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Sample records for common pediatric problems

  1. Creating a pediatric digital library for pediatric health care providers and families: using literature and data to define common pediatric problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Donna; Kingsley, Peggy

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this study was to complete a literature-based needs assessment with regard to common pediatric problems encountered by pediatric health care providers (PHCPs) and families, and to develop a problem-based pediatric digital library to meet those needs. The needs assessment yielded 65 information sources. Common problems were identified and categorized, and the Internet was manually searched for authoritative Web sites. The created pediatric digital library (www.generalpediatrics.com) used a problem-based interface and was deployed in November 1999. From November 1999 to November 2000, the number of hyperlinks and authoritative Web sites increased 51.1 and 32.2 percent, respectively. Over the same time, visitors increased by 57.3 percent and overall usage increased by 255 percent. A pediatric digital library has been created that begins to bring order to general pediatric resources on the Internet. This pediatric digital library provides current, authoritative, easily accessed pediatric information whenever and wherever the PHCPs and families want assistance.

  2. Vulvovaginitis- presentation of more common problems in pediatric and adolescent gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveless, Meredith; Myint, Ohmar

    2018-04-01

    Vulvovaginitis is one of the most common gynecological complaints presenting in the pediatric and adolescent female. The common causes of vulvovaginitis in the pediatric patient differ than that considered in adolescent females. When a child present with vulvar itching, burning and irritation the most common etiology is non-specific and hygiene measures are recommended. However these symptoms can mimic more serious etiologies including infection, labial adhesion, lichen sclerosis, pinworms and foreign body must be considered. Yeast infection is rare in the pediatric population but common in the adolescent. In the adolescent patient infections are more common. Yeast and bacterial vaginosis are commonly seen but due to the higher rate of sexual activity in this population sexually transmitted infections must also be considered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Common Sleep Problems (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Common Sleep Problems KidsHealth / For Teens / Common Sleep Problems What's ... have emotional problems, like depression. What Happens During Sleep? You don't notice it, of course, but ...

  4. Common pediatric and adolescent skin conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Angela M; Barrio, Victoria; Kulp-Shorten, Carol; Callen, Jeffrey P

    2003-10-01

    Skin lesions are encountered in all areas of medicine, and it is therefore important for physicians to understand the fundamentals of explaining and diagnosing common skin conditions. This article begins with a discussion of description and documentation of skin lesions based on color, size, morphology, and distribution. Pigmentation disorders such as vitiligo are depicted. Cutaneous growths that are found in the pediatric and adolescent population include acrochordons, dermatofibromas, keloids, milia, neurofibromas, and pyogenic granulomas. Treatment of these growths usually involves observation or curettage with electrodessication.Psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, poison ivy, and eczema are comprised of scaling patches and plaques; poison ivy and atopic dermatitis may also present with bullous and vesicular changes. Therapy typically consists of topical emollients and corticosteroids; phototherapy is reserved for refractory cases. Acne vulgaris is the most common skin disease of the pediatric and adolescent population. This condition can be psychologically debilitating and, therefore, proper treatment is of paramount importance. Therapeutic options include topical as well as oral antibiotics and retinoids. Extreme caution must be used when prescribing retinoids to post-pubescent females, as these agents are teratogenic. Vascular anomalies are most commonly exemplified as port wine stains and hemangiomas. Port wine stains may be treated with pulsed dye laser or may be observed if they are not of concern to the patient or physician. Hemangiomas typically spontaneously regress by age ten; however, there has been recent concern that certain cases may need to be treated. Dermal rashes may be localized or generalized. Treatment of generalized drug eruptions involves elimination of the inciting agent, topical antipruritics, and systemic corticosteroids for severe reactions. Infectious etiologic agents of skin disease include bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Many sexually

  5. Algorithms for solving common fixed point problems

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavski, Alexander J

    2018-01-01

    This book details approximate solutions to common fixed point problems and convex feasibility problems in the presence of perturbations. Convex feasibility problems search for a common point of a finite collection of subsets in a Hilbert space; common fixed point problems pursue a common fixed point of a finite collection of self-mappings in a Hilbert space. A variety of algorithms are considered in this book for solving both types of problems, the study of which has fueled a rapidly growing area of research. This monograph is timely and highlights the numerous applications to engineering, computed tomography, and radiation therapy planning. Totaling eight chapters, this book begins with an introduction to foundational material and moves on to examine iterative methods in metric spaces. The dynamic string-averaging methods for common fixed point problems in normed space are analyzed in Chapter 3. Dynamic string methods, for common fixed point problems in a metric space are introduced and discussed in Chapter ...

  6. Common management issues in pediatric patients with mild bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Sarah H

    2012-10-01

    Type 1 von Willebrand disease and mild platelet function defects are among the most common disorders seen by pediatric hematologists. The management and prevention of bleeding in these patients can be challenging, as there are limited published data to guide clinical practice, and a complete lack of randomized clinical trials. Desmopressin (DDAVP) and antifibrinolytics are the mainstays of treatment in these patients, yet the optimal dosing and timing of these agents to prevent or resolve bleeding, while minimizing adverse side effects, is sometimes unclear. DDAVP-induced hyponatremia is a particularly under-recognized complication in children with bleeding disorders who undergo surgery. Clinicians need to be aware of local measures that are equally important in treating problems such as epistaxis and surgical bleeding. This review will discuss the published literature and provide practical suggestions regarding four common management issues in the care of children and adolescents with mild bleeding disorders: epistaxis, heavy menstrual bleeding, dental extractions, and tonsillectomy. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Common Group Problems: A Field Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Sanford B.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    A field study of a naturally functioning group (N=125) was conducted to identify common group problems. Trained observers attended group meetings and described the problems encountered. Difficulties of cohesion, leadership, sub-group formation, and personality conflict were identified. (RC)

  8. Audits reveal ten common environmental problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buys, M.W.

    1992-01-01

    The old saying that open-quotes an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cureclose quotes rings particularly true in environmental matters in the 1990s. Environmental problems can potentially lead to expensive fines, costly cleanups, negative public relations, and even criminal sanctions against members of the corporation. A recurring pattern of problems has been noted during the performance of environmental disposition, acquisition, and compliance assessments of many different operators in most of the producing states. The ten most common problems found in oilfield audits are discussed here in an effort to enhance the awareness of operators

  9. Problems and preferences in pediatric imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thukral, Brij Bhushan

    2015-01-01

    Radiological imaging is extremely valuable as a diagnostic tool in the pediatric population, but it comes with a number of distinct challenges as compared to the imaging of adults. This is because of the following: It requires dedicated imaging protocols to acquire the images, there is need for sedation or general anesthesia for longer procedures such as MRI, specific training is required for the healthcare personnel involved, thorough knowledge and expertise should be applied for evaluating the images, and most importantly, it requires consideration for radiation exposure if ionizing radiation is being used. One of the challenges for clinical care personnel is to gain the child's trust and co-operation before and throughout the duration of an examination, which can prove to be difficult in children who may be ill and have pain. This is important to acquire quality images and prevent repeat examinations. Even with a quality examination, the accurate interpretation of images requires a thorough knowledge of the intricate and dynamic face of anatomy and specific pathological presentations in children. The increased radiation sensitivity of growing organs and children's longer expected life spans make them more susceptible to the harmful effects of radiation. Imaging pediatric patients in a dedicated pediatric imaging department with dedicated pediatric CT technologists may result in greater compliance with pediatric protocols and significantly reduced patient dose. In order to prevent the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle should be strictly followed. This article seeks to draw attention to various challenges of pediatric imaging and the ways to overcome them

  10. Off-Label Drug Use in Pediatric Practice: Unsolved Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Titova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread «off-label» drug use and the prescribing of unlicensed medicines in pediatric practice is a major health problem. The authors discuss actual regulatory and legal issues of «off-label» drug use in children in the US, Europe and Russia. The results of different population-based studies from many countries, showing the structure and frequency of «off-label» drug use in children, are summarized in this article. It is shown that such practice increases the risk of adverse drug reactions. The authors offer practical recommendations for a safer use of drugs in pediatric practice. The priority issue is conducting high quality clinical trials with the participation of children, improving national pharmacovigilance and the monitoring of off-label drug use, developing pediatric formularies, improving doctors’ knowledge and awareness of safety and efficacy of medicines in pediatric population.

  11. Diagnostic and therapeutic problems in pediatric epileptology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faienza, C.; Prati, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    The topics covered include a critical review of the ILEA classification of epilepsy in children, genesis of the epileptic seizures, recent advances on the pathology of early epileptic encephalopathies, etiologic and prognostic factors in drug-resistant epilepsies, and a very interesting approach on cyclic modulating processes and electrical activity in the brain. Detailed information on the usefulness of brain mapping and magnetic resonance has also been expertly provided. In the second part of the volume the management of epilepsy, including criteria for starting and interrupting AED, the usefulness and limitation of AED monitoring, neurosurgical approach in the diagnosis and therapy of childhood epilepsy, adverse effects of AED in pediatric age, and new research in AED therapy has been explored. refs.; figs.; tabs

  12. Common ground, complex problems and decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beers, P.J.; Boshuizen, H.P.A.; Kirschner, P.A.; Gijselaers, W.H.

    2006-01-01

    Organisations increasingly have to deal with complex problems. They often use multidisciplinary teams to cope with such problems where different team members have different perspectives on the problem, different individual knowledge and skills, and different approaches on how to solve the problem.

  13. Peregrination in the problem pediatric patient. The pediatric Münchhausen syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fialkov, M J

    1984-10-01

    Peregrinating pediatric patients are those who go from physician to physician either within hospitals or from clinic to clinic within a community. They are often the symptom bearers of dysfunctional multiproblem families requiring an interdisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. Because of the obscure nature of the child's pediatric problems, such children are often shunned by the medical profession and other social agencies, setting in motion a sequence of events that can prove detrimental to the child, his family, the community, and the state. This article illustrates the need for an anticipatory, coordinated approach in the management of this complex psychosocial condition.

  14. Pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  15. common problems affecting supranational attempts in africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Politico-legal Framework for Integration in Africa: Exploring the Attainability of a ... laws, the common international trade policy, the common fisheries policy and the .... among the member states according to the annual imports, production and ...... Fredland R (eds) Integration and Disintegration in East Africa (University.

  16. Common Pediatric Urological Disorders: Clinical and radiological evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, Wm. Lane M.; Leung, Alexander K.C.; Boag, Graham S.

    1991-01-01

    The clinical and radiological presentations of 12 pediatric urological disorders are described. The described disorders include pyelonephritis, vesicoureteral reflux, ureteropelvic obstruction, ureterovesical obstruction, ectopic ureterocele, posterior urethral valves, multicystic dysplastic kidney, polycystic kidney disease, ectopic kidney, staghorn calculi, urethral diverticulum, and urethral meatal stenosis.

  17. Problems with Excessive Residual Lower Leg Length in Pediatric Amputees

    OpenAIRE

    Osebold, William R; Lester, Edward L; Christenson, Donald M

    2001-01-01

    We studied six pediatric amputees with long below-knee residual limbs, in order to delineate their functional and prosthetic situations, specifically in relation to problems with fitting for dynamic-response prosthetic feet. Three patients had congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia secondary to neurofibromatosis, one had fibular hemimelia, one had a traumatic amputation, and one had amputation secondary to burns. Five patients had Syme's amputations, one had a Boyd amputation. Ages at amputa...

  18. Validity of Level of Supervision Scales for Assessing Pediatric Fellows on the Common Pediatric Subspecialty Entrustable Professional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mink, Richard B; Schwartz, Alan; Herman, Bruce E; Turner, David A; Curran, Megan L; Myers, Angela; Hsu, Deborah C; Kesselheim, Jennifer C; Carraccio, Carol L

    2018-02-01

    Entrustable professional activities (EPAs) represent the routine and essential activities that physicians perform in practice. Although some level of supervision scales have been proposed, they have not been validated. In this study, the investigators created level of supervision scales for EPAs common to the pediatric subspecialties and then examined their validity in a study conducted by the Subspecialty Pediatrics Investigator Network (SPIN). SPIN Steering Committee members used a modified Delphi process to develop unique scales for six of the seven common EPAs. The investigators sought validity evidence in a multisubspecialty study in which pediatric fellowship program directors and Clinical Competency Committees used the scales to evaluate fellows in fall 2014 and spring 2015. Separate scales for the six EPAs, each with five levels of progressive entrustment, were created. In both fall and spring, more than 300 fellows in each year of training from over 200 programs were assessed. In both periods and for each EPA, there was a progressive increase in entrustment levels, with second-year fellows rated higher than first-year fellows (P < .001) and third-year fellows rated higher than second-year fellows (P < .001). For each EPA, spring ratings were higher (P < .001) than those in the fall. Interrater reliability was high (Janson and Olsson's iota = 0.73). The supervision scales developed for these six common pediatric subspecialty EPAs demonstrated strong validity evidence for use in EPA-based assessment of pediatric fellows. They may also inform the development of scales in other specialties.

  19. common problems affecting supranational attempts in africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1902), a common currency (1905), a Postal Union (1917) and a Customs ..... established in 1994 as a measure to address the attendant effects of the devaluation ..... According to the IMF, in spite of the establishment of a customs union within ...

  20. MO-DE-207-04: Imaging educational program on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, R.

    2015-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. The educational program will begin with a detailed discussion of the optimal configuration of fluoroscopes for general pediatric procedures. Following this introduction will be a focused discussion on the utility of Dual Energy CT for imaging children. The third lecture will address the substantial challenge of obtaining consistent image post -processing in pediatric digital radiography. The fourth and final lecture will address best practices in pediatric MRI including a discussion of ancillary methods to reduce sedation and anesthesia rates. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality in pediatric fluoroscopy To become familiar with the unique challenges and applications of Dual Energy CT in pediatric imaging To learn solutions for consistent post-processing quality in pediatric digital radiography To understand the key components of an effective MRI safety and quality program for the pediatric practice

  1. MO-DE-207-04: Imaging educational program on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnamurthy, R. [Texas Children’s Hospital: Pediatric MRI Quality, Artifacts, and Safety (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric imaging challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. The educational program will begin with a detailed discussion of the optimal configuration of fluoroscopes for general pediatric procedures. Following this introduction will be a focused discussion on the utility of Dual Energy CT for imaging children. The third lecture will address the substantial challenge of obtaining consistent image post -processing in pediatric digital radiography. The fourth and final lecture will address best practices in pediatric MRI including a discussion of ancillary methods to reduce sedation and anesthesia rates. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality in pediatric fluoroscopy To become familiar with the unique challenges and applications of Dual Energy CT in pediatric imaging To learn solutions for consistent post-processing quality in pediatric digital radiography To understand the key components of an effective MRI safety and quality program for the pediatric practice.

  2. Hip Arthroscopy: Common Problems and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casp, Aaron; Gwathmey, Frank Winston

    2018-04-01

    The use of hip arthroscopy continues to expand. Understanding potential pitfalls and complications associated with hip arthroscopy is paramount to optimizing clinical outcomes and minimizing unfavorable results. Potential pitfalls and complications are associated with preoperative factors such as patient selection, intraoperative factors such as iatrogenic damage, traction-related complications, inadequate correction of deformity, and nerve injury, or postoperative factors such as poor rehabilitation. This article outlines common factors that contribute to less-than-favorable outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sublinear Space Algorithms for the Longest Common Substring Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kociumaka, Tomasz; Starikovskaya, Tatiana; Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel

    2014-01-01

    Given m documents of total length n, we consider the problem of finding a longest string common to at least d ≥ 2 of the documents. This problem is known as the longest common substring (LCS) problem and has a classic O(n) space and O(n) time solution (Weiner [FOCS'73], Hui [CPM'92]). However...

  4. Diagnostic errors in interpretation of pediatric musculoskeletal radiographs at common injury sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisset, George S.; Crowe, James

    2014-01-01

    Extremity pain represents one of the most common reasons for obtaining conventional radiographs in childhood. Despite the frequency of these examinations little is known about the incidence of diagnostic errors by interpreting pediatric radiologists. The purpose of this study was to develop a standard error rate of pediatric radiologists by double-reading of extremity radiographs (elbow, wrists, knees and ankles) in children presenting with a history of trauma or pain. During a 6-month period all major extremity radiographs (excluding digits) obtained at a large pediatric referral hospital for evaluation of pain or trauma were reviewed by two senior pediatric radiologists and compared to the official interpretation. All radiographs were interpreted initially by a board-certified pediatric radiologist with a Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ). We reviewed 3,865 radiographic series in children and young adults 2-20 years of age. We tabulated misses and overcalls. We did not assess the clinical significance of the errors. There were 61 miss errors and 44 overcalls in 1,235 abnormal cases and 2,630 normal cases, for a 1.6% miss rate and a 1.1% overcall rate. Misses and overcalls were most common in the ankle. Interpretive errors by pediatric radiologists reviewing certain musculoskeletal radiographs are relatively infrequent. Diagnostic errors in the form of a miss or overcall occurred in 2.7% of the radiographs. (orig.)

  5. Methylisothiazolinone: An Emergent Allergen in Common Pediatric Skin Care Products

    OpenAIRE

    Schlichte, Megan J.; Katta, Rajani

    2014-01-01

    Recalcitrant dermatitis, such as that of the hands, face, or genitals, may be due to allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from ingredients in seemingly innocuous personal care products. Rising rates of allergy have been noted due to the preservative methylisothiazolinone (MI). This preservative is commonly found in skin and hair care products, especially wipes. This study evaluated the use of MI in products specifically marketed for babies and children and examined the associated marketing terms...

  6. Methylisothiazolinone: an emergent allergen in common pediatric skin care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichte, Megan J; Katta, Rajani

    2014-01-01

    Recalcitrant dermatitis, such as that of the hands, face, or genitals, may be due to allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) from ingredients in seemingly innocuous personal care products. Rising rates of allergy have been noted due to the preservative methylisothiazolinone (MI). This preservative is commonly found in skin and hair care products, especially wipes. This study evaluated the use of MI in products specifically marketed for babies and children and examined the associated marketing terms of such products. Ingredients of skin care products specifically marketed for babies and children were surveyed at two major retailers. Of 152 products surveyed, 30 products contained MI. Categories of products surveyed included facial or body wipes, antibacterial hand wipes, hair products, soaps, bubble baths, moisturizers, and sunscreens. Facial or body wipes and hair products were the categories with the greatest number of MI-containing products. MI-containing products were manufactured by a number of popular brands. Of note, products marketed as "gentle," "sensitive," "organic," or "hypoallergenic" often contained MI, thus emphasizing the importance of consumer scrutiny of product choices. These findings reinforce the importance of educating parents and providing consumer decision-making advice regarding common skin care products, in order to help prevent ACD in children.

  7. Methylisothiazolinone: An Emergent Allergen in Common Pediatric Skin Care Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan J. Schlichte

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recalcitrant dermatitis, such as that of the hands, face, or genitals, may be due to allergic contact dermatitis (ACD from ingredients in seemingly innocuous personal care products. Rising rates of allergy have been noted due to the preservative methylisothiazolinone (MI. This preservative is commonly found in skin and hair care products, especially wipes. This study evaluated the use of MI in products specifically marketed for babies and children and examined the associated marketing terms of such products. Ingredients of skin care products specifically marketed for babies and children were surveyed at two major retailers. Of 152 products surveyed, 30 products contained MI. Categories of products surveyed included facial or body wipes, antibacterial hand wipes, hair products, soaps, bubble baths, moisturizers, and sunscreens. Facial or body wipes and hair products were the categories with the greatest number of MI-containing products. MI-containing products were manufactured by a number of popular brands. Of note, products marketed as “gentle,” “sensitive,” “organic,” or “hypoallergenic” often contained MI, thus emphasizing the importance of consumer scrutiny of product choices. These findings reinforce the importance of educating parents and providing consumer decision-making advice regarding common skin care products, in order to help prevent ACD in children.

  8. NIH Scientists Map Genetic Changes That Drive Tumors in a Common Pediatric Soft-Tissue Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Press Release NIH scientists map genetic changes that drive tumors in a common pediatric soft-tissue cancer ... of Health FOLLOW US Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube Google+ LinkedIn GovDelivery RSS CONTACT INFORMATION Contact Us LiveHelp ...

  9. What Are Common Treatments for Problems of Puberty?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print What are common treatments for problems of puberty? Precocious Puberty There are a number of reasons to treat ... hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). Delayed Puberty With delayed puberty or hypogonadism, treatment varies with ...

  10. A General Solution Framework for Component-Commonality Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Boysen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Component commonality - the use of the same version of a component across multiple products - is being increasingly considered as a promising way to offer high external variety while retaining low internal variety in operations. However, increasing commonality has both positive and negative cost effects, so that optimization approaches are required to identify an optimal commonality level. As components influence to a greater or lesser extent nearly every process step along the supply chain, it is not surprising that a multitude of diverging commonality problems is being investigated in literature, each of which are developing a specific algorithm designed for the respective commonality problem being considered. The paper on hand aims at a general framework which is flexible and efficient enough to be applied to a wide range of commonality problems. Such a procedure based on a two-stage graph approach is presented and tested. Finally, flexibility of the procedure is shown by customizing the framework to account for different types of commonality problems.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging in children: common problems and possible solutions for lung and airways imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciet, Pierluigi; Tiddens, Harm A.W.M. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sophia Children' s Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergology, Sophia Children' s Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wielopolski, Piotr A. [Erasmus Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Sophia Children' s Hospital, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Wild, Jim M. [University of Sheffield, Academic Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Lee, Edward Y. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Departments of Radiology and Medicine, Pulmonary Divisions, Boston, MA (United States); Morana, Giovanni [Ca' Foncello Regional Hospital, Department of Radiology, Treviso (Italy); Lequin, Maarten H. [University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Pediatric chest MRI is challenging. High-resolution scans of the lungs and airways are compromised by long imaging times, low lung proton density and motion. Low signal is a problem of normal lung. Lung abnormalities commonly cause increased signal intensities. Among the most important factors for a successful MRI is patient cooperation, so the long acquisition times make patient preparation crucial. Children usually have problems with long breath-holds and with the concept of quiet breathing. Young children are even more challenging because of higher cardiac and respiratory rates giving motion blurring. For these reasons, CT has often been preferred over MRI for chest pediatric imaging. Despite its drawbacks, MRI also has advantages over CT, which justifies its further development and clinical use. The most important advantage is the absence of ionizing radiation, which allows frequent scanning for short- and long-term follow-up studies of chronic diseases. Moreover, MRI allows assessment of functional aspects of the chest, such as lung perfusion and ventilation, or airways and diaphragm mechanics. In this review, we describe the most common MRI acquisition techniques on the verge of clinical translation, their problems and the possible solutions to make chest MRI feasible in children. (orig.)

  12. Handbook of selected organ doses for projections common in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenstein, M.; Beck, T.J.; Warner, G.G.

    1979-05-01

    This handbook contains data from which absorbed dose (mrad) to selected organs can be estimated for common projections in pediatric radiology. The organ doses are for three reference patients: a newborn (0 to 6 months), a 1-year old child, and a 5-year old child. One intent of the handbook is to permit the user to evaluate the effect on organ dose to these reference pediatric patients as a function of certain changes in technical parameters used in or among facilities. A second intent is to permit a comparison to be made of organ doses as a function of age. This comparison can be extended to a reference adult by referring to the previous Handbook of Selected Organ Doses fo Projections Common in Diagnostic Radiology, FDA 76-8031. Assignment of organ doses to individual pediatric patients using the Handbook data is not recommended unless the physical characteristics of the patient closely correlate with one of the three reference pediatric patients given in Appendix A

  13. Problems with Excessive Residual Lower Leg Length in Pediatric Amputees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osebold, William R; Lester, Edward L; Christenson, Donald M

    2001-01-01

    We studied six pediatric amputees with long below-knee residual limbs, in order to delineate their functional and prosthetic situations, specifically in relation to problems with fitting for dynamic-response prosthetic feet. Three patients had congenital pseudoarthrosis of the tibia secondary to neurofibromatosis, one had fibular hemimelia, one had a traumatic amputation, and one had amputation secondary to burns. Five patients had Syme's amputations, one had a Boyd amputation. Ages at amputation ranged from nine months to five years (average age 3 years 1 month). After amputation, the long residual below-knee limbs allowed fitting with only the lowest-profile prostheses, such as deflection plates. In three patients, the femoral dome to tibial plafond length was greater on the amputated side than on the normal side. To allow room for more dynamic-response (and larger) foot prostheses, two patients have undergone proximal and distal tibial-fibular epiphyseodeses (one at age 5 years 10 months, the other at 3 years 7 months) and one had a proximal tibial-fibular epiphyseodesis at age 7 years 10 months. (All three patients are still skeletally immature.) The families of two other patients are considering epiphyseodeses, and one patient is not a candidate (skeletally mature). Scanogram data indicate that at skeletal maturity the epiphyseodesed patients will have adequate length distal to their residual limbs to fit larger and more dynamic-response prosthetic feet. PMID:11813953

  14. Pediatric patients with common variable immunodeficiency: long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadinejad, P; Aghamohammadi, A; Abolhassani, H; Sadaghiani, M S; Abdollahzade, S; Sadeghi, B; Soheili, H; Tavassoli, M; Fathi, S M; Tavakol, M; Behniafard, N; Darabi, B; Pourhamdi, S; Rezaei, N

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most common form of symptomatic primary immunodeficiency disease. It is characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, increased predisposition to infections, autoimmunity, and cancer. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical and immunological features of a group of pediatric patients with CVID. The study population comprised 69 individuals with CVID diagnosed during childhood. The patients were followed up for a mean (SD) period of 5.2 (4.3) years. The mean diagnostic delay was 4.4 (3.6) years, which was significantly lower in patients who were diagnosed recently. Children were classified according to 5 clinical phenotypes: infections only (n=39), polyclonal lymphocytic infiltration (n=17), autoimmunity (n=12), malignancy (n=7), and enteropathy (n=3). Postdiagnosis survival (10-year) was 71%. The high percentages of pediatric patients with CVID in Iran may be due to the considerable prevalence of parental consanguinity in the region and an underlying genetic background.

  15. Long-acting reversible contraception in the pediatric emergency department: clinical implications and common challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Atsuko; Dorfman, David H; Forcier, Michelle M

    2015-04-01

    Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is recommended as first-line contraception for adolescents and young adults. As the use of LARC increases, pediatric emergency medicine clinicians should be able to recognize different types of LARC and address their common adverse effects, adverse reactions, and complications. This continuing medical education activity provides an overview of LARC and will assist clinicians in the evaluation and management of patients with LARC-associated complaints.

  16. Common Occupational Health Problems In Disease Control In Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviews some common occupational health problems among health workers due to exposure to hazardous or pathogenic biological, chemical and physical agents in the line of duty. Highlighted biological agents are pathogenic viruses, bacteria etc; chemical agents are laboratory reagents, mercury and ...

  17. EAP and LLNP Students: Common Problems and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Minh Phuong

    2010-01-01

    As English learners originate from many cultural and language backgrounds, they come to class with different circumstances. This paper examines the backgrounds, common problems and solutions for English for Academic Purposes (EAP) students and Language, Literacy, and Numeracy Programme (LLNP) students. EAP students are from Meridian International…

  18. Low back pain as a common hypokinetic problem | Masipa | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low back pain as a common hypokinetic problem. MDS Masipa. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ajpherd.v9i1.46323 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  19. Sleep-related problems in common medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parish, James M

    2009-02-01

    Common medical problems are often associated with abnormalities of sleep. Patients with chronic medical disorders often have fewer hours of sleep and less restorative sleep compared to healthy individuals, and this poor sleep may worsen the subjective symptoms of the disorder. Individuals with lung disease often have disturbed sleep related to oxygen desaturations, coughing, or dyspnea. Both obstructive lung disease and restrictive lung diseases are associated with poor quality sleep. Awakenings from sleep are common in untreated or undertreated asthma, and cause sleep disruption. Gastroesophageal reflux is a major cause of disrupted sleep due to awakenings from heartburn, dyspepsia, acid brash, coughing, or choking. Patients with chronic renal disease commonly have sleep complaints often due to insomnia, insufficient sleep, sleep apnea, or restless legs syndrome. Complaints related to sleep are very common in patients with fibromyalgia and other causes of chronic pain. Sleep disruption increases the sensation of pain and decreases quality of life. Patients with infectious diseases, including acute viral illnesses, HIV-related disease, and Lyme disease, may have significant problems with insomnia and hypersomnolence. Women with menopause have from insomnia, sleep-disordered breathing, restless legs syndrome, or fibromyalgia. Patients with cancer or receiving cancer therapy are often bothered by insomnia or other sleep disturbances that affect quality of life and daytime energy. The objective of this article is to review frequently encountered medical conditions and examine their impact on sleep, and to review frequent sleep-related problems associated with these common medical conditions.

  20. Approximate solutions of common fixed-point problems

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavski, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    This book presents results on the convergence behavior of algorithms which are known as vital tools for solving convex feasibility problems and common fixed point problems. The main goal for us in dealing with a known computational error is to find what approximate solution can be obtained and how many iterates one needs to find it. According to know results, these algorithms should converge to a solution. In this exposition, these algorithms are studied, taking into account computational errors which remain consistent in practice. In this case the convergence to a solution does not take place. We show that our algorithms generate a good approximate solution if computational errors are bounded from above by a small positive constant. Beginning with an introduction, this monograph moves on to study: · dynamic string-averaging methods for common fixed point problems in a Hilbert space · dynamic string methods for common fixed point problems in a metric space · dynamic string-averaging version of the proximal...

  1. Management of common behaviour and mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Radhi, A Sahib

    Behavioural problems are usually influenced by both biological and environmental factors. Disruptive behavioural problems such temper tantrums or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder are displayed during the first years of childhood. Breath-holding attacks are relatively common and are an important problem. Although the attacks are not serious and the prognosis is usually good, parents often fear that their child may die during an attack. Parents therefore require explanation and reassurance from health professionals. Conduct disorders (often referred to as antisocial behaviours), such as aggression to others or theft, are more serious as they tend to be repetitive and persistent behaviours where the basic rights of others are violated. Emotional problems, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder tend to occur in later childhood, and are often unrecognised because young children often find it difficult to express their emotions, or it may go unnoticed by the child's parents. This article briefly discusses the most common behavioural problems, including autism, that affect children of all ages.

  2. Common skin problems in the community and primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Kirsty

    2014-10-01

    Skin problems can be hard to diagnose, leaving clinicians frustrated and patients incorrectly treated, but rashes and lesions can be markers of systemic disease and infections. However, by using simple history-taking and mnemonics, safety and correct diagnoses can be achieved. This article will consider some common problems encountered in primary and community care, issues that need to be excluded, resources that will help with diagnosis and some management guidelines. This is not an exhaustive guide, and advice should be sought from learned colleagues in specific cases. Pressure area care and the use of compression bandaging will not be discussed unless it is of relevance to the subject of rashes and lesions.

  3. The male reproductive system - An overview of common problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinha, Sanjiva; Piterman, Leon; Kirby, Catherine N

    2013-05-01

    Many male reproductive system problems could be perceived as being embarrassing, which may be one of the reasons that they are often not identified in general practice. This article provides an overview of some common problems affecting the male reproductive system, and outlines current treatment options. Erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation, loss of libido, testicular cancer and prostate disease may cause embarrassment to the patient and, occasionally, the general practitioner. We describe how patients affected by these conditions may present to general practice, and discuss the reasons why they may not present. We also discuss how GPs can overcome difficulties in identifying and dealing with their male patients suffering from male reproductive system issues.

  4. Pediatric Enteric Feeding Techniques: Insertion, Maintenance, and Management of Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijs, Els L. F.; Cahill, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    Enteral feeding is considered a widespread, well-accepted means of delivering nutrition to adults and children who are unable to consume food by mouth or who need support in maintaining adequate nutrition for a variety of reasons, including acute and chronic disease states. Delivery of enteral feeding to nutritionally deprived patients may be achieved by several means. In this article, the indications and insertion of enteral access in children will be reviewed. In addition, common complications and management of problems will be discussed.

  5. Somatic USP8 Gene Mutations Are a Common Cause of Pediatric Cushing Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucz, Fabio R; Tirosh, Amit; Tatsi, Christina; Berthon, Annabel; Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Settas, Nikolaos; Angelousi, Anna; Correa, Ricardo; Papadakis, Georgios Z; Chittiboina, Prashant; Quezado, Martha; Pankratz, Nathan; Lane, John; Dimopoulos, Aggeliki; Mills, James L; Lodish, Maya; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-01

    Somatic mutations in the ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) gene have been recently identified as the most common genetic alteration in patients with Cushing disease (CD). However, the frequency of these mutations in the pediatric population has not been extensively assessed. We investigated the status of the USP8 gene at the somatic level in a cohort of pediatric patients with corticotroph adenomas. The USP8 gene was fully sequenced in both germline and tumor DNA samples from 42 pediatric patients with CD. Clinical, biochemical, and imaging data were compared between patients with and without somatic USP8 mutations. Five different USP8 mutations (three missense, one frameshift, and one in-frame deletion) were identified in 13 patients (31%), all of them located in exon 14 at the previously described mutational hotspot, affecting the 14-3-3 binding motif of the protein. Patients with somatic mutations were older at disease presentation [mean 5.1 ± 2.1 standard deviation (SD) vs 13.1 ± 3.6 years, P = 0.03]. Levels of urinary free cortisol, midnight serum cortisol, and adrenocorticotropic hormone, as well as tumor size and frequency of invasion of the cavernous sinus, were not significantly different between the two groups. However, patients harboring somatic USP8 mutations had a higher likelihood of recurrence compared with patients without mutations (46.2% vs 10.3%, P = 0.009). Somatic USP8 gene mutations are a common cause of pediatric CD. Patients harboring a somatic mutation had a higher likelihood of tumor recurrence, highlighting the potential importance of this molecular defect for the disease prognosis and the development of targeted therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  6. Vertigo in neurological practice (common problems of diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Vladimirovna Kosivtsova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most patients with vertigo seek neurological advice. In spite of the availability of current examination techniques, a differential diagnosis of vertigo is not frequently made. The paper discusses the terminology and classification of vertigo and clinical methods for diagnosing central and peripheral vestibulopathies. It considers the common problems of management of patients with diseases of the central and peripheral vestibular systems, the use of piracetam and other drugs to stimulate rehabilitation.

  7. Common problems encountered during certification of radioactive material packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The certification of radioactive materials containers is often an expensive, time-consuming process fraught with pitfalls for the unsuspecting applicant. In addition, the United States regulations governing containers for radioactive materials are changing, and the level of knowledge concerning engineering safety of the containers has expanded substantially. Further, as knowledge concerning design safety has grown, the methods of applying the regulations have changed. These changes are affecting both new and older container designs. In many cases, previously certified designs are no longer acceptable. One of the many ways to keep a finger on the pulse of the certification process is to look at the type of problems identified and the questions commonly asked during the review and evaluation of the packaging designs prior to certification. Based upon a recent study, the U.S. Department of Energy Packaging Certification Staff (PCS) has compiled, categorized, and summarized common problems and questions on container designs undergoing certification reviews. The study shows that the most common types of problems/questions are Structural and lack of Specific Information

  8. Ethical problems in pediatrics: what does the setting of care and education show us?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guedert Jucélia

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pediatrics ethics education should enhance medical students' skills to deal with ethical problems that may arise in the different settings of care. This study aimed to analyze the ethical problems experienced by physicians who have medical education and pediatric care responsibilities, and if those problems are associated to their workplace, medical specialty and area of clinical practice. Methods A self-applied semi-structured questionnaire was answered by 88 physicians with teaching and pediatric care responsibilities. Content analysis was performed to analyze the qualitative data. Poisson regression was used to explore the association of the categories of ethical problems reported with workplace and professional specialty and activity. Results 210 ethical problems were reported, grouped into five areas: physician-patient relationship, end-of-life care, health professional conducts, socioeconomic issues and health policies, and pediatric teaching. Doctors who worked in hospitals as well as general and subspecialist pediatricians reported fewer ethical problems related to socioeconomic issues and health policies than those who worked in Basic Health Units and who were family doctors. Conclusions Some ethical problems are specific to certain settings: those related to end-of-life care are more frequent in the hospital settings and those associated with socioeconomic issues and public health policies are more frequent in Basic Health Units. Other problems are present in all the setting of pediatric care and learning and include ethical problems related to physician-patient relationship, health professional conducts and the pediatric education process. These findings should be taken into consideration when planning the teaching of ethics in pediatrics. Trial registration This research article didn't reports the results of a controlled health care intervention. The study project was approved by the Institutional Ethical Review

  9. Commentary: pediatric eHealth interventions: common challenges during development, implementation, and dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yelena P; Steele, Ric G; Connelly, Mark A; Palermo, Tonya M; Ritterband, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    To provide an overview of common challenges that pediatric eHealth researchers may encounter when planning, developing, testing, and disseminating eHealth interventions along with proposed solutions for addressing these challenges. The article draws on the existing eHealth literature and the authors' collective experience in pediatric eHealth research. The challenges associated with eHealth interventions and their proposed solutions are multifaceted and cut across a number of areas from eHealth program development through dissemination. Collaboration with a range of individuals (e.g., multidisciplinary colleagues, commercial entities, primary stakeholders) is the key to eHealth intervention success. To ensure adequate resources for design, development, and planning for sustainability, a number of public and private sources of funding are available. A study design that addresses ethical concerns and security issues is critical to ensure scientific integrity and intervention dissemination. Table I summarizes key issues to consider during eHealth intervention development, testing, and dissemination. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Common pediatric cerebellar tumors: correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koral, Korgün; Mathis, Derek; Gimi, Barjor; Gargan, Lynn; Weprin, Bradley; Bowers, Daniel C; Margraf, Linda

    2013-08-01

    To test whether there is correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. This study was reviewed for issues of patient safety and confidentiality and was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and was compliant with HIPAA. The need for informed consent was waived. Ninety-five patients who had preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and surgical pathologic findings available between January 2003 and June 2011 were included. There were 37 pilocytic astrocytomas, 34 medulloblastomas (23 classic, eight desmoplastic-nodular, two large cell, one anaplastic), 17 ependymomas (13 World Health Organization [WHO] grade II, four WHO grade III), and seven atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors. ADCs of solid tumor components and normal cerebellum were measured. Tumor-to-normal brain ADC ratios (hereafter, ADC ratio) were calculated. The medulloblastomas and ependymomas were subcategorized according to the latest WHO classification, and tumor cellularity was calculated. Correlation was sought between cell densities and mean tumor ADCs, minimum tumor ADCs, and ADC ratio. When all tumors were considered together, negative correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADCs (ρ = -0.737, P correlation between cellularity and ADC ratio. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and minimum tumor ADC in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ρ = -0.786, P correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADC and ADC ratio. There was no correlation between the ADC metrics and cellularity of the pilocytic astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, and ependymomas. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and ADC metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. Although ADC metrics are useful in the preoperative diagnosis of common pediatric cerebellar tumors and this utility is generally attributed to differences in cellularity of tumors

  11. Commons problems, common ground: Earth-surface dynamics and the social-physical interdisciplinary frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, E.

    2015-12-01

    In the archetypal "tragedy of the commons" narrative, local farmers pasture their cows on the town common. Soon the common becomes crowded with cows, who graze it bare, and the arrangement of open access to a shared resource ultimately fails. The "tragedy" involves social and physical processes, but the denouement depends on who is telling the story. An economist might argue that the system collapses because each farmer always has a rational incentive to graze one more cow. An ecologist might remark that the rate of grass growth is an inherent control on the common's carrying capacity. And a geomorphologist might point out that processes of soil degradation almost always outstrip processes of soil production. Interdisciplinary research into human-environmental systems still tends to favor disciplinary vantages. In the context of Anthropocene grand challenges - including fundamental insight into dynamics of landscape resilience, and what the dominance of human activities means for processes of change and evolution on the Earth's surface - two disciplines in particular have more to talk about than they might think. Here, I use three examples - (1) beach nourishment, (2) upstream/downstream fluvial asymmetry, and (3) current and historical "land grabbing" - to illustrate a range of interconnections between physical Earth-surface science and common-pool resource economics. In many systems, decision-making and social complexity exert stronger controls on landscape expression than do physical geomorphological processes. Conversely, human-environmental research keeps encountering multi-scale, emergent problems of resource use made 'common-pool' by water, nutrient and sediment transport dynamics. Just as Earth-surface research can benefit from decades of work on common-pool resource systems, quantitative Earth-surface science can make essential contributions to efforts addressing complex problems in environmental sustainability.

  12. Behavioral problems and intelligence quotient changes in pediatric epilepsy: A case–control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyama Choudhary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is the most common chronic neurological disease and has neurological impairment as an important comorbidity. Objective: To find behavioral problems and intelligence quotient (IQ changes associated with epilepsy and to know the association of variables such as frequency, type of seizures, and duration of disease with cognitive impairment. Materials and Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study, consisting of 50 cases (patients of epilepsy and 50 controls (other patients of same socioeconomic status was conducted at S.P. Medical College, Bikaner. The patients were subjected to detailed clinical history, thorough examination, Pediatric Symptom Checklist, and Bhatia's Battery of Performance intelligence Test. Data analysis was carried out with the help of SPSS 22 software. Results: The prevalence of behavioral problems in generalized and partial seizure group was high (42% and 53.8% as compared to control group (9%. Low IQ was present more in the patients (44% of generalized and partial seizure group as compared with the control group, and results were statistically significant. Furthermore, behavioral problems were more in patients who were having more number of seizures (≥3 per year with significant P values (χ2 = 5.067, P = 0.024. Conclusion: We conclusively found that behavioral problems and cognitive factors, apart from control of seizures, must be kept in mind to determine how well a child with epilepsy progresses toward independence.

  13. Personality and problem-solving in common mynas (Acridotheres tristis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lermite, Françoise; Peneaux, Chloé; Griffin, Andrea S

    2017-01-01

    Animals show consistent individual differences in behaviour across time and/or contexts. Recently, it has been suggested that proactive personality types might also exhibit fast cognitive styles. The speed with which individuals sample environmental cues is one way in which correlations between personality and cognition might arise. Here, we measured a collection of behavioural traits (competitiveness, neophobia, neophilia, task-directed motivation and exploration) in common mynas (Acridotheres tristis) and measured their relationship with problem solving. We predicted that fast solving mynas would interact with (i.e. sample) the problem solving task at higher rates, but also be more competitive, less neophobic, more neophilic, and more exploratory. Mynas that were faster to solve a novel foraging problem were no more competitive around food and no more inclined to take risks. Unexpectedly, these fast-solving mynas had higher rates of interactions with the task, but also displayed lower levels of exploration. It is possible that a negative relation between problem solving and spatial exploration arose as a consequence of how inter-individual variation in exploration was quantified. We discuss the need for greater consensus on how to measure exploratory behaviour before we can advance our understanding of relationships between cognition and personality more effectively. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation protection problems by diagnostic procedures of pediatric nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kletter, K.

    1994-01-01

    Special dosimetry considerations are necessary in the application of radiopharmaceuticals in pediatric nuclear medicine. The influence of differences in irradiation geometry and biokinetic parameters on the radiation dose in children and adults is discussed. Assuming an equal activity concentration, both factors lead rather to a reduced radiation dose than an increased radiation burden in children compared to adults. However, the same radiation dose in children and adults may lead to a different detriment. This is explained by differences in life expectancy and radiation sensitivity for both groups. From special formulas an age dependent reduction factor can be calculated for the application of radiopharmaceuticals in pediatric nuclear medicine. Radiation exposure to hospital staff and parents from children, undergoing nuclear medicine diagnostic or therapeutic procedures, is low. (author)

  15. [Transfusion and its specific problems in pediatrics and neonatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérel, Y; Runel, C; Huguenin, Y; Renesme, L; Aladjidi, N

    2017-09-01

    Principles of transfusion strategy have been used for neonates and children similar to adults. However, due to substantial discrepancies between physiology/pathology in children and in their adult counterparts, decisions, indications, and doses are different from those of adults, especially in neonates. Specific data and practice guidelines for blood product transfusion are reported owing to the experience of pediatrics and neonatology units and partners of the French Blood product bank. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  16. Treatment countermeasures for common problems in dacryocystorhinostomy under nasal endoscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Ling Luo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To discuss the common problems and treatment countermeasures in dacryocystorhinostomy under nasal endoscope.METHODS: The clinical data of 37 cases(43 eyesof postoperative dacryocystorhinostomy under nasal endoscope, by using high-frequency electric knife to open the nasal mucosa, hemostasis in surgery, burning fixed lacrimal sac mucosal flap and nasal mucosal flap, methylene blue staining of the lacrimal sac, lacrimal drainage tube implanted and expansion foam support fixed anastomotic methods were reviewed in our hospital from Mar. 2011 to June. 2013. The effects of surgery were observed, and the intraoperative common questions and the treatments were discussed.RESULTS: In the 37 cases(43 eyes, 42 eyes(97.7%were cured, and 1 eye was improved, and the total efficiency was 100%. All operations were successfully completed without any serious complications during surgery.CONCLUSION: The common complication in dacryocystorhinostomy under nasal endoscope are effectively treated and the success rates of surgery are improved, by using high-frequency electric knife to open the nasal mucosa, hemostasis in surgery, burning fixed lacrimal sac mucosal flap and nasal mucosal flap, methylene blue staining of the lacrimal sac, lacrimal drainage tube implanted and expansion foam support fixed anastomotic methods. These methods are worthy of application and promotion.

  17. Migrant differences in adolescents’ medicine use for common health problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantarero Arevalo, Lourdes; Andersen, Anette; Holstein, Bjørn Evald

    2014-01-01

    the odds to 1.93 (1.32-2.81) for descendants and to 1.30 (0.81-2.07) for immigrants. When simultaneously controlling for the clustering effect of school, feeling safe at school and specific symptoms, the risk of using medicine for stomach-ache was still higher for descendant boys 1.90 (1...... differences in adolescents’ medicine use for common health problems, and if feeling safe at school, as a non-exposure to discrimination, explained these differences. Methods: Data derived from the 2006 Danish contribution to the World Health Organization collaborative study Health Behaviour in School......-aged Children (HBSC). Medicine use for headache, stomach-ache, difficulties getting to sleep and nervousness and feeling safe at school were self-reported. The population included boys and girls from ages 11 to 15 who were enrolled in the cross-sectional study. Included were 8480 ethnic Danes, 508 descendants...

  18. Commentary: Pediatric eHealth Interventions: Common Challenges During Development, Implementation, and Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Ric G.; Connelly, Mark A.; Palermo, Tonya M.; Ritterband, Lee M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide an overview of common challenges that pediatric eHealth researchers may encounter when planning, developing, testing, and disseminating eHealth interventions along with proposed solutions for addressing these challenges. Methods The article draws on the existing eHealth literature and the authors’ collective experience in pediatric eHealth research. Results and conclusions The challenges associated with eHealth interventions and their proposed solutions are multifaceted and cut across a number of areas from eHealth program development through dissemination. Collaboration with a range of individuals (e.g., multidisciplinary colleagues, commercial entities, primary stakeholders) is the key to eHealth intervention success. To ensure adequate resources for design, development, and planning for sustainability, a number of public and private sources of funding are available. A study design that addresses ethical concerns and security issues is critical to ensure scientific integrity and intervention dissemination. Table I summarizes key issues to consider during eHealth intervention development, testing, and dissemination. PMID:24816766

  19. Prescription Writing Errors of Midwifery Students in Common Gynecological problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serveh Parang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Giving improper prescriptions is common among medical practitioners, mostly graduates, in most communities even developed countries. So far, to our knowledge, no study has been conducted on prescription writing of graduate midwifery students. Therefore, this study aimed to detect prescription writing errors of midwifery students in common gynecological problems. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 56 bachelor midwifery students, who had passed the theoretical and clinical courses of gynecology, were evaluated by Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE. A demographic questionnaire and a standard checklist for writing the prescriptions and medications were used for data collection. SPSS Version 16 was used to carry out descriptive statistics. Findings: Most of the students were single, with the mean age of 23.0±1.7 years. Most errors were related to not recording the patients’ age and sex, diagnosis, chief complaint, and the prescriber’s name (observed in less than 10% of the prescriptions. The complete dosage schedule and drug name were stated only in 1.8±4.8 and 14±18.6 of prescriptions, respectively. In more than 93% of the cases, route of use and treatment duration were not recorded. Conclusion: According to the results, the number of prescription errors of midwifery students was high. Therefore, it is recommended to run educational courses on prescription writing skills (e.g. writing prescriptions based on World Health Organization (WHO guidelines for the midwifery students.

  20. Erectile dysfunction is a common problem in interstitial lung diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fløe, Andreas; Hilberg, Ole; Wijsenbeek, Marlies

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is related to chronic diseases, including COPD. The patho- genesis may involve chronic hypoxia, which is common in interstitial lung disease (ILD). We aimed to study the relationship between ILD and ED. Method: Male patients with ILD detected by high...... degree of ED, thirty (56.6%) had moderate to severe ED, and 23 (43.4%) had severe ED. Low diffusion capacity and high body mass index showed a trend of increasing risk of moderate to severe ED. The risk increased with age (OR per 5-year increase=2.63 (1.25; 5.53)) and decreased with 6MWT distance (OR per...... 50 m increase=0.60 (0.41; 0.89). Only two patients (6.7%) received specific treatment with phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors. Conclusion: Severe ED is a common problem in men with ILD, and is associated with poor walking distance and high age. Treatment coverage is low, and physicians should ad- dress...

  1. Common tasks and problems in paediatric trauma radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paertan, Gerald; Pamberger, Petra; Blab, Edmund; Hruby, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Scope of this article is to give practical hints for the most common, typical and important topics of trauma radiology in children to those radiologists who are not exclusively occupied with paediatric imaging. Due to the increased radiation sensitivity of children compared with adults balancing radiation protection and necessary image quality is of utmost importance. Outlines for this optimisation process are given. Especially in imaging of the extremities perhaps the greatest difficulties are posed by the dynamically changing face of the immature, growing, only partially ossified skeleton. Lack of experience must be compensated by meticulous comparison with the normal skeletal development as shown in standard textbooks, and by knowledge of the radiological image of the developmental variants. Besides general remarks about paediatric trauma radiology, some important topics are discussed into more detail. Especially the elbow joint poses a challenge for those less experienced with its radiological appearance in children. More than in adults, ultrasound should remain the primary imaging modality of choice especially in the assessment of abdominal trauma, and CT be tailored to radiological and clinical findings. Imaging and diagnosis of non-accidental injury (NAI) may be a less common task for the general radiologist, however, the severe social implications of physical child abuse mandate a basic knowledge about the radiological symptoms and the imaging management of this problem for all physicians occupied with paediatric radiology

  2. Common tasks and problems in paediatric trauma radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paertan, Gerald E-mail: gerald.paertan@smz.magwien.gv.at; Pamberger, Petra; Blab, Edmund; Hruby, Walter

    2003-10-01

    Scope of this article is to give practical hints for the most common, typical and important topics of trauma radiology in children to those radiologists who are not exclusively occupied with paediatric imaging. Due to the increased radiation sensitivity of children compared with adults balancing radiation protection and necessary image quality is of utmost importance. Outlines for this optimisation process are given. Especially in imaging of the extremities perhaps the greatest difficulties are posed by the dynamically changing face of the immature, growing, only partially ossified skeleton. Lack of experience must be compensated by meticulous comparison with the normal skeletal development as shown in standard textbooks, and by knowledge of the radiological image of the developmental variants. Besides general remarks about paediatric trauma radiology, some important topics are discussed into more detail. Especially the elbow joint poses a challenge for those less experienced with its radiological appearance in children. More than in adults, ultrasound should remain the primary imaging modality of choice especially in the assessment of abdominal trauma, and CT be tailored to radiological and clinical findings. Imaging and diagnosis of non-accidental injury (NAI) may be a less common task for the general radiologist, however, the severe social implications of physical child abuse mandate a basic knowledge about the radiological symptoms and the imaging management of this problem for all physicians occupied with paediatric radiology.

