdottir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate vestibular function, foot sensation, postural control and functional abilities, and to evaluate whether these variables are associated with fall-related wrist fracture. Methods: A case-control study was conducted with 98 subjects, age range 50–75 years, who had sustained a fall-related wrist fracture. Forty-eight sex-, age- and physical activity-matched individuals, with no previous history of wrist fracture, served as controls. Measurements included: head-shake test (HST, tuning fork, biothesiometer, Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments (MF, Sensory Organization Test (SOT, Five-Times-Sit-to-Stand Test (FTSTS, 10-m walk test (10MWT, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC, and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI scales. Logistic regression models were used to determine associations of variables with a fall-related wrist fracture. Results: Vestibular asymmetry was apparent in 82% of wrist fracture subjects and 63% of controls (p = 0.012. Plantar pressure sensation (p <0.001, SOT composite scores (p < 0.001, 10MWT (p <0.001, FTSTS (p <0.001, ABC (p <0.001 and DHI (p <0.005 were significantly poorer among cases than controls. A positive HST (odds ratio (OR 5.424; p = 0.008 and monofilament sensation (OR 3.886; p = 0.014 showed the strongest associations with having a fall-related wrist fracture. Conclusion: Asymmetrical vestibular function and reduced plantar pressure sensation are associated with fall-related wrist fractures among the ageing population. These factors are potential targets for future interventions.

  11. Education in wrist arthroscopy: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obdeijn, M C; Bavinck, N; Mathoulin, C; van der Horst, C M A M; Schijven, M P; Tuijthof, G J M

    2015-05-01

    Arthroscopy has assumed an important place in wrist surgery. It requires specific operative skills that are now mainly acquired in the operating room. In other fields of endoscopic surgery, e-learning and virtual reality (VR) have introduced new perspectives in teaching skills. This leads to the following research question: Could the current way of teaching wrist arthroscopy skills be supported using new educational media, such as e-learning and simulator training? The literature was searched for available methods of teaching endoscopic skills. Articles were assessed on the evidence of validity. In addition, a survey was sent to all members of the European Wrist Arthroscopy Society (EWAS) to find out whether hand surgeons express a need to embrace modern educational tools such as e-learning or simulators for training of wrist arthroscopy skills. This study shows that the current way of teaching wrist arthroscopy skills can be supported using new educational media, such as e-learning and simulator training. Literature indicates that e-learning can be a valuable tool for teaching basic knowledge of arthroscopy and supports the hypothesis that the use of virtual reality and simulators in training enhances operative skills in surgical trainees. This survey indicates that 55 out of 65 respondents feel that an e-learning program would be a valuable asset and 62 out of the 65 respondents are positive on the additional value of wrist arthroscopy simulator in training. Study results support the need and relevance to strengthen current training of wrist arthroscopy using e-learning and simulator training. V.

  12. Chest Injuries Associated with Head Injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of mortality and severe morbidity. Although there have been significant advances in management, associated severe injuries, in particular chest injuries, remain a major challenge. Extracranial injuries, especially chest injuries increase mortality in patients with TBI in both short.

  13. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Filippo, Massimo; Pogliacomi, Francesco; Bertellini, Annalisa; Araoz, Philip A.; Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna; Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo; Zompatori, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  14. MDCT arthrography of the wrist: Diagnostic accuracy and indications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Filippo, Massimo [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)], E-mail: massimo.defilippo@unipr.it; Pogliacomi, Francesco [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Bertellini, Annalisa [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Araoz, Philip A. [Department of Radiology, Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic, 200 First St SW, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States); Averna, Raffaele; Sverzellati, Nicola; Ingegnoli, Anna [Department of Clinical Sciences, Section of Radiological Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci, 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Corradi, Maurizio; Costantino, Cosimo [Orthopaedics, Traumatology and Functional Rehabilitation Unit, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Parma Hospital, Via Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Zompatori, Maurizio [Department of Radiological and Histopathological Sciences, Policlinic S.Orsola-Malpighi, University of Bologna, Via Massarenti 9, 40138 Bologna (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy and indications of arthrography with Multidetector Computed Tomography (arthro-MDCT) of the wrist in patients with absolute or relative contraindications to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies and in patients with periarticular metal implants using diagnostic arthroscopy as the gold standard. Materials and methods: After intra-articular injection of iodixanol and volumetric acquisition, 43 wrists in patients of both genders (18 females, 25 males, age range 32-60 years) were examined with a 16-detector-row CT scanner. Fifteen patients had prior wrist surgery. The patients had arthralgia, degenerative and traumatic arthropathies as well as limited range of motion, but no radiologically detected fractures. All examinations were interpreted by two experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. The findings were compared with arthroscopic findings carried out within 28 days of the CT study. Results: In non-operated and operated wrists the comparison between arthro-MDCT and arthroscopy showed sensitivity, specificity and accuracy ranging between 92% and 94% for triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC), between 80% and 100% for intrinsic ligaments located within the proximal carpal compartment, and between 94% and 100% for articular cartilage. Inter-observer agreement between two radiologists, in the evaluation of all types of lesions, was almost perfect (k = 0.96) and statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Arthro-MDCT of the wrist provides an accurate diagnosis to identify chondral, fibrocartilaginous and intra-articular ligament lesions in patients who cannot be evaluated by MRI, and in post-surgical patients.

  15. The Epidemiology of Injuries Across the Weight-Training Sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Justin W L; Winwood, Paul W

    2017-03-01

    Weight-training sports, including weightlifting, powerlifting, bodybuilding, strongman, Highland Games, and CrossFit, are weight-training sports that have separate divisions for males and females of a variety of ages, competitive standards, and bodyweight classes. These sports may be considered dangerous because of the heavy loads commonly used in training and competition. Our objective was to systematically review the injury epidemiology of these weight-training sports, and, where possible, gain some insight into whether this may be affected by age, sex, competitive standard, and bodyweight class. We performed an electronic search using PubMed, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, and Embase for injury epidemiology studies involving competitive athletes in these weight-training sports. Eligible studies included peer-reviewed journal articles only, with no limit placed on date or language of publication. We assessed the risk of bias in all studies using an adaption of the musculoskeletal injury review method. Only five of the 20 eligible studies had a risk of bias score ≥75 %, meaning the risk of bias in these five studies was considered low. While 14 of the studies had sample sizes >100 participants, only four studies utilized a prospective design. Bodybuilding had the lowest injury rates (0.12-0.7 injuries per lifter per year; 0.24-1 injury per 1000 h), with strongman (4.5-6.1 injuries per 1000 h) and Highland Games (7.5 injuries per 1000 h) reporting the highest rates. The shoulder, lower back, knee, elbow, and wrist/hand were generally the most commonly injured anatomical locations; strains, tendinitis, and sprains were the most common injury type. Very few significant differences in any of the injury outcomes were observed as a function of age, sex, competitive standard, or bodyweight class. While the majority of the research we reviewed utilized retrospective designs, the weight-training sports appear to have relatively low rates of injury compared with common team

  16. Clinical value of MRI on wrists with arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Qiang; Ma Daqing; He Wen; Le Erhu; Ma Xinfa; Wang Jun; Zuo Zhaoyong

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the appearances of various kinds of arthritis on MRI, and to assess and evaluate the role of MRI on diagnosing various kinds of arthritis. Methods: One hundred and fifty-one patients with medical history of wrist pain entered the study. T 1 -weighted spin echo, STIR (short time inversion recovery) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were examined in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical data including swollen joint and patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory, examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score (HAQ). According to 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, in 151 patients, 80 patients were diagnosed as rheumatoid arthritis, 29 patients as undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy, 20 patients as seronegative spondyloarthropathy, and 22 as other kinds of connective tissue diseases. Results: All 80 patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis had bilateral pannus. Among 29 patients diagnosed with undifferentiated spondyloanthropathy, 3 cases had bilateral pannus, 24 had lateral pannus. Among 20 patients diagnosed with seronegative spondyloanthropathy, 4 cases had bilateral pannus, 15 had lateral pannus. Among 22 patients diagnosed with other kinds of connective tissue disease, 21 had lateral pannus. Bilateral pannus on bilateral wrists occured in 87 patients. There were not significant difference in the unilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =6.157; P>0.05). But there were significant difference in the bilateral pannus among patients with various arthritis (χ 2 =126.882, P 2 =94.192, P 2 =70.354, P 2 =96.174, P<0.001). Conclusion: MRI can show the pathologic changes of wrists with various kinds of arthritis. MRI plays an important role in the differential diagnosis of various kinds of arthritis

  17. Hand and wrist involvement in systemic sclerosis: US features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Véronique; Bazeli, Ramin; Elhai, Muriel; Campagna, Raphaël; Pessis, Éric; Avouac, Jérôme; Allanore, Yannick; Drapé, Jean-Luc; Guérini, Henri

    2013-12-01

    To characterize ultrasonographic (US) features in the hand of patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and to evaluate the sensitivity of US in the detection of calcinosis and acroosteolysis. The local ethics committee approved this study, and oral informed consent was obtained. A total of 44 consecutive patients with SSc (34 women; mean age, 56.1 years ± 12.1 [standard deviation]; 10 men; mean age, 45.0 years ± 14.0) and 30 healthy control subjects (20 women; mean age, 46.3 years ± 12.1; 10 men; mean age, 39.6 years ± 10.8) were included between October 2010 and December 2011. Bilateral US, including Doppler assessment of the wrists, hands, and fingers, was performed, and presence of synovitis, tenosynovitis with or without a layered appearance, calcifications, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization was recorded. Radiography of both hands was performed to assess for acroosteolysis and calcinosis. Frequency of US features, sensitivity of US for calcinosis and acroosteolysis, and respective confidence intervals were calculated. Synovitis was found in 17 patients (39%). Tenosynovitis was found in 12 patients (27%), and it had a layered pattern in 15 (41%) of 37 cases. Calcinosis was found in 17 patients (39%) with US, with a sensitivity of 89%. Acroosteolysis was found in nine (20%) patients with US and in 10 (23%) patients with radiography, with 90% sensitivity for US. Distal vascularization was detected in 26 patients (59%) and 30 control subjects (100%) and was in contact with the acroosteolysis bed in seven (78%) of nine patients with SSc. US can be used to assess features of SSc, including synovitis, tenosynovitis, calcinosis, acroosteolysis, and distal vascularization and is sensitive for calcinosis and acroosteolysis detection. A layered pattern (similar to the appearance of an artichoke heart) of tenosynovitis was seen commonly. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2013.

  18. Comparison of Injuries in American Collegiate Football and Club Rugby: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willigenburg, Nienke W; Borchers, James R; Quincy, Richard; Kaeding, Christopher C; Hewett, Timothy E

    2016-03-01

    American football and rugby players are at substantial risk of injury because of the full-contact nature of these sports. Methodological differences between previous epidemiological studies hamper an accurate comparison of injury rates between American football and rugby. To directly compare injury rates in American collegiate football and rugby, specified by location, type, mechanism, and severity of injury, as reported by licensed medical professionals. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Licensed medical professionals (athletic trainer or physician) associated with the football and rugby teams of a National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university reported attendance and injury details over 3 autumn seasons. Injuries were categorized by the location, type, mechanism, and severity of injury, and the injury rate was calculated per 1000 athlete-exposures (AEs). Injury rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated to compare overall, game, and practice injury rates within and between sports. The overall injury rate was 4.9/1000 AEs in football versus 15.2/1000 AEs in rugby: IRR = 3.1 (95% CI, 2.3-4.2). Game injury rates were higher than practice injury rates: IRR = 6.5 (95% CI, 4.5-9.3) in football and IRR = 5.1 (95% CI, 3.0-8.6) in rugby. Injury rates for the shoulder, wrist/hand, and lower leg and for sprains, fractures, and contusions in rugby were >4 times as high as those in football (all P ≤ 0.006). Concussion rates were 1.0/1000 AEs in football versus 2.5/1000 AEs in rugby. Most injuries occurred via direct player contact, especially during games. The rate of season-ending injuries (>3 months of time loss) was 0.8/1000 AEs in football versus 1.0/1000 AEs in rugby: IRR = 1.3 (95% CI, 0.4-3.4). Overall injury rates were substantially higher in collegiate rugby compared with football. Similarities between sports were observed in the most common injury types (sprains and concussions), locations (lower extremity and head), and mechanisms (direct player contact

  19. Iatrogenic injuries of the common femoral artery (CFA) and external iliac artery (EIA) during endograft placement: an underdiagnosed entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Patel, Nirav; Gopal, Kapil; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-09-01

    Early limb occlusions following endovascular treatment of aorto-iliac aneurysmal disease is not uncommon (4%-13%). To assess whether the femoral artery entry site could potentially cause this complication, we prospectively evaluated the ipsilateral common femoral artery (CFA) and distal external iliac artery (EIA) with intraoperative duplex scans (IDS). There were 134 patients with infrarenal nonruptured abdominal aorto-iliac aneurysms treated with endografts since 2002 at our institution. Age ranged from 65 to 89 years (mean: 77 +/- 7 years). Aneuryx (n = 41), Zenith (n = 50), and Excluder (n = 43) endografts were used for repair. All procedures were performed via open exposure of the CFA. Introducer diameter varied from 12 mm to 22 mm. All patients underwent IDS of the CFA and distal EIA after repair of the arteriotomies. In 34 patients (25%), we documented intimal dissections causing severe (>70%) stenoses. Of the 271 arteries that were examined, 38 (14%) had abnormal findings that demanded intervention. These were repaired with flap excision, tacking sutures revision, or patch angioplasty (n = 36). Repeat IDS confirmed the adequacy of the repair. No statistical difference was noted if the site of larger introducer sheath and the incidence of flap formation. In addition, 10 small flaps or plaques were visualized but did not create significant stenosis. No differences were noted in the incidence of positive duplex exams between each type graft (P = .4). No early or late iliac limb occlusions were noted. Follow-up of 94% was obtained. Completion arterial duplex scans are helpful in detecting a substantial number of clinically unsuspected technical defects caused by introducer sheaths. Timely diagnosis and repair of these defects may decrease the incidence of early limb occlusion following endograft placement.

  20. 78 FR 68905 - Agency Information Collection (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-15

    ... Number: 2900-NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire). Type of Review: New data... Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration...- NEW (Wrist Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER...

  1. Validation of the IOF quality of life questionnaire for patients with wrist fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lips, P.T.A.M.; Jameson, K.; Bianchi, M.L.; Goemaere, S.; Boonen, S.; Reeve, J.; Stepan, J.; Johnell, O.; van Schoor, N.M.; Dennison, E.; Kanis, J.A.; Cooper, C.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Wrist fracture causes pain and decreased physical, social and emotional function. The International Osteoporosis Foundation has developed a specific questionnaire to assess quality of life in patients with wrist fracture. This questionnaire, including 12 questions, was validated in a

  2. Technical guide to evaluate upper limb joints (shoulder, elbow and wrist) by ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obregon Baez, Luis Rafael

    2014-01-01

    A guideline to follow is offered to radiologists and residents of radiology service of medical imaging, when evaluating by ultrasound the shoulder joints, elbow, wrist. The importance to performing of musculoskeletal ultrasound by its pathology variable is established. The use of appropriate equipment and effective application of the techniques exposed of echography exploration have made enable the valuation of many pathologies with high sensitivity and specificity. The echography has been the musculoskeletal imaging technique that more rapidly has evolved. Currently, this technique has been replaced by magnetic resonance imaging in various clinical fields and also serves as a complement to other techniques. Exposed techniques have been of great benefit for radiologists medical and residents, obtaining with its use a quick guide for the realization of upper limb musculoskeletal ultrasounds. The appropriate and easy techniques are better known for the evaluation of these structures, and so document both sports injuries, as joint and rheumatic diseases [es

  3. Sports injuries in school gaelic football: a study over one season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A W

    1996-01-01

    School football injuries were studied over the seven months of one season on 150 males aged 16.94 +/- 0.82 years. Training averaged 4.13 +/- 1.47 hours per week and matches 1.84 +/- 0.60 hours per week. Mean time injured was: 0.51 +/- 1.7 days in hospital, 34.27 +/- 37.08 days off sport and 13.98 +/- 5.22 days of restricted activity. There were 136 match and 63 training injuries giving 175.98 injuries per 10000 hours of matches and 31.06 injuries per 10000 hours of training. Injuries were treated as follows: hospital 83, general practitioners 51, physiotherapists 28, no treatment 38. The most common injuries were: ankle sprain (11.6% of the total), hamstring strain (6.5%), contusion (6.5%) back strain (6%) knee sprain (5.0%), finger sprain (5.0%), other muscle strains (5.0%), fracture of the wrist (5.0%), dislocation of the finger (4.5%), overuse injury of the back (4.0%), tenosynovitis (3.5%), fracture of the ankle (3.0%). Thirteen injuries were to goal-keepers, 85 to backs, 31 to mid-field players and 70 to forwards. In 34.83% of the injuries foul play was given as the major cause. This was followed by "Lack of fitness", "Poor kit or boots" and "Previous injury" (all 11.24%). The most common minor cause was "Poor state of the pitch" (17.42% of injuries).

  4. The Epidemiology of Injuries in Mixed Martial Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lystad, Reidar P.; Gregory, Kobi; Wilson, Juno

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mixed martial arts (MMA) has experienced a surge in popularity since emerging in the 1990s, but the sport has also faced concomitant criticism from public, political, and medical holds. Notwithstanding the polarized discourse concerning the sport, no systematic review of the injury problems in MMA has been published to date. Purpose: To systematically review the epidemiologic data on injuries in MMA and to quantitatively estimate injury incidence and risk factor effect sizes. Study Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Electronic searching of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, and SPORTDiscus databases to identify studies reporting on the epidemiology of injuries in MMA. Random-effects models were used to obtain pooled summary estimates of the injury incidence rate per 1000 athlete-exposures (IIRAE) and rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I 2 statistic. Results: A total of 6 studies were eligible for inclusion in this review. The IIRAE summary estimate was found to be 228.7 (95% CI, 110.4-473.5). No studies reported injury severity. The most commonly injured anatomic region was the head (range, 66.8%-78.0%) followed by the wrist/hand (range, 6.0%-12.0%), while the most frequent injury types were laceration (range, 36.7%-59.4%), fracture (range, 7.4%-43.3%), and concussion (range, 3.8%-20.4%). The most notable risk factors pertained to the outcome of bouts. Losers incurred 3 times as many injuries as winners, and fighters in bouts ending with knockout or technical knockout incurred more than 2 times as many injuries as fighters in bouts ending with submission. Conclusion: Notwithstanding the paucity of data, the injury incidence in MMA appears to be greater than in most, if not all, other popular and commonly practiced combat sports. In general, the injury pattern in MMA is very similar to that in professional boxing but unlike that found in other combat sports

  5. Meta-Analysis: Association Between Wrist Posture and Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Among Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doohee You

    2014-03-01

    Conclusion: We found evidence that prolonged exposure to non-neutral wrist postures is associated with a twofold increased risk for CTS compared with low hours of exposure to non-neutral wrist postures. Workplace interventions to prevent CTS should incorporate training and engineering interventions that reduce sustained non-neutral wrist postures.

  6. Stiffness of the ligaments of the human wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savelberg, H.H.C.M.; Kooloos, J.G.M.; Huiskes, H.W.J.; Kauer, J.M.G.

    1992-01-01

    The stiffnesses of the superficial ligaments of 14 human cadaver wrist joints have been determined. In these experiments the tested, fresh-frozen carpal joints are divided into a number of bone-ligament-bone complexes, which are loaded in a tensile testing machine at a rate of 66% of the ligaments'

  7. Education in wrist arthroscopy: past, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Obdeijn, M. C.; Bavinck, N.; Mathoulin, C.; van der Horst, C. M. A. M.; Schijven, M. P.; Tuijthof, G. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopy has assumed an important place in wrist surgery. It requires specific operative skills that are now mainly acquired in the operating room. In other fields of endoscopic surgery, e-learning and virtual reality (VR) have introduced new perspectives in teaching skills. This leads to the

  8. MR imaging of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golimbu, C.N.; Firooznia, H.; Rafii, M.; Melone, C.; Leber, C.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the wrist was performed in 25 patients who had pain or localized soft-tissue swelling in the ulnar side of the wrist. T1-weighted coronal images were obtained in all patients. In addition, coronal or axial images with T2-weighted or fast-field-echo sequences were obtained in 16 of these patients. MR imaging demonstrated tears of the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist in 13 patients. Twelve of these tears were confirmed at surgery. In one patient, the triangular fibrocartilage was found at surgery to be stretched and folded on itself but not torn. This represents the one false-positive MR image in this group of patients. In 12 patients, the symptoms could be explained by a diversity of MR abnormalities, such as aseptic necrosis of carpal bones, subluxation of distal radioulnar joint, and synovitis of the tendon sheaths. MR imaging offers the advantage of investigating the triangular fibrocartilage of the wrist in a noninvasive manner; it may be used as a screening method in patients considered for surgery

  9. Ultrasound-guided platelet-rich plasma injections for the treatment of common peroneal nerve palsy associated with multiple ligament injuries of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, M; Yoshioka, T; Ortega, M; Delgado, D; Anitua, E

    2014-05-01

    Peroneal nerve palsy in traumatic knee dislocations associated with multiple ligament injuries is common. Several surgical approaches are described for this lesion with less-than-optimal outcomes. The present case represents the application of plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) technology for the treatment of peroneal nerve palsy with drop foot. This technology has already been proven its therapeutic potential for various musculoskeletal disorders. Based on these results, we hypothesized that PRGF could stimulate the healing process of traumatic peroneal nerve palsy with drop foot. The patient was a healthy 28-year-old man. He suffered peroneal nerve palsy with drop foot after multiple ligament injuries of the knee. PRGF was prepared according to the manufactured instruction. Eleven months after the trauma with severe axonotmesis, serial intraneural infiltrations of PRGF were started using ultrasound guidance. The therapeutic effect was assessed by electromyography (EMG), echogenicity of the peroneal nerve under ultrasound (US) and manual muscle testing. Twenty-one months after the first injection, not complete but partial useful recovery is obtained. He is satisfied with walking and running without orthosis. Sensitivity demonstrates almost full recovery in the peroneal nerve distribution area. EMG controls show complete reinnervation for the peroneus longus and a better reinnervation for the tibialis anterior muscle, compared with previous examinations. Plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF) infiltrations could enhance healing process of peroneal nerve palsy with drop foot. This case report demonstrates the therapeutic potential of this technology for traumatic peripheral nerve palsy and the usefulness of US-guided PRGF. V.

  10. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin [Shandong University, Department of MR, Shandong Medical Imaging Research Institute Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong (China); Yang, Li [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai Institute of Medical Imaging, Zhongshan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Xu [Shandong Chest Hospital, Department of Radiology, Jinan, Shandong (China); Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie [Philips Healthcare, Shanghai (China); Chhabra, Avneesh [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  11. Hand rest and wrist support are effective in preventing fatigue during prolonged typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegari, Bianca; de Resende, Marília Maniglia; da Silva Filho, Manoel

    Case series (longitudinal). Only few reports concerning the efficacy of commonly used strategies for preventing upper limb occupational disorders associated with prolonged typing exist. We aimed to investigate whether the duration of typing and the use of 2 strategies (hand rest and wrist support) changes muscle physiological response and therefore the electromyography records. We enrolled 25 volunteers, who were unfamiliar with the task and did not have musculoskeletal disorders. The subjects underwent 3 prolonged typing protocols to investigate the efficacy of the 2 adopted strategies in reducing the trapezius, biceps brachii, and extensor digitorum communis fatigue. Typing for 1 hour induced muscular fatigue (60%-67% of the subjects). The extensor digitorum communis muscle exhibited the highest percentage of fatigue (72%-84%) after 1 and 4 hours of typing (1 hour, P = .04; 4 hours, P = .02). Fatigue levels in this muscle were significantly reduced (24%) with the use of pause typing (4 hours, P = .045), whereas biceps brachii muscle fatigue was reduced (32%) only with the use of wrist supports (P = .02, after 4 hours). Trapezius muscle fatigue was unaffected by the tested occupational strategies (1 hour, P = .62; 4 hours, P = .85). Despite presenting an overall tendency for fatigue detected during the application of the protocols, the assessed muscles exhibited different behavior patterns, depending on both the preventive strategy applied and the muscle mechanical role during the task. Hand rest and wrist support can successfully reduce muscle fatigue in specific upper limb muscles during prolonged typing, leading to a muscle-selective reduction in the occurrence of fatigue and thus provide direct evidence that they may prevent work-related musculoskeletal disorders. N/A. Copyright © 2016 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR neurography of median and ulnar nerves in the wrist and palm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao, Hongjing; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Guangbin; Hasan, Mansoor-ul; Yao, Bin; Wu, Chao; Wu, Lebin; Yang, Li; Zhang, Xu; Chen, Weibo; Chan, Queenie; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance neurography (DW-MRN) in the visualisation of extremity nerves in the wrist and palm. Thirty-two volunteers and 21 patients underwent imaging of the wrist and palm on a 3-T MR scanner. In all subjects, two radiologists evaluated the image quality on DW-MRN using a four-point grading scale. Kappa statistics were obtained for inter-observer performance. In volunteers, the chi-squared test was used to assess the differences in nerve visualisation on DW-MRN and axial fat-suppressed proton density weighted imaging (FS-PDWI). In volunteers, the mean image quality scores for the median nerve (MN) and ulnar nerve (UN) were 3.71 ± 0.46 and 3.23 ± 0.67 for observer 1, and 3.70 ± 0.46 and 3.22 ± 0.71 for observer 2, respectively. The inter-observer agreement was excellent (k = 0.843) and good (k = 0.788), respectively. DW-MRN provided significantly improved visualisations of the second and the third common palmar digital nerves and three branches of UN compared with FS-PDWI (P < 0.05). In patients, the mean image quality scores for the two observers were 3.24 ± 0.62 and 3.10 ± 0.83, inter-observer performance was excellent (k = 0.842). DW-MRN is feasible for improved visualisation of extremity nerves and their lesions in the wrist and palm with adequate image quality, thereby providing a supplementary method to conventional MR imaging. (orig.)

  13. LATERAL ANKLE INJURY

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Henry; Sim, Patrick; McHardy, Andrew

    2002-01-01

    Background: Injury to the ankle joint is the most common peripheral joint injury. The sports that most commonly produce high ankle injury rates in their participating athletes include: basketball, netball, and the various codes of football. Objective: To provide an up to date understanding of manual therapy relevant to lateral ligament injury of the ankle. A discussion of the types of ligament injury and common complicating factors that present with lateral ankle pain is presented along with ...

  14. Sports-specific injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancher, K D; Minnich, J M

    1996-04-01

    Injuries to the upper extremities can happen in any sport. Injury patterns are common to specific sports. Understanding which injuries occur with these sports allows the examiner to diagnose and treat the athlete easily. This article reviews some of the injuries common in sports such as bicycling, golf, gymnastics, martial arts, racquet sports, and weightlifting.

  15. Epidemiology of Injuries in Women Playing Competitive Team Bat-or-Stick Sports: A Systematic Review and a Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagodage Perera, Nirmala Kanthi; Joseph, Corey; Kemp, Joanne Lyn; Finch, Caroline Frances

    2018-03-01

    Team bat-or-stick sports, including cricket, softball and hockey, are popular among women. However, little is known about the injury profile in this population. The aim was to describe the incidence, nature and anatomical location of injuries in bat-or-stick sports played by women in a competitive league. This review was prospectively registered (PROSPERO CRD42015026715). CINAHL, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PubMed, SPORTDiscus were systematically searched from January 2000 to September 2016, inclusive. Peer-reviewed original research articles reporting the incidence, nature and anatomical location of injuries sustained by women aged 18 + years in competitive bat-or-stick sports were included. Two meta-analyses based on injury incidence proportions (injury IP) and injury rates per 1000 person-days of athletic exposure (AE) were performed. A total of 37 studies satisfied the inclusion criteria, and five had low risk of bias. The weighted injury IP was 0.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.39-0.45]. The weighted injury rate was 6.12 (95% CI 6.05-6.18) overall, and greater in games [15.79 (95% CI 15.65-15.93)] than in practice [3.07 (95% CI 2.99-3.15)]. The ankle was the most commonly injured anatomical location, followed by the hand (including wrist and fingers), knee and head. Soft tissue and ligament injuries were most common types of injuries. Injury prevention in women's sports is a novel and emerging field of research interest. This review highlights that injury incidence is high among female bat-or-stick players, but little information is known about direct causal mechanisms. This review clearly establishes the need for enhancements to injury data collection. Without this information, it will not be possible to develop evidence-based injury prevention interventions.

  16. A New Promising Technique of 3D Isovoxel Imaging Using 3T MRI in the Wrist: Comparison with 3T MR Arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong

    2011-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 3D isovoxel MR imaging using 3T MRI in the wrist joint, as compared with 3T MR arthrography. A total of 33 patients underwent both MR arthrography and 3D isovoxel imaging of the wrist joints using 3T MR, including 11 patients with arthroscopic confirmation. 3D isovoxel MR imaging was performed using an intermediateweighted fast spin echo coronal scan with a 0.4-mm slice thickness and the axial images were reconstructed with a 1-mm slice thickness. One radiologist evaluated for the presence of scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligament tear and she determined the grade of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tear and chondromalacia with its location. We compared the two examinations using kappa values. The rates of detecting wrist injury were similar for both exams with substantial to almost perfect inter-examination agreement (kappa value = 0.864 for scapholunate ligament tear, 0.835 for lunotriquetral ligament tear, 0.799 for TFCC tear and 0.940 for chondromalacia). For the eleven cases that underwent arthroscopy, their results of 3D isovoxel MRI were also similar to that of MR arthrography. 3D isovoxel MR imaging is useful for the evaluation of the wrist joint

  17. Correlation between the elbow flexion and the hand and wrist flexion after neurotization of the fascicles of the ulnar nerve to the motor branch to the biceps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Boso Escudero

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: Gain in elbow flexion in patients with brachial plexus injury is extremely important. The transfer of a fascicle from the ulnar nerve to the motor branch of the musculocutaneous nerve (Oberlin surgery is a treatment option. However, in some patients, gain in elbow flexion is associated with wrist and finger flexion. This study aimed to assess the frequency of this association and the functional behavior of the limb. METHODS: Case-control study of 18 patients who underwent the Oberlin surgery. Group 1 included patients without disassociation of range of elbow flexion and that of the fingers and wrist; Group 2 included patients in whom this disassociation was present. In the functional evaluation, the Sollerman and DASH tests were used. RESULTS: It was observed that 38.89% of the patients did not present disassociation of elbow flexion with flexion of the wrist and fingers. Despite the existence of a favorable difference in the group with disassociation of the movement, when the Sollerman protocol was applied to the comparison between both groups, this difference was not statistically significant. With the DASH test, however, there was a statistically significant difference in favor of the group of patients who managed to disassociate the movement. CONCLUSION: The association of elbow flexion with flexion of the wrist and fingers, in the group studied, was shown to be a frequent event, which influenced the functional result of the affected limb.

  18. The natural angle between the hand and handle and the effect of handle orientation on wrist radial/ulnar deviation during maximal push exertions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Justin G; Lin, Jia-Hua; Chang, Chien-Chi; McGorry, Raymond W

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to quantify the natural angle between the hand and a handle, and to investigate three design factors: handle rotation, handle tilt and between-handle width on the natural angle as well as resultant wrist radial/ulnar deviation ('RUD') for pushing tasks. Photographs taken of the right upper limb of 31 participants (14 women and 17 men) performing maximal seated push exertions on different handles were analysed. Natural hand/handle angle and RUD were assessed. It was found that all of the three design factors significantly affected natural handle angle and wrist RUD, but participant gender did not. The natural angle between the hand and the cylindrical handle was 65 ± 7°. Wrist deviation was reduced for handles that were rotated 0° (horizontal) and at the narrow width (31 cm). Handles that were tilted forward 15° reduced radial deviation consistently (12-13°) across handle conditions. Manual materials handling (MMH) tasks involving pushing have been related to increased risk of musculoskeletal injury. This study shows that handle orientation influences hand and wrist posture during pushing, and suggests that the design of push handles on carts and other MMH aids can be improved by adjusting their orientation to fit the natural interface between the hand and handle.

  19. A New Promising Technique of 3D Isovoxel Imaging Using 3T MRI in the Wrist: Comparison with 3T MR Arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Guen Young; Kim, Baek Hyun; Park, Jong Woong [Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    We wanted to evaluate the usefulness of 3D isovoxel MR imaging using 3T MRI in the wrist joint, as compared with 3T MR arthrography. A total of 33 patients underwent both MR arthrography and 3D isovoxel imaging of the wrist joints using 3T MR, including 11 patients with arthroscopic confirmation. 3D isovoxel MR imaging was performed using an intermediateweighted fast spin echo coronal scan with a 0.4-mm slice thickness and the axial images were reconstructed with a 1-mm slice thickness. One radiologist evaluated for the presence of scapholunate or lunotriquetral ligament tear and she determined the grade of the triangular fibrocartilage complex tear and chondromalacia with its location. We compared the two examinations using kappa values. The rates of detecting wrist injury were similar for both exams with substantial to almost perfect inter-examination agreement (kappa value = 0.864 for scapholunate ligament tear, 0.835 for lunotriquetral ligament tear, 0.799 for TFCC tear and 0.940 for chondromalacia). For the eleven cases that underwent arthroscopy, their results of 3D isovoxel MRI were also similar to that of MR arthrography. 3D isovoxel MR imaging is useful for the evaluation of the wrist joint

  20. Trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by hand intramuscular intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turan C Dulgeroglu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trigger wrist is a clinical entity characterized by triggering or the crackling of the wrist. Here, a case is reported of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma that caused trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome. This is the only case report where trigger wrist and carpal tunnel syndrome caused by the intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma were developed simultaneously. it is believed that that adhesive tenosynovitis developing in the tendons may have contributed to the triggering and carpal tunnel syndrome in the wrist as a result of inflammation occuring as a consequence of intrasynovial angiofibrolipoma. [Hand Microsurg 2016; 5(2.000: 107-109

  1. Ipsilateral common iliac artery plus femoral artery clamping for inducing sciatic nerve ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats: a reliable and simple method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barzegar-Fallah Anita

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to develop a practical model of sciatic ischemia reperfusion (I/R injury producing serious neurologic deficits and being technically feasible compared with the current time consuming or ineffective models. Thirty rats were divided into 6 groups (n = 5. Animal were anesthetized by using ketamine (50 mg/kg and xylazine (4 mg/kg. Experimental groups included a sham-operated group and five I/R groups with different reperfusion time intervals (0 h, 3 h, 1 d, 4 d, 7 d. In I/R groups, the right common iliac artery and the right femoral artery were clamped for 3 hrs. Sham-operated animals underwent only laparotomy without induction of ischemia. Just before euthanasia, behavioral scores (based on gait, grasp, paw position, and pinch sensitivity were obtained and then sciatic nerves were removed for light-microscopy studies (for ischemic fiber degeneration (IFD and edema. Behavioral score deteriorated among the ischemic groups compared with the control group (p

  2. Performance of Male and Female C57BL/6J Mice on Motor and Cognitive Tasks Commonly Used in Pre-Clinical Traumatic Brain Injury Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura B.; Fu, Amanda H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To date, clinical trials have failed to find an effective therapy for victims of traumatic brain injury (TBI) who live with motor, cognitive, and psychiatric complaints. Pre-clinical investigators are now encouraged to include male and female subjects in all translational research, which is of particular interest in the field of neurotrauma given that circulating female hormones (progesterone and estrogen) have been demonstrated to exert neuroprotective effects. To determine whether behavior of male and female C57BL6/J mice is differentially impaired by TBI, male and cycling female mice were injured by controlled cortical impact and tested for several weeks with functional assessments commonly employed in pre-clinical research. We found that cognitive and motor impairments post-TBI, as measured by the Morris water maze (MWM) and rotarod, respectively, were largely equivalent in male and female animals. However, spatial working memory, assessed by the y-maze, was poorer in female mice. Female mice were generally more active, as evidenced by greater distance traveled in the first exposure to the open field, greater distance in the y-maze, and faster swimming speeds in the MWM. Statistical analysis showed that variability in all behavioral data was no greater in cycling female mice than it was in male mice. These data all suggest that with careful selection of tests, procedures, and measurements, both sexes can be included in translational TBI research without concern for effect of hormones on functional impairments or behavioral variability. PMID:25951234

  3. Baseball and softball injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Quincy

    2006-05-01

    Baseball and softball injuries can be a result of both acute and overuse injuries. Soft tissue injuries include contusions, abrasions, and lacerations. Return to play is allowed when risk of further injury is minimized. Common shoulder injuries include those to the rotator cuff, biceps tendon, and glenoid labrum. Elbow injuries are common in baseball and softball and include medial epicondylitis, ulnar collateral ligament injury, and osteochondritis dissecans. Typically conservative treatment with relative rest, medication, and a rehabilitation program will allow return to play. Surgical intervention may be needed for certain injuries or conservative treatment failure.

  4. Skating on thin ice: a study of the injuries sustained at a temporary ice skating rink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Lynne V; Imam, Samirul; Crawford, John R; Owen, P Julian

    2010-06-01

    In recent years, ice skating and temporary ice skating rinks have become increasingly popular. Regular elite competitors are known to be at risk of both acute and chronic injuries. It may be postulated that skaters at the temporary rinks are at high risk of acute injuries from falls due to both their lack of expertise and the inherent dangers of ice skating. Injuries sustained at skating rinks present a significant burden to local healthcare resources, in particular orthopaedic departments. For the first time, Cambridge hosted such a facility from November 24, 2007 through January 6, 2008. We sought to identify the most common injuries encountered and to quantify the orthopaedic burden. All Emergency Department or Fracture Clinic attendances for an eight-week period from the opening of the rink were investigated. Details of age, sex, injury and management were recorded for the 84 patients who sustained ice rink related injuries. A total of 85 injuries were recorded in 84 patients. Of these injuries 58% were fractures, of which 98% involved the upper limbs. Seven patients (8% of all injuries) required admission for operative fixation. On average, two injuries per day were seen in the Emergency Department or Fracture Clinic, with an average of one orthopaedic admission per week. It is evident that the ice rink in Cambridge has had an impact on local healthcare resources. The vast majority of injuries affected the upper limbs and were sustained following a fall on the out-stretched hand. We therefore encourage the education of skaters as to how to break their falls more safely and recommend the use of wrist protectors as a primary preventative measure.

  5. Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trauma can happen at home, school, play or sports. Most common injuries are scratches to the cornea or blunt trauma. Approved and tested eye and face protection is essential to prevent injuries. Sports such as hockey, baseball, racquet ball, squash, and ...

  6. Initial experience with 3D isotropic high-resolution 3 T MR arthrography of the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, John K; Nozaki, Taiki; Kaneko, Yasuhito; J Yu, Hon; Rafijah, Gregory; Hitt, David; Yoshioka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-16

    obliquity to follow the components of ulnar side wrist structures including triangular fibrocartilage complex. Additionally, isotropic imaging provides thinner slice thickness with less partial volume averaging allowing for identification of subtle injuries.

  7. Wear particles and osteolysis in patients with total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Toxværd, Anders; Bansal, Manjula

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine whether the amount of polyethylene debris in the interphase tissue between prosthesis and bone in patients with total wrist arthroplasty correlated with the degree of periprosthetic osteolysis (PPO); and to investigate the occurrence of metal particles in the periprosthetic...... tissue, the level of chrome and cobalt ions in the blood, and the possible role of infectious or rheumatoid activity in the development of PPO. METHODS: Biopsies were taken from the implant-bone interphase in 13 consecutive patients with total wrist arthroplasty and with at least 3 years' follow......-up. Serial annual radiographs were performed prospectively for the evaluation of PPO. We collected blood samples for white blood cell count, C-reactive protein, and metallic ion level. RESULTS: A radiolucent zone of greater than 2 mm was observed juxta-articular to the radial component in 4 patients...

  8. Wrist arthrography: The value of the three compartment injection technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinsohn, E.M.; Coren, A.B.; Palmer, A.K.; Zinberg, E.

    1987-10-01

    Arthrography of the wrist was performed on 50 consecutive patients with obscure post-traumatic wrist pain by injecting contrast separately into the radiocarpal joint, midcarpal compartment, and distal radioulnar joint. When distal radioulnar joint and midcarpal compartment injections were added to the standard radiocarpal injection, many significant unsuspected abnormalities were identified. Of the 25 triangular fibrocartilage complex abnormalities identified, six (24%) were found only with the distal radioulnar joint injection. Of the 29 abnormal communications between the midcarpal compartment and the radiocarpal joint, ten (35%) were found only with the midcarpal injection. Similarly, five of 29 (17%) of the abnormal radiocarpal-midcarpal communications would have been missed if a midcarpal injection alone had been performed. These findings indicate that separate injections into the radiocarpal joint, midcarpal compartment, and distal radioulnar joint are needed to identify a large number of abnormalities not seen with injections into one compartment alone.

  9. Pose Tracking Algorithm of an Endoscopic Surgery Robot Wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L; Yin, H L; Meng, Q

    2006-01-01

    In recent two decades, more and more research on the endoscopic surgery has been carried out [2]. Most of the work focuses on the development of the robot in the field of robotics and the navigation of the surgery tools based on computer graphics. But the tracking and locating of the EndoWrist is also a very important aspect. This paper deals with the the tracking algorithm of the EndoWrist's pose (position and orientation). The linear tracking of the position is handled by the Kalman Filter. The quaternion-based nonlinear orientation tracking is implemented with the Extended Kalman Filter. The most innovative point of this paper is the parameterization of the motion model of the Extended Kalman Filter

  10. Pose Tracking Algorithm of an Endoscopic Surgery Robot Wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L [Chinese-German Institute of Automatic Control Engineering, Tongji University (China); Yin, H L [Chinese-German Institute of Automatic Control Engineering, Tongji University (China); Meng, Q [Shanghai University of Electric Power (China)

    2006-10-15

    In recent two decades, more and more research on the endoscopic surgery has been carried out [2]. Most of the work focuses on the development of the robot in the field of robotics and the navigation of the surgery tools based on computer graphics. But the tracking and locating of the EndoWrist is also a very important aspect. This paper deals with the the tracking algorithm of the EndoWrist's pose (position and orientation). The linear tracking of the position is handled by the Kalman Filter. The quaternion-based nonlinear orientation tracking is implemented with the Extended Kalman Filter. The most innovative point of this paper is the parameterization of the motion model of the Extended Kalman Filter.

  11. Ear Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of different injuries can affect the outer ear. Cauliflower ear (subperichondrial hematoma) A blunt blow to the ... to a deformed ear. This deformity, called a cauliflower ear, is common among wrestlers, boxers, and rugby ...

  12. Estimation of daily energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant women using a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hees, Vincent T; Renström, Frida; Wright, Antony; Gradmark, Anna; Catt, Michael; Chen, Kong Y; Löf, Marie; Bluck, Les; Pomeroy, Jeremy; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Søren; Franks, Paul W

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have compared the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in pregnant and non-pregnant women. PAEE is commonly estimated with accelerometers attached to the hip or waist, but little is known about the validity and participant acceptability of wrist attachment. The objectives of the current study were to assess the validity of a simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn accelerometer (GENEA, Unilever Discover, UK) to estimate PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to evaluate participant acceptability. Non-pregnant (N = 73) and pregnant (N = 35) Swedish women (aged 20-35 yrs) wore the accelerometer on their wrist for 10 days during which total energy expenditure (TEE) was assessed using doubly-labelled water. PAEE was calculated as 0.9×TEE-REE. British participants (N = 99; aged 22-65 yrs) wore accelerometers on their non-dominant wrist and hip for seven days and were asked to score the acceptability of monitor placement (scored 1 [least] through 10 [most] acceptable). There was no significant correlation between body weight and PAEE. In non-pregnant women, acceleration explained 24% of the variation in PAEE, which decreased to 19% in leave-one-out cross-validation. In pregnant women, acceleration explained 11% of the variation in PAEE, which was not significant in leave-one-out cross-validation. Median (IQR) acceptability of wrist and hip placement was 9(8-10) and 9(7-10), respectively; there was a within-individual difference of 0.47 (p<.001). A simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure in non-pregnant women and is scored acceptable by participants.

  13. Estimation of daily energy expenditure in pregnant and non-pregnant women using a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent T van Hees

    Full Text Available Few studies have compared the validity of objective measures of physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women. PAEE is commonly estimated with accelerometers attached to the hip or waist, but little is known about the validity and participant acceptability of wrist attachment. The objectives of the current study were to assess the validity of a simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn accelerometer (GENEA, Unilever Discover, UK to estimate PAEE in pregnant and non-pregnant women, and to evaluate participant acceptability.Non-pregnant (N = 73 and pregnant (N = 35 Swedish women (aged 20-35 yrs wore the accelerometer on their wrist for 10 days during which total energy expenditure (TEE was assessed using doubly-labelled water. PAEE was calculated as 0.9×TEE-REE. British participants (N = 99; aged 22-65 yrs wore accelerometers on their non-dominant wrist and hip for seven days and were asked to score the acceptability of monitor placement (scored 1 [least] through 10 [most] acceptable.There was no significant correlation between body weight and PAEE. In non-pregnant women, acceleration explained 24% of the variation in PAEE, which decreased to 19% in leave-one-out cross-validation. In pregnant women, acceleration explained 11% of the variation in PAEE, which was not significant in leave-one-out cross-validation. Median (IQR acceptability of wrist and hip placement was 9(8-10 and 9(7-10, respectively; there was a within-individual difference of 0.47 (p<.001.A simple summary measure derived from a wrist-worn tri-axial accelerometer adds significantly to the prediction of energy expenditure in non-pregnant women and is scored acceptable by participants.

  14. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja; Nagy, Ladislav

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  15. Dynamic Causal Modeling of the Cortical Responses to Wrist Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations applied to the wrist joint typically evoke a stereotypical sequence of cortical and muscle responses. The early cortical responses (<100 ms are thought be involved in the “rapid” transcortical reaction to the perturbation while the late cortical responses (>100 ms are related to the “slow” transcortical reaction. Although previous studies indicated that both responses involve the primary motor cortex, it remains unclear if both responses are engaged by the same effective connectivity in the cortical network. To answer this question, we investigated the effective connectivity cortical network after a “ramp-and-hold” mechanical perturbation, in both the early (<100 ms and late (>100 ms periods, using dynamic causal modeling. Ramp-and-hold perturbations were applied to the wrist joint while the subject maintained an isometric wrist flexion. Cortical activity was recorded using a 128-channel electroencephalogram (EEG. We investigated how the perturbation modulated the effective connectivity for the early and late periods. Bayesian model comparisons suggested that different effective connectivity networks are engaged in these two periods. For the early period, we found that only a few cortico-cortical connections were modulated, while more complicated connectivity was identified in the cortical network during the late period with multiple modulated cortico-cortical connections. The limited early cortical network likely allows for a rapid muscle response without involving high-level cognitive processes, while the complexity of the late network may facilitate coordinated responses.

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of the wrist: Diagnostic performance statistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobby, Jonathan L.; Tom, Brian D.M.; Bearcroft, Philip W.P.; Dixon, Adrian K.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To review the published diagnostic performance statistics for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the wrist for tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, the intrinsic carpal ligaments, and for osteonecrosis of the carpal bones. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We used Medline and Embase to search the English language literature. Studies evaluating the diagnostic performance of MRI of the wrist in living patients with surgical confirmation of MR findings were identified. RESULTS: We identified 11 studies reporting the diagnostic performance of MRI for tears of the triangular fibrocartilage complex for a total of 410 patients, six studies for the scapho-lunate ligament (159 patients), six studies for the luno-triquetral ligament (142 patients) and four studies (56 patients) for osteonecrosis of the carpal bones. CONCLUSIONS: Magnetic resonance imaging is an accurate means of diagnosing tears of the triangular fibrocartilage and carpal osteonecrosis. Although MRI is highly specific for tears of the intrinsic carpal ligaments, its sensitivity is low. The diagnostic performance of MRI in the wrist is improved by using high-resolution T2* weighted 3D gradient echo sequences. Using current imaging techniques without intra-articular contrast medium, magnetic resonance imaging cannot reliably exclude tears of the intrinsic carpal ligaments. Hobby, J.L. (2001)

  17. Role of MR imaging in chronic wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanetti, Marco; Saupe, Nadja [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Nagy, Ladislav [University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2007-04-15

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for chronic wrist pain is challenging. Correct assessment of the triangular fibrocartilage, hyaline cartilage, ligaments, and tendons has become mandatory for comprehensive decision making in wrist surgery. The MR technique, potential and limits of MR imaging in patients with chronic wrist pain will be discussed. MR arthrography with injection of gadolinium-containing contrast material into the distal radioulnar joint is suggested for evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage. The clinically meaningful ulnar-sided peripheral tears are otherwise hard to diagnose. The diagnostic performance of MR imaging for interosseous ligament tears varies considerably. The sensitivity for scapholunate ligament tears is consistently better than for lunotriquetral ligament tears. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging is considered to be the best technique for detecting established avascularity of bone, but the assessment of the MR results remains challenging. Most cases of ulnar impaction syndrome have characteristic focal signal intensity changes in the ulnar aspect of the lunate. Avascular necrosis of the lunate (Kienboeck's disease) is characterized by signal changes starting in the proximal radial aspect of the lunate. MR imaging is extremely sensitive for occult fractures. Questions arise if occult posttraumatic bone lesions seen on MR images only necessarily require the same treatment as fractures evident on plain films or computed tomography (CT) images. MR imaging and ultrasound are equally effective for detecting occult carpal ganglia. Carpe bossu (carpal boss) is a bony protuberance of a carpometacarpal joint II and III which may be associated with pain. (orig.)

  18. Injuries associated with combat sports, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2010-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    The practice of combat sports creates a potential for training- and sports-related injuries among military members. During the 4-year surveillance period, there were 12,108 cases of injuries associated with combat sports among active component service members; the overall incidence rate was 21.0 per 10,000 person-years (p-yrs). The rates were higher among service members who were male, Hispanic, in the youngest age groups, in the Army, junior enlisted, and in combat-specific occupations. The rate among recruit/ trainees (779.4 per 10,000 p-yrs) was more than 165 times the rate among all other active component service members (non-recruits) (4.7 per 10,000 p-yrs). Sprains, strains, and contusions accounted for more than one-half of the primary (first-listed) diagnoses associated with combat sports cases. More serious conditions such as concussions/head injuries and skull/face fractures/intracranial injuries were reported among 3.9% and 2.1% of all cases and were more common among boxing-related cases. Hand/wrist fractures were also common among boxing cases. Wrestling had comparatively greater proportions of dislocations and open wounds. Although the combat sport training provides many physical and mental benefits to the individual, safety practices should be enforced to reduce the most frequent and serious injuries.

  19. 4-corner arthrodesis and proximal row carpectomy: a biomechanical comparison of wrist motion and tendon forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debottis, Daniel P; Werner, Frederick W; Sutton, Levi G; Harley, Brian J

    2013-05-01

    Controversy exists as to whether a proximal row carpectomy (PRC) is a better procedure than scaphoid excision with 4-corner arthrodesis for preserving motion in the painful posttraumatic arthritic wrist. The purpose of this study was to determine how the kinematics and tendon forces of the wrist are altered after PRC and 4-corner arthrodesis. We tested 6 fresh cadaver forearms for the extremes of wrist motion and then used a wrist simulator to move them through 4 cyclic dynamic wrist motions, during which time we continuously recorded the tendon forces. We repeated the extremes of wrist motion measurements and the dynamic motions after scaphoid excision with 4-corner arthrodesis, and then again after PRC. We analyzed extremes of wrist motion and the peak tendon forces required for each dynamic motion using a repeated measures analysis of variance. Wrist extremes of motion significantly decreased after both the PRC and 4-corner arthrodesis compared with the intact wrist. Wrist flexion decreased on average 13° after 4-corner arthrodesis and 12° after PRC. Extension decreased 20° after 4-corner arthrodesis and 12° after PRC. Four-corner arthrodesis significantly decreased wrist ulnar deviation from the intact wrist. Four-corner arthrodesis allowed more radial deviation but less ulnar deviation than the PRC. The average peak tendon force was significantly greater after 4-corner arthrodesis than after PRC for the extensor carpi ulnaris during wrist flexion-extension, circumduction, and dart throw motions. The peak forces were significantly greater after 4-corner arthrodesis than in the intact wrist for the extensor carpi ulnaris during the dart throw motion and for the flexor carpi ulnaris during the circumduction motion. The peak extensor carpi radialis brevis force after PRC was significantly less than in the intact wrist. The measured wrist extremes of motion decreased after both 4-corner arthrodesis and PRC. Larger peak tendon forces were required to achieve

  20. Overuse Injuries Associated with Mountain Biking: Is Single-Speed Riding a Predisposing Factor?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Lebec

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Though mountain bikers are at significant risk for overuse injury, there is minimal quality research describing this relationship. Single-speed mountain biking, in which participants pedal a bike with only a single gear, may place riders at even greater risk for overuse problems due to the disproportionate physical effort associated with this type of riding. The focus of this study was to provide additional perspective on overuse injuries sustained by mountain bikers and to determine if single-speed mountain biking places participants at greater risk for overuse conditions. Four hundred and four (404 mountain bikers were surveyed concerning overuse injuries sustained during the previous year. Findings indicate that 63% of respondents reported an overuse injury affecting at least one area with the most commonly reported areas being the lumbar spine, knees, hand/wrist, and cervical spine. Individuals riding single-speed mountain bikes did not have a higher incidence of overuse injuries than riders of multiple-geared bikes. However, respondents who split time between riding single-speed and multiple-geared bikes were significantly more likely to report an overuse syndrome than those only riding single-speed or multiple-geared bikes (p = 0.0104. This group of riders may be at greater risk for overuse injury due to excessive fatigue and poor biomechanics.

  1. Diagnosis of triangular fibrocartilage complex injury using arthrography and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Kiyonobu; Soejima, Osamu; Naito, Masatoshi [Fukuoka Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    Twenty patients (twenty-one wrists) with chronic ulnar wrist pain who had undergone radiocarpal arthrography and MRI before arthroscopic examination were evaluated to determine the usefulness of these preoperative diagnostic procedures (arthrogrphy and MRI) for the detection of triangular fibrocartilage complex (TFCC) injury. Based on the arthroscopic findings, the sensitivity and specificity of arthrography were 63% and 100% respectively for detecting TFCC lesions, while they were 68% and 50% respectively for MRI. Although no significant superiority was observed between arthrography and MRI in this study, further improrumchts in the preoperative diagnostic procedures are still needed in order to more accurately detect TFCC injuries. (author)

  2. Stress fractures of ankle and wrist in childhood: nature and frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oestreich, Alan E.; Bhojwani, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    Stress fractures of many etiologies are found not infrequently in various tarsal bones but are less commonly recognized in carpal bones. To assess the distribution of tarsal and carpal stress fractures. During the last three decades, the senior author collected locations of tarsal and carpal bone stress fracture callus seen on plain radiographs. 527 children with tarsal and carpal stress fractures were identified (88 children had multiple bones involved). The totals were: calcaneus 244, cuboid 188, talus 121, navicular 24, cuneiforms 23, capitate 18, lunate 1, and scaphoid 1. Stress fractures were more frequently seen once we became aware each particular bone could be involved. Tarsal and carpal stress fractures in children are not rare. Careful perusal of these bones is urged in all susceptible children with limping or wrist pain. (orig.)

  3. Stress fractures of ankle and wrist in childhood: nature and frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oestreich, Alan E. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Bhojwani, Nicholas [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Stress fractures of many etiologies are found not infrequently in various tarsal bones but are less commonly recognized in carpal bones. To assess the distribution of tarsal and carpal stress fractures. During the last three decades, the senior author collected locations of tarsal and carpal bone stress fracture callus seen on plain radiographs. 527 children with tarsal and carpal stress fractures were identified (88 children had multiple bones involved). The totals were: calcaneus 244, cuboid 188, talus 121, navicular 24, cuneiforms 23, capitate 18, lunate 1, and scaphoid 1. Stress fractures were more frequently seen once we became aware each particular bone could be involved. Tarsal and carpal stress fractures in children are not rare. Careful perusal of these bones is urged in all susceptible children with limping or wrist pain. (orig.)

  4. The Diagnostic Utility of Midcarpal Anesthetic Injection in the Evaluation of Chronic Wrist Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, S. Josh; Hofmeister, Eric P.; Moran, Steven L.; Shin, Alexander Y.

    2007-01-01

    The evaluation of chronic wrist pain can be a diagnostic dilemma. Lidocaine injections combined with corticosteroids are often used for both diagnosis and therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine if a midcarpal injection of lidocaine could serve as a diagnostic tool in patients with chronic wrist pain. Specifically, the relationship of pain relief from the injection and improvement of grip strength were compared to the presence of intracarpal pathology as confirmed by wrist arthros...

  5. Comparison of regression models for estimation of isometric wrist joint torques using surface electromyography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Carlo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several regression models have been proposed for estimation of isometric joint torque using surface electromyography (SEMG signals. Common issues related to torque estimation models are degradation of model accuracy with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. This work compares the performance of the most commonly used regression models under these circumstances, in order to assist researchers with identifying the most appropriate model for a specific biomedical application. Methods Eleven healthy volunteers participated in this study. A custom-built rig, equipped with a torque sensor, was used to measure isometric torque as each volunteer flexed and extended his wrist. SEMG signals from eight forearm muscles, in addition to wrist joint torque data were gathered during the experiment. Additional data were gathered one hour and twenty-four hours following the completion of the first data gathering session, for the purpose of evaluating the effects of passage of time and electrode displacement on accuracy of models. Acquired SEMG signals were filtered, rectified, normalized and then fed to models for training. Results It was shown that mean adjusted coefficient of determination (Ra2 values decrease between 20%-35% for different models after one hour while altering arm posture decreased mean Ra2 values between 64% to 74% for different models. Conclusions Model estimation accuracy drops significantly with passage of time, electrode displacement, and alteration of limb posture. Therefore model retraining is crucial for preserving estimation accuracy. Data resampling can significantly reduce model training time without losing estimation accuracy. Among the models compared, ordinary least squares linear regression model (OLS was shown to have high isometric torque estimation accuracy combined with very short training times.

  6. Immediate effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands, using electromechanical reaction time

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation distal resistance training on wrist joints by using electromechanical reaction time. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 healthy young people (24.2 ? 3.1?years, 169.7 ? 6.5?cm, 65.3 ? 12.6?kg). Two kinds of isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: the wrist joint extension muscle strength training and the wrist joint extension pa...

  7. A rare localization of tuberculosis of the wrist: The scapholunate joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Sbai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The tuberculosis of the hand and the wrist is a rare entity. Affecting the scapholunate joint is exceptional. It is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage of carpal destruction, due to slowly development of the symptoms. We report the case of a 58-year-old female, presenting as wrist pain for 3 months. Clinical study showed a local swelling in the left wrist, the mobility of the wrist was normal but painful at the end of motion. The diagnosis of osteoarticular tuberculosis was suspected after radiological and biological study then confirmed after histological study. Antibacillary chemotherapy during 12 months promoted healing and good outcome.

  8. A study comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Niu Jinliang; Xie Weina; Song Zhizhen; Zheng Jie; Ma Qiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the appearances of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) on MRI, and compare MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA. Methods: Fifty patients, fulfilled 1987 American Rheumatism Association (ARA) revised criteria, and 10 age-matched healthy controls entered the study. T 1 -weighted spin echo, short time inversion recovery (STIR) of both wrists, gadolinium contrast material-enhanced sequences of dominant wrists were performed in the coronal planes. MRl, plain wrist radiographs, clinical date, including swollen joint, patient global assessment (AIMS), and laboratory examinations including ESR, RF, APF, and AKA were obtained at the same time. Functional disability was assessed using the Health Assessment Questionnaire Disability Score. Results: In 50 patients, all had pannus on MRI of wrists, 38 patients had enhanced signal intensity for pannus, 21 patients had bone marrow edema, 37 patients had joint effusion, and 37 patients had bone erosions. There were significant difference in the ESR, HAQ, AIMS as well as swollen joint count between patients with bone marrow edema and patients without bone marrow edema (P 2 =5.06, P=0.025; χ 2 =5.59, P=0.018). Number of patients with MRI erosion of wrists was associated with the number of patients without MRI bone marrow edema of wrists (χ 2 =5.11, P=0.024). Conclusion: MRI can find the appearances of wrists with RA. Comparing MRI with clinical examinations on wrists with RA, authors can assess and evaluate the role of MRI on RA

  9. [Theoretical origin and clinical application of wrist-ankle acupuncture therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Zhou, Qinghui

    2017-05-12

    The theory of wrist-ankle acupuncture is consistent with traditional meridian-collateral theory. For example, the body divisions of wrist-ankle acupuncture are corresponding to the distribution of 12 cutaneous regions of meridians, the needling sites of it are to the running courses of 12 meridians; the indications of it are to those of 12 meridians. The needling sites of wrist-ankle acupuncture are relevant with some special acupoints of acupuncture theory. For example, the 12-needling sites of wrist-ankle acupuncture are located similar to those of 12 meridian points and have very similar indications. The needling sites of it are located in the wrist and ankle regions, in which the five- shu points are located nearby, for meridian disorders. Most luo -connecting points are located near to the needling sites of wrist-ankle acupuncture or the needle tip points to. Additionally, the needling method of wrist-ankle acupuncture is consistent with some of the subcutaneous needling methods in traditional acupuncture therapy. On the basis of the aspects mentioned above, it is explained that wrist-ankle acupuncture is the development of traditional acupuncture and cannot be independent from the traditional theories of acupuncture and meridians. It is necessary to seek for the evidence from the traditional theories of TCM. The traditional theories of TCM are summarized from clinical practice, which can be newly verified from the practice of wrist-ankle acupuncture.