  3. Effect of breastfeeding on common pediatric infections: a 5-year prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiç, Cüneyt; Yavuz, Erdinç

    2018-04-01

    The studies conducted revealed that breastfeeding duration has a reducing effect on common infectious diseases in the children during breastfeeding period. The aim of the present study was to address the association between breastfeeding duration and common infectious diseases in the children until 5 years of age to show long-term protective effects of the breast milk. The study included 411 infants who were born in Rize (Turkey) between January 2011 and December 2011. The present prospective-cohort study lasted for 5 years and 11 interviews were conducted with each mother of the infants during this period. The infants were divided into two groups as those who were breastfed more and less than 12 months and the association between breastfeeding and infections such as acute otitis media, acute gastroenteritis, acute respiratory tract infections and acute urinary system infections was investigated. Of 270 infants 193 (71.5%) were breastfed longer than 12 months and 77 (28.5%) were breastfed less than 12 months. Infants in the first group had less acute otitis media and acute gastroenteritis (n= 77, 28.52%) when compared with the infants breastfed less than 12 months during 5-year period (p <0.05). The present study detected that breastfeeding duration longer than 12 months significantly reduces the common childhood infections such as otitis media and gastroenteritis during the first 5 years of life. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  4. Metabolic syndrome: a common problem among office workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, S S; Makarem, J; Mehrdad, R; Abbasi, M

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MSx) is associated with several health problems. Workers are an important part of any organization. To determine the prevalence of MSx and related variables among office workers. This cross-sectional study evaluated 1488 office workers in Qom province, Central Iran, by using a multi-stage cluster sampling. Diagnosis of MSx was based on blood HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, and fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and waist circumference, and blood pressure. The overall prevalence of MSx was 35.9% (95% CI 33.5% to 38.3%), higher in men (37.2%) than in women (20.6%), and increased with age. The most common laboratory findings of MSx were hypertriglyceridemia (45.9%) and low HDL-cholesterol level (45.5%). Office workers with MSx had a significantly (pMSx. Lack of regular leisure time physical activity (p=0.003), and low intake of fruits (p=0.02) were associated with MSx. The prevalence of MSx was very high among office workers. Workplace health improvement programs through identifying and preventing MSx are necessary for improvement of staff's health.

  5. Metabolic Syndrome: A Common Problem among Office Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SS Alavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Metabolic syndrome (MSx is associated with several health problems. Workers are an important part of any organization. Objective: To determine the prevalence of MSx and related variables among office workers. Methods: This cross-sectional study evaluated 1488 office workers in Qom province, Central Iran, by using a multi-stage cluster sampling. Diagnosis of MSx was based on blood HDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, and fasting blood sugar (FBS levels and waist circumference, and blood pressure. Results: The overall prevalence of MSx was 35.9% (95% CI 33.5% to 38.3%, higher in men (37.2% than in women (20.6%, and increased with age. The most common laboratory findings of MSx were hypertriglyceridemia (45.9% and low HDL-cholesterol level (45.5%. Office workers with MSx had a significantly (p<0.001 higher body mass index than those without MSx. Lack of regular leisure time physical activity (p=0.003, and low intake of fruits (p=0.02 were associated with MSx. Conclusion: The prevalence of MSx was very high among office workers. Workplace health improvement programs through identifying and preventing MSx are necessary for improvement of staff's health.

  6. A descriptive study of commonly used postoperative approaches to pediatric stoma care in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anyanwu, Lofty-John C; Mohammad, Aminu; Oyebanji, Tunde

    2013-12-01

    Construction of an enterostomy is a common procedure in pediatric surgery. However, caring for the child with a stoma is challenging for parents in developing countries. Modern devices such as colostomy bags and accessories are expensive and not readily available. The purpose of this study was to describe methods of effluent collection and peristomal skin protection used by the mothers of colostomy patients. A prospective, descriptive study was conducted between January and December 2011 during the first three postoperative outpatient clinic visits among mothers of children who had a colostomy constructed in the authors' hospital. The mothers of 44 children (27 males, 17 females, median age 3.3 months, range 2 days to 11 years) consented to participate. Demographic and clinical data were obtained from the records, and mothers were interviewed and asked to describe their preferred methods of colostomy effluent collection and peristomal skin protection. The stomas also were inspected at each clinic visit. Anorectal malformations were the most common indication for a colostomy (32, 72.73%), followed by Hirschsprung's disease (11, 25%). Forty-two (42) patients had a divided sigmoid colostomy (95.45%); two patients had a right loop transverse colostomy (4.55%). Nine mothers alternated between two different collection methods. The diaper collection method was described most frequently (22 out of 53; 41.51%), followed by wraparound waistbands (19; 35.85%) and improvised colostomy bags (12; 22.64%). Peristomal skin excoriations were commonly seen within the first 3 weeks postsurgery and had mostly disappeared by the week 6 postoperative visit. Petrolatum jelly was the most commonly used barrier ointment. These locally available, acceptable, and affordable collection methods may be useful for children in other developing countries.

  7. Sleep problems in pediatric epilepsy and ADHD: The impact of comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Ozalp; Okuyaz, Çetin; Gunes, Serkan; Ekinci, Nuran; Kalınlı, Merve; Tan, Muhammet Emin; Teke, Halenur; Direk, Meltem Çobanoğulları; Erdoğan, Semra

    2017-06-01

    Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a frequent comorbidity in pediatric epilepsy. Although sleep problems are commonly reported in both children with primary ADHD and epilepsy, those with epilepsy-ADHD comorbidity have not been well studied. This study aimed to compare sleep problems among three groups of children: 1) children with epilepsy, 2) children with epilepsy and ADHD (epilepsy-ADHD), and 3) children with primary ADHD. 53 children with epilepsy, 35 children with epilepsy-ADHD, and 52 children with primary ADHD completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). Neurology clinic charts were reviewed for the epilepsy-related variables. ADHD subtypes were diagnosed according to the DSM-IV. Children with epilepsy-ADHD had the highest CSHQ total scores, while children with primary ADHD had higher scores than those with epilepsy. Besides the total score, epilepsy-ADHD group differed from the primary ADHD and epilepsy groups with higher CSHQ subscores on sleep onset delay and sleep anxiety. The frequency of moderate-severe sleep problems (CSHQ>56) was 62.9% in children with epilepsy-ADHD, while it was 40.4% and 26.4% in children with primary ADHD and epilepsy, respectively. CSHQ total scores were not different between ADHD subtypes in both children with epilepsy-ADHD and those with primary ADHD. None of the epilepsy-related variables were found to be associated with CSHQ scores. Epilepsy-ADHD is associated with a significantly poor sleep quality which is beyond that of primary ADHD and epilepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pediatrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasheed, Shabana; Teo, Harvey James Eu Leong; Littooij, Annemieke Simone

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of pediatric patients involves many diverse modalities, including radiography, ultrasound imaging, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and scintigraphic and angiographic studies. It is therefore important to be aware of potential pitfalls that may be related to these modalities

  9. Innovation and problem solving: a review of common mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Andrea S; Guez, David

    2014-11-01

    Behavioural innovations have become central to our thinking about how animals adjust to changing environments. It is now well established that animals vary in their ability to innovate, but understanding why remains a challenge. This is because innovations are rare, so studying innovation requires alternative experimental assays that create opportunities for animals to express their ability to invent new behaviours, or use pre-existing ones in new contexts. Problem solving of extractive foraging tasks has been put forward as a suitable experimental assay. We review the rapidly expanding literature on problem solving of extractive foraging tasks in order to better understand to what extent the processes underpinning problem solving, and the factors influencing problem solving, are in line with those predicted, and found, to underpin and influence innovation in the wild. Our aim is to determine whether problem solving can be used as an experimental proxy of innovation. We find that in most respects, problem solving is determined by the same underpinning mechanisms, and is influenced by the same factors, as those predicted to underpin, and to influence, innovation. We conclude that problem solving is a valid experimental assay for studying innovation, propose a conceptual model of problem solving in which motor diversity plays a more central role than has been considered to date, and provide recommendations for future research using problem solving to investigate innovation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cognition in the wild. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Diastolic Dysfunction is Common in Survivors of Pediatric Differentiated Thyroid Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hesselink, Marielle S. Klein; Bocca, Gianni; Hummel, Yoran M.; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Burgerhof, Johannes G. M.; van Dam, Eveline W. C. M.; Gietema, Jourik A.; Havekes, Bas; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Corssmit, Eleonora P. M.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Netea-Maier, Romana T.; van der Pal, Helena J. H.; Peeters, Robin P.; Plukker, John T. M.; Ronckers, Cecile M.; van Santen, Hanneke M.; van der Meer, Peter; Links, Thera P.; Tissing, Wim J. E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Whether pediatric patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) are at risk of developing treatment-related adverse effects on cardiac function is unknown. We therefore studied in long-term survivors of pediatric DTC the prevalence of cardiac dysfunction and atrial fibrillation

  11. Impact of Resident Surgeons on Procedure Length based on Common Pediatric Otolaryngology Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V.; Kozin, Elliott D.; Sethi, Rosh; Alkire, Blake; Lee, Daniel J.; Gray, Stacey T.; Shrime, Mark G.; Cohen, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical education remains an important mission of academic medical centers. Financial pressures, however, may favor improved operating room (OR) efficiency at the expense of surgical education. We aim to characterize resident impact on the duration of procedural time using common pediatric otolaryngologic cases which do not necessitate a surgical assistant and assess whether other factors modify the extent to which residents impact OR efficiency. Study Design We retrospectively reviewed resident and attending surgeon total OR and procedural times for isolated tonsillectomy, adenoidectomy, tonsillectomy with adenoidectomy (T&A) and bilateral myringotomy with tube insertion between 2009 and 2013. We included cases supervised or performed by one of four teaching surgeons in children with ASA otolaryngology procedures. While residents may increase operative times, addressing other system-wide issues may decrease impact of time needed for education and added efficiencies of resident participation may exist throughout the perioperative period. Our model is applicable to surgical education across specialties. Level of Evidence 4 PMID:25251257

  12. Knowledge of common pediatric cancers among medical students in northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cynthia de Araújo Barros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In recent decades, early diagnosis of childhood cancer has taken an important place on the international agenda. The authors of this study evaluated a group of medical students in Recife, Brazil, regarding knowledge and practices related to early diagnosis of common childhood cancers. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with a sample of 82 medical students, from a total of 86 eligible subjects. Data were collected using self-completed questionnaires. Subgroups were defined according to knowledge of the theme and students' perceptions of their own skills and interest in learning. RESULTS: 74.4% of the sample demonstrated a minimum level of knowledge. The group without minimum knowledge or self-perceived competence to identify suspected cases (23.3% was in the worst position to perform early diagnosis. All subjects expressed interest in learning more about this topic. CONCLUSIONS: Despite acceptable levels of knowledge among these medical students, the definition of central aspects of the teaching and learning processes would be useful for training physicians with the skills for diagnosing and treating pediatric cancers

  13. Two Sides of the Same Coin: Pediatric-Onset and Adult-Onset Common Variable Immune Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Lauren A; Maggadottir, Solrun Melkorka; Pantell, Matthew S; Lugar, Patricia; Rundles, Charlotte Cunningham; Sullivan, Kathleen E

    2017-08-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a complex, heterogeneous immunodeficiency characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia, recurrent infections, and poor antibody response to vaccination. While antibiotics and immunoglobulin prophylaxis have significantly reduced infectious complications, non-infectious complications of autoimmunity, inflammatory lung disease, enteropathy, and malignancy remain of great concern. Previous studies have suggested that CVID patients diagnosed in childhood are more severely affected by these complications than adults diagnosed later in life. We sought to discern whether the rates of various infectious and non-infectious conditions differed between pediatric-diagnosed (ages 17 or younger) versus adult-diagnosed CVID (ages 18 or older). Using the United States Immunodeficiency Network (USIDNET) database, we performed a retrospective analysis of 457 children and adults with CVID, stratified by age at diagnosis. Chi-squared testing was used to compare pediatric versus adult groups. After correcting for multiple comparisons, we identified few statistically significant differences (p ≤ 0.0004) between pediatric and adult groups. Pediatric-onset CVID patients had more frequent diagnoses of otitis media, developmental delay, and failure to thrive compared with adult-onset CVID patients. Adult CVID patients were more frequently diagnosed with bronchitis, arthritis, depression, and fatigue. Diagnoses of autoimmunity, lymphoma, and other malignancies were higher in adults but not to a significant degree. Serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA, and IgM) and lymphocyte subsets did not differ significantly between the two groups. When complications of infections and co-morbid conditions were viewed categorically, there were few differences between pediatric-onset and adult-onset CVID patients. These results suggest that pediatric CVID is not a distinct phenotype. Major features were comparable across the groups. This study underscores the need for

  14. Prader–Willi syndrome: clinical problems in transition from pediatric to adult care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crinò A

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Antonino Crinò,1 Danilo Fintini,1 Sarah Bocchini,1 Chiara Carducci,1 Graziano Grugni,2 1Autoimmune Endocrine Diseases Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Research Institute, Palidoro, Rome, 2Division of Auxology, Italian Auxological Institute, Research Institute, Piancavallo, Verbania, Italy Abstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS represents the most common form of genetic obesity. Thanks to the advances in medical care and technology, many persons with PWS live longer and survive to adulthood. Currently, because of the many physical and behavioral manifestations, transitional health care is not easy for these patients and is considered a very important issue. Moreover, very few studies have examined these transitional problems in young adults with PWS. In recent years, there has been great interest in improving transition planning and support for young people with PWS reaching adulthood. In this article, we underline the main clinical problems in transition and give some advice to make this period less difficult and easier for adolescents with PWS. Special attention should be paid to obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, osteoporosis, and sleep apnea during the period of transition. In PWS, for an effective transition from childhood to adulthood, a multidisciplinary team is needed, and should maintain the same approach to food, environment, and psychiatric issues. For comprehensive care, it is necessary to involve adult endocrinologists and other medical specialists in conjunction with the pediatric team. Parental involvement is, however, a great help for supervising adolescents with PWS during this particular period. Keywords: Prader–Willi, transition period, intellectual disabilities

  15. Community household income and resource utilization for common inpatient pediatric conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieldston, Evan S; Zaniletti, Isabella; Hall, Matthew; Colvin, Jeffrey D; Gottlieb, Laura; Macy, Michelle L; Alpern, Elizabeth R; Morse, Rustin B; Hain, Paul D; Sills, Marion R; Frank, Gary; Shah, Samir S

    2013-12-01

    Child health is influenced by biomedical and socioeconomic factors. Few studies have explored the relationship between community-level income and inpatient resource utilization for children. Our objective was to analyze inpatient costs for children hospitalized with common conditions in relation to zip code-based median annual household income (HHI). Retrospective national cohort from 32 freestanding children's hospitals for asthma, diabetes, bronchiolitis and respiratory syncytial virus, pneumonia, and kidney and urinary tract infections. Standardized cost of care for individual hospitalizations and across hospitalizations for the same patient and condition were modeled by using mixed-effects methods, adjusting for severity of illness, age, gender, and race. Main exposure was median annual HHI. Posthoc tests compared adjusted standardized costs for patients from the lowest and highest income groups. From 116,636 hospitalizations, 4 of 5 conditions had differences at the hospitalization and at the patient level, with lowest-income groups having higher costs. The individual hospitalization level cost differences ranged from $187 (4.1%) to $404 (6.4%). Patient-level cost differences ranged from $310 to $1087 or 6.5% to 15% higher for the lowest-income patients. Higher costs were typically not for laboratory, imaging, or pharmacy costs. In total, patients from lowest income zip codes had $8.4 million more in hospitalization-level costs and $13.6 million more in patient-level costs. Lower community-level HHI is associated with higher inpatient costs of care for 4 of 5 common pediatric conditions. These findings highlight the need to consider socioeconomic status in health care system design, delivery, and reimbursement calculations.

  16. Recognizing the radiographic features of some common bovine foot problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebeid, M.; Steiner, A.

    1996-01-01

    Radiographs of an injured or infected bovine foot can be tricky to interpret - the anatomy is complex, and the signs may be subtle. This guide leads you through the classic radiographic features of several common foot conditions

  17. Shoulder Acromioclavicular and Coracoclavicular Ligament Injuries: Common Problems and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, James D; Johnson, Jeremiah D; DiVenere, Jessica; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2018-04-01

    Injuries to the acromioclavicular joint and coracoclavicular ligaments are common. Many of these injuries heal with nonoperative management. However, more severe injuries may lead to continued pain and shoulder dysfunction. In these patients, surgical techniques have been described to reconstruct the function of the coracoclavicular ligaments to provide stable relationship between the clavicle and scapula. These surgeries have been fraught with high complication rates including clavicle and coracoid fractures, infection, loss of reduction and fixation, hardware migration, and osteolysis. This article reviews common acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular repair and reconstruction techniques and associated complications, and provides recommendations for prevention and management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early Childhood Assessments of Community Pediatric Professionals Predict Autism Spectrum and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Jaspers, Merlijne; de Winter, Andrea F.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.; Hartman, Catharina A.

    2012-01-01

    For clinically referred children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) or Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) several early indicators have been described. However, knowledge is lacking on early markers of less severe variants of ASD and ADHD from the general population. The aim of the present study is to identify early indicators of high risk groups for ASD and ADHD problems based on routine data from community pediatric services between infancy and age four. Data are from 1,816 pa...

  19. Statistical and particle physics: Common problems and techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowler, K.C.; Mc Kane, A.J.

    1984-01-01

    These proceedings contain statistical mechanical studies in condensed matter physics; interfacial problems in statistical physics; string theory; general monte carlo methods and their application to Lattice gauge theories; topological excitations in field theory; phase transformation kinetics; and studies of chaotic systems

  20. Heuristic Method for Decision-Making in Common Scheduling Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Kucharska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to present a heuristic method for decision-making regarding an NP-hard scheduling problem with limitations related to tasks and the resources dependent on the current state of the process. The presented approach is based on the algebraic-logical meta-model (ALMM, which enables making collective decisions in successive process stages, not separately for individual objects or executors. Moreover, taking into account the limitations of the problem, it involves constructing only an acceptable solution and significantly reduces the amount of calculations. A general algorithm based on the presented method is composed of the following elements: preliminary analysis of the problem, techniques for the choice of decision at a given state, the pruning non-perspective trajectory, selection technique of the initial state for the trajectory final part, and the trajectory generation parameters modification. The paper includes applications of the presented approach to scheduling problems on unrelated parallel machines with a deadline and machine setup time dependent on the process state, where the relationship between tasks is defined by the graph. The article also presents the results of computational experiments.

  1. Common genetic variations in cell cycle and DNA repair pathways associated with pediatric brain tumor susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahmideh, Maral Adel; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schüz, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge on the role of genetic polymorphisms in the etiology of pediatric brain tumors (PBTs) is limited. Therefore, we investigated the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), identified by candidate gene-association studies on adult brain tumors, and PBT risk. The study is...... cycle and DNA repair pathways variations associated with susceptibility to adult brain tumors also seem to be associated with PBT risk, suggesting pediatric and adult brain tumors might share similar etiological pathways....

  2. Most common sports-related injuries in a pediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Kathy W; Thrash, Chris; Sorrentino, Annalise; King, William D

    2011-01-01

    Participation in sports is a popular activity for children across the country. Prevention of sports-related injuries can be improved if details of injuries are documented and studied. A retrospective medical record review of injuries that occurred as a direct result of sports participation (both organized and non-organized play) from November 2006 to November 2007. Because the vast majority of injuries were a result of participation in football or basketball, these injuries were focused upon. The injuries specifically examined were closed head injury (CHI), lacerations and fractures. There were 350 football and 196 basketball injuries (total 546). Comparing injuries between the two groups fractures were found to be more prevalent in football compared to basketball (z = 2.14; p = 0.03; 95%CI (0.01, 0.16)). Lacerations were found to be less prevalent among helmeted patients than those without helmets. (z = 2.39; p = 0.02; 95%CI (-0.17,-0.03)). CHI was more prevalent among organized play compared to non-organized (z = 3.9; pfootball related visits, organized play had a higher prevalence of injury compared to non-organized play (z = 2.87; p = 0.004; 95%CI (0.04.0.21)). No differences in fracture or laceration prevalence were found between organized and non-organized play. Football and basketball related injuries are common complaints in a pediatric Emergency Department. Frequently seen injuries include CHI, fractures and lacerations. In our institution, fractures were more prevalent among football players and CHI was more prevalent among organized sports participants.

  3. Low Back Pain - Management Perspective Of A commonly Encountered Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parharaj S S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Low Back pain is a very common symptom affecting the general population, incurring a huge annual societal cost. In spite of this, it remains very commonly misdiagnosed and maltreated. The majority of benign chronic low back pain patients suffer from a combination of myofascial frozen back syndrome with or without an overly of psychosocioeconomic factors. Neural compression causes are less frequent. A though evaluation of the patient to select the most rational therapeutic approach is necessary. In majority of the patients, a well planned out rehabilitation programme is useful. Surgery is indicated in a minority with neural compression or spinal instability, motivation is essential as rehabilitation and surgery have a high failure rate in inadequately motivated patients with psychosocioeconomic dysfunction.

  4. Commonly used stimulants: Sleep problems, dependence and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogeil, Rowan P; Phillips, James G

    2015-08-01

    Caffeine and nicotine are commonly used stimulants that enhance alertness and mood. Discontinuation of both stimulants is associated with withdrawal symptoms including sleep and mood disturbances, which may differ in males and females. The present study examines changes in sleep quality, daytime sleepiness and psychological distress associated with use and dependence on caffeine and nicotine. An online survey comprising validated tools to assess sleep quality, excessive daytime sleepiness and psychological distress was completed by 166 participants (74 males, 96 females) with a mean age of 28 years. Participants completed the study in their own time, and were not offered any inducements to participate. Sleep quality was poorer in those dependent upon caffeine or nicotine, and there were also significant interaction effects with gender whereby females reported poorer sleep despite males reporting higher use of both stimulants. Caffeine dependence was associated with poorer sleep quality, increased daytime dysfunction, and increased levels of night time disturbance, while nicotine dependence was associated with poorer sleep quality and increased use of sleep medication and sleep disturbances. There were strong links between poor sleep and diminished affect, with psychological distress found to co-occur in the context of disturbed sleep. Stimulants are widely used to promote vigilance and mood; however, dependence on commonly used drugs including caffeine and nicotine is associated with decrements in sleep quality and increased psychological distress, which may be compounded in female dependent users. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Ciguatera poisoning: a global issue with common management problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, J Y; Brown, A F

    2001-12-01

    Ciguatera poisoning, a toxinological syndrome comprising an enigmatic mixture of gastrointestinal, neurocutaneous and constitutional symptoms, is a common food-borne illness related to contaminated fish consumption. As many as 50000 cases worldwide are reported annually, and the condition is endemic in tropical and subtropical regions of the Pacific Basin, Indian Ocean and Caribbean. Isolated outbreaks occur sporadically but with increasing frequency in temperate areas such as Europe and North America. Increase in travel between temperate countries and endemic areas and importation of susceptible fish has led to its encroachment into regions of the world where ciguatera has previously been rarely encountered. In the developed world, ciguatera poses a public health threat due to delayed or missed diagnosis. Ciguatera is frequently encountered in Australia. Sporadic cases are often misdiagnosed or not medically attended to, leading to persistent or recurrent debilitating symptoms lasting months to years. Without treatment, distinctive neurologic symptoms persist, occasionally being mistaken for multiple sclerosis. Constitutional symptoms may be misdiagnosed as chronic fatigue syndrome. A common source outbreak is easier to recognize and therefore notify to public health organizations. We present a case series of four adult tourists who developed ciguatera poisoning after consuming contaminated fish in Vanuatu. All responded well to intravenous mannitol. This is in contrast to a fifth patient who developed symptoms suggestive of ciguatoxicity in the same week as the index cases but actually had staphylococcal endocarditis with bacteraemia. In addition to a lack of response to mannitol, clinical and laboratory indices of sepsis were present in this patient. Apart from ciguatera, acute gastroenteritis followed by neurological symptoms may be due to paralytic or neurotoxic shellfish poisoning, scombroid and pufferfish toxicity, botulism, enterovirus 71, toxidromes and

  6. The pediatric knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Robert C

    2013-03-01

    Knee pain is a common problem in children and adolescents, and MRI of the knee is the most commonly performed pediatric cross-sectional musculoskeletal imaging exam. The purpose of this pictorial review is to highlight differences between adult and pediatric knee imaging with an emphasis on normal developmental variants, injury and disease patterns unique to children and adolescents, and differences in response and presentation to conditions affecting both adults and children.

  7. Primary care for women. Management of common respiratory problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, M; Leiner, S

    1996-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical management of common respiratory illness that primary care providers encounter in an outpatient setting. The latest recommendations from the American Thoracic Society, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are summarized. The article discusses the causative organisms and antibiotics of choice for community-acquired pneumonia, and how to determine which patients require hospitalization. The appropriate use of asthma medications is described in detail, along with strategies for reducing aeroallergen exposure and for educating patients. An extensive section covers the interpretation of tuberculin skin tests and use of prophylactic isoniazid for prevention therapy of latent tuberculous infection, as well as the treatment of active tuberculosis. Controversies regarding antibiotics for both acute and chronic bronchitis are discussed along with other treatment options including over-the-counter medications, bronchodilators, and non-pharmacologic interventions. Finally, a strategy for dealing with the complaint of chronic cough is outlined. Although many of these conditions require active comanagement by collaborating physicians, the nurse-midwife will be better able to communicate with an advocate for her clients if she possesses expanded and current knowledge of treatment strategies.

  8. [Clinical application evaluation of Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Diseases of Pediatrics in Traditional Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Yu; Yang, Wei; Wang, Li-Ying; Zhao, Xue-Yao; Wang, Yue-Xi; Liu, Yu-Qi; Han, Xue-Jie; Lv, Ai-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Clinical application evaluation research of Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Diseases of Pediatrics in Traditional Chinese Medicine intends to evaluate the quality level and clinical application of the guideline. A questionnaire and prospective case survey methods were used to evaluate the applicability evaluation based on the clinician questionnaire and the application evaluation based on clinical case observation. The applicability evaluation, familiarity and utilization rate of doctors' guidelines were 85.06%, 62.76%; Sort by technical grade, intermediate grade doctors have a higher familiarity rate and utilization rate, while the junior grade doctor's is lower; Guide quality level of applicability evaluation, other items' rational percentage are better than 96% except the items of health preserving and prevention and other treatment is relatively low; Items' applicable percentage of applicability evaluation are more than 91% except the item of guide simplicity. Comprehensive applicability evaluation, The percentage of the guideline applicable to clinical practice accounted for 94.94%. The consistency rate of syndrome differentiation and clinical application is more than 96% in addition to prescription medication, other treatments and health preserving and prevention of the guidelines apply consistency of application evaluation. The percentage of good treatment effect accounted for 92.96% of application effect evaluation. The safety percentage is 99.89% and economy is 97.45%. The research shows that of Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Common Diseases of Pediatrics in Traditional Chinese Medicine quality level is good and is basically applicable to pediatric clinical practice which can be used as a standardized recommendation of pediatric common diseases' treatment specification. A small part of the guidelines are not applicable and need to be further consummated. Health preserving and prevention and other treatment of the

  9. Pediatric sleep apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... Untreated pediatric sleep apnea may lead to: High blood pressure Heart or lung problems Slow growth and development

  10. Analysis of readability and quality of web pages addressing both common and uncommon topics in pediatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorisio, Ottavio; Silveri, Massimiliano; Rivosecchi, Massimo; Tozzi, Alberto Eugenio; Scottoni, Federico; Buonuomo, Paola Sabrina

    2012-06-01

    The quality medical information on Internet is highly variable. The aim of this study is to determine if Web pages addressing four common pediatric surgical topics (CT) and four uncommon pediatric surgical topics (UT) differ significantly in terms of quality and/or characteristics. We performed an Internet search regarding four CT, addressing more frequent clinical conditions with an incidence≤1:1.500 children (inguinal hernia, varicocele, umbilical hernia, and phimosis) and four UT addressing less frequent clinical conditions with an incidence≥1:1.500 children (anorectal malformation, intestinal atresia, gastroschisis, and omphalocele), using a popular search engine (Google). We evaluated readability with the Flesch reading ease (FRE) and the Flesch-Kincaid grade (FKG) and quality of content using the site checker of the HON Code of Conduct (HON code) for each website. In this study, 30/40 websites addressing CT versus 33/50 addressing UT responded to our criteria. No differences statistically significant in advertisements between the two groups were found (15 vs. 16%) (p>0.05). No differences were found in terms of time from last update, owner/author type, financial disclosure, accreditation, or advertising. CT had higher quality level according to the HON code (6.54±1.38 vs. 5.05±1.82) (p0.05). The mean FKG was 8.1±1.9 for CT versus 8±1.9 for UT (p>0.05). Websites devoted to pediatric surgical topics have higher readability and quality information for disease diagnosis and natural history. Otherwise, the quality of pediatric surgical information on the Internet is high for CT and UT. A high reading level is required to use these resources. Copyright © 2012 by Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  11. Life years lost-comparing potentially fatal late complications after radiotherapy for pediatric medulloblastoma on a common scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Maraldo, Maja V.

    2012-01-01

    The authors developed a framework for estimating and comparing the risks of various long-term complications on a common scale and applied it to 3 different techniques for craniospinal irradiation in patients with pediatric medulloblastoma. METHODS: Radiation dose-response parameters related......-modulated proton therapy (IMPT). RESULTS: Lung cancer contributed most to the estimated LYL, followed by myocardial infarction, and stomach cancer. The estimates of breast or thyroid cancer incidence were higher than those for lung and stomach cancer incidence, but LYL were lower because of the relatively good...

  12. Variation in diagnosis and management of common foot problems by GPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, K; de Melker, R; Kuyvenhoven, M; de Poel, S.

    2001-01-01

    Background. There are indications that the diagnosis and management of common foot problems vary widely in general practice. Objectives. Our aim was to explore the variation of GPs' diagnosis and management of common foot problems and the possible correlation between GPs' characteristics and their

  13. [The topical problems of pediatric balneotherapy and the spa and health resort-based treatment of the children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razumov, A N; Khan, M A

    2016-01-01

    This article is devoted to the topical problems of pediatric balneotherapy with special reference to the organization of the spa and health resort-based treatment of the children in the Russian Federation. The main issues discussed by the authors include the current state of health resort care for the children, the problem of statutory regulation of the activities of the children's spa and health resort facilities, the approaches to increasing the availability of the spa and health resort-based treatment for the children at the enhanced risk of the development of chronic diseases, disabilities, and tuberculosis. Also considered are the problems of the development of the regulatory framework for the medical rehabilitation of the children based at the spa and health resort facilities. The principal goals to be sought in climatotherapy, physiotherapy, balneotherapy, and pelotherapy in the pediatric context are outlined along with the further prospects for the development of the main areas of pediatric balneology.

  14. Nocturnal Hypertension and Attenuated Nocturnal Blood Pressure Dipping is Common in Pediatric Lupus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. Fallon; Swartz, Sarah J.; Wenderfer, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an important manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but reports of prevalence vary between 20-70% in published reports of adult and pediatric patients. For both children and adults with SLE, the clinical diagnosis and management of hypertension has traditionally been based on guidelines developed for the general population. In clinical trials, the criteria used for defining participants with hypertension are mostly undefined. As a first step towards formally assessing the blood pressure (BP) patterns of children diagnosed with SLE, 24-hr ambulatory BP monitoring data was analyzed on clinic patients who presented with prehypertension or stage I hypertension. In this pediatric SLE cohort (n=10), 20% met daytime criteria for a diagnosis of hypertension. Patterns of BP elevation varied widely with white coat, masked, isolated systolic, and diastolic nocturnal hypertension all identified. Nocturnal hypertension was detected in 60% and attenuated nocturnal BP dipping in 90% of both hypertensive and normotensive SLE patients. In SLE patients, the median nighttime systolic and diastolic loads were 25% and 15.5% compared with median daily loads of 12.5% and 11.5%. Daytime and nighttime systolic and diastolic BP load and nocturnal dipping was compared to a control population consisting of 85 non-SLE patients under 21 years old with prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension presenting to hypertension clinic. Median systolic BP dipped 5.3 mmHg in SLE patients compared to 11.9 mmHg in non-lupus ( p-value = 0.001). Median diastolic BP dipped 12.9 mmHg versus 18.5 mmHg in non-lupus ( p-value = 0.003). Patterns of BP dysregulation in pediatric SLE merit further exploration. Children with or without SLE displaying prehypertensive or stage 1 casual BP measurements had similar rates of hypertension by ambulatory BP monitoring. However, regardless of BP diagnosis, and independent of kidney involvement, there was an increased proportion with attenuated

  15. Crowd-sourced Ontology for Photoleukocoria: Identifying Common Internet Search Terms for a Potentially Important Pediatric Ophthalmic Sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staffieri, Sandra E; Kearns, Lisa S; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Craig, Jamie E; Mackey, David A; Hewitt, Alex W

    2018-02-01

    Leukocoria is the most common presenting sign for pediatric eye disease including retinoblastoma and cataract, with worse outcomes if diagnosis is delayed. We investigated whether individuals could identify leukocoria in photographs (photoleukocoria) and examined their subsequent Internet search behavior. Using a web-based questionnaire, in this cross-sectional study we invited adults aged over 18 years to view two photographs of a child with photoleukocoria, and then search the Internet to determine a possible diagnosis and action plan. The most commonly used search terms and websites accessed were recorded. The questionnaire was completed by 1639 individuals. Facebook advertisement was the most effective recruitment strategy. The mean age of all respondents was 38.95 ± 14.59 years (range, 18-83), 94% were female, and 59.3% had children. An abnormality in the images presented was identified by 1613 (98.4%) participants. The most commonly used search terms were: "white," "pupil," "photo," and "eye" reaching a variety of appropriate websites or links to print or social media articles. Different words or phrases were used to describe the same observation of photoleukocoria leading to a range of websites. Variations in the description of observed signs and search words influenced the sites reached, information obtained, and subsequent help-seeking intentions. Identifying the most commonly used search terms for photoleukocoria is an important step for search engine optimization. Being directed to the most appropriate websites informing of the significance of photoleukocoria and the appropriate actions to take could improve delays in diagnosis of important pediatric eye disease such as retinoblastoma or cataract.

  16. An Integer Programming Formulation of the Minimum Common String Partition Problem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S M Ferdous

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of finding a minimum common string partition (MCSP of two strings, which is an NP-hard problem. The MCSP problem is closely related to genome comparison and rearrangement, an important field in Computational Biology. In this paper, we map the MCSP problem into a graph applying a prior technique and using this graph, we develop an Integer Linear Programming (ILP formulation for the problem. We implement the ILP formulation and compare the results with the state-of-the-art algorithms from the literature. The experimental results are found to be promising.

  17. Incorporating the Common Core's Problem Solving Standard for Mathematical Practice into an Early Elementary Inclusive Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics curriculum designers and policy decision makers are beginning to recognize the importance of problem solving, even at the earliest stages of mathematics learning. The Common Core includes sense making and perseverance in solving problems in its standards for mathematical practice for students at all grade levels. Incorporating problem…

  18. Lead and cadmium levels of commonly administered pediatric syrups in Nigeria: A public health concern?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orisakwe, Orish Ebere; Nduka, John Kanayochukwu

    2009-01-01

    Fifty different pediatric syrups were randomly sampled from patent medicine stores and pharmaceutical shops within Awka, in Anambra State between November 2007 and May 2008. Syrups were ashed before digestion using conc. aqua regia, HCl:HNO 3 (3:1) and lead and cadmium were assayed with AAS 205A. Results revealed that 60 and 98% of the sample size had lead and cadmium respectively. The lead levels ranged from 0.01 in chloroquine to 1.08 mg/l in magcid suspension. The highest level of cadmium was seen in magcid suspension with concentration of 2.45 mg/l while lowest concentration of 0.01 in emzolyn and colipan. About 41.2% of the locally made syrup had none detectable levels of lead while all the syrup had detectable levels of cadmium. Lead levels ranged from 0.01 mg/l in cadiphen manufactured in Dholka, India to 0.09 in maxiquine made in England. About 68.8% of the imported syrups of the imported syrups had non detectable levels of lead. Chloramphenicol and zentel albendazole syrups had 0.60 and 0.88 mg/l of cadmium respectively. Bellis cough syrup showed the lowest level (0.01 mg/l) of cadmium. Only erythromycin suspension representing 6.3% had non detectable level of cadmium of the imported syrups. Due to the Cd and Pb levels found, we suggest that the behaviour scenario (here, self administration without medical assistance) should be properly taken under control. Along with this, contamination sources or vulnerable practices during syrups preparation should be also assessed in a tiered approach, towards the minimization of noxious presence in syrups and the promotion of quality of Nigerian-made products.

  19. Lead and cadmium levels of commonly administered pediatric syrups in Nigeria: A public health concern?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orisakwe, Orish Ebere, E-mail: eorish@aol.com [Toxicology Unit, Department of Pharmacology,College of Health Sciences, Nnamdi Azikiwe University,Nnewi Campus. P.M.B. 5001, Nnewi, Anambra State (Nigeria); Nduka, John Kanayochukwu [Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Research Unit, Pure and Industrial Chemistry Department, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, P.M.B. 5025, Awka Anambra State (Nigeria)

    2009-11-15

    Fifty different pediatric syrups were randomly sampled from patent medicine stores and pharmaceutical shops within Awka, in Anambra State between November 2007 and May 2008. Syrups were ashed before digestion using conc. aqua regia, HCl:HNO{sub 3} (3:1) and lead and cadmium were assayed with AAS 205A. Results revealed that 60 and 98% of the sample size had lead and cadmium respectively. The lead levels ranged from 0.01 in chloroquine to 1.08 mg/l in magcid suspension. The highest level of cadmium was seen in magcid suspension with concentration of 2.45 mg/l while lowest concentration of 0.01 in emzolyn and colipan. About 41.2% of the locally made syrup had none detectable levels of lead while all the syrup had detectable levels of cadmium. Lead levels ranged from 0.01 mg/l in cadiphen manufactured in Dholka, India to 0.09 in maxiquine made in England. About 68.8% of the imported syrups of the imported syrups had non detectable levels of lead. Chloramphenicol and zentel albendazole syrups had 0.60 and 0.88 mg/l of cadmium respectively. Bellis cough syrup showed the lowest level (0.01 mg/l) of cadmium. Only erythromycin suspension representing 6.3% had non detectable level of cadmium of the imported syrups. Due to the Cd and Pb levels found, we suggest that the behaviour scenario (here, self administration without medical assistance) should be properly taken under control. Along with this, contamination sources or vulnerable practices during syrups preparation should be also assessed in a tiered approach, towards the minimization of noxious presence in syrups and the promotion of quality of Nigerian-made products.

  20. Single-machine common/slack due window assignment problems with linear decreasing processing times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingong; Lin, Win-Chin; Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Wu, Chin-Chia

    2017-08-01

    This paper studies linear non-increasing processing times and the common/slack due window assignment problems on a single machine, where the actual processing time of a job is a linear non-increasing function of its starting time. The aim is to minimize the sum of the earliness cost, tardiness cost, due window location and due window size. Some optimality results are discussed for the common/slack due window assignment problems and two O(n log n) time algorithms are presented to solve the two problems. Finally, two examples are provided to illustrate the correctness of the corresponding algorithms.

  1. Reflections on Ethics and Humanity in Pediatric Neurology: the Value of Recognizing Ethical Issues in Common Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronen, Gabriel M; Rosenbaum, Peter L

    2017-05-01

    Our goals in this reflection are to (i) identify the ethical dimensions inherent in any clinical encounter and (ii) bring to the forefront of our pediatric neurology practice the myriad of opportunities to explore and learn from these ethical questions. We highlight specifically Beauchamp and Childress's principles of biomedical ethics. We use the terms ethics in common clinical practice and an ethical lens to remind people of the ubiquity of ethical situations and the usefulness of using existing ethical principles to analyze and resolve difficult situations in clinical practice. We start with a few common situations with which many of us tend to struggle. We describe what we understand as ethics and how and why developments in technology, novel potential interventions, policies, and societal perspectives challenge us to think about and debate ethical issues. Individual patients are not a singular population; each patient has their own unique life situations, culture, goals, and expectations that need to be considered with a good dose of humanity and humility. We believe that using an ethical lens-by which we mean making an explicit effort to identify and consider these issues openly-will help us to achieve this goal in practice, education, and research.

  2. Zinc deficiency in the pediatric age group is common but underevaluated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuralli, Dogus; Tumer, Leyla; Hasanoglu, Alev

    2017-08-01

    Subclinical micronutrient deficiencies have been gradually becoming more important as a public health problem and drawing attention of the health authorities. Today it has been known that detecting and treating people having deficiency symptoms alone is no longer sufficient. It is important to detect and prevent any deficiency before it displays clinical manifestations. Zinc deficiency is one of the most widespread micronutrient deficiencies. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the zinc status and the associated factors in healthy school-age children. The study was carried out in schools in Altindag, the district of Ankara. A total of 1063 healthy children, 585 girls and 478 boys, aged 5-16 years were included in the study. Serum zinc, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels and white blood cell count were measured. A serum zinc level zinc deficiency for children zinc concentration were set at 66 μg/dL for females and 70 μg/dL for males. A questionnaire was developed to collect socioeconomic and demographic information of the participants. The prevalence of subclinical zinc deficiency in children attending the study was detected to be 27.8%. This high ratio showed zinc deficiency was an important health problem in the Altindag district of Ankara, Turkey. Evaluating the indicators of zinc deficiency such as serum zinc concentration, dietary zinc intake and stunting prevalence, this study is the most comprehensive epidemiological study performed in children in Turkey. This study reveals the high prevalence of subclinical zinc deficiency and indicates that zinc deficiency is a public health concern for the study population.

  3. Child Neurology Education for Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Dara V F; Patel, Anup D; Behnam-Terneus, Maria; Sautu, Beatriz Cunill-De; Verbeck, Nicole; McQueen, Alisa; Fromme, H Barrett; Mahan, John D

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the current state of child neurology education during pediatric residency provides adequate preparation for pediatric practice. A survey was sent to recent graduates from 3 pediatric residency programs to assess graduate experience, perceived level of competence, and desire for further education in child neurology. Responses from generalists versus subspecialists were compared. The response rate was 32%, half in general pediatric practice. Only 22% feel very confident in approaching patients with neurologic problems. This may represent the best-case scenario as graduates from these programs had required neurology experiences, whereas review of Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education-accredited residency curricula revealed that the majority of residencies do not. Pediatric neurologic problems are common, and pediatric residency graduates do encounter such problems in practice. The majority of pediatricians report some degree of confidence; however, some clear areas for improvement are apparent.

  4. Complications after common sheath reimplantation in pediatric patients with complicated duplex system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong Seung; Im, Young Jae; Shin, Sang Hee; Bascuna, Rosito T; Ha, Ji Yong; Han, Sang Won

    2015-02-01

    To report our experience of common sheath reimplantation (CSR) for ectopic ureterocele (EU) combined with ureteral duplication, describing success rates and postoperative complications, along with risk factors for developing postoperative incontinence. When the upper tract approach is not indicated in patients with EU, a bladder-level approach, involving either CSR or total reconstruction, is the remaining option. However, concerns exist about the high morbidity of bladder-level approaches. We retrospectively examined the postoperative results of 39 patients who underwent CSR between January 2001 and December 2012. Risk factors for the development of postoperative incontinence and decreases in differential renal function (DRF) were additionally analyzed. The median age at operation was 16.5 months. After CSR, upper urinary tract dilatation decreased in 36 patients (92.3%). During a median follow-up of 75.9 months, an additional operation was required in 7 patients (17.9%). Postoperative incontinence developed in 3 patients (7.7%). Median preoperative DRF was significantly lower in the postoperative incontinence group (P = .004). DRF decreased postoperatively in 5 of 36 patients (13.9%). No preoperative factors were related to the decrease in DRF. No patient developed hypertension or proteinuria. CSR decompressed the upper urinary tract effectively in our EU patients. Postoperative incontinence does not seem to be related to operation factors, but with preoperative DRF. When the upper tract approach is not indicated, CSR is a reasonable alternative. Total reconstruction is unnecessary as the remnant upper pole kidney after CSR does not lead to complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gent, Janneane F.; Belanger, Kathleen; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Bracken, Michael B.; Beckett, William S.; Leaderer, Brian P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 μg/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 μg/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for ≥10.0 μg/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  6. Association of pediatric asthma severity with exposure to common household dust allergens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gent, Janneane F., E-mail: janneane.gent@yale.edu [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Belanger, Kathleen [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Triche, Elizabeth W. [Brown University, Department of Community Health/Epidemiology, Providence, RI (United States); Bracken, Michael B. [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Beckett, William S. [Mount Auburn Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Cambridge, MA (United States); Leaderer, Brian P. [Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric and Environmental Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, One Church Street, 6th Floor, New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Background: Reducing exposure to household dust inhalant allergens has been proposed as one strategy to reduce asthma. Objective: To examine the dose-response relationships and health impact of five common household dust allergens on disease severity, quantified using both symptom frequency and medication use, in atopic and non-atopic asthmatic children. Methods: Asthmatic children (N=300) aged 4-12 years were followed for 1 year. Household dust samples from two indoor locations were analyzed for allergens including dust mite (Der p 1, Der f 1), cat (Fel d 1), dog (Can f 1), cockroach (Bla g 1). Daily symptoms and medication use were collected in monthly telephone interviews. Annual disease severity was examined in models including allergens, specific IgE sensitivity and adjusted for age, gender, atopy, ethnicity, and mother's education. Results: Der p 1 house dust mite allergen concentration of 2.0 {mu}g/g or more from the main room and the child's bed was related to increased asthma severity independent of allergic status (respectively, OR 2.93, 95% CI 1.37, 6.30 for 2.0-10.0 {mu}g/g and OR 2.55 95% CI 1.13, 5.73 for {>=}10.0 {mu}g/g). Higher pet allergen levels were associated with greater asthma severity, but only for those sensitized (cat OR 2.41 95% CI 1.19, 4.89; dog OR 2.06 95% CI 1.01, 4.22). Conclusion: Higher levels of Der p 1 and pet allergens were associated with asthma severity, but Der p 1 remained an independent risk factor after accounting for pet allergens and regardless of Der p 1 specific IgE status.

  7. Proceedings of the third international symposium on fire economics, planning, and policy: common problems and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armando González-Cabán

    2009-01-01

    These proceedings summarize the results of a symposium designed to address current issues of agencies with wildland fire protection responsibility at the federal and state levels in the United States as well as agencies in the international community. The topics discussed at the symposium included regional, national, and global vision of forest fires: common problems...

  8. [Complications in pediatric anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becke, K

    2014-07-01

    As in adult anesthesia, morbidity and mortality could be significantly reduced in pediatric anesthesia in recent decades. This fact cannot conceal the fact that the incidence of anesthetic complications in children is still much more common than in adults and sometimes with a severe outcome. Newborns and infants in particular but also children with emergency interventions and severe comorbidities are at increased risk of potential complications. Typical complications in pediatric anesthesia are respiratory problems, medication errors, difficulties with the intravenous puncture and pulmonal aspiration. In the postoperative setting, nausea and vomiting, pain, and emergence delirium can be mentioned as typical complications. In addition to the systematic prevention of complications in pediatric anesthesia, it is important to quickly recognize disturbances of homeostasis and treat them promptly and appropriately. In addition to the expertise of the performing anesthesia team, the institutional structure in particular can improve quality and safety in pediatric anesthesia.

  9. An algorithm for finding a common solution for a system of mixed equilibrium problem, quasi-variational inclusion problem and fixed point problem of nonexpansive semigroup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Min

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a hybrid iterative scheme for finding a common element of the set of solutions for a system of mixed equilibrium problems, the set of common fixed points for a nonexpansive semigroup and the set of solutions of the quasi-variational inclusion problem with multi-valued maximal monotone mappings and inverse-strongly monotone mappings in a Hilbert space. Under suitable conditions, some strong convergence theorems are proved. Our results extend some recent results in the literature.

  10. Commonalities in the psychological factors associated with problem gambling and Internet dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, N A; Brown, M

    2010-08-01

    The most commonly applied conceptual approach for excessive Internet use has been as a behavioral addiction, similar to pathological or problem gambling. In order to contribute to the understanding of Internet dependence as a disorder resembling problem gambling, the current study aimed to examine the relationship between problem gambling and Internet dependence and the degree to which psychological factors associated with problem gambling are relevant to the study of Internet dependence. The factors of depression, anxiety, student stressors, loneliness, and social support were examined in a sample of university students from several Australian universities. The findings revealed that there is no overlap between the populations reporting problem gambling and Internet dependence, but that individuals with these disorders report similar psychological profiles. Although requiring replication with larger community samples and longitudinal designs, these preliminary findings suggest that problem gambling and Internet dependence may be separate disorders with common underlying etiologies or consequences. The implications of the findings in relation to the conceptualization and management of these disorders are briefly discussed.

  11. A waste of time: the problem of common morality in Principles of Biomedical Ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Jan Reinert; Solbakk, Jan Helge

    2011-10-01

    From the 5th edition of Beauchamp and Childress' Principles of Biomedical Ethics, the problem of common morality has been given a more prominent role and emphasis. With the publication of the 6th and latest edition, the authors not only attempt to ground their theory in common morality, but there is also an increased tendency to identify the former with the latter. While this stratagem may give the impression of a more robust, and hence stable, foundation for their theoretical construct, we fear that it comes with a cost, namely the need to keep any theory in medical ethics open to, and thereby aware of, the challenges arising from biomedical research and clinical practice, as well as healthcare systems. By too readily identifying the moral life of common morality with rule-following behaviour, Beauchamp and Childress may even be wrong about the nature of common morality as such, thereby founding their, by now, classic theory on quicksand instead of solid rock.