  10. CT-based three-dimensional kinematic comparison of dart-throwing motion between wrists with malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kim, Y.S.; Park, C.S.; Kim, K.G.; Lee, Y.H.; Gong, H.S.; Lee, H.J.; Baek, G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To compare motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with a malunited distal radius and contralateral normal wrists during dart-throwing motion (DTM) by three-dimensional kinematic studies using computed tomography (CT) images. Materials and methods: CT was performed simultaneously on both wrists in six patients with a unilateral distal radius malunion at three stepwise positions simulating DTM. Using volume registration technique, the kinematic variables of helical axis motion of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate were calculated and compared between both wrists. The helical motion of the capitate was also evaluated in a scaphoid- and lunate-based coordinate system. Results: Among the average rotation and translation of the scaphoid, lunate, and capitate during DTM, only the average rotation of the capitate was significantly different between the uninjured (88.9°) and the injured (70°) wrist (p = 0.0075). Rotation of the capitate relative to the scaphoid (26.3° versus 37.8°, p = 0.029) or lunate (39.2° versus 59.3°, p = 0.028) was smaller in the malunited wrist. The centres of helical axis motion of the three carpal bones were located more dorsally and radially in the injured wrist. Conclusions: The present study showed that decreased DTM in wrists with a distal radius malunion resulted from decreased midcarpal motion. The present study of the capitate, scaphoid, and lunate in wrists with distal radius malunion might be the first to present a 3D kinematic analysis of the effect of distal radius malunion on the carpal bones

  11. Productive osseous changes about the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantor, R.M.; Braunstein, E.M.

    1987-01-01

    Radiographs of 225 consecutive patients with adult-form rheumatoid arthritis were examined for evidence of productive osseous changes about the wrist. The prevalence of new bone on the ulnar styloid was 10%. This form of new bone is probably due to overlying chronic tenosynovitis. A collar of new bone around the ulnar head is a result of degenerative change in the distal radioulnar joint. In general, productive osseous changes in theumatoid arthritis may represent inflammatory periosteal bone formation, osteophytosis, or contact remodeling. We found no evidence of an association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and extensive productive osseous changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. (orig.)

  12. Productive osseous changes about the wrist in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantor, R.M.; Braunstein, E.M.

    1987-07-01

    Radiographs of 225 consecutive patients with adult-form rheumatoid arthritis were examined for evidence of productive osseous changes about the wrist. The prevalence of new bone on the ulnar styloid was 10%. This form of new bone is probably due to overlying chronic tenosynovitis. A collar of new bone around the ulnar head is a result of degenerative change in the distal radioulnar joint. In general, productive osseous changes in theumatoid arthritis may represent inflammatory periosteal bone formation, osteophytosis, or contact remodeling. We found no evidence of an association between diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis and extensive productive osseous changes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

  13. Psychometrics of the wrist stability and hand mobility subscales of the Fugl-Meyer assessment in moderately impaired stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephen J; Hade, Erinn; Persch, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    There remains a need for a quickly administered, stroke-specific, bedside measure of active wrist and finger movement for the expanding stroke population. The wrist stability and hand mobility scales of the upper extremity Fugl-Meyer Assessment (w/h UE FM) constitute a valid, reliable measure of paretic UE impairment in patients with active wrist and finger movement. The aim of this study was to determine performance on the w/h UE FM in a stable cohort of survivors of stroke with only palpable movement in their paretic wrist flexors. A single-center cohort study was conducted. Thirty-two individuals exhibiting stable, moderate upper extremity hemiparesis (15 male, 17 female; mean age=56.6 years, SD=10.1; mean time since stroke=4.6 years, SD=5.8) participated in the study, which was conducted at an outpatient rehabilitation clinic in the midwestern United States. The w/h UE FM and Action Research Arm Test (ARAT) were administered twice. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), Cronbach alpha, and ordinal alpha were computed to determine reliability, and Spearman rank correlation coefficients and Bland-Altman plots were computed to establish validity. Intraclass correlation coefficients for the w/h UE FM and ARAT were .95 and .99, respectively. The w/h UE FM intrarater reliability and internal consistency were greater than .80, and concurrent validity was greater than .70. This also was the first stroke rehabilitative study to apply ordinal alpha to examine internal consistency values, revealing w/h UE FM levels greater than .85. Concurrent validity findings were corroborated by Bland-Altman plots. It appears that the w/h UE FM is a promising tool to measure distal upper extremity movement in patients with little active paretic wrist and finger movement. This finding widens the segment of patients on whom the w/h UE FM can be effectively used and addresses a gap, as commonly used measures necessitate active distal upper extremity movement. © 2015 American

  14. The Epidemiology of Injuries in Mixed Martial Arts: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lystad, Reidar P; Gregory, Kobi; Wilson, Juno

    2014-01-01

    Mixed martial arts (MMA) has experienced a surge in popularity since emerging in the 1990s, but the sport has also faced concomitant criticism from public, political, and medical holds. Notwithstanding the polarized discourse concerning the sport, no systematic review of the injury problems in MMA has been published to date. To systematically review the epidemiologic data on injuries in MMA and to quantitatively estimate injury incidence and risk factor effect sizes. Systematic review and meta-analysis; Level of evidence, 4. Electronic searching of PubMed, Scopus, CINAHL, EMBASE, AMED, and SPORTDiscus databases to identify studies reporting on the epidemiology of injuries in MMA. Random-effects models were used to obtain pooled summary estimates of the injury incidence rate per 1000 athlete-exposures (IIRAE) and rate ratios with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was evaluated with the I (2) statistic. A total of 6 studies were eligible for inclusion in this review. The IIRAE summary estimate was found to be 228.7 (95% CI, 110.4-473.5). No studies reported injury severity. The most commonly injured anatomic region was the head (range, 66.8%-78.0%) followed by the wrist/hand (range, 6.0%-12.0%), while the most frequent injury types were laceration (range, 36.7%-59.4%), fracture (range, 7.4%-43.3%), and concussion (range, 3.8%-20.4%). The most notable risk factors pertained to the outcome of bouts. Losers incurred 3 times as many injuries as winners, and fighters in bouts ending with knockout or technical knockout incurred more than 2 times as many injuries as fighters in bouts ending with submission. Notwithstanding the paucity of data, the injury incidence in MMA appears to be greater than in most, if not all, other popular and commonly practiced combat sports. In general, the injury pattern in MMA is very similar to that in professional boxing but unlike that found in other combat sports such as judo and taekwondo. More epidemiologic research is

  15. Intervention randomized controlled trials involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Although arthroscopy of upper extremity joints was initially a diagnostic tool, it is increasingly used for therapeutic interventions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are considered the gold standard for assessing treatment efficacy. We aimed to review the literature for intervention RCTs involving wrist and shoulder arthroscopy. Methods We performed a systematic review for RCTs in which at least one arm was an intervention performed through wrist arthroscopy or shoulder arthroscopy. PubMed and Cochrane Library databases were searched up to December 2012. Two researchers reviewed each article and recorded the condition treated, randomization method, number of randomized participants, time of randomization, outcomes measures, blinding, and description of dropouts and withdrawals. We used the modified Jadad scale that considers the randomization method, blinding, and dropouts/withdrawals; score 0 (lowest quality) to 5 (highest quality). The scores for the wrist and shoulder RCTs were compared with the Mann–Whitney test. Results The first references to both wrist and shoulder arthroscopy appeared in the late 1970s. The search found 4 wrist arthroscopy intervention RCTs (Kienböck’s disease, dorsal wrist ganglia, volar wrist ganglia, and distal radius fracture; first 3 compared arthroscopic with open surgery). The median number of participants was 45. The search found 50 shoulder arthroscopy intervention RCTs (rotator cuff tears 22, instability 14, impingement 9, and other conditions 5). Of these, 31 compared different arthroscopic treatments, 12 compared arthroscopic with open treatment, and 7 compared arthroscopic with nonoperative treatment. The median number of participants was 60. The median modified Jadad score for the wrist RCTs was 0.5 (range 0–1) and for the shoulder RCTs 3.0 (range 0–5) (p = 0.012). Conclusion Despite the increasing use of wrist arthroscopy in the treatment of various wrist disorders the efficacy of arthroscopically

  16. Trigger wrist caused by avascular necrosis of the capitate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Yuichiro; Kawamura, Daisuke; Kida, Hiroaki; Hatanaka, Kanako C; Iwasaki, Norimasa

    2018-03-27

    Trigger wrist is a rare condition first described by Marti in 1960, and various causes have been reported. The condition mostly occurs with finger flexion and extension, and rarely with flexion and extension of the wrist itself. Avascular necrosis of the capitate is also a rare condition, first described by Jönsson in 1942. While some reports of this condition have been published, little is known about its etiology. Therefore, no established treatment exists. We report a case of trigger wrist caused by avascular necrosis of the capitate. A 16-year-old right-handed male who was a high school handball player was referred to our department from a nearby hospital 5 months after the onset of pain in the dorsal aspect of the right wrist, with an unknown cause. At the previous hospital, imaging findings led to a diagnosis of avascular necrosis of the capitate, and conservative treatment with a wrist brace did not improve the pain. At the initial visit to our department, the patient was noted to have a painful trigger wrist that was brought on by wrist flexion and extension. Preoperative imaging findings led to a diagnosis of trigger wrist caused by capitolunate instability secondary to avascular necrosis of the capitate. We performed a partial excision of the proximal capitate with tendon ball interposition. Two years after surgery, the patient's clinical outcome was favorable, with no recurrence of wrist pain or triggering. Both trigger wrist and avascular necrosis of the capitate are rare disorders. When a patient presents with painful triggering at the wrist, surgeons must bear in mind that avascular necrosis of the capitate may result in this phenomenon. We recommend partial excision of the proximal capitate with tendon ball interposition for the treatment of this lesion.

  17. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu P Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint , forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments.The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis.

  18. A New Myohaptic Instrument to Assess Wrist Motion Dynamically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Manto

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiological assessment of joint properties and voluntary motion in neurological patients remains a challenge. This is typically the case in cerebellar patients, who exhibit dysmetric movements due to the dysfunction of cerebellar circuitry. Several tools have been developed, but so far most of these tools have remained confined to laboratories, with a lack of standardization. We report on a new device which combines the use of electromyographic (EMG sensors with haptic technology for the dynamic investigation of wrist properties. The instrument is composed of a drivetrain, a haptic controller and a signal acquisition unit. Angular accuracy is 0.00611 rad, nominal torque is 6 N·m, maximal rotation velocity is 34.907 rad/sec, with a range of motion of –1.0472 to +1.0472 rad. The inertia of the motor and handgrip is 0.004 kg·m². This is the first standardized myohaptic instrument allowing the dynamic characterization of wrist properties, including under the condition of artificial damping. We show that cerebellar patients are unable to adapt EMG activities when faced with an increase in damping while performing fast reversal movements. The instrument allows the extraction of an electrophysiological signature of a cerebellar deficit.

  19. A new myohaptic instrument to assess wrist motion dynamically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Van Den Braber, Niels; Grimaldi, Giuliana; Lammertse, Piet

    2010-01-01

    The pathophysiological assessment of joint properties and voluntary motion in neurological patients remains a challenge. This is typically the case in cerebellar patients, who exhibit dysmetric movements due to the dysfunction of cerebellar circuitry. Several tools have been developed, but so far most of these tools have remained confined to laboratories, with a lack of standardization. We report on a new device which combines the use of electromyographic (EMG) sensors with haptic technology for the dynamic investigation of wrist properties. The instrument is composed of a drivetrain, a haptic controller and a signal acquisition unit. Angular accuracy is 0.00611 rad, nominal torque is 6 N·m, maximal rotation velocity is 34.907 rad/sec, with a range of motion of -1.0472 to +1.0472 rad. The inertia of the motor and handgrip is 0.004 kg·m2. This is the first standardized myohaptic instrument allowing the dynamic characterization of wrist properties, including under the condition of artificial damping. We show that cerebellar patients are unable to adapt EMG activities when faced with an increase in damping while performing fast reversal movements. The instrument allows the extraction of an electrophysiological signature of a cerebellar deficit.

  20. Omitting histopathology in wrist ganglions. A risky proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Akbar J.; Kumar, Santosh; Mohib, Yasir; Rashid, Rizwan H.; Noordin, Shahryar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To identify incidence and utility of histopathology in wrist ganglions. Methods: A retrospective study of 112 patients operated for wrist swellings between January 2009 and March 2014 at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, was conducted. Medical records were reviewed for demographics, history, location and associated symptoms, provisional diagnosis and operative details. Histopathology reports were reviewed to confirm the final diagnosis. Results: One hundred and twelve patients were included in the study (34 males and 78 females) with a mean age of 28 ± 12 years. Ninety-five percent of ganglia were dorsally located and 85% were solitary in nature. Histopathology reports confirmed 107 as ganglion cysts, whereas 3 had giant cell tumor of tendon sheath and 2 were reported to be tuberculous tenosynovitis. Conclusion: Although most of the time, the clinical diagnosis conforms to the final diagnosis, the possibility of an alternate diagnosis cannot be ignored (4% in this study). We suggest routine histopathological analysis so that such diagnoses are not missed. PMID:27464871

  1. An Exoskeleton Robot for Human Forearm and Wrist Motion Assist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranathunga Arachchilage Ruwan Chandra Gopura; Kiguchi, Kazuo

    The exoskeleton robot is worn by the human operator as an orthotic device. Its joints and links correspond to those of the human body. The same system operated in different modes can be used for different fundamental applications; a human-amplifier, haptic interface, rehabilitation device and assistive device sharing a portion of the external load with the operator. We have been developing exoskeleton robots for assisting the motion of physically weak individuals such as elderly or slightly disabled in daily life. In this paper, we propose a three degree of freedom (3DOF) exoskeleton robot (W-EXOS) for the forearm pronation/ supination motion, wrist flexion/extension motion and ulnar/radial deviation. The paper describes the wrist anatomy toward the development of the exoskeleton robot, the hardware design of the exoskeleton robot and EMG-based control method. The skin surface electromyographic (EMG) signals of muscles in forearm of the exoskeletons' user and the hand force/forearm torque are used as input information for the controller. By applying the skin surface EMG signals as main input signals to the controller, automatic control of the robot can be realized without manipulating any other equipment. Fuzzy control method has been applied to realize the natural and flexible motion assist. Experiments have been performed to evaluate the proposed exoskeleton robot and its control method.

  2. Wrist ultrasonography of ossification centers during the adolescent growth spurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nessi, Renato; Zaffaroni, Roberto; Lazzerini, Francesco; Garattini, Giovanna; Bazzini, Elena

    1997-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound (US) of the hand and wrist was compared with radiography in 26 patients (mean age: 11.4 years) to be submitted to orthodontic therapy. US scans were targeted on the ossification centers critical for the growth spurt, namely the pisiform and abductor sesamoid bones of the metacarpophalaneal joint of the thumb and the cartilage of the distal phalanx of the third finger. All images were retrospectively reviewed on a double-blind basis by two independent observers who gave a conspicuity score to each structure of interest. All the scores were submitted to statistical analysis with the Wilcoxon test. US images clearly demonstrated the initial appearance of the ossification centers of the pisiform and sesamoid bones. These structures appeared as hyperechoic spots causing marked acoustic shadowing. The persistence of the phalangeal cartilage was depicted as a thin rim interrupting the hyperechoic cortical profile of the bone. Us results were statistically equivalent to radiographic findings in the pisiform. A statistically significant difference between the two techniques was found in the third finger cartilage because its profile was poorly depicted on some US images. To conclude, wrist US is proposed as a simple and valuable radiation-free support examination for the follow-up of skeletal maturation in adolescents to be submitted to orthodontic therapy

  3. Elbow Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Many things can make your elbow hurt. A common cause is tendinitis, an inflammation or injury to the tendons that attach muscle to bone. Tendinitis of the elbow is a sports injury, often from playing tennis or golf. You ...

  4. Posterior Cruciate Ligament Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your knee is bent also can cause this injury. Risk factors Being in a motor vehicle accident and participating in sports such as football and soccer are the most common risk factors for a PCL injury. Complications In ...

  5. Chondral Injuries and Irreparable Meniscal Tears Among Adolescents With Anterior Cruciate Ligament or Meniscal Tears Are More Common in Patients With Public Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ariel A; Mancini, Nickolas S; Solomito, Matthew J; Nissen, Carl W; Milewski, Matthew D

    2017-07-01

    Access to health care services is a critical component of health care reform and may differ among patients with different types of insurance. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose was to compare adolescents with private and public insurance undergoing surgery for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and/or meniscal tears. We hypothesized that patients with public insurance would have a delayed presentation from the time of injury and therefore would have a higher incidence of chondral injuries and irreparable meniscal tears and lower preoperative International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores than patients with private insurance. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. This was a retrospective study of patients under 21 years of age undergoing ACL reconstruction and/or meniscal repair or debridement from January 2013 to March 2016 at a single pediatric sports medicine center. Patients were identified by a search of Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes. A chart review was performed for insurance type; preoperative diagnosis; date of injury, initial office visit, and surgery; preoperative IKDC score; intraoperative findings; and procedures. The study group consisted of 119 patients (mean age, 15.0 ± 1.7 years). Forty-one percent of patients had private insurance, while 59% had public insurance. There were 27 patients with isolated meniscal tears, 59 with combined meniscal and ACL tears, and 33 with isolated ACL tears. The mean time from injury to presentation was 56 days (range, 0-457 days) in patients with private insurance and 136 days (range, 0-1120 days) in patients with public insurance ( P = .02). Surgery occurred, on average, 35 days after the initial office visit in both groups. The mean preoperative IKDC score was 53 in both groups. Patients with meniscal tears with public insurance were more likely to require meniscal debridement than patients with private insurance (risk ratio [RR], 2.3; 95% CI, 1.7-3.1; P = .02). Patients with public insurance

  6. [Etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype wrist movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewańska, Magdalena; Walusiak-Skorupa, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy of upper limbs and a leading cause of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of work exposure, repetitive and forceful exertions of the hand and use of vibrating hand tools. The aim of the study was to evaluate etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype movements in wrist. We conducted the retrospective analysis of 300 patients (261 women, 39 men), mean age 52 years (standard deviation: +/-6.93) hospitalized with the suspicion of occupational CTS. The study revealed high percentage (68.7%) of diseases and systemic factors involved in the pathogenesis of CTS in the analyzed population, especially obesity (32%), thyroid diseases (28.7%), hormone replacement therapy and/or oophorectomy (16.3%) and diabetes mellitus (12%). In 111 patients the coexistence of at least a couple of potential etiological factors of the neuropathy was recognized. Clinical analysis and occupational exposure allowed to diagnose occupational carpal tunnel syndrome in 18 (6%) patients only. The undeniable long-term (20(.2+/-9.3 years) occupational exposure to repetitive, forceful movements in the wrist was observed in this group. The results of our study indicated that non-occupational etiological factors of CTS predominated and in 37% of patients at least several factors were found. The analysis showed the high prevalence of CTS in workers employed in various sectors of industry, including so called "blue collar" workers. Our study confirmed the multifactorial etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome, however, occupational agents contributed to only 6% of cases.

  7. Etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype wrist movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Lewańska

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS is the most common neuropathy of upper limbs and a leading cause of upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders, in terms of work exposure, repetitive and forceful exertions of the hand and use of vibrating hand tools. The aim of the study was to evaluate etiological factors of carpal tunnel syndrome in subjects occupationally exposed to monotype movements in wrist. Material and Methods: We conducted the retrospective analysis of 300 patients (261 women, 39 men, mean age 52 years (standard deviation: ±6.93 hospitalized with the suspicion of occupational CTS. Results: The study revealed high percentage (68.7% of diseases and systemic factors involved in the pathogenesis of CTS in the analyzed population, especially obesity (32%, thyroid diseases (28.7%, hormone replacement therapy and/or oophorectomy (16.3% and diabetes mellitus (12%. In 111 patients the coexistence of at least a couple of potential etiological factors of the neuropathy was recognized. Clinical analysis and occupational exposure allowed to diagnose occupational carpal tunnel syndrome in 18 (6% patients only. The undeniable long-term (20.2±9.3 years occupational exposure to repetitive, forceful movements in the wrist was observed in this group. Conclusion: The results of our study indicated that non-occupational etiological factors of CTS predominated and in 37% of patients at least several factors were found. The analysis showed the high prevalence of CTS in workers employed in various sectors of industry, including so called "blue collar" workers. Our study confirmed the multifactorial etiology of carpal tunnel syndrome, however, occupational agents contributed to only 6% of cases. Med Pr 2014;65(2:261–270

  8. Ball-Contact Injuries in 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association Sports: The Injury Surveillance Program, 2009-2010 Through 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Melissa A; Grooms, Dustin R; Guskiewicz, Kevin M; Kerr, Zachary Y

    2017-07-01

      Surveillance data regarding injuries caused by ball contact in collegiate athletes have not been well examined and are mostly limited to discussions of concussions and catastrophic injuries.   To describe the epidemiology of ball-contact injuries in 11 National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   Descriptive epidemiology study.   Convenience sample of NCAA programs in 11 sports (men's football, women's field hockey, women's volleyball, men's baseball, women's softball, men's and women's basketball, men's and women's lacrosse, and men's and women's soccer) during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   Collegiate student-athletes participating in 11 sports.   Ball-contact-injury rates, proportions, rate ratios, and proportion ratios with 95% confidence intervals were based on data from the NCAA Injury Surveillance Program during the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years.   During the 2009-2010 through 2014-2015 academic years, 1123 ball-contact injuries were reported, for an overall rate of 3.54/10 000 AEs. The sports with the highest rates were women's softball (8.82/10 000 AEs), women's field hockey (7.71/10 000 AEs), and men's baseball (7.20/10 000 AEs). Most ball-contact injuries were to the hand/wrist (32.7%) and head/face (27.0%) and were diagnosed as contusions (30.5%), sprains (23.1%), and concussions (16.1%). Among sex-comparable sports (ie, baseball/softball, basketball, and soccer), women had a larger proportion of ball-contact injuries diagnosed as concussions than men (injury proportion ratio = 2.33; 95% confidence interval = 1.63, 3.33). More than half (51.0%) of ball-contact injuries were non-time loss (ie, participation-restriction time common severe ball-contact injuries were concussions (n = 18) and finger fractures (n = 10).   Ball-contact-injury rates were the highest in women's softball, women's field hockey, and men's baseball. Although

  9. High knee abduction moments are common risk factors for patellofemoral pain (PFP) and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury in girls: is PFP itself a predictor for subsequent ACL injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myer, Gregory D; Ford, Kevin R; Di Stasi, Stephanie L; Foss, Kim D Barber; Micheli, Lyle J; Hewett, Timothy E

    2015-01-01

    Identifying risk factors for knee pain and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury can be an important step in the injury prevention cycle. We evaluated two unique prospective cohorts with similar populations and methodologies to compare the incidence rates and risk factors associated with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and ACL injury. The 'PFP cohort' consisted of 240 middle and high school female athletes. They were evaluated by a physician and underwent anthropometric assessment, strength testing and three-dimensional landing biomechanical analyses prior to their basketball season. 145 of these athletes met inclusion for surveillance of incident (new) PFP by certified athletic trainers during their competitive season. The 'ACL cohort' included 205 high school female volleyball, soccer and basketball athletes who underwent the same anthropometric, strength and biomechanical assessment prior to their competitive season and were subsequently followed up for incidence of ACL injury. A one-way analysis of variance was used to evaluate potential group (incident PFP vs ACL injured) differences in anthropometrics, strength and landing biomechanics. Knee abduction moment (KAM) cut-scores that provided the maximal sensitivity and specificity for prediction of PFP or ACL injury risk were also compared between the cohorts. KAM during landing above 15.4 Nm was associated with a 6.8% risk to develop PFP compared to a 2.9% risk if below the PFP risk threshold in our sample. Likewise, a KAM above 25.3 Nm was associated with a 6.8% risk for subsequent ACL injury compared to a 0.4% risk if below the established ACL risk threshold. The ACL-injured athletes initiated landing with a greater knee abduction angle and a reduced hamstrings-to-quadriceps strength ratio relative to the incident PFP group. Also, when comparing across cohorts, the athletes who suffered ACL injury also had lower hamstring/quadriceps ratio than the players in the PFP sample (p15 Nm of knee abduction load

  10. Comparability and feasibility of wrist- and hip-worn accelerometers in free-living adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joseph J; Rowlands, Alex V; Cliff, Dylan P; Morgan, Philip J; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Lubans, David R

    2017-12-01

    To determine the comparability and feasibility of wrist- and hip-worn accelerometers among free-living adolescents. 89 adolescents (age=13-14years old) from eight secondary schools in New South Wales (NSW), Australia wore wrist-worn GENEActiv and hip-worn ActiGraph (GT3X+) accelerometers simultaneously for seven days and completed an accelerometry behavior questionnaire. Bivariate correlations between the wrist- and hip-worn out-put were used to determine concurrent validity. Paired samples t-test were used to compare minutes per day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Group means and paired sample t-tests were used to analyze participants' perceptions of the wrist- and hip-worn monitoring protocols to assist with determining the feasibility. Wrist-worn accelerometry compared favorably with the hip-worn in average activity (r=0.88, phip-worn accelerometer (n=152, 24.4%). Participants reported they liked to wear the device on the wrist (phip (phip-worn accelerometer out-put among adolescents in free-living conditions. Adolescent compliance was significantly higher with wrist placement, with participants reporting that it was more comfortable and less embarrassing to wear on the wrist. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Fine motor assessment in chronic wrist pain: the role of adapted motor control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeulders, M. J.; Kreulen, M.; Bos, K. E.

    2001-01-01

    To show whether a difference in fine motor control exists between patients with chronic, undiagnosed wrist pain (CUWP) and healthy controls. Furthermore, a method to assess fine motor function of the wrist is evaluated. A case-control study. The Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.

  12. The current role of high-resolution ultrasonography of the hand and wrist in rheumatic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; van Dalen, A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To assess the current role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and treatment of pathological changes in the wrist and hand. 39 patients (14 male and 25 female, mean age 35 yrs.) with ill-defined pain and/or swelling of the wrist or hand were examined using a high-definition ultrasound (US) instrument. 18

  13. The effect of tendon loading on in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foumani, M.; Blankevoort, L.; Stekelenburg, C.; Strackee, S. D.; Carelsen, B.; Jonges, R.; Streekstra, G. J.

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of in-vitro carpal kinematics of the wrist provide valuable biomechanical data. Tendon loading is often applied during cadaver experiments to simulate natural stabilizing joint compression in the wrist joint. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of tendon loading on

  14. Chronic wrist pain: diagnosis and management. Development and use of a new algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vugt, R. M.; Bijlsma, J. W.; van Vugt, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    Chronic wrist pain can be difficult to manage and the differential diagnosis is extensive. To provide guidelines for assessment of the painful wrist an algorithm was developed to encourage a structured approach to the diagnosis and management of these patients. A review of the literature on causes

  15. Poor Reliability of Wrist Blood Pressure Self-Measurement at Home: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casiglia, Edoardo; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Albertini, Federica; Palatini, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    The reliability of blood pressure measurement with wrist devices, which has not previously been assessed under real-life circumstances in general population, is dependent on correct positioning of the wrist device at heart level. We determined whether an error was present when blood pressure was self-measured at the wrist in 721 unselected subjects from the general population. After training, blood pressure was measured in the office and self-measured at home with an upper-arm device (the UA-767 Plus) and a wrist device (the UB-542, not provided with a position sensor). The upper-arm-wrist blood pressure difference detected in the office was used as the reference measurement. The discrepancy between office and home differences was the home measurement error. In the office, systolic blood pressure was 2.5% lower at wrist than at arm (P=0.002), whereas at home, systolic and diastolic blood pressures were higher at wrist than at arm (+5.6% and +5.4%, respectively; Pblood pressure values likely because of a poor memory and rendition of the instructions, leading to the wrong position of the wrist. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. 21 CFR 888.3760 - Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis. 888.3760 Section 888.3760 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... scaphoid polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal scaphoid polymer prosthesis is a one...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3750 - Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal lunate polymer prosthesis. 888.3750 Section 888.3750 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... lunate polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal lunate prosthesis is a one-piece...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3770 - Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis. 888.3770 Section 888.3770 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... trapezium polymer prosthesis. (a) Identification. A wrist joint carpal trapezium polymer prosthesis is a one...

  19. A Study of Repeated Wrist Temperature of Sixth, Seventh, and Eighth Graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Doris B.; Quinn, Jimmy L.

    While evidence exists that a person's peripheral temperature responds to his state of arousal or stress, it also responds to other environmental factors. Wrist temperature has been found to vary with ambient temperature, and to increase during the school day. Before wrist temperature can be established as a valid measure of anxiety, stress, or…

  20. Whiplash injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malanga, Gerard; Peter, Jason

    2005-10-01

    Whiplash injuries are very common and usually are associated with rear-end collisions. However, a whiplash injury can be caused by any event that results in hyperextension and flexion of the cervical spine. These injuries are of serious concern to all consumers due to escalating cost of diagnosis, treatment, insurance, and litigation. Most acute whiplash injury cases respond well to conservative treatments, which result in resolution of symptoms usually within weeks to a few months after the injury occurred. Chronic whiplash injuries often are harder to diagnose and treat and often result in poor outcomes. Current research shows that various structures in the cervical spine receive nociceptive innervation and potentially may be the cause of chronic pain symptoms. One potential pain generator showing promise is the facet or zygapophyseal joints. Various researchers have proven that these joints are injured during whiplash injuries and that diagnosis and temporary pain relief can be obtained with facet joint injections. The initial evaluation of any patient should follow an organized and stepwise approach, and more serious causes of neck pain must first be ruled out through the history, physical examination, and diagnostic testing. Treatment regimens should be evidence-based, focusing on treatments that have proven to be effective in treating acute and chronic whiplash injuries.

  1. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  2. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, Antonio; Limbucci, Nicola; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  3. A feasibility study on age-related factors of wrist pulse using principal component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang-Han Bae; Young Ju Jeon; Sanghun Lee; Jaeuk U Kim

    2016-08-01

    Various analysis methods for examining wrist pulse characteristics are needed for accurate pulse diagnosis. In this feasibility study, principal component analysis (PCA) was performed to observe age-related factors of wrist pulse from various analysis parameters. Forty subjects in the age group of 20s and 40s were participated, and their wrist pulse signal and respiration signal were acquired with the pulse tonometric device. After pre-processing of the signals, twenty analysis parameters which have been regarded as values reflecting pulse characteristics were calculated and PCA was performed. As a results, we could reduce complex parameters to lower dimension and age-related factors of wrist pulse were observed by combining-new analysis parameter derived from PCA. These results demonstrate that PCA can be useful tool for analyzing wrist pulse signal.

  4. How repeated 15-minute assertiveness training sessions reduce wrist cutting in patients with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Masaya

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to examine a possible treatment for patients with borderline personality disorder who have wrist-cutting syndrome, a condition characterized by repeated, superficial wrist cutting in a non-suicidal fashion. Within the current healthcare system in Japan, the average amount of time a doctor can spend with a psychiatric outpatient is about 8 to 15 minutes. We, therefore, examined whether repeated 15-minute psychotherapy sessions to improve patient assertiveness would be effective for reducing wrist cutting and possibly other forms of self-mutilation. We treated 13 patients diagnosed with borderline personality disorder and wrist-cutting syndrome with assertiveness training during 15-minute, biweekly therapy sessions over a course of one to four years. At the conclusion of psychotherapeutic treatment, 69% of outpatients showed a statistically significant reduction in wrist-cutting behavior.