  12. Common Menstrual Problems among Slum Adolescent Girls of Western Maharashtra, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganganahalli P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Menstruation, an important part of female reproductive cycle but menstrual dysfunction in adolescent girls may affect normal life of adolescent and young adult women.Objectives: To assess the percentage of common menstrual problems among adolescent girls from urban slums and to determine the correlation between common menstrual problems with nutritional status of these girls. Methodology: A cross sectional study was conducted among adolescent girls residing in urban slum area under the field practice area of Krishna Institute of Medical Sciences Karad of Western Maharashtra, India during the month of November - December 2011. 237 adolescent girls,age between 12-19 years were interviewed and examined using pretested semistructured questionnaire. Data was collected by researchers with the help of Medical Officer and Medical Social Worker of Urban Health Training Center by personal interview and clinical examination method. Data was compiled and presented into frequency percentage distribution. Chisquare test was applied to determine the association between common menstrual problem swith body mass index and anemia. Results: Out of total 237 adolescent girls, 230 (97.04% had attained menarche of which, 147 girls(63.91% had regular and 83(36.08% had irregular menstrual cycle with mean age at menarche by recall method was 12.8 yrs. The percentage of common menstrual problems such as oligomenorrhea, menorrhagia, metrorrhagia,hypomenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, and premenstrual syndrome were 16.08%, 17.82%, 27.39%,59.56%, 49.13% and 46.52% respectively,however amenorrhea ( primary was seen in 3(0.01% girls. Prevalence of under nutrition and anemia was 40.86% and 60.43%. Health seeking behavior for common menstrual problem was seen in only 25.75% girls. Oligomenorrhea, menorrhagia, hypomenorrhea, dysmenorrhea, and premenstrual syndrome were significantly associated with anemia; however BMI was significantly associated with dysmenorrhea

  13. [nursing Diagnoses And Most Common Collaboration Problems In High-risk Pregnancy].

    OpenAIRE

    Gouveia, Helga Geremias; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes

    2015-01-01

    This study identified the demographic profile, obstetric and clinical diagnoses, nursing diagnosis and most common collaboration problem among pregnant women subject to high-risk at a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were collected by means of a form based on Gordon's Functional Health Patterns. Nursing diagnoses were determined on the basis of the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association) taxonomy. The nursing diagnoses found in 50% or more of the pregnant women were: risk for ...

  14. The clinical immunological and long-term follow-up of pediatric patients with common variable immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdollahzade S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "n 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} Background: Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID is a primary immunodeficiency disease, characterized by hypogammaglobulinemia and heterogeneous clinical manifestations. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical and immunological features of pediatric patients with CVID. "n"nMethods: We reviewed the records of 69 children diagnosed under age of 16 years with CVID (35 males and 34 females."n"nResults: By the year 2008, 15 patients (21% had died. The total follow-up period was 333 patient-years. The mean diagnostic time between onset and diagnosis in our patient group was 4.40 years. The overall rate of consanguineous marriages was 58%. 10 patients had a positive family history of immunodeficiency. At the time of diagnosis, the mean levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG, IgM, and IgA levels were 286.86, 39.92, and 18.39 mg/dl, respectively which were below the normal levels for age. All of the patients presented with infectious diseases at the time of onset, the most common of which were pneumonia, diarrhea and sinusitis. Acute and recurrent infections were also found in almost all of the patients, particularly involving respiratory and gastrointestinal systems. The most common infections during follow-up period were pneumonia (31.9%, acute diarrhea (18.8%, acute sinusitis (18.8%, and otitis media (14.5%. Post-diagnosis survival was estimated to be 79% during the first five years. The survival rate was not shown to be influenced by delayed diagnosis, serum levels of IgG and B

  15. Time-Space Trade-Offs for the Longest Common Substring Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Starikovskaya, Tatiana; Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel

    2013-01-01

    The Longest Common Substring problem is to compute the longest substring which occurs in at least d ≥ 2 of m strings of total length n. In this paper we ask the question whether this problem allows a deterministic time-space trade-off using O(n1+ε) time and O(n1-ε) space for 0 ≤ ε ≤ 1. We give a ...... a positive answer in the case of two strings (d = m = 2) and 0 can be solved in O(n1-ε) space and O(n1+ε log2n (d log2n + d2)) time for any 0 ≤ ε ...The Longest Common Substring problem is to compute the longest substring which occurs in at least d ≥ 2 of m strings of total length n. In this paper we ask the question whether this problem allows a deterministic time-space trade-off using O(n1+ε) time and O(n1-ε) space for 0 ≤ ε ≤ 1. We give...

  16. COMPLIANCY AS A MEDICO-SOCIAL AND ETHIC PROBLEM OF PEDIATRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Mikirtichan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article represents the clinic-sociological analysis of the compliancy among pediatric patients and the estimation of various factors influence on the patients’ and their surroundings’ adherence to the treatment regimen. For the compliance assessment physicians, children with allergic dermatosis at the age of 13–18 years old (n =295 and their parents (n =270 were interrogated with the special questionnaires. Received data confirms that there is decrease in compliance among the pediatric patients and their patients. It is more significant in older girls than in boys.

  17. Characteristics of Pediatric Performance on a Test Battery Commonly Used in the Diagnosis of Central Auditory Processing Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihing, Jeffrey; Guenette, Linda; Chermak, Gail; Brown, Mallory; Ceruti, Julianne; Fitzgerald, Krista; Geissler, Kristin; Gonzalez, Jennifer; Brenneman, Lauren; Musiek, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Although central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) test battery performance has been examined in adults with neurologic lesions of the central auditory nervous system (CANS), similar data on children being referred for CAPD evaluations are sparse. This study characterizes CAPD test battery performance in children using tests commonly administered to diagnose the disorder. Specifically, this study describes failure rates for various test combinations, relationships between CAPD tests used in the battery, and the influence of cognitive function on CAPD test performance and CAPD diagnosis. A comparison is also made between the performance of children with CAPD and data from patients with neurologic lesions of the CANS. A retrospective study. Fifty-six pediatric patients were referred for CAPD testing. Participants were administered four CAPD tests, including frequency patterns (FP), low-pass filtered speech (LPFS), dichotic digits (DD), and competing sentences (CS). In addition, they were given the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC). Descriptive analyses examined the failure rates of various test combinations, as well as how often children with CAPD failed certain combinations when compared with adults with CANS lesions. A principal components analysis was performed to examine interrelationships between tests. Correlations and regressions were conducted to determine the relationship between CAPD test performance and the WISC. Results showed that the FP and LPFS tests were most commonly failed by children with CAPD. Two-test combinations that included one or both of these two tests and excluded DD tended to be failed more often. Including the DD and CS test in a battery benefited specificity. Tests thought to measure interhemispheric transfer tended to be correlated. Compared with adult patients with neurologic lesions, children with CAPD tended to fail LPFS more frequently and DD less frequently. Both groups failed FP with relatively equal frequency

  18. Common mental health problems in immigrants and refugees: general approach in primary care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J.; Narasiah, Lavanya; Munoz, Marie; Rashid, Meb; Ryder, Andrew G.; Guzder, Jaswant; Hassan, Ghayda; Rousseau, Cécile; Pottie, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Background: Recognizing and appropriately treating mental health problems among new immigrants and refugees in primary care poses a challenge because of differences in language and culture and because of specific stressors associated with migration and resettlement. We aimed to identify risk factors and strategies in the approach to mental health assessment and to prevention and treatment of common mental health problems for immigrants in primary care. Methods: We searched and compiled literature on prevalence and risk factors for common mental health problems related to migration, the effect of cultural influences on health and illness, and clinical strategies to improve mental health care for immigrants and refugees. Publications were selected on the basis of relevance, use of recent data and quality in consultation with experts in immigrant and refugee mental health. Results: The migration trajectory can be divided into three components: premigration, migration and postmigration resettlement. Each phase is associated with specific risks and exposures. The prevalence of specific types of mental health problems is influenced by the nature of the migration experience, in terms of adversity experienced before, during and after resettlement. Specific challenges in migrant mental health include communication difficulties because of language and cultural differences; the effect of cultural shaping of symptoms and illness behaviour on diagnosis, coping and treatment; differences in family structure and process affecting adaptation, acculturation and intergenerational conflict; and aspects of acceptance by the receiving society that affect employment, social status and integration. These issues can be addressed through specific inquiry, the use of trained interpreters and culture brokers, meetings with families, and consultation with community organizations. Interpretation: Systematic inquiry into patients’ migration trajectory and subsequent follow-up on culturally

  19. Common mental health problems in immigrants and refugees: general approach in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmayer, Laurence J; Narasiah, Lavanya; Munoz, Marie; Rashid, Meb; Ryder, Andrew G; Guzder, Jaswant; Hassan, Ghayda; Rousseau, Cécile; Pottie, Kevin

    2011-09-06

    Recognizing and appropriately treating mental health problems among new immigrants and refugees in primary care poses a challenge because of differences in language and culture and because of specific stressors associated with migration and resettlement. We aimed to identify risk factors and strategies in the approach to mental health assessment and to prevention and treatment of common mental health problems for immigrants in primary care. We searched and compiled literature on prevalence and risk factors for common mental health problems related to migration, the effect of cultural influences on health and illness, and clinical strategies to improve mental health care for immigrants and refugees. Publications were selected on the basis of relevance, use of recent data and quality in consultation with experts in immigrant and refugee mental health. The migration trajectory can be divided into three components: premigration, migration and postmigration resettlement. Each phase is associated with specific risks and exposures. The prevalence of specific types of mental health problems is influenced by the nature of the migration experience, in terms of adversity experienced before, during and after resettlement. Specific challenges in migrant mental health include communication difficulties because of language and cultural differences; the effect of cultural shaping of symptoms and illness behaviour on diagnosis, coping and treatment; differences in family structure and process affecting adaptation, acculturation and intergenerational conflict; and aspects of acceptance by the receiving society that affect employment, social status and integration. These issues can be addressed through specific inquiry, the use of trained interpreters and culture brokers, meetings with families, and consultation with community organizations. Systematic inquiry into patients' migration trajectory and subsequent follow-up on culturally appropriate indicators of social, vocational and

  20. Liaison Problems among Infant Psychiatry, Psychology, Pediatrics, Nursing, and Social Work in Infant Mental Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bry, Thea

    Discussed are attempts made by staff at the Community Mental Health Center of the New Jersey School of Medicine to develop an ongoing working relationship with pediatric neonatologists, house staff, and nursing staff in order to promote their attunement to mental health needs and obtain access to their expertise. After a description of the center…

  1. Beyond Open Source Software: Solving Common Library Problems Using the Open Source Hardware Arduino Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Younker

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using open source hardware platforms like the Arduino, libraries have the ability to quickly and inexpensively prototype custom hardware solutions to common library problems. The authors present the Arduino environment, what it is, what it does, and how it was used at the James A. Gibson Library at Brock University to create a production portable barcode-scanning utility for in-house use statistics collection as well as a prototype for a service desk statistics tabulation program’s hardware interface.

  2. Knowledge and reported practice of antibiotic prescription by dentists for common oral problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanwir, F.; Marrone, G.; Lundborg, C. S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the knowledge and reported practice in relation to antibiotic prescribing regarding common oral problems by dentists in Karachi, Pakistan. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Place and Duration of Study: Three Dental Colleges of Karachi, from July to December 2010. Methodology: The cross-sectional study was conducted in Karachi, Pakistan in the Outpatient Departments (OPD) of three dental colleges. Inclusion criteria were full time employed dentists working in their respective OPDs (n = 100). The dentists were asked to fill a questionnaire. The questionnaire included (i) general information, (ii) perception and knowledge of antibiotic resistance, (iii) reported management of oral problems, (iv) perceptions about oral infections and (v) perceptions of how people perceive oral problems. To assess dentist's ability to relate knowledge to practice regarding the management of the most common oral problems, written simulated case scenarios with related questions were also included. Scores were given for each correct answer. Results: The response rate was 85%. Of the total respondents, 65 (76%) were under the age of 30 years, 53 (62%) were males and 32 (38%) females. Out of 85 respondents 53% (n = 45) reported prescribing of antibiotics 4 - 5 times a week, 87% (n = 74) prescribe antibiotics based upon symptoms and 64% (n = 54) prescribed antibiotics in abscess condition. The total score for all four scenarios showed that nearly two thirds (61%) of all respondents scored sub-optimally. Conclusion: A substantial number of dentists had suboptimal knowledge regarding antibiotic use. This might lead to the provision of suboptimal care of patients with dental infections. Therefore, continuing education, training and supervision are recommended to improve the quality of dental management. (author)

  3. Development of common user data model for APOLLO3 and MARBLE and application to benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kenji

    2009-07-01

    A Common User Data Model, CUDM, has been developed for the purpose of benchmark calculations between APOLLO3 and MARBLE code systems. The current version of CUDM was designed for core calculation benchmark problems with 3-dimensional Cartesian, 3-D XYZ, geometry. CUDM is able to manage all input/output data such as 3-D XYZ geometry, effective macroscopic cross section, effective multiplication factor and neutron flux. In addition, visualization tools for geometry and neutron flux were included. CUDM was designed by the object-oriented technique and implemented using Python programming language. Based on the CUDM, a prototype system for a benchmark calculation, CUDM-benchmark, was also developed. The CUDM-benchmark supports input/output data conversion for IDT solver in APOLLO3, and TRITAC and SNT solvers in MARBLE. In order to evaluate pertinence of CUDM, the CUDM-benchmark was applied to benchmark problems proposed by T. Takeda, G. Chiba and I. Zmijarevic. It was verified that the CUDM-benchmark successfully reproduced the results calculated with reference input data files, and provided consistent results among all the solvers by using one common input data defined by CUDM. In addition, a detailed benchmark calculation for Chiba benchmark was performed by using the CUDM-benchmark. Chiba benchmark is a neutron transport benchmark problem for fast criticality assembly without homogenization. This benchmark problem consists of 4 core configurations which have different sodium void regions, and each core configuration is defined by more than 5,000 fuel/material cells. In this application, it was found that the results by IDT and SNT solvers agreed well with the reference results by Monte-Carlo code. In addition, model effects such as quadrature set effect, S n order effect and mesh size effect were systematically evaluated and summarized in this report. (author)

  4. Harmonisation of European Insolvency Law and the need to tackle two common problems: common pool and anticommons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Weijs, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Insolvency law has finally become a field of law for which harmonisation at a European level is considered both important and feasible. In deciding upon the content of such harmonised rules, there will need to be a common understanding about the goals of insolvency law and, therefore, a European

  5. Association of common cold with exacerbations in pediatric but not adult patients with tic disorder : A prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, PJ; Manson, WL; Steenhuis, MP; Kallenberg, CGM; Minderaa, RB

    Cross-sectional data and case studies suggest a temporal relationship between fluctuations in tic severity and preceding infections. In this study, we aimed to examine this possible relationship in a prospective longitudinal design. Two groups of tic disorder patients were included, a pediatric

  6. BES-HEP Connections: Common Problems in Condensed Matter and High Energy Physics, Round Table Discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fradkin, Eduardo [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Maldacena, Juan [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Chatterjee, Lali [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Office of High Energy Physics; Davenport, James W [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science. Office of Basic Energy Sciences

    2015-02-02

    On February 2, 2015 the Offices of High Energy Physics (HEP) and Basic Energy Sciences (BES) convened a Round Table discussion among a group of physicists on ‘Common Problems in Condensed Matter and High Energy Physics’. This was motivated by the realization that both fields deal with quantum many body problems, share many of the same challenges, use quantum field theoretical approaches and have productively interacted in the past. The meeting brought together physicists with intersecting interests to explore recent developments and identify possible areas of collaboration.... Several topics were identified as offering great opportunity for discovery and advancement in both condensed matter physics and particle physics research. These included topological phases of matter, the use of entanglement as a tool to study nontrivial quantum systems in condensed matter and gravity, the gauge-gravity duality, non-Fermi liquids, the interplay of transport and anomalies, and strongly interacting disordered systems. Many of the condensed matter problems are realizable in laboratory experiments, where new methods beyond the usual quasi-particle approximation are needed to explain the observed exotic and anomalous results. Tools and techniques such as lattice gauge theories, numerical simulations of many-body systems, and tensor networks are seen as valuable to both communities and will likely benefit from collaborative development.

  7. Assessment of Nutritional Problems in Pediatric Patients with Cancer and the Information Needs of Their Parents: A Parental Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Arpaci

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The majority of problems and symptoms occur in the gastrointestinal system in children with cancer. Parents have difficulty in coping with the nutritional problems and changing routines of children and need support in this respect. This study aimed to assess the nutritional problems of children with cancer and the information needs of their parents. Methods: This descriptive study was performed among children with cancer aged 3–18 years and their parents (n = 69. The data were collected through a data collection form developed by the researchers based on the literature. Results: The most prominent nutritional problems experienced by children were loss of appetite (85.5%, nausea (84.1%, vomiting (81.2%, fatigue (79.7%, and mucositis (66.7%. According to the parents, the factors causing these nutritional problems in children were physiological factors (100% and the foods given to children in the hospital (65.2%. The parents mostly needed information about food–drug interactions (58.0%, food–disease interactions (52.2%, foods that children with neutropenia should avoid or should eat (neutropenic diet (46.4%, and frequency of nutritional intake (36.2%. Conclusions: This study has shown that most children experience at least one nutritional problem, and the parents need comprehensive and regular information about nutrition. Pediatric oncology nurses have a significant responsibility in the evaluation, education, and monitoring of these children.

  8. Assessment of Nutritional Problems in Pediatric Patients with Cancer and the Information Needs of Their Parents: A Parental Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Tuba; Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Altay, Naime

    2018-01-01

    Objective: The majority of problems and symptoms occur in the gastrointestinal system in children with cancer. Parents have difficulty in coping with the nutritional problems and changing routines of children and need support in this respect. This study aimed to assess the nutritional problems of children with cancer and the information needs of their parents. Methods: This descriptive study was performed among children with cancer aged 3–18 years and their parents (n = 69). The data were collected through a data collection form developed by the researchers based on the literature. Results: The most prominent nutritional problems experienced by children were loss of appetite (85.5%), nausea (84.1%), vomiting (81.2%), fatigue (79.7%), and mucositis (66.7%). According to the parents, the factors causing these nutritional problems in children were physiological factors (100%) and the foods given to children in the hospital (65.2%). The parents mostly needed information about food–drug interactions (58.0%), food–disease interactions (52.2%), foods that children with neutropenia should avoid or should eat (neutropenic diet) (46.4%), and frequency of nutritional intake (36.2%). Conclusions: This study has shown that most children experience at least one nutritional problem, and the parents need comprehensive and regular information about nutrition. Pediatric oncology nurses have a significant responsibility in the evaluation, education, and monitoring of these children. PMID:29607385

  9. Assessment of Nutritional Problems in Pediatric Patients with Cancer and the Information Needs of Their Parents: A Parental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaci, Tuba; Toruner, Ebru Kilicarslan; Altay, Naime

    2018-01-01

    The majority of problems and symptoms occur in the gastrointestinal system in children with cancer. Parents have difficulty in coping with the nutritional problems and changing routines of children and need support in this respect. This study aimed to assess the nutritional problems of children with cancer and the information needs of their parents. This descriptive study was performed among children with cancer aged 3-18 years and their parents ( n = 69). The data were collected through a data collection form developed by the researchers based on the literature. The most prominent nutritional problems experienced by children were loss of appetite (85.5%), nausea (84.1%), vomiting (81.2%), fatigue (79.7%), and mucositis (66.7%). According to the parents, the factors causing these nutritional problems in children were physiological factors (100%) and the foods given to children in the hospital (65.2%). The parents mostly needed information about food-drug interactions (58.0%), food-disease interactions (52.2%), foods that children with neutropenia should avoid or should eat (neutropenic diet) (46.4%), and frequency of nutritional intake (36.2%). This study has shown that most children experience at least one nutritional problem, and the parents need comprehensive and regular information about nutrition. Pediatric oncology nurses have a significant responsibility in the evaluation, education, and monitoring of these children.

  10. What Is a Pediatric Geneticist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Geneticist? Page Content Article Body Fortunately, most children ... with similar problems. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Geneticists Have? Pediatric geneticists are medical doctors who ...

  11. Pediatric MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pediatric MS Share this page Facebook Twitter Email Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Pediatric MS Support Pediatric Providers ... system through the Pediatric MS Support Group . Treating pediatric MS In 2018 the U.S. Food and Drug ...

  12. Theory of mind mediates the prospective relationship between abnormal social brain network morphology and chronic behavior problems after pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Catroppa, Cathy; Beare, Richard; Silk, Timothy J; Crossley, Louise; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Yeates, Keith Owen; Anderson, Vicki A

    2016-04-01

    Childhood and adolescence coincide with rapid maturation and synaptic reorganization of distributed neural networks that underlie complex cognitive-affective behaviors. These regions, referred to collectively as the 'social brain network' (SBN) are commonly vulnerable to disruption from pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI); however, the mechanisms that link morphological changes in the SBN to behavior problems in this population remain unclear. In 98 children and adolescents with mild to severe TBI, we acquired 3D T1-weighted MRIs at 2-8 weeks post-injury. For comparison, 33 typically developing controls of similar age, sex and education were scanned. All participants were assessed on measures of Theory of Mind (ToM) at 6 months post-injury and parents provided ratings of behavior problems at 24-months post-injury. Severe TBI was associated with volumetric reductions in the overall SBN package, as well as regional gray matter structural change in multiple component regions of the SBN. When compared with TD controls and children with milder injuries, the severe TBI group had significantly poorer ToM, which was associated with more frequent behavior problems and abnormal SBN morphology. Mediation analysis indicated that impaired theory of mind mediated the prospective relationship between abnormal SBN morphology and more frequent chronic behavior problems. Our findings suggest that sub-acute alterations in SBN morphology indirectly contribute to long-term behavior problems via their influence on ToM. Volumetric change in the SBN and its putative hub regions may represent useful imaging biomarkers for prediction of post-acute social cognitive impairment, which may in turn elevate risk for chronic behavior problems. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Managed care in Germany and Switzerland. Two approaches to a common problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweifel, P

    1998-01-01

    The point of departure for this contribution is a problem common to all Western healthcare systems, namely the deficiency of their basic building block, the physician-patient relationship. This deficiency opens up a market for complementary agents in healthcare, ranging from medical associations to the central government. While Germany has traditionally put the emphasis on medical associations as the dominant complementary agent (DCA), it is shifting towards the central government. Switzerland, on the other hand, traditionally has relied on the cantonal governments and is now moving towards competing (quasi-) private health insurers that would function as DCAs. Thus, managed care, which is a means through which to reshape the physician-patient relationship, is used quite differently in the 2 countries, with differing expected outcomes and different consequences for the pharmaceutical industry.

  14. Postanesthetic Emergence Agitation in Pediatric Patients under General Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohkamkar, Masoumeh; Farhoudi, Fatemeh; Alam-Sahebpour, Alireza; Mousavi, Seyed-Abdullah; Khani, Soghra; Shahmohammadi, Soheila

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective Postanesthetic emergence agitation is a common problem in pediatric postanesthetic care unit with an incidence ranging from 10 to 80%. This study was done to determine the prevalence of emergence agitation and associated risk factors in pediatric patients who underwent general anesthesia. Methods This cross-sectional descriptive and analytic study was performed on 747 pediatric patients aged 3- 7 years that underwent general anesthesia for various elective surgeries at Bou-...

  15. [Nursing diagnoses and most common collaboration problems in high-risk pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Helga Geremias; Lopes, Maria Helena Baena de Moraes

    2004-01-01

    This study identified the demographic profile, obstetric and clinical diagnoses, nursing diagnosis and most common collaboration problem among pregnant women subject to high-risk at a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were collected by means of a form based on Gordon's Functional Health Patterns. Nursing diagnoses were determined on the basis of the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association) taxonomy. The nursing diagnoses found in 50% or more of the pregnant women were: risk for infection (90.1%), altered health maintenance (84.5%), altered comfort (80.3%), risk of ineffective breastfeeding (59.2%), altered sexuality patterns (52.1%), fear (52.1%) and pain (50.7%). The collaboration problem found in 50% or more of the cases was: potential complication: preterm labor (62.0%), potential complication: maternal tachycardia (54,9%) and potential complication: hypotension (54,9%). Thus, these results will allow us to guide the nursing care rendered to these pregnant women.

  16. Tragedy of the Commons, Business Growth and the Fundamental Sustainability Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Garrity

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the major issues involved in Hardin’s [1] tragedy of the commons, written over 44 years ago, and examines whether these issues are still relevant today. We assert that this model still provides important insight to aid in the solution to our global problems. In particular, we maintain that the underlying issues of growth against limits and bounded rationality are still not adequately recognized and addressed; this underlies many of the reasons for our unsustainable world. Examples from fisheries management are used to examine potential solutions and reveal weaknesses in current approaches. We show how our current, restricted mental models promote social injustice and blind us to developing sustainable solutions. Both the neo-liberal economic view of business that directly seeks growth and the new sustainable development view that indirectly supports growth are leading our global economy in the wrong direction and away from prosperity and sustainability. Current thinking has not realized Hardin’s message that sustainability is of the class of no technology solution problems. We conclude with recommendations to radically advance a new world view and business paradigm.

  17. Common problems in the elicitation and analysis of expert opinion affecting probabilistic safety assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, M.A.; Booker, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Expert opinion is frequently used in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), particularly in estimating low probability events. In this paper, we discuss some of the common problems encountered in eliciting and analyzing expert opinion data and offer solutions or recommendations. The problems are: that experts are not naturally Bayesian. People fail to update their existing information to account for new information as it becomes available, as would be predicted by the Bayesian philosophy; that experts cannot be fully calibrated. To calibrate experts, the feedback from the known quantities must be immediate, frequent, and specific to the task; that experts are limited in the number of things that they can mentally juggle at a time to 7 {plus minus} 2; that data gatherers and analysts can introduce bias by unintentionally causing an altering of the expert's thinking or answers; that the level of detail the data, or granularity, can affect the analyses; and the conditioning effect poses difficulties in gathering and analyzing of the expert data. The data that the expert gives can be conditioned on a variety of factors that can affect the analysis and the interpretation of the results. 31 refs.

  18. Shoulder pain -- a common problem in world-class badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlström, Martin; Yeap, Joo Seng; Alfredson, Håkan; Söderman, Kerstin

    2006-06-01

    Badminton is a sport that requires a lot of over-shoulder motion, with the shoulder in abduction/external rotation. This questionnaire study on 188 international top-level badminton players during the World Mixed Team Championships showed that previous or present shoulder pain on the dominant side was reported by 52% of the players. Previous shoulder pain was reported by 37% of the players and on-going shoulder pain by 20% of the players. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of shoulder pain between men and women. The majority of the shoulder pain had started gradually. The pain was usually associated with shoulder activity, and stiffness was a common, associated symptom. Furthermore, the shoulder pain was associated with consequences such as sleeping disturbances, changes in training and competition habits, and it also affected activities of daily living. The majority of the players had sought medical advice and had been given different kinds of treatment. The study showed that shoulder pain is a common and significant problem in world-class badminton players, and the consequences are most likely of importance for their training and playing capacity.

  19. A Novel Efficient Graph Model for the Multiple Longest Common Subsequences (MLCS Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Peng

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Searching for the Multiple Longest Common Subsequences (MLCS of multiple sequences is a classical NP-hard problem, which has been used in many applications. One of the most effective exact approaches for the MLCS problem is based on dominant point graph, which is a kind of directed acyclic graph (DAG. However, the time and space efficiency of the leading dominant point graph based approaches is still unsatisfactory: constructing the dominated point graph used by these approaches requires a huge amount of time and space, which hinders the applications of these approaches to large-scale and long sequences. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose a new time and space efficient graph model called the Leveled-DAG for the MLCS problem. The Leveled-DAG can timely eliminate all the nodes in the graph that cannot contribute to the construction of MLCS during constructing. At any moment, only the current level and some previously generated nodes in the graph need to be kept in memory, which can greatly reduce the memory consumption. Also, the final graph contains only one node in which all of the wanted MLCS are saved, thus, no additional operations for searching the MLCS are needed. The experiments are conducted on real biological sequences with different numbers and lengths respectively, and the proposed algorithm is compared with three state-of-the-art algorithms. The experimental results show that the time and space needed for the Leveled-DAG approach are smaller than those for the compared algorithms especially on large-scale and long sequences.

  20. Associations between Psychological Problems and Quality of Life in Pediatric Short Stature from Patients’ and Parents’ Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullinger, Monika; Sommer, Rachel; Rohenkohl, Anja Christine; Bernardino Da Silva, Neuza Maria

    2016-01-01

    Short stature has been associated with psychosocial impairments, but whether treatments and achieved height impact on health-related quality of life (HrQoL) and psychological functioning of children/adolescents is still controversial. This study aimed to examine the effects of height deviation and treatment status on psychosocial adaptation outcomes and to identify clinical and psychosocial determinants of internalizing/externalizing problems in a large cohort of short statured children/adolescents from seven European countries. Participants were 345 children aged 8–18 years with a clinical diagnosis of short stature and 421 parents of 4–18 year-old patients. Children and parents reported on psychological problems (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), generic (KIDSCREEN) and condition-specific HrQoL (QoLISSY). According to analyses of covariance, children/adolescents with current short stature presented more parent-reported internalizing problems and lower self- and parent-reported condition-specific HrQoL, compared to patients with an achieved height above -2SD. Treated children self-reported better HrQoL than the untreated group. Hierarchical regression analysis showed that, rather than height–related clinical variables, children’s sex, younger age and poorer HrQoL were the best predictors of psychological problems, explaining 39% of the variance in patient- and 42% in parent-reported internalizing problems, and 22% of the variance in patient- and 24% in parent-reported externalizing problems. Treatment status also moderated the negative links between patient-reported HrQoL and internalizing problems, explaining 2% of additional variance. These results suggest that children with current short stature are at greater risk for internalizing problems. Routine assessment of HrQoL in pediatric healthcare may help identify children for referral to specialized psychological assessment and intervention. PMID:27097033

  1. Identifying and attributing common data quality problems: temperature and precipitation observations in Bolivia and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Stefan; Gubler, Stefanie; Calle, Juan; Moreno, Isabel; Andrade, Marcos; Velarde, Fernando; Ticona, Laura; Carrasco, Gualberto; Castellón, Yaruska; Oria Rojas, Clara; Brönnimann, Stefan; Croci-Maspoli, Mischa; Konzelmann, Thomas; Rohrer, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Assessing climatological trends and extreme events requires high-quality data. However, for many regions of the world, observational data of the desired quality is not available. In order to eliminate errors in the data, quality control (QC) should be applied before data analysis. If the data still contains undetected errors and quality problems after QC, a consequence may be misleading and erroneous results. A region which is seriously affected by observational data quality problems is the Central Andes. At the same time, climatological information on ongoing climate change and climate risks are of utmost importance in this area due to its vulnerability to meteorological extreme events and climatic changes. Beside data quality issues, the lack of metadata and the low station network density complicate quality control and assessment, and hence, appropriate application of the data. Errors and data problems may occur at any point of the data generation chain, e.g. due to unsuitable station configuration or siting, poor station maintenance, erroneous instrument reading, or inaccurate data digitalization and post processing. Different measurement conditions in the predominantly conventional station networks in Bolivia and Peru compared to the mostly automated networks e.g. in Europe or Northern America may cause different types of errors. Hence, applying QC methods used on state of the art networks to Bolivian and Peruvian climate observations may not be suitable or sufficient. A comprehensive amount of Bolivian and Peruvian maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation in-situ measurements were analyzed to detect and describe common data quality problems. Furthermore, station visits and reviews of the original documents were done. Some of the errors could be attributed to a specific source. Such information is of great importance for data users, since it allows them to decide for what applications the data still can be used. In ideal cases, it may even allow to

  2. Junk food seen at pediatric clinic visits: is it a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Johnnie P; Land, Megan; Hsieh, Pei-Hsuan; Barratt, Michelle S

    2014-04-01

    To document the prevalence of junk foods seen at clinic visits. A cross-sectional 23-item survey of observed food items were completed by medical staff using a convenience sample of families from June 2, 2011 to March 2, 2012. The study was conducted in pediatric clinics affiliated with the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. A convenience sample consisting of 738 families with children from 4 months to 16 years old presenting for visits were included in the study. Children exclusively breast and formula fed was excluded. Junk food was observed 20.9% at the clinic visits. Junk food was often seen at clinic visits. There was a trend toward higher body mass index in patients whose families had junk food at the visit.

  3. A multi-model evaluation of aerosols over South Asia: common problems and possible causes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, X.; Chin, M.; Gautam, R.; Bian, H.; Kim, D.; Colarco, P. R.; Diehl, T. L.; Takemura, T.; Pozzoli, L.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S.; Bellouin, N.

    2015-05-01

    Atmospheric pollution over South Asia attracts special attention due to its effects on regional climate, water cycle and human health. These effects are potentially growing owing to rising trends of anthropogenic aerosol emissions. In this study, the spatio-temporal aerosol distributions over South Asia from seven global aerosol models are evaluated against aerosol retrievals from NASA satellite sensors and ground-based measurements for the period of 2000-2007. Overall, substantial underestimations of aerosol loading over South Asia are found systematically in most model simulations. Averaged over the entire South Asia, the annual mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) is underestimated by a range 15 to 44% across models compared to MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer), which is the lowest bound among various satellite AOD retrievals (from MISR, SeaWiFS (Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor), MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) Aqua and Terra). In particular during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods (i.e., October-January), when agricultural waste burning and anthropogenic emissions dominate, models fail to capture AOD and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP) compared to ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sunphotometer measurements. The underestimations of aerosol loading in models generally occur in the lower troposphere (below 2 km) based on the comparisons of aerosol extinction profiles calculated by the models with those from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) data. Furthermore, surface concentrations of all aerosol components (sulfate, nitrate, organic aerosol (OA) and black carbon (BC)) from the models are found much lower than in situ measurements in winter. Several possible causes for these common problems of underestimating aerosols in models during the post-monsoon and wintertime periods are identified: the aerosol hygroscopic growth and formation of

  4. Pediatric emergence delirium: Canadian Pediatric Anesthesiologists' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, H David; Mervitz, Deborah; Cravero, Joseph P

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric emergence agitation/delirium (ED) is a cluster of behaviors seen in the early postanesthetic period with negative emotional consequences for families and increased utilization of healthcare resources. Many studies have looked at identifying risk factors for ED and at pharmacologic regimens to prevent ED. There are few published reports on treatment options and efficacy for established ED episodes, and essentially no data concerning current practice in the treatment of ED. We sought to elicit the experience and opinions of Canadian Pediatric Anesthesiologists on the incidence of ED in their practice, definitions and diagnostic criteria, preventative strategies, treatments, and their perceived efficacy. A web-based survey was sent to pediatric anesthesiologists working at academic health science centers across Canada. The participants were selected based on being members of the Canadian Pediatric Anesthesia Society (CPAS), which represents the subspecialty in Canada. All members of CPAS who had e-mail contact information available in the membership database were invited to participate. A total of 209 members out of the total of 211 fulfilled these criteria and were included in the study population. The response rate was 51% (106/209). Of respondents, 42% felt that ED was a significant problem at their institutions, with 45% giving medication before or during anesthesia to prevent the development of ED. Propofol was the most common medication given to prevent ED (68%) and to treat ED (42%). Total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) was considered by 38% of respondents as a technique used to prevent ED. Medications used for treatment included propofol (42%), midazolam (31%), fentanyl (10%), morphine (7%), and dexmedetomidine (5%), with 87% of respondents rating effectiveness of treatment as 'usually works quickly with one dose'. We present information on current practice patterns with respect to prophylaxis and treatment of ED among a specialized group of pediatric

  5. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed

  6. Detection of Common Problems in Real-Time and Multicore Systems Using Model-Based Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Beamonte

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multicore systems are complex in that multiple processes are running concurrently and can interfere with each other. Real-time systems add on top of that time constraints, making results invalid as soon as a deadline has been missed. Tracing is often the most reliable and accurate tool available to study and understand those systems. However, tracing requires that users understand the kernel events and their meaning. It is therefore not very accessible. Using modeling to generate source code or represent applications’ workflow is handy for developers and has emerged as part of the model-driven development methodology. In this paper, we propose a new approach to system analysis using model-based constraints, on top of userspace and kernel traces. We introduce the constraints representation and how traces can be used to follow the application’s workflow and check the constraints we set on the model. We then present a number of common problems that we encountered in real-time and multicore systems and describe how our model-based constraints could have helped to save time by automatically identifying the unwanted behavior.

  7. Local Management as a Proposal for the Solution of Urban Planning Common Problems in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Sánchez García

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The scene of the majority of Latin American cities is hopeless due the crisis faced by this part of the world. The decisive factor was globalization because it forced an economical restructuring and the implementation of new ways of production. Cities had to reorganize to deal with and adapt to this system through “global cities.” This way, it was possible to strengthen certain groups or population areas while ignoring others. This generated and emphasized poverty, which, at the same time, created social and environmental segregation, insecurity, mobility, lack of housing and utilities, overspend, waste of materials and human resources, as well as other institutional difficulties. These were a constant and limited the equitable access to social opportunities.For this reason, every urban planning and prediction system should take into account realistic circumstances that foster solidarity, participation, consensus, and sustainability as the central concept of the strategy to implement. This is known as “local management.” To manage a city implies working together with public, private, and social sectors in order to solve everyday problems efficiently and wisely. This way, it is possible to prevent and solve the difficulties faced by the community while searching for a common good and the recovery of its citizenship.

  8. Academic Performance in Primary School Children With Common Emotional and Behavioral Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy, Lisa K; Canterford, Louise; Tucker, Dawn; Bayer, Jordana; Romaniuk, Helena; Sawyer, Susan; Lietz, Petra; Redmond, Gerry; Proimos, Jenny; Allen, Nicholas; Patton, George

    2017-08-01

    Many emotional and behavioral problems first emerge in primary school and are the forerunners of mental health problems occurring in adolescence. However, the extent that these problems may be associated with academic failure has been explored less. We aimed to quantify the association between emotional and behavioral problems with academic performance. A stratified random sample of 8- to 9-year-olds (N = 1239) were recruited from schools in Australia. Data linkage was performed with a national assessment of academic performance to assess reading and numeracy. Parent report assessed emotional and behavioral problems with students dichotomized into "borderline/abnormal" and "normal" categories. One in 5 grade 3 students fell in the "borderline/abnormal" category. Boys with total difficulties (β = -47.8, 95% CI: -62.8 to -32.8), conduct problems, and peer problems scored lower on reading. Numeracy scores were lower in boys with total difficulties (β = -37.7, 95% CI: -53.9 to -21.5) and emotional symptoms. Children with hyperactivity/inattention scored lower in numeracy. Girls with peer problems scored lower in numeracy. Boys with emotional and behavioral problems in mid-primary school were 12 months behind their peers. Children with emotional and behavioral problems are at high risk for academic failure, and this risk is evident in mid-primary school. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  9. On the Equivalence of Quadratic Optimization Problems Commonly Used in Portfolio Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Taras Bodnar; Nestor Parolya; Wolfgang Schmid

    2012-01-01

    In the paper, we consider three quadratic optimization problems which are frequently applied in portfolio theory, i.e, the Markowitz mean-variance problem as well as the problems based on the mean-variance utility function and the quadratic utility.Conditions are derived under which the solutions of these three optimization procedures coincide and are lying on the efficient frontier, the set of mean-variance optimal portfolios. It is shown that the solutions of the Markowitz optimization prob...

  10. Diabetes mellitus en el anciano, un problema frecuente Diabetes mellitus present in elderly, a common problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marelys Yanes Quesada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available La presencia de diabetes mellitus en la población anciana es un problema de salud frecuente en la atención primaria. Es por ello que en el presente trabajo pretendemos revisar algunos elementos importantes de este tema. Esta entidad se presenta habitualmente en estos pacientes, oligosintomática o de manera atípica, y los objetivos terapéuticos dependen de la situación funcional del enfermo. En relación con el tratamiento no farmacológico, la educación, la dieta y el ejercicio físico constituyen los pilares básicos; y respecto a la terapéutica farmacológica, se deben evitar las sulfonilureas de acción prolongada y de gran potencia. Las biguanidas pueden ser usadas para mejorar la sensibilidad a la insulina, y los inhibidores de la alfa glucosidasa son los medicamentos de elección cuando predomina la hiperglucemia posprandial. Las tiazolidinedionas deben ser usadas con precaución en pacientes con riesgo cardiovascular, y el uso de insulina está indicado en circunstancias especiales. Siempre se debe tener presente el tratamiento de la comorbilidad, para así tratar integralmente al anciano con diabetes mellitus.Presence of diabetes mellitus in elderlies is a common health problem in primary care. Thus, the aim of present paper is to review some significant elements of this matter. This entity is habitually present in these patients in a olisymptomatic way of in a atypical form, and therapeutic objectives depend on functional status of patient. With regard to non-pharmacological treatment, the education, diet, and physical exercise are the main basis; and regarding the pharmacological therapeutics, sulfonylurea of lengthy action and very potent must to be avoided. Biguanides may be used to improve insulin-sensitivity, and a-glycosidase inhibitors are the choice drugs when there is a predominance of postprandial hyperglycemia. The thiazolidinediones must to be used with precaution in patients presenting with cardiovascular risk, and

  11. Groupwork as a Form of Assessment: Common Problems and Recommended Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the literature on the use of groupwork as a form of assessment in tertiary institutions. It outlines the considerable advantages of groupwork but also its systemic associated problems. In discussing the problems, the paper considers issues such as "free riding" and the "sucker effect", issues associated with ethnic mix…

  12. Western herbal medicine consultations for common menstrual problems; practitioner experiences and perceptions of treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Carole; Adams, Jon; Frawley, Jane; Hickman, Louise; Sibbritt, David

    2018-03-01

    To explore the prevalence with which Australian Western herbalists treat menstrual problems and their related treatment, experiences, perceptions, and interreferral practices with other health practitioners. Members of the Practitioner Research and Collaboration Initiative practice-based research network identifying as Western Herbalists (WHs) completed a specifically developed, online questionnaire. Western Herbalists regularly treat menstrual problems, perceiving high, though differential, levels of effectiveness. For menstrual problems, WHs predominantly prescribe individualised formulas including core herbs, such as Vitex agnus-castus, and problem-specific herbs. Estimated clients' weekly cost (median = $25.00) and treatment duration (median = 4-6 months) covering this Western herbal medicine treatment appears relatively low. Urban-based women are more likely than those rurally based to have used conventional treatment for their menstrual problems before consulting WHs (p = .001). Only 19% of WHs indicated direct contact by conventional medical practitioners regarding treatment of clients' menstrual problems despite 42% indicating clients' conventional practitioners recommended consultation with WH. Western herbal medicine may be a substantially prevalent, cost-effective treatment option amongst women with menstrual problems. A detailed examination of the behaviour of women with menstrual problems who seek and use Western herbal medicine warrants attention to ensure this healthcare option is safe, effective, and appropriately co-ordinated within women's wider healthcare use. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Groin Problems in Male Soccer Players Are More Common Than Previously Reported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harøy, Joar; Clarsen, Ben; Thorborg, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    surveillance method developed to capture acute and overuse problems. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive epidemiology study. METHODS: We registered groin problems during a 6-week period of match congestion using the Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center Overuse Injury Questionnaire. A total of 240 players from 15 teams......BACKGROUND: The majority of surveillance studies in soccer have used a time-loss injury definition, and many groin problems result from overuse, leading to gradually increasing pain and/or reduced performance without necessarily causing an absence from soccer training or match play. Thus......, the magnitude of groin problems in soccer has probably been underestimated in previous studies based on traditional injury surveillance methods. PURPOSE: To investigate the prevalence of groin problems among soccer players of both sexes and among male soccer players at different levels of play through a new...

  14. Influence of Child Factors on Health-Care Professionals' Recognition of Common Childhood Mental-Health Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Delia A; Koot, Hans M; de Wilde, Amber; Begeer, Sander

    Early recognition of childhood mental-health problems can help minimise long-term negative outcomes. Recognition of mental-health problems, needed for referral and diagnostic evaluation, is largely dependent on health-care professionals' (HCPs) judgement of symptoms presented by the child. This study aimed to establish whether HCPs recognition of mental-health problems varies as a function of three child-related factors (type of problem, number of symptoms, and demographic characteristics). In an online survey, HCPs ( n  = 431) evaluated a series of vignettes describing children with symptoms of mental-health problems. Vignettes varied by problem type (Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Conduct Disorder (CD) and Major Depressive Disorder), number of symptoms presented (few and many), and child demographic characteristics (ethnicity, gender, age and socio-economic status (SES)). Results show that recognition of mental-health problems varies by problem type, with ADHD best recognised and GAD worst. Furthermore, recognition varies by the number of symptoms presented. Unexpectedly, a child's gender, ethnicity and family SES did not influence likelihood of problem recognition. These results are the first to reveal differences in HCPs' recognition of various common childhood mental-health problems. HCPs in practice should be advised about poor recognition of GAD, and superior recognition of ADHD, if recognition of all childhood mental-health problems is to be equal.

  15. Prader–Willi syndrome: clinical problems in transition from pediatric to adult care

    OpenAIRE

    Crinò, Antonino; Fintini,Danilo; Bocchini,Sarah; Carducci,Chiara; Grugni,Graziano

    2016-01-01

    Antonino Crinò,1 Danilo Fintini,1 Sarah Bocchini,1 Chiara Carducci,1 Graziano Grugni,2 1Autoimmune Endocrine Diseases Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Research Institute, Palidoro, Rome, 2Division of Auxology, Italian Auxological Institute, Research Institute, Piancavallo, Verbania, Italy Abstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) represents the most common form of genetic obesity. Thanks to the advances in medical care and technology, many...

  16. Prader–Willi syndrome: clinical problems in transition from pediatric to adult care

    OpenAIRE

    Crinò A; Fintini D; Bocchini S; Carducci C; Grugni G

    2016-01-01

    Antonino Crinò,1 Danilo Fintini,1 Sarah Bocchini,1 Chiara Carducci,1 Graziano Grugni,2 1Autoimmune Endocrine Diseases Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, Research Institute, Palidoro, Rome, 2Division of Auxology, Italian Auxological Institute, Research Institute, Piancavallo, Verbania, Italy Abstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS) represents the most common form of genetic obesity. Thanks to the advances in medical care and technology, many persons with PWS li...

  17. Isometric surfaces with a common mean curvature and the problem of Bonnet pairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabitov, Idzhad Kh

    2012-01-01

    Simple methods are used to give new proofs, and sometimes to make them more precise, of basic theorems on isometric surfaces with a common mean curvature, which are usually called Bonnet pairs. The considerations are conducted under the assumption of minimally admissible smoothness of the objects in question, and certain necessary or sufficient criteria are given for the non-existence of Bonnet pairs with a common non-constant mean curvature among compact surfaces. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  18. The common marmoset monkey: avenues for exploring the prenatal, placental, and postnatal mechanisms in developmental programming of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesche, Laren; Tardif, Suzette D; Ross, Corinna N; deMartelly, Victoria A; Ziegler, Toni; Rutherford, Julienne N

    2018-05-01

    Animal models have been critical in building evidence that the prenatal experience and intrauterine environment are capable of exerting profound and permanent effects on metabolic health through developmental programming of obesity. However, despite physiological and evolutionary similarities, nonhuman primate models are relatively rare. The common marmoset monkey ( Callithrix jacchus) is a New World monkey that has been used as a biomedical model for well more than 50 years and has recently been framed as an appropriate model for exploring early-life impacts on later health and disease. The spontaneous, multifactorial, and early-life development of obesity in the common marmoset make it a valuable research model for advancing our knowledge about the role of the prenatal and placental mechanisms involved in developmental programming of obesity. This paper provides a brief overview of obesity in the common marmoset, followed by a discussion of marmoset reproduction and placental characteristics. We then discuss the occurrence and utility of variable intrauterine environments in developmental programming in marmosets. Evidence of developmental programming of obesity will be given, and finally, we put forward future directions and innovations for including the placenta in developmental programming of obesity in the common marmoset.

  19. Urinary tract infection during pregnancy: current concepts on a common multifaceted problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinderi, Kallirhoe; Delkos, Dimitrios; Kalinderis, Michail; Athanasiadis, Apostolos; Kalogiannidis, Ioannis

    2018-02-06

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common bacterial infection in pregnancy, increasing the risk of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Urinary tract infections may present as asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis or pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen associated with both symptomatic and asymptomatic bacteriuria. If asymptomatic bacteriuria is untreated, up to 30% of mothers develop acute pyelonephritis, with an increased risk of multiple maternal and neonatal complications, such as preeclampsia, preterm birth, intrauterine growth restriction and low birth weight. Urinary tract infection is a common, but preventable cause of pregnancy complications, thus urinary tests, such as urine culture or new technologies such as high-throughput DNA sequence-based analyses, should be used in order to improve antenatal screening of pregnant women.

  20. Return to work and occupational physicians' management of common mental health problems--process evaluation of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebergen, David S.; Bruinvels, David J.; Bos, Chris M.; van der Beek, Allard J.; van Mechelen, Willem

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the adherence of occupational physicians (OP) to the Dutch guideline on the management of common mental health problems and its effect on return to work as part of the process evaluation of a trial comparing adherence to the guideline to care as usual. The first

  1. The benefits of paid employment among persons with common mental health problems: Evidence for the selection and causation mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Schuring (Merel); S.J.W. Robroek (Suzan); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractObjectives The aims of this study were to (i) investigate the impact of paid employment on self-rated health, self-esteem, mastery, and happiness among previously unemployed persons with common mental health problems, and (ii) determine whether there are educational inequalities in these

  2. Common mental health problems in historically disadvantaged urban and rural communities in South Africa: prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenaar, J.M.; Geerlings, M.I.; Vivian, L.; Collinson, M.; Robertson, B.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on an epidemiological study of common mental health and substance abuse problems in a historically disadvantaged urban and rural community in South Africa. In the rural Limpopo Province of South Africa, and in a peri-urban township near Cape Town, self-report instruments were used

  3. Common mental health problems in historically disadvantaged urban and rural communities in South Africa: prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenaar, Juhan; Geerlings, Mirjan; Vivian, Lauraine; Collinson, Marh; Robertson, Brian

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on an epidemiological study of common mental health and substance abuse problems in a historically disadvantaged urban and rural community in South Africa. In the rural Limpopo Province of South Africa, and in a peri-urban township near Cape Town, self-report instruments were

  4. Common mental health problems in historically disadvantaged urban and rural communities in South Africa : prevalence and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havenaar, Juhan M.; Geerlings, Mirjan I.; Vivian, Lauraine; Collinson, Marh; Robertson, Brian

    This paper reports on an epidemiological study of common mental health and substance abuse problems in a historically disadvantaged urban and rural community in South Africa. In the rural Limpopo Province of South Africa, and in a peri-urban township near Cape Town, self-report instruments were used

  5. Common Problems Experienced by First Year Alternatively Certified Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Ching; Smith, Cary Stacy

    2012-01-01

    The teacher shortage throughout the United States, especially in areas considered "at-risk," has reached an alarming level. Novice teachers often decide not to return after one year of service, with the number of teachers not returning doubling at five years. One possible means of overcoming these two problems is alternative…

  6. The Trauma Syndrome: Identification, Treatment, and Referral of Commonly Seen Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohon, Donald J., Jr.

    This paper provides counselors and social service case workers serving Indochinese refugees in northern California with guidelines for identifying, treating and making referrals of clients with emotional problems. Freud's theory of trauma neurosis and its effect on refugees' language acquisition, learning ability and job readiness are described.…

  7. Common-Sense Chemistry: The Use of Assumptions and Heuristics in Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeyer, Jenine Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Students experience difficulty learning and understanding chemistry at higher levels, often because of cognitive biases stemming from common sense reasoning constraints. These constraints can be divided into two categories: assumptions (beliefs held about the world around us) and heuristics (the reasoning strategies or rules used to build…

  8. Cultural Commonalities and Differences in Spatial Problem-Solving: A Computational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Andrew; Forbus, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental question in human cognition is how people reason about space. We use a computational model to explore cross-cultural commonalities and differences in spatial cognition. Our model is based upon two hypotheses: (1) the structure-mapping model of analogy can explain the visual comparisons used in spatial reasoning; and (2) qualitative,…

  9. Optimization of Radiological Protection in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Common Conventional Radiological Procedures: Effectiveness of Increasing the Film to Focus Distance (FFD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Increasing the x-ray film to focus distance (FFD, has been recommended as a practical dose optimization tool for patients undergoing conventional radiological procedures. In the previous study, we demonstrated a 32% reduction in absorbed dose is achievable due to increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm during pediatric chest radiography. The aim of this study was to examine whether increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm is equally effective for other common radiological procedures and performing a literature review of published studies to address the feasibility and probable limitations against implementing this optimization tool in clinical practice. Materials and Methods Radiographic examination of the pelvis (AP view, abdomen (AP view, skull (AP and lateral view, and spine (AP and lateral view, were taken of pediatric patients. The radiation dose and image quality of a radiological procedure is measured in FFD of 100 cm (reference FFD and 130 cm (increased FFD. The thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD were used for radiation dose measurements and visual grading analysis (VGA for image quality assessments. Results: Statistically significant reduction in the ESD ranged from 21.91% for the lateral skull projection to 35.24% for the lateral spine projection was obtained, when the FFD was increased from 100 to 130 cm (P0.05. Conclusion Increasing the FFD from 100 to 130 cm has significantly reduced radiation exposure without affecting on image quality. Our findings are commensurate with the literatures and emphasized that radiographers should learn to use of an updated reference FFD of 130 cm in clinical practice.

  10. Prevalence of common canine digestive problems compared with other health problems in teaching veterinary hospital, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Cairo University, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal M. H. Rakha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to ascertain the prevalence of common digestive problems compared to other health problems among dogs that were admitted to the teaching veterinary hospital, faculty of veterinary medicine, Cairo University, Egypt during 1 year period from January to December 2013. Also, study the effect of age, sex, breeds, and season on the distribution of digestive problems in dogs. Materials and Methods: A total of 3864 dogs included 1488 apparently healthy (included 816 males and 672 females and 2376 diseased dogs (included 1542 males and 834 females were registered for age, sex, breed, and the main complaint from their owners. A complete history and detailed clinical examination of each case were applied to the aids of radiographic, ultrasonographic, and endoscopic examination tools. Fecal examination was applied for each admitted case. Rapid tests for parvovirus and canine distemper virus detection were also performed. Results: A five digestive problems were commonly recorded including vomiting, diarrhea, concurrent vomiting with diarrhea, anorexia, and constipation with a prevalence (% of 13.6, 19.1, 10.1, 13.1, and 0.5 respectively while that of dermatological, respiratory, urinary, neurological, cardiovascular, auditory, and ocular problems was 27.9, 10.5, 3.3, 0.84, 0.4, 0.25, and 0.17 (% respectively. This prevalence was obtained on the basis of the diseased cases. Age and breed had a significant effect on the distribution of digestive problems in dogs (p0.05 on the distribution of such problems. Conclusion: Digestive problems were the highest recorded problems among dogs, and this was the first records for such problems among dogs in Egypt. Age, gender, and breeds had a significant effect on the distribution of the digestive problems in dogs while season had a non-significant effect on the distribution of such problems. The present data enable veterinarians in Egypt to ascertain their needs for diagnostic tools

  11. What Is a Pediatric Allergist / Immunologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Allergist/Immunologist? Page Content Article Body If your ... immune system problems. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Allergists/Immunologists Have? Pediatric allergists/immunologists are medical ...

  12. Common Sleep, Psychiatric, and Somatic Problems According to Work Schedule: an Internet Survey in an Eastern European Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voinescu, Bogdan I

    2018-03-19

    A wide range of health problems was investigated, aiming to identify the presence and severity of a set of self-reported and common sleep, psychiatric, and somatic health problems among working professionals in four different shift schedules (morning, evening, rotating, and day) in several cities in Romania. A heterogeneous sample of 488 workers of different professions completed online a battery of tests, namely the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire, the Parasomnia Questionnaire, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire, designed to identity symptoms of insomnia, sleepiness, snoring, parasomnia, as well as of depression, anxiety, eating, somatoform, and alcohol use disorders, respectively. The timing and the duration of the sleep, along with the presence of high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes mellitus were also inquired. The prevalence of the different health problems in relation to the type of shift schedule was evaluated with the Pearson Chi-square test. ANOVA was used to calculate the significance of the difference between the means, while associations with different health problems were estimated by binary logistic regression. The most common mental health problems were depression (26%), insomnia (20%), alcohol misuse (18%), and anxiety (17%). No significant differences based on the type of shift in terms of health problems were found, except for high blood pressure and symptoms of panic disorder that were more frequently reported by the workers in early morning shifts. Together with the workers in rotating shifts, they also reported increased sleepiness, poorer sleep quality, and shorter sleep duration. In contrast, the workers in evening shifts reported less severe health problems and longer sleep duration. Working in early morning shifts was found to be associated with poorer health outcomes, while working in rotating and early morning shifts with more severe sleep-related problems.

  13. Psychiatric aspects of pediatric epilepsy: Focus on anxiety disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujita Kumar Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric co-morbidities are commonly seen with pediatric epilepsy, which can be in the form of cognitive deficits like - inattention and intellectual disability, motor disturbances like - hyperactivity, emotional disturbances like - depression and anxiety disorders and behavioral problems like - impulsivity, aggression and even psychotic behavior. Anxiety disorders like - Obsessive compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, separation anxiety disorder, agoraphobia and panic attacks are commonly seen with pediatric epilepsy. Presence of co-morbid anxiety disorder in pediatric epilepsy is responsible for scholastic decline, peer maladjustment and poor quality of life. Management of anxiety disorders in children with epilepsy is always a challenge. Until, there is no general consensus regarding management of anxiety disorders in pediatric epilepsy. Despite its enormous impact on an individual′s life, this area has not been addressed adequately through clinical research. This review focuses on psychiatric aspects of pediatric epilepsy with specific emphasis on anxiety disorders.

  14. Knuckle Pads—A common problem but good to treat by Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Manfred; Russe-Wilflingseder, Katharina

    2010-05-01

    Knuckle pads are common skin lesions not disease associated and seen as thickended skin like nodules situated usually on the dorsal site of the proximal interphalangeal joints. Neither medical nor surgical procedures are very effective to remove knuckle pads. A women 22 years of age with knuckle pads on the fingers two and three on both hands which reoccurred after surgical resections was successful treated with a long pulsed Erbium:YAG laser. All four fingers were ablated within one single treatment. The aesthetic result was excellent and lasted at least for 18 months.

  15. FLU AS PROBLEM COMMON TO ALL MANKIND. FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF INFLUENZA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korovaeva I.V

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the flu, as one of the most common infectious diseases affecting humanity throughout its history. The data on the structure of A influenza virus and its variability is given historical background for most famous of the pandemics, which inflicted irreparable damage to the population of the Earth, are shown the basic stages of the study for influenza virus. Are considered the types of variability of the A virus influenza, its ability to overcome interspecies barriers that form the basis of pathogen escape from the immune response. The article shows the promising areas of modern prevention and treatment of this disease

  16. Disordered Eating Behaviors in Emerging Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: A Common Problem for Both Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Elizabeth A; Quinn, Sheila M; Ambrosino, Jodie M; Weyman, Kate; Tamborlane, William V; Jastreboff, Ania M

    Emerging adults (EA) with disordered eating behaviors (DEBs) and Type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at increased risk for severe complications of T1D, and these behaviors have been reported in EA women with T1D. Few studies, though, have included men. This study assessed the prevalence of DEB in both EA men and women with T1D. DEB was measured with the diabetes-specific Diabetes Eating Problem Survey-Revised (DEPS-R); scores of 20 or greater indicate need for further evaluation for DEB. A total of 27 women and 33 men (age range = 21 ± 2.5 years) completed the DEPS-R; 27% of women and 18% of men had scores of 20 or greater (p = .23). Hemoglobin A1c level was significantly higher in subjects with elevated DEPS-R scores (10.4 ± 2.1% vs. 7.8 ± 1.3%; p < .001), and DEPS-R scores correlated with increased body mass index values (r = 0.27, p < .05). Clinicians should assess for DEB in both male and female emerging adults with T1D, especially overweight patients with poor glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Understanding common risk analysis problems leads to better E and P decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Many petroleum geologists, engineers and managers who have been introduced to petroleum risk analysis doubt that probability theory actually works in practice. Discovery probability estimates for exploration prospects always seem to be more optimistic than after-the-fact results. In general, probability estimates seem to be plucked from the air without any objective basis. Because of subtleties in probability theories, errors may result in applying risk analysis to real problems. Four examples have been selected to illustrate how misunderstanding in applying risk analysis may lead to incorrect decisions. Examples 1 and 2 show how falsely assuming statistical independence distorts probability calculations. Example 1 and 2 show how falsely assuming statistical independence distorts probability calculations. Example 3 discusses problems with related variable using the Monte Carlo method. Example 4 shows how subsurface data yields a probability value that is superior to a simple statistical estimate. The potential mistakes in the following examples would go unnoticed in analyses in most companies. Lack of objectivity and flawed theory would be blamed when fault actually would lies with incorrect application of basic probability principles

  18. Are the components of social reciprocity transdiagnostic across pediatric neurodevelopmental disorders? Evidence for common and disorder-specific social impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Alexandra; Rozenman, Michelle; Chang, Susanna; McGough, James J; McCracken, James T; Piacentini, John C

    2018-06-01

    Deficits in social communication are a core feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), yet significant social problems have been observed in youth with many neurodevelopmental disorders. In this preliminary investigation, we aimed to explore whether domains of social reciprocity (i.e., social communication, social cognition, social awareness, social motivation, and restricted and repetitive behaviors) represent transdiagnostic traits. These domains were compared across youth ages 7-17 with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD; N = 32), tic disorders (TD; N = 20), severe mood dysregulation (N = 33) and autism spectrum disorder (N = 35). While the ASD group was rated by parents as exhibiting the greatest social reciprocity deficits across domains, a high proportion of youth with severe mood dysregulation also exhibited pronounced deficits in social communication, cognition, and awareness. The ASD and severe mood dysregulation groups demonstrated comparable scores on the social awareness domain. In contrast, social motivation and restricted and repetitive behaviors did not appear to be transdiagnostic domains in severe mood dysregulation, OCD, or TD groups. The present work provides preliminary support that social awareness, and to a lesser extent social communication and cognition, may represent features of social reciprocity that are transdiagnostic across ASD and severe mood dysregulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Solving the multiple-set split equality common fixed-point problem of firmly quasi-nonexpansive operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Zong, Haili

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose parallel and cyclic iterative algorithms for solving the multiple-set split equality common fixed-point problem of firmly quasi-nonexpansive operators. We also combine the process of cyclic and parallel iterative methods and propose two mixed iterative algorithms. Our several algorithms do not need any prior information about the operator norms. Under mild assumptions, we prove weak convergence of the proposed iterative sequences in Hilbert spaces. As applications, we obtain several iterative algorithms to solve the multiple-set split equality problem.

  20. Iron deficiency and anemia: a common problem in female elite soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landahl, Göran; Adolfsson, Peter; Börjesson, Mats; Mannheimer, Clas; Rödjer, Stig

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia among elite women soccer players. Hemoglobin, serum iron, serum total iron binding capacity, and ferritin were determined in 28 female soccer players called up for the national team. Of the investigated female soccer players, 57% had iron deficiency and 29% iron deficiency anemia 6 months before the FIFA Women's World Cup. It is concluded that iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia is common in female soccer players at the top international level. Some might suffer from relative anemia and measurement of hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to reveal relative anemia. Regular monitoring of hemoglobin concentration and iron status is necessary to institute iron supplementation when indicated.

  1. Antibiotic Resistance in Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stultz, Jeremy S; Doern, Christopher D; Godbout, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in pediatric patients. Resistance to common antibiotic agents appears to be increasing over time, although resistance rates may vary based on geographic region or country. Prior antibiotic exposure is a pertinent risk factor for acquiring resistant organisms during a first UTI and recurrent UTI. Judicious prescribing of antibiotics for common pediatric conditions is needed to prevent additional resistance from occurring. Complex pediatric patients with histories of hospitalizations, prior antibiotic exposure, and recurrent UTIs are also at high risk for acquiring UTIs due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing organisms. Data regarding the impact of in vitro antibiotic susceptibility testing interpretation on UTI treatment outcomes is lacking.

  2. Dysphagia is a common and serious problem for adults with mental illness: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Kristy J; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2012-03-01

    Adults with mental illness may experience a higher incidence of dysphagia and choking due to factors such as medication side effects and behavioural abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of dysphagia and the most effective interventions for this population. Studies published up to August 2010 were sought via a comprehensive electronic database search (CINAHL, PsycINFO, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cochrane, and Embase). Studies reporting dysphagia frequency or dysphagia intervention outcomes in adults with mental illness were included. Two reviewers independently assessed study eligibility and quality, and the results were synthesised descriptively. Ten studies were identified, each describing dysphagia frequency or death due to choking asphyxiation. No studies evaluating intervention effectiveness were identified. Study quality was limited by subjective assessment of outcomes. Six studies presented dysphagia frequencies ranging from 9 to 42% in varying subgroups. Four studies presented the frequency of choking asphyxiation death, including a large survey that concluded that adults with organic mental illness were 43 times more likely to die of this cause than the general population. Dysphagia is a common and significant cause of morbidity and mortality in adults with mental illness and our review found that there is a lack of studies evaluating the effectiveness of intervention techniques.

  3. Halitosis--a common medical and social problem. A review on pathology, diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska, A; Zatoński, M; Jabłonka-Strom, A; Paradowska, A; Kawala, B; Litwin, A

    2012-09-01

    Bad breath is a condition that has health and social implications. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the classification of halitosis, it's etiology, it's prevalence, diagnosis and treatment strategies for the condition. Halitosis is affecting about 25-30% of world's population. It includes categories of genuine halitosis, pseudo-halitosis and halitophobia. It is believed that in 80-90% of cases halitosis origins in the oral cavity and the most common causes are: gingival pathologies, caries and poor oral hygiene. Extraoral sources of halitosis are responsible for 10-20% of all cases and are caused by poor diet, alcohol abuse, tobacco smoking, certain drugs and diseases of other parts of digestive tract as well as some systemic conditions. Diagnostics of halitosis includes subjective methods (examiner's sense of smell) and objective methods (instrumental analysis). Simple, subjective examination is considered a "golden standard" in clinical practice. In case of pathological halitosis identifying the direct cause of halitosis is essential. After excluding, or after successful treatment, of all oral pathologies, in case of remaining fetor ex ore identification and treatment of halitosis often requires multidisciplinary approach. Many unknowns remain in causes and mechanisms of halitosis. It can significantly impair quality of life, social interactions, lead directly to depression,low self-esteem or other mood disorders, therefore it is important to properly identify, treat and continue research on halitosis.

  4. Meta-heuristic algorithms for parallel identical machines scheduling problem with weighted late work criterion and common due date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenzhen; Zou, Yongxing; Kong, Xiangjie

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, this paper investigates the first application of meta-heuristic algorithms to tackle the parallel machines scheduling problem with weighted late work criterion and common due date ([Formula: see text]). Late work criterion is one of the performance measures of scheduling problems which considers the length of late parts of particular jobs when evaluating the quality of scheduling. Since this problem is known to be NP-hard, three meta-heuristic algorithms, namely ant colony system, genetic algorithm, and simulated annealing are designed and implemented, respectively. We also propose a novel algorithm named LDF (largest density first) which is improved from LPT (longest processing time first). The computational experiments compared these meta-heuristic algorithms with LDF, LPT and LS (list scheduling), and the experimental results show that SA performs the best in most cases. However, LDF is better than SA in some conditions, moreover, the running time of LDF is much shorter than SA.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses special ... the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) ... are the limitations of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a ...

  7. Pediatric Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Children > Family Life > Medical Home > Pediatric Specialists Pediatric Specialists Article Body ​Your pediatrician may refer your child to a pediatric specialist for further evaluation and treatment. Pediatric specialists ...

  8. Child maltreatment and pediatric asthma: a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Schreier, Hannah M. C.; Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Child maltreatment is a common problem with known adverse consequences, yet its contributions to the development and course of pediatric asthma are only poorly understood. Main This review first describes possible pathways connecting child maltreatment to pediatric asthma, including aspects of the physical home environment, health behaviors and disease management, and psychological consequences of child maltreatment. We subsequently review existing studies, which generally report a...

  9. A Two-Phase Heuristic Algorithm for the Common Frequency Routing Problem with Vehicle Type Choice in the Milk Run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency and small lot size are characteristics of milk runs and are often used to implement the just-in-time (JIT strategy in logistical systems. The common frequency problem, which simultaneously involves planning of the route and frequency, has been extensively researched in milk run systems. In addition, vehicle type choice in the milk run system also has a significant influence on the operating cost. Therefore, in this paper, we simultaneously consider vehicle routing planning, frequency planning, and vehicle type choice in order to optimize the sum of the cost of transportation, inventory, and dispatch. To this end, we develop a mathematical model to describe the common frequency problem with vehicle type choice. Since the problem is NP hard, we develop a two-phase heuristic algorithm to solve the model. More specifically, an initial satisfactory solution is first generated through a greedy heuristic algorithm to maximize the ratio of the superior arc frequency to the inferior arc frequency. Following this, a tabu search (TS with limited search scope is used to improve the initial satisfactory solution. Numerical examples with different sizes establish the efficacy of our model and our proposed algorithm.

  10. Other Common Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accountability & Whistleblower Protection Transparency Media Room Inside the Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos Publications National Observances Veterans Day Memorial Day Celebrating America's Freedoms Special Events Adaptive Sports Program Creative Arts Festival ...

  11. Pediatric cardiac emergencies: Children are not small adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frazier Aisha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Compared with adults, cardiac emergencies are infrequent in children and clinical presentation is often quite variable. In adults, cardiac emergencies are most commonly related to complications of coronary artery disease; however, in pediatric cases, the coronaries are only rarely the underlying problem. Pediatric cardiac emergencies comprise a range of pathology including but not limited to undiagnosed congenital heart disease in the infant; complications of palliated congenital heart disease in children; arrhythmias related to underlying cardiac pathology in the teenager and acquired heart disease. The emergency room physician and pediatric intensivist will usually be the first and second lines of care for pediatric cardiac emergencies and thus it is imperative that they have knowledge of the diverse presentations of cardiac disease in order to increase the likelihood of delivering early appropriate therapy and referral. The objective of this review is to outline cardiac emergencies in the pediatric population and contrast the presentation with adults.

  12. Most common mental problems in the elderly as viewed by medical school students in Poland, Belarus and Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Cybulski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the opinions of respondents on the most common mental and psychological problems of the elderly over 60 years of age. Material and methods: The study was conducted between January 2013 and November 2014 in three study groups: Polish, Belarusian and Greek students. A total of 600 (200 for each group respondents were tested with a questionnaire developed by the authors. Women dominated in study groups. Three quarters of the study population consisted of people between the ages of 21 and 25 years. An analysis of the education level of respondents showed that almost 60% of respondents studied nursing, 30% – physiotherapy and 10% – other courses of studies. Results: More than half of all respondents (50.8% were afraid of old age. The vast majority of students in each group (a total of 88.3% stated that it is better for the elderly not to be alone and to have a family. Loneliness (61.5%, the sense of helplessness (52.7% and depression (50.8% were mental problems of the elderly that were most often indicated by the respondents. Conclusions: There is a need to educate the younger generations on problems associated with aging and old age, including mental health problems. The study showed significant differences in the perception of mental health problems of elderly people, depending on respondents’ country. There is a need for a change in the functioning of the care systems for the elderly, which would involve perceiving a family as an institution able to provide care services for old people.

  13. Pediatric neuroimaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tidwell, A.S.; Solano, M.; Schelling, S.H.

    1994-01-01

    In this article, some of the common and not-so-common neuropediatric disorders were discussed. As in the full-grown animal, abnormalities of the CNS in the pediatric animal patient may be classified according to the type of insult present (eg, malformation, injury, neoplasia, inflammation, or degeneration). To recognize the imaging manifestations of such disorders, an appreciation of normal anatomy, the pathological response of nervous system tissue to insult, and the principles of image interpretation is required. These fundamentals may then be applied to any CNS disease, regardless of frequency and to any animal patient, regardless of age

  14. PET imaging in pediatric oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shulkin, B.L.

    2004-01-01

    High-quality PET imaging of pediatric patients is challenging and requires attention to issues commonly encountered in the practice of pediatric nuclear medicine, but uncommon to the imaging of adult patients. These include intravenous access, fasting, sedation, consent, and clearance of activity from the urinary tract. This paper discusses some technical differences involved in pediatric PET to enhance the quality of scans and assure the safety and comfort of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  15. Ear, nose and thorat disorders in pediatric patients at a rural hospital in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tall, Hady; Bah, Fatoumata Yarie; Nasser, Timi; Sambou, Aly; Diallo, Bay Karim

    2017-05-01

    The main health problems encountered in pediatric population in Senegal are low birth weigth malnutrition and infection. However, there is a lack of data on pediatric ENT diseases from west african population. This is no published data on any research work on pattern ENT pediatric done in Senegal. This study aimed at determining the pattern of common pediatric ENT diseases. This was a retrospective descriptive study involving review of medical record of patients aged 0-16 years who presented ENT diseases from April 2011 to May 2013 (2 years). within the study period a total of 1329 children were seen. We found 696 children male and 633 female, sex ratio (M/F) is 1.1. Mean age of patients seen was 06 years. Nasal disorders (54,6%) were found to be the commonest group of ENT, followed by ear disorders (22,8%) thorat (22,7%). Hypertrophic adenoid (27,9%) allergic rhinitis (22,9%) and pharyngitis (17,7%) are the most common ENT problems in our pediatric population. The main health problems encountered in pediatric population in Senegal are low birth weigth malnutrition and infection. This study indicated hypertrophic adenoid (27,9%) allergic rhinitis (22,9%) and pharyngitis (17,7%) are the most common ENT problems in our pediatric population. However, this study can provide basic data for heath plan and future local research work. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The problem of gastroptosis as a manifestation of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia in the clinical practice of pediatric gastroenterologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Shulhai

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the authors describe a clinical case of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia in 10- and 15-year-old girls. This pathology is common because it has a lot of clinical, morphological and visceral manifestations, but it is hard to diagnose. Many chronic diseases have been formed based on this pathology. Clinical cases in this article describe confirmed gastroptosis (greater curvature of the stomach is displaced downwards, below the level of the iliac crests in standing position as one of the visceral manifestations of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia, laboratory and instrumental findings that help to diagnose this syndrome. Gastroptosis occurs in children with asthenic type of constitution (elongated limbs, thin body, small chest, narrow shoulders, hypermobility of the joints. It comes from weak development of muscle and connective tissues so they can not endure overload, resulting is many problems, including the gastroptosis, visceroptosis etc. There are many causes of gastroptosis: congenital anomalies of the ligamentous apparatus structure, maternal disease during pregnancy, surgical intervention, sharp decrease in body weight, vitamin and proteins deficiency, irrational nutrition, lengthening the mesentery of an organ such as large intestine. If we know clinical manifestations and features of undifferentiated connective tissue dysplasia, it will allow diagnosing this pathology in a timely manner and will help more fully provide medical care to such patients, carry out their rehabilitation, psychological ada­ptation, and prevent early development of disability.

  17. Pediatric Sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Sinusitis Pediatric Sinusitis Patient Health Information News media interested in ... sinuses are present at birth. Unlike in adults, pediatric sinusitis is difficult to diagnose because symptoms of ...

  18. Pediatric Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... meet the rising demand for asthma care. Our pediatric asthma team brings together physicians, nurses, dietitians, physical ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders that are congenital (present at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... at birth) or that develop during childhood. Physicians use nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? What are some common uses of the procedure? How does the nuclear medicine procedure work? What does the equipment look like? How is ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ...

  4. Causes of Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... inherited metabolic or congenital muscle disorder such as Noonan syndrome, Pompe disease, fatty acid oxidation defect or Barth ... where a specific chromosome is deleted or duplicated. Noonan syndrome is the most common form associated with pediatric ...

  5. Problemas comuns na lactação e seu manejo Common problems during lactation and their management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsa R. J. Giugliani

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar uma revisão atualizada sobre problemas comuns relacionados à lactação e seu manejo. FONTE DOS DADOS: Foi realizada extensa revisão bibliográfica sobre o tópico, sendo utilizadas publicações selecionadas a partir de pesquisa na base de dados MEDLINE e de organismos nacionais e internacionais. Foram utilizados também livros-texto e alguns artigos-chave selecionados a partir de citações em outros artigos. SÍNTESE DOS DADOS: Vários dos problemas comuns enfrentados durante a lactação - ingurgitamento mamário, traumas mamilares, bloqueio de ducto lactífero, infecções mamárias e baixa produção de leite - têm a sua origem em condições que levam a um esvaziamento mamário inadequado. Assim, má técnica de amamentação, mamadas infreqüentes e em horários predeterminados, uso de chupetas e de complementos alimentares constituem importantes fatores que podem predispor ao aparecimento de complicações da lactação. Nessas condições, o manejo adequado é imprescindível, pois, se não tratadas adequadamente, com freqüência levam ao desmame precoce. Para a abordagem dos fatores que dificultam o esvaziamento adequado das mamas, há medidas específicas. Além disso, o suporte emocional e medidas que visem dar maior conforto à lactante não podem ser negligenciadas. CONCLUSÕES: A maioria dos problemas comuns relacionados à lactação pode ser prevenida com esvaziamento adequado das mamas. Uma vez presentes, os problemas devem ser manejados adequadamente, evitando-se, assim, o desmame precoce decorrente de situações dolorosas e, por vezes, debilitantes para a nutriz.OBJECTIVE: To present an update review on common problems associated with breastfeeding and their management. SOURCE OF THE FINDINGS: A comprehensive bibliographic review on the issue was performed by searching publications from the MEDLINE database and from national and international organizations. Books and some key articles cited in

  6. Pediatric rheumatology: An under-recognized subspecialty in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhila Kavirayani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatrics in India at the levels of both undergraduate and postgraduate training is often viewed upon as an acute disease specialty with little emphasis on chronic medical musculoskeletal diseases. Pediatric rheumatology is an under-recognized subspecialty of pediatrics which deals specifically with childhood arthritis, noninflammatory joint pains, connective tissue diseases, autoimmune diseases, vasculitis, and other rare inflammatory disorders. This article aims to give a bird's eye view of the repertoire of commonly encountered problems seen by a pediatric rheumatologist, via a classical case vignette for each topic followed by discussion. There is also mention of some rare diseases managed within pediatric rheumatology to give a flavor of the spectrum of diseases encountered. This is to raise awareness of the importance of pediatric rheumatology as a subspecialty within India and to prompt readers to seek specialist advice when encountering challenging cases. Pediatric rheumatologists network and work collaboratively with many other specialties such as ophthalmology, dermatology, neurology, orthopedics, nephrology, infectious diseases, immunology, and gastroenterology for combined care of diverse conditions. There is an unmet need in India to develop a training program for pediatric rheumatology so that shared care pathways with sensitized pediatricians and other specialists can be developed nationwide, to serve these children better to achieve optimal outcomes.

  7. Pediatric fibromyalgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ablin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia (FM is currently defined as chronic widespread pain (CWP with allodynia or hyperalgesia to pressure pain. It is classified as one of the large group of soft-tissue pain syndromes. Pain is the cardinal symptom of FM; however, most patients also experience additional symptoms such as debilitating fatigue, disrupted or non-restorative sleep, functional bowel disturbances, and a variety of neuropsychiatric problems, including cognitive dysfunction, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Its pathogenesis is not entirely understood, although it is currently believed to be the result of a central nervous system (CNS malfunction that increases pain transmission and perception. FMS usually involves females, and in these patients it often makes its first appearance during menopause. But it is often diagnosed both in young as well as elderly individuals. Pediatric FMS is a frustrating condition affecting children and adolescents at a crucial stage of their physical and emotional development. Pediatric FMS is an important differential diagnosis to be considered in the evaluation of children suffering from widespread musculoskeletal pain, and must be differentiated from a spectrum of inflammatory joint disorders such as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, juvenile ankylosing spondylitis, etc. The management of pediatric FMS is centered on the issues of education, behavioral and cognitive change (with a strong emphasis on physical exercise, and a relatively minor role for pharmacological treatment with medications such as muscle relaxants, analgesics and tricyclic agents.

  8. Vision Problems in Homeless Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Natalie L; Smith, Thomas J; DeSantis, Diana; Suhocki, Marissa; Fenske, Danielle

    2015-08-01

    Vision problems in homeless children can decrease educational achievement and quality of life. To estimate the prevalence and specific diagnoses of vision problems in children in an urban homeless shelter. A prospective series of 107 homeless children and teenagers who underwent screening with a vision questionnaire, eye chart screening (if mature enough) and if vision problem suspected, evaluation by a pediatric ophthalmologist. Glasses and other therapeutic interventions were provided if necessary. The prevalence of vision problems in this population was 25%. Common diagnoses included astigmatism, amblyopia, anisometropia, myopia, and hyperopia. Glasses were required and provided for 24 children (22%). Vision problems in homeless children are common and frequently correctable with ophthalmic intervention. Evaluation by pediatric ophthalmologist is crucial for accurate diagnoses and treatment. Our system of screening and evaluation is feasible, efficacious, and reproducible in other homeless care situations.

  9. Screening for psychosocial problems in children attending the pediatric clinic at king Khalid university hospital (KKUH in Riyadh (KSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim H Al-Ayed

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: This study revealed the feasibility of screening for behavioral problems of children in an outpatient setting. It is necessary to implement screening procedures for psycho-behavioral problems, and train pediatricians to screen children presenting at clinics.

  10. Can You Teach a Teen New Tricks? Problem Solving Skills Training Improves Oral Medication Adherence in Pediatric Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Disease Participating in a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenley, Rachel N; Gumidyala, Amitha P; Nguyen, Eve; Plevinsky, Jill M; Poulopoulos, Natasha; Thomason, Molly M; Walter, Jennifer G; Wojtowicz, Andrea A; Blank, Ellen; Gokhale, Ranjana; Kirschner, Barbara S; Miranda, Adrian; Noe, Joshua D; Stephens, Michael C; Werlin, Steven; Kahn, Stacy A

    2015-11-01

    Medication nonadherence is associated with higher disease activity, greater health care utilization, and lower health-related quality of life in pediatric inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Problem solving skills training (PSST) is a useful tool to improve adherence in patients with chronic diseases but has not been fully investigated in IBD. This study assessed feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary efficacy of PSST in pediatric IBD. Recruitment occurred during outpatient clinic appointments. After completion of baseline questionnaires, families were randomized to a treatment group or wait-list comparison group. The treatment group received either 2 or 4 PSST sessions. Youth health-related quality of life was assessed at 3 time points, and electronic monitoring of oral medication adherence occurred for the study duration. Seventy-six youth (ages 11-18 years) on an oral IBD maintenance medication participated. High retention (86%) and treatment fidelity rates (95%) supported feasibility. High satisfaction ratings (mean values ≥4.2 on 1-5 scale) supported intervention acceptability. Modest increases in adherence occurred after 2 PSST sessions among those with imperfect baseline adherence (d = 0.41, P 0.05). Phone-delivered PSST was feasible and acceptable. Efficacy estimates were similar to those of lengthier interventions conducted in other chronic illness populations. Older adolescents benefited more from the intervention than their younger counterparts.

  11. Pediatric fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buskila, Dan

    2009-05-01

    Fibromyalgia is an idiopathic chronic pain syndrome defined by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain and generalized tender points. The syndrome is associated with a constellation of symptoms, including fatigue, nonrefreshing sleep, irritable bowel, and more. Central nervous system sensitization is a major pathophysiologic aspect of fibromyalgia; in addition, various external stimuli such as trauma and stress may contribute to development of the syndrome. Fibromyalgia is most common in midlife, but may be seen at any age. This article reviews the epidemiology, clinical characteristics, etiology, management, and outcome of pediatric fibromyalgia.

  12. The benefits of paid employment among persons with common mental health problems: evidence for the selection and causation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuring, Merel; Robroek, Suzan Jw; Burdorf, Alex

    2017-11-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to (i) investigate the impact of paid employment on self-rated health, self-esteem, mastery, and happiness among previously unemployed persons with common mental health problems, and (ii) determine whether there are educational inequalities in these effects. Methods A quasi-experimental study was performed with a two-year follow-up period among unemployed persons with mental health problems. Eligible participants were identified at the social services departments of five cities in The Netherlands when being diagnosed with a common mental disorder, primarily depression and anxiety disorders, in the past 12 months by a physician (N=749). Employment status (defined as paid employment for ≥12 hours/week), mental health [Short Form 12 (SF-12)], physical health (SF-12), self-esteem, mastery, and happiness were measured at baseline, after 12 months and 24 months. The repeated-measurement longitudinal data were analyzed using a hybrid method, combining fixed and random effects. The regression coefficient was decomposed into between- and within-individual associations, respectively. Results The between-individuals associations showed that persons working ≥12 hours per week reported better mental health (b=26.7, SE 5.1), mastery (b=2.7, SE 0.6), self-esteem (b=5.7, SE 1.1), physical health (b=14.6, SE 5.6) and happiness (OR 7.7, 95% CI 2.3-26.4). The within-individual associations showed that entering paid employment for ≥12 hours per week resulted in better mental health (b=16.3, SE 3.4), mastery (b=1.7, SE 0.4), self-esteem (b=3.4, SE 0.7), physical health (b=9.8, SE 2.9), and happiness (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.4-6.9). Among intermediate- and high-educated persons, entering paid employment had significantly larger effect on mental health than among low-educated persons. Conclusions This study provides evidence that entering paid employment has a positive impact on self-reported health; thus work should be considered as an important

  13. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric Obesity ... self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, and ...

  14. Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Obesity and Ear, Nose, and Throat Disorders Pediatric ... of self-esteem, and isolation from their peers. Pediatric obesity and otolaryngic problems Otolaryngologists, or ear, nose, ...

  15. Perform qualify reliability-power tests by shooting common mistakes: practical problems and standard answers per Telcordia/Bellcore requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zheng

    2002-08-01

    Facing the new demands of the optical fiber communications market, almost all the performance and reliability of optical network system are dependent on the qualification of the fiber optics components. So, how to comply with the system requirements, the Telcordia / Bellcore reliability and high-power testing has become the key issue for the fiber optics components manufacturers. The qualification of Telcordia / Bellcore reliability or high-power testing is a crucial issue for the manufacturers. It is relating to who is the outstanding one in the intense competition market. These testing also need maintenances and optimizations. Now, work on the reliability and high-power testing have become the new demands in the market. The way is needed to get the 'Triple-Win' goal expected by the component-makers, the reliability-testers and the system-users. To those who are meeting practical problems for the testing, there are following seven topics that deal with how to shoot the common mistakes to perform qualify reliability and high-power testing: ¸ Qualification maintenance requirements for the reliability testing ¸ Lots control for preparing the reliability testing ¸ Sampling select per the reliability testing ¸ Interim measurements during the reliability testing ¸ Basic referencing factors relating to the high-power testing ¸ Necessity of re-qualification testing for the changing of producing ¸ Understanding the similarity for product family by the definitions

  16. The Daily Operational Brief: Fostering Daily Readiness, Care Coordination, and Problem-Solving Accountability in a Large Pediatric Health Care System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Lane F; Basta, Kathryne C; Dykes, Anne M; Zhang, Wei; Shook, Joan E

    2018-01-01

    At a pediatric health system, the Daily Operational Brief (DOB) was updated in 2015 after three years of operation. Quality and safety metrics, the patient volume and staffing assessment, and the readiness assessment are all presented. In addition, in the problem-solving accountability system, problematic issues are categorized as Quick Hits or Complex Issues. Walk-the-Wall, a biweekly meeting attended by hospital senior administrative leadership and quality and safety leaders, is conducted to chart current progress on Complex Issues. The DOB provides a daily standardized approach to evaluate readiness to provide care to current patients and improvement in the care to be provided for future patients. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychological issues in pediatric obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurvinder Kalra

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric obesity is a major health problem and has reached epidemiological proportions today. The present paper reviews major psychological issues in pediatric obesity from a developmental perspective. Research and literature has shown that a number of developmental, family, maternal and child factors are responsible in the genesis of pediatric obesity. Family food habits, early developmental lifestyle of the child, parenting, early family relationships and harmony all contribute towards the growth and development of a child. The present review focuses on the role of developmental psychological factors in the pathogenesis of pediatric obesity and highlights the developmental factors that must be kept in mind when evaluating a case of pediatric obesity.

  18. Relationship between problems related to child late effects and parent burnout after pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl Norberg, Annika; Mellgren, Karin; Winiarski, Jacek; Forinder, Ulla

    2014-05-01

    A few studies have indicated that parents' reactions to a child's serious disease may entail long-term stress for the parents. However, further knowledge of its consequences is valuable. The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of burnout in a Swedish national sample of parents of children who had undergone HSCT and survived. Burnout (Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire) and estimations of the child's health status (Lansky/Karnofsky estimations and study-specific questions) were self-reported by 159 mothers and 123 fathers. In addition, physicians made estimations of the child's health status (Lansky/Karnofsky estimations). Nonparametric tests revealed that burnout symptoms occurred more often among fathers of children who had undergone transplantation within the last five yr compared to fathers of children with no history of serious disease (34.4% vs. 19.9%). Burnout among mothers and fathers was associated with the child's number and severity of health impairments up to five yr after the child underwent HSCT (Spearman's rho for mothers 0.26-0.36 and for fathers 0.36-0.61). In conclusion, chronic stress in parents after a child's HSCT seems to abate eventually. However, parents should be monitored and offered adequate support when needed. Moreover, the situation of fathers in the often mother-dominated pediatric setting should receive more attention in research as well as in the clinic. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Molecular epidemiology of carbapenem resistant gram-negative bacilli from infected pediatric population in tertiary - care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia: an increasing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Johanna M; Parra, O Lorena; Jiménez, J Natalia

    2016-09-01

    Gram-negative bacilli are a cause of serious infections in the pediatric population. Carbapenem are the treatment of choice for infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacilli, but the emergence of carbapenem resistance has substantially reduced access to effective antimicrobial regimens. Children are a population vulnerable to bacterial infections and the emergence of resistance can worsen prognosis. The aim of this study is to describe the clinical and molecular characteristics of infections caused by carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli in pediatric patients from five tertiary-care hospitals in Medellín, Colombia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in five tertiary-care hospitals from June 2012 to June 2014. All pediatric patients infected by carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacilli were included. Clinical information for each patient was obtained from medical records. Molecular analyses included PCR for detection of bla VIM, bla IMP bla NDM, bla OXA-48 and bla KPC genes and PFGE and MLST for molecular typing. A total of 59 patients were enrolled, most of them less than 1 year old (40.7 % n = 24), with a previous history of antibiotic use (94.9 %; n = 56) and healthcare-associated infections - predominately urinary tract infections (31.0 %; n = 18). Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most frequent bacteria (47.4 %), followed by Enterobacter cloacae (40.7 %) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11.9 %). For K. pneumoniae, KPC was the predominant resistance mechanism (85.7 %; n = 24) and ST14 was the most common clone (39.3 % n = 11), which included strains closely related by PFGE. In contrast, E. cloacae and P. aeruginosa were prevailing non-carbapenemase-producing isolates (only KPC and VIM were detected in 1 and 3 isolates, respectively) and high genetic diversity according to PFGE and MLST was found in the majority of the cases. In recent years, increasing carbapenem-resistant bacilli in children has become in a matter

  20. Common mental health problems in rural-to-urban migrant workers in Shenzhen, China: prevalence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, B L; Liu, T B; Chan, S S M; Jin, D; Hu, C Y; Dai, J; Chiu, H F K

    2018-06-01

    Rural-to-urban migrant workers are a large marginalised population in urban China. Prevalence estimates of common mental health problems (CMHPs) in previous studies varied widely and very few studies have investigated migration-related factors of CMHPs in migrant workers. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors of CMHPs among Chinese migrant workers. A random sample of 3031 migrant workers of ten manufacturing factories in Shenzhen, China, completed a standardised questionnaire containing socio-demographic and migration-related variables and the Chinese 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). A GHQ-12 score of three or higher was used to denote the presence of CMHPs. The prevalence of CMHPs was 34.4% in Chinese migrant workers. In multiple logistic regression, risk factors for CMHPs included being 16-25 years old (odd ratio [OR] 1.65, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28, 2.12), being 26-35 years old (OR 1.36, 95% CI: 1.05, 1.75), low monthly income (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.04, 1.92), poor living condition (OR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.22, 2.54), physical illness in the past 2 weeks (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.43, 2.05), having worked in many cities (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.03, 1.74), infrequently visiting hometown (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.22, 1.99), poor Mandarin proficiency (OR 1.51, 95%CI 1.13, 2.01), a low level of perceived benefits of migration (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.14, 1.55) and working more than 8 h/day (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.14, 1.70). CMHPs are very prevalent among Chinese migrant workers. Given the large number of Chinese migrant workers, there is an urgent need to address the mental health burden of China's migrant worker population.

  1. How Much Will My Child's Operation Cost? Availability of Consumer Prices From US Hospitals for a Common Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgical Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racimo, Allison R; Talathi, Nakul S; Zelenski, Nicole A; Wells, Lawrence; Shah, Apurva S

    2018-05-02

    Price transparency allows patients to make value-based health care decisions and is particularly important for individuals who are uninsured or enrolled in high-deductible health care plans. The availability of consumer prices for children undergoing orthopaedic surgery has not been previously investigated. We aimed to determine the availability of price estimates from hospitals in the United States for an archetypal pediatric orthopaedic surgical procedure (closed reduction and percutaneous pinning of a distal radius fracture) and identify variations in price estimates across hospitals. This prospective investigation utilized a scripted telephone call to obtain price estimates from 50 "top-ranked hospitals" for pediatric orthopaedics and 1 "non-top-ranked hospital" from each state and the District of Columbia. Price estimates were requested using a standardized script, in which an investigator posed as the mother of a child with a displaced distal radius fracture that needed closed reduction and pinning. Price estimates (complete or partial) were recorded for each hospital. The number of calls and the duration of time required to obtain the pricing information was also recorded. Variation was assessed, and hospitals were compared on the basis of ranking, teaching status, and region. Less than half (44%) of the 101 hospitals provided a complete price estimate. The mean price estimate for top-ranked hospitals ($17,813; range, $2742 to $49,063) was 50% higher than the price estimate for non-top-ranked hospitals ($11,866; range, $3623 to $22,967) (P=0.020). Differences in price estimates were attributable to differences in hospital fees (P=0.003), not surgeon fees. Top-ranked hospitals required more calls than non-top-ranked hospitals (4.4±2.9 vs. 2.8±2.3 calls, P=0.003). A longer duration of time was required to obtain price estimates from top-ranked hospitals than from non-top-ranked hospitals (8.2±9.4 vs. 4.1±5.1 d, P=0.024). Price estimates for pediatric

  2. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Computed tomography has made possible the excellent and basic work having to do with the characteristics of the trachea, its caliber, shape, and length in children. Another group of articles has to do with interventional pediatric radiology. This year there were a number of articles of which only a sample is included, dealing with therapeutic procedures involving drainage of abscesses, angioplasty, nephrostomy, therapeutic embolization, and the removal of esophageal foreign bodies. Obviously, there is no reason to think that techniques developed for the adult may not be applicable to the infant or child; also, there is no reason to believe that processes peculiar to the child should not be amenable to intervention, for instance, use of embolization of hepatic hemangioma and transluminal balloon valvuloplasty for pulmonary valvular stenosis. Among the reports and reviews, the author would add that sonography remains a basic imaging technique in pediatric radiology and each year its application broadens. For example, there is an excellent article having to do with sonography of the neonatal and infant hip and evaluation of the inferior vena cava and the gallbladder. Nuclear medicine continues to play a significant role in diagnosis, which is featured in two articles concerned with problems of the hip

  3. A hybrid algorithm for solving the economic lot and delivery scheduling problem in the common cycle case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens; Ju, S.

    2006-01-01

    The ELDSP problem is a combined lot sizing and sequencing problem. A supplier produces and delivers components of different types to a consumer in batches. The task is to determine the cycle time, i.e., the time between deliveries, which minimizes the total cost per time unit. This includes the d...

  4. Influence of Child Factors on Health-Care Professionals' Recognition of Common Childhood Mental-Health Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burke, Delia A; Koot, Hans M; de Wilde, Amber; Begeer, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Early recognition of childhood mental-health problems can help minimise long-term negative outcomes. Recognition of mental-health problems, needed for referral and diagnostic evaluation, is largely dependent on health-care professionals' (HCPs) judgement of symptoms presented by the child. This

  5. Pediatric Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Patient Resources Home » Patients & Families » About Stroke » Pediatric Stroke » Introduction Introduction What is a Stroke? Ischemic Stroke Intracerebral Hemorrhage Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Pediatric Stroke Introduction Types of Stroke Diagnosis and Treatment ...

  6. Myocarditis - pediatric

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007307.htm Myocarditis - pediatric To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in ...

  7. A Hybrid Algorithm for Solving the Economic Lot and Delivery Scheduling Problem in the Common Cycle Case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ju, Suquan; Clausen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    The ELDSP problem is a combined lot sizing and sequencing problem. A supplier produces and delivers components of different component types to a consumer in batches. The task is to determine the cycle time, i.e. that time between deliveries, which minimizes the total cost per time unit. This incl......The ELDSP problem is a combined lot sizing and sequencing problem. A supplier produces and delivers components of different component types to a consumer in batches. The task is to determine the cycle time, i.e. that time between deliveries, which minimizes the total cost per time unit....... This includes the determination of the production sequence of the component types within each cycle. We investigate the computational behavior of two published algorithms, a heuristic and an optimal algorithm. With large number of component types, the optimal algorithm has long running times. We devise a hybrid...

  8. Pediatric maxillary fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jack; Dinsmore, Robert; Mar, Philip; Bhatt, Kirit

    2011-07-01

    Pediatric craniofacial structures differ from those of adults in many ways. Because of these differences, management of pediatric craniofacial fractures is not the same as those in adults. The most important differences that have clinical relevance are the mechanical properties, craniofacial anatomy, healing capacity, and dental morphology. This article will review these key differences and the management of pediatric maxillary fractures. From the mechanical properties' perspective, pediatric bones are much more resilient than adult bones; as such, they undergo plastic deformation and ductile failure. From the gross anatomic perspective, the relative proportion of the cranial to facial structures is much larger for the pediatric patients and the sinuses are not yet developed. The differences related to dentition and dental development are more conical crowns, larger interdental spaces, and presence of permanent tooth buds in the pediatric population. The fracture pattern, as a result of all the above, does not follow the classic Le Fort types. The maxillomandibular fixation may require circum-mandibular wires, drop wires, or Ivy loops. Interfragmentary ligatures using absorbable sutures play a much greater role in these patients. The use of plates and screws should take into consideration the future development with respect to growth centers and the location of the permanent tooth buds. Pediatric maxillary fractures are not common, require different treatments, and enjoy better long-term outcomes.

  9. Access to Medicines : Common problems, common solutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stephens, P.N.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates four cross-cutting controversies in access to medicines – aspects of pharmaceutical R&D, equity, generics policy and scale up. Chapter 2 describes the state of pharmaceutical research and development (R&D). It finds that failure rates remain high with the probability of

  10. Chronicle of pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, Gabriele; Richter, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    The chronicle of pediatric radiology covers the following issues: Development of pediatric radiology in Germany (BRD, DDR, pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in the Netherlands (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Austria (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations); development of pediatric radiology in Switzerland (chronology and pediatric radiological accommodations).

  11. Training Pediatric Residents and Pediatricians about Adolescent Mental Health Problems: A Proof-of-Concept Pilot for a Proposed National Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Lawrence; Olson, Cheryl K.; Schlozman, Steven; Goldstein, Mark; Warner, Dorothy; Beresin, Eugene V.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: This article presents a DVD-based educational program intended to help pediatric residents and practicing pediatricians recognize and respond to adolescent depression in busy primary care settings. Methods: Representatives from pediatrics and adolescent medicine, child and adolescent psychiatry and psychology, and experts in the…

  12. Attention for pediatric interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Ming; Cheng Yongde

    2005-01-01

    ; devices closure of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect and patent ducts; and radiofrequency ablation of arrhythmias and others. Pediatric radiologists usually only take the responsibility for diagnosis of angiocardiography and do not take part in cardiac interventional procedures in most children's hospitals of China. The problem of underdevelopment of pediatric interventional radiology in China possesses a lot of reasons, even historical. Most of pediatric patients are confined in children's hospital with shortage of advanced equipment and enough pediatric interventional patients due to the old price system, the old medical insurance system and old financial support system, outcoming with the economic condition of most children's hospital be more inferior than the adult general hospital. (authors)

  13. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is a fast, painless exam that uses ... of Children's CT? What is Children's CT? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  14. A New Approach for the Approximations of Solutions to a Common Fixed Point Problem in Metric Fixed Point Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishak Altun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We provide sufficient conditions for the existence of a unique common fixed point for a pair of mappings T,S:X→X, where X is a nonempty set endowed with a certain metric. Moreover, a numerical algorithm is presented in order to approximate such solution. Our approach is different to the usual used methods in the literature.

  15. Pediatric lower extremity mower injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sean M; Elwood, Eric T

    2011-09-01

    Lawn mower injuries in children represent an unfortunate common problem to the plastic reconstructive surgeon. There are approximately 68,000 per year reported in the United States. Compounding this problem is the fact that a standard treatment algorithm does not exist. This study follows a series of 7 pediatric patients treated for lower extremity mower injuries by a single plastic surgeon. The extent of soft tissue injury varied. All patients were treated with negative pressure wound therapy as a bridge to definitive closure. Of the 7 patients, 4 required skin grafts, 1 required primary closure, 1 underwent a lower extremity amputation secondary to wounds, and 1 was repaired using a cross-leg flap. Function limitations were minimal for all of our patients after reconstruction. Our basic treatment algorithm is presented with initial debridement followed by the simplest method possible for wound closure using negative pressure wound therapy, if necessary.