  5. Different evolutionary pathways underlie the morphology of wrist bones in hominoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivell, Tracy L; Barros, Anna P; Smaers, Jeroen B

    2013-10-23

    The hominoid wrist has been a focus of numerous morphological analyses that aim to better understand long-standing questions about the evolution of human and hominoid hand use. However, these same analyses also suggest various scenarios of complex and mosaic patterns of morphological evolution within the wrist and potentially multiple instances of homoplasy that would benefit from require formal analysis within a phylogenetic context.We identify morphological features that principally characterize primate - and, in particular, hominoid (apes, including humans) - wrist evolution and reveal the rate, process and evolutionary timing of patterns of morphological change on individual branches of the primate tree of life. Linear morphological variables of five wrist bones - the scaphoid, lunate, triquetrum, capitate and hamate - are analyzed in a diverse sample of extant hominoids (12 species, 332 specimens), Old World (8 species, 43 specimens) and New World (4 species, 26 specimens) monkeys, fossil Miocene apes (8 species, 20 specimens) and Plio-Pleistocene hominins (8 species, 18 specimens). Results reveal a combination of parallel and synapomorphic morphology within haplorrhines, and especially within hominoids, across individual wrist bones. Similar morphology of some wrist bones reflects locomotor behaviour shared between clades (scaphoid, triquetrum and capitate) while others (lunate and hamate) indicate clade-specific synapomorphic morphology. Overall, hominoids show increased variation in wrist bone morphology compared with other primate clades, supporting previous analyses, and demonstrate several occurrences of parallel evolution, particularly between orangutans and hylobatids, and among hominines (extant African apes, humans and fossil hominins). Our analyses indicate that different evolutionary processes can underlie the evolution of a single anatomical unit (the wrist) to produce diversity in functional and morphological adaptations across individual wrist

  6. [Trampoline injuries in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinikumpu, Juha-Jaakko; Antila, Eeva; Korhonen, Jussi; Rättyä, Johanna; Serlo, Willy

    2012-01-01

    Trampolines for home use have become common in Finland during the past ten years, being especially favored by children. Trampoline jumping is beneficial and constructive physical exercise, but poses a significant risk for injuries. The most common injuries include sprains and strains. During summertime, trampoline injuries account for as many as 13% of children's accidents requiring hospital care. Fractures are by far the most common trampoline injuries requiring hospital care. Injuries can be prevented by using safety nets. Only one child at a time is allowed to jump on the trampoline.

  7. Review article: Methodology for the 'rapid review' series on musculoskeletal injuries in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Kirsten; McPhee, Megan; Bell, Anthony; Martin-Khan, Melinda; Russell, Trevor

    2018-02-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common presentation to the ED, with significant costs involved in the management of these injuries, variances in care within the ED and associated morbidity. A series of rapid review papers were completed to guide best practice for the assessment and management of common musculoskeletal injuries presenting to the ED. This paper presents the methodology used across the rapid reviews. PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, TRIP and the grey literature, including relevant organisational websites, were searched in 2015. The search was repeated consistently for each topic area (injuries of the foot and ankle, knee, hand and wrist, elbow, shoulder, lumbar spine and cervical spine). English-language primary studies, systematic reviews and guidelines that were published in the last 10 years and addressed acute musculoskeletal injury management were considered for inclusion. Data extraction of each included article was conducted, followed by a quality appraisal. The extracted data from each article was synthesised to group similar evidence together. For each rapid review, the evidence has been organised in a way that a clinician can direct their attention to a specific component of the clinical cycle of care in the ED, such as the assessment, diagnostic tests, management and follow-up considerations from ED. The series of rapid reviews are designed to foster evidence-based practice within the ED, targeting the injuries most commonly presenting. The reviews provide clinicians in EDs with rapid access to the best current evidence, which has been synthesised and organised to assist decision-making. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  8. Swertianlarin, an Herbal Agent Derived from Swertia mussotii Franch, Attenuates Liver Injury, Inflammation, and Cholestasis in Common Bile Duct-Ligated Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangjun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Swertianlarin is an herbal agent abundantly distributed in Swertia mussotii Franch, a Chinese traditional herb used for treatment of jaundice. To study the therapeutic effect of swertianlarin on cholestasis, liver injury, serum proinflammatory cytokines, and bile salt concentrations were measured by comparing rats treated with swertianlarin 100 mg/kg/d or saline for 3, 7, or 14 days after bile duct ligation (BDL. Serum alanine aminotransferase (ATL and aspartate aminotransferase (AST levels were significantly decreased in BDL rats treated with swertianlarin for 14 days (P<0.05. The reduced liver injury in BDL rats by swertianlarin treatment for 14 days was further confirmed by liver histopathology. Levels of serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα were decreased by swertianlarin in BDL rats for 3 and 7 days (P<0.05. Moreover, reductions in serum interleukins IL-1β and IL-6 levels were also observed in BDL rats treated with swertianlarin (P<0.05. In addition, most of serum toxic bile salt concentrations (e.g., chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA and deoxycholic acid (DCA in cholestatic rats were decreased by swertianlarin (P<0.05. In conclusion, the data suggest that swertianlarin derived from Swertia mussotii Franch attenuates liver injury, inflammation, and cholestasis in bile duct-ligated rats.

  9. Muscle and joint sequelae in brachial plexus injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnisveld, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    A brachial plexus injury is caused by traction on the brachial plexus during delivery or due to a high-energy road traffic accident in young adults. Muscle denervation and subsequent muscle degeneration results in functional limitations of the shoulder, elbow, wrist and hand including contractures

  10. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist: clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurecker, G.

    2001-03-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: In 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: The following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG negative - AS positive/AG positive - AS negative/ AG and AS negative): SLL: 16/8/0/34, LTL: 13/4/8/33, TFC: 28/5/1/24. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 67/100, LTL 76/80, TFC 85/96. PACT versus AS: The following detection rates were observed (PACT and AS positive/PACT negative - AS positive/PACT positive - AS negative/ PACT and AS negative): SLL: 18/6/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM: 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 75/100, LTL 88/80, TFC 94/92, ChM 57/87. AG+PACT versus AS: The following detection rates were observed (AG+PACT and AS positive/AG+PACT negative - AS positive/AG+PACT positive - AS negative/ AG+PACT and AS negative): SLL: 19/5/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity

  11. The post-arthro-CT of the wrist: clinical evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurecker, G.

    2001-03-01

    To compare the diagnostic effectiveness of post-arthro-CT (PACT) and 3-compartment wrist arthrography (AG) both separate and combined versus wrist arthroscopy for scapho-lunate ligament (SLL), luno-triquetral ligament (LTL) and triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) defects and chondromalacia of the carpal bones. Material and methods: in 58 patients (16-69 years) the affected wrist was examined initially by conventional 3-compartment wrist arthrography with digital subtraction technique during injection followed by digital stress images. Afterwards spiral arthro-CT was performed in the semi-coronal and axial plane with 1 mm slice thickness and secondary true-coronal and sagittal reconstructions. Within 1 month arthroscopy was performed in general anesthesia utilizing standard joint entry points combined with routine digital picture archiving. All examinations were evaluated for SLL, LTL and TFC defects, PACT and AS for ChM too. Results: AG versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG and AS positive/AG negative - AS positive/AG positive - AS negative/ AG and AS negative): SLL: 16/8/0/34, LTL: 13/4/8/33, TFC: 28/5/1/24. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 67/100, LTL 76/80, TFC 85/96. PACT versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (PACT and AS positive/PACT negative - AS positive/PACT positive - AS negative/ PACT and AS negative): SLL: 18/6/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM: 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity (%) values: SLL 75/100, LTL 88/80, TFC 94/92, ChM 57/87. AG+PACT versus AS: the following detection rates were observed (AG+PACT and AS positive/AG+PACT negative - AS positive/AG+PACT positive - AS negative/ AG+PACT and AS negative): SLL: 19/5/0/34, LTL: 15/2/8/33, TFC: 31/2/2/23, ChM 20/15/3/20. Using AS as the 'gold standard' this translates into following sensitivity (%) and specificity

  12. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: MRI findings in three patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sueyoshi, E. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Uetani, M. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Hayashi, K. [Department of Radiology, Nagasaki University School of Medicine, 1-7-1 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852 (Japan); Kohzaki, S. [Nagasaki Municipal Hospital, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    We report recent MRI findings in patients with tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist. Marked synovial thickening around the flexor tendons and fluid in the tendon sheath were clearly shown on MRI. Post-contrast study was useful in distinguishing the thick tenosynovium from the surrounding structures and fluid in the tendon sheath. The well-enhanced tenosynovium was also seen in the carpal tunnel in all cases. On the basis of these findings, we could easily distinguish tenosynovitis from other soft-tissue-mass lesions, such as tumors or infected ganglia. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is often not diagnosed early, and its differentiation from soft tissue tumors may be clinically difficult. MRI, particularly post-contrast study, is useful for early diagnosis of, and planning treatment for, tuberculous tenosynovitis. (orig.). With 3 figs.

  13. Tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist: MRI findings in three patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sueyoshi, E.; Uetani, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kohzaki, S.

    1996-01-01

    We report recent MRI findings in patients with tuberculous tenosynovitis of the wrist. Marked synovial thickening around the flexor tendons and fluid in the tendon sheath were clearly shown on MRI. Post-contrast study was useful in distinguishing the thick tenosynovium from the surrounding structures and fluid in the tendon sheath. The well-enhanced tenosynovium was also seen in the carpal tunnel in all cases. On the basis of these findings, we could easily distinguish tenosynovitis from other soft-tissue-mass lesions, such as tumors or infected ganglia. Tuberculous tenosynovitis is often not diagnosed early, and its differentiation from soft tissue tumors may be clinically difficult. MRI, particularly post-contrast study, is useful for early diagnosis of, and planning treatment for, tuberculous tenosynovitis. (orig.). With 3 figs

  14. Gymnastics injuries and imaging in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, Marc S. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Injuries of children participating in gymnastics are seen less often than in more popular sports. Patterns of injury are predictable based upon sex, age and level of intensity of training and competition. More injuries are seen in girls than in boys, and the great majority of early adolescents who compete have wrist pain. Some otherwise quiescent congenital spine anomalies may be uncovered by the stress of gymnastics maneuvers and present with low back pain. In addition to diagnosis of injuries, imaging can be used to guide analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy in some injured athletes. Parents whose children wish to participate in gymnastics should understand that fewer injuries occur in the child enjoying recreational gymnastics than in competing gymnasts. More gymnastics injuries are found in very competitive athletes training at higher levels. (orig.)

  15. Gymnastics injuries and imaging in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, Marc S.

    2009-01-01

    Injuries of children participating in gymnastics are seen less often than in more popular sports. Patterns of injury are predictable based upon sex, age and level of intensity of training and competition. More injuries are seen in girls than in boys, and the great majority of early adolescents who compete have wrist pain. Some otherwise quiescent congenital spine anomalies may be uncovered by the stress of gymnastics maneuvers and present with low back pain. In addition to diagnosis of injuries, imaging can be used to guide analgesic and anti-inflammatory therapy in some injured athletes. Parents whose children wish to participate in gymnastics should understand that fewer injuries occur in the child enjoying recreational gymnastics than in competing gymnasts. More gymnastics injuries are found in very competitive athletes training at higher levels. (orig.)

  16. The hamatolunate facet: characterization and association with cartilage lesions - magnetic resonance arthrography and anatomic correlation in cadaveric wrists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfirrmann, C.W.A. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States); Orthopedic University Hospital Balgrist, Department of Radiology, Forchstrasse 340, 8008 Zurich (Switzerland); Theumann, N.H.; Chung, C.B.; Trudell, D.J.; Resnick, D. [Department of Radiology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, 3350 La Jolla Village Dr., San Diego, CA 92161 (United States)

    2002-08-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the appearance of the hamatolunate facet using high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) arthrography in cadavers and to correlate the presence of this anatomic variant with the presence of osteoarthritis in the wrist. High-resolution MR images of 22 cadaveric wrist specimens were obtained after tri-compartmental arthrography. Two readers in consensus analyzed the MR images and recoded the presence or absence of a hamatolunate facet. Geometric characteristics and cartilage and ligament integrity were analyzed. A third reader, who was blinded to the purpose of the study, recorded cartilage lesions of all the bones of the proximal and distal carpal rows. A hamatolunate facet was present in 11 of 22 wrists (50%). The mean coronal size of the lunate facet at the lunate (type II lunate) was 4.5 mm (range, 2-6 mm). The highest frequencies of cartilage lesions were seen in the scapho-trapezio-trapezoid joint (45.5%) and at the proximal pole of the hamate (54.4% and 40.9% for consensus reading/blinded reading, respectively). In cases with a hamatolunate facet, the frequency of cartilage lesions in the proximal pole of the hamate was 81.8% and 63.6% versus 27.3% and 18.2% without such a facet (chi-squared, P=0.01/P=0.03). No correlation of the presence of a hamatolunate facet with interosseous ligament tears or lesions of the triangular fibrocartilage was seen. In conclusion, the hamatolunate facet is a very common anatomic variant. The presence of a hamatolunate facet is associated with cartilage damage in the proximal pole of the hamate. (orig.)

  17. A Haptic Feedback Scheme to Accurately Position a Virtual Wrist Prosthesis Using a Three-Node Tactor Array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Erwin

    Full Text Available In this paper, a novel haptic feedback scheme, used for accurately positioning a 1DOF virtual wrist prosthesis through sensory substitution, is presented. The scheme employs a three-node tactor array and discretely and selectively modulates the stimulation frequency of each tactor to relay 11 discrete haptic stimuli to the user. Able-bodied participants were able to move the virtual wrist prosthesis via a surface electromyography based controller. The participants evaluated the feedback scheme without visual or audio feedback and relied solely on the haptic feedback alone to correctly position the hand. The scheme was evaluated through both normal (perpendicular and shear (lateral stimulations applied on the forearm. Normal stimulations were applied through a prototype device previously developed by the authors while shear stimulations were generated using an ubiquitous coin motor vibrotactor. Trials with no feedback served as a baseline to compare results within the study and to the literature. The results indicated that using normal and shear stimulations resulted in accurately positioning the virtual wrist, but were not significantly different. Using haptic feedback was substantially better than no feedback. The results found in this study are significant since the feedback scheme allows for using relatively few tactors to relay rich haptic information to the user and can be learned easily despite a relatively short amount of training. Additionally, the results are important for the haptic community since they contradict the common conception in the literature that normal stimulation is inferior to shear. From an ergonomic perspective normal stimulation has the potential to benefit upper limb amputees since it can operate at lower frequencies than shear-based vibrotactors while also generating less noise. Through further tuning of the novel haptic feedback scheme and normal stimulation device, a compact and comfortable sensory substitution

  18. Protecting the health of the @hlete: how online technology may aid our common goal to prevent injury and illness in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Evert; Bolling, Caroline

    2015-09-01

    Online technology dominates our era and eHealth has become a reality for sports clinicians and researchers. Contemporary online platforms enable self-monitoring and provide tailored feedback to the different stakeholders who play a role in the health and care of athletes. Innovations such as digital monitoring, mobile applications and connected hardware provide the critical tools to solve current enigmas in sports medicine research, and to streamline and facilitate injury prevention, management and rehabilitation. eHealth is not an emerging future of sports medicine-the technology to move our field forward in terms of research and practice is already available. This Analysis is based on Evert Verhagen's keynote presentation at the IOC World Conference on Injury and Illness Prevention in Sport (Monaco, 12 April 2014). It outlines the use of eHealth in research, implementation and practice, and provides an overview of possibilities and opportunities that existing and emerging eHealth solutions provide for sports and exercise medicine and physiotherapy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Use of Anisotropy, 3D Segmented Atlas, and Computational Analysis to Identify Gray Matter Subcortical Lesions Common to Concussive Injury from Different Sites on the Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kulkarni

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can occur anywhere along the cortical mantel. While the cortical contusions may be random and disparate in their locations, the clinical outcomes are often similar and difficult to explain. Thus a question that arises is, do concussions at different sites on the cortex affect similar subcortical brain regions? To address this question we used a fluid percussion model to concuss the right caudal or rostral cortices in rats. Five days later, diffusion tensor MRI data were acquired for indices of anisotropy (IA for use in a novel method of analysis to detect changes in gray matter microarchitecture. IA values from over 20,000 voxels were registered into a 3D segmented, annotated rat atlas covering 150 brain areas. Comparisons between left and right hemispheres revealed a small population of subcortical sites with altered IA values. Rostral and caudal concussions were of striking similarity in the impacted subcortical locations, particularly the central nucleus of the amygdala, laterodorsal thalamus, and hippocampal complex. Subsequent immunohistochemical analysis of these sites showed significant neuroinflammation. This study presents three significant findings that advance our understanding and evaluation of TBI: 1 the introduction of a new method to identify highly localized disturbances in discrete gray matter, subcortical brain nuclei without postmortem histology, 2 the use of this method to demonstrate that separate injuries to the rostral and caudal cortex produce the same subcortical, disturbances, and 3 the central nucleus of the amygdala, critical in the regulation of emotion, is vulnerable to concussion.

  20. Acromioclavicular joint dislocations: radiological correlation between Rockwood classification system and injury patterns in human cadaver species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschler, Anica; Rösler, Klaus; Rotter, Robert; Gradl, Georg; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gierer, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The classification system of Rockwood and Young is a commonly used classification for acromioclavicular joint separations subdividing types I-VI. This classification hypothesizes specific lesions to anatomical structures (acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments, capsule, attached muscles) leading to the injury. In recent literature, our understanding for anatomical correlates leading to the radiological-based Rockwood classification is questioned. The goal of this experimental-based investigation was to approve the correlation between the anatomical injury pattern and the Rockwood classification. In four human cadavers (seven shoulders), the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were transected stepwise. Radiological correlates were recorded (Zanca view) with 15-kg longitudinal tension applied at the wrist. The resulting acromio- and coracoclavicular distances were measured. Radiographs after acromioclavicular ligament transection showed joint space enlargement (8.6 ± 0.3 vs. 3.1 ± 0.5 mm, p acromioclavicular joint space width increased to 16.7 ± 2.7 vs. 8.6 ± 0.3 mm, p acromioclavicular joint lesions higher than Rockwood type I and II. The clinical consequence for reconstruction of low-grade injuries might be a solely surgical approach for the acromioclavicular ligaments or conservative treatment. High-grade injuries were always based on additional structural damage to the coracoclavicular ligaments. Rockwood type V lesions occurred while muscle attachments were intact.

  1. Effect of wrist cooling on aerobic and anaerobic performance in elite sportsmen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Anup; Singh, Krishan; Sharma, Deep; Upadhyay, Vivekanand; Singh, Amit

    2018-01-01

    Body cooling has been used to increase sporting performance and enhance recovery. Several studies have reported improvement in exercise capacities using forearm and hand cooling or only hand cooling. Wrist cooling has emerged as a portable light weight solution for precooling prior to sporting activity. The Astrand test for aerobic performance and the Wingate test for anaerobic performance are reliable and accurate tests for performance assessment. This study conducted on elite Indian athletes analyses the effects of wrist precooling on aerobic and anaerobic performance as tested by the Astrand test and the Wingate test before and after wrist precooling. 67 elite sportsmen were administered Wingate and Astrand test under standardised conditions with and without wrist precooling using a wrist cooling device (dhamaSPORT). Paired t -test was applied to study effect on aerobic [VO 2 (ml/min/kg)] and anaerobic performance [peak power (W/kg) and average power (W/kg)] and Cohen's d was used to calculate effect size of wrist precooling. After wrist precooling, significant increase of 0.22 ( p  = 0.014, 95% CI: 0.047, 0.398) in peak power (W/kg) and 0.22 ( p  effective in aerobic performance. Wrist cooling effect size was smaller in VO 2 (Cohen's d  = 0.21), peak power (Cohen's d  = 0.31) and it was larger in average power (Cohen's d  = 0.71). Results show wrist precooling significantly improves anaerobic than aerobic performance of elite sportsmen.

  2. Psychometric properties of two questionnaires in the context of total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E H; Merser, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Disabilites of Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) and Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation questionnaires in patients with total wrist arthroplasty. METHODS: In a prospective cohort of 102 cases, we evaluated the QuickDASH. Furthermore, in a cross-sectional study and a test-retest on a subgroup of the patients, we...... patients scored significantly higher on the QuickDASH than other patients did. The scores of both questionnaires were very closely related. CONCLUSION: Both questionnaires are valid and equivalent for use in patients with total wrist arthroplasty. FUNDING: This research received no specific grant from any...

  3. [Cinematography, a new diagnostic procedure in evaluation of the injured painful wrist joint].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werber, K D; Wuttge-Hannig, A; Hannig, C

    1990-01-01

    By the X-ray Cineradiografie we are able to examine and to judge the dynamic of the wrist bones by 50 pictures/sec. in comparison to one another and also depending on their ligaments. We did an investigation of 170 patients with painful wrist. With the method we were able to make up a clear diagnosis and to propose the therapy. I.e.: If consecutive shortening of the radius after distal radius fracture resulting ingruency of the wrist joint is relevant, or a scaphoid pseudarthrosis is fixed elastically, or a scaphoic dissociation is effective. The variations were shown in comparison to normal circumstances.

  4. MRI patterns of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in preterm and full term infants – classical and less common MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabaj, Astra; Bekiesińska-Figatowska, Monika; Mądzik, Jaroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury occurring in antenatal, perinatal or early postnatal period constitutes an important diagnostic problem in both term and prematurely born neonates. Over the past several years magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become relatively easily accessible in Poland. On the basis of the central nervous system MRI, the experienced radiologist are able to determine the location of the hypoxic-ischemic lesions, their extent and evolution. Therefore he can help clinicians to answer the question whether the brain damage of the newborn is responsible for its clinical condition and he can contribute to determining the prognosis of the infant’s future development. The aim of this study is to present the current knowledge of different types of hypoxic-ischemic brain lesions based on our personal experience and MR images from the archives of the Department of Diagnostic Imaging at the Institute of Mother and Child

  5. The common antitussive agent dextromethorphan protects against hyperoxia-induced cell death in established in vivo and in vitro models of neonatal brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posod, A; Pinzer, K; Urbanek, M; Wegleiter, K; Keller, M; Kiechl-Kohlendorfer, U; Griesmaier, E

    2014-08-22

    Preterm infants are prematurely subjected to relatively high oxygen concentrations, even when supplemental oxygen is not administered. There is increasing evidence to show that an excess of oxygen is toxic to the developing brain. Dextromethorphan (DM), a frequently used antitussive agent with pleiotropic mechanisms of action, has been shown to be neuroprotective in various models of central nervous system pathology. Due to its numerous beneficial properties, it might also be able to counteract detrimental effects of a neonatal oxygen insult. The aim of the current study was to evaluate its therapeutic potential in established cell culture and rodent models of hyperoxia-induced neonatal brain injury. For in vitro studies pre- and immature oligodendroglial (OLN-93) cells were subjected to hyperoxic conditions for 48 h after pre-treatment with increasing doses of DM. For in vivo studies 6-day-old Wistar rat pups received a single intraperitoneal injection of DM in two different dosages prior to being exposed to hyperoxia for 24h. Cell viability and caspase-3 activation were assessed as outcome parameters at the end of exposure. DM significantly increased cell viability in immature oligodendroglial cells subjected to hyperoxia. In pre-oligodendroglial cells cell viability was not significantly affected by DM treatment. In vivo caspase-3 activation induced by hyperoxic exposure was significantly lower after administration of DM in gray and white matter areas. In control animals kept under normoxic conditions DM did not significantly influence caspase-3-dependent apoptosis. The present results indicate that DM is a promising and safe treatment strategy for neonatal hyperoxia-induced brain injury that merits further investigation. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Triathlon: running injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, Andrea M; Dixit, Sameer; Cosgarea, Andrew J

    2012-12-01

    The running portion of the triathlon represents the final leg of the competition and, by some reports, the most important part in determining a triathlete's overall success. Although most triathletes spend most of their training time on cycling, running injuries are the most common injuries encountered. Common causes of running injuries include overuse, lack of rest, and activities that aggravate biomechanical predisposers of specific injuries. We discuss the running-associated injuries in the hip, knee, lower leg, ankle, and foot of the triathlete, and the causes, presentation, evaluation, and treatment of each.

  7. Adult Reconstructive Surgery: A High-Risk Profession for Work-Related Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Saad M; Alzahrani, Mohammad M; Tanzer, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Adult reconstructive surgery is an orthopedic subspecialty characterized by surgical tasks that are physical, repetitive, and require some degree of stamina from the surgeon. This can result strain and/or injury of the surgeon's musculoskeletal system. This study investigates the prevalence of work-related injuries among arthroplasty surgeons. A modified version of the physical discomfort survey was sent to surgeon members of the Hip Society, the International Hip Society, and the Canadian Orthopedic Arthroplasty via email. One hundred and eighty-three surgeons completed the survey. Overall, 66.1% of the arthroplasty surgeons reported that they had experienced a work-related injury. The most common injuries that occurred were low back pain (28%), lateral epicondylitis of the elbow (14%), shoulder tendonitis (14%), lumbar disc herniation (13%), and wrist arthritis (12%). Overall, 27% of surgeons took time off from work because of the injury. As the number of disorders diagnosed increased, there was a significant increase in the incidence of requiring time off work because of the disorder (P increased the risk of the surgeon requiring time off because of the disorder were age >55 years, practicing for more than >20 years, and performing >100 total hip arthroplasty procedures per year (P < .05). In addition, 31% of the orthopedic surgeons surveyed required surgery for their injury. Although most studies concentrate on the importance of patient safety and thus the quality of the health care system, the surgeon's safety is also considered an integral part of this system's quality. This study highlights a high prevalence of musculoskeletal work-related injuries among arthroplasty surgeons and indicates the need for the identification of preventive measures directed toward improving the operative surgical environment and work ergonomics for the surgeons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Urological injuries following trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bent, C.; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M.; Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N.; Fotheringham, T.

    2008-01-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated

  9. Urological injuries following trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, C. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: clare.bent@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk; Iyngkaran, T.; Power, N.; Matson, M. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Hajdinjak, T.; Buchholz, N. [Department of Urology, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom); Fotheringham, T. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Barts and The London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  10. Upper extremity golf injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Michael A; Lee, Steven K; Strauss, Eric J

    2013-01-01

    Golf is a global sport enjoyed by an estimated 60 million people around the world. Despite the common misconception that the risk of injury during the play of golf is minimal, golfers are subject to a myriad of potential pathologies. While the majority of injuries in golf are attributable to overuse, acute traumatic injuries can also occur. As the body's direct link to the golf club, the upper extremities are especially prone to injury. A thorough appreciation of the risk factors and patterns of injury will afford accurate diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of further injury.

  11. Urological injuries following trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, C; Iyngkaran, T; Power, N; Matson, M; Hajdinjak, T; Buchholz, N; Fotheringham, T

    2008-12-01

    Blunt renal trauma is the third most common injury in abdominal trauma following splenic and hepatic injuries, respectively. In the majority, such injuries are associated with other abdominal organ injuries. As urological injuries are not usually life-threatening, and clinical signs and symptoms are non-specific, diagnosis is often delayed. We present a practical approach to the diagnosis and management of these injuries based on our experience in a busy inner city trauma hospital with a review of the current evidence-based practice. Diagnostic imaging signs are illustrated.

  12. Recreational mountain biking injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, S A; Biant, L C; Court-Brown, Charles M

    2011-04-01

    Mountain biking is increasing in popularity worldwide. The injury patterns associated with elite level and competitive mountain biking are known. This study analysed the incidence, spectrum and risk factors for injuries sustained during recreational mountain biking. The injury rate was 1.54 injuries per 1000 biker exposures. Men were more commonly injured than women, with those aged 30-39 years at highest risk. The commonest types of injury were wounding, skeletal fracture and musculoskeletal soft tissue injury. Joint dislocations occurred more commonly in older mountain bikers. The limbs were more commonly injured than the axial skeleton. The highest hospital admission rates were observed with head, neck and torso injuries. Protective body armour, clip-in pedals and the use of a full-suspension bicycle may confer a protective effect.

  13. Trampoline-related injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, B J; Davis, J W

    1995-08-01

    Two hundred and seventeen patients who had sustained an injury during the recreational use of a trampoline were managed in the emergency room of Logan Regional Hospital in Logan, Utah, from January 1991 through December 1992. We retrospectively reviewed the charts and radiographs of these patients to categorize the injuries. Additional details regarding the injuries of seventy-two patients (33 per cent) were obtained by means of a telephone interview with use of a questionnaire. The injuries occurred from February through November, with the peak incidence in July. The patients were eighteen months to forty-five years old (average, ten years old); ninety-four patients (43 per cent) were five to nine years old. Eighty-four patients (39 per cent) sustained a fracture; fifty-four (25 per cent), a sprain or strain; forty-five (21 per cent), a laceration; and thirty-four (16 per cent), a contusion. Fifty-seven injuries (26 per cent) involved the elbow or forearm; forty-six (21 per cent), the head or neck; forty (18 per cent), the ankle or foot; thirty-three (15 per cent), the knee or leg; nineteen (9 per cent), the trunk or back; thirteen (6 per cent), the shoulder or arm; and nine (4 per cent), the wrist or hand. Thirteen patients (6 per cent) had a back injury, but none of them had a permanent neurological deficit. One patient who had an ocular injury was transferred to a tertiary care center. One hundred and fifty-six patients (72 per cent) were evaluated radiographically, fifteen (7 per cent) were admitted to the hospital, and thirteen (6 per cent) had an operation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Radial and ulnar bursae of the wrist: cadaveric investigation of regional anatomy with ultrasonographic-guided tenography and MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, R.O.C.; Gasparetto, E.L.; Marchiori, E.; Escuissato, D.L.; Trudell, D.J.; Haghighi, P.; Resnik, D.

    2006-01-01

    To demonstrate the anatomy of the radial and ulnar bursae of the wrist using MR and US images. Ultrasonographic-guided tenography of the tendon sheath of flexor pollicis longus (FPL) and the common tendon sheath of the flexor digitorum of the fifth digit (FD5) of ten cadaveric hands was performed, followed by magnetic resonance imaging and gross anatomic correlation. Patterns of communication were observed between these tendon sheaths and the radial and ulnar bursae of the wrist. The tendon sheath of the FPL communicated with the radial bursa in 100% (10/10) of cases, and the tendon sheath of the FD5 communicated with the ulnar bursa in 80% (8/10). Communication of the radial and ulnar bursae was evident in 100% (10/10), and presented an ''hourglass'' configuration in the longitudinal plane. The ulnar and radial bursae often communicate. The radial bursa communicates with the FPL tendon sheath, and the ulnar bursa may communicate with the FD5 tendon sheath

  15. Schwannoma of the Median Nerve at the Wrist and Palmar Regions of the Hand: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harun Kütahya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwannomas are also known as neurolemmas that are usually originated from Schwann cells located in the peripheric nerve sheaths. They are the most common tumours of the hand (0.8–2%. They usually present solitary swelling along the course of the nerve however multiple lesions may be present in cases of NF type 1, familial neurofibromatosis, and sporadic schwannomatosis. Schwannomas are generally represented as an asymptomatic mass; however pain, numbness and fatigue may take place with the increasing size of the tumour. EMG (electromyelography, MRI (magnetic resonance imagination, and USG (ultrasound are helpful in the diagnosis. Surgical removal is usually curative. In this paper, we present a 24-year-old male referred to our clinic for a lump located at the volar side of the left wrist and a lump located in his left palm and numbness at his 3rd and 4th fingers. Total excision was performed for both lesions. Histopathological examination of the masses revealed typical features of schwannoma. At the 6th-month followup the patient was symptom-free except for slight paresthesia of the 3rd and the 4th fingers. For our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature presenting wrist and palm involvement of the median nerve schwannoma.