  16. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    Egypt J Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2008; 6(2): 51-56. 51. Epidemiological Pattern and Management of Pediatric Asthma. Review of Ain Shams Pediatric Hospital Chest Clinic Data. Cairo, Egypt 1995-2004. INTRODUCTION. Bronchial asthma is a major worldwide health problem, which has received increased attention in.

  17. Screening for distress, the 6th vital sign: common problems in cancer outpatients over one year in usual care: associations with marital status, sex, and age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giese-Davis Janine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Very few studies examine the longitudinal prevalence of problems and the awareness or use of clinical programs by patients who report these problems. Of the studies that examine age, gender and marital status as predictors of a range of patient outcomes, none examines the interactions between these demographic variables. This study examined the typical trajectory of common practical and psychosocial problems endorsed over 12 months in a usual-care sample of cancer outpatients. Specifically, we examined whether marital status, sex, age, and their interactions predicted these trajectories. We did not actively triage or refer patients in this study in order to examine the natural course of problem reports. Methods Patients completed baseline screening (N = 1196 of 1707 approached and the sample included more men (N = 696 than women (N = 498, average age 61.1 years. The most common diagnoses were gastrointestinal (27.1%, prostate (19.2%, skin (11.1% and gynecological (9.2%. Among other measures, patients completed a Common Problem Checklist and Psychosocial Resources Use questions at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months using paper and pencil surveys. Results Results indicated that patients reported psychosocial problems more often than practical and both decreased significantly over time. Younger single patients reported more practical problems than those in committed relationships. Younger patients and women of all ages reported more psychosocial problems. Among a number of interesting interactions, for practical problems, single older patients improved more; whereas among married people, younger patients improved more. For psychosocial problems we found that older female patients improved more than younger females, but among males, it was younger patients who improved more. Young single men and women reported the most past-and future-use of services. Conclusions Younger women are particularly vulnerable to experiencing

  18. A randomized trial of teen online problem solving for improving executive function deficits following pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L; Walz, Nicolay C; Carey, JoAnne; Williams, Kendra M; Cass, Jennifer; Herren, Luke; Mark, Erin; Yeates, Keith Owen

    2010-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of teen online problem solving (TOPS) in improving executive function (EF) deficits following traumatic brain injury (TBI) in adolescence. Families of adolescents (aged 11-18 years) with moderate to severe TBI were recruited from the trauma registry of 2 tertiary-care children's hospitals and then randomly assigned to receive TOPS (n = 20), a cognitive-behavioral, skill-building intervention, or access to online resources regarding TBI (Internet resource comparison; n = 21). Parent and teen reports of EF were assessed at baseline and a posttreatment follow-up (mean = 7.88 months later). Improvements in self-reported EF skills were moderated by TBI severity, with teens with severe TBI in the TOPS treatment reporting significantly greater improvements than did those with severe TBI in the Internet resource comparison. The treatment groups did not differ on parent ratings of EF at the follow up. Findings suggest that TOPS may be effective in improving EF skills among teens with severe TBI.

  19. The most common problem facing by the maintenance department: A case Study between Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) and Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norazam Yasin, Mohd; Mohamad Zin, Rosli; Halid Abdullah, Abd; Shafiq Mahmad, Muhammad; Fikri Hasmori, Muhammad

    2017-11-01

    From time to time, the maintenance works become more challenging due to construction of new building and also aging of the existing buildings. University buildings without any exception require proper maintenance services to support their function requirements and this can be considered as major responsibilities to be fulfilled by the maintenance department in the universities. Maintenance department specifically will face various kinds of problems in their operation works and thus this might influence the maintenance work operations itself. This study purposely to identify the common problem facing by the maintenance department and also to examine the current status of the maintenance department. In addition, this study would also propose any suitable approach that could be implemented to overcome the problem facing by the maintenance department. To achieve the objectives of this study, a combination of deep literature study and carrying out a survey is necessary. Literature study aimed to obtain deeper information about this study, meanwhile a survey aimed at identifying the common problem facing by the maintenance department and also to provide the information of the maintenance department’s organization. Several methods will be used in analyzing the data obtained through the survey, including Microsoft Office Excel and also using mean index formula. This study has identified three categories of problem in the maintenance department, which are management problems, human resource problem, and technical problems. Following the findings, several solutions being proposed which can be implemented as the solution to the problem facing. These suggestions have the potential to improve the maintenance department work efficiency, thus could help to increase the department productivity.

  20. Pediatric Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nicole Shu-Wen; Choi, Jessy; Cheung, Chui Ming Gemmy

    2018-01-01

    Pediatric uveitis differs from adult-onset uveitis and is a topic of special interest because of its diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Children with uveitis are often asymptomatic and the uveitis is often chronic, persistent, recurrent, and resistant to conventional treatment. Anterior uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in children; the prevalence of intermediate, posterior, and panuveitis varies geographically and among ethnic groups. Regarding etiology, most cases of pediatric uveitis are idiopathic but can be due to systemic inflammatory disorders, infections, or a manifestation of masquerade syndrome. Ocular complications include cataracts, hypotony or glaucoma, band keratopathy, synechiae formation, macular edema, optic disc edema, choroidal neovascular membranes, and retinal detachment. These complications are often severe, leading to irreversible structural damage and significant visual disability due to delayed presentation and diagnosis, persistent chronic inflammation from suboptimal treatment, topical and systemic corticosteroid dependence, and delayed initiation of systemic disease‒modifying agents. Treatment for noninfectious uveitis is a stepwise approach starting with corticosteroids. Immunomodulatory therapy should be initiated in cases where quiescence cannot be achieved without steroid dependence. Patients should be monitored regularly for complications of uveitis along with systemic and ocular adverse effects from treatments. The goals are to achieve steroid-free durable remission, to reduce the risk of sight-threatening complications from the uncontrolled ocular inflammation, and to avoid the impact of lifelong burden of visual loss on the child and their family. Multidisciplinary management will ensure holistic care of affected children and improve the support for their families. Copyright 2018 Asia-Pacific Academy of Ophthalmology.

  1. Radiology illustrated. Pediatric radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-One (ed.) [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-11-01

    Depicts characteristic imaging findings of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. Will serve as an ideal diagnostic reference in daily practice. Offers an excellent teaching aid, with numerous high-quality illustrations. This case-based atlas presents images depicting the findings typically observed when imaging a variety of common and uncommon diseases in the pediatric age group. The cases are organized according to anatomic region, covering disorders of the brain, spinal cord, head and neck, chest, cardiovascular system, gastrointestinal system, genitourinary system, and musculoskeletal system. Cases are presented in a form resembling teaching files, and the images are accompanied by concise informative text. The goal is to provide a diagnostic reference suitable for use in daily routine by both practicing radiologists and radiology residents or fellows. The atlas will also serve as a teaching aide and a study resource, and will offer pediatricians and surgeons guidance on the clinical applications of pediatric imaging.

  2. Pediatric Dentistese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharath Asokan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful practice of pediatric dentistry depends on the establishment of a good relationship between the dentist and the child. Such a relationship is possible only through effective communication. Pediatric dentistry includes both an art and a science component. The focus has been mostly on the technical aspects of our science, and the soft skills we need to develop are often forgotten or neglected. This paper throws light on the communication skills we need to imbibe to be a successful pediatric dentist. A new terminology “Pediatric Dentistese” has been coined similar to motherese, parentese, or baby talk. Since baby talk cannot be applied to all age groups of children, pediatric dentistese has been defined as “the proactive development-based individualized communication between the pediatric dentist and the child which helps to build trust, allay fear, and treat the child effectively and efficiently.”

  3. Challenges and opportunities in coding the commons: problems, procedures, and potential solutions in large-N comparative case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elicia Ratajczyk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available On-going efforts to understand the dynamics of coupled social-ecological (or more broadly, coupled infrastructure systems and common pool resources have led to the generation of numerous datasets based on a large number of case studies. This data has facilitated the identification of important factors and fundamental principles which increase our understanding of such complex systems. However, the data at our disposal are often not easily comparable, have limited scope and scale, and are based on disparate underlying frameworks inhibiting synthesis, meta-analysis, and the validation of findings. Research efforts are further hampered when case inclusion criteria, variable definitions, coding schema, and inter-coder reliability testing are not made explicit in the presentation of research and shared among the research community. This paper first outlines challenges experienced by researchers engaged in a large-scale coding project; then highlights valuable lessons learned; and finally discusses opportunities for further research on comparative case study analysis focusing on social-ecological systems and common pool resources.

  4. Retrospective Survey of Biopsied Oral Lesions in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Lin Wang

    2009-11-01

    Conclusion: The mucous extravasation phenomenon, odontoma, or dentigerous cyst was the most common inflammatory and reactive, neoplastic, or cystic lesion, respectively, in pediatric patients. The relatively high incidence of inflammatory and reactive lesions in pediatric patients implies the importance of stringent oral hygiene in children. Most oral neoplastic lesions in pediatric patients are benign, and malignant oral tumors rarely occur in pediatric patients.

  5. On Harmonizing the External Economic Policy among the Countries of the Common Economic Space: Problems and Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Ratushnyak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the tax systems of the countries of the customs union of Belarus, Kazakhstan and Russia, reveals the differences and identifies the need for harmonization and convergence of the structures and principles of taxation, the general tax reforms and harmonization of fiscal policies of member countries in order to increase the investment attractiveness and competitiveness of the national economies in the process of development and integration. The comparison of the existing tax systems of the three countries revealed differences affecting the implementation and development of the foreign economic activity of companies in terms of the common market, in particular, the main obstacles to doing business are high tax rates as well as different rates of value added tax (further - VAT regarding indirect taxation, because this tax is the major budget revenue generating tax involved in the pricing and resulted in decreasing in the export potential of the country. One of the major exporters' obstacles of CU, revealed in the paper, is a VAT refund in export transactions, preventing the development of export activity, which reduces the competitiveness of CU on the foreign markets. The harmonization success of fiscal policy depends on the government, and the institution body taking the harmonization, - this paper looks at the necessity of such harmonization among the three countries of customs union, which at present has interstate form while supranational regulation of Eurasian Economic Commission is absent, since it does not have such empowerment. The paper finds the main tax policy directions of harmonization of customs union countries focused on eliminating of the barriers and for easy the implementation of a process for foreign trade enterprises, the development of the participating countries investment attractiveness, the enhancing the products competitiveness, the development of the export activities efficiency on the whole for the

  6. A pilot study of common health problems in smallholder pigs in Angónia and Boane districts, Mozambique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Matos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Apilot survey was conducted in 2 districts in Mozambique to determine the most important health problems facing smallholder pig producers. While African swine fever is the most serious disease that affects pigs at all levels of production in Mozambique, it is likely that productivity is reduced by the presence of mange and gastrointestinal parasites, while in traditional systems the conditions are favourable for the development of porcine cysticercosis caused by the pork tapeworm Taenia solium, which poses a health risk to communities. Results of the pilot survey confirmed that, with the exception of African swine fever, ecto- and endoparasites are probably the most important health risks for producers. Porcine cysticercosis is more prevalent among pigs in traditional, free-ranging systems, while mange becomes a serious factor when pigs are permanently confined.

  7. The problem of the second wind turbine – a note on a common but flawed wind power estimation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kleidon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Several recent wind power estimates suggest that this renewable energy resource can meet all of the current and future global energy demand with little impact on the atmosphere. These estimates are calculated using observed wind speeds in combination with specifications of wind turbine size and density to quantify the extractable wind power. However, this approach neglects the effects of momentum extraction by the turbines on the atmospheric flow that would have effects outside the turbine wake. Here we show with a simple momentum balance model of the atmospheric boundary layer that this common methodology to derive wind power potentials requires unrealistically high increases in the generation of kinetic energy by the atmosphere. This increase by an order of magnitude is needed to ensure momentum conservation in the atmospheric boundary layer. In the context of this simple model, we then compare the effect of three different assumptions regarding the boundary conditions at the top of the boundary layer, with prescribed hub height velocity, momentum transport, or kinetic energy transfer into the boundary layer. We then use simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model that explicitly simulate generation of kinetic energy with momentum conservation. These simulations show that the assumption of prescribed momentum import into the atmospheric boundary layer yields the most realistic behavior of the simple model, while the assumption of prescribed hub height velocity can clearly be disregarded. We also show that the assumptions yield similar estimates for extracted wind power when less than 10% of the kinetic energy flux in the boundary layer is extracted by the turbines. We conclude that the common method significantly overestimates wind power potentials by an order of magnitude in the limit of high wind power extraction. Ultimately, environmental constraints set the upper limit on wind power potential at larger scales rather than

  8. Can work make you mentally ill? A systematic meta-review of work-related risk factors for common mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Samuel B; Modini, Matthew; Joyce, Sadhbh; Milligan-Saville, Josie S; Tan, Leona; Mykletun, Arnstein; Bryant, Richard A; Christensen, Helen; Mitchell, Philip B

    2017-03-01

    It has been suggested that certain types of work may increase the risk of common mental disorders, but the exact nature of the relationship has been contentious. The aim of this paper is to conduct the first comprehensive systematic meta-review of the evidence linking work to the development of common mental health problems, specifically depression, anxiety and/or work-related stress and to consider how the risk factors identified may relate to each other. MEDLINE, PsychInfo, Embase, the Cochrane Collaboration and grey literature databases were systematically searched for review articles that examined work-based risk factors for common mental health problems. All included reviews were subjected to a quality appraisal. 37 review studies were identified, of which 7 were at least moderate quality. 3 broad categories of work-related factors were identified to explain how work may contribute to the development of depression and/or anxiety: imbalanced job design, occupational uncertainty and lack of value and respect in the workplace. Within these broad categories, there was moderate level evidence from multiple prospective studies that high job demands, low job control, high effort-reward imbalance, low relational justice, low procedural justice, role stress, bullying and low social support in the workplace are associated with a greater risk of developing common mental health problems. While methodological limitations continue to preclude more definitive statements on causation between work and mental disorders, there is now a range of promising targets for individual and organisational-level interventions aimed at minimising mental health problems in the workplace. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. PEDIATRIC OPHTHALMLOGY AND STRABISMUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pediatric Refractive Errors in Lautech Teaching Hospital Eye. Clinic ... carry on into adulthood and become a problem later in life such as ... Children with refractive errors but without associated organic ..... for which elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a primary risk factor. .... Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

  10. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... both imaging exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is PET/MRI. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging is performed to help diagnose childhood disorders ...

  13. Microbial pattern of pressure ulcer in pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramita, D. A.; Khairina; Lubis, N. Z.

    2018-03-01

    Pressure ulcer (PU) is a localized trauma to the skin and or tissue beneath which lies in bony prominence due to pressure or pressure that combines with a sharp surface. Several studies have found that PU is a common problem in pediatrics population. Infection at the site of a PU is the most common complication in which the PU may host a resistant microorganism and may turn into a local infection that will be the source of bacteremia in hospitalized patients. To reveal which is the most common microbial species that underlie in pressure ulcer of pediatrics patients.A cross-sectional study was conducted in July-September 2017, involving 18 PU pediatric patients in Haji Adam Malik Hospital. To each subject, swab culture from the ulcer was madein microbial laboratory in Haji Adam Malik Hospital to determine the microbial pattern. This study found that the most common microbial pattern in pressure ulcers of pediatrics patient in Haji Adam Malik Hospital is Acinetobacter baumannii (22.2%).

  14. Pilot randomised controlled trial of the ENGAGER collaborative care intervention for prisoners with common mental health problems, near to and after release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennox, Charlotte; Kirkpatrick, Tim; Taylor, Rod S; Todd, Roxanne; Greenwood, Clare; Haddad, Mark; Stevenson, Caroline; Stewart, Amy; Shenton, Deborah; Carroll, Lauren; Brand, Sarah L; Quinn, Cath; Anderson, Rob; Maguire, Mike; Harris, Tirril; Shaw, Jennifer; Byng, Richard

    2018-01-01

    Rates of common mental health problems are much higher in prison populations, but access to primary care mental health support falls short of community equivalence. Discontinuity of care on release is the norm and is further complicated by substance use and a range of social problems, e.g. homelessness. To address these problems, we worked with criminal justice, third sector social inclusion services, health services and people with lived experiences (peer researchers), to develop a complex collaborative care intervention aimed at supporting men with common mental health problems near to and following release from prison. This paper describes an external pilot trial to test the feasibility of a full randomised controlled trial. Eligible individuals with 4 to 16 weeks left to serve were screened to assess for common mental health problems. Participants were then randomised at a ratio of 2:1 allocation to ENGAGER plus standard care (intervention) or standard care alone (treatment as usual). Participants were followed up at 1 and 3 months' post release. Success criteria for this pilot trial were to meet the recruitment target sample size of 60 participants, to follow up at least 50% of participants at 3 months' post release from prison, and to deliver the ENGAGER intervention. Estimates of recruitment and retention rates and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are reported. Descriptive analyses included summaries (percentages or means) for participant demographics, and baseline characteristics are reported. Recruitment target was met with 60 participants randomised in 9 months. The average retention rates were 73% at 1 month [95% CI 61 to 83] and 47% at 3 months follow-up [95% CI 35 to 59]. Ninety percent of participants allocated to the intervention successfully engaged with a practitioner before release and 70% engaged following release. This pilot confirms the feasibility of conducting a randomised trial for prison leavers with common mental health problems. Based

  15. Phylogenomic approaches to common problems encountered in the analysis of low copy repeats: The sulfotransferase 1A gene family example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benner Steven A

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blocks of duplicated genomic DNA sequence longer than 1000 base pairs are known as low copy repeats (LCRs. Identified by their sequence similarity, LCRs are abundant in the human genome, and are interesting because they may represent recent adaptive events, or potential future adaptive opportunities within the human lineage. Sequence analysis tools are needed, however, to decide whether these interpretations are likely, whether a particular set of LCRs represents nearly neutral drift creating junk DNA, or whether the appearance of LCRs reflects assembly error. Here we investigate an LCR family containing the sulfotransferase (SULT 1A genes involved in drug metabolism, cancer, hormone regulation, and neurotransmitter biology as a first step for defining the problems that those tools must manage. Results Sequence analysis here identified a fourth sulfotransferase gene, which may be transcriptionally active, located on human chromosome 16. Four regions of genomic sequence containing the four human SULT1A paralogs defined a new LCR family. The stem hominoid SULT1A progenitor locus was identified by comparative genomics involving complete human and rodent genomes, and a draft chimpanzee genome. SULT1A expansion in hominoid genomes was followed by positive selection acting on specific protein sites. This episode of adaptive evolution appears to be responsible for the dopamine sulfonation function of some SULT enzymes. Each of the conclusions that this bioinformatic analysis generated using data that has uncertain reliability (such as that from the chimpanzee genome sequencing project has been confirmed experimentally or by a "finished" chromosome 16 assembly, both of which were published after the submission of this manuscript. Conclusion SULT1A genes expanded from one to four copies in hominoids during intra-chromosomal LCR duplications, including (apparently one after the divergence of chimpanzees and humans. Thus, LCRs may

  16. Risk in pediatric anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Neil; Waterhouse, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Risk in pediatric anesthesia can be conveniently classified as minor or major. Major morbidity includes cardiac arrest, brain damage and death. Minor morbidity can be assessed by clinical audits with small patient samples. Major morbidity is rare. It is best assessed by very large clinical studies and by review of closed malpractice claims. Both minor and major morbidity occur most commonly in infants and children under three, especially those with severe co-morbidities. Knowledge of risk profiles in pediatric anesthesia is a starting point for the reduction of risk. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Contact Dermatitis in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Janice L; Perez, Caroline; Jacob, Sharon E

    2016-08-01

    Contact dermatitis is an umbrella term that describes the skin's reaction to contacted noxious or allergenic substances. The two main categories of contact dermatitis are irritant type and allergic type. This review discusses the signs, symptoms, causes, and complications of contact dermatitis. It addresses the testing, treatment, and prevention of contact dermatitis. Proper management of contact dermatitis includes avoidance measures for susceptible children. Implementation of a nickel directive (regulating the use of nickel in jewelry and other products that come into contact with the skin) could further reduce exposure to the most common allergens in the pediatric population. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(8):e287-e292.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Pediatric brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poussaint, Tina Y. [Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Panigrahy, Ashok [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Huisman, Thierry A.G.M. [Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children' s Center, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Division of Pediatric Radiology and Pediatric Neuroradiology, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Among all causes of death in children from solid tumors, pediatric brain tumors are the most common. This article includes an overview of a subset of infratentorial and supratentorial tumors with a focus on tumor imaging features and molecular advances and treatments of these tumors. Key to understanding the imaging features of brain tumors is a firm grasp of other disease processes that can mimic tumor on imaging. We also review imaging features of a common subset of tumor mimics. (orig.)

  19. Diabetes care provider perceptions on family challenges of pediatric type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pediatric healthcare providers' perspectives on barriers to diabetes self-management among youth with type 1 diabetes and strategies to overcome them were explored qualitatively. Family conflict about diabetes care was viewed as a common problem, addressable by behavioral interventions to improve co...

  20. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  1. Pediatric psoriasis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanette B Silverberg

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanette B SilverbergPediatric and Adolescent Dermatology, St. Luke’s-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Pediatric psoriasis consists broadly of 3 age groups of psoriatic patients: infantile psoriasis, a self-limited disease of infancy, psoriasis with early onset, and pediatric psoriasis with psoriatic arthritis. About one-quarter of psoriasis cases begin before the age of 18 years. A variety of clinical psoriasis types are seen in childhood, including plaque-type, guttate, erythrodermic, napkin, and nail-based disease. Like all forms of auto-immunity, susceptibility is likely genetic, but environmental triggers are required to initiate disease activity. The most common trigger of childhood is an upper respiratory tract infection. Once disease has occurred, treatment is determined based on severity and presence of joint involvement. Topical therapies, including corticosteroids and calcipotriene, are the therapies of choice in the initial care of pediatric patients. Ultraviolet light, acitretin and cyclosporine can clear skin symptoms, while methotrexate and etanercept can clear both cutaneous and joint disease. Concern for psychological development is required when choosing psoriatic therapies. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric psoriasis and a rational approach to therapeutics. Keywords: psoriasis, autoimmunity, Streptococcus, etanercept, calcipotriene, topical corticosteroids

  2. Development problems were common five years after positive screening for language disorders and, or, autism at 2.5 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniscalco, Carmela; Fernell, Elisabeth; Thompson, Lucy; Sandberg, Eva; Kadesjö, Björn; Gillberg, Christopher

    2018-04-10

    This study identified whether children who had screened positive for either developmental language disorder (DLD) or autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at the age of 2.5 years had neurodevelopmental assessments five years later. Our study cohort were 288 children born from 1 July 2008 to 20 June 2009 who screened positive for DLD and, or, ASD at 2.5 years. Of these, 237 children were referred to, and assessed, at the Paediatric Speech and Language Pathology clinic (n = 176) or the Child Neuropsychiatry Clinic (n = 61) at the Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Clinical registers covering all relevant outpatient clinics were reviewed five years later with regard to established diagnoses. When the 237 were followed up five years later, 96 (40%) had established neurodevelopmental disorders or problems, often beyond DLD and ASD. Co-existing problems were common in this cohort and multidisciplinary assessments were indicated. The other 60% did not appear in subsequent clinic records. It is likely that this 40% was a minimum rate and that more children will be referred for developmental problems later. Five years after they had been screened positive for DLD and, or autism at 2.5 years, 40% of our cohort had remaining or other developmental problems. ©2018 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Responding to Emotional Stress in Pediatric Hospitals: Results From a National Survey of Chief Nursing Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetsch, Michael; Green, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify leadership awareness of emotional stress and employee support efforts in pediatric hospitals. The current pediatric environment has seen increases in treatment intensity, care duration, and acuity of patients resulting in increased likelihood of being exposed to emotional events. Mail survey was sent to chief nursing officers at 87 pediatric hospitals. A total of 49 responses (56%) were received. Hospitals with less than 250 beds were significantly more likely to rate emotional stress as a large to very large problem, whereas ANCC Magnet® hospitals felt better about support efforts after patient deaths. Most commonly used support offerings focused on staff recovery after a traumatic event as opposed to training for prevention of emotional stress. Emotional stress is a well-recognized issue in pediatric hospitals with comparatively large resource commitment. Further focus on caregiver prevention training and unit leadership recognition of stress may be needed.

  4. Obesity and Pediatric Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughns, Janelle D; Conklin, Laurie S; Long, Ying; Zheng, Panli; Faruque, Fahim; Green, Dionna J; van den Anker, John N; Burckart, Gilbert J

    2018-05-01

    There is a lack of dosing guidelines for use in obese children. Moreover, the impact of obesity on drug safety and clinical outcomes is poorly defined. The paucity of information needed for the safe and effective use of drugs in obese patients remains a problem, even after drug approval. To assess the current incorporation of obesity as a covariate in pediatric drug development, the pediatric medical and clinical pharmacology reviews under the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Amendments Act of 2007 and the FDA Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) of 2012 were reviewed for obesity studies. FDA labels were also reviewed for statements addressing obesity in pediatric patients. Forty-five drugs studied in pediatric patients under the FDA Amendments Act were found to have statements and key words in the medical and clinical pharmacology reviews and labels related to obesity. Forty-four products were identified similarly with pediatric studies under FDASIA. Of the 89 product labels identified, none provided dosing information related to obesity. The effect of body mass index on drug pharmacokinetics was mentioned in only 4 labels. We conclude that there is little information presently available to provide guidance related to dosing in obese pediatric patients. Moving forward, regulators, clinicians, and the pharmaceutical industry should consider situations in drug development in which the inclusion of obese patients in pediatric trials is necessary to facilitate the safe and effective use of new drug products in the obese pediatric population. © 2018, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  5. Pediatric Terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) works with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other research activities.

  6. Pediatric MRI

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The NIH Study of Normal Brain Development is a longitudinal study using anatomical MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS) to map pediatric...

  7. Pediatric uroradiology. 2nd rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fotter, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Since the first edition of Pediatric Uroradiology, very significant advances have been made in the imaging and treatment of common and important pediatric urologic disorders such as vesicoureteric reflux, urinary tract infection, and upper urinary tract dilatation. This revised and extended version takes full account of the sometimes dramatic changes. Where appropriate, new contents have been included, e.g., on genetics, while other information that continues to be pertinent has been retained. This book describes in detail all aspects of pediatric uroradiology. While it is written primarily from the point of view of the radiologist, it includes essential information for the pediatrician, pediatric surgeon, and urologist. It is specifically designed to aid the clinician in decisions on imaging management. The newest techniques and the changing relevance of imaging and interventional procedures are presented, and the diverse problems associated with the changing anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology from the newborn period to adulthood are explained. The whole spectrum of imaging features of agenesis, anomalies, dysplasia, parenchymal diseases, neoplastic diseases, stone disease, renal vascular hypertension, renal failure, renal transplantation, and genitourinary trauma is covered. Individual chapters are devoted to vesicoureteric reflux, urinary tract infection, upper urinary tract dilatation, voiding dysfunction, and neurogenic bladder. A new chapter on the clinical management of common nephrourologic disorders, with the subtitle ''guidelines and beyond,'' explains how imaging is embedded in the whole process of clinical management today. Short conclusions are included at the end of chapters and sections to provide the reader with the key information on the specific topic under consideration. (orig.)

  8. Pediatric uroradiology. 2nd rev. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotter, Richard (ed.) [Univ. Hospital Medical Univ. Graz (Austria). Div. of Pediatric Radiology

    2008-07-01

    Since the first edition of Pediatric Uroradiology, very significant advances have been made in the imaging and treatment of common and important pediatric urologic disorders such as vesicoureteric reflux, urinary tract infection, and upper urinary tract dilatation. This revised and extended version takes full account of the sometimes dramatic changes. Where appropriate, new contents have been included, e.g., on genetics, while other information that continues to be pertinent has been retained. This book describes in detail all aspects of pediatric uroradiology. While it is written primarily from the point of view of the radiologist, it includes essential information for the pediatrician, pediatric surgeon, and urologist. It is specifically designed to aid the clinician in decisions on imaging management. The newest techniques and the changing relevance of imaging and interventional procedures are presented, and the diverse problems associated with the changing anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology from the newborn period to adulthood are explained. The whole spectrum of imaging features of agenesis, anomalies, dysplasia, parenchymal diseases, neoplastic diseases, stone disease, renal vascular hypertension, renal failure, renal transplantation, and genitourinary trauma is covered. Individual chapters are devoted to vesicoureteric reflux, urinary tract infection, upper urinary tract dilatation, voiding dysfunction, and neurogenic bladder. A new chapter on the clinical management of common nephrourologic disorders, with the subtitle 'guidelines and beyond,' explains how imaging is embedded in the whole process of clinical management today. Short conclusions are included at the end of chapters and sections to provide the reader with the key information on the specific topic under consideration. (orig.)

  9. 'Getting back to normal': the added value of an art-based programme in promoting 'recovery' for common but chronic mental health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makin, Sally; Gask, Linda

    2012-03-01

    OBJECTIVES. The aim of this project was to explore the added value of participation in an Arts on Prescription (AoP) programme to aid the process of recovery in people with common but chronic mental health problems that have already undergone a psychological 'talking'-based therapy. METHODS. The study utilized qualitative in-depth interviews with 15 clients with persistent anxiety and depression who had attended an 'AoP' service and had previously received psychological therapy. RESULTS and discussion. Attending AoP aided the process of recovery, which was perceived by participants as 'returning to normality' through enjoying life again, returning to previous activities, setting goals and stopping dwelling on the past. Most were positive about the benefits they had previously gained from talking therapies. However, these alone were not perceived as having been sufficient to achieve recovery. The AoP offered some specific opportunities in this regard, mediated by the therapeutic and effect of absorption in an activity, the specific creative potential of art, and the social aspects of attending the programme. CONCLUSIONS. For some people who experience persistent or relapsing common mental health problems, participation in an arts-based programme provides 'added value' in aiding recovery in ways not facilitated by talking therapies alone.

  10. Burnout Syndrome in Pediatric Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Youbi, Reem A.; Jan, Mohammed M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics.Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabi...

  11. Phantom Limb Pain in Pediatric Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick DeMoss

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Phantom limb pain (PLP is a prevalent problem for children and adolescents undergoing amputation due to cancer treatment. The symptoms are wide ranging from sharp to tingling. PLP in children typically lasts for a few minutes but can be almost constant and can be highly distressing. This focused review describes the characteristics, epidemiology, mechanisms, and evidence-based treatment of PLP in pediatric populations, focusing on pediatric cancer. In pediatric oncology, the administration of chemotherapy is a risk factor that potentially sensitizes the nervous system and predisposes pediatric cancer patients to develop PLP after amputation. Gabapentin, tricyclic antidepressants, opiates, nerve blocks, and epidural catheters have shown mixed success in adults and case reports document potential utility in pediatric patients. Non-pharmacologic treatments, such as mirror therapy, psychotherapy, and acupuncture have also been used in pediatric PLP with success. Prospective controlled trials are necessary to advance care for pediatric patients with PLP.

  12. Bullying and victimisation are common in four-year-old children and are associated with somatic symptoms and conduct and peer problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilola, Anna-Marja; Lempinen, Lotta; Huttunen, Jukka; Ristkari, Terja; Sourander, Andre

    2016-05-01

    There are few population-based studies on bullying behaviour among preschool children. The aims of the study were to investigate the prevalence of bullying behaviour among four-year-old children, as reported by their parents, the prevalence of types of bullying behaviour and the associations between bullying behaviour and psychosocial factors. This study was based on a population-based study sample of 931 children who attended their check-up at a child health clinic at four years of age. Parents completed the questionnaire about their child's bullying behaviour and risk factors during the check-up. Bullying behaviour, especially being both a bully and a victim, was a common phenomenon among four-year-old children. Being a bully or both a bully and victim were most strongly associated with conduct problems, while being a victim was associated with somatic symptoms and peer problems. Bullying behaviour was frequently found in preschool children and associated with a wide range of other problems, which indicate that routine checking of bullying behaviour should be included in child health clinic check-ups. Bullying prevention programmes are usually targeted at school-aged children, but this study highlights the importance of focusing already on preschool children. ©2016 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. [Common pediatric infectious diseases following natural disasters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kai-Hu

    2013-06-01

    Natural disasters may lead to the outbreaks of infectious diseases because they increase the risk factors for infectious diseases. This paper reviews the risk factors for infectious diseases after natural disasters, especially earthquake, and the infectious diseases following disasters reported in recent years. The infectious diseases after earthquake include diarrhea, cholera, viral hepatitis, upper respiratory tract infection, tuberculosis, measles, leptospirosis, dengue fever, tetanus, and gas gangrene, as well as some rare infections. Children are vulnerable to infectious diseases, so pediatricians should pay more attention to the research on relationship between infectious diseases and natural disasters.

  14. Profile ENT surgery in a pediatric hospital in Curitiba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mocellin, Marcos

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: ENT procedures are very common in the pediatric surgery and otolaryngologists have a wide range of surgical procedures, and adenotonsillectomy most performed procedure, followed by otological. The most common complication is bleeding from tonsillectomies. Despite being the most feared complication, only a minority of patients need surgical intervention to stop the bleed. Objective: To evaluate the surgical profile in hospital pediatric otolaryngology Curitiba. Method: Retrospective Study of registered surgeries. Results: A total 2020 procedures performed in the operating room in 2009, 9.26% (187 and tests were 90.74% (1833 surgeries, being 65.14% (1316 performed by the SUS,% 32.47 (656 by covenant and 2.39% (48 individuals. The gender distribution was 1106 boys and 914 girls. Adenoidectomy with or without tonsillectomy corresponded to 62.5% (1146. Of these, only 0.96% (11 underwent revision surgery center. In second place comes the otological surgery, with results of tympanostomy, with or without ventilation tube, the most prevalent. Conclusion: The otolaryngologists are able to perform various types of ENT surgical. A procedure most frequently performed in pediatric hospital in Little Prince is adenotonsillectomy, with revision rate similar to that reported in the literature. Boys are more subjected to procedures than girls. Most ENT procedures performed in this hospital in 2009 were performed by the SUS. This shows the importance of adenotonsillectomy in the daily practice of pediatric ENT, and the weight of this problem among users of SUS is great.

  15. Constipation in pediatric patients with lower urinary tract symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhammad, S.; Nawaz, G.; Jamil, I.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of constipation in patients with pediatric age group presenting with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS). Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Outpatient Department of Urology in Pakistan Kidney Institute at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, from November 2012 to February 2014. Methodology: Two hundred pediatric patients presenting with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) were studied in terms of age, gender, obstructive and irritative types of LUTS along with any associated symptoms. Constipation was assessed by Bristol stool chart in these patients. Patients with exstrophy of bladder were excluded from the study. Descriptive statistics were measured for both qualitative and quantitative variables. For qualitative variables like gender, presenting symptoms, constipation and stool types, percentages and frequencies were calculated. For quantitative variables like age, percentages / mean ± SD were calculated. Results: Mean age was 6.87 ± 3.64 years with a range of 2 - 14 years. Constipation was found in 37.5% of the pediatric patients with lower urinary tract symptoms. Conclusion: Constipation is frequent and overlooked problem in pediatric patients having urinary symptoms. Irritative lower urinary tract symptoms are more common. Children up to 5 years of age are the most common sufferers. Knowing the burden of constipation in such patients can help physicians in better treatment of such cases. (author)

  16. ANALGESICS ANTIPYRETICS IN PEDIATRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Zaitseva

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers one of the most critical issues in the pediatrics: the problem of children's hyperthermia. The article features the fever pathogenesis and 'points of application' for antipyretics, the data on efficiency and side effects of this group of medications, as well as indications to reduce heightened body temperature of children. The author demonstrates her own experience: an application of an antipyretic — ibuprofen.Key words: fever, antipyretics, medications of choice, medical indications, children.

  17. Imaging pediatric magnet ingestion with surgical-pathological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otjen, Jeffrey P.; Iyer, Ramesh S.; Rohrmann, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population and a frequent cause for emergency room visits. Magnets are common household objects that when ingested can bring about severe, possibly fatal gastrointestinal complications. Radiography is an integral component of the management of these children. Pediatric and emergency radiologists alike must be aware of imaging manifestations of magnet ingestion, as their identification drives decision-making for consulting surgeons and gastroenterologists. Radiology can thus substantially augment the clinical history and physical exam, facilitating appropriate management. This manuscript sequentially presents cases of magnet ingestion featuring imaging findings coupled with surgical and pathological correlation. Each case is presented to highlight ways in which the radiologist can make impactful contributions to diagnosis and management. Clinical overview with pitfalls of magnet ingestion imaging and an imaging decision tree will also be presented. (orig.)

  18. Imaging pediatric magnet ingestion with surgical-pathological correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otjen, Jeffrey P; Rohrmann, Charles A; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2013-07-01

    Foreign body ingestion is a common problem in the pediatric population and a frequent cause for emergency room visits. Magnets are common household objects that when ingested can bring about severe, possibly fatal gastrointestinal complications. Radiography is an integral component of the management of these children. Pediatric and emergency radiologists alike must be aware of imaging manifestations of magnet ingestion, as their identification drives decision-making for consulting surgeons and gastroenterologists. Radiology can thus substantially augment the clinical history and physical exam, facilitating appropriate management. This manuscript sequentially presents cases of magnet ingestion featuring imaging findings coupled with surgical and pathological correlation. Each case is presented to highlight ways in which the radiologist can make impactful contributions to diagnosis and management. Clinical overview with pitfalls of magnet ingestion imaging and an imaging decision tree will also be presented.

  19. TH-B-207B-00: Pediatric Image Quality Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children

  20. TH-B-207B-00: Pediatric Image Quality Optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2016-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children.

  1. Atypical disease phenotypes in pediatric ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levine, Arie; de Bie, Charlotte I; Turner, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Definitive diagnosis of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) may be particularly challenging since isolated colitis with overlapping features is common in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD), while atypical phenotypes of UC are not uncommon. The Paris classification allows more accurate phenotyping...... of atypical inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Our aim was to identify the prevalence of atypical disease patterns in new-onset pediatric UC using the Paris classification....

  2. Comparative analysis of a hypothetical coolant loss accident in an LMFB reactor with the use of various calculation models for a common reference problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royl, P.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a comparative analysis of the initial and dismantling stages of a hypothetical loss of flow accident in an LMFB reactor are presented. The analyses were made for a common reference problem with four different calculation models (CARMEN/KADIS, SURDYN, CAPRI/KADIS and FRAX). The reference core is described specifically, as are the differences in its geometrical disposition in the models, the static and transient conditions before and after the start of boiling and during dismantling. The differences in the models used for simulating the boiling and the dismantling are compared. The structure of the core, as well as the calculation conditions and hypotheses, were intentionally designed so that the accident would culminate, in all cases, in an energetic hydrodynamic dismantling stage

  3. Pediatric AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, D.B.; Haller, J.O.; Kramer, J.; Hotson, G.C.; Loh, J.P.; Schlusselberg, D.; Inglese, C.M.; Jacobs, J.; Rose, A.L.; Menez-Bautista, R.; Fikrig, S.

    1988-01-01

    A group of 23 pediatric patients seropositive for HIV antibody were studied by computed tomography and evaluated neurodevelopmentally. Significant neurodevelopmental delays were found in over 95% of the patients studied. CT findings in six patients were normal and thirteen of 23 (57%) had prominence of the CSF spaces. Less frequent findings included calcifications in the basal ganglia and white matter. Cerebral mass lesions included one case of lymphoma and one case of hemorrhage. The CT findings in the pediatric age group differs from the adult population in that that contrast enhancing inflammatory mass lesions are uncommon. (orig.)

  4. Cardiomyopathy in the pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cardiomyopathies are a group of myocardial diseases with complex taxonomies. Cardiomyopathy can occur in children at any age, and it is a common cause of heart failure and heart transplantation in children. The incidence of pediatric cardiomyopathy is increasing with time. They may be associated with variable comorbidities, which are most often arrhythmia, heart failure, and sudden death. Medical imaging technologies, including echocardiography, cardiac magnetic resonance, and nuclear cardiology, are helpful in reaching a diagnosis of cardiomyopathy. Nevertheless, endomyocardial biopsy is the final diagnostic method of diagnosis. Patients warrant surgical operations, such as palliative operations, bridging operations, ventricular septal maneuvers, and heart transplantation, if pharmaceutical therapies are ineffective. Individual therapeutic regimens due to pediatric characteristics, genetic factors, and pathogenesis may improve the effects of treatment and patients' survival. Key Words: cardiomyopathy, classification, pediatrics

  5. Childhood obesity for pediatric gastroenterologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeannie S; Barlow, Sarah E; Quiros-Tejeira, Ruben E; Scheimann, Ann; Skelton, Joseph; Suskind, David; Tsai, Patrika; Uko, Victor; Warolin, Joshua P; Xanthakos, Stavra A

    2013-01-01

    Obesity in childhood is one of the major health issues in pediatric health care today. As expected, the prevalence of obesity-related comorbidities has risen in parallel with that of obesity. Consultation regarding these concomitant diseases and subsequent management by subspecialists, including pediatric gastroenterologists, is now common and has resulted in obesity being recognized as a chronic disease requiring coordination of care. Although medications and even surgery may provide effective, though often temporary, treatments for obesity and its comorbidities, behavioral interventions addressing healthy dietary and physical activity habits remain a mainstay in the obesity treatment paradigm. Therefore, the issue of weight management must be addressed by both general practitioner and subspecialist alike. In this report, we review select aspects of pediatric obesity and obesity-related management issues because it relates in particular to the field of pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology.

  6. A pilot investigation of food insecurity among children seen in an outpatient pediatric nephrology clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Starr

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Food insecurity (FI is common - affecting one in six American households with children. FI is defined as limited or uncertain availability of nutritionally adequate and safe foods. Awareness of food insecurity and its impact on health has increased since the American Academy of Pediatrics 2015 policy statement, “Promoting Food Security for All Children.” Though FI is frequently addressed in general pediatric primary care, it is not routinely identified in patients with chronic medical problems. Patients with complex care needs, prescription medication, or restrictive nutritional requirements may be at higher risk of food insecurity. The prevalence of FI in patients with chronic disease, including pediatric patients with kidney disease, remains unknown. We sought to determine the prevalence of FI among our pediatric nephrology clinic patients with a cross-sectional screening pilot study. Nearly 35% of 118 children seen in our pediatric nephrology outpatient clinic lived in food insecure households, a prevalence rate more than double the general pediatric population (16%. Barriers to food security were variable; common themes included challenges with restricted diet and available food, identifying and accessing community resources, and not qualifying for support. For physicians, dietitians, and other health providers that counsel patients with kidney disease on dietary interventions, it is important to be aware of food security status. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the prevalence of food insecurity in pediatric patients with kidney disease. Further studies of food insecurity and social determinants of heath in this patient population are needed. Keywords: Kidney disease, Pediatrics, Child, Healthcare utilization, Food insecurity, Nutritional status

  7. Intraosseous infusion in elective and emergency pediatric anesthesia: when should we use it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Diego

    2014-06-01

    Difficulties to establish a venous access may also occur in routine pediatric anesthesia and lead to hazardous situations. Intraosseous infusion is a well tolerated and reliable but rarely used alternative technique in this setting. According to recent surveys, severe complications of intraosseous infusion stay a rare event. Minor complications and problems in getting an intraosseous infusion started on the other side seem to be more common than generally announced. The EZ-IO intraosseous infusion system has received expanded EU CE mark approval for an extended dwell time of up to 72 h and for insertion in pediatric patients in the distal femur. Key values of blood samples for laboratory analysis can be obtained with only 2 ml of blood/marrow waste and do also offer reliable values using an I-Stat point-of-care analyzer. Most problems in using an intraosseous infusion are provider-dependent. In pediatric anesthesia, the perioperative setting should further contribute to reduce these problems. Nevertheless, regular training, thorough anatomical knowledge and prompt availability especially in the pediatric age group are paramount to get a seldom used technique work properly under pressure. More longitudinal data on large cohorts were preferable to further support the safety of the intraosseous infusion technique in pediatric patients.

  8. Pediatric oncologic emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietz, Hallie A.

    1997-01-01

    Oncologic emergencies arise in three ways: disease or therapy induced cytopenias; a space occupying lesion causing pressure on or obstruction of surrounding tissues; or leukemia or tumors creating life-threatening metabolic or hormonal problems. Knowledge of presenting signs and symptoms of these emergencies are essential in pediatric oncologic nursing. Neutropenia opens the door for all manner of infections, but the most life threatening is septicemia progressing to shock. A variety of organisms can cause septic shock in the neutropenic patient, but episodes are most often due to gram-negative organisms and the endotoxins they release. Shock, while still compensated, may present with a elevated or subnormal temperature, flushed, warm, dry skin, widening pulse pressure, tachycardia, tachypnoea and irritability, but without medical intervention will progress to hypo tension, cool, clammy extremities, decreased urinary out- put, and eventually to bradycardia and cardiogenic shock. Another emergency in the cytopenia category is bleeding as a result of thrombocytopenia. Of greatest concern is intracranial hemorrhage that may occur at platelet counts of less than 5,000/mm3. Space-occupying lesions of the chest may produce superior vena cava syndrome (SVGS), pleural and pericardial effusions, and cardiac tamponade. SVGS is most often caused by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and presents as cough, hoarseness, dyspnea, orthopnea and chest pain. Signs include swelling, plethora, cyanosis, edema of conjunctiva and wheezing. Pleural and pericardial effusions present with respiratory or cardiac distress as does cardiac tamponade. Abdominal emergencies arise because of inflammation, mechanical obstruction, hemorrhage (often from steroid induced ulcers), and perforation. Pain is the most common presenting symptom, although vital sign alterations, fever, blood in vomitus or stool, abdominal distension and cessation of flatus are also important components of the acute abdomen

  9. Pediatric vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to define childhood vasculitis and to highlight new causative factors and treatment modalities under the guidance of recently published studies. Childhood vasculitis is difficult to diagnose because of the wide variation in the symptoms and signs. New nomenclature and classification criteria were proposed for the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the genetic susceptibility to pediatric vasculitis as it was in other diseases. Various radiological techniques provide great opportunities in establishing the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Mild central nervous system disease can accompany Henoch-Schonlein purpura and can go unnoticed. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is rare in children. Increased severity of the disease, subglottic stenosis, and renal disease are described more frequently among children. Biological therapies are used with success in children as in adults. Future studies, whose aims are to evaluate treatment responses, prognosis and to design guidelines for activity, and damage index of vasculitis for children are required. Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the most frequent vasculitides of children. Experience from adult studies for treatment and prognosis are usually used because of low incidence of other vasculitides in children. Multicenter studies of pediatric vasculitis should be conducted to detail treatment responses and prognosis in children.

  10. Pulmonary parenchymal changes in the pediatric patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, G.O. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Analysis of the pediatric chest radiograph for parenchymal pathology is similar to that of the adult. This chapter focuses primarily on the radiographic changes of certain entities presenting to the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU), including airway diseases, pneumonia, pulmonary hemorrhage, and lung trauma, as well as problems related to general anesthesia and surgery

  11. Pediatric epilepsy: The Indian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadgil, Pradnya; Udani, Vrajesh

    2011-10-01

    Epilepsy is a common clinical entity in neurology clinics. The understanding of the genetics of epilepsy has undergone a sea change prompting re-classification by the International league against epilepsy recently. The prevalence rates of epilepsy in India are similar to those of developed nations. However, the large treatment gap is a major challenge to our public health system. Perinatal injuries are a major causative factor in pediatric group. We have discussed a few common etiologies such as neurocysticercosis and newer genetic epilepsy syndromes. We have also briefly touched upon the Indian experience in pediatric epilepsy surgery.

  12. Extrapulmonary involvement in pediatric tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Andres, Mariaem M; Tatco, Vincent R; Lim, Cielo Consuelo Q; Concepcion, Nathan David P

    2017-09-01

    Tuberculosis in childhood is clinically challenging, but it is a preventable and treatable disease. Risk factors depend on age and immunity status. The most common form of pediatric tuberculosis is pulmonary disease, which comprises more than half of the cases. Other forms make up the extrapulmonary tuberculosis that involves infection of the lymph nodes, central nervous system, gastrointestinal system, hepatobiliary tree, and renal and musculoskeletal systems. Knowledge of the imaging characteristics of pediatric tuberculosis provides clues to diagnosis. This article aims to review the imaging characteristics of common sites for extrapulmonary tuberculous involvement in children.

  13. Pediatric digital chest imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarver, R D; Cohen, M; Broderick, N J; Conces, D J

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology.

  14. Pediatric digital chest imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarver, R.D.; Cohen, M.; Broderick, N.J.; Conces, D.J. Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The Philips Computed Radiography system performs well with pediatric portable chest radiographs, handling the throughout of a busy intensive care service 24 hours a day. Images are excellent and routinely provide a conventional (unenhanced) image and an edge-enhanced image. Radiation dose is decreased by the lowered frequency of repeat examinations and the ability of the plates to respond to a much lower dose and still provide an adequate image. The high quality and uniform density of serial PCR portable radiographs greatly enhances diagnostic content of the films. Decreased resolution has not been a problem clinically. Image manipulation and electronic transfer to remote viewing stations appear to be helpful and are currently being evaluated further. The PCR system provides a marked improvement in pediatric portable chest radiology

  15. Common approach to common interests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    In referring to issues confronting the energy field in this region and options to be exercised in the future, I would like to mention the fundamental condition of the utmost importance. That can be summed up as follows: any subject in energy area can never be solved by one country alone, given the geographical and geopolitical characteristics intrinsically possessed by energy. So, a regional approach is needed and it is especially necessary for the main players in the region to jointly address problems common to them. Though it may be a matter to be pursued in the distant future, I am personally dreaming a 'Common Energy Market for Northeast Asia,' in which member countries' interests are adjusted so that the market can be integrated and the region can become a most economically efficient market, thus formulating an effective power to encounter the outside. It should be noted that Europe needed forty years to integrate its market as the unified common market. It is necessary for us to follow a number of steps over the period to eventually materialize our common market concept, too. Now is the time for us to take a first step to lay the foundation for our descendants to enjoy prosperity from such a common market.