  16. What wrist should you wear your actigraphy device on? Analysis of dominant vs. non-dominant wrist actigraphy for measuring sleep in healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew William Driller

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Differences in sleep results due to the placement of actigraphy devices (non-dominant vs. dominant wrist are yet to be determined. METHODS: 65 nights of data from 13 adult participants was collected while participants wore two actigraphy devices, one on each wrist. Sleep indices including total sleep time (TST, total time in bed (TTB, sleep efficiency (SE%, sleep latency (SL, wake after sleep onset (WASO, sleep onset time (SOT and wake time (WT were assessed between the two devices. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between devices for any of the measured sleep variables (p>0.05. SE%, SL and WASO resulted in high correlations between devices (0.89, 0.89 and 0.76, respectively, with all other sleep variables resulting in very high correlations (>0.90 between devices. CONCLUSIONS: Based on our results, it does not seem critical which wrist the actigraphy device is worn on for measuring key sleep variables.

  17. Cold injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, R J

    1995-01-01

    There are two categories of cold injury. The first is hypothermia, which is a systemic injury to cold, and the second is frostbite, which is a local injury. Throughout history, entire armies, from George Washington to the Germans on the Russian Front in World War II, have fallen prey to prolonged cold exposure. Cold injury is common and can occur in all seasons if ambient temperature is lower than the core body temperature. In the 1985 Boston Marathon, even though it was 76 degrees and sunny, there were 75 runners treated for hypothermia. In general, humans adapt poorly to cold exposure. Children are at particular risk because of their relatively greater surface area/body mass ratio, causing them to cool even more rapidly than adults. Because of this, the human's best defense against cold injury is to limit his/her exposure to cold and to dress appropriately. If cold injury has occurred and is mild, often simple passive rewarming such as dry blankets and a warm room are sufficient treatment.

  18. COBRA-Bee Carpal-Wrist Gimbal for Astrobee, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TUI proposes to develop a carpal-wrist gimbal payload for the Astrobee free-flier, called 'COBRA-Bee' to satisfy Astrobee mission needs for a lightweight, integrated...

  19. A complex suicide by vehicle assisted ligature strangulation and wrist-cutting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Akçan

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: A complete forensic investigation revealed the case was an unusual complex suicide by vehicle assisted ligature strangulation and wrist-cutting. The case was interesting in terms of involving car assisted ligature strangulation.

  20. MRI features in de Quervain`s tenosynovitis of the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glajchen, N. [Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Schweitzer, M. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1996-01-01

    De Quervain`s stenosing tenosynovitis of the first dorsal extensor component is traditionally diagnosed clinically but may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. A retrospective review of wrist MR images was performed in cases where the diagnosis of de Quervain`s synovitis was suggested (n=5). Imaging findings were correlated with clinical findings in four cases and with wrist arthroscopy in one case. Increased thickness of the extensor pollicus brevis and abductor pollicis longus tendons was the most reliable finding on MRI, being present in all cases. Peritendinous edema was also a reliable finding. Surrounding subcutaneous edema and increased intratendinous signal were less reliable findings in confirmed cases of de Quervain`s disease. De Quervain`s tenosynovitis may be encountered when performing MRI of the wrist. Increased tendon thickness and peritendinous edema are the most reliable imaging findings. (orig.)

  1. MR anatomy of the joints: an MR-cadaveric correlative study: part I. wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Donald Resnick [University of California, San Diego (United States)

    1991-07-15

    To acquire the anatomic information necessary for correct interpretation of MR images of the wrist, transverse, coronal, and sagittal MR images of 3 fresh cadaveric wrists were obtained and, subsequently, sectioned along the MR imaging planes. For the precise correlation of anatomic features depicted with MR and with specimen section, cadaveric wrists were fixed in a rectangular cardboard box using paraffin and frozen after MR imaging. High contrast and spatial resolution enabled delineation of small structures including tendons, nerves, vessels, and ligaments, as well as osseous structures. Transverse images provided the best delineation of the carpal tunnel, tendons, nerves, and vessels. Coronal images permitted optimal visualization of triangular fibrocartilage and lunotriquetral and scapholunate ligaments. We conclude that MR imaging accurately and reliably displays the anatomy of the wrist.

  2. Rollerblading and skateboarding injuries in children in northeast England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, I; Dorani, B J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To establish the demographic profile and injury characteristics of children presenting with rollerblading or skateboarding associated injuries. This study also examines the circumstances leading to these injuries with a view to suggesting preventive measures. METHODS: A prospective study using a proforma to collect data from each child presenting with rollerblading or skateboarding related injuries. Injury details were obtained from clinical and radiological records. The injury severity score (ISS) was calculated for each child and statistical analysis was done using chi2. RESULTS: Eighty one children presented with rollerblading associated injuries accounting for 7% of childhood injuries seen during the eight month study period. The mean age was 10.3 years and sex distribution was equal. Soft tissue injuries accounted for 51% and fractures for 49% of the injuries. Wrist fractures alone accounted for 86% of all fractures seen. Seventy per cent of soft tissue injuries involved the upper limb. The overall mean ISS was 3.0 with a range from 1 to 9. Injury was attributed to fall secondary to loss of control or collision with an obstacle while rollerblading in the majority of children. Injury occurred while rollerblading in residential or public places in 99% of the children. In contrast skateboarding related injuries were much rarer and caused soft tissue injuries only. CONCLUSION: This study has revealed a higher incidence of rollerblading injuries than previously suspected. Effective management strategies should include not only the treatment of these injuries but also attention to their causes and prevention. PMID:10505916

  3. Aetiological spectrum, injury characteristics and treatment outcome ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Road traffic accidents (RTAs) were the most common cause of injury accounting for 49.2% of patients. Scalp injuries, cerebral concussion and skull fractures were the most common type of head injuries. Fifty-six (21.5%) patients had associated injuries of which musculoskeletal region (36.1%) was commonly affected.

  4. Snapping wrist due to multiple accessory tendon of first extensor compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dhiyaneswaran Subramaniyam

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: There are various causes for snapping wrist syndrome. Multiple accessory tendon can also cause snapping as shown in this case report. Moreover am presenting this case to highlight the diagnostic failure with non dynamic radiological investigation and to consider multiple accessory tendon as differential diagnosis for snapping wrist syndrome. Also suggest dynamic study could be a better choice of investigation to diagnosis snapping syndrome. First compartment tunnel release with few accessory tendon slip tenotomy gives good result.

  5. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toernvall, A.H.; Ekenstam, F. af; Hagert, C.G.; Irstam, L.; Sahlgrenska Sjukhuset, Goeteborg; Uppsala Univ.

    1986-01-01

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles. (orig.)

  6. Radiologic examination and measurement of the wrist and distal radio-ulnar joint. New aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toernvall, A.H.; Ekenstam, F. af; Hagert, C.G.; Irstam, L.

    Following fractures of the distal radius, a relatively high incidence of complications is caused by malalignment in the distal radio-ulnar (DRU) joint; recent anatomic and clinical investigations have shown a congruity of that joint to be of significant importance for restoring the function of the wrist. The radius forms a moderately arched bone, which moves around the ulna in pronation and supination. Biomechanically, the ulna may be regarded as the pillar around which the radius moves. In an anatomic investigation of 5 arm specimens, we have shown that the maximum cartilage contact in the DRU joint between the ulna head and the distal radius occurs in the neutral rotation position. A proposed routine examination method of the wrist and forearm includes a true antero-posterior and a lateral projection of the radius and the ulna, performed with the forearm and wrist in a neutral rotation, a neutral wrist deviation and with the elbow angled 90 degrees. Such an examination implies a standardized and reproducible method. In a radioanatomic investigation, a series of 50 healthy wrists and forearms were examined. A simple measuring technique is presented, applicable to the DRU joint and wrist favouring the ulna as the bone through which a reproducible long axis of the forearm/wrist may be drawn. It is suggested that the length of the radius should be judged relative to the ulna. Ulnar head inclination and radio-ulnar angle are new concepts, being major characteristics of the DRU joint. These angles of the right and left wrist were equal and no difference was found between the sexes. Minor alterations of the distal radius may be revealed when estimating these angles.

  7. Skin regeneration with conical and hair follicle structure of deep second-degree scalding injuries via combined expression of the EPO receptor and beta common receptor by local subcutaneous injection of nanosized rhEPO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebert S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Augustinus Bader1, Sabine Ebert1, Shibashish Giri1, Mathias Kremer2, Shuhua Liu2, Andreas Nerlich5, Christina I Günter³, Dagmar U Smith4, Hans-Günther Machens2,31Department of Applied Stem Cell Biology and Cell Techniques, Centre for Biotechnology and Biomedicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzieg, 2Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, University of Lübeck, Lübeck, 3Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Technische Universität München, Munich, 4Münchner Studienzentrum, Technische Universität München, Munich, 5Institute of Pathology, Klinikum München-Bogenhausen, Munich, GermanyBackground: Acceleration of skin regeneration is still an unsolved problem in the clinical treatment of patients suffering from deep burns and scalds. Although erythropoietin (EPO has a protective role in a wide range of organs and cells during ischemia and after trauma, it has been recently discovered that EPO is not tissue-protective in the common β subunit receptor (βCR knockout mouse. The protective capacity of EPO in tissue is mediated via a heteroreceptor complex comprising both the erythropoietin receptor (EPOR and βCR. However, proof of coexpression of these heterogenic receptors in regenerating skin after burns is still lacking.Methods: To understand the role of nanosized recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO in wound healing, we investigated the effects of subcutaneous injections of EPO on skin regeneration after deep second-degree scalding injuries. Our aim was to determine if joint expression of EPOR and βCR is a prerequisite for the tissue-protective effect of rhEPO. The efficiency in wound regeneration in a skin scalding injury mouse model was examined. A deep second-degree dermal scald injury was produced on the backs of 20 female Balb/c mice which were subsequently randomized to four experimental groups, two of which received daily subcutaneous injections of rhEPO. At days 7 and 14, the mice were sacrificed and the effects of rhEPO were

  8. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Massy-Westropp

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker’s compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection.

  9. Augmented reality-based navigation system for wrist arthroscopy: feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemirline, Ahmed; Agnus, Vincent; Soler, Luc; Mathoulin, Christophe L; Obdeijn, Miryam; Liverneaux, Philippe A

    2013-11-01

    In video surgery, and more specifically in arthroscopy, one of the major problems is positioning the camera and instruments within the anatomic environment. The concept of computer-guided video surgery has already been used in ear, nose, and throat (ENT), gynecology, and even in hip arthroscopy. These systems, however, rely on optical or mechanical sensors, which turn out to be restricting and cumbersome. The aim of our study was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of a navigation system based on electromagnetic sensors in video surgery. We used an electromagnetic localization device (Aurora, Northern Digital Inc., Ontario, Canada) to track the movements in space of both the camera and the instruments. We have developed a dedicated application in the Python language, using the VTK library for the graphic display and the OpenCV library for camera calibration. A prototype has been designed and evaluated for wrist arthroscopy. It allows display of the theoretical position of instruments onto the arthroscopic view with useful accuracy. The augmented reality view represents valuable assistance when surgeons want to position the arthroscope or locate their instruments. It makes the maneuver more intuitive, increases comfort, saves time, and enhances concentration.

  10. (Dry) arthroscopic partial wrist arthrodesis: tips and tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Piñal, F; Tandioy-Delgado, F

    2014-10-01

    One of the options for performing a partial wrist arthrodesis is the arthroscopic technique. As a first advantage arthroscopy allows us to directly assess the state of the articular surface of the carpal bones and define the best surgical option during the salvage operation. Furthermore, it allows performance of the procedure with minimal ligament damage and minimal interference with the blood supply of the carpals. These will (presumably) entail less capsular scarring and more rapid healing. Lastly, there is cosmetic benefit by reducing the amount of external scarring. The procedure has a steep learning curve even for accomplished arthroscopists but can be performed in a competitive manner to the open procedure if the dry technique is used. The aim of this paper is to present the technical details, tricks and tips to make the procedure accessible to all hand specialists with an arthroscopic interest. As it is paramount that the surgeon is acquainted with the "dry" technique, some technical details about it will also be presented. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Autologous Blood Injection and Wrist Immobilisation for Chronic Lateral Epicondylitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massy-Westropp, Nicola; Simmonds, Stuart; Caragianis, Suzanne; Potter, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. This study explored the effect of autologous blood injection (with ultrasound guidance) to the elbows of patients who had radiologically assessed degeneration of the origin of extensor carpi radialis brevis and failed cortisone injection/s to the lateral epicondylitis. Methods. This prospective longitudinal series involved preinjection assessment of pain, grip strength, and function, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Patients were injected with blood from the contralateral limb and then wore a customised wrist support for five days, after which they commenced a stretching, strengthening, and massage programme with an occupational therapist. These patients were assessed after six months and then finally between 18 months and five years after injection, using the patient-rated tennis elbow evaluation. Results. Thirty-eight of 40 patients completed the study, showing significant improvement in pain; the worst pain decreased by two to five points out of a 10-point visual analogue for pain. Self-perceived function improved by 11–25 points out of 100. Women showed significant increase in grip, but men did not. Conclusions. Autologous blood injection improved pain and function in a worker's compensation cohort of patients with chronic lateral epicondylitis, who had not had relief with cortisone injection. PMID:23251809

  12. Solar powered wrist worn acquisition system for continuous photoplethysmogram monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieffenderfer, James P; Beppler, Eric; Novak, Tristan; Whitmire, Eric; Jayakumar, Rochana; Randall, Clive; Qu, Weiguo; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Bozkurt, Alper

    2014-01-01

    We present a solar-powered, wireless, wrist-worn platform for continuous monitoring of physiological and environmental parameters during the activities of daily life. In this study, we demonstrate the capability to produce photoplethysmogram (PPG) signals using this platform. To adhere to a low power budget for solar-powering, a 574 nm green light source is used where the PPG from the radial artery would be obtained with minimal signal conditioning. The system incorporates two monocrystalline solar cells to charge the onboard 20 mAh lithium polymer battery. Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) is used to tether the device to a smartphone that makes the phone an access point to a dedicated server for long term continuous storage of data. Two power management schemes have been proposed depending on the availability of solar energy. In low light situations, if the battery is low, the device obtains a 5-second PPG waveform every minute to consume an average power of 0.57 mW. In scenarios where the battery is at a sustainable voltage, the device is set to enter its normal 30 Hz acquisition mode, consuming around 13.7 mW. We also present our efforts towards improving the charge storage capacity of our on-board super-capacitor.

  13. Work-related acute physical injuries, chronic overuse complaints, and the psychosocial work environment in Danish primary care chiropractic practice - a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mille Charlotte; Aagaard, Tine; Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Hartvigsen, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Little is known about the physical and psychosocial work environment of chiropractors and their work-related health complaints, and this has never been described for Danish chiropractors. The aim of this study was, therefore, to describe work-related acute physical injuries, overuse complaints, and psychosocial stress in Danish chiropractic work settings. We developed a questionnaire specifically for this study and distributed it electronically in August 2016 using SurveyXact to all 575 members of the Danish Chiropractors' Association working in primary care clinics. Chiropractors were asked about their work-related acute physical injuries and overuse complaints as well as any psychosocial stress they experienced at work during the previous year. We described our sample and variables using means, medians, ranges, and confidence intervals where appropriate. Statistically significant differences between genders, types of complaints and injuries, and between clinic owners and associates were examined using Chi-square and Fischer's exact tests, where appropriate, or by examining confidence intervals for non-overlap. 355 (65.2%) chiropractors answered the survey. Of these, 216 (61%, 95% CI 56-66) had experienced a work-related acute physical injury and/or overuse complaint during the previous year. Work-related overuse complaints were most commonly reported in the low back, wrist, thumb, and shoulder, and were more common among women (63%, 95% CI 56-70) than men (51%, 95% CI 43-59). Chiropractors with more than five years in practice (59%, 95% CI 52-64) reported significantly fewer work-related acute injuries and overuse complaints during the previous year compared with chiropractors with less than five years in practice (83%, 95% CI 73-91). In general, these practicing Danish chiropractors reported having a good psychosocial work environment, and 90% of chiropractors "always" or "often" felt that they were motivated and committed to their work. This sample of Danish

  14. The science of softball: implications for performance and injury prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flyger, Nicholas; Button, Chris; Rishiraj, Neetu

    2006-01-01

    Whilst the sport of softball has achieved worldwide popularity over the last 100 years, a consideration of the scientific principles underpinning softball is in its infancy. It is clear that the various motor skills associated with softball, such as pitching, batting and fielding, place considerable perceptual and physical demands upon players. Each of these skill categories are examined in more detail by reviewing the biomechanical principles associated with skilled performance. For pitching, a certain amount of information can be gleaned from baseball research; however, the underarm technique required by softball places the highest loads on the arm and shoulder during the accelerative, downward phase of the swing. Kinematic analyses of the bat swing suggest that elite batters have approximately 200 ms to decide whether to swing, and approximately the same duration to complete the swing (resulting in reported bat speeds of up to 40 m/sec). The research conducted on fielding has been limited to a consideration of throwing styles adopted in games. A variety of throwing techniques are adopted in the course of a typical game but elite players commonly adopt a sidearm technique when returning to base as quickly as possible. Data obtained from the National Athletic Training Association indicate a similar level of injury incidence in softball as in baseball. Approximately 17% of injuries are experienced by the pitcher and approximately 25% of all injuries are located in the forearm/wrist/hand joint segments. Sports science and sports medicine research have the potential to contribute significantly to performance enhancement and injury prevention in the future.

  15. Boxing injury epidemiology in the Great Britain team: a 5-year surveillance study of medically diagnosed injury incidence and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loosemore, Michael; Lightfoot, Joseph; Palmer-Green, Deborah; Gatt, Ian; Bilzon, James; Beardsley, Chris

    2015-09-01

    There has been no comprehensive injury report of elite-level amateur boxers in competition and training. We reviewed injuries in training and competition in the Great Britain (GB) amateur boxing squad between 2005 and 2009. Longitudinal, prospective injury surveillance over 5 years of the GB boxing squad from 2005 to 2009. 66 boxers passed through the squad. The location, region affected, description, and the duration of each injury were recorded by the team doctor and team physiotherapist. We recorded whether the injury occurred during competition or training, and also whether it was a new or a recurrent injury. The injury rate during competition was calculated as the number of injuries per 1000 h. More injuries affected the hand than any other body location. This was the case overall, in training and competition individually, and for both new and recurrent injuries. More injuries occurred during training than during competition, and most injuries were new rather than recurrent. Total injury rate during competition was 828 per 1000 h and hand injury rate in competition was 302 injuries per 1000 h. Hand injury rate in competition was significantly higher than at the other locations. The incidence of concussion is comparatively low. Injury prevention should aim to protect the hands and wrists of elite amateur boxers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Immediate effects of different treatments for the wrist joints of subdominant hands, using electromechanical reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chunying; Huang, Qiuchen; Yu, Lili; Zhou, Yue; Gu, Rui; Cui, Yao; Ge, Meng; Xu, Yanfeng; Liu, Jianfeng

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the immediate effects of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation distal resistance training on wrist joints by using electromechanical reaction time. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 12 healthy young people (24.2 ± 3.1 years, 169.7 ± 6.5 cm, 65.3 ± 12.6 kg). Two kinds of isotonic contraction techniques were applied on the wrist joint: the wrist joint extension muscle strength training and the wrist joint extension pattern of neuromuscular joint facilitation. The electromechanical reaction time, premotor time, and motor time of the left upper limb were measured before and after each intervention session of muscle strength training and neuromuscular joint facilitation. [Results] The neuromuscular joint facilitation group showed significant shortening of the electromechanical reaction time and motor time after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the electromechanical reaction time and motor time of the wrist joint can be improved by neuromuscular joint facilitation together with proximal resistance training, which can be used as a new form of exercise for improving the functions of subdominant hand wrist joints.

  17. Registration-based Bone Morphometry for Shape Analysis of the Bones of the Human Wrist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Anand A.; Leahy, Richard M.; Badawi, Ramsey D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a method that quantifies point-wise changes in surface morphology of the bones of the human wrist. The proposed method, referred to as Registration-based Bone Morphometry (RBM), consists of two steps: an atlas selection step and an atlas warping step. The atlas for individual wrist bones was selected based on the shortest l2 distance to the ensemble of wrist bones from a database of a healthy population of subjects. The selected atlas was then warped to the corresponding bones of individuals in the population using a non-linear registration method based on regularized l2 distance minimization. The displacement field thus calculated showed local differences in bone shape that then were used for the analysis of group differences. Our results indicate that RBM has potential to provide a standardized approach to shape analysis of bones of the human wrist. We demonstrate the performance of RBM for examining group differences in wrist bone shapes based on sex and between those of the right and left wrists in healthy individuals. We also present data to show the application of RBM for tracking bone erosion status in rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26353369

  18. Tendo-ligamentous pathologies of the wrist joint: Can ultrasonography replace magnetic resonance imaging?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunwarpal Singh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Characterization of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist remains problematic, despite advances in imaging. By using clinical history and imaging appearance, one can determine the diagnosis. USG is used as first imaging modality whereas MRI aids in making a specific diagnosis of few of the lesions. Aims: To investigate the etiological spectrum of tendo-ligamentous pathologies of wrist on USG & MRI with statistical correlation. Patients and methods: 80 patients (male/female = 46/34 with complaint of swelling or pain in wrist were included and underwent USG and MRI of both the wrists. Results: The spectrum included ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis, tendinopathy, ligament tears and fibrosis. The analysis was done using kappa coefficient and spearman's rho correlation coefficient. The strength of agreement between USG and MRI for the diagnosis of ganglion cysts, vascular malformations, tenosynovitis and tendinopathy was found to be very good. Conclusion: USG provides detailed depiction of superficial structures, is less expensive, and allows dynamic examinations of the wrist. It should be the first choice of investigation for majority of the cystic, tendinous, vascular, and fibrotic pathologies of the wrist. However, less promising results were observed for ligamentous pathologies on USG in our study. Keywords: Tendo-ligamentous pathologies, Ganglion cyst, Tenosynovitis, Ultrasonography, MRI

  19. Wrist sensor-based tremor severity quantification in Parkinson's disease using convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han Byul; Lee, Woong Woo; Kim, Aryun; Lee, Hong Ji; Park, Hye Young; Jeon, Hyo Seon; Kim, Sang Kyong; Jeon, Beomseok; Park, Kwang S

    2018-04-01

    Tremor is a commonly observed symptom in patients of Parkinson's disease (PD), and accurate measurement of tremor severity is essential in prescribing appropriate treatment to relieve its symptoms. We propose a tremor assessment system based on the use of a convolutional neural network (CNN) to differentiate the severity of symptoms as measured in data collected from a wearable device. Tremor signals were recorded from 92 PD patients using a custom-developed device (SNUMAP) equipped with an accelerometer and gyroscope mounted on a wrist module. Neurologists assessed the tremor symptoms on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) from simultaneously recorded video footages. The measured data were transformed into the frequency domain and used to construct a two-dimensional image for training the network, and the CNN model was trained by convolving tremor signal images with kernels. The proposed CNN architecture was compared to previously studied machine learning algorithms and found to outperform them (accuracy = 0.85, linear weighted kappa = 0.85). More precise monitoring of PD tremor symptoms in daily life could be possible using our proposed method. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The prevalence of median neuropathy at wrist in systemic sclerosis patients at Srinagarind Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanaporn Nimitbancha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the prevalence and factor related with median neuropathy at wrist (MNW in systemic sclerosis patients. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Srinagarind Hospital, Khon Kaen, Thailand. Participants: Systemic sclerosis patients who attended the Scleroderma Clinic, Srinagarind Hospital. Materials and Methods: Seventyfive systemic sclerosis patients were prospectively evaluated by questionnaire, physical examination, and electrodiagnostic study. The questionnaire consisted of the symptoms, duration, and type of systemic sclerosis. The physical examination revealed skin score of systemic sclerosis, pinprick sensation of median nerve distribution of both hands, and weakness of both abductor pollicis brevis muscles. The provocative test which were Tinel′s sign and Phalen′s maneuver were also examined. Moreover, electrodiagnostic study of the bilateral median and ulnar nerves was conducted. Results: The prevalence of MNW in systemic sclerosis patients was 44% - percentage of mild, moderate, and severe were 28%, 9.3%, and 6.7%, respectively. The prevalence of asymptomatic MNW was 88%. There were no association between the presence of MNW and related factors of systemic sclerosis. Conclusions: MNW is one of the most common entrapment neuropathies in systemic sclerosis patients. Systemic sclerosis patients should be screened for early signs of MNW.

  1. Collection and Processing of Data from Wrist Wearable Devices in Heterogeneous and Multiple-User Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de Arriba-Pérez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over recent years, we have witnessed the development of mobile and wearable technologies to collect data from human vital signs and activities. Nowadays, wrist wearables including sensors (e.g., heart rate, accelerometer, pedometer that provide valuable data are common in market. We are working on the analytic exploitation of this kind of data towards the support of learners and teachers in educational contexts. More precisely, sleep and stress indicators are defined to assist teachers and learners on the regulation of their activities. During this development, we have identified interoperability challenges related to the collection and processing of data from wearable devices. Different vendors adopt specific approaches about the way data can be collected from wearables into third-party systems. This hinders such developments as the one that we are carrying out. This paper contributes to identifying key interoperability issues in this kind of scenario and proposes guidelines to solve them. Taking into account these topics, this work is situated in the context of the standardization activities being carried out in the Internet of Things and Machine to Machine domains.

  2. Collection and Processing of Data from Wrist Wearable Devices in Heterogeneous and Multiple-User Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arriba-Pérez, Francisco; Caeiro-Rodríguez, Manuel; Santos-Gago, Juan M

    2016-09-21

    Over recent years, we have witnessed the development of mobile and wearable technologies to collect data from human vital signs and activities. Nowadays, wrist wearables including sensors (e.g., heart rate, accelerometer, pedometer) that provide valuable data are common in market. We are working on the analytic exploitation of this kind of data towards the support of learners and teachers in educational contexts. More precisely, sleep and stress indicators are defined to assist teachers and learners on the regulation of their activities. During this development, we have identified interoperability challenges related to the collection and processing of data from wearable devices. Different vendors adopt specific approaches about the way data can be collected from wearables into third-party systems. This hinders such developments as the one that we are carrying out. This paper contributes to identifying key interoperability issues in this kind of scenario and proposes guidelines to solve them. Taking into account these topics, this work is situated in the context of the standardization activities being carried out in the Internet of Things and Machine to Machine domains.

  3. Hematogenous osteoarticular infections of the hand and the wrist in children with sickle cell anemia: preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordjman, Daniel; Holvoet, Laurent; Benkerrou, Malika; Ilharreborde, Brice; Mazda, Keyvan; Penneçot, Georges F; Fitoussi, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Hematogenous osteoarticular infections of the hand and the wrist in children with sickle cell anemia are rare and no specific studies for this location have been published. This retrospective and comparative study reviewed 34 children who carry the diagnosis of osteoarticular infections of the wrist and the hand at our institution during a 10-year period extending from January 2000 to December 2010. The first group included 8 patients with sickle cell anemia (Hg SS). The second group or control group included 26 children without sickle cell disease or any immune deficiency. Differences between groups were established by χ tests. The most common site of osteomyelitis for the sickle cell group was the metacarpals and the fingers phalanx (87.5%) whereas the most common site for the control group was the wrist and the carpus (96.2%; P<0.005).The most common pathogens responsible for osteomyelitis was Salmonella sp. (37.5%) for children with SCD, whereas it was Staphylococcus aureus (70%) for the nonsicklers. There was a significant difference between both groups regarding the treatment. Indeed, a surgical procedure was needed for the sickle cell group in all cases (100%) whereas a surgical debridement was needed in only 19.2% patients in the control group (P<0.001). At long-term follow-up, there were more long-term complications in the sickle cell group (62.5%) with epiphysiodesis of the metacarpals and metacarpophalangeal joint destruction whereas only 11.5% cases with complications were present in the control group including distal ulna epiphysiodesis, proximal interphalangeal joint stiffness, and a central radius epiphysiodesis (P<0.004). Our results confirm the severity of hand osteomyelitis in patients with sickle cell disease. A systematic approach is needed to perform early diagnosis and treatment. Identification of the causative organism is required (blood culture, bone aspiration). With antibiotic therapy, surgical treatment is the rule. Parents have to be

  4. The Effects of Counterforce Brace Size on the Wrist Range of Motility, Pain, Grip & Wrist Extension Sterngth in Normal Subjects and Patients with Tennis Elbow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Asghar Jameh-Bozorgi

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Counter force brace is one of the most usefull treatments for lateral opicondylitis (Tennis elbow because it decreases grip pain and increases the power of grip, power of wrist extension and Wrist Range of Motility. The purpose of this quasi experimental (repeated measurementsstudy was to determine the effect of 3 counterforce brace sizes on the wrist R.O.M, grip and wrist extension strength and pain intensity in two groups of healthy subjects and patients with tennis elbow. Materials & Methods: 18 normal subjects & 18 patients with tennis elbow were selected simple conveniently and were tested with no brace and 3 size of counterforce (1,2 and 3 inches. The R.O.M , strength and pain intensity were measured by jamar goniometry and Nicholas MMT dynamometry & VAS, respectively. Results: 1 With all sizes there was a significant decrease of R.O.M on normal subjects but no significant difference in patients. 2 There was a significant decrease of grip strength with 1-inch brace in normal subjects but a significant increase of grip strength with 2 and 3-inch brace in patiens. 3 All sizes of brace caused significant decrease of extension strength in normal subjects but increase in patients. 4All size caused significant decrease of pain intensity that was more considerable in the case of 2 and 3 inch size. Conclusion: The results shows that the counterforce brace may be considered as an effective treatment for increasing strength and decreasing pain in patients with tennis elbow.