  16. Pediatric Type Follicular Lymphoma: A Rare Entity with Excellent Prognosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-19

    YYYY) 12. REPORT TYPE 19/01/2018 Poster 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pediatric -Type Follicular Lymphoma: A Rare Entity with Excellent Prognosis 6. AUTHOR(S...lymphoma is common in older adults but rare in pediatric and young adult patients. Pediatric follicular lymphoma comprises a only 6.5% of childhood... Pediatric follicular lymphoma is defined by a localized high grade appearing lymphoma that lacks these gene rearrangements. Other diagnoses to rule out

  17. Psychiatric Boarding in the Pediatric Inpatient Medical Setting: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Katherine A S; Bujoreanu, I Simona; Cheung, Priscilla; Choi, Christine; Golden, Sara; Brodziak, Kerry; Andrade, Gabriela; Ibeziako, Patricia

    2017-08-01

    Psychiatric concerns are a common presenting problem for pediatric providers across many settings, particularly on inpatient medical services. The volume of youth requiring intensive psychiatric treatment outnumbers the availability of psychiatric placements, and as a result many youth must board on pediatric medical units while awaiting placement. As the phenomenon of boarding in the inpatient pediatric setting increases, it is important to understand trends in boarding volume and characteristics of pediatric psychiatric boarders (PBs) and understand the supports they receive while boarding. A retrospective chart review of patients admitted as PBs to a medical inpatient unit at a large northeastern US pediatric hospital during 2013. Four hundred thirty-seven PBs were admitted to the medical service from January to December 2013, representing a more than 50% increase from PB admissions in 2011 and 2012. Most PBs were admitted for suicidal attempt and/or ideation. Average length of boarding was 3.11 ± 3.34 days. PBs received a wide range of mental health supports throughout their admissions. PBs demonstrated modest but statistically significant clinical improvements over the course of their stay, with only a small proportion demonstrating clinical deterioration. Psychiatric boarding presents many challenges for families, providers, and the health care system, and PBs have complex psychiatric histories and needs. However, boarding may offer a valuable opportunity for psychiatric intervention and stabilization among psychiatrically vulnerable youth. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  18. Organic Ferroelectric-Based 1T1T Random Access Memory Cell Employing a Common Dielectric Layer Overcoming the Half-Selection Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Hanlin; Ni, Zhenjie; Liu, Jie; Zhen, Yonggang; Zhang, Xiaotao; Jiang, Lang; Li, Rongjin; Dong, Huanli; Hu, Wenping

    2017-09-01

    Organic electronics based on poly(vinylidenefluoride/trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF-TrFE)) dielectric is facing great challenges in flexible circuits. As one indispensable part of integrated circuits, there is an urgent demand for low-cost and easy-fabrication nonvolatile memory devices. A breakthrough is made on a novel ferroelectric random access memory cell (1T1T FeRAM cell) consisting of one selection transistor and one ferroelectric memory transistor in order to overcome the half-selection problem. Unlike complicated manufacturing using multiple dielectrics, this system simplifies 1T1T FeRAM cell fabrication using one common dielectric. To achieve this goal, a strategy for semiconductor/insulator (S/I) interface modulation is put forward and applied to nonhysteretic selection transistors with high performances for driving or addressing purposes. As a result, high hole mobility of 3.81 cm 2 V -1 s -1 (average) for 2,6-diphenylanthracene (DPA) and electron mobility of 0.124 cm 2 V -1 s -1 (average) for N,N'-1H,1H-perfluorobutyl dicyanoperylenecarboxydiimide (PDI-FCN 2 ) are obtained in selection transistors. In this work, we demonstrate this technology's potential for organic ferroelectric-based pixelated memory module fabrication. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Speech Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Speech Problems KidsHealth / For Teens / Speech Problems What's in ... a person's ability to speak clearly. Some Common Speech and Language Disorders Stuttering is a problem that ...

  20. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Pediatric biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvaterra, Elena; Giorda, Roberto; Bassi, Maria T

    2012-01-01

    Ethical, legal, and social issues related to the collection, storage, and use of biospecimens and data derived from children raise critical concerns in the international debate. So far, a number of studies have considered a variety of the individual issues crucial to pediatric biobanking such as ......Ethical, legal, and social issues related to the collection, storage, and use of biospecimens and data derived from children raise critical concerns in the international debate. So far, a number of studies have considered a variety of the individual issues crucial to pediatric biobanking...... such as decision making, privacy protection, minor recontact, and research withdrawal by focusing on theoretical or empirical perspectives. Our research attempted to analyze such issues in a comprehensive manner by exploring practices, rules, and researcher opinions regarding proxy consent, minor assent, specimens...

  2. Pediatric stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoermann, M.

    2008-01-01

    Stroke in childhood has gained increasingly more attention and is accepted as an important disease in childhood. The reasons for this severe event and the consequences for the rest of the life are totally different than for adults. This is also true for the diagnosis and therapy. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the characteristics of pediatric stroke to assist radiologists in making a rapid and safe diagnosis in order to identify the underlying disease. (orig.) [de

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses ... limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of ...

  4. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... discharge; Heart valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 434. ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts ... Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical imaging ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging ... the limitations of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small ... of Children's Nuclear Medicine? What is Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine is a branch of medical ...

  9. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benz-Bohm, G.

    1997-01-01

    Pediatric radiology is an important subsection of diagnostic radiology involving specific difficulties, but unfortunately is quite too often neglected as a subject of further education and training. The book therefore is not intended for specialists in the field, but for radiologists wishing to plunge deeper into the matter of pediatric radiology and to acquire a sound, basic knowledge and information about well-proven modalities, the resulting diagnostic images, and interpretation of results. The book is a compact guide and a helpful source of reference and information required for every-day work, or in special cases. With patients who are babies or children, the challenges are different. The book offers all the information needed, including important experience from pediatric hospital units that may be helpful in diagnostic evaluation, information about specific dissimilarities in anatomy and physiology which affect the imaging results, hints for radiology planning and performance, as well as information about the various techniques and their indication and achievements. The book presents a wide spectrum of informative and annotated images. (orig./CB) [de

  10. Days out-of-role due to common physical and mental health problems: Results from the Sao Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Helena Andrade

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relative importance of common physical and mental disorders with regard to the number of days out-of-role (DOR; number of days for which a person is completely unable to work or carry out normal activities because of health problems in a population-based sample of adults in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area, Brazil. METHODS: The São Paulo Megacity Mental Health Survey was administered during face-to-face interviews with 2,942 adult household residents. The presence of 8 chronic physical disorders and 3 classes of mental disorders (mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders was assessed for the previous year along with the number of days in the previous month for which each respondent was completely unable to work or carry out normal daily activities due to health problems. Using multiple regression analysis, we examined the associations of the disorders and their comorbidities with the number of days out-of-role while controlling for socio-demographic variables. Both individual-level and population-level associations were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 13.1% of the respondents reported 1 or more days out-of-role in the previous month, with an annual median of 41.4 days out-of-role. The disorders considered in this study accounted for 71.7% of all DOR; the disorders that caused the greatest number of DOR at the individual-level were digestive (22.6, mood (19.9, substance use (15.0, chronic pain (16.5, and anxiety (14.0 disorders. The disorders associated with the highest population-attributable DOR were chronic pain (35.2%, mood (16.5%, and anxiety (15.0% disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Because pain, anxiety, and mood disorders have high effects at both the individual and societal levels, targeted interventions to reduce the impairments associated with these disorders have the highest potential to reduce the societal burdens of chronic illness in the São Paulo Metropolitan Area.

  11. Find a Pediatric Dentist

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AAPD AAPD Publications Advertising Brochures Journals & Publications Full Journal Archives Access Pediatric Dentistry Today Practice Management and Marketing Newsletter Pediatric Dentistry Journal Open Access Articles Oral ...

  12. Identification of emotional and behavior problems in obese children using Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL and 17-items Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC-17

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Fachri Harahap

    2010-03-01

    Conclusions The prevalence of emotional and behavior problems detected using CBCL and PSC-17 in obese children was 28% and 22%, respectively. The PSC-17 has moderate sensitivity to screen emotional and behavior problem in obese children.[Paediatr Indones. 2010;50:42-8].

  13. Evaluation of Pediatric Questions on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination-An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Robert F; Nunez, Leah; Barfield, William R; Mooney, James F

    2017-09-01

    Pediatric orthopaedics is tested frequently on the Orthopaedic In-Training Examination (OITE). The most recent data on the pediatrics section of the OITE were generated from content 10 years old. The purpose of this study is to assess the pediatric orthopaedic questions on the 2011 to 2014 OITE, and to compare question categories and cognitive taxonomy with previous data. Four years (2011 to 2014) of OITE questions, answers, and references were reviewed. The number of pediatric questions per year was recorded, as well as presence of a clinical photo or imaging modality. Each question was categorized and assigned a cognitive taxonomy level. Categories included: knowledge; knowledge-treatment modalities; diagnosis; diagnosis/recognition of associated conditions; diagnosis/further studies; and diagnosis/treatment. Cognitive taxonomy levels included: simple recall, interpretation of data, and advanced problem-solving. The 3 most commonly covered topics were upper extremity trauma (17.4%), scoliosis (10.1%), and developmental dysplasia of the hip (5.7%). Compared with previous data, the percentage of pediatric questions was constant (13% vs. 14%). Categorically, the more recent OITE examinations contained significantly fewer questions testing simple knowledge (19% vs. 39%, P=0.0047), and significantly more questions testing knowledge of treatment modalities (17% vs. 9%, P=0.016) and diagnosis with associated conditions (19% vs. 9%, P=0.0034). Regarding cognitive taxonomy, there was a significant increase in the average number of questions that required advanced problem-solving (57% vs. 46%, P=0.048). Significantly more questions utilized clinical photographs and imaging studies (62% vs. 48%, P=0.012). The most common reference materials provided to support correct responses included Lovell and Winter's Pediatric Orthopaedics (25.7%) and the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics (23.4%). Although the percentage of pediatric questions on the OITE has remained essentially

  14. The Dutch version of the Oxford Ankle and Foot Questionnaire for Children: Useful for evaluation of pediatric foot problems in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Elise; Selles, Ruud; van Nieuwkasteele, Shelly; Bessems, Gert; Pollet, Virginie; Hovius, Steven; van Nieuwenhoven, Christianne

    2017-11-04

    The purpose of this study is to develop a Dutch version of the Oxford Ankle and Foot Questionnaire for Children (OxAFQ-c) to allow evaluation of pediatric foot care. The OxAFQ-c was translated into Dutch, according to the ISPOR-guidelines. Children with different foot and ankle complaints completed the OxAFQ-c at baseline, after two weeks, and after 4-6 months. Measurement properties were assessed in terms of reliability, responsiveness, and construct validity. Test-retest reliability showed moderate intraclass correlation coefficients. Bland-Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement. After 4-6 months, the group that experienced improvement also showed improved questionnaire outcomes, indicating responsiveness. Moderate correlation between the OxAFQ-c and the Kidscreen and foot-specific VAS-scores were observed, indicating moderate construct validity. The Dutch OxAFQ-c showed moderate to good measurement properties. However, because we observed limited sensitivity to changes and wide limits of agreement in individual patients, we think the questionnaire should only be used in groups. Copyright © 2017 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pediatric contact dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vinod

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD in children, until recently, was considered rare. ACD was considered as a disorder of the adult population and children were thought to be spared due to a lack of exposure to potential allergens and an immature immune system. Prevalence of ACD to even the most common allergens in children, like poison ivy and parthenium, is relatively rare as compared to adults. However, there is now growing evidence of contact sensitization of the pediatric population, and it begins right from early childhood, including 1-week-old neonates. Vaccinations, piercing, topical medicaments and cosmetics in younger patients are potential exposures for sensitization. Nickel is the most common sensitizer in almost all studies pertaining to pediatric contact dermatitis. Other common allergens reported are cobalt, fragrance mix, rubber, lanolin, thiomersol, neomycin, gold, mercapto mix, balsum of Peru and colophony. Different factors like age, sex, atopy, social and cultural practices, habit of parents and caregivers and geographic changes affect the patterns of ACD and their variable clinical presentation. Patch testing should be considered not only in children with lesions of a morphology suggestive of ACD, but in any child with dermatitis that is difficult to control.

  16. Abdominal emergencies in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coca Robinot, D; Liébana de Rojas, C; Aguirre Pascual, E

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal symptoms are among the most common reasons for pediatric emergency department visits, and abdominal pain is the most frequently reported symptom. Thorough history taking and physical examination can often reach the correct diagnosis. Knowing the abdominal conditions that are most common in each age group can help radiologists narrow the differential diagnosis. When imaging tests are indicated, ultrasonography is usually the first-line technique, enabling the diagnosis or adding relevant information with the well-known advantages of this technique. Nowadays, plain-film X-ray studies are reserved for cases in which perforation, bowel obstruction, or foreign body ingestion is suspected. It is also important to remember that abdominal pain can also occur secondary to basal pneumonia. CT is reserved for specific indications and in individual cases, for example, in patients with high clinical suspicion of abdominal disease and inconclusive findings at ultrasonography. We review some of the most common conditions in pediatric emergencies, the different imaging tests indicated in each case, and the imaging signs in each condition. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Pediatric obesity: Current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greydanus, Donald E; Agana, Marisha; Kamboj, Manmohan K; Shebrain, Saad; Soares, Neelkamal; Eke, Ransome; Patel, Dilip R

    2018-04-01

    This discussion reflects on concepts of obesity in children and adolescents in the early 21st century. It includes reflections on its history, definition, epidemiology, diagnostic perspectives, psychosocial considerations, musculoskeletal complications, endocrine complications and principles of management. In addition to emphasis on diet and exercise, research and clinical applications in the second decade of the 21 st century emphasize the increasing use of pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery for adolescent and adult populations with critical problems of overweight and obesity. We conclude with a discussion of future directions in pediatric obesity management. Copyright © 2018 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric ambulatory anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    August, David A; Everett, Lucinda L

    2014-06-01

    Pediatric patients often undergo anesthesia for ambulatory procedures. This article discusses several common preoperative dilemmas, including whether to postpone anesthesia when a child has an upper respiratory infection, whether to test young women for pregnancy, which children require overnight admission for apnea monitoring, and the effectiveness of nonpharmacological techniques for reducing anxiety. Medication issues covered include the risks of anesthetic agents in children with undiagnosed weakness, the use of remifentanil for tracheal intubation, and perioperative dosing of rectal acetaminophen. The relative merits of caudal and dorsal penile nerve block for pain after circumcision are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Incarcerated Pediatric Hernias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulhai, Sophia A; Glenn, Ian C; Ponsky, Todd A

    2017-02-01

    Indirect inguinal hernias are the most commonly incarcerated hernias in children, with a higher incidence in low birth weight and premature infants. Contralateral groin exploration to evaluate for a patent processus vaginalis or subclinical hernia is controversial, given that most never progress to clinical hernias. Most indirect inguinal hernias can be reduced nonoperatively. It is recommended to repair them in a timely fashion, even in premature infants. Laparoscopic repair of incarcerated inguinal hernia repair is considered a safe and effective alternative to conventional open herniorrhaphy. Other incarcerated pediatric hernias are extremely rare and may be managed effectively with laparoscopy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, F.N.

    1982-01-01

    A literature review with 186 references of diagnostic pediatric radiology, a speciality restricted to an age group rather than to an organ system or technique of examination, is presented. In the present chapter topics follow the basic organ system divisions with discussions of special techniques within these divisions. The diagnosis of congenital malformations, infectious diseases and neoplasms are a few of the topics discussed for the head and neck region, the vertebrae, the cardiovascular system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal tract, the urinary tract, and the skeleton

  1. Titanium elastic nailing in pediatric femoral diaphyseal fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Roop

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The need for operative fixation of pediatric femoral fractures is increasingly being recognised in the present decade. The conventional traction and casting method for management of pediatric femoral fractures is giving way for the operative stabilisation of the fracture. Methods : Thirty five pediatric patients in age group 6-14 years with diaphyseal femoral fractures were stabilised with two titanium nails. Patients were followed up clinically and radiologically for two years. The final results were evaluated using the criteria of Flynn et al. Technical problems and complications associated with the procedure were also analysed. Results : Overall results observed were excellent in 25, satisfactory in 8 and poor in 2 patients. Hospital time averaged 12.30 days in the series. All the fractures healed with an average time to union of 9.6 (6-14.4 weeks. Return to school was early with an average of 7.8 weeks. The soft tissue discomfort near the knee produced by the nails ends was the most common problem encountered. Shortening was observed in three cases and restriction of knee flexion in 5 patients. There was no delayed union, infection or refractures. Per operative technical problems included failure of closed reduction in 2 cases and cork screwing of nails in one case. Conclusion : We believe that with proper operative technique and aftercare TENs may prove to be an ideal implant for pediatric femoral fracture fixation. The most of the complication associated with the procedure are infact features of inexact technique and can be eliminated by strictly adhering to the basic principles and technical aspects.

  2. Utility of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) in Predicting Mental Health Service Costs for Patients with Common Mental Health Problems: Historical Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twomey, Conal; Prina, A Matthew; Baldwin, David S; Das-Munshi, Jayati; Kingdon, David; Koeser, Leonardo; Prince, Martin J; Stewart, Robert; Tulloch, Alex D; Cieza, Alarcos

    2016-01-01

    Few countries have made much progress in implementing transparent and efficient systems for the allocation of mental health care resources. In England there are ongoing efforts by the National Health Service (NHS) to develop mental health 'payment by results' (PbR). The system depends on the ability of patient 'clusters' derived from the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) to predict costs. We therefore investigated the associations of individual HoNOS items and the Total HoNOS score at baseline with mental health service costs at one year follow-up. An historical cohort study using secondary care patient records from the UK financial year 2012-2013. Included were 1,343 patients with 'common mental health problems', represented by ICD-10 disorders between F32-48. Costs were based on patient contacts with community-based and hospital-based mental health services. The costs outcome was transformed into 'high costs' vs 'regular costs' in main analyses. After adjustment for covariates, 11 HoNOS items were not associated with costs. The exception was 'self-injury' with an odds ratio of 1.41 (95% CI 1.10-2.99). Population attributable fractions (PAFs) for the contribution of HoNOS items to high costs ranged from 0.6% (physical illness) to 22.4% (self-injury). After adjustment, the Total HoNOS score was not associated with costs (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99-1.07). However, the PAF (33.3%) demonstrated that it might account for a modest proportion of the incidence of high costs. Our findings provide limited support for the utility of the self-injury item and Total HoNOS score in predicting costs. However, the absence of associations for the remaining HoNOS items indicates that current PbR clusters have minimal ability to predict costs, so potentially contributing to a misallocation of NHS resources across England. The findings may inform the development of mental health payment systems internationally, especially since the vast majority of countries have not progressed

  3. Utility of the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS in Predicting Mental Health Service Costs for Patients with Common Mental Health Problems: Historical Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conal Twomey

    Full Text Available Few countries have made much progress in implementing transparent and efficient systems for the allocation of mental health care resources. In England there are ongoing efforts by the National Health Service (NHS to develop mental health 'payment by results' (PbR. The system depends on the ability of patient 'clusters' derived from the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS to predict costs. We therefore investigated the associations of individual HoNOS items and the Total HoNOS score at baseline with mental health service costs at one year follow-up.An historical cohort study using secondary care patient records from the UK financial year 2012-2013. Included were 1,343 patients with 'common mental health problems', represented by ICD-10 disorders between F32-48. Costs were based on patient contacts with community-based and hospital-based mental health services. The costs outcome was transformed into 'high costs' vs 'regular costs' in main analyses.After adjustment for covariates, 11 HoNOS items were not associated with costs. The exception was 'self-injury' with an odds ratio of 1.41 (95% CI 1.10-2.99. Population attributable fractions (PAFs for the contribution of HoNOS items to high costs ranged from 0.6% (physical illness to 22.4% (self-injury. After adjustment, the Total HoNOS score was not associated with costs (OR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99-1.07. However, the PAF (33.3% demonstrated that it might account for a modest proportion of the incidence of high costs.Our findings provide limited support for the utility of the self-injury item and Total HoNOS score in predicting costs. However, the absence of associations for the remaining HoNOS items indicates that current PbR clusters have minimal ability to predict costs, so potentially contributing to a misallocation of NHS resources across England. The findings may inform the development of mental health payment systems internationally, especially since the vast majority of countries have not

  4. Intraosseous infusion in elective and emergency pediatric anesthesia: when should we use it?

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhaus, Diego

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW Difficulties to establish a venous access may also occur in routine pediatric anesthesia and lead to hazardous situations. Intraosseous infusion is a well tolerated and reliable but rarely used alternative technique in this setting. RECENT FINDINGS According to recent surveys, severe complications of intraosseous infusion stay a rare event. Minor complications and problems in getting an intraosseous infusion started on the other side seem to be more common than generally ...

  5. Pediatric spinal infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The infections of the spinal axis in children are rare when compared with adults. They encompass a large spectrum of diseases ranging from relatively benign diskitis to spinal osteomyleitis and to the rapidly progressive, rare, and potentially devastating spinal epidural, subdural, and intramedullary spinal cord infections. We present a comprehensive review of the literature pertaining to these uncommon entities, in light of our experience from northern India. The most prevalent pediatric spinal infection in Indian scenario is tuberculosis, where an extradural involvement is more common than intradural. The craniovertebral junction is not an uncommon site of involvement in children of our milieu. The majority of pyogenic infections of pediatric spine are associated with congenital neuro-ectodermal defects such as congenital dermal sinus. The clinico-radiological findings of various spinal infections commonly overlap. Hence the endemicity of certain pathogens should be given due consideration, while considering the differential diagnosis. However, early suspicion, rapid diagnosis, and prompt treatment are the key factors in avoiding neurological morbidity and deformity in a growing child.

  6. How often do German children and adolescents show signs of common mental health problems? Results from different methodological approaches – a cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Kristin; Barkmann, Claus; Klasen, Fionna; Bullinger, Monika; Glaeske, Gerd; Ravens-Sieberer, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    Background Child and adolescent mental health problems are ubiquitous and burdensome. Their impact on functional disability, the high rates of accompanying medical illnesses and the potential to last until adulthood make them a major public health issue. While methodological factors cause variability of the results from epidemiological studies, there is a lack of prevalence rates of mental health problems in children and adolescents according to ICD-10 criteria from nationally representative ...

  7. [Management of asthma in a context of ambulatory pediatrics: relevance and possibility to avoid the problems. Gruppo de lavoro pediatri dell'Abruzzo Basilicata e Puglia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misticoni, G; Marchetti, F; D'Andrea, N

    1994-01-01

    41 pediatricians agreed to register on a very simple form, all the cases of children affected by bronchial asthma visited in their clinic during october 1993. The data included basic information related to the therapy prescribed, its duration, a judgement on the efficacy of symptoms control and the main problems encountered with the children and their families. 237 cases were reported (mean age 4.6 year, range 2 months-13 years). 80% of children were monitored by the pediatrician; 47% had allergic reactions. The main drug used for profilaxis is ketotifen, a compound without documented efficacy; the main route for drug administration (especially during acute attacks) is by mouth, instead of by aerosol, evidencing problems in the health education on practical skills. In fact the main problems encountered by doctors are related to the communication with patients and families. This survey represents also a research model for involving health care providers and easily and quickly obtaining a useful, methodologically sound and interesting picture of everyday practice.

  8. Skill qualifications in pediatric minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaka, Tadashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Yamataka, Atsuyuki; Nio, Masaki; Segawa, Osamu; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Masahito; Terakura, Hirotsugu; Take, Hiroshi; Hirose, Ryuichiro; Yagi, Makoto

    2011-07-01

    In 2006, The Japanese Society of Pediatric Endoscopic Surgeons devised a plan to develop a pediatric endoscopic surgical skill qualification (ESSQ) system. This system is controlled by The Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery. The standard requirement for skills qualification is the ability of each applicant to complete common types of laparoscopic surgery. The main goal of the system is to decrease complications of laparoscopic surgery by evaluating the surgical skills of each applicant and subsequently certify surgeons with adequate skills to perform laparoscopic operations safely. A committee of pediatric ESSQ created a checklist to assess the applicant's laparoscopic surgical skills. Skills are assessed in a double-blinded fashion by evaluating an unedited video recording of a fundoplication for pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease. The initial pediatric ESSQ system was started in 2008. In 2008 and 2009, respectively, 9 out of 17 (53%) and 6 out of 12 (50%) applicants were certified as expert pediatric laparoscopic surgeons. Our ultimate goal is to provide safe and appropriate pediatric minimally invasive procedures and to avoid severe complications. To prove the predictive validity of this system, a survey of the outcomes of operations performed by certified pediatric surgeons is required.

  9. Perception of pediatric neurology among non-neurologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Mohammed M S

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric neurology is considered a relatively new and evolving subspecialty. In Saudi Arabia, neurologic disorders in children are common, and the demand for trained pediatric neurologists is strong. The aim was to study the perception of the pediatric neurology specialty among practicing generalists and their referral practices. Attendees of a symposium on pediatric epilepsy comprehensive review for the generalist were included. A structured 25-item questionnaire was designed to examine their demographics, training, practice, and referral patterns. One hundred nineteen participants attended the symposium, and 90 (76%) questionnaires were returned. Attendees' ages were 22 to 70 years (mean 32 years), with 65.5% female physicians. There were 32% consultants, 51% trainees, and 17% students. Most physicians (67%) were practicing general pediatrics. Only 36% received a structured pediatric neurology rotation during training. Children with neurologic complaints constituted 28.5% of those seen in their practice, and they referred 32.5% of them to pediatric neurology. Only 32% were moderately or highly confident in making the diagnosis or providing the appropriate treatment. Those who received a structured pediatric neurology rotation felt more comfortable in their management (P = .03). Many physicians (38.5%) had no direct access to a pediatric neurologist for referrals. To conclude, pediatric neurologic disorders are common in daily practice. Most generalists did not receive a structured neurology rotation during their training and were not highly confident in diagnosing and treating these children. Given the limited number of pediatric neurologists, I highly recommend that generalists receive appropriate neurologic training.

  10. Pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller-Bernstein, Carmi; Etzioni, Amos

    2013-03-01

    After the geographic and sociodemographic settings as well as the health care in Israel are briefly described, the scope of pediatric allergy and immunology in Israel is presented. This includes specific disorders commonly encountered, the environment that induces symptoms, the specialists who treat them, and the common challenges of patients, parents, doctors, and allied health personnel who collaborate to manage the maladies and patient care. Allergies usually affect some overall 15-20% of the pediatric population. The main allergens are inhaled, ingested, or injected (insects stings). Generally, the incidence of the various allergens affecting children in Israel, is similar to other parts of the Western world. Owing to the high consanguinity rate in the Israeli population, the prevalence of the various immunodeficiency conditions (in the adaptive as well as the innate system) is higher than that reported worldwide. Pediatric allergists/immunologists also treat autoimmune disorders affecting the pediatric group. Pediatric allergy and clinical immunology are not separate specialties. The 25 specialists who treat children with allergic/immunologic diseases have undergone a basic training in Pediatrics. They also received an additional 2-yr training in allergy and clinical immunology and then have to pass the board examinations. They work mainly in pediatric allergy units, in several hospitals that are affiliated to the five medical schools in the country. Aside from clinical work, most of the centers are also heavily involved in clinical and basic research in allergy and immunology. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. What Is a Pediatric Rheumatologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Rheumatologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... a pediatric rheumatologist. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Rheumatologists Have? Pediatric rheumatologists are medical doctors who ...

  12. SOS! Ayuda para Padres: Una Guia Practica para Manejar Problemas de Conducta Comunes y Corrientes. (SOS! Help for Parents: A Practical Guide for Handling Common Everyday Behavior Problems.) Leader's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lynn

    This Spanish-language version of "SOS" provides parents with guidance for handling a variety of common behavior problems based on the behavior approach to child rearing and discipline. This approach suggests that good and bad behavior are both learned and can be changed, and proposes specific methods, skills, procedures, and strategies…

  13. Sedation in Pediatric Esophagogastroduodenoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seak Hee Oh

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD has become an established diagnostic and therapeutic modality in pediatric gastroenterology. Effective sedation strategies have been adopted to improve patient tolerance during pediatric EGD. For children, safety is a fundamental consideration during this procedure as they are at a higher risk of severe adverse events from procedural sedation compared to adults. Therefore, a detailed risk evaluation is required prior to the procedure, and practitioners should be aware of the benefits and risks associated with sedation regimens during pediatric EGD. In addition, pediatric advanced life support by endoscopists or immediate intervention by anesthesiologists should be available in the event that severe adverse events occur during pediatric EGD.

  14. MRI tracheomalacia (TM) assessment in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciet, P.; Wielopolski, P.; Lever, S.

    Purpose: TM is an excessive narrowing of the intrathoracic part of the trachea. TM is a common congenital pediatric anomaly, but it’s often not recognized due to its unspecific clinical presentation. The aims of our study are: 1) to develop cine-MRI sequences to visualize central airways in static...... in pediatric population and allows avoiding radiation exposure and bronchoscopy for the evaluation of central airway dimensions....

  15. Pediatric brain tumors of neuroepithelial tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Politi, M.; Bergmann, M.; Pekrun, A.; Juergens, K.U.

    2014-01-01

    Tumors of neuroepithelial tissue represent the largest group of pediatric brain tumors by far and has therefore been divided into several discrete tumor subtypes each corresponding to a specific component of the neuropil. The neuropil contains several subtypes of glial cells, including astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and modified ependymal cells that form the choroid plexus. This review discusses the imaging aspects of the most common pediatric tumors of neuroepithelial tissue. (orig.) [de

  16. Beyond Survival - Cognition after Pediatric Brain Tumor

    OpenAIRE

    Tonning Olsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pediatric Brain Tumor (PBT) survivors suffer from cognitive sequelae, especially within the areas of cognitive tempo, attention, executive function and memory. The cognitive difficulties are often accentuated over the years, but knowledge about the long term trajectory is still scarce. Aim: The aim of this thesis was to examine cognitive sequelae after Pediatric Brain Tumor (PBT); risk factors, common difficulties, development and neuroimaging correlates. Methods: In study...

  17. COMMON MENTAL-DISORDERS AND DISABILITY ACROSS CULTURES - RESULTS FROM THE WHO COLLABORATIVE STUDY ON PSYCHOLOGICAL-PROBLEMS IN GENERAL HEALTH-CARE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ORMEL, J; VONKORFF, M; USTUN, TB; PINI, S; KORTEN, A; OLDEHINKEL, T

    1994-01-01

    Objective.-To examine the impact of common mental illness on functional disability and the cross-cultural consistency of this relationship while controlling for physical illness. A secondary objective was to determine the level of disability associated with specific psychiatric disorders. Design.-A

  18. Process evaluation of a blended web-based intervention on return to work for sick-listed employees with common mental health problems in the occupational health setting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volker, D; Zijlstra-Vlasveld, M C; Brouwers, E.P.M.; van der Feltz-Cornelis, C M

    2017-01-01

    Purpose A blended web-based intervention, "eHealth module embedded in collaborative occupational health care" (ECO), aimed at return to work, was developed and found effective in sick-listed employees with common mental disorders. In order to establish the feasibility of ECO, a process evaluation

  19. Use and reimbursement of off-label drugs in pediatric anesthesia: the Italian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, Ida; Landoni, Giovanni; Mucchetti, Marta; Cabrini, Luca; Pani, Luca

    2014-06-01

    Most of the drugs used in anesthesia are off-label in children even if they present solid clinical evidence in adults. This lack of authorization is caused by multiple factors including the difficulty in conducting research in this area (due to the ethical concerns and/or the low number of available participants, the high variability of the outcome measures) and the lack of economic interest of the pharmaceutical companies (due to the limited market). Define a list of medicinal products commonly used off-label in pediatrics anesthesia to be reimbursed by Italian National Health System. We hereby describe the methodological framework used to allow reimbursed use of a list of medicinal products, widely used off-label in pediatric patients, ensuring the best therapeutic results with the lowest possible risk for children. A task force of pediatric anesthesiologists from Italy petitioned the Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA) to allow a number of commonly utilized but off-label drugs for pediatric anesthesia to be reimbursed for specific indications. For each drug, both the supporting literature and expert opinion were used, and the resulting list of drugs allowed to be used/reimbursed officially by AIFA was significantly expanded. This paper documents one approach to the problem of off-label use of drugs for pediatric patients that can be a model for future efforts. Continuous efforts are needed from government institutions and sponsors on drug development and on drug approval process in pediatrics, as research on drug effectiveness and safety is mandatory in children as in adults. At the same time, clinicians must become more familiar with the drug-approval process, participate to sponsored trials, and perform ztrials themselves. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Conceptualization and treatment of chronic abdominal pain in pediatric gastroenterology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurman, Jennifer V; Hunter, Heather L; Friesen, Craig A

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how children with abdominal pain presently are viewed, assessed, and treated by pediatric gastroenterologists across North America, as well as how perspectives have changed since initial release of the Rome criteria for functional gastrointestinal disorders approximately 15 years ago. One hundred seventy-four full members of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition completed a pediatric gastroenterology practice survey designed by the authors in 2006. The responses were examined for practice patterns and specific knowledge/use of the Rome criteria. The responses were also compared with historical data from 151 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition members who completed a similar survey in 1992. There were few changes in the evaluation, treatment, or outcomes for children with abdominal pain for the past 15 years. Knowledge of the Rome criteria was common, but use in practice was not; several specific problems with the criteria were identified. A mismatch also appeared between belief in the importance of psychological factors in the creation/maintenance of pediatric abdominal pain and integration of these factors as part of standard evaluation and treatment. Finally, controversy emerged regarding both the term "functional" and the importance of histologic inflammation in the pathophysiology of pediatric abdominal pain. The evolution and dissemination of the Rome criteria for the past 15 years have not substantially changed evaluation or treatment practices for children with abdominal pain. Many areas of inconsistency and controversy remain. More focused research is needed to better understand this common pain condition and to establish an effective treatment program that can be disseminated across practitioners.

  1. Genetics of pediatric obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Melania; Dallapiccola, Bruno

    2012-07-01

    Onset of obesity has been anticipated at earlier ages, and prevalence has dramatically increased worldwide over the past decades. Epidemic obesity is mainly attributable to modern lifestyle, but family studies prove the significant role of genes in the individual's predisposition to obesity. Advances in genotyping technologies have raised great hope and expectations that genetic testing will pave the way to personalized medicine and that complex traits such as obesity will be prevented even before birth. In the presence of the pressing offer of direct-to-consumer genetic testing services from private companies to estimate the individual's risk for complex phenotypes including obesity, the present review offers pediatricians an update of the state of the art on genomics obesity in childhood. Discrepancies with respect to genomics of adult obesity are discussed. After an appraisal of findings from genome-wide association studies in pediatric populations, the rare variant-common disease hypothesis, the theoretical soil for next-generation sequencing techniques, is discussed as opposite to the common disease-common variant hypothesis. Next-generation sequencing techniques are expected to fill the gap of "missing heritability" of obesity, identifying rare variants associated with the trait and clarifying the role of epigenetics in its heritability. Pediatric obesity emerges as a complex phenotype, modulated by unique gene-environment interactions that occur in periods of life and are "permissive" for the programming of adult obesity. With the advent of next-generation sequencing techniques and advances in the field of exposomics, sensitive and specific tools to predict the obesity risk as early as possible are the challenge for the next decade.

  2. How do pediatric anesthesiologists define intraoperative hypotension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafiu, Olubukola O; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Morris, Michelle; Chimbira, Wilson T; Malviya, Shobha; Reynolds, Paul I; Tremper, Kevin K

    2009-11-01

    Although blood pressure (BP) monitoring is a recommended standard of care by the ASA, and pediatric anesthesiologists routinely monitor the BP of their patients and when appropriate treat deviations from 'normal', there is no robust definition of hypotension in any of the pediatric anesthesia texts or journals. Consequently, what constitutes hypotension in pediatric anesthesia is currently unknown. We designed a questionnaire-based survey of pediatric anesthesiologists to determine the BP ranges and thresholds used to define intraoperative hypotension (IOH). Members of the Society of Pediatric Anesthesia (SPA) and the Association of Paediatric Anaesthetists (APA) of Great Britain and Ireland were contacted through e-mail to participate in this survey. We asked a few demographic questions and five questions about specific definitions of hypotension for different age groups of patients undergoing inguinal herniorraphy, a common pediatric surgical procedure. The overall response rate was 56% (483/860), of which 76% were SPA members. Majority of the respondents (72%) work in academic institutions, while 8.9% work in institutions with fewer than 1000 annual pediatric surgical caseload. About 76% of respondents indicated that a 20-30% reduction in baseline systolic blood pressure (SBP) indicates significant hypotension in children under anesthesia. Most responders (86.7%) indicated that they use mean arterial pressure or SBP (72%) to define IOH. The mean SBP values for hypotension quoted by SPA members was about 5-7% lower across all pediatric age groups compared to values quoted by APA members (P = 0.001 for all age groups). There is great variability in the BP parameters used and the threshold used for defining and treating IOH among pediatric anesthesiologists. The majority of respondents considered a 20-30% reduction from baseline in SBP as indicative of significant hypotension. Lack of a consensus definition for a common clinical condition like IOH could have

  3. PET applications in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulkin, B. L. [Ann Arbor, Univ. of Michigan Medical Center (United States). Pediatric Nuclear Medicine Section

    1997-12-01

    This article summarizes the major PET studies which have been performed in pediatric patients to elucidate and characterize diseases and normal development. Issues special for the application of the technique in children, such as dosimetry, patient preparation, and image acquisition are discussed. Studies of central nervous system (CNS) development and pathology, including epilepsy, intraventricular hemorrhage, neonatal asphyxia, tumors, and effects on the CNS from treatment of other tumors are reviewed. These have contributed information fundamental to their understanding of CNS development and pathology. PET investigations into the pathophysiology of congenital heart disease have begun and hold great promise to aid their understanding of these conditions. The second major area in which PET has been applied is the study of non CNS neoplasms. Neuroblastoma has been investigated with tracers which explore basic biochemical features which characterize this tumor, as well as with tracers which explore biochemical events relatively specific for this malignancy. Other common and uncommon tumors of childhood are discussed. The PET technique has been shown useful for answering questions of clinical relevance for the management of these uncommon neoplasms. PET is likely to continue to aid their understanding of many pediatric diseases and may gain more widespread clinical acceptance as the technology continues to disseminate rapidly.

  4. An overview of pediatric dysphagia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasse, Jane E; Kikano, George E

    2009-04-01

    Difficulty swallowing or dysphagia can be present in children and adults alike. Pediatric dysphagias have long been recognized in the literature. Certain groups of infants with specific developmental and/or medical conditions have been identified as being at high risk for developing dysphagia. Still others may present with a swallowing or feeding problem as their primary symptom. Left untreated, these problems in infants and children can lead to failure to thrive, aspiration pneumonias, gastroesophageal reflux, and/or the inability to establish and maintain proper nutrition and hydration. Awareness of the prevalence of pediatric dysphagia in today's population and the signs and symptoms of this condition aids in its treatment. Early detection of dysphagia in infants and children is important to prevent or minimize complications. This article provides a review of symptoms, etiologies, and resources available regarding management of this condition to help the primary care physician and the families of young children and infants in its management.

  5. Child maltreatment and pediatric asthma: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Hannah M C; Chen, Edith; Miller, Gregory E

    2016-01-01

    Child maltreatment is a common problem with known adverse consequences, yet its contributions to the development and course of pediatric asthma are only poorly understood. This review first describes possible pathways connecting child maltreatment to pediatric asthma, including aspects of the physical home environment, health behaviors and disease management, and psychological consequences of child maltreatment. We subsequently review existing studies, which generally report an association between maltreatment experiences and asthma outcomes in childhood. However, this literature is in its early stages; there are only a handful studies, most of them rely on self-reports of both child maltreatment and asthma history, and none have investigated the physiological underpinnings of this association. Taken together, however, the studies are suggestive of child maltreatment playing a role in pediatric asthma incidence and expression that should be explored further. Existing data are sparse and do not allow for specific conclusions. However, the data are suggestive of child maltreatment influencing asthma risk and morbidity long before the adult years. Future research should focus on understanding how child maltreatment contributes to asthma disease risk and progression in this highly vulnerable population.

  6. Relative luminance and figure-background segmentation problems: Using AMLA to avoid nondiscernible stimulus pairs in common and color blind observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Lillo Jover

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Four experiments evaluated AMLA temporal version accuracy to measure relative luminosity in people with and without color blindness and, consequently, to provide the essential information to avoid poor figurebackground combinations in any possible “specific screen-specific observer” pair. Experiment 1 showed that two very different apparatus, a sophisticated photometer and a common luxometer, provide equivalent measurements to compute: (1 screen gamma exponents and (2 relative luminance (Y/Yn of achromatic but not of chromatic stimuli. Experiments 2, 3 and 4 showed that the psychophysical task of AMLA temporal version provided, for any stimulus type, accurate relative luminance measurements. They were: equivalent to standardised photometric measurements for common observers (Experiment 2; similar to the expected distortions for simulated (Experiment 2 and real (Experiment 3 aged tritanomalous observers; concordant with the expected distortions of protanope observers (Experiment 4.

  7. Pediatric dental chair vs. traditional dental chair: A pediatric dentist′s poll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushboo Barjatya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Proper positioning of the child patient, can not only have positive ramifications for the operator′s posture, comfort, and career longevity - it can also lead to better treatment and increased productivity. The aim of the survey questionnaire was to assess the utilization, need, and attitude concerning dental chairs among pediatric dentist while working on and managing the child patient. Study Design: The questions were structured using adobe forms central online software, regarding the user-friendliness of pediatric dental chair vs. traditional adult dental chair available in the market. Results: Our result shows that out of 337 respondents, 79% worked on pediatric dental chair, whereas 21% had no experience of it. Of these 79% pediatric dentist, 48% preferred pediatric dental chair. But pediatric dental problem still has certain disadvantages like higher cost, leg space problem, lower availability, etc. Conclusion: During the research it was found that ergonomics and usability issues were the main problems. Thus, pediatric dental chair is not so popular in the current scenario. This study allowed for general ideas for the improvement of dental chairs and thus improved dental chair would fill the gap in the current scenario.

  8. Pediatric advanced life support and sedation of pediatric dental patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jongbin

    2016-03-01

    Programs provided by the Korea Association of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation include Basic Life Support (BLS), Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS), and Korean Advanced Life Support (KALS). However, programs pertinent to dental care are lacking. Since 2015, related organizations have been attempting to develop a Dental Advanced Life Support (DALS) program, which can meet the needs of the dental environment. Generally, for initial management of emergency situations, basic life support is most important. However, emergencies in young children mostly involve breathing. Therefore, physicians who treat pediatric dental patients should learn PALS. It is necessary for the physician to regularly renew training every two years to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations. In order to manage emergency situations in the pediatric dental clinic, respiratory support is most important. Therefore, mastering professional PALS, which includes respiratory care and core cases, particularly upper airway obstruction and respiratory depression caused by a respiratory control problem, would be highly desirable for a physician who treats pediatric dental patients. Regular training and renewal training every two years is absolutely necessary to be able to immediately implement professional skills in emergency situations.

  9. Pediatric Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. Pediatric Celiac Disease If your child has celiac disease, ... physician. Established by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) Celiac Disease Eosinophilic ...

  10. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  11. Pediatric Voiding Cystourethrogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scan for mobile link. Children's (Pediatric) Voiding Cystourethrogram A children’s (pediatric) voiding cystourethrogram uses fluoroscopy – a form of real-time x-ray – to examine a child’s bladder ...

  12. Pediatric MATCH Infographic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infographic explaining NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH, a cancer treatment clinical trial for children and adolescents, from 1 to 21 years of age, that is testing the use of precision medicine for pediatric cancers.

  13. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... navigate their brain tumor diagnosis. WATCH AND SHARE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Central Nervous System Cancers Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  14. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  15. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join Now International Welcome to PENS The Pediatric Endocrinology Nursing Society (PENS) is committed to the development ... nurses in the art and science of pediatric endocrinology nursing. Learn More Text1 2018 PENS Call for ...

  16. National Pediatric Program Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The book of the National Pediatric Program Update, issued by the Argentina Society of Pediatrics, describes important issues, including: effective treatment of addictions (drugs); defects of the neural tube; and the use of radiation imaging in diagnosis. [es

  17. TH-B-207B-01: Optimizing Pediatric CT in the Emergency Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodge, C.

    2016-01-01

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children

  18. TH-B-207B-01: Optimizing Pediatric CT in the Emergency Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, C. [Texas Children’s Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    This imaging educational program will focus on solutions to common pediatric image quality optimization challenges. The speakers will present collective knowledge on best practices in pediatric imaging from their experience at dedicated children’s hospitals. One of the most commonly encountered pediatric imaging requirements for the non-specialist hospital is pediatric CT in the emergency room setting. Thus, this educational program will begin with optimization of pediatric CT in the emergency department. Though pediatric cardiovascular MRI may be less common in the non-specialist hospitals, low pediatric volumes and unique cardiovascular anatomy make optimization of these techniques difficult. Therefore, our second speaker will review best practices in pediatric cardiovascular MRI based on experiences from a children’s hospital with a large volume of cardiac patients. Learning Objectives: To learn techniques for optimizing radiation dose and image quality for CT of children in the emergency room setting. To learn solutions for consistently high quality cardiovascular MRI of children.

  19. Pediatric portal hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Clarissa Barbon

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Pediatric portal hypertension management is a team approach between the patient, the patient's family, the primary caregiver, and specialty providers. Evidence-based practice guidelines have not been established in pediatrics. This article serves as a review for the primary care NP in the management of pediatric portal hypertension, discussing the etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical presentation of pediatric portal hypertension, diagnostic tests, and treatment and management options. PMID:28406835

  20. Understanding the pediatric dermatology workforce shortage: mentoring matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Admani, Shehla; Caufield, Maura; Kim, Silvia S; Siegfried, Elaine C; Friedlander, Sheila Fallon

    2014-02-01

    To target pediatric dermatologists directly in order to evaluate their current demographics and the most important motivating factors that influenced their career choice. Pediatric dermatology is one of the pediatric subspecialties with an inadequate supply to meet current patient needs. A survey was designed to evaluate the training pathway, employment status, participation in teaching, and clinical practice characteristics of pediatric dermatologists. The survey was administered to attendants of the 2010 Society for Pediatric Dermatology annual meeting. Any remaining board certified pediatric dermatologists who had not previously responded were queried via Survey Monkey. There was a 71% response rate. The majority chose a career in pediatric dermatology early, often prior to starting a dermatology residency. The vast majority of respondents noted mentorship as the most important influence on their decision to pursue a career in pediatric dermatology. The most common obstacles cited by respondents were financial hardship and resistance of some dermatology programs to accept applicants previously trained in pediatrics. Our survey provides evidence to support the importance of early exposure to the field and, most importantly, to committed pediatric dermatologists who can serve as mentors. This information may be helpful in approaching solutions to the workforce shortage in the field of pediatric dermatology. Copyright © 2014 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vulvovaginitis and other common vulvar disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rome, Ellen S

    2012-01-01

    Vulvovaginitis, labial adhesions, and other vulvar disorders occur commonly in children and can provoke high anxiety in both the parent and child. Performed correctly, the pediatric gynecologic examination can diagnose and treat, educate and reassure both parent and child. This examination requires patience, sensitivity, direct communication with the child as well as with the parent, and an open manner that inspires trust in both parties to manage a potentially anxiety-provoking situation. This chapter will review common vulvar disorders, including vulvovaginitis, lichen sclerosis et atrophicus, bubble bath vaginitis, labial adhesions, urethral prolapse, and other common problems. A discussion of childhood sexual abuse is beyond the scope of this chapter, with appropriate references available elsewhere. Practical pearls will be offered to make this exam easy for the primary care clinician and/or subspecialist. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Annals of Pediatric Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Annals of Pediatric Surgery is striving to fill an important niche that provides focus to clinical care, technical innovation and clinical research. The Annals of Pediatric Surgery has the responsibility to serve not only pediatric surgeons in the Middle East and North Africa but also should be an important conduit for scientific ...

  3. Pediatric neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Pediatric neurocritical care is an emerging multidisciplinary field of medicine and a new frontier in pediatric critical care and pediatric neurology. Central to pediatric neurocritical care is the goal of improving outcomes in critically ill pediatric patients with neurological illness or injury and limiting secondary brain injury through optimal critical care delivery and the support of brain function. There is a pressing need for evidence based guidelines in pediatric neurocritical care, notably in pediatric traumatic brain injury and pediatric stroke. These diseases have distinct clinical and pathophysiological features that distinguish them from their adult counterparts and prevent the direct translation of the adult experience to pediatric patients. Increased attention is also being paid to the broader application of neuromonitoring and neuroprotective strategies in the pediatric intensive care unit, in both primary neurological and primary non-neurological disease states. Although much can be learned from the adult experience, there are important differences in the critically ill pediatric population and in the circumstances that surround the emergence of neurocritical care in pediatrics.

  4. Radiodiagnosis in pediatrics today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baklanova, V.F.

    1982-01-01

    The fields of radiodiagnosis application in pediatrics are considered. The improvement of roentgenologic methods and application of various contrast proparations enable to study and precisely differentiate congenital and acquired diseases. The scope of roentgenology application in pediatrics extends due to differentiation of pediatric specialities. New methods of investigation with decreasing radiation exposure to minimal are realized [ru

  5. Biomarkers of Pediatric Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Russell

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Need for Novel Biomarkers: Brain tumors are the leading cause of death by solid tumors in children. Although improvements have been made in their radiological detection and treatment, our capacity to promptly diagnose pediatric brain tumors in their early stages remains limited. This contrasts several other cancers where serum biomarkers such as CA 19-9 and CA 125 facilitate early diagnosis and treatment. Aim: The aim of this article is to review the latest literature and highlight biomarkers which may be of clinical use in the common types of primary pediatric brain tumor. Methods: A PubMed search was performed to identify studies reporting biomarkers in the bodily fluids of pediatric patients with brain tumors. Details regarding the sample type (serum, cerebrospinal fluid or urine, biomarkers analyzed, methodology, tumor type and statistical significance were recorded. Results: A total of 12 manuscripts reporting 19 biomarkers in 367 patients vs. 397 controls were identified in the literature. Of the 19 biomarkers identified, 12 were isolated from cerebrospinal fluid, 2 from serum, 3 from urine, and 2 from multiple bodily fluids. All but one study reported statistically significant differences in biomarker expression between patient and control groups.Conclusions: This review identifies a panel of novel biomarkers for pediatric brain tumors. It provides a platform for the further studies necessary to validate these biomarkers and, in addition, highlights several techniques through which new biomarkers can be discovered.

  6. Moral Hazard in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnquell, Donald; Michaelson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    "Moral hazard" is a term familiar in economics and business ethics that illuminates why rational parties sometimes choose decisions with bad moral outcomes without necessarily intending to behave selfishly or immorally. The term is not generally used in medical ethics. Decision makers such as parents and physicians generally do not use the concept or the word in evaluating ethical dilemmas. They may not even be aware of the precise nature of the moral hazard problem they are experiencing, beyond a general concern for the patient's seemingly excessive burden. This article brings the language and logic of moral hazard to pediatrics. The concept reminds us that decision makers in this context are often not the primary party affected by their decisions. It appraises the full scope of risk at issue when decision makers decide on behalf of others and leads us to separate, respect, and prioritize the interests of affected parties.