  5. A repeated-measures analysis of the effects of soft tissues on wrist range of motion in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs: Implications for the functional origins of an automatic wrist folding mechanism in Crocodilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutson, Joel David; Hutson, Kelda Nadine

    2014-07-01

    A recent study hypothesized that avian-like wrist folding in quadrupedal dinosaurs could have aided their distinctive style of locomotion with semi-pronated and therefore medially facing palms. However, soft tissues that automatically guide avian wrist folding rarely fossilize, and automatic wrist folding of unknown function in extant crocodilians has not been used to test this hypothesis. Therefore, an investigation of the relative contributions of soft tissues to wrist range of motion (ROM) in the extant phylogenetic bracket of dinosaurs, and the quadrupedal function of crocodilian wrist folding, could inform these questions. Here, we repeatedly measured wrist ROM in degrees through fully fleshed, skinned, minus muscles/tendons, minus ligaments, and skeletonized stages in the American alligator Alligator mississippiensis and the ostrich Struthio camelus. The effects of dissection treatment and observer were statistically significant for alligator wrist folding and ostrich wrist flexion, but not ostrich wrist folding. Final skeletonized wrist folding ROM was higher than (ostrich) or equivalent to (alligator) initial fully fleshed ROM, while final ROM was lower than initial ROM for ostrich wrist flexion. These findings suggest that, unlike the hinge/ball and socket-type elbow and shoulder joints in these archosaurs, ROM within gliding/planar diarthrotic joints is more restricted to the extent of articular surfaces. The alligator data indicate that the crocodilian wrist mechanism functions to automatically lock their semi-pronated palms into a rigid column, which supports the hypothesis that this palmar orientation necessitated soft tissue stiffening mechanisms in certain dinosaurs, although ROM-restricted articulations argue against the presence of an extensive automatic mechanism. Anat Rec, 297:1228-1249, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Evaluation of a compact portable DEXA unit for wrist densitometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mares, T.; Bonovas, G.; Larcos, G. [Westmead Hospital, Sydney, NSW (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine

    1998-06-01

    Full text: Recently, a number of manufacturers have introduced compact, portable DEXA units in order to facilitate osteoporosis screening in remote communities and on an in-office basis. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the accuracy and reproducibility of the Norland-Stratec (pDEXA) compared to measurements obtained using a conventional densitometer (Norland XR-36). We recruited 61 adults (3 men, 58 women) with mean age 54 years (range: 19-76) referred for clinical assessment of BMD. Most patients had medications (n=39; 64%) or disorders (n=48;79%) known to interfere with bone mineral metabolism. Subjects underwent bone densitometry of the lumbar spine, (AP; L2-4) femoral neck and distal radius/ulna of the nondominant forearm using the Norland XR-36, with the wrist subsequently re-scanned on pDEXA. Four subjects also underwent 5 scans each on the pDEXA. Mean BMD for the distal radius/ulna was 0.30g/cm2 (range: 0.17 - 0.539/cm2; XR-36) vs 0.319/cm2 (range: 0.18-0.56 g/cm2; pDEXA), r = 0.98 (SEE = 0.07). Mean BMC for the distal radius/ulna was 1.229 (range: 0.67-2.59; XR-36) vs 1.289 (range:0.74-2.69; pDEXA), r = 0.97 (SEE= 0.08). The CV for pDEXA was 0.8% (BMD) and 2.5% (BMC). Thus, we conclude that pDEXA has excellent in-vivo reproducibility, with good correlation of BMD and BMC with standard densitometers

  7. Tennis injuries: prevention and treatment. A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulund, D N; McCue, F C; Rockwell, D A; Gieck, J H

    1979-01-01

    When players are engaged in the sport of tennis, injuries may occur to the eyes, in the neck, to the shoulder and back, arm and elbow, wrist and hand, and feet. The key to prevention and treatment of these injuries is good coaching and a formal stretching and strengthening program. The drooped "tennis shoulder" of professionals and senior tennis players is a natural response to heavy use. Shoulder elevating exercises are useful when soreness is associated. The treatment of tennis elbow includes wrist extensor stretching, isometrics, and light weightlifting. When a player follows this program, injections or counterforce braces are rarely needed. It is important for the player to bring his racket to the examination so that his stroke mechanics and grip can be checked. Wrist soreness in a tennis player may denote a hamate hook fracture. Special radiographic views are needed to discern the fracture and it is treated with a short arm cast and little finger extension splint. Nonunion of a hamate hook requires excision. The calf pain prodrome of "tennis leg" requires rest and then a stretching program. Tennis shoes should have rolled heels and large toe boxes with reinforced toe bumpers. The physician may have to fashion soft inserts for the tennis shoes; arch supports may be insufficient.

  8. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S. [Univ. of California, Orange (United States). Dept. of Radiological Sciences

    2006-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb.

  9. Reproducibility of wrist home blood pressure measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickenig Georg

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wrist blood pressure (BP devices have physiological limits with regards to accuracy, therefore they were not preferred for home BP monitoring. However some wrist devices have been successfully validated using etablished validation protocols. Therefore this study assessed the reproducibility of wrist home BP measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage. Methods To compare the reproducibility of three different(BP measurement methods: 1 office BP, 2 home BP (Omron wrist device HEM- 637 IT with position sensor, 3 24-hour ambulatory BP(24-h ABPM (ABPM-04, Meditech, Hunconventional sphygmomanometric office BP was measured on study days 1 and 7, 24-h ABPM on study days 7 and 14 and home BP between study days 1 and 7 and between study days 8 and 14 in 69 hypertensive and 28 normotensive subjects. The correlation coeffcient of each BP measurement method with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index was analyzed. The schedule of home readings was performed according to recently published European Society of Hypertension (ESH- guidelines. Results The reproducibility of home BP measurement analyzed by the standard deviation as well as the squared differeces of mean individual differences between the respective BP measurements was significantly higher than the reproducibility of office BP (p Conclusion The short-term reproducibility of home BP measurement with the Omron HEM-637 IT wrist device was superior to the reproducibility of office BP and 24- h ABPM measurement. Furthermore, home BP with the wrist device showed similar correlations to targed organ damage as recently reported for upper arm devices. Although wrist devices have to be used cautious and with defined limitations, the use of validated devices with position sensor according to recently recommended measurement schedules might have the potential to be used for therapy monitoring.

  10. Enhanced MR imaging of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tehranzadeh, J.; Ashilyan, O.; Anavim, A.; Tramma, S.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the appearance of tenosynovitis in various tendon groups in the wrist and hand and to compare MR enhanced and non-enhanced imaging evaluation of tenosynovitis of hand and wrist in inflammatory arthritis. We reviewed 72 MRI studies of hands and wrists, including coronal, axial and sagittal images in 30 consecutive patients with inflammatory arthritis and tenosynovitis. We compared the degree of synovitis on T2-weighted vs contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images, using a predetermined scale. We also measured the extent of tenosynovitis in three dimensions. The tendons were assigned to volar, dorsal, ulnar and radial groups in the wrist and to extensor, flexor and thumb groups in the hand. Degree of tenosynovitis (graded 0-3), cross-sectional area and volume of the inflamed synovium in various tendon groups were then compared by statistical analysis. Review of the medical records revealed the following diagnoses in our patient population: rheumatoid arthritis (n=16), unspecified inflammatory polyarthritis (n=9), psoriatic arthritis (n=2), CREST syndrome (n=1), systemic lupus erythematosus (n=1), paraneoplastic syndrome with arthritis (n=1). The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 1.0 and 1.7 respectively (P<0.001) in the wrist studies. The average T2 brightness scores and post-gadolinium enhancement scores were 0.7 and 1.4, respectively (P<0.001) in the hand studies. The average sensitivity of T2-weighted imaging for detection of tenosynovitis was 40% in the hand and 67% in the wrist tendons, when contrast-enhanced images were used as a reference. Carpal tunnel flexor tendons were the most frequently affected tendons of the wrist. The most frequently affected tendons of the hand were second and third flexor tendons. The hand flexors demonstrated higher degrees of enhancement and larger volumes of the inflamed tenosynovium than did the hand extensors and tendons of the thumb

  11. Kinesthetic Feedback During 2DOF Wrist Movements via a Novel MR-Compatible Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Andrew; O'Malley, Marcia K; Ress, David; Sergi, Fabrizio

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate the interaction control capabilities of the MR-SoftWrist, a novel MR-compatible robot capable of applying accurate kinesthetic feedback to wrist pointing movements executed during fMRI. The MR-SoftWrist, based on a novel design that combines parallel piezoelectric actuation with compliant force feedback, is capable of delivering 1.5 N [Formula: see text] of torque to the wrist of an interacting subject about the flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation axes. The robot workspace, defined by admissible wrist rotation angles, fully includes a circle with a 20 deg radius. Via dynamic characterization, we demonstrate capability for transparent operation with low (10% of maximum torque output) backdrivability torques at nominal speeds. Moreover, we demonstrate a 5.5 Hz stiffness control bandwidth for a 14 dB range of virtual stiffness values, corresponding to 25%-125% of the device's physical reflected stiffness in the nominal configuration. We finally validate the possibility of operation during fMRI via a case study involving one healthy subject. Our validation experiment demonstrates the capability of the device to apply kinesthetic feedback to elicit distinguishable kinetic and neural responses without significant degradation of image quality or task-induced head movements. With this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of MR-compatible devices like the MR-SoftWrist to be used in support of motor control experiments investigating wrist pointing under robot-applied force fields. Such future studies may elucidate fundamental neural mechanisms enabling robot-assisted motor skill learning, which is crucial for robot-aided neurorehabilitation.

  12. Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... joint Quickly stop moving and change direction while running, landing from a jump, or turning Basketball, football, soccer, and skiing are common sports linked to ACL tears. ACL injuries often occur with other injuries. For example, an ...

  13. Association of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament injury with radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgese, Marissa; Boutin, Robert D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J. [University of California - Davis, Department of Radiology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Bayne, Christopher O.; Szabo, Robert M. [University of California - Davis, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sacramento, CA (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Radiologic presentation of carpal instability at the radial side of the carpus, e.g. scapholunate diastasis following scapholunate interosseous ligament injury, has been studied extensively. By comparison, presentation at the ulnar-sided carpus has not. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL) status on the radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint (C-T distance). Further, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of C-T distance for assessing LTIL injuries. We retrospectively identified 223 wrists with wrist radiographs and MR arthrograms with contrast injection. Data collected included sex, lunate morphology and LTIL status from MR arthrography, and C-T distance from radiography. The effects of lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status on C-T distance were evaluated using generalized linear models. Diagnostic performance of C-T distance was assessed by the area under receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUROC). Lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status all had significant effects on C-T distance; wrists with type II lunates, men, and wrists with LTIL injuries had greater C-T distances than wrists with type I lunates, women, and wrists without LTIL injuries, respectively (p < 0.01). The diagnostic value of the C-T distance for identifying patients with full-thickness LTIL tears was sufficient for women with type I (AUROC = 0.67) and type II lunates (0.60) and good for men with type I (0.72) and type II lunates (0.77). The demonstrated influence of LTIL status on C-T distance supports the use of C-T distance as a tool in assessing for full-thickness LTIL tears. (orig.)

  14. Association of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament injury with radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgese, Marissa; Boutin, Robert D.; Chaudhari, Abhijit J.; Bayne, Christopher O.; Szabo, Robert M.

    2017-01-01

    Radiologic presentation of carpal instability at the radial side of the carpus, e.g. scapholunate diastasis following scapholunate interosseous ligament injury, has been studied extensively. By comparison, presentation at the ulnar-sided carpus has not. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of lunate morphology, sex, and lunotriquetral interosseous ligament (LTIL) status on the radiologic measurement of the capitate-triquetrum joint (C-T distance). Further, we sought to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of C-T distance for assessing LTIL injuries. We retrospectively identified 223 wrists with wrist radiographs and MR arthrograms with contrast injection. Data collected included sex, lunate morphology and LTIL status from MR arthrography, and C-T distance from radiography. The effects of lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status on C-T distance were evaluated using generalized linear models. Diagnostic performance of C-T distance was assessed by the area under receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUROC). Lunate morphology, sex, and LTIL injury status all had significant effects on C-T distance; wrists with type II lunates, men, and wrists with LTIL injuries had greater C-T distances than wrists with type I lunates, women, and wrists without LTIL injuries, respectively (p < 0.01). The diagnostic value of the C-T distance for identifying patients with full-thickness LTIL tears was sufficient for women with type I (AUROC = 0.67) and type II lunates (0.60) and good for men with type I (0.72) and type II lunates (0.77). The demonstrated influence of LTIL status on C-T distance supports the use of C-T distance as a tool in assessing for full-thickness LTIL tears. (orig.)

  15. Accuracy and reliability of wrist-cuff devices for self-measurement of blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuya, Masahiro; Chonan, Kenichi; Imai, Yutaka; Goto, Eiji; Ishii, Masao

    2002-04-01

    Self-measurement of blood pressure (BP) might offer some advantages in diagnosis and therapeutic evaluation and in patient management of hypertension. Recently, wrist-cuff devices for self-measurement of BP have gained more than one-third of the world market share. In the present study, we validated wrist-cuff devices and compared the results between wrist- and arm-cuff devices. The factors affecting the accuracy of wrist-cuff devices were also studied. The research group to assess the validity of automated blood pressure measuring device consisted of 13 institutes in Japan, which validated two wrist-cuff devices (WC-1 and WC-2) and two arm-cuff devices (AC-1 and AC-2). They used a crossover method, where the comparison was done between auscultation, by two observers by means of a double stethoscope on one arm and the device on the opposite arm or wrist. There was good inter-observer agreement for the auscultation method in each institute (systolic blood pressure (SBP), -0.1 +/- 2.8 mmHg; diastolic blood pressure (DBP), -0.1 +/- 2.6 mmHg, n = 498). The mean difference between auscultation and the device was minimal both in arm-cuff devices (mean difference for AC-1, 2.2/1.9 mmHg, n = 97 and for AC-2, 5.1/2.9 mmHg, n = 136, SBP/DBP) and wrist-cuff devices (mean difference for WC-1, -2.1/1.2 mmHg, n = 173 mmHg and for WC-2, -2.3/-5.6 mmHg, n = 92). The standard deviation of the difference (SDD) in wrist-cuff devices, however (SDD for WC-1, 9.7/7.3 mmHg and for WC-2, 10.2/8.6 mmHg), was larger than that of the arm-cuff devices (SDD for AC-1, 5.6/6.6 mmHg and for AC-2, 6.3/5.1 mmHg). Grading of AC-1 and AC-2 based on criteria of British Hypertension Society was A/A and B/A, respectively, while that of WC-1 and WC-2 was C/B and D/B, respectively. Using the same validation protocol, the results of validation for one device were divergent in each institute. In wrist-cuff devices, the BP value obtained in palmar flexion was significantly higher and that obtained in palmar

  16. ESCAPS study protocol: a feasibility randomised controlled trial of 'Early electrical stimulation to the wrist extensors and wrist flexors to prevent the post-stroke complications of pain and contractures in the paretic arm'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Smith, Joanna C; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Sprigg, Nikola; James, Marilyn; Walker, Marion F; Allatt, Kate; Mehta, Rajnikant; Pandyan, Anand D

    2016-01-04

    Approximately 70% of patients with stroke experience impaired arm function, which is persistent and disabling for an estimated 40%. Loss of function reduces independence in daily activities and impacts on quality of life. Muscles in those who do not recover functional movement in the stroke affected arm are at risk of atrophy and contractures, which can be established as early as 6 weeks following stroke. Pain is also common. This study aims to evaluate the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial to test the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering early intensive electrical stimulation (ES) to prevent post-stroke complications in the paretic upper limb. This is a feasibility randomised controlled trial (n=40) with embedded qualitative studies (patient/carer interviews and therapist focus groups) and feasibility economic evaluation. Patients will be recruited from the Stroke Unit at the Nottingham University Hospitals National Health Service (NHS) Trust within 72 h after stroke. Participants will be randomised to receive usual care or usual care and early ES to the wrist flexors and extensors for 30 min twice a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. The initial treatment(s) will be delivered by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist who will then train the patient and/or their nominated carer to self-manage subsequent treatments. This study has been granted ethical approval by the National Research Ethics Service, East Midlands Nottingham1 Research Ethics Committee (ref: 15/EM/0006). To our knowledge, this is the first study of its kind of the early application (within 72 h post-stroke) of ES to both the wrist extensors and wrist flexors of stroke survivors with upper limb impairment. The results will inform the design of a definitive randomised controlled trial. Dissemination will include 2 peer-reviewed journal publications and presentations at national conferences. ISRCTN1648908; Pre-results. Clinicaltrials.gov ID: NCT02324634. Published by the BMJ

  17. Vertical force and wrist deviation angle when using a walker to stand up and sit down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cherng-Yee; Yeh, Po-Chan

    2011-08-01

    Research investigating walkers suggests that safety and assistance for the elderly with weak lower limbs were important. However, the relationship between the use of a walker and the upper limbs has received little investigation. Standing up and sitting down are important daily activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore wrist deviation and vertical force among elderly individuals using a walker for assistance to stand up and sit down. In total, 64 elderly volunteers (M age = 80.22, SD = 9.36) were enrolled. Data were obtained from four load cells and a twin-axis wrist goniometer. Wrist deviation and vertical force were examined when participants used a walker with horizontal handles to assist in standing up and sitting down. Significant wrist angle deviation occurred with the use of a walker, with dorsiflexion of the right hand greater than that of the left. Males exerted significantly greater vertical force. In the sitting position, greater ulnar deviation was seen among experienced walker users, whereas during standing, experienced users exhibited greater dorsiflexion. The horizontal handles of most marketed walkers may cause user wrist deviations, suggesting researchers should pursue improvements in walker design.

  18. Diagnostic values of bone scintigram for painful disorders of the hand and the wrist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogura, Kazuhisa; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Kusunose, Koichi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Honjou, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    From April 1993 to April 1997, 43 patients underwent bone scintigraphic examination for various painful conditions in the hand and the wrist joint. Three hours after an intravenous injection of 740 MBq of TC-99m HMDP, wrist scintigram was obtained. Of 18 patients with ulnar wrist pain, 12 patients had positive scan. The accumulation pattern in the five cases of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome showed different patterns. Slight difference of the accumulation between the ulnar head and the ulnar styloid process was well differentiated. Each carpal bone could be well identified, but when two bones were overlapping as in the triquetrum and the pisiform, additional physical findings were helpful. Six patients showed negative scan. The two patients with positive triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) tear but with negative bone scan showed no bony involvement, whereas those with TFC tear and positive scan were the ones having some bony disorders such as ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. Of 25 patients with wrist pain other than ulnar pain, 14 patients had positive scan. The remaining 11 patients who had negative scan included three patients with occult ganglion, two with wrist sprain and six with various disorders. (K.H.)

  19. Diagnostic values of bone scintigram for painful disorders of the hand and the wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogura, Kazuhisa; Yamauchi, Yasuo; Kusunose, Koichi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Honjou, Yuji [Juntendo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-02-01

    From April 1993 to April 1997, 43 patients underwent bone scintigraphic examination for various painful conditions in the hand and the wrist joint. Three hours after an intravenous injection of 740 MBq of TC-99m HMDP, wrist scintigram was obtained. Of 18 patients with ulnar wrist pain, 12 patients had positive scan. The accumulation pattern in the five cases of ulnocarpal abutment syndrome showed different patterns. Slight difference of the accumulation between the ulnar head and the ulnar styloid process was well differentiated. Each carpal bone could be well identified, but when two bones were overlapping as in the triquetrum and the pisiform, additional physical findings were helpful. Six patients showed negative scan. The two patients with positive triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) tear but with negative bone scan showed no bony involvement, whereas those with TFC tear and positive scan were the ones having some bony disorders such as ulnocarpal abutment syndrome. Of 25 patients with wrist pain other than ulnar pain, 14 patients had positive scan. The remaining 11 patients who had negative scan included three patients with occult ganglion, two with wrist sprain and six with various disorders. (K.H.)

  20. Snowboarding injuries. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladin, C; McCrory, P

    1995-05-01

    Over the last 10 years, snowboarding has become established as a popular and legitimate alpine sport. However, at present, there are few epidemiological studies examining the spectrum of injuries associated with this new sport. Snowboarders are typically male (male: female ratio of 3:1) and in their early twenties. They have an injury rate of 4 to 6 per 1000 visits, which is comparable to that which occurs with skiing. However, in contrast to skiing, in which only 34% of those injured are beginners, the majority (60%) of snowboarders injured are beginners. This is a reflection of the participant profile of this developing sport. 57% of injuries occur in the lower limbs, and 30% in the upper limbs. The most common injuries are simple sprains (31 to 53%), particularly of the ankles (23 to 26%) and knees (12 to 23%), followed by fractures (24 to 27%) and contusions (12%). Compared with skiing injuries, snowboarders have 2.4 times as many fractures, particularly of the upper limbs (constituting 21 vs 35% of upper limb injuries), fewer knee injuries (23 vs 44% of lower limb injuries), but more ankle injuries (23 vs 6% of lower limb injuries). Snowboarding knee injuries are less severe than those associated with skiing. Fracture of the lateral process of the talus is an unusual and uncommon snowboarding injury that can be misdiagnosed as a severe ankle sprain. Ankle injuries are more common with soft shell boots, whereas knee injuries and distal tibia fractures are more common with hard shell boots.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. The Effectiveness of Limited Dynamic Wrist Splints on the Symptoms, Function, and Strength of Women with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Controlled Trial Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedeh Marjan Jaladat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Splinting is the most common conservative method of treating patients with mild and moderate Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of the limited dynamic wrist splint on the symptoms, function, and strength of women with CTS. In this controlled trial study, the subjects wore a splint of a new design called the “limited dynamic wrist splint”, which allowed the wrist motion in the range (between 15-degree flexion and 15-degree extension that exerts minimum pressure on the median nerve and prevents extra pressure on the nerve by limiting the range of motions out of the allowed range. Methods: In this study, 24 women diagnosed with mild to moderate CTS were initially evaluated on the basis of the Boston questionnaire, the dexterity test of the Purdue pegboard, grip and pinch strength, distal sensory latency, and sensory nerve conduction velocity. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups, control and treatment. Both groups received routine rehabilitation treatment for six weeks. The treatment group received the limited dynamic wrist splint for about six to eight hours a day. After six weeks, the initial examinations were repeated. The SPSS-16, independent t, and paired t-tests were used for data analysis. Results: All the variables in the treatment and the control groups showed improvement. The function test of the Boston questionnaire, the Purdue pegboard test, and the pinch strength were significantly improved in the treatment group. The “severity of the symptoms” test of the Boston questionnaire and the pinch strength in the control group showed a statistically significant difference (P < 0.05. In a comparison of the two groups, the function test of the Boston questionnaire showed a significant difference. Conclusion: This study showed that the use of the limited dynamic wrist splint for about six weeks for six to eight hours a day could have a significant effect on the

  2. MRI of overuse injury in elite athletes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koh, E.S.; Lee, J.C.; Healy, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Overuse injuries are a common finding in elite athletes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the optimal method for the diagnosis of overuse injury in athletes of all levels. We present a review of common and important overuse injuries occurring in elite athletes. A systematic approach based on the functional anatomic units - tendons, bones and joints - may assist in diagnosis of these injuries

  3. Development of an Underactuated 2-DOF Wrist Joint using McKibben PAMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopal, S. P.; Jain, S.; Ramasubramanian, S. N.; Johnson, B. V.; Dwivedy, S. K.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, model of an underactuated 2-DOF wrist joint with pneumatically actuated muscles is proposed. For the joint, McKibben-type artificial muscles are used in parallel configuration for the actuation. For each Degree of Freedom (DOF) one agonist-antagonist pair arrangement is usually used with a pulley mechanism. A mathematical model of wrist joint is derived using conventional forward kinematic analysis. The static model relating pressure in the muscle with the orientation of the wrist joint is obtained by combining the experimental data and mathematical model. Regulation of pressure can be achieved by pulse width modulation control of on/off solenoid valves. A set of free vibration experiments are done for the dynamic identification of the muscle characteristics.

  4. Ultrahigh-frequency ultrasound of fascicles in the median nerve at the wrist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Michael S; Baute, Vanessa; Caress, James B; Walker, Francis O

    2017-10-01

    An ultrahigh-frequency (70 MHZ) ultrasound device has recently been approved for human use. This study seeks to determine whether this device facilitates counting of fascicles within the median nerve at the wrist. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent imaging of the median nerve at the wrist bilaterally. The number of fascicles in each nerve was counted by two independent raters. The mean fascicle number was 22.68. Correlation was strong between the two raters (r = 0.68, P nerve area did not predict fascicle number. Those with bifid median nerves and persistent median arteries had lower fascicle density than those without anatomic anomalies (1.79 vs. 2.29; P = 0.01). Fascicles within the median nerve at the wrist can be readily imaged. Ultrahigh-frequency ultrasound technology may be informative in a variety of disorders affecting the peripheral nervous system. Muscle Nerve 56: 819-822, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Frequency and spectrum of abnormalities in the bone marrow of the wrist: MR imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, F.; Schweitzer, M.E.; Malat, J.; Hussain, S.M.; Rijksuniversiteit Leiden

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To describe the frequency of marrow abnormalities on wrist MR imaging and the MR findings of these various abnormalities.Design and patients. Five hundred and nineteen patients were studied at 1.5 T. Two observers recorded the presence and location of avascular necrosis, occult fractures and arthritic edema [focal osteoarthritis, ulnolunate abutment, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, gouty arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC)].Results and conclusion. One hundred and eighty-seven (36%) patients demonstrated marrow abnormalities in the wrist, of which 101 were diagnosed as arthritis [64 (34%) as focal osteoarthritis, 17 (9%) as ulnolunate abutment, 15 (8%) as rheumatoid arthritis, 2 as septic arthritis, 2 as SLAC, and 1 as gouty arthritis]. Seventy-two patients had occult fractures and in 27 patients avascular necrosis was seen. MR imaging can reveal various abnormalities in bone marrow of the wrist when findings on radiography are normal or equivocal. (orig.)

  6. Frequency and spectrum of abnormalities in the bone marrow of the wrist: MR imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, F.; Schweitzer, M.E. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology); Li Xiaoxian (Dept. of Radiology, Tangshan Gongren Hospital, Tangshan (China)); Malat, J. (Department of Radiology, Naples Radiologists, Naples (Italy)); Hussain, S.M. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology)

    1999-06-01

    Objective. To describe the frequency of marrow abnormalities on wrist MR imaging and the MR findings of these various abnormalities.Design and patients. Five hundred and nineteen patients were studied at 1.5 T. Two observers recorded the presence and location of avascular necrosis, occult fractures and arthritic edema [focal osteoarthritis, ulnolunate abutment, rheumatoid arthritis, septic arthritis, gouty arthritis and scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC)].Results and conclusion. One hundred and eighty-seven (36%) patients demonstrated marrow abnormalities in the wrist, of which 101 were diagnosed as arthritis [64 (34%) as focal osteoarthritis, 17 (9%) as ulnolunate abutment, 15 (8%) as rheumatoid arthritis, 2 as septic arthritis, 2 as SLAC, and 1 as gouty arthritis]. Seventy-two patients had occult fractures and in 27 patients avascular necrosis was seen. MR imaging can reveal various abnormalities in bone marrow of the wrist when findings on radiography are normal or equivocal. (orig.) With 17 figs., 13 refs.

  7. Automatic Quantification of Radiographic Wrist Joint Space Width of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Yinghe; Vincken, Koen L; van der Heijde, Desiree; de Hair, Maria J H; Lafeber, Floris P; Viergever, Max A

    2017-11-01

    Objective: Wrist joint space narrowing is a main radiographic outcome of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Yet, automatic radiographic wrist joint space width (JSW) quantification for RA patients has not been widely investigated. The aim of this paper is to present an automatic method to quantify the JSW of three wrist joints that are least affected by bone overlapping and are frequently involved in RA. These joints are located around the scaphoid bone, viz. the multangular-navicular, capitate-navicular-lunate, and radiocarpal joints. Methods: The joint space around the scaphoid bone is detected by using consecutive searches of separate path segments, where each segment location aids in constraining the subsequent one. For joint margin delineation, first the boundary not affected by X-ray projection is extracted, followed by a backtrace process to obtain the actual joint margin. The accuracy of the quantified JSW is evaluated by comparison with the manually obtained ground truth. Results: Two of the 50 radiographs used for evaluation of the method did not yield a correct path through all three wrist joints. The delineated joint margins of the remaining 48 radiographs were used for JSW quantification. It was found that 90% of the joints had a JSW deviating less than 20% from the mean JSW of manual indications, with the mean JSW error less than 10%. Conclusion: The proposed method is able to automatically quantify the JSW of radiographic wrist joints reliably. The proposed method may aid clinical researchers to study the progression of wrist joint damage in RA studies. Objective: Wrist joint space narrowing is a main radiographic outcome of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Yet, automatic radiographic wrist joint space width (JSW) quantification for RA patients has not been widely investigated. The aim of this paper is to present an automatic method to quantify the JSW of three wrist joints that are least affected by bone overlapping and are frequently involved in RA. These joints

  8. Upper limb joint muscle/tendon injury and anthropometric adaptations in French competitive tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowski, Isabelle; Creveaux, Thomas; Genevois, Cyril; Klouche, Shahnaz; Rahme, Michel; Hardy, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the upper limb anthropometric dimensions and a history of dominant upper limb injury in tennis players. Dominant and non-dominant wrist, forearm, elbow and arm circumferences, along with a history of dominant upper limb injuries, were assessed in 147 male and female players, assigned to four groups based on location of injury: wrist (n = 9), elbow (n = 25), shoulder (n = 14) and healthy players (n = 99). From anthropometric dimensions, bilateral differences in circumferences and in proportions were calculated. The wrist group presented a significant bilateral difference in arm circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between wrist and forearm, as well as between elbow and arm, compared to the healthy group (6.6 ± 3.1% vs. 4.9 ± 4.0%, P elbow group displayed asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and arm compared to the healthy group (-0.4 ± 4.3% vs. 1.5 ± 4.0%, P elbow circumference, and asymmetrical bilateral proportions between forearm and elbow when compared to the healthy group (5.8 ± 4.7% vs. 3.1 ± 4.8%, P tennis injury and asymmetry in upper limb proportions using high-tech measurements in symptomatic tennis players.

  9. Radiographic assessment of skeletal maturation stages for orthodontic patients: hand-wrist bones or cervical vertebrae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Eddie Hsiang-Hua; Liu, Jen-Pei; Chang, Jenny Zwei-Chieng; Tsai, Shih-Jaw; Yao, Chung-Chen Jane; Chen, Mu-Hsiung; Chen, Yi-Jane; Lin, Chun-Pin

    2008-04-01

    The skeletal maturation status of a growing patient can influence the selection of orthodontic treatment procedures. Either lateral cephalometric or hand-wrist radiography can be used to assess skeletal development. In this study, we examined the correlation between the maturation stages of cervical vertebrae and hand-wrist bones in Taiwanese individuals. The study group consisted of 330 male and 379 female subjects ranging in age from 8 to 18 years. A total of 709 hand-wrist and 709 lateral cephalometric radiographs were analyzed. Hand-wrist maturation stages were assessed using National Taiwan University Hospital Skeletal Maturation Index (NTUH-SMI). Cervical vertebral maturation stages were determined by the latest Cervical Vertebral Maturation Stage (CVMS) Index. Spearman's rank correlation was used to correlate the respective maturation stages assessed from the hand-wrist bones and the cervical vertebrae. The values of Spearman's rank correlation were 0.910 for males and 0.937 for females, respectively. These data confirmed a strong and significant correlation between CVMS and NTUH-SMI systems (p less than 0.001). After comparison of the mean ages of subjects in different stages of CVMS and NTU-SMI systems, we found that CVMS I corresponded to NTUH-SMI stages 1 and 2, CVMS II to NTUH-SMI stage 3, CVMS III to NTUHSMI stage 4, CVMS IV to NTUH-SMI stage 5, CVMS V to NTUH-SMI stages 6, 7 and 8, and CVMS VI to NTUH-SMI stage 9. Our results indicate that cervical vertebral maturation stages can be used to replace hand-wrist bone maturation stages for evaluation of skeletal maturity in Taiwanese individuals.

  10. Injuries in Rugby Union football.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J E; Gibson, T

    In a prospective study of 185 players attached to 10 British rugby clubs, 151 injuries were recorded among 98 of them (53%) during a single season. Forwards sustained significantly more injuries than backs. The standard of rugby, players' body weights, degree of fitness, and presence of joint hypermobility did not affect the risk of injury. The leg was the most common site of injury. Head and neck injuries were significantly more common when play was static and on wet pitches. Scrummaging accounted for no neck injuries. Almost half the injuries occurred during the last quarter of games. Foul play might have caused as many as 47 (31%) of all reported injuries. Complete eradication of deliberately dangerous play would considerably reduce the high incidence of injuries in this sport.

  11. Case study of a physiotherapy treatment of patient with Arthritis of the wrist joints

    OpenAIRE

    Liapis, Achilleas

    2016-01-01

    Title: Case study of a physiotherapy treatment of patient with Arthritis of the wrist joints. Název: Kazuistika fyzioterapeutické péče o pacienta s diagnózou artróza zápěstních kloubů Aim The aim of my bachelor thesis is to analyze the diagnosis of my patient and find a proper therapeutic plan for his health care and to prevent any further complication. Moreover I will be able to understand the function and the structure of wrist joint. Summary My bachelor thesis is divided into two main part...

  12. Hyperparathyroidism-related extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist: a general review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, Satoshi; Hidalgo-Diaz, Juan Jose; Prunières, Guillaume; Facca, Sybille; Bodin, Frédéric; Boucher, Stéphanie; Liverneaux, Philippe

    2015-07-01

    Extensor tenosynovitis often occurs accompanying with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, trauma, mycobacterium and dialysis-related amyloidosis. However, there is no recognition of extensor tenosynovitis accompanying with hyperparathyroidism. The purpose of this general review was to describe the clinical condition and to report the results of surgical intervention in the extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist related to hyperparathyroidism. Hyperparathyroidism is thought to be a rare disease in adult. Although renal symptoms are the commonest symptom, musculoskeletal complaints also occur in hyperparathyroidism. From our general review, hyperparathyroidism deserves consideration in the differential diagnosis of extensor tenosynovitis at the wrist.

  13. The effect of arm and wrist supports on the load of the upper extremity during VDU work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.; de Korte, E.; van der Kraan, I.; Kuijer, P. [=P. Paul F. M.

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of arm and wrist supports in reducing the workload during computer work. Female subjects (n=10) performed computer work in conditions with arm or wrist supports and in a condition without supports. Sustained muscle tension in the trapezius muscle is a risk factor for

  14. The effect of arm and wrist supports on the load of he upper extrimity during VDU work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, B.; de Korte, E.; van der Kraan, I.; Kuijer, P.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of arm and wrist supports in reducing the workload during computer work. Design. Female subjects (n=10) performed computer work in conditions with arm or wrist supports and in a condition without supports. Background. Sustained muscle tension in the trapezius

  15. Effects of Neoprene Wrist/Hand Splints on Handwriting for Students with Joint Hypermobility Syndrome: A Single System Design Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohlich, Lauren; Wesley, Alison; Wallen, Margaret; Bundy, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Pain associated with hypermobility of wrist and hand joints can contribute to decreased handwriting output. This study examined the effectiveness of a neoprene wrist/hand splint in reducing pain and increasing handwriting speed and endurance for students with joint hypermobility syndrome. Methods: Multiple baseline, single system design…

  16. Ulnar nerve lesion at the wrist and sport: A report of 8 cases compared with 45 non-sport cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seror, P

    2015-04-01

    Reporting clinical and electrodiagnostic characteristics of sport-related ulnar neuropathies at the wrist. Eight sport-related and 45 non-sport-related cases from 53 ulnar neuropathies at the wrist cases over 14 years. Sport-related ulnar neuropathies at the wrist cases were due to cycling (5 cases), kayaking (2 cases), and big-game fishing (1 case). No patient had sensory complaints in ulnar digits, and all had motor impairment. Conduction across the wrist with recording on the first dorsal interosseous muscle was impaired in all cases, with conduction block in 5. Two cyclists showed bilateral ulnar neuropathies at the wrist. All cases recovered within 2 to 6 months with sport discontinuation. Distal lesions of the deep motor branch were more frequent in sport- than non-sport-related cases. The 8 sport-related ulnar neuropathies at the wrist cases involved the deep motor branch. Conduction study to the first dorsal interosseous muscle across the wrist is the key to electrodiagnostics. Bilateral cases in cyclists does not require wrist imaging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Downhill Skiing Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D H

    1981-01-01

    In brief: Lower extremity injuries are common in downhill skiing. Fifty-three percent of the skiing injuries in one study, and 81% in another, were below the knee. Twelve case reports are presented and their treatment is discussed. The author suggests that skiers undertake a physical fitness program to increase stamina and elasticity of muscles and ligaments.

  18. Direct catastrophic injury in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boden, Barry P

    2005-11-01

    Catastrophic sports injuries are rare but tragic events. Direct (traumatic) catastrophic injury results from participating in the skills of a sport, such as a collision in football. Football is associated with the greatest number of direct catastrophic injuries for all major team sports in the United States. Pole vaulting, gymnastics, ice hockey, and football have the highest incidence of direct catastrophic injuries for sports in which males participate. In most sports, the rate of catastrophic injury is higher at the collegiate than at the high school level. Cheerleading is associated with the highest number of direct catastrophic injuries for all sports in which females participate. Indirect (nontraumatic) injury is caused by systemic failure as a result of exertion while participating in a sport. Cardiovascular conditions, heat illness, exertional hyponatremia, and dehydration can cause indirect catastrophic injury. Understanding the common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for direct catastrophic injuries is critical in caring for athletes.

  19. Common Runners/Walkers Foot Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry W.; Ihlers, Matt; Haar, Calin; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This is my 35th year of running most days a year. That was correct most days a year not a week. Running is my first priority each day. Developing a routine will assist those who want exercise to become a habit. After I awake I drink a glass of water and a cup of coffee then my dog "Jazz" and I hit the streets for a 3-4 mile run. Later in…

  20. Ice hockey injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Brian W; Meeuwisse, Willem H

    2005-01-01

    This article reviews the distribution and determinants of injuries reported in the pediatric ice hockey literature, and suggests potential injury prevention strategies and directions for further research. Thirteen electronic databases, the ISI Web of Science, and 'grey literature' databases were searched using a combination of Medical Subject Headings and text words to identify potentially relevant articles. The bibliographies of selected studies were searched to identify additional articles. Studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A comparison between studies on this topic area was difficult due to the variability in research designs, definition of injury, study populations, and measurements used to assess injury. The majority of injuries were sustained during games compared with practices. The two most commonly reported injuries were sprains/strains and contusions. Players competing at the Minor hockey, High School, and Junior levels of competition sustained most of their injuries to the upper extremity, head, and lower extremity, respectively. The primary mechanism of injury was body checking, followed by stick and puck contact. The frequency of catastrophic eye injuries has been significantly reduced with the world-wide mandation of full facial protection for all Minor hockey players. Specific hockey-related injury risk factors are poorly delineated and rarely studied among pediatric ice hockey players leaving large gaps in the knowledge of appropriate prevention strategies. Risk management strategies should be focused at avoiding unnecessary foreseeable risk, and controlling the risks inherent to the sport. Suggestions for injury prevention and future research are discussed.

  1. Effects of Volar Tilt, Wrist Extension, and Plate Position on Contact Between Flexor Pollicis Longus Tendon and Volar Plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtzel, Caroline N Wolfe; Burns, Geoffrey T; Zhu, Andy F; Ozer, Kagan

    2017-12-01

    Volar plates positioned at, or distal to, the watershed line have been shown to have a higher incidence of attritional rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of wrist extension and volar tilt on the contact between the plate and the FPL tendon in a cadaver model. We hypothesized that, following volar plate application, loss of native volar tilt increases the contact between the FPL and the plate at lower degrees of wrist extension. A volar locking plate was applied on 6 fresh-frozen cadavers. To determine the contact between the plate and the FPL tendon, both structures were wrapped with copper wire and circuit conductivity was monitored throughout wrist motion. A lateral wrist radiograph was obtained at each circuit closure, indicating tendon-plate contact. Baseline measurements were obtained with plate positioned at Soong grades 0, 1, and 2. An extra-articular osteotomy was made and contact was recorded at various volar tilt angles (+5°, 0°, -5°, -10°, -15°, and -20°) in 3 different plate positions. A blinded observer measured the degree of wrist extension on all lateral radiographs. Data were analyzed using linear mixed-effects regression model. Plates placed distal to the watershed line had the most contact throughout wrist range of motion. Significantly, less wrist extension was required for contact in wrists with neutral or dorsal tilt and in distally placed volar plates. Volar tilt, wrist extension, and plate position were 3 independent risk factors determining contact between plate and tendon. Loss of volar tilt, increased wrist extension, and higher Soong grade plate position result in greater contact between wire-wrapped FPL tendon and plate. The FPL/plate contact chart generated in this study may be used to assess the risk of rupture in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Facial Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the patient has HIV or hepatitis. Facial Fractures Sports injuries can cause potentially serious broken bones or fractures of the face. Common symptoms of facial fractures include: swelling and bruising, ...

  3. Leg Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are important for motion and standing. Playing sports, running, falling, or having an accident can damage your legs. Common leg injuries include sprains and strains, joint dislocations, and fractures. ...

  4. [An overview of snow-boarding injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biasca, N; Battaglia, H; Simmen, H P; Disler, P; Trentz, O

    1995-01-01

    Snowboarding is increasing dramatically in popularity in Switzerland as well as other countries. Work aimed at improving the design of the boards and of the boots and bindings has also increased rapidly during recent years. Most injured snowboarders are fit young men and boys who describe themselves as beginners and have had a minimal amount of instruction at an officially approved training centre. Appropriate snowboard training has mostly been quite inadequate, and protective devices (e.g. waterproofed support gloves). The anatomical distribution and the types of injuries sustained in snowboarding differ from those in alpine skiing. The wrist (and forearm) and the ankle are the most frequent locations of injuries (23%) as against the knee and thumb in alpine skiing. Sprains and strains were the most frequent types of injuries (46%), followed by fractures (28%) and contusions (13.5%). The snowboard injury rate was higher than in alpine skiing (1.7-8/1000 snowboard days versus 2-4/1000 ski days). Falling forward on the slope was the major mechanism of injury (80%), and torsion the next most frequent (20%). Snowboarding injuries were sustained most often on ice and hardpacked snow, compared with soft powder snow for alpine skiing injuries. Appropriate preseason conditioning, snowboarding lessons from a certified instructor, appropriate selection of rigorously tested equipment and use of protective devices are the main steps that must be taken to prevent injuries.

  5. Injuries in Irish dance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Cynthia J; Tyson, Kesley D; Johnson, Victor M; Popoli, David M; d'Hemecourt, Pierre A; Micheli, Lyle J

    2013-12-01

    Irish dance is growing in popularity and competitiveness; however, very little research has focused specifically on this genre of dance. The purpose of this study was to analyze the types of dance injuries incurred by Irish dancers. A chart review was performed to identify all injuries associated with Irish dance seen in the sports medicine or orthopaedic clinics at the investigators' hospital over an 11-year period. "Injury" was defined as any dance-related pain or disorder that led to evaluation in the clinics. Survey data were also collected from study participants. Ultimately, 255 patients from over 30 different schools of dance were seen with injuries directly related (726 clinic visits) or partially related (199 visits) to Irish dance. Participants ranged in age from 4 to 47, with 95% (243/255) under the age of 19. These 255 patients received 437 diagnoses. Almost 80% of the injuries (348/437) were attributable to overuse, and 20.4% were acute and traumatic injuries (89/437). Ninety-five percent (95.9%) of injuries involved the hip or lower extremity. The most common sites were the foot (33.2%), ankle (22.7%), knee (19.7%), and hip (14.4%). Typical diagnoses were tendon injury (13.3%), apophysitis (11.4%), patellofemoral pain and instability (10.8%), stress injury (10.1%), and muscle injury (7.8%). The majority of traumatic injuries were seen in clinic within 3 weeks, but less than a quarter of overuse injuries were seen that quickly. The most common treatment, prescribed to 84.3% of patients, was physical therapy and home exercises, and the majority of dancers (64.3%) were able to return to full dance activity after injury.

  6. Testbed of a novel robotic pitch-roll wrist parameter identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Xiao Qing; Chopra, Vikram; Angeles, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports work in progress on the development of an innovative gearless pitch-roll wrist (PRW)for robotic applications. The PRW bears the morphology of a bevel-gear differential, its novelty lying in the absence of gears. Indeed, the PRW motivating this study is based on cams and rollers,...

  7. Automated joint space width quantification of hand and wrist joints : a proof of concept study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huo, Yinghe; Veldhuizen, Renske D; van der Heijde, Desiree M; Besselink, Nick J; Jacobs, Johannes W G; van Laar, Jacob M; Viergever, Max A; Vincken, Koen L; Lafeber, Floris P; De Hair, Maria JH

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare as proof of concept the sensitivity to change of automated quantification of radiographic wrist and hand joint space width (JSW) with scoring JSW according to the Sharp/van der Heijde scoring method (SHS) in two strategy groups of a treat-to-target and tight-control early

  8. Detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures by a wireless wrist accelerometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Polster, T.

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to assess the clinical reliability of a wrist-worn, wireless accelerometer sensor for detecting generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). Seventy-three consecutive patients (age 6-68 years; median 37 years) at risk of having GTCS and who were admitted to the long-term video-elec...

  9. Finite-element analysis of some pneumatically-actuated wrist-rehabilitation equipment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Ovidiu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some wrist-rehabilitation equipment, actuated by a pneumatic muscle. This one drives, through a rack-pinion mechanism, a Fin Ray-type mechanism, with a view to mobilizing the injured palm. Unlike other rehabilitation equipments, the one presented in this paper, ensures the movement of both palm and fingers.

  10. Kinematic rate control of simulated robot hand at or near wrist singularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, K.; Houck, J. A.; Carzoo, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A robot hand should obey movement commands from an operator on a computer program as closely as possible. However, when two of the three rotational axes of the robot wrist are colinear, the wrist loses a degree of freedom, and the usual resolved rate equations (used to move the hand in response to an operator's inputs) are indeterminant. Furthermore, rate limiting occurs in close vicinity to this singularity. An analysis shows that rate limiting occurs not only in the vicinity of this singularity but also substantially away from it, even when the operator commands rotational rates of the robot hand that are only a small percentage of the operational joint rate limits. Therefore, joint angle rates are scaled when they exceed operational limits in a real time simulation of a robot arm. Simulation results show that a small dead band avoids the wrist singularity in the resolved rate equations but can introduce a high frequency oscillation close to the singularity. However, when a coordinated wrist movement is used in conjunction with the resolved rate equations, the high frequency oscillation disappears.

  11. Clinical Utility of Dual-Energy CT Analysis of Bone Marrow Edema in Acute Wrist Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ismail T; Wong, William D; Liang, Teresa; Khosa, Faisal; Mian, Memoona; Jalal, Sabeena; Nicolaou, Savvas

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the utility of dual-energy CT (DECT) for assessing carpal fractures and to obtain an attenuation value cutoff (in Hounsfield units) to identify bone marrow edema due to an acute carpal fracture. In this retrospective study, 24 patients who presented with wrist fractures from September 3, 2014, through March 9, 2015, underwent imaging with DECT (80 and 140 kVp). Using the three-material decomposition algorithm specific for virtual noncalcium to construct images, two radiologists identified carpal fractures and associated bone marrow edema. Readers noted the attenuation at areas with and without bone marrow edema. The cutoff value was obtained by ROC analysis and was internally validated on 13 separate patients with suspected wrist fractures. A p edema than in areas without it (p edema associated with acute wrist fractures with 100% sensitivity and 99.5% specificity, compared with visual DECT interpretation. In the 13 validation cases, the cutoff of 5.90 HU identified bone marrow edema with 100% accuracy, compared with visual interpretation. Kappa values were 0.83 between the two readings by reader 1, and 0.73 and 0.96 comparing the two readings of reader 1 with the reading by reader 2. DECT is a useful tool for identifying bone marrow edema in the setting of acute wrist fractures, providing an alternative to MRI. A cutoff value of 5.90 HU can be used for accurate diagnosis and exclusion of carpal fractures.

  12. Supinator Extender (SUE): a pneumatically actuated robot for forearm/wrist rehabilitation after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, James; Spencer, Steven J; Klein, Julius; Buell, Meghan; Reinkensmeyer, David J; Bobrow, James

    2011-01-01

    The robot described in this paper, SUE (Supinator Extender), adds forearm/wrist rehabilitation functionality to the UCI BONES exoskeleton robot and to the ArmeoSpring rehabilitation device. SUE is a 2-DOF serial chain that can measure and assist forearm supination-pronation and wrist flexion-extension. The large power to weight ratio of pneumatic actuators allows SUE to achieve the forces needed for rehabilitation therapy while remaining lightweight enough to be carried by BONES and ArmeoSpring. Each degree of freedom has a range of 90 degrees, and a nominal torque of 2 ft-lbs. The cylinders are mounted away from the patient's body on the lateral aspect of the arm. This is to prevent the danger of a collision and maximize the workspace of the arm robot. The rotation axis used for supination-pronation is a small bearing just below the subject's wrist. The flexion-extension motion is actuated by a cantilevered pneumatic cylinder, which allows the palm of the hand to remain open. Data are presented that demonstrate the ability of SUE to measure and cancel forearm/wrist passive tone, thereby extending the active range of motion for people with stroke.

  13. Pisotriquetral joint disorders: an under-recognized cause of ulnar side wrist pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraux, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Imagerie Medicale Jacquemars Gielee, Lille (France); Lefebvre, G.; Pansini, V.; Aucourt, J.; Vandenbussche, L.; Cotten, A. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Demondion, X. [Hopital Roger Salengro, Service d' Imagerie Musculo-Squelettique, Centre de Consultation de l' Appareil Locomoteur, CHRU Lille (France); Pole Recherche Faculte de Medecine de Lille, Laboratoire d' Anatomie, Lille (France)

    2014-06-15

    Pisotriquetral joint disorders are often under-recognized in routine clinical practice. They nevertheless represent a significant cause of ulnar side wrist pain. The aim of this article is to present the main disorders of this joint and discuss the different imaging modalities that can be useful for its assessment. (orig.)

  14. Stiffness and position control of a prosthetic wrist by means of an EMG interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, S.; Carloni, Raffaella; Stramigioli, Stefano

    In this paper, we present a novel approach for decoding electromyographic signals from an amputee and for interfacing them with a prosthetic wrist. The model for the interface makes use of electromyographic signals from electrodes placed in agonistic and antagonistic sides of the forearm. The model

  15. Effects of circumferential rigid wrist orthoses in rehabilitation of patients with radius fracture at typical site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Aleksandar

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The use of orthoses is a questionable rehabilitation method for patients with the distal radius fracture at typical site. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the rehabilitation on patients with radius fracture at the typical site, who wore circumferential static wrist orthoses, with those who did not wear them. Methods. Thirty patients were divided into 3 equal groups, 2 experimental groups, and 1 control group. The patients in the experimental groups were given the rehabilitation program of wearing serially manufactured (off-the-shelf, as well as custom-fit orthoses. Those in the control group did not wear wrist orthoses. Evaluation parameters were pain, edema, the range of the wrist motion, the quality of cylindrical, spherical, and pinch-spherical grasp, the strength of pinch and hand grasp, and patient's assessment of the effects of rehabilitation. Results. No significant difference in the effects of rehabilitation on the patients in experimental groups as opposed to control group was found. Patients in the first experimental group, and in control group were more satisfied with the effects of rehabilitation, as opposed to the patients in the second experimental group (p<0,05. Conclusion. The effects of circumferential static wrist orthoses in the rehabilitation of patients with distal radius fracture at the typical site were not clinically significant. There was no significant difference between the custom and off-the-shelf orthoses.

  16. SCRIPT passive orthosis : design of interactive hand and wrist exoskeleton for rehabilitation at home after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ates, Sedar; Haarman, Claudia J W; Stienen, Arno H A

    2017-01-01

    Recovery of functional hand movements after stroke is directly linked to rehabilitation duration and intensity. Continued therapy at home has the potential to increase both. For many patients this requires a device that helps them overcome the hyperflexion of wrist and fingers that is limiting their

  17. Effects of wrist tendon vibration on arm tracking in people poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Megan O; Scheidt, Robert A; Schmit, Brian D

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the influence of wrist tendon vibration on a multijoint elbow/shoulder tracking task. We hypothesized that tendon vibration applied at the wrist musculature would improve upper arm tracking performance in chronic stroke survivors through increased, Ia-afferent feedback to the central nervous system (CNS). To test this hypothesis, 10 chronic stroke and 5 neurologically intact subjects grasped the handle of a planar robot as they tracked a target through a horizontal figure-8 pattern. A total of 36 trials were completed by each subject. During the middle trials, 70-Hz tendon vibration was applied at the wrist flexor tendons. Position, velocity, and electromyography data were evaluated to compare the quality of arm movements before, during, and after trials with concurrent vibration. Despite tracking a target that moved at a constant velocity, hand trajectories appeared to be segmented, displaying alternating intervals of acceleration and deceleration. Segments were identifiable in tangential velocity data as single-peaked, bell-shaped speed pulses. When tendon vibration was applied at the wrist musculature, stroke subjects experienced improved tracking performance in that hand path lengths and peak speed variability decreased, whereas movement smoothness increased. These performance improvements were accompanied by decreases in the muscle activity during movement. Possible mechanisms behind improved movement control in response to tendon vibration may include improved sensorimotor integration or improved cortical modulation of spinal reflex activity.

  18. Wrist Hypothermia Related to Continuous Work with a Computer Mouse: A Digital Infrared Imaging Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Reste

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Computer work is characterized by sedentary static workload with low-intensity energy metabolism. The aim of our study was to evaluate the dynamics of skin surface temperature in the hand during prolonged computer mouse work under different ergonomic setups. Digital infrared imaging of the right forearm and wrist was performed during three hours of continuous computer work (measured at the start and every 15 minutes thereafter in a laboratory with controlled ambient conditions. Four people participated in the study. Three different ergonomic computer mouse setups were tested on three different days (horizontal computer mouse without mouse pad; horizontal computer mouse with mouse pad and padded wrist support; vertical computer mouse without mouse pad. The study revealed a significantly strong negative correlation between the temperature of the dorsal surface of the wrist and time spent working with a computer mouse. Hand skin temperature decreased markedly after one hour of continuous computer mouse work. Vertical computer mouse work preserved more stable and higher temperatures of the wrist (>30 °C, while continuous use of a horizontal mouse for more than two hours caused an extremely low temperature (<28 °C in distal parts of the hand. The preliminary observational findings indicate the significant effect of the duration and ergonomics of computer mouse work on the development of hand hypothermia.

  19. The paediatric wrist revisited - findings of bony depressions in healthy children on radiographs compared to MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avenarius, Derk M.F.; Eldevik, Petter; Ording Mueller, Lil-Sofie; Owens, Catherine M.; Rosendahl, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The presence of erosions is used for diagnosis and monitoring of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Assessment of carpal bone erosions in children is challenging due to lack of normal references. To define normal appearances of bony depressions in the wrist on radiographs and MRI. MRI and radiography of the wrist were performed in 88 healthy children, 5-15 years of age. We assessed the number of bony depressions within the carpals/proximal metacarpals on both modalities, separately and combined. A total of 75 carpal depressions were identified on radiography compared to 715 on MRI. The number of bony depressions identified radiographically showed no statistically significant difference across age-groups. Within the metacarpals, there was no significant difference between bony depressions identified by MRI or radiography, except at the bases of the second metacarpal. Bony depressions that resemble erosions are normal findings in the wrist in children. MRI identifies more depressions than radiographs in the carpus. Some bony depressions occur at typical locations and should be accounted for when assessing the wrist in JIA to avoid overstaging. (orig.)

  20. The distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap for wrist defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karki Durga

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reconstruction of soft tissue defects around the wrist with exposed tendons, joints, nerves and bone represents a challenge to plastic surgeons, and such defects necessitate flap coverage to preserve hand functions and to protect its vital structures. We evaluated the use of a distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap in patients with volar soft tissue defects around the wrist. Materials and Methods: Between June 2004 and June 2006, seven patients of soft tissue defects on the volar aspect of the wrist underwent distally-based island ulnar artery perforator flap. Out of seven patients, five were male and two patients were female. This flap was used in the reconstruction of the post road traffic accident defects in four patients and post electric burn defects in three patients. Flap was raised on one or two perforators and was rotated to 180°. Results: All flaps survived completely. Donor sites were closed primarily without donor site morbidity. Conclusion: The distally-based island Ulnar artery perforator flap is convenient, reliable, easy to manage and is a single-stage technique for reconstructing soft tissue defects of the volar aspect of the wrist. Early use of this flap allows preservation of vital structures, decreases morbidity and allows for early rehabilitation.

  1. Elimination of hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment in children needing orthodontic therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Khal, Hessa A.; Wong, Ricky W.K.; Rabie, A.B.M.

    2008-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method as an indicator of skeletal age during the circumpubertal period by correlating the CVM method with the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in an attempt to eliminate the need for hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 400 Chinese were randomly selected. The age for girls was between 10 years and 15 years and for boys it was between 12 years and 17 years, so that they were within the circumpubertal period. The CVM was assessed by a method developed by Baccetti and co-workers, whereas hand-wrist maturation was assessed by Fishman's method. The CVM was significantly correlated with HWM skeletal age. (Spearman's r boys 0.9206, girls = 0.9363). All the patients in cervical vertebra stage 3 (CVS3) of CVM corresponded to skeletal maturation indicator 2 (SMI2) or SMI3 stages of HWM (around the peak of the growth spurt). The method error was insignificant. CVM is a valid indicator of skeletal growth during the circumpubertal period. This work will provide dental practitioners with information on jaw growth modification therapy. (orig.)

  2. Comparative evaluation between cervical vertebral morphology and hand-wrist morphology for skeletal maturation assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grippaudo, C; Garcovich, D; Volpe, G; Lajolo, C

    2006-05-01

    The aim of the study was to find a correlation between the evaluation of skeletal maturation performed by the study of cervical vertebrae maturation indicators and the evaluation obtained by the hand and wrist maturation indicators. Left hand wrist radiographs and the corresponding lateral cephalograms of 90 patients (48 males and 42 females; aged 6 to 14 years) were paired and a study group of 128 pair of radiographs was obtained, having some patients 2 or more radiographs at different times. Hand and wrist radiographs were evaluated according to the protocol proposed by Grave (scores 0 to 9); corresponding lateral cephalograms were evaluated according to the method reported by Baccetti (scores 1 to 5). Values obtained with the 2 methods were analyzed by Spearman's correlation test. When the values were compared globally in the 2 genders a good correlation was obtained (r=0.795; Pmaturation evaluation by the analysis of cervical vertebrae in laterolateral cephalograms which can substitute the hand and wrist radiograph for the skeletal maturation evaluation in orthodontic diagnosis.

  3. Elimination of hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment in children needing orthodontic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Khal, Hessa A.; Wong, Ricky W.K.; Rabie, A.B.M. [University of Hong Kong, Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, Hong Kong (China)

    2008-03-15

    Our aim was to evaluate the validity of the cervical vertebra maturation (CVM) method as an indicator of skeletal age during the circumpubertal period by correlating the CVM method with the hand-wrist maturation (HWM) method in an attempt to eliminate the need for hand-wrist radiographs for maturity assessment. Hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 400 Chinese were randomly selected. The age for girls was between 10 years and 15 years and for boys it was between 12 years and 17 years, so that they were within the circumpubertal period. The CVM was assessed by a method developed by Baccetti and co-workers, whereas hand-wrist maturation was assessed by Fishman's method. The CVM was significantly correlated with HWM skeletal age. (Spearman's r boys = 0.9206, girls = 0.9363). All the patients in cervical vertebra stage 3 (CVS3) of CVM corresponded to skeletal maturation indicator 2 (SMI2) or SMI3 stages of HWM (around the peak of the growth spurt). The method error was insignificant. CVM is a valid indicator of skeletal growth during the circumpubertal period. This work will provide dental practitioners with information on jaw growth modification therapy. (orig.)

  4. Priorities for injury prevention in women's Australian football: a compilation of national data from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortington, Lauren V; Finch, Caroline F

    2016-01-01

    Participation in Australian football (AF) has traditionally been male dominated and current understanding of injury and priorities for prevention are based solely on reports of injuries in male players. There is evidence in other sports that indicates that injury types differ between males and females. With increasing participation in AF by females, it is important to consider their specific injury and prevention needs. This study aimed to provide a first injury profile from existing sources for female AF. Compilation of injury data from four prospectively recorded data sets relating to female AF: (1) hospital admissions in Victoria, 2008/09-13/14, n=500 injuries; (2) emergency department (ED) presentations in Victoria, 2008/09-2012/13, n=1,879 injuries; (3) insurance claims across Australia 2004-2013, n=522 injuries; (4) West Australian Women's Football League (WAWFL), 2014 season club data, n=49 injuries. Descriptive results are presented as injury frequencies, injury types and injury to body parts. Hospital admissions and ED presentations were dominated by upper limb injuries, representing 47% and 51% of all injuries, respectively, primarily to the wrist/hand at 32% and 40%. Most (65%) insurance claim injuries involved the lower limb, 27% of which were for knee ligament damage. A high proportion of concussions (33%) were reported in the club-collected data. The results provide the first compilation of existing data sets of women's AF injuries and highlight the need for a rigorous and systematic injury surveillance system to be instituted.