  7. Pediatric Headache: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Raquel; DiSabella, Marc T

    2017-03-01

    Headache represents the most common neurologic disorder in the general population including children and is increasingly being recognized as a major source of morbidity in youth related to missed school days and activities. In this article, we take a holistic approach to the child presenting with headache with a focus on the detailed headache history, physical and neurologic examinations, and diagnostic evaluation of these patients. Clinical presentations and classification schema of multiple primary and secondary headache types in children are discussed using the International Headache Criteria (IHCD-3) as a guide, and a summary provided of the various treatment modalities employed for pediatric headache including lifestyle modifications, behavioral techniques, and abortive and preventive medications. Copyright © 2017 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutrition support of the pediatric patient with AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentler, M; Stanish, M

    1987-04-01

    Maintaining optimal nutrition in the pediatric patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is challenging, but it may be one of the most effective therapies. Patients experience numerous complications that compromise nutritional status. Infection, fever, diarrhea, feeding problems, and decreased intake all contribute to malnutrition, which in turn predisposes the patient even more to infection and malabsorption. Nutrition assessment should be done routinely so that new problems may be identified and treated. High-calorie, high-protein feedings, vitamin supplementation, and, when necessary, gavage feedings or parenteral nutrition are recommended to improve nutritional status and prevent further deficits. Maintaining optimal nutrition in the pediatric patient with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) poses a significant challenge to the health care team. Patients may experience numerous complications that compromise nutritional status. The patient is at high risk for opportunistic infections, especially of the lungs, central nervous system, gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and skin. Such infections are common causes of morbidity and mortality. Impaired nutritional status may further impair the patient's immunocompetence. A study by Kotler and Gaety demonstrated severe progressive malnutrition in adult AIDS patients, with the lowest measures of lean body mass occurring in those patients close to death at the time of the study. While no studies of children with AIDS have been done to date, we have subjectively observed feeding problems, weight loss, and malnutrition in most of the patients we have seen.

  9. MO-D-BRB-02: Pediatric Treatment Planning II: Applications of Proton Beams for Pediatric Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, C. [St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Most Medical Physicists working in radiotherapy departments see few pediatric patients. This is because, fortunately, children get cancer at a rate nearly 100 times lower than adults. Children have not smoked, abused alcohol, or been exposed to environmental carcinogens for decades, and of course, have not fallen victim to the aging process. Children get very different cancers than adults. Breast or prostate cancers, typical in adults, are rarely seen in children but instead a variety of tumors occur in children that are rarely seen in adults; examples are germinomas, ependymomas and primitive neuroectodermal tumors, which require treatment of the child’s brain or neuroblastoma, requiring treatment in the abdomen. The treatment of children with cancer using radiation therapy is one of the most challenging planning and delivery problems facing the physicist. This is because bones, brain, breast tissue, and other organs are more sensitive to radiation in children than in adults. Because most therapy departments treat mostly adults, when the rare 8 year-old patient comes to the department for treatment, the physicist may not understand the clinical issues of his disease which drive the planning and delivery decisions. Additionally, children are more prone than adults to developing secondary cancers after radiation. For bilateral retinoblastoma for example, an irradiated child has a 40% chance of developing a second cancer by age 50. The dosimetric tradeoffs made during the planning process are complex and require careful consideration for children treated with radiotherapy. In the first presentation, an overview of childhood cancers and their corresponding treatment techniques will be given. These can be some of the most complex treatments that are delivered in the radiation therapy department. These cancers include leukemia treated with total body irradiation, medulloblastoma, treated with craniospinal irradiation plus a conformal boost to the posterior fossa

  10. Improvement of Pediatric Drug Development: Regulatory and Practical Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Katusra; Carroll, Kelly A; Onishi, Taku; Matsumaru, Naoki; Brasseur, Daniel; Nakamura, Hidefumi

    2016-03-01

    A dearth in pediatric drug development often leaves pediatricians with no alternative but to prescribe unlicensed or off-label drugs with a resultant increased risk of adverse events. We present the current status of pediatric drug development and, based on our data analysis, clarify the problems in this area. Further action is proposed to improve the drug development that has pediatric therapeutic orphan status. We analyzed all Phase II/III and Phase III trials in ClinicalTrials.gov that only included pediatric participants (Performance index, an indicator of pediatric drug development, was calculated by dividing the annual number of pediatric clinical trials by million pediatric populations acquired from Census.gov. Effects of the 2 Japanese premiums introduced in 2010, for the enhancement of pediatric drug development, were analyzed by comparing mean performance index prepremiums (2006-2009) and postpremiums (2010-2014) among Japan, the European Union, and the United States. The European Union Clinical Trials Register and published reports from the European Medicines Agency were also surveyed to investigate the Paediatric Committee effect on pediatric clinical trials in the European Union. Mean difference of the performance index in prepremiums and postpremiums between Japan and the European Union were 0.296 (P 15% after 2008. Recruitment and ethical obstacles make conducting pediatric clinical trials challenging. An improved operational framework for conducting clinical trials should mirror the ever-improving regulatory framework that incentivizes investment in pediatric clinical trials. Technological approaches, enhancements in electronic medical record systems, and community approaches that actively incorporate input from physicians, researchers, and patients could offer a sustainable solution to recruitment of pediatric study participants. The key therefore is to improve pediatric pharmacotherapy collaboration among industry, government, academia, and

  11. Nursing Diagnoses And Most Common Collaboration Problems In High-risk Pregnancy [diagnósticos De Enfermagem E Problemas Colaborativos Mais Comuns Na Gestação De Risco.

    OpenAIRE

    Gouveia H.G.; Lopes M.H.

    2004-01-01

    This study identified the demographic profile, obstetric and clinical diagnoses, nursing diagnosis and most common collaboration problem among pregnant women subject to high-risk at a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Data were collected by means of a form based on Gordon's Functional Health Patterns. Nursing diagnoses were determined on the basis of the NANDA (North American Nursing Diagnosis Association) taxonomy. The nursing diagnoses found in 50% or more of the pregnant women were: risk for ...

  12. Approximation of a Common Element of the Fixed Point Sets of Multivalued Strictly Pseudocontractive-Type Mappings and the Set of Solutions of an Equilibrium Problem in Hilbert Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. Isiogugu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong convergence of a hybrid algorithm to a common element of the fixed point sets of multivalued strictly pseudocontractive-type mappings and the set of solutions of an equilibrium problem in Hilbert spaces is obtained using a strict fixed point set condition. The obtained results improve, complement, and extend the results on multivalued and single-valued mappings in the contemporary literature.

  13. Better outcome after pediatric resuscitation is still a dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahu Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cardiac arrest is not a single problem. Although most episodes of pediatric cardiac arrest occur as complications and progression of respiratory failure and shock. Sudden cardiac arrest may result from abrupt and unexpected arrhythmias. With a better-tailored therapy, we can optimize the outcome. In the hospital, cardiac arrest often develops as a progression of respiratory failure and shock. Typically half or more of pediatric victims of in-hospital arrest have pre-existing respiratory failure and one-third or more have shock, although these figures vary somewhat among reporting hospitals. When in-hospital respiratory arrest or failure is treated before the development of cardiac arrest, survival ranges from 60% to 97%. Bradyarrthmia, asystole or pulseless electric activity (PEA were recorded as an initial rhythm in half or more of the recent reports of in-hospital cardiac arrest, with survival to hospital discharge ranging from 22% to 40%. Data allowing characterization of out of hospital pediatric arrest are limited, although existing data support the long-held belief that as with hospitalized children, cardiac arrest most often occurs as a progression of respiratory failure or shock to cardiac arrest with bradyasystole rhythm. Although VF (Ventricular fibrillation, is a very rapid, uncoordinated, ineffective series of contractions throughout the lower chambers of the heart. Unless stopped, these chaotic impulses are fatal and VT (Ventricular tachycardia is a rapid heartbeat that originates in one of the ventricles of the heart. To be classified as tachycardia, the heart rate is usually at least 100 beats per minute are not common out-of-cardiac arrest in children, they are more likely to be present with sudden, witnessed collapse, particularly among adolescents. Pre-hospital care till the late 1980s was mainly concerned with adult care, and the initial focus for pediatric resuscitation was provision of oxygen and ventilation, with

  14. Multidrug resistance in pediatric urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspari, Romolo J; Dickson, Eric; Karlowsky, James; Doern, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) represent a common infection in the pediatric population. Escherichia coli is the most common uropathogen in children, and antimicrobial resistance in this species complicates the treatment of pediatric UTIs. Despite the impact of resistance on empiric antibiotic choice, there is little data on multidrug resistance in pediatric patients. In this paper, we describe characteristics of multidrug-resistant E. coli in pediatric patients using a large national database of uropathogens antimicrobial sensitivities. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to commonly prescribed antibiotics were performed on uropathogens isolated from children presenting to participating hospitals between 1999 and 2001. Data were analyzed separately for four pediatric age groups. Single and multidrug resistance to ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefazolin, ciprofloxacin, nitrofurantoin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) were performed on all specimens. There were a total of 11,341 E. coli urine cultures from 343 infants (0-4 weeks), 1,801 toddlers (5 weeks-24 months), 6,742 preteens (2-12 years), and 2,455 teens (13-17 years). E. coli resistance to ampicillin peaked in toddlers (52.8%) but was high in preteens (52.1%), infants (50.4%), and teens (40.6%). Resistance to two or more antibiotics varied across age groups, with toddlers (27%) leading preteens (23.1%), infants (21%), and teens (15.9%). Resistance to three or more antibiotics was low in all age groups (range 3.1-5.2%). The most common co-resistance in all age groups was ampicillin/TMP-SMZ. In conclusion, less than half of all pediatric UTIs are susceptible to all commonly used antibiotics. In some age groups, there is a significant percentage of co-resistance between the two most commonly used antibiotics (ampicillin and TMP-SMZ).

  15. Comparative demography of an epiphytic lichen: support for general life history patterns and solutions to common problems in demographic parameter estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriver, Robert K; Cutler, Kerry; Doak, Daniel F

    2012-09-01

    Lichens are major components in many terrestrial ecosystems, yet their population ecology is at best only poorly understood. Few studies have fully quantified the life history or demographic patterns of any lichen, with particularly little attention to epiphytic species. We conducted a 6-year demographic study of Vulpicida pinastri, an epiphytic foliose lichen, in south-central Alaska. After testing multiple size-structured functions to describe patterns in each V. pinastri demographic rate, we used the resulting estimates to construct a stochastic demographic model for the species. This model development led us to propose solutions to two general problems in construction of demographic models for many taxa: how to simply but accurately characterize highly skewed growth rates, and how to estimate recruitment rates that are exceptionally difficult to directly observe. Our results show that V. pinastri has rapid and variable growth and, for small individuals, low and variable survival, but that these traits are coupled with considerable longevity (e.g., >50 years mean future life span for a 4-cm(2) thallus) and little deviation of the stochastic population growth rate from the deterministic expectation. Comparisons of the demographic patterns we found with those of other lichen studies suggest that their relatively simple architecture may allow clearer generalities about growth patterns for lichens than for other taxa, and that the expected pattern of faster growth rates for epiphytic species is substantiated.

  16. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Sydnrome : Fluid Management in the PICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingelse, SA; Wösten-van Asperen, RM; Lemson, J; Daams, JG; Bem, R.A.; van Woensel, JB

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric

  17. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: Fluid Management in the PICU

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingelse, Sarah A.; Wösten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Lemson, Joris; Daams, Joost G.; Bem, Reinout A.; van Woensel, Job B.

    2016-01-01

    The administration of an appropriate volume of intravenous fluids, while avoiding fluid overload, is a major challenge in the pediatric intensive care unit. Despite our efforts, fluid overload is a very common clinical observation in critically ill children, in particular in those with pediatric

  18. Pediatric Pulmonary Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Barbour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 6-year-old previously healthy male presented to the emergency department with three days of left upper quadrant abdominal pain. Family endorsed one week of fevers, cough productive of yellow sputum, and non-bilious, non-bloody emesis. He denied shortness of breath and chest pain. On exam, the patient was febrile with otherwise normal vital signs. He had diffuse tenderness to his abdomen but clear lungs. Laboratory studies revealed leukocytosis to 25,000/mm3 with a left shift. Significant findings: Upright posterior-anterior plain chest films show a left lower lobe consolidation with an air-fluid level and a single septation consistent with a pulmonary abscess (white arrows. A small left pleural effusion was also present, seen as blunting of the left costophrenic angle and obscuration of the left hemidiaphragm (black arrows. Discussion: Pediatric pulmonary abscesses are rare, most commonly caused by aspiration, and the majority consequently arise in dependent portions of the lung.1 The most common pathogens in children are Streptococcus pneumoniaeand Staphylococcus aureus.1 Immunocompromised patients and those with existing pulmonary disease more commonly contract Pseudomonas aeruginosaor Bacteroides, and fungal pathogens are possible.1 Common symptoms include tachypnea, fever, and cough. Imaging is necessary to distinguish pulmonary abscesses from pneumonia, empyema, pneumatocele, and other etiologies. Plain film radiography may miss up to 18% of pulmonary abscesses yet is often the first modality to visualize an intrathoracic abnormality.2 If seen, pulmonary abscesses most often appear as consolidations with air-fluid levels. Generally, pulmonary abscesses are round with irregular, thick walls, whereas empyemas are elliptical with smooth, thin walls.3 However, these characteristics cannot definitively distinguish these processes.2 Advantages of plain films include being low cost and easily obtained. Computed

  19. Nosocomial Infections and Antibiotic Administration in Pediatric Department, Imam Reza Hospital, Mashhad-Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkarim Hamedi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial Infections (NI are a frequent and relevant problem, in other hands; those are responsible of mortality especially in pediatric ICU( Intensive Care Unit and NICUs (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Healthcare-associated infections are important in wide-ranging concern in the medical field. The most cause of Nosocomial infection include: bloodstream infection, urinary tract infection, pneumonia, and wound infection. The purpose of this study was to determine the epidemiology of the three most common NI in the Pediatric department.        Materials and Methods: We performed a prospective study in a single Pediatric department during 12 months. Children were assessed for 3 NI: wound infections, pneumonia and urinary tract infections (UTI, as the same method as Center of Disease Control criteria. All patients were followed up and individuals who had have NI and their treatment was entered in this study.          Results: In this study 811 patients were hospitalized that 60% of them were male and were older than 60 months. The main causes of hospitalization include: toxicity, seizure, respiratory infection and fever. Among them 15 cases had NI (1.87%. The most NI occurred in pediatric intensive care unit (PICU and it was followed in aspect of intubation. The most cultured organism was pseudomonas that they suspected to ceftazidime and isolate from blood and endotracheal tube.           Conclusion:  NI presence was associated with increased mortality and length of stay in hospital. This study highlights the importance of NIs in children admitted to a pediatric department especially PICU in a developing country. Clinical monitoring of NIs and bacterial resistance profiles are required in all pediatric units.

  20. Pediatric Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Matthew J; Hornby, Laura; Witteman, William; Shemie, Sam D

    2016-03-01

    remain an event less common than brain death, albeit with the potential to substantially expand the existing organ donation pool. Limited data suggest outcomes comparable with organs donated after neurologic determination of death. Although there is continued debate around ethical aspects of pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death, all pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death publications from professional societies contend that pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death can be practiced ethically. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the published literature related to pediatric donation after circulatory determination of death. In addition to informing the development of pediatric-specific guidelines, this review serves to highlight several important knowledge gaps in this topic.

  1. Problemas de la ética médica: sus manifestaciones en el manejo de pacientes pediátricos inmunodeprimidos Problems of the medical ethics: its manifestations in the management of immunodepression in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam C. Sánchez-Segura

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La Bioética nació a partir de 1970, y desde su surgimiento, comenzó a tener enorme impacto en la práctica de la medicina y en la investigación. Más que un influjo de la ciencia sobre la ética se debe hablar de un desfasaje entre ambas, pues la ciencia progresó con tanta rapidez que la ética no podía dar respuesta a los problemas que planteaba. Por esto, algunos autores señalaron que si no se le añadía ciencia a la ética, esta sería algo vano, inconsistente. Entonces se realizó una nueva revisión de la fundamentación y sistematización de la ética, que cobijó particularmente a la ética científica y, desde luego, a la ética médica. En este trabajo se exponen algunos de los problemas de la ética médica que pueden surgir en el manejo de pacientes pediátricos inmunodeprimidos y de qué forma pueden cumplirse en ellos los principios de autonomía, beneficencia y justicia, que constituyen la trinidad de la Bioética Médica, con la finalidad de lograr un mejor tratamiento y seguimiento de los enfermos y la rápida incorporación de ellos y de sus familiares a la vida social.The Bioethics appeared from 1970 and from then it has a great impact in the medical practice and in research. More than a influence science on the ethics it is necessary to speak of a gapamong them since the science has progressed so fast that the ethics could not to give an answer to related problems. Thus, some authors have indicated that if the science is not added to ethics, this will be something in vain and inconsistent. Then a new review of the foundation and systematization of the ethics was carried out covering particularly the scientific ethics and of course, the medical ethics. In present paper are exposed some of the problems of medical ethics that may to appear in the management of immunodepression pediatric patients and way to fulfill in them the autonomy, charity and justice principles that are the Trinity of the Medical Bioethics to achieve

  2. Musculoskeletal ultrasound in pediatric rheumatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özçakar Levent

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although musculoskeletal ultrasound (MSUS has emerged as an indispensible tool among physicians involved in musculoskeletal medicine in the last two decades, only recently has it become more attractive to pediatric rheumatologists. Thereafter, the use of MSUS in pediatric rheumatology has started to increase. Yet, an ever-growing body of literature shows parity and even superiority of MSUS when compared to physical examination and other imaging modalities. MSUS is suitable for examination of children of all ages and it has certain advantages over other imaging modalities; as it is cheaper, mobile, instantly accessible bedside, easy to combine with clinical assessment (interactivity and non-invasive. It does not require sedation, which facilitates repetitive examinations. Assessment of multiple locations is possible during the same session. Agitation is rarely a problem and small children can be seated in their parents' lap or they can even play while being examined.

  3. Practical pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilton, S.V.W.; Edwards, D.K.; Hilton, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Taking a problem-oriented approach, this book outlines the appropriate measures for examination of a child with a common presenting complaint. Based on the patient's presenting signs and symptoms, the text explains how to derive a careful, accurate diagnosis of the particular problem at hand. Post-operative results as well as the possible diagnoses are given, and the book is well illustrated with numerous tables, radiographs and line drawings

  4. [Pediatric anesthesia: little children, big problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosjean, V; Veyckemans, F; Seghaye, M C; Hallet, C; Jastrowicz, J; Brichant, J F

    2011-03-01

    Infants and children are patients who are the most susceptible to benefit from a procedure in the ambulatory setting. However, some of these patients are at risk. They include infants, especially if premature, and children with sleep apnea syndrome or with current or recent upper respiratory infection. The present paper gives advices for an optimal anesthesic management of these young patients.

  5. Antibiotic overusage and resistance: A cross-sectional survey among pediatric dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Konde

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Most human orofacial infections originate from odontogenic infections and prescribing antibiotics has become a ubiquitous phenomenon. The World Health Organization (WHO has recognized the inappropriate, indiscriminate, and irrational use of antibiotics leading to antibiotic resistance as a global problem. Objective: The objective of this survey is to compare the antibiotic prescription pattern and the awareness of antibiotic resistance among Bachelor of Dental Surgery (BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists. Materials and methods: A hundred BDS practitioners and 100 pediatric dentists included in the study were given a questionnaire containing both open-ended and closed-ended questions. The questionnaire comprised information pertaining to antibiotic prescription for most common oral conditions, commonly prescribed antibiotics, their dosage, etc. Results: The majority of the practitioners prescribed antibiotics for managing oral diseases. On comparing the prescription patterns between the BDS practitioners and pediatric dentists, there was an overprescription in the BDS group for many conditions, which was statistically significant. Amoxicillin was the most commonly prescribed drug in both the groups. In the presence of an anaerobic infection, the most preferred drug was a combination of amoxicillin and clavulanic acid with metronidazole. With regard to the duration of antibiotic prescription, 74% BDS practitioners prescribed antibiotics as a 3-day course and 60% pediatric dentists resorted to a 5-day course, which was statistically significant. The awareness regarding antibiotic prophylaxis and antibiotic resistance was found to be adequate in both the groups. However, there was a general lack of awareness with regard to the guidelines for antibiotic prescribing in both the groups. Conclusion: Practitioners should prescribe antibiotics in accordance with the guidelines to curb antibiotic resistance, an emerging public health

  6. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome: a randomised, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, M; Byraki, A; Ahlberg, J; Heymans, M W; Hamburger, H L; De Lange, J; Lobbezoo, F; Aarab, G

    2017-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. In this randomised placebo-controlled trial, sixty-four OSAS patients (52·0 ± 9·6 years) were randomly assigned to an MAD, nCPAP or an intra-oral placebo appliance in a parallel design. All participants filled out the validated Dutch Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ) twice: one before treatment and one after six months of treatment. With 88 questions, thirteen scales were constructed, representing common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to study differences between the groups for the different SDQ scales over time. The MAD group showed significant improvements over time in symptoms corresponding with 'insomnia', 'excessive daytime sleepiness', 'psychiatric sleep disorder', 'periodic limb movements', 'sleep apnoea', 'sleep paralysis', 'daytime dysfunction', 'hypnagogic hallucinations/dreaming', 'restless sleep', 'negative conditioning' and 'automatic behaviour' (range of P values: 0·000-0·014). These improvements in symptoms were, however, not significantly different from the improvements in symptoms observed in the nCPAP and placebo groups (range of P values: 0·090-0·897). It can be concluded that there is no significant difference between MAD and nCPAP in their positive effects on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. These beneficial effects may be a result of placebo effects. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Pediatric hospital medicine core competencies: development and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Erin R; Ottolini, Mary C; Maniscalco, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Pediatric hospital medicine is the most rapidly growing site-based pediatric specialty. There are over 2500 unique members in the three core societies in which pediatric hospitalists are members: the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) and the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). Pediatric hospitalists are fulfilling both clinical and system improvement roles within varied hospital systems. Defined expectations and competencies for pediatric hospitalists are needed. In 2005, SHM's Pediatric Core Curriculum Task Force initiated the project and formed the editorial board. Over the subsequent four years, multiple pediatric hospitalists belonging to the AAP, APA, or SHM contributed to the content of and guided the development of the project. Editors and collaborators created a framework for identifying appropriate competency content areas. Content experts from both within and outside of pediatric hospital medicine participated as contributors. A number of selected national organizations and societies provided valuable feedback on chapters. The final product was validated by formal review from the AAP, APA, and SHM. The Pediatric Hospital Medicine Core Competencies were created. They include 54 chapters divided into four sections: Common Clinical Diagnoses and Conditions, Core Skills, Specialized Clinical Services, and Healthcare Systems: Supporting and Advancing Child Health. Each chapter can be used independently of the others. Chapters follow the knowledge, skills, and attitudes educational curriculum format, and have an additional section on systems organization and improvement to reflect the pediatric hospitalist's responsibility to advance systems of care. These competencies provide a foundation for the creation of pediatric hospital medicine curricula and serve to standardize and improve inpatient training practices. (c) 2010 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  8. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  9. QCI Common

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    There are many common software patterns and utilities for the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute that can and should be shared across projects. Otherwise we find duplication of code which adds unwanted complexity. This is a software product seeks to alleviate this by providing common utilities such as object factories, graph data structures, parameter input mechanisms, etc., for other software products within the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute. This work enables pure basic research, has no export controlled utilities, and has no real commercial value.

  10. Challenges of pediatric residency training in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsuen-Chiuan; Harasym, Peter H

    2006-01-01

    A crisis in pediatric residency training today has raised serious concerns about the healthcare quality for children in Taiwan. The purpose of this study was to document the problems and to propose possible solutions for improvement. The problems include: 1) manpower shortage due to the difficulty of recruiting pediatric residents; 2) heavy workload that hinders learning; 3) lack of assessment and poor program planning; and 4) inadequate institutional and financial support. As a result, physicians' competencies are not guaranteed at the end of residency training, even with the pediatric board certification. Possible solutions may include: 1) conducting research on physician manpower statistics, work hours and environment; 2) establishing a Residency Program Review Committee and provision of standards for accreditation; 3) defining the competencies mandated as a general pediatrician and developing a set of measurable qualitative standards; 4) encouraging new programs with flexibility (e.g., primary care); and 5) pursuing adequate institutional and financial supports.

  11. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Pediatric computed tomography (CT) is ... a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  13. What Is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... children, and teens. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Gastroenterologists Have? Pediatric gastroenterologists are medical doctors who ...

  14. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Endocrinologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... the teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Endocrinologists Have? Pediatric endocrinologists are medical doctors who ...

  15. What is Pediatric Palliative Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQ Handout for Patients and Families What Is Pediatric Palliative Care? Pediatric Palliative care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is ... life for both the child and the family. Pediatric palliative care is provided by a team of ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  17. What Is a Pediatric Urologist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Urologist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... treat your child. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Urologists Have? Pediatric urologists are medical doctors who ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  19. Citation classics in pediatrics: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhapola, Viswas; Tiwari, Soumya; Deepthi, Bobbity; Kanwal, Sandeep Kumar

    2018-03-06

    Citation analysis provides insights into the history and developmental trajectory of scientific fields. Our objective was to perform an analysis of citation classics in the journals of pediatric specialty and to examine their characteristics. Initially, all the journals listed under the category of pediatrics (n = 120) were identified using Journal Citation Reports. Web of science database was then searched (1950-2016) to select the top-100 cited articles in the above identified pediatric journals. The top-100 cited article were categorized according the study design, sub-specialty, country, institutional affiliation, and language. The top-100 articles were published in 18 different journals, with Pediatrics having the highest numbers (n = 40), followed by The Journal of Pediatrics (n = 17). The majority (n = 62) of classics were published after 1990. The most cited article had citation count of 3516 and the least cited had a citation count of 593. The USA (n = 71) was the most commonly represented country, and 60 institutions contributed to 100 articles. Fifteen authors contributed to more than one classic as first or second author. Observational study (n = 55) was the commonest study design across all decades, followed by reviews (n = 12), scale development studies (n = 11), and guidelines (n = 11). Among the pediatric sub-specialties, growth and development articles were highly cited (n = 24), followed by pediatric psychiatry and behavior (n = 21), endocrinology (n = 15), and neonatology (n = 12). The top-100 cited articles in pediatrics identify the impactful authors, journals, institutes, and countries. Observational study design was predominant-implying that inclusion among citation classics is not related to soundness of study design.

  20. Mouth Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as sores, are very common. Follow this chart for more information about mouth problems in adults. ... cancers. See your dentist if sharp or rough teeth or dental work are causing irritation. Start OverDiagnosisThis ...

  1. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is proving to be a powerful diagnostic modality. Included in this year's abstracts and discussions are papers having to do with it application to neoplasia in general and a variety of specific disorders of the brain and spinal column. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy is reported; whether or not this becomes practical, it is an exciting prospect. Perhaps because interventional techniques are so readily applicable at this time, both in the infant and child as well as in the adult, little has been included. On the other hand, some disorders that were in the province of adult medicine are now becoming distressingly common in infants and children, i.e., the adult respiratory distress syndrome; the acquired immune deficiency syndrome and AIDS-related complex; and aluminum bone disease in children. Of those developments that are promising and related to the infant or child, one can count the articles having to do with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and the treatment of the respiratory distress syndrome, hyaline membrane disease, with human surfactant. The latter raises expectations for the end of multiple examinations of the sick neonate necessary for the definition and follow-up of pulmonary interstitial emphysema and the other complications of air block phenomenon. The two contributions on the role of diagnostic imaging before and after transplantation of the liver serve as a reference

  2. Correlates of Pediatric CPAP Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stephen M.M.; Jensen, Emily L.; Simon, Stacey L.; Friedman, Norman R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common pediatric condition characterized by recurrent partial or complete cessation of airflow during sleep, typically due to inadequate upper airway patency. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a therapeutic option that reduces morbidity. Despite efforts to promote use, CPAP adherence is poor in both pediatric and adult populations. We sought to determine whether demographics, insurance status, OSA severity, therapeutic pressure, or comorbid conditions were associated with pediatric CPAP adherence. Methods: A retrospective review of adherence download data was performed on all pediatric patients with initiation or adjustment of CPAP treatment over a one-year period with documented in-laboratory CPAP titration. Patients were grouped as CPAP adherent or non-adherent, where adherence was defined as > 70% nightly use and average usage ≥ 4 hours per night. Differences between the groups were analyzed by χ2 test. Results: Overall, nearly half of participants were CPAP adherent (49%, 69/140). Of the demographic data collected (age, ethnicity, sex, insurance status), only female sex was associated with better adherence (60.9% vs 39.5% of males adherent; odds ratio [OR] = 2.41, 95%CI = 1.20–4.85; p = 0.01). Severity of OSA (diagnostic apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] and degree of hypoxemia), therapeutic pressure, and residual AHI did not impact CPAP adherence (p > 0.05). Patients with developmental delay (DD) were more likely to be adherent with CPAP than those without a DD diagnosis (OR = 2.55, 95%CI = 1.27–5.13; p = 0.007). Female patients with trisomy 21 tended to be more adherent, but this did not reach significance or account for the overall increased adherence associated with female sex. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates that adherence to CPAP therapy is poor but suggests that female sex and developmental delay are associated with better adherence. These findings support efforts to understand the

  3. Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry Inaugural Case Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Alina; Mousdicas, Nico; Silverberg, Nanette; Powell, Douglas; Pelletier, Janice L; Silverberg, Jonathan I; Zippin, Jonathan; Fonacier, Luz; Tosti, Antonella; Lawley, Leslie; Wu Chang, Mary; Scheman, Andrew; Kleiner, Gary; Williams, Judith; Watsky, Kalman; Dunnick, Cory A; Frederickson, Rachel; Matiz, Catalina; Chaney, Keri; Estes, Tracy S; Botto, Nina; Draper, Michelle; Kircik, Leon; Lugo-Somolinos, Aida; Machler, Brian; Jacob, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) in US children. More widespread diagnostic confirmation through epicutaneous patch testing is needed. The aim was to quantify patch test results from providers evaluating US children. The study is a retrospective analysis of deidentified patch test results of children aged 18 years or younger, entered by participating providers in the Pediatric Contact Dermatitis Registry, during the first year of data collection (2015-2016). One thousand one hundred forty-two cases from 34 US states, entered by 84 providers, were analyzed. Sixty-five percent of cases had one or more positive patch test (PPT), with 48% of cases having 1 or more relevant positive patch test (RPPT). The most common PPT allergens were nickel (22%), fragrance mix I (11%), cobalt (9.1%), balsam of Peru (8.4%), neomycin (7.2%), propylene glycol (6.8%), cocamidopropyl betaine (6.4%), bacitracin (6.2%), formaldehyde (5.7%), and gold (5.7%). This US database provides multidisciplinary information on pediatric ACD, rates of PPT, and relevant RPPT reactions, validating the high rates of pediatric ACD previously reported in the literature. The registry database is the largest comprehensive collection of US-only pediatric patch test cases on which future research can be built. Continued collaboration between patients, health care providers, manufacturers, and policy makers is needed to decrease the most common allergens in pediatric consumer products.

  4. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  5. Science commons

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    SCP: Creative Commons licensing for open access publishing, Open Access Law journal-author agreements for converting journals to open access, and the Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine for retaining rights to self-archive in meaningful formats and locations for future re-use. More than 250 science and technology journals already publish under Creative Commons licensing while 35 law journals utilize the Open Access Law agreements. The Addendum Engine is a new tool created in partnership with SPARC and U.S. universities. View John Wilbanks's biography

  6. Pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkpatrick, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    In the other sections, one finds discussions of lesions or disorders that are congenital in nature, that are genetically determined, and that are acquired. Others that involve the lung of the child may in fact be encountered in the adult as well, e.g., cystic adenomatoid malformation, knowledge of which will provide another basis for a more encompassing differential diagnosis of some curious or poorly understood problems. Some would appear to be quite rare, and one might wonder why they should be included, e.g., plastic bronchitis and immotile cilia syndrome. The radiologist is the one who may well see the patient with chronic pulmonary disease on repeated occasions and suggest an approximate differential diagnosis that may result in a definitive diagnosis. One must know the possibilities, however, in order to construct such a differential. There are papers dealing with hydatid disease and amebiasis, uncommon to be sure, but these diseases have been encountered in Boston an I am sure elsewhere as the world gets smaller and travel becomes available to more people. Again, it is the radiologist who might be the first to suspect the underlying disease. There is a follow-up to an interesting article that occurred in the 1984 YEAR BOOK (article 6-1) that has to do with the role of surgical intervention in utero. The abstracted paper concerned with the prenatal diagnosis of obstructive uropathy and the comments by Doctor Lebowitz that are included this year are pertinent as intrauterine diagnosis and potential therapy become better understood and defined. The dysfunction of collagen-dificient osteogenesis imperfecta is of interest because of its importance and relevance to the diagnosis of the osseous dysplasias; its elucidation will become more and more the province of the enzyme chemist or the biochemist as opposed to reliance on gross morphology

  7. Pediatric anesthesia in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösenberg, Adrian T

    2007-06-01

    To highlight the problems faced in developing countries where healthcare resources are limited, with particular emphasis on pediatric anesthesia. The fact that very few publications address pediatric anesthesia in the developing world is not surprising given that most anesthetics are provided by nonphysicians, nurses or unqualified personnel. In compiling this article information is drawn from pediatric surgical, anesthetic and related texts. In a recent survey more than 80% of anesthesia providers in a poor country acknowledged that with the limited resources available they could not provide basic anesthesia for children less than 5 years. Although many publications could be regarded as anecdotal, the similarities to this survey suggest that the lack of facilities is more generalized than we would like to believe. The real risk of anesthesia in comparison to other major health risks such as human immunodeficiency virus, malaria, tuberculosis and trauma remains undetermined. The critical shortage of manpower remains a barrier to progress. Despite erratic electrical supplies, inconsistent oxygen delivery, paucity of drugs or equipment and on occasion even lack of running water, many provide life-saving anesthesia. Perioperative morbidity and mortality is, however, understandably high by developed world standards.

  8. Pediatric Liver Transplantation: Our Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Ahmet; Yılmaz, Aygen; Sayar, Ersin; Dinçhan, Ayhan; Aliosmanoğlu, İbrahim; Erbiş, Halil; Aydınlı, Bülent; Artan, Reha

    2016-10-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate our liver transplant pediatric patients and to report our experience in the complications and the long-term follow-up results. Patients between the ages of 0 and 18 years, who had liver transplantation in the organ transplantation center of our university hospital between 1997 and 2016, were included in the study. The age, sex, indications for the liver transplantation, complications after the transplantation, and long-term follow-up findings were retrospectively evaluated. The obtained results were analyzed with statistical methods. In our organ transplantation center, 62 pediatric liver transplantations were carried out since 1997. The mean age of our patients was 7.3 years (6.5 months-17 years). The 4 most common reasons for liver transplantation were: Wilson's disease (n=10; 16.3%), biliary atresia (n=9; 14.5%), progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (n=8; 12.9%), and cryptogenic cirrhosis (n=7; 11.3%). The mortality rate after transplantation was 19.6% (12 of the total 62 patients). The observed acute and chronic rejection rates were 34% and 4.9%, respectively. Thrombosis (9.6%) was observed in the hepatic artery (4.8%) and portal vein (4.8%). Bile leakage and biliary stricture rates were 31% and 11%, respectively. 1-year and 5-year survival rates of our patients were 87% and 84%, respectively. The morbidity and mortality rates in our organ transplantation center, regarding pediatric liver transplantations, are consistent with the literature.

  9. Types and Treatment of Pediatric Sleep Disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Gloria J.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an overview of pediatric sleep disturbances with emphases on types and treatments. Relationships between sleep disorders and comorbid conditions function to exacerbate and maintain both disorders. An estimated 20% of teenagers experience chronic partial sleep deprivation, resulting in problems with memory, attention, and…

  10. Neutropenia in pediatric hematology/oncology practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Deordieva

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Acquired neutropenia is one of the most common conditions in pediatric hematology practice. These conditions usually are benign. In contrast, congenital neutropenia are rare conditions, but in the absence of pathogenic therapy can cause fatal complications. Approach to the differential diagnosis and management of these patients are discussed in this review.

  11. Safety Profile of Cough and Cold Medication Use in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jody L; Wang, George Sam; Reynolds, Kate M; Banner, William; Bond, G Randall; Kauffman, Ralph E; Palmer, Robert B; Paul, Ian M; Dart, Richard C

    2017-06-01

    The safety of cough and cold medication (CCM) use in children has been questioned. We describe the safety profile of CCMs in children pediatric (75.5%), and single-ingredient (77.5%) formulations were most commonly involved. AEs occurring in >20% of all cases included tachycardia, somnolence, hallucinations, ataxia, mydriasis, and agitation. Twenty cases (0.6%) resulted in death; most were in children pediatric liquid formulations were the most commonly reported products. These characteristics present an opportunity for targeted prevention efforts. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Hyperglycaemic emergencies are a common problem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to presence of ketosis, standard bicarbonate level and serum osmolality: (I) mild diabetic keto-acidosis (OKA);. (h) severe DKA; (UI) hyperosmolar state; and. (iv) hyperglycaemia. Results. There were 131 admissions in 122 patients. Sixty-five occurred in non-insulin-dependent diabetics,. 45 in insulin-dependent diabetics ...

  13. Hyperglycaemic emergencies are a common problem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    employed at the first two but the tertiary institutions are staffed by ... The type of diabetes, Le. insulin-dependent diabetes. (type I, lOOM) .... diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar non-ketotic coma with low-dose insulin and a uniform treatment ...

  14. Child Abuse : A Common Problem in Curacao?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, K.; Boersma, A. A.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.; de Bruijn, J.

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of child abuse among high school students in Curacao. Methods: A questionnaire survey among high school students up to 17 years of age was conducted. The questionnaire was based on existing literature and validated questionnaires. The questionnaire used was

  15. Coping with Common Period Problems (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the changes in hormone levels. There are other theories as well. For example, some believe that what ... throw your hormones out of whack. To get everything back on course, your doctor may use hormone ...

  16. Common visual problems in children with disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salt, Alison; Sargent, Jenefer

    2014-12-01

    Children with disability are at a substantially higher risk of visual impairment (VI) (10.5% compared with 0.16%) but also of ocular disorders of all types, including refractive errors and strabismus. The aetiology of VI in children with disability reflects that of the general population and includes cerebral VI, optic atrophy, as well as primary visual disorders such as retinal dystrophies and structural eye anomalies. VI and other potentially correctable ocular disorders may not be recognised without careful assessment and are frequently unidentified in children with complex needs. Although assessment may be more challenging than in other children, identifying these potential additional barriers to learning and development may be critical. There is a need to develop clearer guidelines, referral pathways and closer working between all professionals involved in the care of children with disability and visual disorders to improve our focus on the assessment of vision and outcomes for children with disability. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Bridging Adult Experience to Pediatrics in Oncology Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Ruby; Zhao, Hong; Reaman, Gregory; Liu, Qi; Wang, Yaning; Stewart, Clinton F; Burckart, Gilbert

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric drug development in the United States has grown under the current regulations made permanent by the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act of 2012. Over 1200 pediatric studies have now been submitted to the US FDA, but there is still a high rate of failure to obtain pediatric labeling for the indication pursued. Pediatric oncology represents special problems in that the disease is most often dissimilar to any cancer found in the adult population. Therefore, the development of drug dosing in pediatric oncology patients represents a special challenge. Potential approaches to pediatric dosing in oncology patients include extrapolation of efficacy from adult studies in those few cases where the disease is similar, inclusion of adolescent patients in adult trials when possible, and bridging the adult dose to the pediatric dose. An analysis of the recommended phase 2 dose for 40 molecularly targeted agents in pediatric patients provides some insight into current practices. Increased knowledge of tumor biology and efforts to identify and validate molecular targets and genetic abnormalities that drive childhood cancers can lead to increased opportunities for precision medicine in the treatment of pediatric cancers. © 2017, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  18. Too many pediatric trampoline injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnival, R A; Street, K A; Schunk, J E

    1999-05-01

    Recent reports note a dramatic increase in the number of pediatric trampoline injuries (PTI) during the past several years. In 1996, the US Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that 83 000 patients received treatment for trampoline injuries in US hospital emergency departments (EDs), and that approximately 75% of these patients were trampolines accounted for 99% of PTI. Most injuries (66%) occurred on the trampoline, 28% resulted from falls off, and 4% from imaginative mechanisms. One hundred eleven patients (15%) suffered severe injury (1990 Abbreviated Injury Scale value >/=3), usually of an extremity (89 out of 111). Fractures occurred in 324 patients (45%). Spinal injuries were common (12%), including 7 patients with cervical or thoracic fractures, and 1 with C7 paraplegia. Fractures were more frequently associated with falls off the trampoline, whereas spinal injuries more frequently occurred on the trampoline. Eighty patients (11%) required prehospital medical transport to our ED, 584 (80%) had ED radiographs, and 382 (53%) required pediatric surgical subspecialty involvement. Seventeen percent of PTI patients (125 out of 727) were admitted to the hospital, including 9 to the pediatric intensive care unit; 99 (14%) required one or more operations. Mean hospital stay was 2 days (range, 1-63 days); 24 stays (19%) were for >/=3 days. We estimate that the hospital charges for the acute medical care of PTI study patients at our institution totaled approximately $700 000. PTI are dramatically increasing in number, and result in considerable childhood morbidity. Most PTI occur on privately owned trampolines. Few, if any, safety recommendations for the trampoline are followed. We support recommendations for a ban on the recreational, school, and competitive pediatric use of trampolines.

  19. Pediatric Mania: The Controversy between Euphoria and Irritability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Giulia; Uchida, Mai; Battaglia, Claudia; Casini, Maria Pia; De Chiara, Lavinia; Biederman, Joseph; Vicari, Stefano; Wozniak, Janet

    2017-04-01

    Pediatric Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a highly morbid pediatric psychiatric disease, consistently associated with family psychiatric history of mood disorders and associated with high levels of morbidity and disability and with a great risk of suicide. While there is a general consensus on the symptomatology of depression in childhood, the phenomenology of pediatric mania is still highly debated and the course and long-term outcome of pediatric BD still need to be clarified. We reviewed the available studies on the phenomenology of pediatric mania with the aim of summarizing the prevalence, demographics, clinical correlates and course of these two types of pediatric mania. Eighteen studies reported the number of subjects presenting with either irritable or elated mood during mania. Irritability has been reported to be the most frequent clinical feature of pediatric mania reaching a sensitivity of 95-100% in several samples. Only half the studies reviewed reported on number of episodes or cycling patterns and the described course was mostly chronic and ultra-rapid whereas the classical episodic presentation was less common. Few long-term outcome studies have reported a diagnostic stability of mania from childhood to young adult age. Future research should focus on the heterogeneity of irritability aiming at differentiating distinct subtypes of pediatric psychiatric disorders with distinct phenomenology, course, outcome and biomarkers. Longitudinal studies of samples attending to mood presentation, irritable versus elated, and course, chronic versus episodic, may help clarify whether these are meaningful distinctions in the course, treatment and outcome of pediatric onset bipolar disorder.

  20. Pediatric Hospitalist Comanagement Survey of Clinical and Billing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Katherine M; Zipes, David G; Schaffzin, Joshua K; Rosenberg, Rebecca

    2017-10-01

    Surgical comanagement is an increasingly common practice in pediatric hospital medicine. Information about the structure and financing of such care is limited. The aim of the researchers for this study was to investigate pediatric hospitalist surgical comanagement models and to assess pediatric hospitalist familiarity with and patterns of billing for surgical patients. We conducted a cross-sectional cohort web-based survey of pediatric hospitalists using the American Academy of Pediatrics' Section on Hospital Medicine listserv. In our study ( N = 133), we found wide variation in our cohort in surgical patient practice management, including program structure, individual billing practices, and knowledge regarding billing practices. Even for pediatric hospitalists with comanagement service agreements between surgeons and pediatric hospitalists, there was no increased awareness or knowledge about reimbursement or billing for surgical patients. This global lack of knowledge in our small but diverse sample suggests that billing resources and training for pediatric hospitalists practicing comanagement of surgical patients are needed. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. Orthobiologics in Pediatric Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Christopher C; Walker, Clark M; Spence, David D

    2017-07-01

    Orthobiologics are biological substances that allow injured muscles, tendons, ligaments, and bone to heal more quickly. They are found naturally in the body; at higher concentrations they can aid in the healing process. These substances include autograft bone, allograft bone, demineralized bone matrix, bone morphogenic proteins, growth factors, stem cells, plasma-rich protein, and ceramic grafts. Their use in sports medicine has exploded in efforts to increase graft incorporation, stimulate healing, and get athletes back to sport with problems including anterior cruciate ligament ruptures, tendon ruptures, cartilage injuries, and fractures. This article reviews orthobiologics and their applications in pediatric sports medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Advances in pediatric dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Richard K; Best, Jed M

    2011-07-01

    This article addresses advances in 4 key areas related to pediatric dentistry: (1) caries detection tools, (2) early interventions to arrest disease progression, (3) caries-risk assessment tools, and (4) trends in pediatric procedures and dental materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pediatric magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    This book defines the current clinical potential of magnetic resonance imaging and focuses on direct clinical work with pediatric patients. A section dealing with the physics of magnetic resonance imaging provides an introduction to enable clinicians to utilize the machine and interpret the images. Magnetic resonance imaging is presented as an appropriate imaging modality for pediatric patients utilizing no radiation

  4. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux during First Year of Life in Infants Admitted in Pediatric Department of Imam Reza Hospital-Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Amirian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is the most common of esophageal disorder in all ages.  GER defined as passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, and GER disease (GERD, (symptoms or complications of GER, are common pediatric problems. Clinical manifestations of GERD in infants include regurgitation, irritability, choking, gagging vomiting, poor weight gain and respiratory disorder. The purpose of this study is evaluation prevalence of Gastroesophageal reflux and its symptoms in infants during first year of life.   Materials and Method: This study was performed on 75 infants younger than one year old, who were admitted in pediatric department of Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad during 3 months.   Results: In this study in a three- month period, GER was assessed in 75 infants younger than one year who were admitted in pediatric department of Imam Reza Hospital. Their parents reported GER in 66% of these infants. The most common symptom of reflux was regurgitation. Regurgitation was reported at least once a day to seven times a day. The other reported symptoms were respectively: irritability (16%, choking (10%, and failure to thrive (0.3%. Peak reported regurgitation was 60% at 3.5 months.   Conclusion: Gastroesophageal reflux is a common problem in infancy. Complaints of regurgitation are common during the first year of life. So understanding the symptoms of GER and recognition of GERD should be considred.   Keyword: Infant,Gastroesophageal Reflux, Prevalence. 

  5. Pediatric oncologic endosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Yoon Jung; Goedecke, Jan; Muensterer, Oliver J

    2017-08-01

    Despite increasing popularity of minimal-invasive techniques in the pediatric population, their use in diagnosis and management of pediatric malignancy is still debated. Moreover, there is limited evidence to clarify this controversy due to low incidence of each individual type of pediatric tumor, huge diversity of the disease entity, heterogeneity of surgical technique, and lack of well-designed studies on pediatric oncologic minimal-invasive surgery. However, a rapid development of medical instruments and technologies accelerated the current trend toward less invasive surgery, including oncologic endosurgery. The aim of this article is to review current literatures about the application of the minimal-invasive approach for pediatric tumors and to give an overview of the current status, indications, individual techniques, and future perspectives.

  6. Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis: an uncommon pediatric renal mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Ethan A.; Dillman, Jonathan R. [University of Michigan Health System, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Styn, Nicholas; Wan, Julian [University of Michigan Health System, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Urology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McHugh, Jonathan [University of Michigan Health System, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Pathology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis (XGP) is a chronic suppurative infectious process that only rarely affects pediatric patients, and most commonly occurs in the setting of a large obstructing calculus. Histologically, XGP is characterized by the presence of chronic inflammation and lipid-laden macrophages. This case report illustrates the radiological, surgical, and pathologic findings in a young patient who presented to our institution for treatment of this uncommon condition. Although rare, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis is a clinically important entity that can affect pediatric patients. This condition should be considered in the differential diagnosis for an atypical-appearing renal mass. (orig.)

  7. Pediatric Abdominal Pain: An Emergency Medicine Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremiah; Fox, Sean M

    2016-05-01

    Abdominal pain is a common complaint that leads to pediatric patients seeking emergency care. The emergency care provider has the arduous task of determining which child likely has a benign cause and not missing the devastating condition that needs emergent attention. This article reviews common benign causes of abdominal pain as well as some of the cannot-miss emergent causes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Making the Common Good Common

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    How are independent schools to be useful to the wider world? Beyond their common commitment to educate their students for meaningful lives in service of the greater good, can they educate a broader constituency and, thus, share their resources and skills more broadly? Their answers to this question will be shaped by their independence. Any…

  9. Nasal Bacterial Colonization in Pediatric Epistaxis: The Role of Topical Antibacterial Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukaddder Korkmaz

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epistaxis is a common problem in childhood. It has been shown that children with recurrent epistaxis are more likely to have nasal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus. It has been suggested that low-grade inflammation, crusting and increased vascularity due to bacterial colonization contributes to the development of epistaxis in children. Aims: This study aimed to investigate the nasal colonization and treatment outcome in pediatric epistaxis patients. Study Design: Retrospective cross-sectional study. Methods: Charts of the pediatric patients referred to our university hospital otolaryngology outpatient clinics for the evaluation of epistaxis were reviewed. The patients whose nasal cultures had been taken at the first clinical visit comprised the study group. Results: Staphylococcus aureus was the most common bacteria grown. The presence of crusting and hypervascularity was not dependent on the type of bacterial growth and there was no relation between hypervascularity and crusting of the nasal mucosa. Thirty-six patients were evaluated for the outcome analysis. Resolution of bleeding was not dependent on nasal colonization; in patients with colonization, there was no difference between topical antibacterial and non-antibacterial treatments. Conclusion: Despite the high colonization rates, topical antibacterial treatment was not found superior to non-antibacterial treatment. Our study does not support the belief that bacterial colonization results in hypervascularity of the septal mucosa causing epistaxis since no relation was found between nasal colonization, hypervascularity and crusting. The role of bacterial colonization in pediatric epistaxis need to be further investigated and treatment protocols must be determined accordingly.

  10. Managing common marital stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A C; Starling, B P

    1989-10-01

    Marital conflict and divorce are problems of great magnitude in our society, and nurse practitioners are frequently asked by patients to address marital problems in clinical practice. "Family life cycle theory" provides a framework for understanding the common stresses of marital life and for developing nursing strategies to improve marital satisfaction. If unaddressed, marital difficulties have serious adverse consequences for a couple's health, leading to greater dysfunction and a decline in overall wellness. This article focuses on identifying couples in crisis, assisting them to achieve pre-crisis equilibrium or an even higher level of functioning, and providing appropriate referral if complex relationship problems exist.