  5. Reproducibility of wrist home blood pressure measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uen, Sakir; Fimmers, Rolf; Brieger, Miriam; Nickenig, Georg; Mengden, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Wrist blood pressure (BP) devices have physiological limits with regards to accuracy, therefore they were not preferred for home BP monitoring. However some wrist devices have been successfully validated using etablished validation protocols. Therefore this study assessed the reproducibility of wrist home BP measurement with position sensor and automatic data storage. Methods To compare the reproducibility of three different(BP) measurement methods: 1) office BP, 2) home BP (Omron wrist device HEM- 637 IT with position sensor), 3) 24-hour ambulatory BP(24-h ABPM) (ABPM-04, Meditech, Hun)conventional sphygmomanometric office BP was measured on study days 1 and 7, 24-h ABPM on study days 7 and 14 and home BP between study days 1 and 7 and between study days 8 and 14 in 69 hypertensive and 28 normotensive subjects. The correlation coeffcient of each BP measurement method with echocardiographic left ventricular mass index was analyzed. The schedule of home readings was performed according to recently published European Society of Hypertension (ESH)- guidelines. Results The reproducibility of home BP measurement analyzed by the standard deviation as well as the squared differeces of mean individual differences between the respective BP measurements was significantly higher than the reproducibility of office BP (p ABPM (p ABPM was not significantly different (p = 0.80 systolic BP, p = 0.1 diastolic BP). The correlation coefficient of 24-h ABMP (r = 0.52) with left ventricular mass index was significantly higher than with office BP (r = 0.31). The difference between 24-h ABPM and home BP (r = 0.46) was not significant. Conclusion The short-term reproducibility of home BP measurement with the Omron HEM-637 IT wrist device was superior to the reproducibility of office BP and 24- h ABPM measurement. Furthermore, home BP with the wrist device showed similar correlations to targed organ damage as recently reported for upper arm devices. Although wrist devices have

  6. MAJOR INJURIES MUSCULOSKELETALS IN YOUNG ATHLETES BASKETBALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Simão Rodrigues Filho

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The growth of participation of youth in sports is accompanied by an increase in the number of musculoskeletal injuries, especially in contact sports. Basketball gained prominence among contact sports not only for its plastic and beauty of their games, but because it is a sport that demands much of its practitioners, and in the case of young athletes, this requirement can endanger children and adolescents are not properly monitored for health professionals sports. In this study we can see that the ankle is the most affected, followed by knee and fingers and wrists. The mechanisms of injury most frequently reported were sprains, after the bruises and fractures. Highlight for disturbances dorsolumbar, pointed out by many authors. The prevention programs and pre-competition oriented properly treated as paramount by all the authors investigated, in order to reduce the number of injuries in young athletes.

  7. Anatomical variation of radial wrist extensor muscles: a study in cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soubhagya Ranjan Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The tendons of the extensor carpi radialis longus and brevis muscles are quite useful in tendon transfer, such as in correction of finger clawing and restoration of thumb opposition. Knowledge of additional radial wrist extensor muscle bellies with independent tendons is useful in the above-mentioned surgical procedures. METHODS: The skin, subcutaneous tissue, and antebrachial fascia of 48 (24 on the right side and 24 on left side male upper limb forearms were dissected. The following aspects were then analyzed: (a the presence of additional muscle bellies of radial wrist extensors, (b the origin and insertion of the additional muscle, and (c measurements of the muscle bellies and their tendons. RESULTS: Five out of 48 upper limbs (10.41% had additional radial wrist extensors; this occurred in 3 out of 24 left upper limbs (12.5% and 2 out of 24 right upper limbs (8.3%. In one of the right upper limbs, two additional muscles were found. The length and width of each additional muscle belly and its tendon ranged between 2 - 15cm by 0.35 - 6.4cm and 2.8 - 20.8cm by 0.2 0.5cm, respectively. The additional radial wrist extensor tendons in our study basically originated either from the extensor carpi radialis longus or brevis muscles and were inserted at the base of the 2nd or 3rd metacarpal bone. CONCLUSION: The present study will inform surgeons about the different varieties of additional radial wrist extensors and the frequency of their occurrence.

  8. A comparison of hand-wrist bone and cervical vertebral analyses in measuring skeletal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Paola; Mancini, Marta; Andreani, Federico

    2006-11-01

    To compare skeletal maturation as measured by hand-wrist bone analysis and by cervical vertebral analysis. A radiographic hand-wrist bone analysis and cephalometric cervical vertebral analysis of 30 patients (14 males and 16 females; 7-18 years of age) were examined. The hand-wrist bone analysis was evaluated by the Bjork index, whereas the cervical vertebral analysis was assessed by the cervical vertebral maturation stage (CVMS) method. To define vertebral stages, the analysis consisted of both cephalometric (13 points) and morphologic evaluation of three cervical vertebrae (concavity of second, third, and fourth vertebrae and shape of third and fourth vertebrae). These measurements were then compared with the hand-wrist bone analysis, and the results were statistically analyzed by the Cohen kappa concordance index. The same procedure was repeated after 6 months and showed identical results. The Cohen kappa index obtained (mean +/- SD) was 0.783 +/- 0.098, which is in the significant range. The results show a concordance of 83.3%, considering that the estimated percentage for each case is 23.3%. The results also show a correlation of CVMS I with Bjork stages 1-3 (interval A), CVMS II with Bjork stage 4 (interval B), CVMS III with Bjork stage 5 (interval C), CVMS IV with Bjork stages 6 and 7 (interval D), and CVMS V with Bjork stages 8 and 9 (interval E). Vertebral analysis on a lateral cephalogram is as valid as the hand-wrist bone analysis with the advantage of reducing the radiation exposure of growing subjects.

  9. Nasal avulsion injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denneny, J C

    1987-11-01

    The nose is the most frequently traumatized portion of the human face. High-speed motor vehicle accidents and interpersonal violence commonly produce bony pyramid and septal damage and occasional minor soft-tissue damage. Major soft-tissue injuries are much less commonly encountered. Avulsion injuries of this type may involve skin only or the bony and cartilaginous framework as well. The severity of these injuries can range from total avulsion to minor skin loss and anywhere within the spectrum between. My experience is reviewed, management guidelines and options are detailed, and selected cases are presented.

  10. Injuries in women's basketball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojian, Thomas H; Ragle, Rosemary B

    2008-03-01

    Women's basketball has changed over time. It is a faster paced game than it was 30 years ago. Greatplayers, like Anne Meyers,who was the first, and only, woman to be signed to an NBA contract, would agree today's game is different. The game is played mostly "below the rim" but with players like Candice Parker, Sylvia Fowles and Maya Moore able to dunk the ball, the game is still changing. The one thing that remains constant in basketball, especially women's basketball, is injury. The majority of injuries in women's basketball are similar to those in men's basketball. Studies at the high school and college level show similar injury rates between women and men. ACL injuries are one exception, with female athletes having atwo to four times higher rate ofACL injuries. In this article, we review the common injuries in women's basketball. We discuss treatment issues and possible preventive measures.

  11. Soccer injuries in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paterson, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics. (orig.)

  12. Soccer injuries in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Anne [Royal Belfast Hospital for Sick Children, Radiology Department, Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2009-12-15

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics. (orig.)

  13. Soccer injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Anne

    2009-12-01

    Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with FIFA recognising more than 265 million amateur players. Despite the fact that soccer is a contact sport, it is perceived to be relatively safe to play, a factor that has contributed to its status as the fastest growing team sport in the USA. Acute and minor injuries predominate in the statistics, with contusions and abrasions being the most commonly recorded. As would be expected, the majority of soccer injuries are to the lower limbs, with serious truncal and spinal trauma being rare. This article examines the type and anatomic location of injuries sustained by children and adolescents who play soccer, and the main mechanisms whereby such injuries occur. The risk factors underpinning injury occurrence are considered, along with injury avoidance tactics.

  14. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  15. QCI Common

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    There are many common software patterns and utilities for the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute that can and should be shared across projects. Otherwise we find duplication of code which adds unwanted complexity. This is a software product seeks to alleviate this by providing common utilities such as object factories, graph data structures, parameter input mechanisms, etc., for other software products within the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute. This work enables pure basic research, has no export controlled utilities, and has no real commercial value.

  16. Avaliação artroscópica e macroscópica do complexo da fibrocartilagem triangular do punho. Estudo em cadáveres Arthroscopic and gross evaluation of the triangular fibrocartilage complex of the wrist: a cadaver-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano Inácio de Souza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O complexo da fibrocartilagem triangular tem importante papel na biomecânica do punho. O diagnóstico preciso das lesões é fundamental para se obter sucesso no tratamento. Há controvérsias acerca da especificidade e sensibilidade dos métodos de imagem empregados atualmente. A artroscopia de punho é um método pouco empregado para o diagnóstico das lesões do CFCT em nosso meio, embora apresente grandes vantagens, como possibilidade de visão direta das lesões e tratamento no mesmo tempo cirúrgico. O objetivo deste estudo foi o de avaliar o papel da artroscopia de punho na inspeção do CFCT, bem como na detecção de possíveis lesões, comparando os dados com a dissecção macroscópica. Foram avaliados 15 punhos de cadáveres sexo masculino, média de idade de 56,1 anos. A artroscopia demonstrou presença de lesões em 33,3% dos punhos avaliados. Estes achados foram coincidentes após estudo anatômico com ampla dissecção. Concluímos que houve absoluta correlação entre o exame artroscópico e a dissecção macroscópica na detecção de lesões do CFCT.The triangular fibrocartilage complex plays a key role on wrist biomechanics. An accurate injuries diagnosis is paramount for a successful treatment. There are controversies regarding specificity and sensitiveness of imaging methods employed today. Wrist arthroscopy is a method uncommonly used for diagnosing TFCC injuries in our environment, although it presents good advantages, such as the potential of direct viewing injuries, and treatment at the same surgical time. The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of wrist arthroscopy for inspecting TFCC, as well as for detecting potential injuries, comparing those data to gross dissection. Fifteen wrists of male cadavers (mean age: 56.1 years old were assessed. Arthroscopy showed the presence of injuries in 33.3% of the assessed wrists. Those findings showed consistency after an anatomical study with broad dissection. We

  17. Injuries in Cricket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardiwala, Dinshaw N; Rao, Nandan N; Varshney, Ankit V

    Cricket is a popular global sport that requires a combination of physical fitness, skill, and strategy. Although a noncontact sport, overuse and impact injuries are common since players engage in a wide range of physical activities, including running, throwing, batting, bowling, catching, and diving. Significant or match time-loss injuries are defined as those that either prevent a player from being fully available for selection in a major match, or during a major match, cause a player to be unable to bat, bowl, or keep wicket when required by either the rules or the team's captain. This review describes the various region-wise injuries sustained in cricket along with their epidemiology, biomechanics, treatment, and prevention. Data were collected from peer-reviewed articles (obtained via PubMed search) published through November 2016 that involved the medical, biomechanical, and epidemiological aspects of cricket injuries. Clinical review. Level 4. Cricket was one of the first sports to publish recommended methods for injury surveillance in 2005 from England, South Africa, Australia, the West Indies, and India. While the incidence of injuries is about the same, the prevalence of injuries has increased due to game format changes, increasing number of matches played, and decreased rest between matches. Bowling (41.3%), fielding, and wicket keeping (28.6%) account for most injuries. Acute injuries are most common (64%-76%), followed by acute-on-chronic (16%-22.8%) and chronic ones (8%-22%). The most common modern-day cricket injury is hamstring strain, and the most severe is lumbar stress fracture in young fast bowlers. With improved understanding of the scientific and medical aspects of cricket, along with advances in surgical and nonsurgical treatment techniques, the time to return to play has shortened considerably. While the prevalence of cricket injuries has increased, their severity has decreased over the past decades.

  18. Prevention of injury in karate.

    OpenAIRE

    Johannsen, H V; Noerregaard, F O

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyse the effect of knuckle protection on the type and incidence of injuries in traditional karate contests. Knuckle protection was mandatory at the Danish karate championships 1983 and 1986 (290 matches, 0.26 injuries per match), and prohibited at the championships 1984 and 1985 (620 matches, 0.25 injuries per match). Head injuries were more common in the tournaments where fist pads were used. The incidences of transitory psychomotor disturbances following b...

  19. Chronologic age and skeletal maturation of the cervical vertebrae and hand-wrist: is there a relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tancan; Ramoglu, Sabri Ilhan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Sari, Zafer

    2006-11-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to investigate the relationship between chronologic age and maturation of cervical vertebrae, (2) to identify the relationship between chronologic age and maturation stage evaluated by hand-wrist radiographs, and (3) to determine whether the maturation of cervical vertebrae correlates with maturation indicated by hand-wrist radiographs in a Turkish population. The samples were derived from lateral cephalometric and hand-wrist radiographs of 503 subjects (213 male, 290 female; ages, 5.3-24.1 years). Cervical vertebral development was evaluated by the method of Hassel and Farman. Skeletal maturation of each hand-wrist radiograph was determined according to the method described by Björk and Grave, and Brown's system. The Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients were estimated separately for males and females to measure the relationships among chronologic age, cervical vertebral maturation, and the skeletal maturation measured at the hand-wrist. The Spearman correlation coefficients were 0.72 (P cervical vertebrae skeletal maturation, and 0.79 (P maturation via hand-wrist radiographs. The correlation coefficient between hand-wrist and cervical-vertebrae maturation was 0.86 (P cervical-vertebrae maturation stages are clinically useful maturity indicators of the pubertal growth period Turkish subjects.

  20. A comprehensive comparison of simple step counting techniques using wrist- and ankle-mounted accelerometer and gyroscope signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhudy, Matthew B; Mahoney, Joseph M

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this work is to compare the differences between various step counting algorithms using both accelerometer and gyroscope measurements from wrist and ankle-mounted sensors. Participants completed four different conditions on a treadmill while wearing an accelerometer and gyroscope on the wrist and the ankle. Three different step counting techniques were applied to the data from each sensor type and mounting location. It was determined that using gyroscope measurements allowed for better performance than the typically used accelerometers, and that ankle-mounted sensors provided better performance than those mounted on the wrist.

  1. Intra-articular distribution pattern after ultrasound-guided injections in wrist joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Jensen, Karl Erik; Torp-Pedersen, Søren

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the distribution of an ultrasound-guided intra-articular (IA) injection in the wrist joint of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: An ultrasound-guided IA drug injection into the wrist joint was performed in 17 patients with 1 ml methylprednisolone (40 mg...... with the MRI OMERACT synovitis score (r=0.60, p=0.014), but not with the erosions, bonemarrow oedema scores or any clinical parameters. CONCLUSION: The distribution of contrast on MRI showed patient specific and random patterns after IA injections in active RA wrist joints. The degree of distribution increased...

  2. Prevalence of Work-related Musculoskeletal Disorders and Injuries in Occupational and Physical Therapists and Its Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himan Nazari

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: This study confirmed the rate of prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders and injuries in occupational and physical therapists, with wrist and lumbar being the most affected. The promotion of therapist’s knowledge about MSD and following ergonomic principles and new approaches in the treatment may lower or prevent MSD. 

  3. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  4. Science commons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    SCP: Creative Commons licensing for open access publishing, Open Access Law journal-author agreements for converting journals to open access, and the Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine for retaining rights to self-archive in meaningful formats and locations for future re-use. More than 250 science and technology journals already publish under Creative Commons licensing while 35 law journals utilize the Open Access Law agreements. The Addendum Engine is a new tool created in partnership with SPARC and U.S. universities. View John Wilbanks's biography

  5. Using Fitness Trackers and Smartwatches to Measure Physical Activity in Research: Analysis of Consumer Wrist-Worn Wearables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen Mikalsen, Martin; Woldaregay, Ashenafi Zebene; Muzny, Miroslav; Hartvigsen, Gunnar; Hopstock, Laila Arnesdatter; Grimsgaard, Sameline

    2018-01-01

    Background New fitness trackers and smartwatches are released to the consumer market every year. These devices are equipped with different sensors, algorithms, and accompanying mobile apps. With recent advances in mobile sensor technology, privately collected physical activity data can be used as an addition to existing methods for health data collection in research. Furthermore, data collected from these devices have possible applications in patient diagnostics and treatment. With an increasing number of diverse brands, there is a need for an overview of device sensor support, as well as device applicability in research projects. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the availability of wrist-worn fitness wearables and analyze availability of relevant fitness sensors from 2011 to 2017. Furthermore, the study was designed to assess brand usage in research projects, compare common brands in terms of developer access to collected health data, and features to consider when deciding which brand to use in future research. Methods We searched for devices and brand names in six wearable device databases. For each brand, we identified additional devices on official brand websites. The search was limited to wrist-worn fitness wearables with accelerometers, for which we mapped brand, release year, and supported sensors relevant for fitness tracking. In addition, we conducted a Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) and ClinicalTrials search to determine brand usage in research projects. Finally, we investigated developer accessibility to the health data collected by identified brands. Results We identified 423 unique devices from 132 different brands. Forty-seven percent of brands released only one device. Introduction of new brands peaked in 2014, and the highest number of new devices was introduced in 2015. Sensor support increased every year, and in addition to the accelerometer, a photoplethysmograph, for estimating heart rate

  6. The Injury Profile of an Australian Specialist Policing Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Larsen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the injuries sustained by an Australian specialist police division. Injury records spanning four-years were analyzed. The role being performed when the injury occurred, injury cause, body part injured, and injury-related costs were quantified. The percentage of personnel injured multiple times was documented. One hundred and thirty eight personnel reported injuries, 58 of these on multiple occasions. This resulted in 229 injuries and 76 claims being raised. Half of the injuries occurred during operational policing tasks, however training activities accounted for >30% of injuries. The most common injury was strain/sprain, and upper body injuries were 2.5-times more common than lower-body or torso injuries. 1107 shifts were lost, and injuries cost the organization $487,159 (Australian Dollars over the four-year period. The injury costs (both financial and in manpower may prompt policy makers to review the current training and post-injury rehabilitation protocols.

  7. At Home Photography-Based Method for Measuring Wrist Range of Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Samir K; Rancy, Schneider K; Johnsen, Parker H; Hillstrom, Howard J; Lee, Steve K; Wolfe, Scott W

    2017-11-01

    Purpose  To determine the reliability of wrist range of motion (WROM) measurements based on digital photographs taken by patients at home compared with traditional measurements done in the office with a goniometer. Methods  Sixty-nine postoperative patients were enrolled in this study at least 3 months postoperatively. Active and passive wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation were recorded by one of the two attending surgeons with a 1-degree resolution goniometer at the last postoperative office visit. Patients were provided an illustrated instruction sheet detailing how to take digital photographic images at home in six wrist positions (active and passive flexion/extension, and radial/ulnar deviation). Wrist position was measured from digital images by both the attending surgeons in a randomized, blinded fashion on two separate occasions greater than 2 weeks apart using the same goniometer. Reliability analysis was performed using the intraclass correlation coefficient to assess agreement between clinical and photography-based goniometry, as well as intra- and interobserver agreement. Results  Out of 69 enrolled patients, 30 (43%) patients sent digital images. Of the 180 digital photographs, only 9 (5%) were missing or deemed inadequate for WROM measurements. Agreement between clinical and photography-based measurements was "almost perfect" for passive wrist flexion/extension and "substantial" for active wrist flexion/extension and radial/ulnar deviation. Inter- and intraobserver agreement for the attending surgeons was "almost perfect" for all measurements. Discussion  This study validates a photography-based goniometry protocol allowing accurate and reliable WROM measurements without direct physician contact. Passive WROM was more accurately measured from photographs than active WROM. This study builds on previous photography-based goniometry literature by validating a protocol in which patients or their families take and submit their own

  8. Common approach to common interests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    In referring to issues confronting the energy field in this region and options to be exercised in the future, I would like to mention the fundamental condition of the utmost importance. That can be summed up as follows: any subject in energy area can never be solved by one country alone, given the geographical and geopolitical characteristics intrinsically possessed by energy. So, a regional approach is needed and it is especially necessary for the main players in the region to jointly address problems common to them. Though it may be a matter to be pursued in the distant future, I am personally dreaming a 'Common Energy Market for Northeast Asia,' in which member countries' interests are adjusted so that the market can be integrated and the region can become a most economically efficient market, thus formulating an effective power to encounter the outside. It should be noted that Europe needed forty years to integrate its market as the unified common market. It is necessary for us to follow a number of steps over the period to eventually materialize our common market concept, too. Now is the time for us to take a first step to lay the foundation for our descendants to enjoy prosperity from such a common market.

  9. Ankle ligament injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per A.F.H. Renström

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Acute ankle ligament sprains are common injuries. The majority of these occur during athletic participation in the 15 to 35 year age range. Despite the frequency of the injury, diagnostic and treatment protocols have varied greatly. Lateral ligament complex injuries are by far the most common of the ankle sprains. Lateral ligament injuries typically occur during plantar flexion and inversion, which is the position of maximum stress on the anterotalofibular liagment (ATFL. For this reason, the ATFL is the most commonly torn ligament during an inversion injury. In more severe inversion injuries the calcaneofibular (CFL, posterotalofibular (PTFL and subtalar ligament can also be injured. Most acute lateral ankle ligament injuries recover quickly with nonoperative management. The treatment program, called "functional treatment," includes application of the RICE principle (rest, ice, compression, and elevation immediately after the injury, a short period of immobilization and protection with an elastic or inelastic tape or bandage, and early motion exercises followed by early weight bearing and neuromuscular ankle training. Proprioceptive training with a tilt board is commenced as soon as possible, usually after 3 to 4 weeks. The purpose is to improve the balance and neuromuscular control of the ankle. Sequelae after ankle ligament injuries are very common. As much as 10% to 30% of patients with a lateral ligament injury may have chronic symptoms. Symptoms usually include persistent synovitis or tendinitis, ankle stiffness, swelling, and pain, muscle weakness, and frequent giving-way. A well designed physical therapy program with peroneal strengthening and proprioceptive training, along with bracing and/or taping can alleviate instability problems in most patients. For cases of chronic instability that are refractory to bracing and external support, surgical treatment can be explored. If the chronic instability is associated with subtalar instability

  10. Ultrasound of skeletal muscle injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Eamon Su Chun; McNally, Eugene G

    2007-06-01

    The professional and recreational demands of modern society make the treatment of muscle injury an increasingly important clinical problem, particularly in the athletic population. In the elite athlete, significant financial and professional pressures may also exist that emphasize the need for accurate diagnosis and treatment. With new advances in ultrasound technology, images of exquisite detail allow diagnosis of muscle injury that matches the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Furthermore, the benefits of real-time and Doppler imaging, ability to perform interventional procedures, and relative cost benefits compared with MRI place ultrasound at the forefront for investigation for these injuries in many circumstances. Muscle injury may be divided into acute and chronic pathology, with muscle strain injury the most common clinical problem presenting to sports physicians. This article reviews the spectrum of acute and chronic muscle injuries, with particular attention to clinical features and some common or important muscle strain injuries.

  11. Dynamic high-resolution ultrasound of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist: How to make it simple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitto, Salvatore; Messina, Carmelo; Mauri, Giovanni; Aliprandi, Alberto; Sardanelli, Francesco; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2017-02-01

    Wrist ligaments are crucial structures for the maintenance of carpal stability. They are classified into extrinsic ligaments, connecting the carpus with the forearm bones or distal radioulnar ligaments, and intrinsic ligaments, entirely situated within the carpus. Lesions of intrinsic and extrinsic ligaments of the wrist have been demonstrated to occur largely, mostly in patients with history of trauma and carpal instability, or rheumatoid arthritis. Ultrasound allows for rapid, cost-effective, non-invasive and dynamic evaluation of the wrist, and may represent a valuable diagnostic tool. Although promising results have been published, ultrasound of wrist ligaments is not performed in routine clinical practice, maybe due to its technical feasibility regarded as quite complex. This review article aims to enlighten readers about the normal sonographic appearance of intrinsic and extrinsic carpal ligaments, and describe a systematic approach for their sonographic assessment with detailed anatomic landmarks, dynamic manoeuvres and scanning technique. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of lesions of the internal ligaments of the wrist; conventional magnetic resonance imaging versus MR arthrography (MRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Ahmed Kamal

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: MR arthrography is a potent additional tool facilitating the diagnosis of different pathologic entities affecting the major internal ligaments of the wrist joint and helps to reduce arthroscopic interventions.

  13. Growth indicators in orthodontic patients. Part 1: comparison of cervical vertebral maturation and hand-wrist skeletal maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litsas, G; Ari-Demirkaya, A

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the skeletal maturation status based on the assessment of cervical vertebrae from lateral cephalometric radiographs and to compare these findings with the skeletal maturity of the same individuals judged from the hand-wrist radiographs. Lateral cephalometric and left hand-wrist radiographs of 393 Caucasian children from 8 to 18 years old were evaluated. On the hand-wrist radiographs the classification of Bjork [1972] and Grave and Brown [1976] was used to assess skeletal maturity (HWSS). Cervical vertebral maturation was also evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs using the improved CVMS method described by Baccetti, Franchi, and McNamara [2002]. These methods were correlated using the chi-square test. The chi-square test showed that skeletal maturational values obtained by the CVMS method were significantly correlated with the skeletal values obtained from the hand-wrist analysis for both genders (pmaturity.

  14. Severe psychogenic tremor of both wrists in a 13-year-old girl treated successfully with a customized wrist brace: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schafflhuber Caroline

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Psychogenic movement disorders in childhood have been little researched. As there are few courses of treatment which have been evaluated, further examination and case studies about the treatment and clinical course of this rare occurrence of severe psychogenic tremor in childhood and adolescence are much needed. Case presentation A 13-year-old Caucasian girl with tremor in both wrists, severe enough to prevent her from attending school, was sent to our hospital. After a complete neurological and psychiatric examination, in-patient child-psychotherapeutic treatment was started, with careful consideration given to both chronic and acute stress factors which constitute her performance and exam anxiety in school as well as the girl's parents' conflicted relationship. With the aid of a customized wrist brace our patient was able to go to school and write despite the presence of a marked tremor, which in turn reduced her avoidance behavior and exam anxiety. By the end of her in-patient treatment, the tremor was still noticeable, but markedly reduced in severity (reduction 80%. Two weeks after she was discharged from hospital, the tremor had completely disappeared. Conclusion After careful clinical diagnostics, this kind of dissociative disorder should be treated appropriately with age-adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy to achieve positive and lasting benefits.

  15. Wearable Stretch Sensors for Motion Measurement of the Wrist Joint Based on Dielectric Elastomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bo; Li, Mingyu; Mei, Tao; McCoul, David; Qin, Shihao; Zhao, Zhanfeng; Zhao, Jianwen

    2017-11-23

    Motion capture of the human body potentially holds great significance for exoskeleton robots, human-computer interaction, sports analysis, rehabilitation research, and many other areas. Dielectric elastomer sensors (DESs) are excellent candidates for wearable human motion capture systems because of their intrinsic characteristics of softness, light weight, and compliance. In this paper, DESs were applied to measure all component motions of the wrist joints. Five sensors were mounted to different positions on the wrist, and each one is for one component motion. To find the best position to mount the sensors, the distribution of the muscles is analyzed. Even so, the component motions and the deformation of the sensors are coupled; therefore, a decoupling method was developed. By the decoupling algorithm, all component motions can be measured with a precision of 5°, which meets the requirements of general motion capture systems.

  16. Validity of Modified Ashworth Scale as a Measure of Wrist Spasticity in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Heidari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: There are some controversies about the value of modified Ashworth Scale (MAS for assessing spasticity. The goal of this study was to investigate if there is any correlation between scores obtained from MAS for wrist spasticity and electrophysiological recordings as the objective measure of spasticity. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 34 stroke patients were employed. Wrist spasticity was clinically measured by means of MAS. Also, an electromyogram (EMG machine was used to elicit Hmax and Mmax from the flexor carpi radialis muscle. Spearman’s correlation coefficient test was used to investigate potential correlation between clinically and electrophysiologically measures of spasticity. Results: The observed relation between MAS and EMG recordings was not statistically significant (rho=0.183, P>0.05. Discussion: Our findings suggest that MAS may be a useful tool for grading hypertonia, but it is not a valid measure of spasticity in selected patients.

  17. Ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand: How to do

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandi, Davide; Corazza, Angelo; Silvestri, Enzo; Serafini, Giovanni; Savarino, Edoardo Vincenzo; Garlaschi, Giacomo; Mauri, Giovanni; Cimmino, Marco Amedeo; Sconfienza, Luca Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound has emerged as a low-cost, radiation-free and effective imaging technique to detect joint abnormalities and to guide percutaneous procedures. Being superficial, wrist and hand tendons and joints represent a good target to perform such procedures using ultrasound guidance. This kind of approach allows for a clear and real-time visualization of the needles during their whole path. In this setting, the knowledge of technical aspects and tips is essential to act in the most accurate way on target tissues that can be as small as a few millimetres. The aim of this review is to summarize the local treatments of inflammatory and degenerative disease described in literature (such as treatment of De Quervain's tenosynovitis, trigger finger, trapezio-metacarpal joint osteoarthritis, etc.), emphasizing precautions and tricks based on day-by-day experience that may help to improve the outcome of percutaneous ultrasound-guided procedures around the wrist and hand

  18. Daily physical activity patterns from hip- and wrist-worn accelerometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiroma, Eric J; Schepps, M A; Harezlak, J

    2016-01-01

    Accelerometer wear location may influence physical activity estimates. This study investigates this relationship through the examination of activity patterns throughout the day. Participants from the aging research evaluating accelerometry (AREA) study (n men = 37, n women = 47, mean age (SD) = 78...... activity accrual provide support that each location is capable of estimating total physical activity volume. The examination of activity patterns over time may provide a more detailed way to examine differences in wear location and different subpopulations. © 2016 Institute of Physics and Engineering.......9 (5.5) years) were asked to wear accelerometers in a free-living environment for 7 d at three different wear locations; one on each wrist and one on the right hip. During waking hours, wrist-worn accelerometers consistently produced higher median activity counts, about 5 × higher, as well as wider...

  19. Mechanical design of EFW Exo II: A hybrid exoskeleton for elbow-forearm-wrist rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Hui; Chen, Ziye; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Tieshi

    2017-07-01

    The use of rehabilitation exoskeleton has become an important means for the treatment of stroke patients. A hybrid exoskeleton named EFW Exo II is developed for the motor function rehabilitation of elbow, forearm and wrist. The EFW Exo II is based on a parallel 2-URR/RRS mechanism and a serial R mechanism. It could fit both left and right arms for the symmetrical and open structure, and the distance between the elbow and wrist could automatically adjust for different forearm length. Details of the mechanical design are introduced. Brushless DC servo motors with planetary gear reducer are used as the actuators of the exoskeleton. Gear drive and belt drive are used for power transmission. A three dimensional force sensor is mounted in the handle to regulate the interaction between the exoskeleton and patient. The EFW Exo II can realize rehabilitation exercise for each joint and the ranges of motion meet the rehabilitation demands of daily living.

  20. Possibilities opened up by MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuck, A.; Steinbach, L.; Stoller, D.; Genant, H.

    1989-01-01

    MRI studies of 63 patients with various abnormalities of the hand and wrist were analyzed. Studies were performed on scanners with a field strength of 0.35, 0.5, or 1.5 T. Imaging parameters included T1- and T2-weighted sequences in the coronal and transverse planes and contiguous slices 3-5 mm thick. In 37 patients with post-traumatic disorders, MRI revealed carpal avascular necrosis, tendon abnormalities and, in some cases, abnormalities of interosseous ligaments and the triangular fibrocartilage. In 15 patients with such inflammatory diseases as arthritis, tenosynovitis and carpal tunnel syndrome and in 11 patients with tumors, MRI provided clear delineation of osseous and soft tissue abnormalities. The current role of MRI in the diagnosis of hand and wrist abnormalities is discussed on the basis of these results. (orig.) [de