  11. Social pediatrics: weaving horizontal and vertical threads through pediatric residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Levy, Rebecca; Atkinson, Adelle; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth; Shouldice, Michelle

    2017-01-13

    Social pediatrics teaches pediatric residents how to understand disease within their patients' social, environmental and political contexts. It's an essential component of pediatric residency training; however there is very little literature that addresses how such a broad-ranging topic can be taught effectively. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize social pediatric education in our pediatric residency training in order to identify strengths and gaps. A social pediatrics curriculum map was developed, attending to 3 different dimensions: (1) the intended curriculum as prescribed by the Objectives of Training for Pediatrics of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), (2) the formal curriculum defined by rotation-specific learning objectives, and (3) the informal/hidden curriculum as reflected in resident and teacher experiences and perceptions. Forty-one social pediatric learning objectives were extracted from the RCPSC Objectives of Training for Pediatrics, most were listed in the Medical Expert (51%) and Health Advocate competencies (24%). Almost all RCPSC social pediatric learning objectives were identified in more than one rotation and/or seminar. Adolescent Medicine (29.2%), Pediatric Ambulatory Medicine (26.2%) and Developmental Pediatrics (25%) listed the highest proportion of social pediatric learning objectives. Four (10%) RCPSC social pediatric objectives were not explicitly named within learning objectives of the formal curriculum. The informal curriculum revealed that both teachers and residents viewed social pediatrics as integral to all clinical encounters. Perceived barriers to teaching and learning of social pediatrics included time constraints, particularly in a tertiary care environment, and the value of social pediatrics relative to medical expert knowledge. Despite the lack of an explicit thematic presentation of social pediatric learning objectives by the Royal College and residency training program

  12. A pediatric digital storytelling system for third year medical students: The Virtual Pediatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Donna M; Lewis, Tamra E; D'Alessandro, Michael P

    2004-01-01

    Background Computer-based patient simulations (CBPS) are common, effective, instructional methods for medical students, but have limitations. The goal of this project was to describe the development of a CBPS designed to overcome some of these limitations and to perform an online evaluation. Methods In 1996, patients and families experiencing a common pediatric problem were interviewed, photographed and a chart review completed. A digital storytelling template was developed: 1. patient's story, evaluation and clinical course, 2. problem-based approach to the evaluation, and 3. discussion of disease process. The media was digitized and placed onto the Internet. The digital stories and a 10-question online survey were pilot tested. Online survey responses were collected from 1999–2003. Overall use of the digital stories was measured by computer server logs and by the number of hyperlinks to the CBPS. Results Eight stories were created using this system. Over 4.5 years, 814,148 digital story pages were read by 362,351 users. Hyperlink citations from other websites to the CBPS were 108. Online survey respondents (N = 393) described the overall quality as excellent or very good (88.4%). The stores were clearly written (92%) at an appropriate level (91.4%). Respondents felt they could begin to evaluate a similar case presentation (95.4%), and would remember the case in the future (91%). Conclusions A new type of CBPS, the digital storytelling system, has been developed and evaluated which and appears to be successful in overcoming some of the limitations of earlier CBPS by featuring patient's stories in their own words, by focusing on problems rather than diseases, and by having stories that are quick for students to work through. PMID:15260883

  13. Pediatric Awake Craniotomy for Brain Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, Ali; Rükşen, Mete; Çetin, H Yurday; Seval, H Özer; İşlekel, Sertaç

    2016-01-01

    Awake craniotomy is a special method to prevent motor deficits during the resection of lesions that are located in, or close to, functional areas. Although it is more commonly performed in adult patients, reports of pediatric cases undergoing awake craniotomy are limited in the literature. In our clinic, where we frequently use awake craniotomy in adult patients, we performed this method in 2 selected pediatric cases for lesion surgery. At an early age, these 2 cases diagnosed with epilepsy presented cerebral lesions, but since the lesions enclosed functional areas, surgical resection was not regarded as a treatment option at this time. In these 2 pediatric cases, we successfully completed lesion surgery with awake craniotomy. The method and the techniques employed during surgery are presented concomitant with other reports in the literature. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Krister; Ekström-Jodal, Barbro; Meretoja, Olli

    2015-01-01

    The initiation and development of pediatric anesthesia and intensive care have much in common in the Scandinavian countries. The five countries had to initiate close relations and cooperation in all medical disciplines. The pediatric anesthesia subspecialty took its first steps after the Second...... World War. Relations for training and exchange of experiences between Scandinavian countries with centers in Europe and the USA were a prerequisite for development. Specialized pediatric practice was not a full-time position until during the 1950s, when the first pediatric anesthesia positions were...... created. Scandinavian anesthesia developed slowly. In contrast, Scandinavia pioneered both adult and certainly pediatric intensive care. The pioneers were heavily involved in the teaching and training of anesthetists and nurses. This was necessary to manage the rapidly increasing work. The polio epidemics...

  15. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Sullivan, Ashley N. [St. George' s University School of Medicine, Grenada, West Indies (Grenada); Bloom, David A. [William Beaumont Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States); William Beaumont Hospital, Section of Pediatric Radiology, Department of Radiology, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  16. Pediatric blunt splenic trauma: a comprehensive review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, Karen N.; Werder, Gabriel M.; Callaghan, Rachel M.; Jafri, Zafar H.; Sullivan, Ashley N.; Bloom, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal trauma is a leading cause of death in children older than 1 year of age. The spleen is the most common organ injured following blunt abdominal trauma. Pediatric trauma patients present unique clinical challenges as compared to adults, including different mechanisms of injury, physiologic responses, and indications for operative versus nonoperative management. Splenic salvage techniques and nonoperative approaches are preferred to splenectomy in order to decrease perioperative risks, transfusion needs, duration/cost of hospitalization, and risk of overwhelming postsplenectomy infection. Early and accurate detection of splenic injury is critical in both adults and children; however, while imaging findings guide management in adults, hemodynamic stability is the primary determinant in pediatric patients. After initial diagnosis, the primary role of imaging in pediatric patients is to determine the level and duration of care. We present a comprehensive literature review regarding the mechanism of injury, imaging, management, and complications of traumatic splenic injury in pediatric patients. Multiple patients are presented with an emphasis on the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma organ injury grading system. Clinical practice guidelines from the American Pediatric Surgical Association are discussed and compared with our experience at a large community hospital, with recommendations for future practice guidelines. (orig.)

  17. Management of Pediatric Migraine: Current Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrizman, Marina; Pakalnis, Ann

    2018-02-01

    Migraine is one of the most common neurologic conditions in pediatrics. It can be a significant stressor, causing absences from school and interruption of parents' work and family schedules. The mainstay of treatment remains educating patients about healthy lifestyle practices and the influences of sleep, stressors, and hydration on triggering migraine attacks. Psychological therapies such as biofeedback or cognitive-behavioral therapy may be beneficial in some patients, especially those with prominent psychological comorbidities. New advances in the pathophysiology of migraine and additional pediatric approval of abortive therapy with triptans have led to significant advances in the management of migraine in children. Some challenges to preventive therapy were recently noted with the negative results obtained in the Childhood and Adolescent Migraine Prevention Study, which compared prescription drugs to placebo. Inherent differences between adult and pediatric headaches, with shorter duration of pediatric migraine and prominent placebo effect, present recurring challenges for clinicians. [Pediatr Ann. 2018;47(2):e55-e60.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  18. Leadership trends in academic pediatric departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, F Bruder; Jones, Douglas; Fiser, Debra H

    2005-08-01

    To examine recent turnover trends among chairs of academic pediatric departments. Membership data for the 150 institutions represented by the Association of Medical School Pediatric Department Chairs in the United States, Canada, and Puerto Rico were reviewed for the time period of 1993-2003. From 1993 to 2003, 278 individuals (250 men and 28 women) held the position of chair. The mean time of service was 5.58 +/- 3.2 years (median: 5 years). Twenty-nine individuals served continuously as chairs during the 11-year period. Seventy-two individuals served as interim chairs. Twenty-eight women were appointed either chairs or interim chairs during the 11 years. The number of female chairs decreased from 13 in 1993 to 11 in 2003. Female chairs were in office 3.42 +/- 2.72 years. A total of 123 departments had a change in leadership, with a mean annual turnover rate of 17% (range: 4.6-24%). Three departments had 5 different leaders as either interim chair or chair and 6 departments had 4 different leaders during this time period. Neonatology was the most common subspecialty represented by recent pediatric chairs, although nephrology was the subspecialty with the greatest proportional representation. Departments of pediatrics have high turnover of leadership. Women, in particular, serve for relatively short periods and appear to be under-represented within the leadership of pediatrics. Efforts should be made to ascertain personal qualities that allow sustained leadership and to attract more women into leadership positions.

  19. Biofeedback as Prophylaxis for Pediatric Migraine: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubberud, Anker; Varkey, Emma; McCrory, Douglas C; Pedersen, Sindre Andre; Linde, Mattias

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a common problem in children and adolescents, but few satisfactory prophylactic treatments exist. Our goal was to investigate the pooled evidence for the effectiveness of using biofeedback to reduce childhood migraine. A systematic search was conducted across the databases Medline, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. Prospective, randomized controlled trials of biofeedback for migraine among children and adolescents were located in the search. Data on reduction of mean attack frequency and a series of secondary outcomes, including adverse events, were extracted. Risk of bias was also assessed. Forest plots were created by using a fixed effects model, and mean differences were reported. Five studies with a total of 137 participants met the inclusion criteria. Biofeedback reduced migraine frequency (mean difference, -1.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), -2.72 to -1.21]; P Biofeedback demonstrated no adjuvant effect when combined with other behavioral treatment; neither did it have significant advantages over active treatment. Only 40% of bias judgments were deemed as "low" risk. Methodologic issues hampered the meta-analyses. Only a few studies were possible to include, and they suffered from incomplete reporting of data and risk of bias. Biofeedback seems to be an effective intervention for pediatric migraine, but in light of the limitations, further investigation is needed to increase our confidence in the estimate. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  20. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  1. Pediatric Infectious Endophthalmitis: A 271-case Retrospective Study at a Single Center in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Penetrating ocular trauma is the most frequent cause of pediatric endophthalmitis in China. Streptococcus and Staphylococcus species are the most commonly identified organisms in exogenous pediatric endophthalmitis whereas Fusarium species are commonly seen in endogenous endophthalmitis. In this research, in spite of aggressive management with antibiotics and vitrectomy, the visual prognosis was found to be generally poor.

  2. Pediatric critical incidents reported over 15 years at a tertiary care teaching hospital of a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Shemila; Khan, Fauzia Anis; Khan, Sobia

    2018-01-01

    The role of critical incident (CI) reporting is well established in improving patient safety but only a limited number of available reports relate to pediatric incidents. Our aim was to analyze the reported CIs specific to pediatric patients in our database and to reevaluate the value of this program in addressing issues in pediatric anesthesia practice. Incidents related to pediatric population from neonatal period till the age of 12 years were selected. A review of all CI records collected between January 1998 and December 2012, in the Department of Anaesthesiology of Aga Khan University hospital was done. This was retrospective form review. The Department has a structured CI form in use since 1998 which is intermittently evaluated and modified if needed. A total of 451 pediatric CIs were included. Thirty-four percent of the incidents were reported in infants. Ninety-six percent of the reported incidents took place during elective surgery and 4% during emergency surgery. Equipment-related events (n = 114), respiratory events (n = 112), and drug events (n = 110) were equally distributed (25.6%, 25.3%, and 24.7%). Human factors accounted for 74% of reports followed by, equipment failure (10%) and patient factors (8%). Only 5% of the incidents were system errors. Failure to check (equipment/drugs/doses) was the most common cause for human factors. Poor outcome was seen in 7% of cases. Medication and equipment are the clinical areas that need to be looked at more closely. We also recommend quality improvement projects in both these areas as well as training of residents and staff in managing airway-related problems in pediatric patients.

  3. The impact of pediatric obesity on hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infections in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Yusuke; Nochioka, Kotaro; Testa, Marcia A

    2018-04-01

    Obesity is the most common public health problem and is a clinically complicating risk factor among hospitalized children. The impact of pediatric obesity on the severity and morbidity of lower respiratory tract infections remains unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of bronchitis and pneumonia among children aged 2-20 years using hospital discharge records. The data were obtained from the Kid's Inpatient Database in 2003, 2006, 2009, and 2012, and were weighted to estimate the number of hospitalizations in the United States. We used the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification code (278.0×) to classify whether the patient was obese or not. We investigated the associations between pediatric obesity and use of mechanical ventilation using multivariable logistic regression model. In addition, we ascertained the relationships between pediatric obesity, comorbid blood stream infections, mean healthcare cost, and length of hospital stay. We estimated a total of 133 602 hospitalizations with pneumonia and bronchitis among children aged between 2 and 20 years. Obesity was significantly associated with use of mechanical ventilation (adjusted OR 2.90, 95% CI 2.15-3.90), comorbid bacteremia or septicemia (adjusted OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.03-2.44), elevated healthcare costs (adjusted difference $383, 95%CI $276-$476), and prolonged length of hospital stay (difference 0.32 days, 95%CI 0.23-0.40 days), after adjusting for patient and hospital characteristics using multivariable logistic regression models. Pediatric obesity is an independent risk factor for severity and morbidity among pediatric patients with lower respiratory tract infections. These findings suggest the importance of obesity prevention for pediatric populations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pediatric bloodstream infections in Cambodia, 2007 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoesser, Nicole; Moore, Catrin E; Pocock, Joanna M; An, Khun Peng; Emary, Kate; Carter, Michael; Sona, Soeng; Poda, Sar; Day, Nicholas; Kumar, Varun; Parry, Christopher M

    2013-07-01

    Pediatric bacterial bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Epidemiological data from resource-limited settings in southeast Asia, such as Cambodia, are sparse but have important implications for treatment and public health strategies. We retrospectively investigated BSI in children at a pediatric hospital and its satellite clinic in Siem Reap, Cambodia, from January 1, 2007, to July 31, 2011. The range of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were analyzed in conjunction with demographic, clinical and outcome data. Of 7682 blood cultures with results (99.9% of cultures taken), 606 (7.9%) episodes of BSI were identified in 588 children. The incidence of BSI increased from 14 to 50/1000 admissions (P < 0.001); this was associated with an increased sampling rate. Most BSI were community acquired (89.1%). Common pathogens included Salmonella Typhi (22.8% of all isolates), Staphylococcus aureus (12.2%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (10.0%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.4%) and Escherichia coli (6.3%). 21.5% of BSI were caused by a diverse group of uncommon organisms, the majority of which were environmental Gram-negative species. No Listeria monocytogenes or Group B streptococcal BSI were identified. Antimicrobial resistance, particularly among the Enterobacteriaceae, was common. Overall mortality was substantial (19.0%), higher in neonates (36.9%) and independently associated with meningitis/meningoencephalitis and K. pneumoniae infection. BSI is a common problem in Cambodian children attending hospital and associated with significant mortality. Further studies are needed to clarify the epidemiology of neonatal sepsis, the contribution of atypical organisms and the epidemiology of pneumococcal disease before the introduction of vaccine.

  5. Evaluating Hospice and Palliative Medicine Education in Pediatric Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arun L; Klick, Jeffrey C; McCracken, Courtney E; Hebbar, Kiran B

    2017-08-01

    Hospice and Palliative Medicine (HPM) competencies are of growing importance in training general pediatricians and pediatric sub-specialists. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) emphasized pediatric trainees should understand the "impact of chronic disease, terminal conditions and death on patients and their families." Currently, very little is known regarding pediatric trainee education in HPM. We surveyed all 486 ACGME-accredited pediatric training program directors (PDs) - 200 in general pediatrics (GP), 57 in cardiology (CARD), 64 in critical care medicine (CCM), 69 in hematology-oncology (ONC) and 96 in neonatology (NICU). We collected training program's demographics, PD's attitudes and educational practices regarding HPM. The complete response rate was 30% (148/486). Overall, 45% offer formal HPM curriculum and 39% offer a rotation in HPM for trainees. HPM teaching modalities commonly reported included conferences, consultations and bedside teaching. Eighty-one percent of all respondents felt that HPM curriculum would improve trainees' ability to care for patients. While most groups felt that a HPM rotation would enhance trainees' education [GP (96%), CARD (77%), CCM (82%) and ONC (95%)], NICU PDs were more divided (55%; p training, there remains a paucity of opportunities for pediatric trainees. Passive teaching methods are frequently utilized in HPM curricula with minimal diversity in methods utilized to teach HPM. Opportunities to further emphasize HPM in general pediatric and pediatric sub-specialty training remains.

  6. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and Bowel Why is it important to begin urologic care in infancy and ...

  7. Pediatric Nephrolithiasis: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, Tayaba; Kamat, Deepak

    2017-06-01

    The incidence of pediatric nephrolithiasis is on the rise. The composition of kidney stones in children is different than in adults, as most stones in children have a composition of calcium oxalate and calcium phosphate mixed with a small amount of uric acid. The symptoms of pediatric nephrolithiasis are nonspecific. Computed tomography (CT) is the gold standard for diagnosis; however, because of radiation exposure associated with a CT scan, ultrasonography is also an accepted modality for the diagnosis. Extensive metabolic evaluation is important to rule out an underlying metabolic disorder. Urinary decompression, medical expulsion therapy, and surgical interventions such as ureteroscopy and extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy are some of the options available for treating pediatric nephrolithiasis. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(6):e242-e244.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Nuclear Medicine Children’s (pediatric) nuclear medicine imaging uses small amounts of radioactive materials called radiotracers, a special ... is a branch of medical imaging that uses small amounts of radioactive material to diagnose and determine ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging techniques. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's " ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... interventions. Children's (pediatric) nuclear medicine refers to imaging examinations done in babies, young children and teenagers. Nuclear ... nuclear medicine procedure work? With ordinary x-ray examinations, an image is made by passing x-rays ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank ... View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child is taking as well as vitamins and herbal supplements and if he or she has any ... What are the limitations of Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine? Nuclear medicine procedures can be time consuming. It ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media General Nuclear Medicine Children's (Pediatric) CT ( ... About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 Radiological Society of ...

  15. [Focus of childhood obesity from pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-López, Erika F; Macías-Rosales, Rocío

    2014-01-01

    The prevalences of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically in the last two decades in the adult and children population. The Organization for Cooperation and Economic Development reported in 2010 that Mexico ranks first worldwide in childhood obesity. The 2006 National Health and Nutrition Survey reported that one of every three teenagers are overweight and obese. In the last decades, pediatric hospitals in different parts of the world reported the prevalence of secondary malnutrition, since in those days overweight and obesity did not represent health problems. Currently, the prevalence of overweight and obesity has been scarcely studied in pediatric hospitals. In the Hospital de Pediatría (Children's Hospital) of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social's Centro Médico Nacional de Occidente it is reported a prevalence of overweight of 15.4 % and obesity of 12.2 %, which reflects a nutritional transition.Due to the high prevalence of overweight and obesity in this pediatric hospital of reference, one could conclude that the pediatrician should be able to make a correct evaluation of the nutritional state, because, if he does not detect these problems, we will be condemning children to suffer from a chronic disease for the rest of their lives, and with all the implications in the short, medium and long term.

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or the environment, or if your child has asthma. The contrast material most commonly used for an ... if there is a history of heart disease, asthma, diabetes, kidney disease or thyroid problems. Any of ...

  17. Pediatric vascular access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, James S.

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric interventional radiologists are ideally suited to provide vascular access services to children because of inherent safety advantages and higher success from using image-guided techniques. The performance of vascular access procedures has become routine at many adult interventional radiology practices, but this service is not as widely developed at pediatric institutions. Although interventional radiologists at some children's hospitals offer full-service vascular access, there is little or none at others. Developing and maintaining a pediatric vascular access service is a challenge. Interventionalists skilled in performing such procedures are limited at pediatric institutions, and institutional support from clerical staff, nursing staff, and technologists might not be sufficiently available to fulfill the needs of such a service. There must also be a strong commitment by all members of the team to support such a demanding service. There is a slippery slope of expected services that becomes steeper and steeper as the vascular access service grows. This review is intended primarily as general education for pediatric radiologists learning vascular access techniques. Additionally, the pediatric or adult interventional radiologist seeking to expand services might find helpful tips. The article also provides education for the diagnostic radiologist who routinely interprets radiographs containing vascular access devices. (orig.)

  18. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, I.

    1998-01-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics

  19. Cerebral imaging in pediatrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, I [London, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-01

    Radioisotope brain imaging has focused mainly on regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). However the use of ligand which go to specific receptor sites is being introduced in pediatrics, mainly psychiatry. rCBF is potentially available in many institutions, especially with the availability of multi-headed gamma cameras. The use of this technique in pediatrics requires special attention to detail in the manner of data acquisition and handling the child. The interpretation of the rCBF study in a child requires knowledge of normal brain maturation. The major clinical use in pediatrics is epilepsy because of the advances in surgery and the frequency of complex partial seizures. Other indications in pediatric neurology include brain death, acute neurological loss including stroke, language disorders, cerebral palsy, hypertension due to renovascular disease, traumatic brain injury and migraine. There are pediatric physiological conditions in which rCBF has been undertaken, these include anorexia nervosa, autism, Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS) and attention deficit disorder-hyperactivity (ADHD). Research using different ligands to specific receptor sites will also be reviewed in pediatrics.

  20. Preventing Diabetes Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Diabetes, Sexual, & Bladder Problems Clinical Trials Preventing Diabetes Problems View or Print All Sections Heart Disease & ... to help control symptoms and restore intimacy. Depression & Diabetes Depression is common among people with a chronic, ...

  1. Bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns among pediatric patients with urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayelign, Birhanu; Abebe, Betelehem; Shibeshi, Adugna; Meshesha, Sosina; Shibabaw, Tewodros; Addis, Zelalem; Gelaw, Aschalew; Dagnew, Mulat

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is a common pediatric problem with the potential to produce long-term morbidity. Therefore, appropriate diagnosis and prompt treatment is required. However, studies about magnitude of uropathogenicity and antimicrobial resistance pattern of pediatric urinary tract infection (UTI) are lacking in resource limited countries including Ethiopia. This study was aimed to determine bacterial isolates, antimicrobial susceptibility pattern among pediatric patients with UTI. A cross- sectional study was conducted. Pathogenic bacterial isolates were identified by culture and biochemical methods following standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of the isolates for commonly used antibiotics was done using the standard disc diffusion method on Muller Hinton agar. Associations between dependent and independent variables were measured using chi-square test and within 95% confidence interval. P values pediatric patients were included in the study, and 82 (26.45%) bacterial isolates were detected. Gram- negative bacteria were predominant etiologic agents of UTI in this study. E. coli was the most frequently occurring pathogen (n=45; 54.88%) followed by S. aureus and P.aeruginosa (n=8; 9.75% for both), P. vulgaris , P.aeruginosa (n=4; 4.88%, for both) and Enterococcus species (n=3; 3.66%). All K. pneumoniae , P. mirabilis , and K. ozanae straines were 100% resistance to ampicillin, followed by P. aeruginosa (87.5%) and E. coli (69%). While all Gram- positive bacterial isolates were 100% sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Malnutrition, history of catherization and previous history of UTI were independently associated with UTI (p=0.000). There was a high prevalence of uropathogenic bacteria and drug resistance particularly to ampicillin (72%) and tetracycline (37.80%). This condition indicates that antibiotic selection should be based on knowledge of the local prevalence of bacterial organisms and antibiotic sensitivities rather than empirical

  2. Sedation and Monitoring in the Pediatric Patient during Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hyun Kee; Lightdale, Jenifer R

    2016-07-01

    Sedation is a fundamental component of pediatric gastrointestinal procedures. The 2 main types of sedation for pediatric endoscopy remain general anesthesia and procedural sedation. Although anesthesiologist-administered sedation protocols are more common, there is no ideal regimen for endoscopy in children. This article discusses specific levels of sedation for endoscopy as well as various regimens that can be used to achieve each. Risks and considerations that may be specific to performing gastrointestinal procedures in children are reviewed. Finally, potential future directions for sedation and monitoring that may change the practice of pediatric gastroenterology and ultimately patient outcomes are examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Sleep and sedation in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carno, Margaret-Ann; Connolly, Heidi V

    2005-09-01

    Sleep is an important and necessary function of the human body. Somatic growth and cellular repair occur during sleep. Critically ill children have disturbed sleep while in the pediatric intensive care unit related both to the illness itself and to light, noise, and caregiver activities disrupting an environment conducive to sleep. Medications administered in the pediatric intensive care unit can also disrupt sleep. This article reviews what is known about sleep in the pediatric intensive care unit and the effects of common sedation medications on sleep.

  4. Urinary Tract Infection in Children: Management in the Era of Antibiotic Resistance-A Pediatric Urologist's View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutasy, Balazs; Coyle, David; Fossum, Magdalena

    2017-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance to uropathogens has grown significantly worldwide. Today, pediatric urologist experience a situation that needs appropriate action because urinary tract infections are one of the most common bacterial infections in children. In this overview we aimed at presenting the clinical aspects of antibiotic usage in pediatric urology. Our intention was to take part of the important debate regarding future management of bacterial resistance against antibiotics. We searched PubMed for the terms: [UTI in children], [Recurrent UTI in children], and [Antibiotic resistance in UTI]. When using these terms, we found a numerous amount (3875) of published clinical articles related to the topic. By means of an overview, we chose not to focus on a specific condition but to an overall understanding of the problems related to pediatric urology in general. We found that usage of antibiotics has had an unquestionable benefit to reduce the morbidity and mortality related to urinary tract infections in childhood. However, recent studies suggest that early exposure to antibiotics in childhood might have negative systemic effects related to neurocognitive function, body metabolism, and fat distribution. In addition to increased resistance to common antimicrobial agents, it has resulted in increased costs and inadequate effect in severe infections. This calls for changes in the clinical management of urinary pathogens in pediatric urology. As the prevalence of antibiotic resistance grows, pediatric urologists have a key role in managing its consequences and its prevention. In this overview we looked at the consequences of antibiotic usage treating urinary tract infections in childhood. We found that the prevalence of antibiotic resistance has grown. We concluded that decision-makers must know about the short- and long-term effects of antibiotic usage in children. When we understand the development of antibiotic resistance better, we can build up prevention strategies

  5. Do pediatric gastroenterology doctors address pediatric obesity?

    OpenAIRE

    Batra, Suruchi; Yee, Caitlin; Diez, Bernadette; Nguyen, Nicholas; Sheridan, Michael J; Tufano, Mark; Sikka, Natalie; Townsend, Stacie; Hourigan, Suchitra

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To assess how often obesity is acknowledged at pediatric gastroenterology outpatient visits. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed to identify obese children seen at a gastroenterology subspecialty clinic over a 1-year period of time; 132 children were identified. Demographics, obesity comorbidities, reasons for referral, diagnosis of obesity, and a plan to address obesity were abstracted. Chi-square or Fisher?s exact tests were used to examine statistical associatio...

  6. Pediatric palliative care and pediatric medical ethics: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feudtner, Chris; Nathanson, Pamela G

    2014-02-01

    The fields of pediatric palliative care (PPC) and pediatric medical ethics (PME) overlap substantially, owing to a variety of historical, cultural, and social factors. This entwined relationship provides opportunities for leveraging the strong communication skills of both sets of providers, as well as the potential for resource sharing and research collaboration. At the same time, the personal and professional relationships between PPC and PME present challenges, including potential conflict with colleagues, perceived or actual bias toward a palliative care perspective in resolving ethical problems, potential delay or underuse of PME services, and a potential undervaluing of the medical expertise required for PPC consultation. We recommend that these challenges be managed by: (1) clearly defining and communicating clinical roles of PPC and PME staff, (2) developing questions that may prompt PPC and PME teams to request consultation from the other service, (3) developing explicit recusal criteria for PPC providers who also provide PME consultation, (4) ensuring that PPC and PME services remain organizationally distinct, and (5) developing well-defined and broad scopes of practice. Overall, the rich relationship between PPC and PME offers substantial opportunities to better serve patients and families facing difficult decisions.

  7. Continuing stability of center differences in pediatric diabetes care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Beaufort, Carine E.; Swift, Peter G.F.; Skinner, Chas T.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE- To reevaluate the persistence and stability of previously observed differences between pediatric diabetes centers and to investigate the influence of demography, language communication problems, and changes in insulin regimens on metabolic outcome, hypoglycemia, and ketoacidosis....... CONCLUSIONS - Despite many changes in diabetes management, major differences in metabolic outcome between 21 international pediatric diabetes centers persist. Different application between centers in the implementation of insulin treatment appears to be of more importance and needs further exploration....

  8. Qualitative evaluation of antibiotic usage in pediatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Hindra Irawan Satari; Agus Firmansyah; Theresia Theresia

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are among the most commonly prescribed drug for pediatric patients. Inappropriate use of antibiotics can increase morbidity, mortality, patient cost and bacterial antibiotic resistence. Antibiotic uses can be evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Objective To qualitatively evaluate antibiotic use in patients using Gyssens algorithm. Methods We performed a descriptive, retrospective study of matient medical records of those admitted to the pediatric ward fro...

  9. The impact of pediatric skin disease on self-esteem

    OpenAIRE

    K.L. Vivar, MD; L. Kruse, MD

    2018-01-01

    Background: Pediatric skin disorders can affect children’s self-esteem, relationships with caregivers and peers, and performance in school and activities. Objective: This review describes common pediatric congenital and acquired dermatologic disorders and the impact that these disorders can have on children’s self-esteem. Methods: A review of current, English-language literature was conducted with use of the PubMed database. Search terms included atopic dermatitis, acne, infantile heman...

  10. Recent advances in delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy during pediatric respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue'E; Zhang, Chonglin; Zhen, Qing

    2018-04-01

    The treatment of pediatric surgery diseases via utilization of aerosol delivery mechanisms is in progress for the betterment of pediatric care. Over the years, aerosol therapy has come to play an integral role in the treatment of pediatric respiratory diseases. Inhaled aerosol agents such as bronchodilators, corticosteroids, antibiotics, and mucolytics are commonly delivered to spontaneously breathing pediatric patients with a tracheostomy. Administering therapeutic inhaled aerosols to pediatric patients is challenging. The pediatric population ranges in age, which means patients with different airway sizes, breathing patterns, and cooperation levels. These patient-related factors impact the deposition of aerosol drugs in the lungs. The present review article will discuss the recent advancements in the delivery mechanisms for aerosol therapy in pediatric patients with respiratory diseases.

  11. Assessment of commonly used pediatric stool scales: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, M; Nichols-Vinueza, D; Dhroove, G; Adams, P; Chogle, A

    2013-01-01

    The Bristol Stool Form Scale (BSFS) and a modified child-friendly version (M-BSFS) are frequently used in clinical practice and research. These scales have not been validated in children. 3-D stool scale models may be better adapted to the child's development. To assess the usefulness of the BSFS, M-BSFS, and a newly developed 3-D stool scale in children. Fifty children were asked to rank the picture cards of the BSFS and 3-D models from hardest to softest and to match the pictures with descriptors for each stool type. Thirty percent of the children appropriately characterized the stools as hard, loose, or normal using the BSFS vs. 36.6% with the 3-D model (p=0.27). Appropriate correlation of stools as hard, loose, or normal consistency using the BSFS vs. the 3-D model by age group was: 6 to 11-year-olds, 27.5% vs. 33.3% (p=0.58) and 12 to 17-year-olds, 32.1% vs. 39.5% (p=0.41). Thirty-three percent correlated the BSFS pictures with the correct BSFS words, 46% appropriately correlated with the M-BSFS words, and 46% correlated the 3-D stool models with the correct wording. The BSFS and M-BSFS that are widely used as stool assessment instruments are not user-friendly for children. The 3-D model was not found to be better than the BSFS and the M-BSFS. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessment of Commonly Used Pediatric Stool Scales: A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Saps, M.; Nichols-Vinueza, D.; Dhroove, G.; Adams, P.; Chogle, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Bristol Stool Form Scale (BSFS) and a modified child-friendly version (M-BSFS) are frequently used in clinical practice and research. These scales have not been validated in children. 3-D stool scale models may be better adapted to the child's development. Aims: To assess the usefulness of the BSFS, M-BSFS, and a newly developed 3-D stool scale in children. Methods: Fifty children were asked to rank the picture cards of the BSFS and 3-D models from hardest to softest and...

  13. Rising utilization of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Sunitha V; Rodean, Jonathan; Bekmezian, Arpi; Hall, Matt; Shah, Samir S; Mahant, Sanjay; Parikh, Kavita; Morse, Rustin; Puls, Henry; Cabana, Michael D

    2018-02-01

    Clinical pathways are detailed care plans that operationalize evidence-based guidelines into an accessible format for health providers. Their goal is to link evidence to practice to optimize patient outcomes and delivery efficiency. It is unknown to what extent inpatient pediatric asthma pathways are being utilized nationally. (1) Describe inpatient pediatric asthma pathway design and implementation across a large hospital network. (2) Compare characteristics of hospitals with and without pathways. We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, survey study of hospitals in the Pediatric Research in Inpatient Settings Network (75% children's hospitals, 25% community hospitals). Our survey determined if each hospital used a pathway and pathway characteristics (e.g. pathway elements, implementation methods). Hospitals with and without pathways were compared using Chi-square tests (categorical variables) and Student's t-tests (continuous variables). Surveys were distributed to 3-5 potential participants from each hospital and 302 (74%) participants responded, representing 86% (106/123) of surveyed hospitals. From 2005-2015, the proportion of hospitals utilizing inpatient asthma pathways increased from 27% to 86%. We found variation in pathway elements, implementation strategies, electronic medical record integration, and compliance monitoring across hospitals. Hospitals with pathways had larger inpatient pediatric programs [mean 12.1 versus 6.1 full-time equivalents, p = 0.04] and were more commonly free-standing children's hospitals (52% versus 23%, p = 0.05). From 2005-2015, there was a dramatic rise in implementation of inpatient pediatric asthma pathways. We found variation in many aspects of pathway design and implementation. Future studies should determine optimal implementation strategies to better support hospital-level efforts in improving pediatric asthma care and outcomes.

  14. Biologics in pediatric psoriasis - efficacy and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogra, Sunil; Mahajan, Rahul

    2018-01-01

    Childhood psoriasis is a special situation that is a management challenge for the treating dermatologist. As is the situation with traditional systemic agents, which are commonly used in managing severe psoriasis in children, the biologics are being increasingly used in the recalcitrant disease despite limited data on long term safety. Areas covered: We performed an extensive literature search to collect evidence-based data on the use of biologics in pediatric psoriasis. The relevant literature published from 2000 to September 2017 was obtained from PubMed, using the MeSH words 'biologics', 'biologic response modifiers' and 'treatment of pediatric/childhood psoriasis'. All clinical trials, randomized double-blind or single-blind controlled trials, open-label studies, retrospective studies, reviews, case reports and letters concerning the use of biologics in pediatric psoriasis were screened. Articles covering the use of biologics in pediatric psoriasis were screened and reference lists in the selected articles were scrutinized to identify other relevant articles that had not been found in the initial search. Articles without relevant information about biologics in general (e.g. its mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and adverse effects) and its use in psoriasis in particular were excluded. We screened 427 articles and finally selected 41 relevant articles. Expert opinion: The available literature on the use of biologics such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α agents, and anti-IL-12/23 agents like ustekinumab suggests that these are effective and safe in managing severe pediatric psoriasis although there is an urgent need to generate more safety data. Dermatologists must be careful about the potential adverse effects of the biologics before administering them to children with psoriasis. It is likely that with rapidly evolving scenario of biologics in psoriasis, these will prove to be very useful molecules particularly in managing severe and recalcitrant

  15. Simulation in pediatric anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehr, James J; Honkanen, Anita; Murray, David J

    2012-10-01

    Simulation-based training, research and quality initiatives are expanding in pediatric anesthesiology just as in other medical specialties. Various modalities are available, from task trainers to standardized patients, and from computer-based simulations to mannequins. Computer-controlled mannequins can simulate pediatric vital signs with reasonable reliability; however the fidelity of skin temperature and color change, airway reflexes and breath and heart sounds remains rudimentary. Current pediatric mannequins are utilized in simulation centers, throughout hospitals in-situ, at national meetings for continuing medical education and in research into individual and team performance. Ongoing efforts by pediatric anesthesiologists dedicated to using simulation to improve patient care and educational delivery will result in further dissemination of this technology. Health care professionals who provide complex, subspecialty care to children require a curriculum supported by an active learning environment where skills directly relevant to pediatric care can be developed. The approach is not only the most effective method to educate adult learners, but meets calls for education reform and offers the potential to guide efforts toward evaluating competence. Simulation addresses patient safety imperatives by providing a method for trainees to develop skills and experience in various management strategies, without risk to the health and life of a child. A curriculum that provides pediatric anesthesiologists with the range of skills required in clinical practice settings must include a relatively broad range of task-training devises and electromechanical mannequins. Challenges remain in defining the best integration of this modality into training and clinical practice to meet the needs of pediatric patients. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Sleep in children with cancer: case review of 70 children evaluated in a comprehensive pediatric sleep center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Gerald; Brand, Sarah R

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to characterize the sleep problems of children with cancer who were referred for a comprehensive sleep evaluation. A retrospective case series review was conducted of all children with cancer referred to the pediatric sleep clinic from 1994 to 2009 for evaluation of a sleep problem. Seventy children were seen and evaluated during this interval; all had a complete sleep history taken, and further objective sleep evaluations were performed as part of their evaluation only when clinically indicated. An overnight polysomnogram was performed in 53 children. In 36 children with a history of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), a multiple sleep latency study was performed the following day. Seven children had a 3-4-week actigraphic study. Children with neoplasms of central nervous system (CNS) involving the hypothalamus, thalamus, and brainstem were the most commonly referred children and had the most frequent and severe sleep problems. Excessive daytime sleepiness was the most common sleep problem, seen in 60% of children with cancer and in 80% of children with CNS neoplasms involving the hypothalamus, thalamus, and brainstem. Sleep disordered breathing (SDB) was present in 40% of the entire group of children with cancer and 46% of children with neoplasms involving the hypothalamus, thalamus, and brainstem. Children with CNS neoplasms often had more than one sleep problem, most commonly EDS and SDB. In these children, correction of the SDB often did not eliminate the EDS. In children with leukemia, insomnia was the most common sleep problem identified, present in 39%. The causes of the sleep problems were varied and included neurologic injury caused by the neoplasm and/or the CNS-directed treatments; seizures, adenotonsillar hypertrophy, medication side effects, obesity, pain, anxiety, and drug abuse. Some of the sleep problems were present before the diagnosis of cancer, though most developed after treatment was begun. A wide range of

  17. Burnout Syndrome in Pediatric Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem A. Al-Youbi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics.Methods: A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia was conducted utilizing the Maslach Burnout Inventory in addition to questions regarding work-related and lifestyle-related factors.Results: One hundred and thirty pediatricians (55% females were included with age ranging between 25 and 45 years (mean: 30. Most (46% were consultants and 54% practiced in a university based setting. Burnout scores were abnormal in 107 (82% and in 45 (34% the syndrome was severe. Males were more likely to reach a severe burnout category compared to females (40% vs. 31%; p=0.012. Academic pediatricians working in a university setting were much more likely to experience severe burnout compared to their counterparts working in other hospitals (50% vs. 19%; p=0.0005. Consultants were also more likely to experience severe burnout compared to residents and assistants (46% vs. 27%; p=0.03.Conclusion: At least one third of practicing pediatricians suffer from burnout syndrome. Specific strategies should be developed and implemented to limit and prevent professional burnout.

  18. Burnout syndrome in pediatric practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Youbi, Reem A; Jan, Mohammed M

    2013-07-01

    Burnout is a common work-related syndrome consisting of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and diminished feelings of personal accomplishment. Burnout influences the performance and efficiency of the healthcare professionals and therefore the quality of the care provided. This study aims to assess the burnout rates and potential determinants in pediatrics. A cross-sectional, descriptive study involving physicians practicing pediatrics in the Jeddah area of Saudi Arabia was conducted utilizing the Maslach Burnout Inventory in addition to questions regarding work-related and lifestyle-related factors. One hundred and thirty pediatricians (55% females) were included with age ranging between 25 and 45 years (mean: 30). Most (46%) were consultants and 54% practiced in a university based setting. Burnout scores were abnormal in 107 (82%) and in 45 (34%) the syndrome was severe. Males were more likely to reach a severe burnout category compared to females (40% vs. 31%; p=0.012). Academic pediatricians working in a university setting were much more likely to experience severe burnout compared to their counterparts working in other hospitals (50% vs. 19%; p=0.0005). Consultants were also more likely to experience severe burnout compared to residents and assistants (46% vs. 27%; p=0.03). At least one third of practicing pediatricians suffer from burnout syndrome. Specific strategies should be developed and implemented to limit and prevent professional burnout.

  19. Pediatric Obesity: Looking into Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Malavolti

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of pediatric obesity continues to rise worldwide. Increasing the number of health care practitioners as well as pediatricians with expertise in obesity treatment is necessary. Because many obese patients suffer obesity-associated cardiovascular, metabolic and other health complications that could increase the severity of obesity, it is fundamental not only to identify the child prone to obesity as early as possible, but to recognize, treat and monitor obesity-related diseases during adolescence. This short review outlines the treatment of pediatric obesity that may have applications in the primary care setting. It examines current information on eating behavior, sedentary behavior, and details studies of multidisciplinary, behavior-based, obesity treatment programs. We also report the less common and more aggressive forms of treatment, such as medication and bariatric surgery. We emphasize that health care providers have the potential to improve outcomes by performing early identification, helping families create the best possible home environment, and by providing structured guidance to obese children and their families.

  20. Pediatric feeding and swallowing rehabilitation: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Engel-Hoek, Lenie; Harding, Celia; van Gerven, Marjo; Cockerill, Helen

    2017-05-16

    Children with neurological disabilities frequently have problems with feeding and swallowing. Such problems have a significant impact on the health and well-being of these children and their families. The primary aims in the rehabilitation of pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders are focused on supporting growth, nutrition and hydration, the development of feeding activities, and ensuring safe swallowing with the aim of preventing choking and aspiration pneumonia. Pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders can be divided into four groups: transient, developmental, chronic or progressive.This article provides an overview of the available literature about the rehabilitation of feeding and swallowing disorders in infants and children. Principles of motor control, motor learning and neuroplasticity are discussed for the four groups of children with feeding and swallowing disorders.

  1. Collagenous gastritis in the pediatric age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rosell-Camps

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous gastritis (CG is an uncommon condition known in the pediatric age. It is characterized by the presence of subepithelial collagen bands (> 10 μm associated with lymphoplasmacytic infiltration of the stomach's lamina propria. Symptoms manifested by patients with CG may be common with many other disorders. It typically manifests with epigastralgia, vomiting, and iron deficiency during pre-adolescence. This condition's pathophysiology remains unclear. In contrast to adults, where association with collagenous colitis and other autoimmune conditions is more common, pediatric involvement is usually confined to the stomach. Drugs of choice include proton pump inhibitors and corticoids. A case is reported of a 12-year-old girl with abdominal pain and ferritin deficiency who was diagnosed with CG based on gastric biopsy and experienced a favorable outcome.

  2. Anesthesia for Ambulatory Pediatric Surgery in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pilot Study in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabré, Yvette B; Traoré, Idriss S S; Kaboré, Flavien A R; Ki, Bertille; Traoré, Alain I; Ouédraogo, Isso; Bandré, Emile; Wandaogo, Albert; Ouédraogo, Nazinigouba

    2017-02-01

    Long surgical wait times and limited hospital capacity are common obstacles to surgical care in many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Introducing ambulatory surgery might contribute to a solution to these problems. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and feasibility of introducing ambulatory surgery into a pediatric hospital in SSA. This is a cross-sectional descriptive study that took place over 6 months. It includes all patients assigned to undergo ambulatory surgery in the Pediatric University Hospital in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Eligibility criteria for the ambulatory surgery program included >1 year of age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) 1 status, surgery with a low risk of bleeding, lasting anesthesia with halothane. Sixty-five percent also received regional or local anesthesia consisting of caudal block in 79.23% or nerve block in 20.77%. The average duration of surgery was 33 ± 17.47 minutes. No intraoperative complications were noted. All the patients received acetaminophen and a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug in the recovery room. Twelve (11.7%) patients had complications in recovery, principally nausea and vomiting. Eight (7.8%) patients were admitted to the hospital. No serious complications were associated with ambulatory surgery. Its introduction could possibly be a solution to improving pediatric surgical access in low-income countries.

  3. Posttraumatic stress following pediatric injury: update on diagnosis, risk factors, and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Marsac, Meghan L; Hildenbrand, Aimee; Winston, Flaura

    2013-12-01

    After pediatric injury, transient traumatic stress reactions are common, and about 1 in 6 children and their parents develop persistent posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms that are linked to poorer physical and functional recovery. Meta-analytic studies identify risk factors for persistent PTS, including preinjury psychological problems, peritrauma fear and perceived life threat, and posttrauma factors such as low social support, maladaptive coping strategies, and parent PTS symptoms. There is growing prospective data indicating that children's subjective appraisals of the injury and its aftermath influence PTS development. Secondary prevention of injury-related PTS often involves parents and focuses on promoting adaptive child appraisals and coping strategies. Web-based psychoeducation and targeted brief early intervention for injured children and their parents have shown a modest effect, but additional research is needed to refine preventive approaches. There is a strong evidence base for effective psychological treatment of severe and persistent PTS via trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy; evidence is lacking for psychopharmacological treatment. Pediatric clinicians play a key role in preventing injury-related PTS by providing "trauma-informed" pediatric care (ie, recognizing preexisting trauma, addressing acute traumatic stress reactions associated with the injury event, minimizing potentially traumatic aspects of treatment, and identifying children who need additional monitoring or referral).

  4. Helping the helpers: mindfulness training for burnout in pediatric oncology--a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Karen; Kramer, Deborah; Santizo, Ruth O; Magro, Laurence; Wyshogrod, Diane; Ambrosio, John; Castillo, Catalina; Lieberman, Rhonda; Stein, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Burnout, a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and diminished feelings of accomplishment, is common among pediatric oncology staff. This study explores a mindfulness-based course (MBC) to decrease burnout in a multidisciplinary group of pediatric oncology staff members in the United States and Israel. Forty-eight participants, mostly nurses, were randomized to either the MBC intervention or a control group. MBC participants received eight weekly sessions of mindfulness education. The primary outcome studied was burnout. Secondary outcomes studied included depression and perceived stress. Nearly 100% of the subjects exhibited signs of burnout at baseline and MBC did not result in any significant improvement in scores on burnout, perceived stress or depression scales. Qualitative analysis of diaries kept by subjects revealed reduced stress, improved inner peace, compassion and joy, better focus and self-awareness and less somatic symptoms in the intervention arm. Burnout is a major problem in pediatric oncology staff. Mindfulness practices can be taught in the workplace and may be a useful component of a multidimensional strategy to reduce burnout in this population.

  5. Prophylactic antibiotics in pediatric shunt surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biyani, N; Grisaru-Soen, G; Steinbok, P; Sgouros, S; Constantini, S

    2006-11-01

    The optimal antibiotic prophylaxis for pediatric shunt-related procedures is not clear. There is much inconsistency among different medical centers. This paper summarizes and analyzes the various prophylactic antibiotic regiments used for shunt-related surgeries at different pediatric neurosurgery centers in the world. A survey questionnaire was distributed through the Pediatric Neurosurgery list-server (an e-mail-based special interest group in pediatric neurosurgery). Forty-five completed questionnaires were received, one per medical center, primarily from pediatric neurosurgeons with the following geographic breakdown: 25 from North America, 13 from Europe, and 7 from Asia and other countries. All centers routinely administered prophylactic antibiotics for shunt-related procedures. The drugs of choice were first-generation cephalosporins (23), second-generation cephalosporins (10), naficillin/oxacillin (4), vancomycin (3), clindamycin (1), amoxicillin (1), and mixed protocols in three centers. The initial drug administration ("first dose") was: in the department before transfer to operating room (5), upon arrival to operating room (11), at induction of anesthesia (13), and at initial skin incision (16). The duration of antibiotic dosage also varied: single dose (13), 24-h administration (26), 48-h administration (2), and longer than 48 h in four centers. Two general tendencies were noted, common to the majority of participating centers. There was a general trend to modify antibiotic treatment protocol in "high-risk" populations. The second common theme noted in more than half of responding centers was the use of long-term antibiotic treatment for externalized devices (such as externalized shunts, external ventricular drains or lumbar drains), usually till the device was in place.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam. MRI scanners are air-conditioned and well-lit. Music may be played through the headphones ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a risk, depending on their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  8. NCI Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI has awarded grants to five research teams to participate in its Pediatric Preclinical Testing Consortium, which is intended to help to prioritize which agents to pursue in pediatric clinical trials.

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. top of page This page was reviewed on ... using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in CT scans should have no immediate side effects. Risks The risk of serious allergic reaction to ... Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your child. top of page Additional Information and Resources The Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging's " ... A child being prepared for a CT scan. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MRI) exam. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Catheter Angiography Magnetic Resonance, ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your child's ... full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy ...

  16. Antibiotic prophylaxis for children with sickle cell disease: a survey of pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, Anupama Rao; Norris, Chelita Kaye; Minniti, Caterina P

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: (1) investigate the current clinical practice regarding the use of antibiotic prophylaxis by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists for children with sickle cell disease (SCD) requiring dental treatment; and (2) evaluate the perceived relative risk of bacteremia following specific dental procedures, as defined by pediatric dentistry residency program directors and pediatric hematologists. A written survey depicting various clinical scenarios of SCD children requiring common dental procedures was mailed to directors of pediatric dental advanced education programs and distributed to pediatric hematologists attending the 2003 Annual Sickle Cell Disease Association of America conference in Washington, DC. Surveys were returned by 60% (N=34/57) of the pediatric dentistry residency program directors. The surveys were obtained from 51% of pediatric hematologists at the meeting (N=72/140). At least 50% of all respondents recommended prophylaxis for the following clinical situations: dental extractions, treatment under general anesthesia, and status post splenectomy. The perceived risk of infectious complication was highest for extractions, followed by restorative treatment and tooth polishing. Dental residency program directors were more likely (71%, N=24/34) to recommend additional antibiotic therapy for patients taking penicillin prophylaxis if they required an invasive oral surgical procedure. Conversely, only 38% (N=25/66) of pediatric hematologists recommended additional antibiotic therapy (P=.001). Eighty-six percent of dental residency program directors (N=25/29) chose amoxicillin for prophylaxis whereas only 62% of pediatric hematologists (N=36/58) recommended amoxicillin. (Pchildren undergoing dental treatments. Further research and risk/benefit assessment is needed to create a unified approach.

  17. Can We Tune Our Pediatric Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Jindal, Ritu; Kaur, Rajwinder

    2011-01-01

    For the pedodontic team, a child?s dental anxiety poses major management problems. Previously, wide variety of aversive techniques have been used with varying success rates to manage anxious child patients. The present trend advocates the use of nonaversive techniques like distraction in the management of anxious pediatric patients. So the aim of this study is to compare the effect of audio distraction with the normal set up operatory. Thirty patients of age between 4 and 8 years were include...

  18. Pediatric Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jennifer N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: 1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and pre-excitation, 3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25722754

  19. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Neonatal and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Foglia, Elizabeth; Meier, Mary Dawn; Elward, Alexis

    2007-01-01

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the second most common hospital-acquired infection among pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Empiric therapy for VAP accounts for approximately 50% of antibiotic use in pediatric ICUs. VAP is associated with an excess of 3 days of mechanical ventilation among pediatric cardiothoracic surgery patients. The attributable mortality and excess length of ICU stay for patients with VAP have not been defined in matched case control studies. VAP is as...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children’s (Pediatric) Magnetic Resonance Imaging Children’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... limitations of Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? What is Children’s (Pediatric) MRI? Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive ...