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Sample records for common mhc haplotype

  1. Polymorphism at expressed DQ and DR loci in five common equine MHC haplotypes.

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    Miller, Donald; Tallmadge, Rebecca L; Binns, Matthew; Zhu, Baoli; Mohamoud, Yasmin Ali; Ahmed, Ayeda; Brooks, Samantha A; Antczak, Douglas F

    2017-03-01

    The polymorphism of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II DQ and DR genes in five common equine leukocyte antigen (ELA) haplotypes was determined through sequencing of mRNA transcripts isolated from lymphocytes of eight ELA homozygous horses. Ten expressed MHC class II genes were detected in horses of the ELA-A3 haplotype carried by the donor horses of the equine bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library and the reference genome sequence: four DR genes and six DQ genes. The other four ELA haplotypes contained at least eight expressed polymorphic MHC class II loci. Next generation sequencing (NGS) of genomic DNA of these four MHC haplotypes revealed stop codons in the DQA3 gene in the ELA-A2, ELA-A5, and ELA-A9 haplotypes. Few NGS reads were obtained for the other MHC class II genes that were not amplified in these horses. The amino acid sequences across haplotypes contained locus-specific residues, and the locus clusters produced by phylogenetic analysis were well supported. The MHC class II alleles within the five tested haplotypes were largely non-overlapping between haplotypes. The complement of equine MHC class II DQ and DR genes appears to be well conserved between haplotypes, in contrast to the recently described variation in class I gene loci between equine MHC haplotypes. The identification of allelic series of equine MHC class II loci will aid comparative studies of mammalian MHC conservation and evolution and may also help to interpret associations between the equine MHC class II region and diseases of the horse.

  2. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes.

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    Yunis, Juan J; Yunis, Edmond J; Yunis, Emilio

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family), Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family), Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families), Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family), Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family), Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family) and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family). for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1). Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  3. MHC Class II haplotypes of Colombian Amerindian tribes

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    Juan J. Yunis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyzed 1041 individuals belonging to 17 Amerindian tribes of Colombia, Chimila, Bari and Tunebo (Chibcha linguistic family, Embera, Waunana (Choco linguistic family, Puinave and Nukak (Maku-Puinave linguistic families, Cubeo, Guanano, Tucano, Desano and Piratapuyo (Tukano linguistic family, Guahibo and Guayabero (Guayabero Linguistic Family, Curripaco and Piapoco (Arawak linguistic family and Yucpa (Karib linguistic family. for MHC class II haplotypes (HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1. Approximately 90% of the MHC class II haplotypes found among these tribes are haplotypes frequently encountered in other Amerindian tribes. Nonetheless, striking differences were observed among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes. The DRB1*04:04, DRB1*04:11, DRB1*09:01 carrying haplotypes were frequently found among non-Chibcha speaking tribes, while the DRB1*04:07 haplotype showed significant frequencies among Chibcha speaking tribes, and only marginal frequencies among non-Chibcha speaking tribes. Our results suggest that the differences in MHC class II haplotype frequency found among Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking tribes could be due to genetic differentiation in Mesoamerica of the ancestral Amerindian population into Chibcha and non-Chibcha speaking populations before they entered into South America.

  4. Genetic analysis of completely sequenced disease-associated MHC haplotypes identifies shuffling of segments in recent human history.

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    James A Traherne

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is recognised as one of the most important genetic regions in relation to common human disease. Advancement in identification of MHC genes that confer susceptibility to disease requires greater knowledge of sequence variation across the complex. Highly duplicated and polymorphic regions of the human genome such as the MHC are, however, somewhat refractory to some whole-genome analysis methods. To address this issue, we are employing a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC cloning strategy to sequence entire MHC haplotypes from consanguineous cell lines as part of the MHC Haplotype Project. Here we present 4.25 Mb of the human haplotype QBL (HLA-A26-B18-Cw5-DR3-DQ2 and compare it with the MHC reference haplotype and with a second haplotype, COX (HLA-A1-B8-Cw7-DR3-DQ2, that shares the same HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 alleles. We have defined the complete gene, splice variant, and sequence variation contents of all three haplotypes, comprising over 259 annotated loci and over 20,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Certain coding sequences vary significantly between different haplotypes, making them candidates for functional and disease-association studies. Analysis of the two DR3 haplotypes allowed delineation of the shared sequence between two HLA class II-related haplotypes differing in disease associations and the identification of at least one of the sites that mediated the original recombination event. The levels of variation across the MHC were similar to those seen for other HLA-disparate haplotypes, except for a 158-kb segment that contained the HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 genes and showed very limited polymorphism compatible with identity-by-descent and relatively recent common ancestry (<3,400 generations. These results indicate that the differential disease associations of these two DR3 haplotypes are due to sequence variation outside this central 158-kb segment, and that shuffling of

  5. Association of an MHC class II haplotype with increased risk of polymyositis in Hungarian Vizsla dogs.

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    Jonathan Massey

    Full Text Available A breed-specific polymyositis is frequently observed in the Hungarian Vizsla. Beneficial clinical response to immunosuppressive therapies has been demonstrated which points to an immune-mediated aetiology. Canine inflammatory myopathies share clinical and histological similarities with the human immune-mediated myopathies. As MHC class II associations have been reported in the human conditions we investigated whether an MHC class II association was present in the canine myopathy seen in this breed. 212 Hungarian Vizsla pedigree dogs were stratified both on disease status and degree of relatedness to an affected dog. This generated a group of 29 cases and 183 "graded" controls: 93 unaffected dogs with a first degree affected relative, 44 unaffected dogs with a second degree affected relative, and 46 unaffected dogs with no known affected relatives. Eleven DLA class II haplotypes were identified, of which, DLA-DRB1*02001/DQA1*00401/DQB1*01303, was at significantly raised frequency in cases compared to controls (OR = 1.92, p = 0.032. When only control dogs with no family history of the disease were compared to cases, the association was further strengthened (OR = 4.08, p = 0.00011. Additionally, a single copy of the risk haplotype was sufficient to increase disease risk, with the risk substantially increasing for homozygotes. There was a trend of increasing frequency of this haplotype with degree of relatedness, indicating low disease penetrance. These findings support the hypothesis of an immune-mediated aetiology for this canine myopathy and give credibility to potentially using the Hungarian Vizsla as a genetic model for comparative studies with human myositis.

  6. Allelic complementation between MHC haplotypes B(Q) and B17 increases regression of Rous sarcomas.

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    Senseney, H L; Briles, W E; Abplanalp, H; Taylor, R L

    2000-12-01

    Major histocompatibility (B) complex haplotypes B(Q) and B17 were examined for their effect on Rous sarcoma outcome. Pedigree matings of B(Q)B17 chickens from the second backcross generation (BC2) of Line UCD 001 (B(Q)B(Q)) mated to Line UCD 003 (B17B17) produced progeny with genotypes B(Q)B(Q), B(Q)B17, and B17B17. Six-week-old chickens were injected with subgroup A Rous sarcoma virus (RSV). The tumors were scored for size at 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 10 weeks postinoculation. A tumor profile index (TPI) was assigned to each bird based on the six tumor scores. Two experiments with two trials each were conducted. In Experiment 1, chickens (n = 84) were inoculated with 30 pock-forming units (pfu) RSV. There was no significant B genotype effect on tumor growth over time or TPI among the 70 chickens that developed tumors. Chickens (n = 141) were injected with 15 PFU RSV in Experiment 2. The B genotype significantly affected tumor growth pattern over time in the 79 chickens with sarcomas. The B(Q)B17 chickens had the lowest TPI, which was significantly different from B17B17 but not B(Q)B(Q). The data indicate complementation because more tumor regression occurs in the B(Q)B17 heterozygote than in either B(Q)B(Q) or B17B17 genotypes at a 15 pfu RSV dose and significantly so compared to B17B17. By contrast, the 30 pfu RSV dose utilized in the first experiment overwhelmed all genotypic combinations of the B(Q) and B17 haplotypes, suggesting that certain MHC genotypes affect the immune response under modest levels of viral challenge.

  7. Extremely prolonged HIV seroconversion associated with an MHC haplotype carrying disease susceptibility genes for antibody deficiency disorders.

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    Padiglione, Alex; Aleksic, Eman; French, Martyn; Arnott, Alicia; Wilson, Kim M; Tippett, Emma; Kaye, Matthew; Gray, Lachlan; Ellett, Anne; Crane, Megan; Leslie, David E; Lewin, Sharon R; Breschkin, Alan; Birch, Chris; Gorry, Paul R; McPhee, Dale A; Crowe, Suzanne M

    2010-11-01

    Severe immunodeficiency during primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is unusual. Here, we characterized viral and immunological parameters in a subject presenting with Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in the setting of prolonged primary HIV illness and delayed seroconversion. HIV antibody was only detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 12 months after presentation, and Western blot profiles remain indeterminate. Isolated virus was of R5 phenotype, exhibited poor viral fitness, but was otherwise unremarkable. Analysis of HIV antibody isotypes showed failure to mount a detectable HIV IgG response over nearly 2 years of infection, in particular IgG(1)- and IgG(3)-specific responses, despite normal responses to common infections and vaccines. Genetic analysis demonstrated homozygosity for part of an MHC haplotype containing susceptibility genes for common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) syndrome and other antibody deficiency disorders. Thus, a primary disorder of specific antibody production may explain exceptionally slow antibody development in an otherwise severe seroconversion illness. This highlights the need for multiparameter testing, in particular use of a fourth generation HIV test, for confirming HIV infection and underscores the importance of host factors in HIV pathogenesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. How well do HapMap haplotypes identify common haplotypes of genes? A comparison with haplotypes of 334 genes resequenced in the environmental genome project.

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    Taylor, Jack A; Xu, Zong-Li; Kaplan, Norman L; Morris, Richard W

    2006-01-01

    One of the goals of the International HapMap Project is the identification of common haplotypes in genes. However, HapMap uses an incomplete catalogue of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and might miss some common haplotypes. We examined this issue using data from the Environmental Genome Project (EGP) which resequenced 335 genes in 90 people, and thus, has a nearly complete catalogue of gene SNPs. The EGP identified a total of 45,243 SNPs, of which 10,780 were common SNPs (minor allele frequency >or=0.1). Using EGP common SNP genotype data, we identified 1,459 haplotypes with frequency >or=0.05 and we use these as "benchmark" haplotypes. HapMap release 16 had genotype information for 1,573 of 10,780 (15%) EGP common SNPs. Using these SNPs, we identified common HapMap haplotypes (frequency >or=0.05) in each of the four HapMap ethnic groups. To compare common HapMap haplotypes to EGP benchmark haplotypes, we collapsed benchmark haplotypes to the set of 1,573 SNPs. Ninety-eight percent of the collapsed benchmark haplotypes could be found as common HapMap haplotypes in one or more of the four HapMap ethnic groups. However, collapsing benchmark haplotypes to the set of SNPs available in HapMap resulted in a loss of haplotype information: 545 of 1,459 (37%) benchmark haplotypes were uniquely identified, and only 25% of genes had all their benchmark haplotypes uniquely identified. We resampled the EGP data to examine the effect of increasing the number of HapMap SNPs to 5 million, and estimate that approximately 40% of common SNPs in genes will be sampled and that half of the genes will have sufficient SNPs to identify all common haplotypes. This inability to distinguish common haplotypes of genes may result in loss of power when examining haplotype-disease association.

  9. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida or Ascaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed.

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    Schou, T W; Labouriau, R; Permin, A; Christensen, J P; Sørensen, P; Cu, H P; Nguyen, V K; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2010-05-15

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida were compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous Vietnamese Ri and the commercial Luong Phuong. Furthermore, the association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) with disease-related parameters was evaluated, using alleles of the LEI0258 microsatellite as markers for MHC haplotypes. The Ri chickens were found to be more resistant to A. galli and S. Enteritidis than commercial Luong Phuong chickens. In contrast, the Ri chickens were more susceptible to P. multocida, although production parameters were more affected in the Luong Phuong chickens. Furthermore, it was shown that the individual variations observed in response to the infections were influenced by the MHC. Using marker alleles of the microsatellite LEI0258, which is located within the MHC region, several MHC haplotypes were identified as being associated with infection intensity of A. galli. An association of the MHC with the specific antibody response to S. Enteritidis was also found where four MHC haplotypes were shown to be associated with high specific antibody response. Finally, one MHC haplotype was identified as being associated with pathological lesions and mortality in the P. multocida experiment. Although not statistically significant, our analysis suggested that this haplotype might be associated with resistance. These results demonstrate the presence of local genetic resources in Vietnamese chickens, which could be utilized in breeding programmes aiming at improving disease resistance. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. MHC class I and class II phenotype, gene, and haplotype frequencies in Greeks using molecular typing data.

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    Papassavas, E C; Spyropoulou-Vlachou, M; Papassavas, A C; Schipper, R F; Doxiadis, I N; Stavropoulos-Giokas, C

    2000-06-01

    In the present study, DNA typing for HLA-A, C, B, DRB1, DRB3, DRB4, DRB5, DQA1, DQB1, and DPB1 was performed for 246 healthy, unrelated Greek volunteers of 20-59 years of age. Phenotype, genotype frequencies, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium fit, and 3-locus haplotype frequencies for HLA-A, C, B, HLA-A, B, DRB1, HLA-DRB1, DQA1, DQB1, and HLA-DRB1, DQB1, DPB1 were calculated. Furthermore, linkage disequilibrium, deltas, relative deltas and p-values for significance of the deltas were defined. The population studied is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, and many MHC haplotypes are in linkage disequilibrium. The most frequent specificities were HLA-A*02 (phenotype frequency = 44.3%) followed by HLA-A*24 (27.2%), HLA-B*51 (28.5%), HLA-B*18 (26.8%) and HLA-B*35 (26.4%) and HLA-Cw*04 (30.1%) and HLA-Cw*12 (26.8%). The most frequent MHC class II alleles were HLA-DRB1*1104 (34.1%), HLA-DQB1*0301 (54.5%) and HLA-DPB1*0401 with a phenotype frequency of 59.8%. The most prominent HLA-A, C, B haplotypes were HLA-A*24, Cw*04, B*35, and HLA-A*02, Cw*04, B*35, each of them observed in 21/246 individuals. The most frequent HLA-A, B, DRB1 haplotype was HLA-A*02, B*18, DRB1*1104 seen in 20/246 individuals, while the haplotype HLA-DRB1*1104, DQB1*0301, DPB1*0401 was found in 49/246 individuals. Finally, the haplotype DRB1*1104, DQA1*0501, DQB1*0301 was observed in 83/246 individuals. These results can be used for the estimation of the probability of finding a suitable haplotypically identical related or unrelated stem cell donor for patients of Greek ancestry. In addition, they can be used for HLA and disease association studies, genetic distance studies in the Balkan and Mediterranean area, paternity cases, and matching probability calculations for the optimal allocation of kidneys in Greece.

  11. A novel HURRAH protocol reveals high numbers of monomorphic MHC class II loci and two asymmetric multi-locus haplotypes in the Pere David's deer.

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    Qiu-Hong Wan

    Full Text Available The Père David's deer is a highly inbred, but recovered, species, making it interesting to consider their adaptive molecular evolution from an immunological perspective. Prior to this study, genomic sequencing was the only method for isolating all functional MHC genes within a certain species. Here, we report a novel protocol for isolating MHC class II loci from a species, and its use to investigate the adaptive evolution of this endangered deer at the level of multi-locus haplotypes. This protocol was designated "HURRAH" based on its various steps and used to estimate the total number of MHC class II loci. We confirmed the validity of this novel protocol in the giant panda and then used it to examine the Père David's deer. Our results revealed that the Père David's deer possesses nine MHC class II loci and therefore has more functional MHC class II loci than the eight genome-sequenced mammals for which full MHC data are currently available. This could potentially account at least in part for the strong survival ability of this species in the face of severe bottlenecking. The results from the HURRAH protocol also revealed that: (1 All of the identified MHC class II loci were monomorphic at their antigen-binding regions, although DRA was dimorphic at its cytoplasmic tail; and (2 these genes constituted two asymmetric functional MHC class II multi-locus haplotypes: DRA1*01 ∼ DRB1 ∼ DRB3 ∼ DQA1 ∼ DQB2 (H1 and DRA1*02 ∼ DRB2 ∼ DRB4 ∼ DQA2 ∼ DQB1 (H2. The latter finding indicates that the current members of the deer species have lost the powerful ancestral MHC class II haplotypes of nine or more loci, and have instead fixed two relatively weak haplotypes containing five genes. As a result, the Père David's deer are currently at risk for increased susceptibility to infectious pathogens.

  12. MHC haplotype and susceptibility to experimental infections (Salmonella Enteritidis, Pasteurella multocida orAscaridia galli) in a commercial and an indigenous chicken breed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, T W; Labouriau, R; Permin, A

    2010-01-01

    In three independent experimental infection studies, the susceptibility and course of infection of three pathogens considered of importance in most poultry production systems, Ascaridia galli, Salmonella Enteritidis and Pasteurella multocida was compared in two chicken breeds, the indigenous...... might be associated with resistance. These results demonstrate the presence of local genetic resources in Vietnamese chickens, which could be utilized in breeding programmes aiming at improving disease resistance...... Vietnamese Ri and the commercial Luong Phuong. Furthermore, the association of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) with disease-related parameters was evaluated, using alleles of the LEI0258 microsatellite as markers for MHC haplotypes. The Ri chickens were found to be more resistant to A. galli and S...

  13. Kullback-Leibler divergence for detection of rare haplotype common disease association.

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    Lin, Shili

    2015-11-01

    Rare haplotypes may tag rare causal variants of common diseases; hence, detection of such rare haplotypes may also contribute to our understanding of complex disease etiology. Because rare haplotypes frequently result from common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), focusing on rare haplotypes is much more economical compared with using rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) from sequencing, as SNPs are available and 'free' from already amassed genome-wide studies. Further, associated haplotypes may shed light on the underlying disease causal mechanism, a feat unmatched by SNV-based collapsing methods. In recent years, data mining approaches have been adapted to detect rare haplotype association. However, as they rely on an assumed underlying disease model and require the specification of a null haplotype, results can be erroneous if such assumptions are violated. In this paper, we present a haplotype association method based on Kullback-Leibler divergence (hapKL) for case-control samples. The idea is to compare haplotype frequencies for the cases versus the controls by computing symmetrical divergence measures. An important property of such measures is that both the frequencies and logarithms of the frequencies contribute in parallel, thus balancing the contributions from rare and common, and accommodating both deleterious and protective, haplotypes. A simulation study under various scenarios shows that hapKL has well-controlled type I error rates and good power compared with existing data mining methods. Application of hapKL to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) shows a strong association of the complement factor H (CFH) gene with AMD, identifying several individual rare haplotypes with strong signals.

  14. Native and European haplotypes of Phragmites Australis (common reed) in the central Platte River, Nebraska

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    Larson, D.L.; Galatowitsch, S.M.; Larson, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Phragmites australis (common reed) is known to have occurred along the Platte River historically, but recent rapid increases in both distribution and density have begun to impact habitat for migrating sandhill cranes and nesting piping plovers and least terns. Invasiveness in Phragmites has been associated with the incursion of a European genotype (haplotype M) in other areas; determining the genotype of Phragmites along the central Platte River has implications for proper management of the river system. In 2008 we sampled Phragmites patches along the central Platte River from Lexington to Chapman, NE, stratified by bridge segments, to determine the current distribution of haplotype E (native) and haplotype M genotypes. In addition, we did a retrospective analysis of historical Phragmites collections from the central Platte watershed (1902-2006) at the Bessey Herbarium. Fresh tissue from the 2008 survey and dried tissue from the herbarium specimens were classified as haplotype M or E using the restriction fragment length polymorphism procedure. The European haplotype was predominant in the 2008 samples: only 14 Phragmites shoots were identified as native haplotype E; 224 were non-native haplotype M. The retrospective analysis revealed primarily native haplotype individuals. Only collections made in Lancaster County, near Lincoln, NE, were haplotype M, and the earliest of these was collected in 1973. ?? 2011 Copyright by the Center for Great Plains Studies, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

  15. New chicken Rfp-Y haplotypes on the basis of MHC class II RFLP and MLC analyses

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    Juul-Madsen, H R; Zoorob, R; Auffray, C;

    1997-01-01

    New chicken Rfp-Y haplotypes were determined by the use of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) in four different chicken haplotypes, B15, B19, B21, B201. The RFLP polymorphism was mapped to the Rfp-Y system by the use of a subclone (18.1) which maps...... near a polymorphic lectin gene located in the Rfp-Y system and DNA from families with known segregation of the implicated RFLP polymorphism. For the first time it is shown that major histocompatibility complex class II genes in the Rfp-Y system have functional implications. Sequence information...

  16. Definition of gene content for nine common group B haplotypes of the Caucasoid population: KIR haplotypes contain between seven and eleven KIR genes.

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    Uhrberg, Markus; Parham, Peter; Wernet, Peter

    2002-07-01

    The segregation of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor ( KIR) genes was determined for a panel of 21 Caucasoid families: 23 different KIR gene patterns were found and could be assigned to combinations of 16 different haplotypes. Four loci were held in common by all haplotypes: KIR2DL4, KIR3DL2, the putative pseudogene KIR3DL3 and KIR2DL2/KIR2DL3, the latter likely being alleles of one gene. Group A haplotypes, which have a unique combination of seven KIR genes, were found at 80% frequency in the family panel, the polygenic group B haplotypes at 65% frequency. KIR gene segregation was fully determined for the nine group B haplotypes, which occurred at highest frequencies in both the family panel and a panel of unrelated individuals. The group B haplotypes carried between seven and 11 KIR genes and encoded inhibitory KIR for one, two, or all three major HLA class I epitopes. Analysis of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class I genotypes revealed that most, but not all, individuals possess an inhibitory KIR for a self HLA class I epitope. The number of stimulatory KIR genes in group B haplotypes varied considerably between one and five. The data show that group B haplotypes possess a broad spectrum of KIR gene patterns, which is largely complementary to the KIR gene set of group A haplotypes. The results suggest that rapid diversification of group B haplotypes is the result of pathogen-mediated selection for KIR genotypes that have more than the set of KIR genes provided by the group A haplotype.

  17. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) class I allele typing of Danish swine herds and identification of commonly occurring haplotypes using sequence specific low and high resolution primers.

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    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers; Sorensen, Maria Rathmann; Ho, Chak-Sum; Vadekær, Dorte Fink

    2014-12-15

    The swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genomic region (SLA) is extremely polymorphic comprising high numbers of different alleles, many encoding a distinct MHC class I molecule, which binds and presents endogenous peptides to circulating T cells of the immune system. Upon recognition of such peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) naïve T cells can become activated and respond to a given pathogen leading to its elimination and the generation of memory cells. Hence SLA plays a crucial role in maintaining overall adaptive immunologic resistance to pathogens. Knowing which SLA alleles that are commonly occurring can be of great importance in regard to future vaccine development and the establishment of immune protection in swine through broad coverage, highly specific, subunit based vaccination against viruses such as swine influenza, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, foot-and-mouth-disease virus and others. Here we present the use of low- and high-resolution PCR-based typing methods to identify individual and commonly occurring SLA class I alleles in Danish swine. A total of 101 animals from seven different herds were tested, and by low resolution typing the top four most frequent SLA class I alleles were those of the allele groups SLA-3*04XX, SLA-1*08XX, SLA-2*02XX, and SLA-1*07XX, respectively. Customised high resolution primers were used to identify specific alleles within the above mentioned allele groups as well as within the SLA-2*05XX allele group. Our studies also suggest the most common haplotype in Danish pigs to be Lr-4.0 expressing the SLA-1*04XX, SLA-2*04XX, and SLA-3*04XX allele combination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic sequence analysis of the MHC class I G/F segment in common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

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    Kono, Azumi; Brameier, Markus; Roos, Christian; Suzuki, Shingo; Shigenari, Atsuko; Kametani, Yoshie; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Walter, Lutz; Shiina, Takashi

    2014-04-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World monkey that is used frequently as a model for various human diseases. However, detailed knowledge about the MHC is still lacking. In this study, we sequenced and annotated a total of 854 kb of the common marmoset MHC region that corresponds to the HLA-A/G/F segment (Caja-G/F) between the Caja-G1 and RNF39 genes. The sequenced region contains 19 MHC class I genes, of which 14 are of the MHC-G (Caja-G) type, and 5 are of the MHC-F (Caja-F) type. Six putatively functional Caja-G and Caja-F genes (Caja-G1, Caja-G3, Caja-G7, Caja-G12, Caja-G13, and Caja-F4), 13 pseudogenes related either to Caja-G or Caja-F, three non-MHC genes (ZNRD1, PPPIR11, and RNF39), two miscRNA genes (ZNRD1-AS1 and HCG8), and one non-MHC pseudogene (ETF1P1) were identified. Phylogenetic analysis suggests segmental duplications of units consisting of basically five (four Caja-G and one Caja-F) MHC class I genes, with subsequent expansion/deletion of genes. A similar genomic organization of the Caja-G/F segment has not been observed in catarrhine primates, indicating that this genomic segment was formed in New World monkeys after the split of New World and Old World monkeys.

  19. Association between a common CYP17A1 haplotype and anxiety in female anorexia nervosa.

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    Czerniak, Efrat; Korostishevsky, Michael; Frisch, Amos; Cohen, Yoram; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Michaelovsky, Elena; Stein, Daniel; Danziger, Yardena; Fennig, Silvana; Apter, Alan; Weizman, Abraham; Gak, Eva

    2013-10-01

    Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the main brain neurosteroid, has been implicated in various psychiatric disorders especially those including gender differences. We studied genetic variability in the DHEA-producing enzyme CYP17A1 in relation to anorexia nervosa (AN) susceptibility and AN-related co-morbidities. We performed analysis of 100 Israeli AN family trios accounting for CYP17A1 haplotypes characteristic of populations of European origin and studied genotype-phenotype relationships using correlation analyses and transmission disequilibrium test. Although our analysis revealed no evidence of association between CYP17A1 and AN per se, it revealed an association between specific CYP17A1 haplotypes and AN co-morbidity, specifically anxiety. We found that a common CYP17A1 haplotype (H1) was associated with higher anxiety in AN patients (Clinical Global Impression; CGI-anxiety ≥4). Moreover, H1 homozygotes were at higher risk for expressing high CGI-anxiety levels (OR = 3.7), and H1 was preferentially transmitted to AN patients with high CGI-anxiety levels (P = 0. 037). We suggest that CYP17A1 H1 haplotype may contribute to genetic predisposition to higher CGI-anxiety levels in AN patients and that this predisposition may be mediated by reduced CYP17A1 enzymatic activity and corresponding lower DHEA production.

  20. Distribution of TAP gene polymorphisms and extended MHC haplotypes in Mexican Mestizos and in Seri Indians from northwest Mexico.

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    Balladares, S; Alaez, C; Pujol, J; Duran, C; Navarro, J L; Gorodezky, C

    2002-04-01

    The study of the genetic structure is very useful for investigating the biological significance of polymorphism and may provide clues to understand population origins. We present TAP1/TAP2 gene analysis in the Seri indians from Sonora, and in Mestizos from the highlands of Mexico. Thirty-two Seri and 89 Mestizos were studied. TAP genes were typed using the ARMS-PCR technique. The most frequent alleles in Seri were: TAP1*0101/02, (68.8%); TAP1*02011/02012, (31.2%); TAP2*0201, (38.7%) and TAP2*0101, (29.0%). TAP1*0301, TAP1*0401, TAP2*0102 TAP2*0103 and TAP2H were absent in them. For Mestizos, the prevalent alleles were: TAP1*0101/02 (75.8%); TAP1*02011/12 (20.3%); TAP2*0101 (45.4%) and TAP2*0201 (29.3%). These results are similar to those found in Kaingang and Caucasians from Brazil, four Mediterranean, other Caucasians, two Oriental and one African group. In Seri, the extended prevalent haplotypes are typically Amerindian, such as TAP1*0101/2-TAP2*0201-QBP3.21-DQB1*0302-QAP*3.1-DQA1*03011-DRB1*0407-B*3501-A*0201 (HF = 16.6%). Thirty-two extended haplotypes were found in Seri, although TAP contributed scarcely to diversity. Mestizos show Amerindian and Caucasian combinations. No difference was detected in the distribution of amino acids in the individual variable sites, between both groups. These findings are the basis for further anthropological studies and to explore the contribution of TAP genes to disease expression in Mexicans.

  1. Common 5' beta-globin RFLP haplotypes harbour a surprising level of ancestral sequence mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Matthew T; Clegg, John B; Harding, Rosalind M

    2003-07-01

    Blocks of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the human genome represent segments of ancestral chromosomes. To investigate the relationship between LD and genealogy, we analysed diversity associated with restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) haplotypes of the 5' beta-globin gene complex. Genealogical analyses were based on sequence alleles that spanned a 12.2-kb interval, covering 3.1 kb around the psibeta gene and 6.2 kb of the delta-globin gene and its 5' flanking sequence known as the R/T region. Diversity was sampled from a Kenyan Luo population where recent malarial selection has contributed to substantial LD. A single common sequence allele spanning the 12.2-kb interval exclusively identified the ancestral chromosome bearing the "Bantu" beta(s) (sickle-cell) RFLP haplotype. Other common 5' RFLP haplotypes comprised interspersed segments from multiple ancestral chromosomes. Nucleotide diversity was similar between psibeta and R/T-delta-globin but was non-uniformly distributed within the R/T-delta-globin region. High diversity associated with the 5' R/T identified two ancestral lineages that probably date back more than 2 million years. Within this genealogy, variation has been introduced into the 3' R/T by gene conversion from other ancestral chromosomes. Diversity in delta-globin was found to lead through parts of the main genealogy but to coalesce in a more recent ancestor. The well-known recombination hotspot is clearly restricted to the region 3' of delta-globin. Our analyses show that, whereas one common haplotype in a block of high LD represents a long segment from a single ancestral chromosome, others are mosaics of short segments from multiple ancestors related in genealogies of unsuspected complexity.

  2. Salt tolerance underlies the cryptic invasion of North American salt marshes by an introduced haplotype of the common reed Phragmites australis (Poaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, Edward A.; Glenn, Edward P.; Brown, J. Jed; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Nelson, Stephen G.

    2005-01-01

    A distinct, non-native haplotype of the common reed Phragmites australis has become invasive in Atlantic coastal Spartina marshes. We compared the salt tolerance and other growth characteristics of the invasive M haplotype with 2 native haplotypes (F and AC) in greenhouse experiments. The M haplotype retained 50% of its growth potential up to 0.4 M NaCl, whereas the F and AC haplotypes did not grow above 0.1 M NaCl. The M haplotype produced more shoots per gram of rhizome tissue and had higher relative growth rates than the native haplotypes on both freshwater and saline water treatments. The M haplotype also differed from the native haplotypes in shoot water content and the biometrics of shoots and rhizomes. The results offer an explanation for how the M haplotype is able to spread in coastal salt marshes and support the conclusion of DNA analyses that the M haplotype is a distinct ecotype of P. australis.

  3. Association of A Common Haplotype of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1α With Type 2 Diabetes in Chinese Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG-RONG WANG; CHENG HU; RONG ZHANG; QI-CHEN FANG; XIAO-JING MA; WEI-PING JIA; KUN-SAN XIANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyze the association of variants of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) gene with type 2 diabetes in Chinese population. Methods In 152 unrelated type 2 diabetes patients and 93 unrelated controls, eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and genotyped. Statistical analyses were performed to investigate whether these SNPs were associated with diabetes status in our samples. Results In the individual SNP study, no SNP differed significantly in frequency between type 2 diabetes patients and controls. In the haplotype analysis, two haplotype blocks were identified. In haplotype block 1, no evidence was found between common HNF-1α haplotypes and type 2 diabetes. However, in haplotype block 2, a common haplotype GCGC formed by four tagging SNPs (tSNPs) was found to be associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 0.6011, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4138-0.8732,P=0.0073, empirical P=0.0511, permutation test). A similar trend was also observed in the diplotype analysis, indicating that the increasing copy number of the haplotype GCGC was associated with the decreased frequency of diabetes (P=0.0193). Conclusion The results of this study provide evidence that the haplotype of HNF-1α decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese individuals.

  4. Comparative genome analysis of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I B/C segments in primates elucidated by genomic sequencing in common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Takashi; Kono, Azumi; Westphal, Nico; Suzuki, Shingo; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kita, Yuki F; Roos, Christian; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Walter, Lutz

    2011-08-01

    Common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus) have emerged as important animal models for biomedical research, necessitating a more extensive characterization of their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. However, the genomic information of the marmoset MHC (Caja) is still lacking. The MHC-B/C segment represents the most diverse MHC region among primates. Therefore, in this paper, to elucidate the detailed gene organization and evolutionary processes of the Caja class I B (Caja-B) segment, we determined two parts of the Caja-B sequences with 1,079 kb in total, ranging from H6orf15 to BAT1 and compared the structure and phylogeny with that of other primates. This segment contains 54 genes in total, nine Caja-B genes (Caja-B1 to Caja-B9), two MIC genes (MIC1 and MIC2), eight non-MHC genes, two non-coding genes, and 33 non-MHC pseudogenes that have not been observed in other primate MHC-B/C segments. Caja-B3, Caja-B4, and Caja-B7 encode proper MHC class I proteins according to amino acid structural characteristics. Phylogenetic relationships based on 48 MHC-I nucleotide sequences in primates suggested (1) species-specific divergence for Caja, Mamu, and HLA/Patr/Gogo lineages, (2) independent generation of the "seven coding exon" type MHC-B genes in Mamu and HLA/Patr/Gogo lineages from an ancestral "eight coding exon" type MHC-I gene, (3) parallel correlation with the long and short segmental duplication unit length in Caja and Mamu lineages. These findings indicate that the MHC-B/C segment has been under permanent selective pressure in the evolution of primates.

  5. Evidence that the ancestral haplotype in Australian hemochromatosis patients may be associated with a common mutation in the gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, D.H.G.; Powell, L.W.; Leggett, B.A. [Univ. of Queensland (Australia)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Hemochromatosis (HC) is a common inherited disorder of iron metabolism for which neither the gene nor biochemical defect have yet been identified. The aim of this study was to look for clinical evidence that the predominant ancestral haplotype in Australian patients is associated with a common mutation in the gene. We compared indices of iron metabolism and storage in three groups of HC patients categorized according to the presence of the ancestral haplotype (i.e., patients with two copies, one copy, and no copies of the ancestral haplotype). We also examined iron indices in two groups of HC heterozygotes (those with the ancestral haplotype and those without) and in age-matched controls. These analyses indicate that (i) HC patients with two copies of the ancestral haplotype show significantly more severe expression of the disorder than those with one copy or those without, (ii) HC heterozygotes have partial clinical expression, which may be influenced by the presence of the ancestral haplotype in females but not in males, and (iii) the high population frequency of the HC gene may be the result of the selective advantage conferred by protecting heterozygotes against iron deficiency. 18 refs., 3 tabs.

  6. A common SLC26A4-linked haplotype underlying non-syndromic hearing loss with enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattaraj, Parna; Munjal, Tina; Honda, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is the most common radiological abnormality in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in coding regions and splice sites of the SLC26A4 gene are often detected in Caucasians with EVA. Approximately one-fourth of patients with EVA.......0042). CONCLUSIONS: The CEVA haplotype causally contributes to most cases of Caucasian M1 EVA and, possibly, some cases of M0 EVA. The CEVA haplotype of SLC26A4 defines the most common allele associated with hereditary hearing loss in Caucasians. The diagnostic yield and prognostic utility of sequence analysis...

  7. The role of MHC haplotypes H2d/H2b in mouse resistance/susceptibility to cyst formation is influenced by the lineage of infective Toxoplasma gondii strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne G. Resende

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii strains displaying the Type I/III genotype are associated with acquired ocular toxoplasmosis in humans. Here, we used a mice model to characterize some immunological mechanisms involved in host resistance to infection with such strains. We have chosen the Type I/III strains D8, G2 and P-Br, which cause a chronic infection in mice that resembles human toxoplamosis. Mice deficient of molecules MyD88, IFN-gamma, and IL-12 were susceptible to all three parasite strains. This finding indicates the importance of innate mechanisms in controlling infection. On the other hand, MHC haplotype did not influenced resistance/susceptibility; since mice lineages displaying a same genetic background but different MHC haplotypes (H2b or H2d developed similar mortality and cyst numbers after infection with those strains. In contrast, the C57BL/6 genetic background, and not MHC haplotype, was critical for development of intestinal inflammation caused by any of the studied strains. Finally, regarding effector mechanisms, weobserved that B and CD8+ T lymphocytes controlled survival,whereas the inducible nitric oxide synthase influenced cyst numbers in brains of mice infected with Type I/III strains. These findings are relevant to further understanding of the immunologic mechanisms involved in host protection and pathogenesis during infection with T. gondii.Cepas de Toxoplasma gondii que apresentam o genótipo I/III são associadas a toxoplasmose ocular adquirida em humanos. No presente trabalho, nós utilizamos um modelo da doença em camundongos para caracterizar mecanismos imunológicos envolvidos na resistência do hospedeiro à infecção por aquelas cepas. Escolhemos as cepas D8, G2 e P-Br, que causam infecção crônica em camundongos, semelhante à toxoplasmose humana. Camundongos deficientes em MyD88, IFN-G e IL-12 foram susceptíveis a infecções com todas as três linhagens do parasita. Esses dados indicam a importância de mecanismos

  8. Common SNP-Based Haplotype Analysis of the 4p16.3 Huntington Disease Gene Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Min; Gillis, Tammy; Mysore, Jayalakshmi Srinidhi; Ramos, Eliana Marisa; Myers, Richard H.; Hayden, Michael R.; Morrison, Patrick J.; Nance, Martha; Ross, Christopher A.; Margolis, Russell L.; Squitieri, Ferdinando; Griguoli, Annamaria; Di Donato, Stefano; Gomez-Tortosa, Estrella; Ayuso, Carmen; Suchowersky, Oksana; Trent, Ronald J.; McCusker, Elizabeth; Novelletto, Andrea; Frontali, Marina; Jones, Randi; Ashizawa, Tetsuo; Frank, Samuel; Saint-Hilaire, Marie-Helene; Hersch, Steven M.; Rosas, Herminia D.; Lucente, Diane; Harrison, Madaline B.; Zanko, Andrea; Abramson, Ruth K.; Marder, Karen; Sequeiros, Jorge; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Gusella, James F.

    2012-01-01

    Age at the onset of motor symptoms in Huntington disease (HD) is determined largely by the length of a CAG repeat expansion in HTT but is also influenced by other genetic factors. We tested whether common genetic variation near the mutation site is associated with differences in the distribution of expanded CAG alleles or age at the onset of motor symptoms. To define disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we compared 4p16.3 SNPs in HD subjects with population controls in a case:control strategy, which revealed that the strongest signals occurred at a great distance from the HD mutation as a result of “synthetic association” with SNP alleles that are of low frequency in population controls. Detailed analysis delineated a prominent ancestral haplotype that accounted for ∼50% of HD chromosomes and extended to at least 938 kb on about half of these. Together, the seven most abundant haplotypes accounted for ∼83% of HD chromosomes. Neither the extended shared haplotype nor the individual local HTT haplotypes were associated with altered CAG-repeat length distribution or residual age at the onset of motor symptoms, arguing against modification of these disease features by common cis-regulatory elements. Similarly, the 11 most frequent control haplotypes showed no trans-modifier effect on age at the onset of motor symptoms. Our results argue against common local regulatory variation as a factor influencing HD pathogenesis, suggesting that genetic modifiers be sought elsewhere in the genome. They also indicate that genome-wide association analysis with a small number of cases can be effective for regional localization of genetic defects, even when a founder effect accounts for only a fraction of the disorder. PMID:22387017

  9. Characterisation of TNF block haplotypes affecting the production of TNF and LTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J H; Temple, S E L; Kee, C; Waterer, G W; Tan, C R T; Gut, I; Price, P

    2011-02-01

    Polymorphisms in the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (particularly TNF and adjacent genes) associate with several immunopathological diseases and with susceptibility to pneumonia. The MHC is characterised by strong linkage disequilibrium (LD), so identification of loci affecting disease must be based on haplotypes. We have defined 31 tumour necrosis factor (TNF) block haplotypes (denoted FV1-31) in Caucasians, Asians and Australian Aboriginals. This study correlates the carriage of TNF block haplotypes with TNF and lymphotoxin alpha (LTA) protein production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 205 healthy Caucasian subjects, following in vitro stimulation with Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae; gram-positive bacteria), Escherichia coli (E. coli; gram-negative bacteria) or TNF over 4, 8 and 24 h. Fifteen haplotypes were present at >1%, accounting for 94.5% of the cohort. The haplotypes were grouped into five families based on common alleles. Following stimulation, cells from carriers of the FV10 haplotype (family 2) produced less LTA compared with non-FV10 carriers. Carriers of the FV18 haplotype (family 4) produced more LTA than other donors. Induction of TNF by S. pneumoniae following 24 h stimulation was also greater in donors with FV18. The FV18 haplotype associated with the 44.1 MHC ancestral haplotype (HLA-A2, -C5, -B44, -DRB1*0401 and -DQB1*0301) that has few disease associations. FV16 occurred in the 8.1 MHC haplotype (HLA-A2, B8, DR3) that is associated with multiple immunopathological diseases. FV16 did not affect TNF or LTA levels. The findings suggest that many genetic variations critical in vivo are not effectively modelled by short-term cultures.

  10. A common haplotype in the G-protein-coupled receptor gene GPR74 is associated with leanness and increased lipolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlman, Ingrid; Dicker, Andrea; Jiao, Hong

    2007-01-01

    0.36; P=.036) among those selected for obese or lean phenotypes. The ATAG haplotype was associated with increased adipocyte lipid mobilization (lipolysis) in vivo and in vitro. In human fat cells, GPR74 receptor stimulation and inhibition caused a significant and marked decrease and increase......, respectively, of lipolysis, which could be linked to catecholamine stimulation of adipocytes through beta -adrenergic receptors. These findings suggest that a common haplotype in the GPR74 gene protects against obesity, which, at least in part, is caused by a relief of inhibition of lipid mobilization from...... with protection against obesity in two samples selected for obese and lean phenotypes (odds ratio for obesity 0.48 and 0.62; nominal P=.0014 and .014; n=1,013 and 1,423, respectively). In a population-based sample, it was associated with lower waist (P=.02) among 3,937 men and with obesity protection (odds ratio...

  11. Fine localization of the Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene to 8q21: Evidence for a common founder haplotype

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerosaletti, K.M. [Univ. of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA (United States); Lange, E.; Stringham, H.M. [Univ. of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Biostatistics] [and others

    1998-07-01

    Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microcephaly, a birdlike face, growth retardation, immunodeficiency, lack of secondary sex characteristics in females, and increased incidence of lymphoid cancers. NBS cells display a phenotype similar to that of cells from ataxia-telangiectasia patients, including chromosomal instability, radiation sensitivity, and aberrant cell-cycle-checkpoint control following exposure to ionizing radiation. A recent study reported genetic linkage of NBs to human chromosome 8q21, with strong linkage disequilibrium detected at marker D8S1811 in eastern European NBS families. The authors collected a geographically diverse group of NBS families and tested them for linkage, using an expanded panel of markers at 8q21. In this article, the authors report linkage of NBS to 8q21 in 6/7 of these families, with a maximum LOD score of 3.58. Significant linkage disequilibrium was detected for 8/13 markers tested in the 8q21 region, including D8S1811. In order to further localize the gene for NBS, the authors generated a radiation-hybrid map of markers at 8q21 and constructed haplotypes based on this map. Examination of disease haplotypes segregating in 11 NBS pedigrees revealed recombination events that place the NBS gene between D8S1757 and D8S270. A common founder haplotype was present on 15/18 disease chromosomes from 9/11 NBS families. Inferred (ancestral) recombination events involving this common haplotype suggest that NBS can be localized further, to an interval flanked by markers D8S273 and D8S88.

  12. Identical MHC markers in non-Jewish Iranian and Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris: possible common central Asian ancestral origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, N; Yunis, E J; Alper, C A; Yunis, J J; Delgado, J C; Yunis, D E; Firooz, A; Dowlati, Y; Bahar, K; Gregersen, P K; Ahmed, A R

    1997-09-15

    Previous studies showed that almost all Ashkenazi Jewish patients with pemphigus vulgaris carried the extended haplotype [HLA-B38, SC21, DRB1*0402, DQB1*0302] or [HLA-B35, SC31, DRB1*0402, DQB1*0302] or class II fragments of them. Non-Jewish patients carried [HLA-B55, SB45, DRB1*1401, DQB1*0503] or its class II fragments. In the present study of 20 Iranian patients with pemphigus vulgaris, 17 were found to carry DRB1*0402, DQB1*0302 haplotypes, also found among normal Iranian haplotypes and the same as that of the Jews. These findings suggest that the pemphigus MHC susceptibility gene among Iranians derived from the same ancestor as that in the Ashkenazim. The ancient Jews were under Persian domination from 500 B.C. until 300 B.C. and in the 8th century A.D., a Tataric people living in the kingdom of Khazar on the Western shore of the Caspian Sea and the Northern shore of the Black Sea, near Persia, converted to Judaism, providing possible opportunities for gene mixing in two populations that are distinct and separate today.

  13. A common haplotype of KIAA0319 contributes to the phonological awareness skill in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Cadmon King-Poo; Wong, Amabel May-Bo; Ho, Connie Suk-Han; Waye, Mary Mui-Yee

    2014-07-11

    Previous studies have shown that KIAA0319 is a candidate gene for dyslexia in western populations. In view of the different languages used in Caucasian and Chinese populations, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether there is also an association of KIAA0319 in Chinese children with dyslexia and/or to the language-related cognitive skills. A total of twenty six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped from three hundred and ninety three individuals from 131 Chinese families. Four of the SNPs have been reported in the literature and twenty two being tag SNPs at KIAA0319. Analysis for allelic and haplotypic associations was performed with the UNPHASED program and multiple testing was corrected using permutation. Results indicate that KIAA0319 is not associated with Chinese children with dyslexia but a haplotype consisting of rs2760157 and rs807507 SNPs were significantly associated with an onset detection test, a measure of phonological awareness (pnominal = 6.85 10-5 and pcorrected = 0.0029). In conclusion, our findings suggest that KIAA0319 is associated with a reading-related cognitive skill.

  14. Complete loss of MHC genetic diversity in the Common Hamster (Cricetus cricetus ) population in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Snoek, L.B.; Booy, G.; Vosman, B.

    2003-01-01

    The Common Hamster (Cricetus cricetus L.) has suffered from changes in agricultural practices. In some Western European countries the populations have become so small and scattered that they are threatened with extinction. We studied the genetic diversity of mitochondrial and major histoincompatibil

  15. Protective influences on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by MHC class I and class II alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustafa, M; Vingsbo, C; Olsson, T;

    1994-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is influenced by polymorphism of the MHC. We have previously found that Lewis rats with certain MHC haplotypes are susceptible to disease induced with the myelin basic protein (MBP) peptide 63-88, whereas Lewis rats with other MHC haplotypes...

  16. Patterns of MHC-G-Like and MHC-B Diversification in New World Monkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S Lugo

    Full Text Available The MHC class I (MHC-I region in New World monkeys (Platyrrhini has remained relatively understudied. To evaluate the diversification patterns and transcription behavior of MHC-I in Platyrrhini, we first analyzed public genomic sequences from the MHC-G-like subregion in Saimiri boliviensis, Ateles geoffroyi and Callicebus moloch, and from the MHC-B subregion in Saimiri boliviensis. While S. boliviensis showed multiple copies of both MHC-G-like (10 and -B (15 loci, A. geoffroyi and C. moloch had only three and four MHC-G-like genes, respectively, indicating that not all Platyrrhini species have expanded their MHC-I loci. We then sequenced MHC-G-like and -B cDNAs from nine Platyrrhini species, recovering two to five unique cDNAs per individual for both loci classes. In two Saguinus species, however, no MHC-B cDNAs were found. In phylogenetic trees, MHC-G-like cDNAs formed genus-specific clusters whereas the MHC-B cDNAs grouped by Platyrrhini families, suggesting a more rapid diversification of the former. Furthermore, cDNA sequencing in 12 capuchin monkeys showed that they transcribe at least four MHC-G-like and five MHC-B polymorphic genes, showing haplotypic diversity for gene copy number and signatures of positive natural selection at the peptide binding region. Finally, a quantitative index for MHC:KIR affinity was proposed and tested to predict putative interacting pairs. Altogether, our data indicate that i MHC-I genes has expanded differentially among Platyrrhini species, ii Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets MHC-B loci have limited or tissue-specific expression, iii MHC-G-like genes have diversified more rapidly than MHC-B genes, and iv the MHC-I diversity is generated mainly by genetic polymorphism and gene copy number variation, likely promoted by natural selection for ligand binding.

  17. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) class I allele typing of Danish swine herds and identification of commonly occurring haplotypes using sequence specific low and high resolution primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Jungersen, Gregers; Sørensen, Maria Rathmann;

    2014-01-01

    of such peptide-MHC complexes (pMHC) naïve T cells can become activated and respond to a given pathogen leading to its elimination and the generation of memory cells. Hence SLA plays a crucial role in maintaining overall adaptive immunologic resistance to pathogens. Knowing which SLA alleles that are commonly...... occurring can be of great importance in regard to future vaccine development and the establishment of immune protection in swine through broad coverage, highly specific, subunit based vaccination against viruses such as swine influenza, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, vesicular...

  18. Meta-analysis reveals association between most common class II haplotype in full-heritage Native Americans and rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R C; Jacobsson, L T; Knowler, W C; del Puente, A; Kostyu, D; McAuley, J E; Bennett, P H; Pettitt, D J

    1995-01-01

    The association of RA with the alleles at the HLA system was tested among Pima and Tohono O'odham Indians (Pimans) of the Gila River Indian Community of Arizona. Serologic class I (HLA-A, -B, and -C) alleles were typed in 51 individuals with RA and in 302 without RA. Serologic class II (HLA-DR, DQ; DR52 DR53) alleles were typed in a subset of 47 with RA and 147 without RA. Molecular subtypes of DR3X6, DRB1*1402, and *1406 were determined in 29 individuals, 16 with RA and 13 without RA. Among the cases with RA, 46 of 47 had the serologic antigen HLA-DR3X6, as did 140 of 147 of those without the disease. However, this association was not statistically significant because of the high prevalence of the antigen in the controls. Data from Pimans were analyzed with similar results from the Tlingit and Yakima Indians. A meta-analysis employing the Mantel-Haenszel procedure, stratified by tribe, revealed a statistically significant association between the most common haplotype, DRB1*1402 DQA1*0501 DQB1*0301 DRB3*0101, and RA (summary odds ratio = 2.63, 95% confidence interval = 1.08, 6.46). There was also a statistically significant difference in the genotype distributions of one class I locus, HLA-C, between those with and without RA (chi 2 = 12.4, 5 df; p = 0.03). It is concluded that the association with the most common class II haplotype in full-heritage Native Americans might help explain their high prevalence of RA.

  19. Polymorphism in the upstream regulatory region of DQA1 genes and DRB1, QAP, DQA1, and DQB1 haplotypes in the German population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, J P; Kimura, A; Andreas, A; Hochberger, M; Keller, E; Brünnler, G; Bettinotti, M P; Nevinny-Stickel, C; Hildebrandt, B; Sierp, G

    1994-01-01

    Polymorphism in the URR of the MHC class II DQA1 gene defines ten different alleles named QAP. Oligotyping for the alleles of DRB1, QAP, DQA1, and DQB1 have been performed in 210 unrelated healthy controls from Germany. Moreover, 83 HTCs from the Tenth IHWS have been tested. Four point loci haplotypes (DRB1, QAP, DQA1, and DQB1) have been analyzed in the unrelated healthy population sample. Computer analysis of the linkage disequilibria leads to the conclusion that QAP alleles are in strong linkage disequilibrium with alleles either the DQA1 or the DRB1 locus. One typical ("common") haplotype was found to be associated with each DRB1 allele in the majority (86%) of the tested persons. Apart from that, 25 other less frequent ("unusual") haplotypes, with an overall frequency of 14% have been defined. Some of these "unusual" MHC class II haplotypes were found to differ only in the regulatory alleles of DQA1 (QAP alleles) while they are identical for the alleles coding for structural elements (DRB1, DQA1, and DQB1). Most of the "unusual" haplotypes were found to carry HLA-DQ6. Assuming that "unusual" (= rare) haplotypes have arisen from "common" (= frequent) haplotypes by point mutation and recombination, we propose the existence of three recombination sites in the MHC DR-DQ region: one between DRB1 and QAP, the second between QAP and DQA1, and the third between DQA1 and DQB1.

  20. Haplotype variation of Glu-D1 locus and the origin of Glu-D1d allele conferring superior end-use qualities in common wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenying Dong

    Full Text Available In higher plants, seed storage proteins (SSPs are frequently expressed from complex gene families, and allelic variation of SSP genes often affects the quality traits of crops. In common wheat, the Glu-D1 locus, encoding 1Dx and 1Dy SSPs, has multiple alleles. The Glu-D1d allele frequently confers superior end-use qualities to commercial wheat varieties. Here, we studied the haplotype structure of Glu-D1 genomic region and the origin of Glu-D1d. Using seven diagnostic DNA markers, 12 Glu-D1 haplotypes were detected among common wheat, European spelt wheat (T. spelta, a primitive hexaploid relative of common wheat, and Aegilops tauschii (the D genome donor of hexaploid wheat. By comparatively analyzing Glu-D1 haplotypes and their associated 1Dx and 1Dy genes, we deduce that the haplotype carrying Glu-D1d was likely differentiated in the ancestral hexaploid wheat around 10,000 years ago, and was subsequently transmitted to domesticated common wheat and T. spelta. A group of relatively ancient Glu-D1 haplotypes was discovered in Ae. tauschii, which may serve for the evolution of other haplotypes. Moreover, a number of new Glu-D1d variants were found in T. spelta. The main steps in Glu-D1d differentiation are proposed. The implications of our work for enhancing the utility of Glu-D1d in wheat quality improvement and studying the SSP alleles in other crop species are discussed.

  1. Swine Leukocyte Antigen (SLA) class I allele typing of Danish swine herds and the identification of commonly expressed haplotypes using sequence specific low- and high resolution primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Fink, Dorte Rosenbek; Jungersen, Gregers

    The genomic region (SLA) of the swine major histocompatibility complex (MHC), which bind and present endogenous peptides to circulating T cells of the immune system, is extremely polymorphic comprising high numbers of different alleles, many of which encode a distinct MHC class I molecule. Each SLA...... individual. Therefore analyses of the prevalence of SLA alleles in a population are fundamental to employ pathogen-specific subunits or peptides in novel vaccines or immune diagnostics. In this study we present the use of low- and high-resolution PCR-based typing methods to identify individual and commonly...... expressed SLA class I alleles in Danish outbred swine. A total of 108 animals from eight different production herds were tested, and with low resolution sequence specific primer (SSP)-PCR typing the top five most commonly expressed SLA class I allele groups were found to be SLA-3*04XX, SLA-1*08XX, SLA-1...

  2. Presence of a TA haplotype in the APC gene containing the common 1822 polymorphism and colorectal adenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Jan B; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Martínez, María Elena; Gerner, Eugene W; Jurutka, Peter W; Thompson, Patricia A

    2008-07-15

    Acquired or inherited mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene are causally linked to colorectal cancer. Given the significance of APC in colorectal cancer, we investigated the association between common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in the APC gene and the odds of developing metachronous colorectal adenomas as a surrogate measure of colorectal cancer risk. Coding SNPs at codons 486, 1678, 1822, 1960, and 2502 were analyzed in a total of 1,399 subjects who participated in two randomized clinical trials for the prevention of colorectal adenomas. No association was found for any single SNP and the odds of metachronous adenoma. In contrast, a TA haplotype (codons 486 and 1822) was associated with a statistically significant 27% and 26% reduction in the odds of any and nonadvanced metachronous adenoma after adjustment for baseline adenoma characteristics [odds ratio (OR), 0.73; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.59-0.91 and OR, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.57-0.94], respectively. No significant reduction in odds was observed for advanced metachronous lesions. Diplotype analysis revealed a strong gene dose effect with carriers of two alleles containing TT-AA (codons 486 and 1822, respectively) having an 89% lower odds for advanced metachronous adenomas (OR, 0.11; 95% CI, 0.01-0.80) when compared with the common CC-AA diplotype (codons 486 and 1822, respectively). Our findings support an important role for germ-line allele sequence in the APC gene and individual risk of metachronous adenomatous polyps.

  3. NetMHCIIpan-3.0, a common pan-specific MHC class II prediction method including all three human MHC class II isotypes, HLA-DR, HLA-DP and HLA-DQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita; Rasmussen, Michael; Blicher, Thomas;

    2013-01-01

    importance for understanding the nature of immune responses and identifying T cell epitopes for the design of new vaccines and immunotherapies. Given the large number of MHC variants, and the costly experimental procedures needed to evaluate individual peptide–MHC interactions, computational predictions have...

  4. The MHC class I genes of zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirscherl, Hayley; McConnell, Sean C; Yoder, Jeffrey A; de Jong, Jill L O

    2014-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the immune response and in the recognition of non-self. Found in all jawed vertebrate species, including zebrafish and other teleosts, MHC genes are considered the most polymorphic of all genes. In this review we focus on the multi-faceted diversity of zebrafish MHC class I genes, which are classified into three sequence lineages: U, Z, and L. We examine the polygenic, polymorphic, and haplotypic diversity of the zebrafish MHC class I genes, discussing known and postulated functional differences between the different class I lineages. In addition, we provide the first comprehensive nomenclature for the L lineage genes in zebrafish, encompassing at least 15 genes, and characterize their sequence properties. Finally, we discuss how recent findings have shed new light on the remarkably diverse MHC loci of this species.

  5. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tove H; Børglum, A.D; Mors, O

    2002-01-01

    with different frequencies in patients compared to controls. Two segments were of most interest when the results of the association tests were combined with the probabilities of identity by descent of single haplotypes. For bipolar patients, the strongest evidence for a candidate region harboring a risk gene...

  6. Haplotype analysis suggest common founders in carriers of the recurrent BRCA2 mutation, 3398delAAAAG, in French Canadian hereditary breast and/ovarian cancer families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foulkes William D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 3398delAAAAG mutation in BRCA2 was recently found to recur in breast and/or ovarian cancer families from the French Canadian population of Quebec, a population that has genetic attributes consistent with a founder effect. To characterize the contribution of this mutation in this population, this study established the frequency of this mutation in breast and ovarian cancer cases unselected for family history of cancer, and determined if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Methods The frequency was estimated by assaying the mutation in series of French Canadian breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 41 (n = 60 or 80 (n = 127 years of age, and ovarian cancer cases (n = 80 unselected for family history of cancer by mutation analysis. Haplotype analysis was performed to determine if mutation carriers shared a common ancestry. Members from 11 families were analyzed using six polymorphic microsatellite markers (cen-D13S260-D13S1699-D13S1698-D13S1697-D13S1701-D13S171-tel spanning approximately a 3.6 cM interval at the chromosomal region 13q13.1, which contains BRCA2. Allele frequencies were estimated by genotyping 47 unaffected female individuals derived from the same population. Haplotype reconstruction of unaffected individuals was performed using the program PHASE. Results The recurrent BRCA2 mutation occurred in 1 of 60 (1.7% women diagnosed with breast cancer before 41 years of age and one of 80 (1.3% women with ovarian cancer. No mutation carriers were identified in the series of breast cancer cases diagnosed before age 80. Mutation carriers harboured one of two haplotypes, 7-3-9-3 – [3/4]-7, that varied with marker D13S1701 and which occurred at a frequency of 0.001. The genetic analysis of D13S1695, a polymorphic marker located approximately 0.3 cM distal to D13S171, did not favour a genetic recombination event to account for the differences in D13S1701 alleles within the haplotype. Although mutation carriers

  7. Effects of highly conserved major histocompatibility complex (MHC extended haplotypes on iron and low CD8+ T lymphocyte phenotypes in HFE C282Y homozygous hemochromatosis patients from three geographically distant areas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Costa

    Full Text Available Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HH is a recessively inherited disorder of iron overload occurring commonly in subjects homozygous for the C282Y mutation in HFE gene localized on chromosome 6p21.3 in linkage disequilibrium with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A locus. Although its genetic homogeneity, the phenotypic expression is variable suggesting the presence of modifying factors. One such genetic factor, a SNP microhaplotype named A-A-T, was recently found to be associated with a more severe phenotype and also with low CD8(+T-lymphocyte numbers. The present study aimed to test whether the predictive value of the A-A-T microhaplotype remained in other population settings. In this study of 304 HH patients from 3 geographically distant populations (Porto, Portugal 65; Alabama, USA 57; Nord-Trøndelag, Norway 182, the extended haplotypes involving A-A-T were studied in 608 chromosomes and the CD8(+ T-lymphocyte numbers were determined in all subjects. Patients from Porto had a more severe phenotype than those from other settings. Patients with A-A-T seemed on average to have greater iron stores (p = 0.021, but significant differences were not confirmed in the 3 separate populations. Low CD8(+ T-lymphocytes were associated with HLA-A*03-A-A-T in Porto and Alabama patients but not in the greater series from Nord-Trøndelag. Although A-A-T may signal a more severe iron phenotype, this study was unable to prove such an association in all population settings, precluding its use as a universal predictive marker of iron overload in HH. Interestingly, the association between A-A-T and CD8(+ T-lymphocytes, which was confirmed in Porto and Alabama patients, was not observed in Nord-Trøndelag patients, showing that common HLA haplotypes like A*01-B*08 or A*03-B*07 segregating with HFE/C282Y in the three populations may carry different messages. These findings further strengthen the relevance of HH as a good disease model to search for novel candidate loci

  8. The major histocompatibility complex (Mhc class IIB region has greater genomic structural flexibility and diversity in the quail than the chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulski Jerzy K

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quail and chicken major histocompatibility complex (Mhc genomic regions have a similar overall organization but differ markedly in that the quail has an expanded number of duplicated class I, class IIB, natural killer (NK-receptor-like, lectin-like and BG genes. Therefore, the elucidation of genetic factors that contribute to the greater Mhc diversity in the quail would help to establish it as a model experimental animal in the investigation of avian Mhc associated diseases. Aims and approaches The main aim here was to characterize the genetic and genomic features of the transcribed major quail MhcIIB (CojaIIB region that is located between the Tapasin and BRD2 genes, and to compare our findings to the available information for the chicken MhcIIB (BLB. We used four approaches in the study of the quail MhcIIB region, (1 haplotype analyses with polymorphic loci, (2 cloning and sequencing of the RT-PCR CojaIIB products from individuals with different haplotypes, (3 genomic sequencing of the CojaIIB region from the individuals with the different haplotypes, and (4 phylogenetic and duplication analysis to explain the variability of the region between the quail and the chicken. Results Our results show that the Tapasin-BRD2 segment of the quail Mhc is highly variable in length and in gene transcription intensity and content. Haplotypic sequences were found to vary in length between 4 to 11 kb. Tapasin-BRD2 segments contain one or two major transcribed CojaIIBs that were probably generated by segmental duplications involving c-type lectin-like genes and NK receptor-like genes, gene fusions between two CojaIIBs and transpositions between the major and minor CojaIIB segments. The relative evolutionary speed for generating the MhcIIBs genomic structures from the ancestral BLB2 was estimated to be two times faster in the quail than in the chicken after their separation from a common ancestor. Four types of genomic rearrangement

  9. Common haplotype dependency of high G gamma-globin gene expression and high Hb F levels in beta-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Labie, D; Pagnier, J.; Lapoumeroulie, C; Rouabhi, F; Dunda-Belkhodja, O; Chardin, P; Beldjord, C; Wajcman, H; Fabry, M E; Nagel, R L

    1985-01-01

    We have studied 42 homozygous beta-thalassemia patients from Algeria and 34 sickle cell anemia patients from Senegal and Benin, determining the relationship between haplotypes, Hb F, and G gamma-globin/A gamma-globin ratios. Populations selected have a high frequency of haplotype homozygotes because of consanguinity (Algeria) and geographic homogeneity (West Africa). We find in beta-thalassemia patients, that haplotype IX in haplotypic homozygotes and heterozygotes, haplotype III in heterozyg...

  10. MHC polymorphism under host-pathogen coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghans, José A M; Beltman, Joost B; De Boer, Rob J

    2004-02-01

    The genes encoding major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules are among the most polymorphic genes known for vertebrates. Since MHC molecules play an important role in the induction of immune responses, the evolution of MHC polymorphism is often explained in terms of increased protection of hosts against pathogens. Two selective pressures that are thought to be involved are (1) selection favoring MHC heterozygous hosts, and (2) selection for rare MHC alleles by host-pathogen coevolution. We have developed a computer simulation of coevolving hosts and pathogens to study the relative impact of these two mechanisms on the evolution of MHC polymorphism. We found that heterozygote advantage per se is insufficient to explain the high degree of polymorphism at the MHC, even in very large host populations. Host-pathogen coevolution, on the other hand, can easily account for realistic polymorphisms of more than 50 alleles per MHC locus. Since evolving pathogens mainly evade presentation by the most common MHC alleles in the host population, they provide a selective pressure for a large variety of rare MHC alleles. Provided that the host population is sufficiently large, a large set of MHC alleles can persist over many host generations under host-pathogen coevolution, despite the fact that allele frequencies continuously change.

  11. Combining haplotypers

    CERN Document Server

    Kääriäinen, Matti; Lappalainen, Sampsa; Mielikäinen, Taneli

    2007-01-01

    Statistically resolving the underlying haplotype pair for a genotype measurement is an important intermediate step in gene mapping studies, and has received much attention recently. Consequently, a variety of methods for this problem have been developed. Different methods employ different statistical models, and thus implicitly encode different assumptions about the nature of the underlying haplotype structure. Depending on the population sample in question, their relative performance can vary greatly, and it is unclear which method to choose for a particular sample. Instead of choosing a single method, we explore combining predictions returned by different methods in a principled way, and thereby circumvent the problem of method selection. We propose several techniques for combining haplotype reconstructions and analyze their computational properties. In an experimental study on real-world haplotype data we show that such techniques can provide more accurate and robust reconstructions, and are useful for out...

  12. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    tested for the presence of a missense mutation in the WKL1 gene encoding a putative cation channel close to segment D22S1161--D22S922, which has been associated with schizophrenia. We did not find this mutation in schizophrenic or bipolar patients or the controls from the Faroe Islands.......Chromosome 22q may harbor risk genes for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder from the Faroe...... Islands were typed for 35 evenly distributed polymorphic markers on 22q in a search for shared risk genes in the two disorders. No single marker was strongly associated with either disease, but five two-marker segments that cluster within two regions on the chromosome have haplotypes occurring...

  13. Search for common haplotypes on chromosome 22q in patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder from the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, T.H.; Børglum, A.D.; Mors, O.;

    2002-01-01

    Chromosome 22q may harbor risk genes for schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder. This is evidenced through genetic mapping studies, investigations of cytogenetic abnormalities, and direct examination of candidate genes. Patients with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder from the Faroe...... tested for the presence of a missense mutation in the WKL1 gene encoding a putative cation channel close to segment D22S1161--D22S922, which has been associated with schizophrenia. We did not find this mutation in schizophrenic or bipolar patients or the controls from the Faroe Islands....... with different frequencies in patients compared to controls. Two segments were of most interest when the results of the association tests were combined with the probabilities of identity by descent of single haplotypes. For bipolar patients, the strongest evidence for a candidate region harboring a risk gene...

  14. Extensive shared polymorphism at non-MHC immune genes in recently diverged North American prairie grouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minias, Piotr; Bateson, Zachary W; Whittingham, Linda A; Johnson, Jeff A; Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Dunn, Peter O

    2017-01-01

    Gene polymorphisms shared between recently diverged species are thought to be widespread and most commonly reflect introgression from hybridization or retention of ancestral polymorphism through incomplete lineage sorting. Shared genetic diversity resulting from incomplete lineage sorting is usually maintained for a relatively short period of time, but under strong balancing selection it may persist for millions of years beyond species divergence (balanced trans-species polymorphism), as in the case of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. However, balancing selection is much less likely to act on non-MHC immune genes. The aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of shared polymorphism and selection at non-MHC immune genes in five grouse species from Centrocercus and Tympanuchus genera. For this purpose, we genotyped five non-MHC immune genes that do not interact directly with pathogens, but are involved in signaling and regulate immune cell growth. In contrast to previous studies with MHC, we found no evidence for balancing selection or balanced trans-species polymorphism among the non-MHC immune genes. No haplotypes were shared between genera and in most cases more similar allelic variants sorted by genus. Between species within genera, however, we found extensive shared polymorphism, which was most likely attributable to introgression or incomplete lineage sorting following recent divergence and large ancestral effective population size (i.e., weak genetic drift). Our study suggests that North American prairie grouse may have attained relatively low degree of reciprocal monophyly at nuclear loci and reinforces the rarity of balancing selection in non-MHC immune genes.

  15. Common variants at the MHC locus and at chromosome 16q24.1 predispose to Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhan; Gay, Laura J.; Strange, Amy; Palles, Claire; Band, Gavin; Whiteman, David C.; Lescai, Francesco; Langford, Cordelia; Nanji, Manoj; Edkins, Sarah; van der Winkel, Anouk; Levine, David; Sasieni, Peter; Bellenguez, Celine; Howarth, Kimberley; Freeman, Colin; Trudgill, Nigel; Tucker, Art T.; Pirinen, Matti; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Peters, Wilbert H.; Reynolds, John V.; Kelleher, Dermot P.; McManus, Ross; Grabsch, Heike; Prenen, Hans; Bisschops, Raf; Krishnadath, Kausila; Siersema, Peter D.; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Middleton, Mark; Petty, Russell; Gillies, Richard; Burch, Nicola; Bhandari, Pradeep; Paterson, Stuart; Edwards, Cathryn; Penman, Ian; Vaidya, Kishor; Ang, Yeng; Murray, Iain; Patel, Praful; Ye, Weimin; Mullins, Paul; Wu, Anna H.; Bird, Nigel C.; Dallal, Helen; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Murray, Liam J.; Koss, Konrad; Bernstein, Leslie; Romero, Yvonne; Hardie, Laura J.; Zhang, Rui; Winter, Helen; Corley, Douglas A.; Panter, Simon; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brian J.; Sargeant, Ian; Gammon, Marilie D.; Smart, Howard; Dhar, Anjan; McMurtry, Hugh; Ali, Haythem; Liu, Geoffrey; Casson, Alan G.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rutter, Matt; Tawil, Ashref; Morris, Danielle; Nwokolo, Chuka; Isaacs, Peter; Rodgers, Colin; Ragunath, Krish; MacDonald, Chris; Haigh, Chris; Monk, David; Davies, Gareth; Wajed, Saj; Johnston, David; Gibbons, Michael; Cullen, Sue; Church, Nicholas; Langley, Ruth; Griffin, Michael; Alderson, Derek; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah E.; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Anderson, Mark; Brooks, Claire; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Atherfold, Paul; Nicholson, Anna M.; Gellatly, Nichola L.; Glancy, Deborah; Cooper, Sheldon C.; Cunningham, David; Lind, Tore; Hapeshi, Julie; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Brown, Julia; Love, Sharon; Attwood, Stephen; MacGregor, Stuart; Watson, Peter; Sanders, Scott; Ek, Weronica; Harrison, Rebecca F.; Moayyedi, Paul; de Caestecker, John; Barr, Hugh; Stupka, Elia; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Peltonen, Leena; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Tomlinson, Ian; Donnelly, Peter; Jankowski, Janusz A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is an increasingly common disease that is strongly associated with reflux of stomach acid and usually a hiatus hernia, and it strongly predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a tumor with a very poor prognosis. We report the first genome-wide association study on Barrett'

  16. Common variants at the MHC locus and at chromosome 16q24.1 predispose to Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhan; Gay, Laura J.; Strange, Amy; Palles, Claire; Band, Gavin; Whiteman, David C.; Lescai, Francesco; Langford, Cordelia; Nanji, Manoj; Edkins, Sarah; van der Winkel, Anouk; Levine, David; Sasieni, Peter; Bellenguez, Celine; Howarth, Kimberley; Freeman, Colin; Trudgill, Nigel; Tucker, Art T.; Pirinen, Matti; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Peters, Wilbert H.; Reynolds, John V.; Kelleher, Dermot P.; McManus, Ross; Grabsch, Heike; Prenen, Hans; Bisschops, Raf; Krishnadath, Kausila; Siersema, Peter D.; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Middleton, Mark; Petty, Russell; Gillies, Richard; Burch, Nicola; Bhandari, Pradeep; Paterson, Stuart; Edwards, Cathryn; Penman, Ian; Vaidya, Kishor; Ang, Yeng; Murray, Iain; Patel, Praful; Ye, Weimin; Mullins, Paul; Wu, Anna H.; Bird, Nigel C.; Dallal, Helen; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Murray, Liam J.; Koss, Konrad; Bernstein, Leslie; Romero, Yvonne; Hardie, Laura J.; Zhang, Rui; Winter, Helen; Corley, Douglas A.; Panter, Simon; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brian J.; Sargeant, Ian; Gammon, Marilie D.; Smart, Howard; Dhar, Anjan; McMurtry, Hugh; Ali, Haythem; Liu, Geoffrey; Casson, Alan G.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rutter, Matt; Tawil, Ashref; Morris, Danielle; Nwokolo, Chuka; Isaacs, Peter; Rodgers, Colin; Ragunath, Krish; MacDonald, Chris; Haigh, Chris; Monk, David; Davies, Gareth; Wajed, Saj; Johnston, David; Gibbons, Michael; Cullen, Sue; Church, Nicholas; Langley, Ruth; Griffin, Michael; Alderson, Derek; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah E.; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Anderson, Mark; Brooks, Claire; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Atherfold, Paul; Nicholson, Anna M.; Gellatly, Nichola L.; Glancy, Deborah; Cooper, Sheldon C.; Cunningham, David; Lind, Tore; Hapeshi, Julie; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Brown, Julia; Love, Sharon; Attwood, Stephen; MacGregor, Stuart; Watson, Peter; Sanders, Scott; Ek, Weronica; Harrison, Rebecca F.; Moayyedi, Paul; de Caestecker, John; Barr, Hugh; Stupka, Elia; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Peltonen, Leena; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Tomlinson, Ian; Donnelly, Peter; Jankowski, Janusz A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is an increasingly common disease that is strongly associated with reflux of stomach acid and usually a hiatus hernia, and it strongly predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a tumor with a very poor prognosis. We report the first genome-wide association study on Barrett'

  17. Common variants at the MHC locus and at chromosome 16q24.1 predispose to Barrett's esophagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Zhan; Gay, Laura J.; Strange, Amy; Palles, Claire; Band, Gavin; Whiteman, David C.; Lescai, Francesco; Langford, Cordelia; Nanji, Manoj; Edkins, Sarah; van der Winkel, Anouk; Levine, David; Sasieni, Peter; Bellenguez, Celine; Howarth, Kimberley; Freeman, Colin; Trudgill, Nigel; Tucker, Art T.; Pirinen, Matti; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Kuipers, Ernst J.; Drenth, Joost P. H.; Peters, Wilbert H.; Reynolds, John V.; Kelleher, Dermot P.; McManus, Ross; Grabsch, Heike; Prenen, Hans; Bisschops, Raf; Krishnadath, Kausila; Siersema, Peter D.; van Baal, Jantine W. P. M.; Middleton, Mark; Petty, Russell; Gillies, Richard; Burch, Nicola; Bhandari, Pradeep; Paterson, Stuart; Edwards, Cathryn; Penman, Ian; Vaidya, Kishor; Ang, Yeng; Murray, Iain; Patel, Praful; Ye, Weimin; Mullins, Paul; Wu, Anna H.; Bird, Nigel C.; Dallal, Helen; Shaheen, Nicholas J.; Murray, Liam J.; Koss, Konrad; Bernstein, Leslie; Romero, Yvonne; Hardie, Laura J.; Zhang, Rui; Winter, Helen; Corley, Douglas A.; Panter, Simon; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brian J.; Sargeant, Ian; Gammon, Marilie D.; Smart, Howard; Dhar, Anjan; McMurtry, Hugh; Ali, Haythem; Liu, Geoffrey; Casson, Alan G.; Chow, Wong-Ho; Rutter, Matt; Tawil, Ashref; Morris, Danielle; Nwokolo, Chuka; Isaacs, Peter; Rodgers, Colin; Ragunath, Krish; MacDonald, Chris; Haigh, Chris; Monk, David; Davies, Gareth; Wajed, Saj; Johnston, David; Gibbons, Michael; Cullen, Sue; Church, Nicholas; Langley, Ruth; Griffin, Michael; Alderson, Derek; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah E.; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Anderson, Mark; Brooks, Claire; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Atherfold, Paul; Nicholson, Anna M.; Gellatly, Nichola L.; Glancy, Deborah; Cooper, Sheldon C.; Cunningham, David; Lind, Tore; Hapeshi, Julie; Ferry, David; Rathbone, Barrie; Brown, Julia; Love, Sharon; Attwood, Stephen; MacGregor, Stuart; Watson, Peter; Sanders, Scott; Ek, Weronica; Harrison, Rebecca F.; Moayyedi, Paul; de Caestecker, John; Barr, Hugh; Stupka, Elia; Vaughan, Thomas L.; Peltonen, Leena; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Tomlinson, Ian; Donnelly, Peter; Jankowski, Janusz A. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Barrett's esophagus is an increasingly common disease that is strongly associated with reflux of stomach acid and usually a hiatus hernia, and it strongly predisposes to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), a tumor with a very poor prognosis. We report the first genome-wide association study on

  18. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, C.; Southwood, S.; Hoof, Ilka;

    2010-01-01

    macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we...... characterized a total of 50 unique Chinese rhesus macaques from several varying origins for their entire MHC class I allele composition and identified a total of 58 unique complete MHC class I sequences. Only nine of the sequences had been associated with Indian rhesus macaques, and 28/58 (48...... binding characteristics with the HLA-B7 supertype, the most frequent supertype in human populations. These studies provide the first functional characterization of an MHC class I molecule in the context of Chinese rhesus macaques and the first instance of HLA-B7 analogy for rhesus macaques....

  19. Activity-dependent regulation of MHC class I expression in the developing primary visual cortex of the common marmoset monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlumbohm Christina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several recent studies have highlighted the important role of immunity-related molecules in synaptic plasticity processes in the developing and adult mammalian brains. It has been suggested that neuronal MHCI (major histocompatibility complex class I genes play a role in the refinement and pruning of synapses in the developing visual system. As a fast evolutionary rate may generate distinct properties of molecules in different mammalian species, we studied the expression of MHCI molecules in a nonhuman primate, the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus. Methods and results Analysis of expression levels of MHCI molecules in the developing visual cortex of the common marmoset monkeys revealed a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High levels of expression were detected very early in postnatal development, at a stage when synaptogenesis takes place and ocular dominance columns are formed. To determine whether the expression of MHCI molecules is regulated by retinal activity, animals were subjected to monocular enucleation. Levels of MHCI heavy chain subunit transcripts in the visual cortex were found to be elevated in response to monocular enucleation. Furthermore, MHCI heavy chain immunoreactivity revealed a banded pattern in layer IV of the visual cortex in enucleated animals, which was not observed in control animals. This pattern of immunoreactivity indicated that higher expression levels were associated with retinal activity coming from the intact eye. Conclusions These data demonstrate that, in the nonhuman primate brain, expression of MHCI molecules is regulated by neuronal activity. Moreover, this study extends previous findings by suggesting a role for neuronal MHCI molecules during synaptogenesis in the visual cortex.

  20. Peptide motifs of the single dominantly expressed class I molecule explain the striking MHC-determined response to Rous sarcoma virus in chickens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallny, Hans-Joachim; Avila, David; Hunt, Lawrence G.

    2006-01-01

    Compared with the MHC of typical mammals, the chicken MHC is smaller and simpler, with only two class I genes found in the B12 haplotype. We make five points to show that there is a single-dominantly expressed class I molecule that can have a strong effect on MHC function. First, we find only one...

  1. Beyond the MHC: A canine model of dermatomyositis shows a complex pattern of genetic risk involving novel loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jacquelyn M.; Hill, Cody M.; Anderson, Kendall J.

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a chronic inflammatory myopathy and vasculopathy driven by genetic and environmental influences. Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of an analogous, spontaneous disease of dogs also termed dermatomyositis (DMS). As in JDM, we observed a significant association with a haplotype of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) (DLA-DRB1*002:01/-DQA1*009:01/-DQB1*001:01), particularly in homozygosity (P-val = 0.0001). However, the high incidence of the haplotype among healthy dogs indicated that additional genetic risk factors are likely involved in disease progression. We conducted genome-wide association studies in two modern breeds having common ancestry and detected strong associations with novel loci on canine chromosomes 10 (P-val = 2.3X10-12) and 31 (P-val = 3.95X10-8). Through whole genome resequencing, we identified primary candidate polymorphisms in conserved regions of PAN2 (encoding p.Arg492Cys) and MAP3K7CL (c.383_392ACTCCACAAA>GACT) on chromosomes 10 and 31, respectively. Analyses of these polymorphisms and the MHC haplotypes revealed that nine of 27 genotypic combinations confer high or moderate probability of disease and explain 93% of cases studied. The pattern of disease risk across PAN2 and MAP3K7CL genotypes provided clear evidence for a significant epistatic foundation for this disease, a risk further impacted by MHC haplotypes. We also observed a genotype-phenotype correlation wherein an earlier age of onset is correlated with an increased number of risk alleles at PAN2 and MAP3K7CL. High frequencies of multiple genetic risk factors are unique to affected breeds and likely arose coincident with artificial selection for desirable phenotypes. Described herein is the first three-locus association with a complex canine disease and two novel loci that provide targets for exploration in JDM and related immunological dysfunction. PMID:28158183

  2. Serological Screening for MHC (B)-Polymorphism in Indigenous Chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baelmans, R.; Parmentier, H.K.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.; Dorny, P.; Demey, F.

    2005-01-01

    As part of a series of studies to characterize innate and specific immune responses of indigenous chicken lines, birds from Bolivia and India were screened serologically for MHC class IV (BG) polymorphism by direct haemagglutination using haplotype-specific antisera (B2, B4, B12, B13, B14, B15, B19,

  3. Candidate gene sequencing of SLC11A2 and TMPRSS6 in a family with severe anaemia: common SNPs, rare haplotypes, no causative mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kloss-Brandstätter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA is a rare disorder which was linked to mutations in two genes (SLC11A2 and TMPRSS6. Common polymorphisms within these genes were associated with serum iron levels. We identified a family of Serbian origin with asymptomatic non-consanguineous parents with three of four children presenting with IRIDA not responding to oral but to intravenous iron supplementation. After excluding all known causes responsible for iron deficiency anaemia we searched for mutations in SLC11A2 and TMPRSS6 that could explain the severe anaemia in these children. METHODOLOGY/RESULTS: We sequenced the exons and exon-intron boundaries of SLC11A2 and TMPRSS6 in all six family members. Thereby, we found seven known and fairly common SNPs, but no new mutation. We then genotyped these seven SNPs in the population-based SAPHIR study (n = 1,726 and performed genetic association analysis on iron and ferritin levels. Only two SNPs, which were top-hits from recent GWAS on iron and ferritin, exhibited an effect on iron and ferritin levels in SAPHIR. Six SAPHIR participants carrying the same TMPRSS6 genotypes and haplotype-pairs as one anaemic son showed lower ferritin and iron levels than the average. One individual exhibiting the joint SLC11A2/TMPRSS6 profile of the anaemic son had iron and ferritin levels lying below the 5(th percentile of the population's iron and ferritin level distribution. We then checked the genotype constellations in the Nijmegen Biomedical Study (n = 1,832, but the profile of the anaemic son did not occur in this population. CONCLUSIONS: We cannot exclude a gene-gene interaction between SLC11A2 and TMPRSS6, but we can also not confirm it. As in this case candidate gene sequencing did not reveal causative rare mutations, the samples will be subjected to whole exome sequencing.

  4. HLA class I and class II alleles and haplotypes in Mexican mestizos established from serological typing of 50 families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, C; Castelan, N; Lopez, M; Gonzalez, N; Weckmann, A L; Melin-Aldana, H; Vargas-Alarcon, G; Bordes, J; Alarcon-Segovia, D; Granados, J; Ramirez, E; Lisker, R

    1997-12-01

    We describe new information on the frequency and association of class II antigens (HLA-DR and HLA-DQ) of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in Mexicans. The study includes HLA-B typing and its association with the HLA-DR antigens determined in 50 families, which included 100 individuals. This family study allowed the establishment of the precise composition of the 200 HLA haplotypes, which cannot be obtained from unrelated individuals. The predominant antigens in decreasing order of frequency were B35, B39, and B61 at the B locus; DR4, DR5, and DR8 at the DR locus; and DQ3 at the DQ locus. The most common HLA-B,HLA-DR haplotype (considering broad specificities) was B16,DR4, with a frequency of 8.0%. Five HLA-B,HLA-DR haplotypes showed significant delta values (observed vs. expected frequencies) after correcting for the number of comparisons. On the other hand, the most common HLA-DR,HLA-DQ haplotypes were DR4,DQ3 and DR5,DQ3 with a frequency higher than 10%. Ten of the 17 HLA-DR,HLA-DQ haplotypes had significant postcorrection delta values.

  5. Haplotypes in the lipoprotein lipase gene influence fasting insulin and discovery of a new risk haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mark O; Taylor, Kent D; Guo, Xiuqing; Hokanson, John E; Haffner, Steven M; Cui, Jinrui; Chen, Yii-Der I; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Bergman, Richard N; Rotter, Jerome I

    2007-01-01

    Prior studies of Mexican Americans described association of lipoprotein lipase (LPL) gene haplotypes with insulin sensitivity/resistance and atherosclerosis. The most common haplotype (haplotype 1) was protective, whereas the fourth most common haplotype (haplotype 4) conferred risk for insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. In this study of Hispanics in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Study Family Study, we sought to replicate LPL haplotype association with insulin sensitivity/resistance. LPL haplotypes based on 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms were analyzed for association with indexes of insulin sensitivity and other metabolic and adiposity measures. This study was conducted in the general community of San Antonio, Texas, and San Luis Valley, Colorado. Participants in this study were 978 members of 86 Hispanic families. LPL haplogenotype, metabolic phenotypes, and adiposity were measured in this study. The haplotype structure was identical with that observed in prior studies. Among 978 phenotyped subjects, haplotype 1 was associated with decreased fasting insulin (P = 0.01), and haplotype 4 was associated with increased fasting insulin (P = 0.02) and increased visceral fat mass (P = 0.002). Insulin sensitivity, derived from iv glucose tolerance testing, tended (P > 0.1) to be higher with haplotype 1 (S(I) = 1.72) and lower with haplotype 4 (S(I)=1.38). Haplotype 2 was associated with increases in fasting insulin, triglycerides (TGs), TG to high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol ratio, and apolipoprotein B (P = 0.01-0.04). This study independently replicates our prior results of LPL haplotypes 1 and 4 as associated with measures of insulin sensitivity and resistance, respectively. Haplotype 4 may confer insulin resistance by increasing visceral fat. Haplotype 2 was identified as a new risk haplotype, suggesting the complex nature of LPL's effect on features of the insulin resistance syndrome.

  6. Peptide Immunization Elicits Polyomavirus-Specific MHC Class Ib-Restricted CD8 T Cells in MHC Class Ia Allogeneic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Amelia R.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Unlike the polymorphic MHC class Ia molecules, MHC class Ib molecules are oligomorphic or nonpolymorphic. We recently discovered a protective CD8 T cell response to mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) in H-2b haplotype mice that is restricted by H2-Q9, a member of the Qa-2 MHC class Ib family. Here, we demonstrate that immunization with a peptide corresponding to a virus capsid-derived peptide presented by Q9 also elicits MHC class Ib-restricted MPyV-specific CD8 T cells in mice of H-2s and H-2g7 strains. These findings support the concept that immunization with a single MHC class Ib-restricted peptide can expand CD8 T cells in MHC class Ia allogeneic hosts. PMID:23374150

  7. Cryopreservation of MHC multimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Sine Reker; Maurer, Dominik; Laske, Karoline;

    2015-01-01

    and long-term storage is generally not recommended. We investigated here the possibility of cryopreserving MHC multimers, both in-house produced and commercially available, using a wide range of peptide-MHC class I multimers comprising virus and cancer-associated epitopes of different affinities presented...

  8. The MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the onset of cellular immune reactions is controlled by presentation of peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to T cell receptors. In humans, MHCs are called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Different MHC molecules present different subsets...

  9. Mapping Haplotype-haplotype Interactions with Adaptive LASSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ming

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genetic etiology of complex diseases in human has been commonly viewed as a complex process involving both genetic and environmental factors functioning in a complicated manner. Quite often the interactions among genetic variants play major roles in determining the susceptibility of an individual to a particular disease. Statistical methods for modeling interactions underlying complex diseases between single genetic variants (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs have been extensively studied. Recently, haplotype-based analysis has gained its popularity among genetic association studies. When multiple sequence or haplotype interactions are involved in determining an individual's susceptibility to a disease, it presents daunting challenges in statistical modeling and testing of the interaction effects, largely due to the complicated higher order epistatic complexity. Results In this article, we propose a new strategy in modeling haplotype-haplotype interactions under the penalized logistic regression framework with adaptive L1-penalty. We consider interactions of sequence variants between haplotype blocks. The adaptive L1-penalty allows simultaneous effect estimation and variable selection in a single model. We propose a new parameter estimation method which estimates and selects parameters by the modified Gauss-Seidel method nested within the EM algorithm. Simulation studies show that it has low false positive rate and reasonable power in detecting haplotype interactions. The method is applied to test haplotype interactions involved in mother and offspring genome in a small for gestational age (SGA neonates data set, and significant interactions between different genomes are detected. Conclusions As demonstrated by the simulation studies and real data analysis, the approach developed provides an efficient tool for the modeling and testing of haplotype interactions. The implementation of the method in R codes can be

  10. Mapping haplotype-haplotype interactions with adaptive LASSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Romero, Roberto; Fu, Wenjiang J; Cui, Yuehua

    2010-08-27

    The genetic etiology of complex diseases in human has been commonly viewed as a complex process involving both genetic and environmental factors functioning in a complicated manner. Quite often the interactions among genetic variants play major roles in determining the susceptibility of an individual to a particular disease. Statistical methods for modeling interactions underlying complex diseases between single genetic variants (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs) have been extensively studied. Recently, haplotype-based analysis has gained its popularity among genetic association studies. When multiple sequence or haplotype interactions are involved in determining an individual's susceptibility to a disease, it presents daunting challenges in statistical modeling and testing of the interaction effects, largely due to the complicated higher order epistatic complexity. In this article, we propose a new strategy in modeling haplotype-haplotype interactions under the penalized logistic regression framework with adaptive L1-penalty. We consider interactions of sequence variants between haplotype blocks. The adaptive L1-penalty allows simultaneous effect estimation and variable selection in a single model. We propose a new parameter estimation method which estimates and selects parameters by the modified Gauss-Seidel method nested within the EM algorithm. Simulation studies show that it has low false positive rate and reasonable power in detecting haplotype interactions. The method is applied to test haplotype interactions involved in mother and offspring genome in a small for gestational age (SGA) neonates data set, and significant interactions between different genomes are detected. As demonstrated by the simulation studies and real data analysis, the approach developed provides an efficient tool for the modeling and testing of haplotype interactions. The implementation of the method in R codes can be freely downloaded from http://www.stt.msu.edu/~cui/software.html.

  11. Deleterious impact of feto-maternal MHC compatibility on the success of pregnancy in a macaque model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarnink, Alice; Mee, Edward T; Savy, Nicolas; Congy-Jolivet, Nicolas; Rose, Nicola J; Blancher, Antoine

    2014-02-01

    The impact of feto-maternal histocompatibility on reproduction has inspired long-lasting debates. However, after the review of numerous articles, the impact of HLA allele sharing within couples on fecundity remains questionable. We decided to explore the impact of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) feto-maternal compatibility on reproduction in a cynomolgus macaque facility composed of animals of Mauritian descent. The Mauritian-derived macaque population presents a very restricted MHC polymorphism (only seven founding haplotypes) due to a strong founding bottleneck effect. The MHC polymorphism was investigated in 237 trios (male, female and offspring) using 17 microsatellite markers distributed across the MHC. Haplotypes were confirmed by segregation analysis. We evaluated the relative frequencies of MHC-compatible and MHC-semi-compatible offspring with the mothers. Among the 237 trios, we selected 42 trios for which the identity of the father is certain and for which the theoretical probabilities of fully compatible and semi-compatible offspring were equal. We found 11 offspring fully compatible and 31 offspring semi-compatible with their respective mother. The observed proportions were clearly outside the interval of confidence of 99 % and therefore most probably resulted from a selection of the semi-compatible offspring during pregnancy. We concluded that MHC fully compatible cynomolgus macaque offspring have a selective survival disadvantage in comparison with offspring inheriting a paternal MHC haplotype differing from maternal haplotypes.

  12. Co-evolution of MHC class I and variable NK cell receptors in placental mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Norman, Paul J; Hilton, Hugo G; Parham, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Shaping natural killer (NK) cell functions in human immunity and reproduction are diverse killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) that recognize polymorphic MHC class I determinants. A survey of placental mammals suggests that KIRs serve as variable NK cell receptors only in certain primates and artiodactyls. Divergence of the functional and variable KIRs in primates and artiodactyls predates placental reproduction. Among artiodactyls, cattle but not pigs have diverse KIRs. Catarrhine (humans, apes, and Old World monkeys) and platyrrhine (New World monkeys) primates, but not prosimians, have diverse KIRs. Platyrrhine and catarrhine systems of KIR and MHC class I are highly diverged, but within the catarrhines, a stepwise co-evolution of MHC class I and KIR is discerned. In Old World monkeys, diversification focuses on MHC-A and MHC-B and their cognate lineage II KIR. With evolution of C1-bearing MHC-C from MHC-B, as informed by orangutan, the focus changes to MHC-C and its cognate lineage III KIR. Evolution of C2 from C1 and fixation of MHC-C drove further elaboration of MHC-C-specific KIR, as exemplified by chimpanzee. In humans, the evolutionary trajectory changes again. Emerging from reorganization of the KIR locus and selective attenuation of KIR avidity for MHC class I are the functionally distinctive KIR A and KIR B haplotypes.

  13. Polymorphisms in the F8 gene and MHC-II variants as risk factors for the development of inhibitory anti-factor VIII antibodies during the treatment of hemophilia a: a computational assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gouri Shankar Pandey

    Full Text Available The development of neutralizing anti-drug-antibodies to the Factor VIII protein-therapeutic is currently the most significant impediment to the effective management of hemophilia A. Common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (ns-SNPs in the F8 gene occur as six haplotypes in the human population (denoted H1 to H6 of which H3 and H4 have been associated with an increased risk of developing anti-drug antibodies. There is evidence that CD4+ T-cell response is essential for the development of anti-drug antibodies and such a response requires the presentation of the peptides by the MHC-class-II (MHC-II molecules of the patient. We measured the binding and half-life of peptide-MHC-II complexes using synthetic peptides from regions of the Factor VIII protein where ns-SNPs occur and showed that these wild type peptides form stable complexes with six common MHC-II alleles, representing 46.5% of the North American population. Next, we compared the affinities computed by NetMHCIIpan, a neural network-based algorithm for MHC-II peptide binding prediction, to the experimentally measured values and concluded that these are in good agreement (area under the ROC-curve of 0.778 to 0.972 for the six MHC-II variants. Using a computational binding predictor, we were able to expand our analysis to (a include all wild type peptides spanning each polymorphic position; and (b consider more MHC-II variants, thus allowing for a better estimation of the risk for clinical manifestation of anti-drug antibodies in the entire population (or a specific sub-population. Analysis of these computational data confirmed that peptides which have the wild type sequence at positions where the polymorphisms associated with haplotypes H3, H4 and H5 occur bind MHC-II proteins significantly more than a negative control. Taken together, the experimental and computational results suggest that wild type peptides from polymorphic regions of FVIII constitute potential T-cell epitopes

  14. Genetic variation at the MHC in a population of introduced wild turkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Miranda M; Miller, Marcia M; Briles, W Elwood; Reed, Kent M

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is known to affect disease resistance in many species. Investigations of MHC diversity in populations of wild species have focused on the antigen presenting class IIβ molecules due to the known polymorphic nature of these genes and the role these molecules play in pathogen recognition. Studies of MHC haplotype variation in the turkey ( Meleagris gallopavo ) are limited. This study was designed to examine MHC diversity in a group of Eastern wild turkeys ( Meleagris gallopavo silvestris ) collected during population expansion following reintroduction of the species in southern Wisconsin, USA. Southern blotting with BG and class IIβ probes and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was used to measure MHC variation. SNP analysis focused on single copy MHC genes flanking the highly polymorphic class IIβ genes. Southern blotting identified 27 class IIβ phenotypes, whereas SNP analysis identified 13 SNP haplotypes occurring in 28 combined genotypes. Results show that genetic diversity estimates based on RFLP (Southern blot) analysis underestimate the level of variation detected by SNP analysis. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial D-loop identified 7 mitochondrial haplotypes (mitotypes) in the sampled birds. Results show that wild turkeys located in southern Wisconsin have a genetically diverse MHC and originate from several maternal lineages.

  15. MHC motif viewer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas Philippe Jean-Pierre; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . Algorithms that predict which peptides MHC molecules bind have recently been developed and cover many different alleles, but the utility of these algorithms is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing the specificity of these molecules. We have, therefore, developed a web server, MHC motif...... viewer, that allows the display of the likely binding motif for all human class I proteins of the loci HLA A, B, C, and E and for MHC class I molecules from chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), and mouse (Mus musculus). Furthermore, it covers all HLA-DR protein sequences...

  16. Towards the MHC-peptide combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangueane, P; Sakharkar, M K; Kolatkar, P R; Ren, E C

    2001-05-01

    The exponentially increased sequence information on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles points to the existence of a high degree of polymorphism within them. To understand the functional consequences of MHC alleles, 36 nonredundant MHC-peptide complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) were examined. Induced fit molecular recognition patterns such as those in MHC-peptide complexes are governed by numerous rules. The 36 complexes were clustered into 19 subgroups based on allele specificity and peptide length. The subgroups were further analyzed for identifying common features in MHC-peptide binding pattern. The four major observations made during the investigation were: (1) the positional preference of peptide residues defined by percentage burial upon complex formation is shown for all the 19 subgroups and the burial profiles within entries in a given subgroup are found to be similar; (2) in class I specific 8- and 9-mer peptides, the fourth residue is consistently solvent exposed, however this observation is not consistent in class I specific 10-mer peptides; (3) an anchor-shift in positional preference is observed towards the C terminal as the peptide length increases in class II specific peptides; and (4) peptide backbone atoms are proportionately dominant at the MHC-peptide interface.

  17. The most common mutation causing medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency is strongly associated with a particular haplotype in the region of the gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kølvraa, S; Gregersen, N; Blakemore, A I;

    1991-01-01

    RFLP haplotypes in the region containing the medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD) gene on chromosome 1 have been determined in patients with MCAD deficiency. The RFLPs were detected after digestion of patient DNA with the enzymes BanII. PstI and TaqI and with an MCAD cDNA-clone as a probe....... Of 32 disease-causing alleles studied, 31 possessed the previously published A----G point-mutation at position 985 of the cDNA. This mutation has been shown to result in inactivity of the MCAD enzyme. In at least 30 of the 31 alleles carrying this G985 mutation a specific RFLP haplotype was present....... In contrast, the same haplotype was present in only 23% of normal alleles (P less than or equal to 3.4 x 10(-18)). These findings are consistent with the existence of a pronounced founder effect, possibly combined with biological and/or sampling selection....

  18. Haplotype block structure is conserved across mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guryev, Victor; Smits, Bart M G; van de Belt, Jose; Verheul, Mark; Hubner, Norbert; Cuppen, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variation in genomes is organized in haplotype blocks, and species-specific block structure is defined by differential contribution of population history effects in combination with mutation and recombination events. Haplotype maps characterize the common patterns of linkage disequilibrium i

  19. Efficacy of Marek's disease vaccines in Mhc heterozygous chickens: Mhc congenic x inbred line F1 matings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, L D; Witter, R L

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this study is to demonstrate that Mhc (B) heterozygous chickens differ in efficacy of response to several Marek's disease (MD) vaccines. Four types of B2 heterozygotes, in addition to B2B2 homozygotes, were developed by crossing 15.B congenic males to inbred line 7(1) (B2B2) hens. The five types of F1 chicks were intermingled in isolators and vaccinated with one of four types of MD vaccine before inoculation with the very virulent Md5 strain of MD herpesvirus. The F1 chickens differ in development of protective immunity following MD vaccination from two perspectives. First, chickens of a particular Mhc genotype were protected better by some vaccines than others. Second, individual vaccine preparations protected some Mhc genotypes more effectively. We conclude that some MD vaccines are more appropriate than others for certain B-haplotypes when chickens are heterozygous for the Mhc. The value of using Mhc-congenic x inbred line F1 animals for studies concerning the influence of the Mhc on vaccinal immunity is discussed.

  20. Sequence polymorphism and evolution of three cetacean MHC genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi Xia; Ren, Wen Hua; Li, Shu Zhen; Wei, Fu Wen; Zhou, Kai Ya; Yang, Guang

    2009-09-01

    Sequence variability at three major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes (DQB, DRA, and MHC-I) of cetaceans was investigated in order to get an overall understanding of cetacean MHC evolution. Little sequence variation was detected at the DRA locus, while extensive and considerable variability were found at the MHC-I and DQB loci. Phylogenetic reconstruction and sequence comparison revealed extensive sharing of identical MHC alleles among different species at the three MHC loci examined. Comparisons of phylogenetic trees for these MHC loci with the trees reconstructed only based on non-PBR sites revealed that allelic similarity/identity possibly reflected common ancestry and were not due to adaptive convergence. At the same time, trans-species evolution was also evidenced that the allelic diversity of the three MHC loci clearly pre-dated species divergence events according to the relaxed molecular clock. It may be the forces of balancing selection acting to maintain the high sequence variability and identical alleles in trans-specific manner at the MHC-I and DQB loci.

  1. Most parsimonious haplotype allele sharing determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jiaofen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The "common disease – common variant" hypothesis and genome-wide association studies have achieved numerous successes in the last three years, particularly in genetic mapping in human diseases. Nevertheless, the power of the association study methods are still low, in particular on quantitative traits, and the description of the full allelic spectrum is deemed still far from reach. Given increasing density of single nucleotide polymorphisms available and suggested by the block-like structure of the human genome, a popular and prosperous strategy is to use haplotypes to try to capture the correlation structure of SNPs in regions of little recombination. The key to the success of this strategy is thus the ability to unambiguously determine the haplotype allele sharing status among the members. The association studies based on haplotype sharing status would have significantly reduced degrees of freedom and be able to capture the combined effects of tightly linked causal variants. Results For pedigree genotype datasets of medium density of SNPs, we present two methods for haplotype allele sharing status determination among the pedigree members. Extensive simulation study showed that both methods performed nearly perfectly on breakpoint discovery, mutation haplotype allele discovery, and shared chromosomal region discovery. Conclusion For pedigree genotype datasets, the haplotype allele sharing status among the members can be deterministically, efficiently, and accurately determined, even for very small pedigrees. Given their excellent performance, the presented haplotype allele sharing status determination programs can be useful in many downstream applications including haplotype based association studies.

  2. A locus-wide approach to assessing variation in the avian MHC: the B-locus of the wild turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, L D; Faile, G M; Hendrickson, J A; Mock, K E; Reed, K M

    2011-07-01

    Studies of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity in non-model vertebrates typically focus on structure and sequence variation in the antigen-presenting loci: the highly variable and polymorphic class I and class IIB genes. Although these studies provide estimates of the number of genes and alleles/locus, they often overlook variation in functionally related and co-inherited genes important in the immune response. This study utilizes the sequence of the MHC B-locus derived from a commercial turkey to investigate MHC variation in wild birds. Sequences were obtained for nine interspersed MHC amplicons (non-class I/II) from each of 40 birds representing 3 subspecies of wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). Analysis of aligned sequences identified 238 single-nucleotide variants approximately one-third of which had minor allele frequencies >0.2 in the sampled birds. PHASE analysis identified 70 prospective MHC haplotypes in the wild turkeys, whereas a combined analysis with commercial birds identified almost 100 haplotypes in the species. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the class IIB loci was used to test the efficacy of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotyping to capture locus-wide variation. Diversity in SNP haplotypes and haplotype sharing among individuals was directly reflected in the DGGE patterns. Utilization of a reference haplotype to sequence interspersed regions of the MHC has significant advantages over other methods of surveying diversity while identifying high-frequency SNPs for genotyping. SNP haplotyping provides a means to identify both divergent haplotypes and homozygous individuals for assessment of immunological variation in wild and domestic populations.

  3. IMGT unique numbering for MHC groove G-DOMAIN and MHC superfamily (MhcSF) G-LIKE-DOMAIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule; Duprat, E.; Kaas, Quentin

    2005-01-01

    IMGT, the international ImMunoGeneTics information system® (http://imgt.cines.fr) provides a common access to expertly annotated data on the genome, proteome, genetics and structure of immunoglobulins (IG), T cell receptors (TR), major histocompatibility complex (MHC), and related proteins...

  4. Can selective MHC downregulation explain the specificity and genetic diversity of NK cell receptors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eCarrillo-Bustamante

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells express inhibiting receptors (iNKRs s which specifically bind MHC-I molecules on the surface of healthy cells. When the expression of MHC-I on the cell surface decreases, which might occur during certain viral infections and cancer, iNKRs s lose inhibiting signals and the infected cells become target for NK cell activation (missing-self detection. Although the detection of MHC-I deficient cells can be achieved by conserved receptor-ligand interactions, several iNKRs are encoded by gene families with a remarkable genetic diversity, containing many haplotypes varying in gene content and allelic polymorphism. So far, the biological function of this expansion within the NKR cluster has remained poorly understood. Here, we investigate whether the evolution of diverse iNKRs genes can be driven by a specific viral immunoevasive mechanism: selective MHC downregulation. Several viruses, including EBV, CMV, and HIV, decrease the expression of MHC-I to escape from T cell responses. This downregulation does not always affect all MHC loci in the same way, as viruses target particular MHC molecules. To study the selection pressure of selective MHC downregulation on iNKRs, we have developed an agent-based model simulating an evolutionary scenario of hosts infected with herpes-like viruses that are able to selectively downregulate the expression of MHC-I molecules on the cell surface. We show that iNKRs evolve specificity and, depending on the similarity of MHC alleles within each locus and the differences between the loci, they can specialize to a particular MHC-I locus. The easier it is to classify an MHC allele to its locus, the lower the required diversity of the NKRs. Thus, the diversification of the iNKR cluster depends on the locus specific MHC structure.

  5. Enhanced pathogenicity of diabetogenic T cells escaping a non-MHC gene-controlled near death experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choisy-Rossi, Caroline-Morgane; Holl, Thomas M; Pierce, Melissa A; Chapman, Harold D; Serreze, David V

    2004-09-15

    For unknown reasons, the common MHC class I variants encoded by the H2g7 haplotype (Kd, Db) aberrantly elicit autoreactive CD8 T cell responses essential to type 1 diabetes development when expressed in NOD mice, but not other strains. In this study, we show that interactive non-MHC genes allow a NOD-derived diabetogenic CD8 T cell clonotype (AI4) to be negatively selected at far greater efficiency in C57BL/6 mice congenically expressing H2g7 (B6.H2g7). However, the few AI4 T cells escaping negative selection in B6.H2g7 mice are exported from the thymus more efficiently, and are more functionally aggressive than those of NOD origin. This provides mechanistic insight to previous findings that resistant mouse strains carry some genes conferring greater diabetes susceptibility than the corresponding NOD allele. In the B6.H2g7 stock, non-MHC gene-controlled elevations in TCR expression are associated with both enhanced negative selection of diabetogenic CD8 T cells and increased aggressiveness of those escaping this process. An implication of this finding is that the same phenotype, in this case relatively high TCR expression levels, could have double-edged sword effects, contributing to type 1 diabetes resistance at one level of T cell development, but at another actually promoting pathogenesis.

  6. Trans-species polymorphism and selection in the MHC class II DRA genes of domestic sheep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith T Ballingall

    Full Text Available Highly polymorphic genes with central roles in lymphocyte mediated immune surveillance are grouped together in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC in higher vertebrates. Generally, across vertebrate species the class II MHC DRA gene is highly conserved with only limited allelic variation. Here however, we provide evidence of trans-species polymorphism at the DRA locus in domestic sheep (Ovis aries. We describe variation at the Ovar-DRA locus that is far in excess of anything described in other vertebrate species. The divergent DRA allele (Ovar-DRA*0201 differs from the sheep reference sequences by 20 nucleotides, 12 of which appear non-synonymous. Furthermore, DRA*0201 is paired with an equally divergent DRB1 allele (Ovar-DRB1*0901, which is consistent with an independent evolutionary history for the DR sub-region within this MHC haplotype. No recombination was observed between the divergent DRA and B genes in a range of breeds and typical levels of MHC class II DR protein expression were detected at the surface of leukocyte populations obtained from animals homozygous for the DRA*0201, DRB1*0901 haplotype. Bayesian phylogenetic analysis groups Ovar-DRA*0201 with DRA sequences derived from species within the Oryx and Alcelaphus genera rather than clustering with other ovine and caprine DRA alleles. Tests for Darwinian selection identified 10 positively selected sites on the branch leading to Ovar-DRA*0201, three of which are predicted to be associated with the binding of peptide antigen. As the Ovis, Oryx and Alcelaphus genera have not shared a common ancestor for over 30 million years, the DRA*0201 and DRB1*0901 allelic pair is likely to be of ancient origin and present in the founding population from which all contemporary domestic sheep breeds are derived. The conservation of the integrity of this unusual DR allelic pair suggests some selective advantage which is likely to be associated with the presentation of pathogen antigen to T

  7. Preferred SLA class I/class II haplotype combinations in German Landrace pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimsa, Ulrike; Ho, Chak-Sum; Hammer, Sabine E

    2017-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are responsible for the antigen presentation to T lymphocytes. High recombination rates in the MHC genes, as observed in humans, are believed to serve the evolutionary goal to achieve a high genetic diversity, allowing for a broad and efficient immune response. In a cohort of 155 pedigreed German Landrace pigs (65 founders and 90 piglets), we found that MHC genes occur in particular class I and class II haplotype combinations. This phenomenon has not been described before, probably because most of the earlier MHC studies in pigs were not pedigree-based. After comparing our data with published genotypes of different European pig breeds and Asian pigs, we hypothesise that the combination of particular but different haplotypes in different geographical regions may have developed under the evolutionary pressure of regionally endemic pathogens. This proposed mechanism ensures an efficient immune response despite low recombination rates.

  8. The separate and combined effects of MHC genotype, parasite clone, and host gender on the course of malaria in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Mirjam

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The link between host MHC (major histocompatibility complex genotype and malaria is largely based on correlative data with little or no experimental control of potential confounding factors. We used an experimental mouse model to test for main effects of MHC-haplotypes, MHC heterozygosity, and MHC × parasite clone interactions. We experimentally infected MHC-congenic mice (F2 segregants, homo- and heterozygotes, males and females with one of two clones of Plasmodium chabaudi and recorded disease progression. Results We found that MHC haplotype and parasite clone each have a significant influence on the course of the disease, but there was no significant host genotype by parasite genotype interaction. We found no evidence for overdominance nor any other sort of heterozygote advantage or disadvantage. Conclusion When tested under experimental conditions, variation in the MHC can significantly influence the course of malaria. However, MHC heterozygote advantage through overdominance or dominance of resistance cannot be assumed in the case of single-strain infections. Future studies might focus on the interaction between MHC heterozygosity and multiple-clone infections.

  9. Analysis of chickens for recombination within the MHC (B-complex)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Koch, C; Crone, M

    1985-01-01

    confirmed the original serological typing of the two recombinant B haplotypes. No recombination between B-F (class I) and B-L (class II) loci was found. This very low frequency of recombination within the B complex as compared with recombination frequencies found in mammalian MHC's is discussed...

  10. Haplotype block structure is conserved across mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Guryev

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in genomes is organized in haplotype blocks, and species-specific block structure is defined by differential contribution of population history effects in combination with mutation and recombination events. Haplotype maps characterize the common patterns of linkage disequilibrium in populations and have important applications in the design and interpretation of genetic experiments. Although evolutionary processes are known to drive the selection of individual polymorphisms, their effect on haplotype block structure dynamics has not been shown. Here, we present a high-resolution haplotype map for a 5-megabase genomic region in the rat and compare it with the orthologous human and mouse segments. Although the size and fine structure of haplotype blocks are species dependent, there is a significant interspecies overlap in structure and a tendency for blocks to encompass complete genes. Extending these findings to the complete human genome using haplotype map phase I data reveals that linkage disequilibrium values are significantly higher for equally spaced positions in genic regions, including promoters, as compared to intergenic regions, indicating that a selective mechanism exists to maintain combinations of alleles within potentially interacting coding and regulatory regions. Although this characteristic may complicate the identification of causal polymorphisms underlying phenotypic traits, conservation of haplotype structure may be employed for the identification and characterization of functionally important genomic regions.

  11. Organizing MHC Class II Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Fooksman

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules are ligands for CD4+ T cells and are critical for initiating the adaptive immune response. This review is focused on what is currently known about MHC class II organization at the plasma membrane of antigen presenting cells and how this affects antigen presentation to T cells. The organization and diffusion of class II molecules have been measured by a variety of biochemical and microscopic techniques. Membrane lipids and other proteins have been implicated in MHC class II organization and function. However, when compared with the organization of MHC class I or TCR complexes, much less is known about MHC class II. Since clustering of T cell receptors occurs during activation, the organization of MHC molecules prior to recognition and during synapse formation may be critical for antigen presentation.

  12. Evidence for directional selection at a novel major histocompatibility class I marker in wild common frogs (Rana temporaria exposed to a viral pathogen (Ranavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber G F Teacher

    Full Text Available Whilst the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC is well characterized in the anuran Xenopus, this region has not previously been studied in another popular model species, the common frog (Rana temporaria. Nor, to date, have there been any studies of MHC in wild amphibian host-pathogen systems. We characterise an MHC class I locus in the common frog, and present primers to amplify both the whole region, and specifically the antigen binding region. As no more than two expressed haplotypes were found in over 400 clones from 66 individuals, it is likely that there is a single class I locus in this species. This finding is consistent with the single class I locus in Xenopus, but contrasts with the multiple loci identified in axolotls, providing evidence that the diversification of MHC class I into multiple loci likely occurred after the Caudata/Anura divergence (approximately 350 million years ago but before the Ranidae/Pipidae divergence (approximately 230 mya. We use this locus to compare wild populations of common frogs that have been infected with a viral pathogen (Ranavirus with those that have no history of infection. We demonstrate that certain MHC supertypes are associated with infection status (even after accounting for shared ancestry, and that the diseased populations have more similar supertype frequencies (lower F(ST than the uninfected. These patterns were not seen in a suite of putatively neutral microsatellite loci. We interpret this pattern at the MHC locus to indicate that the disease has imposed selection for particular haplotypes, and hence that common frogs may be adapting to the presence of Ranavirus, which currently kills tens of thousands of amphibians in the UK each year.

  13. Evidence for Directional Selection at a Novel Major Histocompatibility Class I Marker in Wild Common Frogs (Rana temporaria) Exposed to a Viral Pathogen (Ranavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teacher, Amber G. F.; Garner, Trenton W. J.; Nichols, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Whilst the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is well characterized in the anuran Xenopus, this region has not previously been studied in another popular model species, the common frog (Rana temporaria). Nor, to date, have there been any studies of MHC in wild amphibian host-pathogen systems. We characterise an MHC class I locus in the common frog, and present primers to amplify both the whole region, and specifically the antigen binding region. As no more than two expressed haplotypes were found in over 400 clones from 66 individuals, it is likely that there is a single class I locus in this species. This finding is consistent with the single class I locus in Xenopus, but contrasts with the multiple loci identified in axolotls, providing evidence that the diversification of MHC class I into multiple loci likely occurred after the Caudata/Anura divergence (approximately 350 million years ago) but before the Ranidae/Pipidae divergence (approximately 230 mya). We use this locus to compare wild populations of common frogs that have been infected with a viral pathogen (Ranavirus) with those that have no history of infection. We demonstrate that certain MHC supertypes are associated with infection status (even after accounting for shared ancestry), and that the diseased populations have more similar supertype frequencies (lower FST) than the uninfected. These patterns were not seen in a suite of putatively neutral microsatellite loci. We interpret this pattern at the MHC locus to indicate that the disease has imposed selection for particular haplotypes, and hence that common frogs may be adapting to the presence of Ranavirus, which currently kills tens of thousands of amphibians in the UK each year. PMID:19240796

  14. Carrier frequency of a nonsense mutation in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene implies a high incidence of ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in Somalia and a single, common haplotype indicates common ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Juan J; Monaghan, Gemma; Børsting, Claus; Norbury, Gail; Morling, Niels; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2007-05-01

    Inherited adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare metabolic disorder that causes immunodeficiency, varying from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the majority of cases to a less severe form in a small minority of patients. Five patients of Somali origin from four unrelated families, with severe ADA-SCID, were registered in the Greater London area. Patients and their parents were investigated for the nonsense mutation Q3X (ADA c7C>T), two missense mutations K80R (ADA c239A>G) and R142Q (ADA c425G>A), and a TAAA repeat located at the 3' end of an Alu element (AluVpA) positioned 1.1 kb upstream of the ADA transcription start site. All patients were homozygous for the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7. Among 207 Somali immigrants to Denmark, the frequency of ADA c7C>T and the maximum likelihood estimate of the frequency of the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7 were both 0.012 (carrier frequency 2.4%). Based on the analysis of AluVpA alleles, the ADA c7C/T mutation was estimated to be approximately 7,100 years old. Approximately 1 out of 5 - 10000 Somali children will be born with ADA deficiency due to an ADA c7C/T mutation, although within certain clans the frequency may be significantly higher. ADA-SCID may be a frequent immunodeficiency disorder in Somalia, but will be underdiagnosed due to the prevailing socioeconomic and nutritional deprivation.

  15. Diversity of cystathionine ß-synthase haplotypes bearing the most common homocystinuria mutation c.833T>C: a possible role for gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vyletal, P; Sokolová, J; Cooper, DN;

    2007-01-01

    Homozygosity or compound heterozygosity for the c.833T>C transition (p.I278 T) in the cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) gene represents the most common cause of pyridoxine-responsive homocystinuria in Western Eurasians. However, the frequency of the pathogenic c.833C allele, as observed in healthy...

  16. Candidate gene sequencing of SLC11A2 and TMPRSS6 in a family with severe anaemia: common SNPs, rare haplotypes, no causative mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloss-Brandstätter, A.; Erhart, G.; Lamina, C.; Meister, B.; Haun, M.; Coassin, S.; Seifert, M.; Klein-Franke, A.; Paulweber, B.; Kedenko, L.; Kollerits, B.; Swinkels, D.W.; Vermeulen, S.; Galesloot, T.E.; Kronenberg, F.; Weiss, G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Iron-refractory iron deficiency anaemia (IRIDA) is a rare disorder which was linked to mutations in two genes (SLC11A2 and TMPRSS6). Common polymorphisms within these genes were associated with serum iron levels. We identified a family of Serbian origin with asymptomatic non-consanguineo

  17. Antibody Stabilization of Peptide–MHC Multimers Reveals Functional T Cells Bearing Extremely Low-Affinity TCRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tungatt, Katie; Bianchi, Valentina; Crowther, Michael D;

    2015-01-01

    Fluorochrome-conjugated peptide-MHC (pMHC) multimers are commonly used in combination with flow cytometry for direct ex vivo visualization and characterization of Ag-specific T cells, but these reagents can fail to stain cells when TCR affinity and/or TCR cell-surface density are low. pMHC multim...

  18. LEI0258 microsatellite variability and its relationship to B-F haplotypes in Brazilian (blue-egg Caipira chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lima-Rosa Carlos André da Veiga

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 149 chickens from two different sources (one non-commercial, the other commercial was tested for variability of the LEI0258 microsatellite. Fifty- three genotypes, explainable by 15 alleles, were found. There are clear allele and heterozygosity differences between the two samples. One of them was simultaneously studied for the MHC B-F haplotypes. Strong genetic disequilibrium was observed between the variants of the two systems, therefore providing a cheap alternative for MHC genotyping.

  19. B-G cDNA clones have multiple small repeats and hybridize to both chicken MHC regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Salomonsen, J; Skjødt, K

    1989-01-01

    in turn react with authentic B-G proteins. None of the clones represent a complete message, some--if not all--bear introns, and none of them match with any sequences presently stored in the data banks. The following new information did, however, emerge. At least two homologous transcripts are present......We used rabbit antisera to the chicken MHC erythrocyte molecule B-G and to the class I alpha chain (B-F) to screen lambda gt11 cDNA expression libraries made with RNA selected by oligo-dT from bone marrow cells of anemic B19 homozygous chickens. Eight clones were found to encode B-G molecules which...... could explain the bewildering variation in size of B-G proteins within and between haplotypes. Southern blots of genomic chicken DNA gave complex patterns for most probes, with many bands in common using different probes, but few bands in common between haplotypes. The sequences detected are all present...

  20. MHC Class II and Non-MHC Class II Genes Differentially Influence Humoral Immunity to Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor and Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A. James

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Anthrax Lethal Toxin consists of Protective Antigen (PA and Lethal Factor (LF, and current vaccination strategies focus on eliciting antibodies to PA. In human vaccination, the response to PA can vary greatly, and the response is often directed toward non-neutralizing epitopes. Variable vaccine responses have been shown to be due in part to genetic differences in individuals, with both MHC class II and other genes playing roles. Here, we investigated the relative contribution of MHC class II versus non-MHC class II genes in the humoral response to PA and LF immunization using three immunized strains of inbred mice: A/J (H-2k at the MHC class II locus, B6 (H-2b, and B6.H2k (H-2k. IgG antibody titers to LF were controlled primarily by the MHC class II locus, whereas IgG titers to PA were strongly influenced by the non-MHC class II genetic background. Conversely, the humoral fine specificity of reactivity to LF appeared to be controlled primarily through non-MHC class II genes, while the specificity of reactivity to PA was more dependent on MHC class II. Common epitopes, reactive in all strains, occurred in both LF and PA responses. These results demonstrate that MHC class II differentially influences humoral immune responses to LF and PA.

  1. Peptide-binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John

    2013-01-01

    and deciphering outcomes of infection and vaccine efficacy. In this study, we have provided detailed characterization of six prevalent Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I alleles, yielding a combined phenotypic frequency of 29 %. The peptide-binding specificity of two of these alleles, Mamu-A2*01:02 and Mamu-B*010...... in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts and thereby warrants......Chinese rhesus macaques are of particular interest in simian immunodeficiency virus/human immunodeficiency virus (SIV/HIV) research as these animals have prolonged kinetics of disease progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), compared to their Indian counterparts, suggesting...

  2. Evolution of MHC class I in the order Crocodylia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Ho, Simon Y W; Salomonsen, Jan; Skjodt, Karsten; Miles, Lee G; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genomic region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of jawed vertebrates. The evolution of the MHC has been dominated by gene duplication and gene loss, commonly known as the birth-and-death process. Evolutionary studies of the MHC have mostly focused on model species. However, the investigation of this region in non-avian reptiles is still in its infancy. To provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the diversity of this region in the Order Crocodylia, we investigated MHC class I exon 3, intron 3, and exon 4 across 20 species of the families Alligatoridae and Crocodilidae. We generated 124 DNA sequences and identified 31 putative functional variants as well as 14 null variants. Phylogenetic analyses revealed three gene groups, all of which were present in Crocodilidae but only one in Alligatoridae. Within these groups, variants generally appear to cluster at the genus or family level rather than in species-specific groups. In addition, we found variation in gene copy number and some indication of interlocus recombination. These results suggest that MHC class I in Crocodylia underwent independent events of gene duplication, particularly in Crocodilidae. These findings enhance our understanding of MHC class I evolution and provide a preliminary framework for comparative studies of other non-avian reptiles as well as diversity assessment within Crocodylia.

  3. Haplotype-phenotype relationships of paraoxonase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Chan, Wendy; Wallenstein, Sylvan; Berkowitz, Gertrud; Wetmur, James G

    2005-03-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) is an enzyme with multiple activities, including detoxification of organophosphates. It is believed to be important in preventing neurotoxic damage and has also been implicated in atherosclerosis. The PON1 gene contains five common polymorphisms, three in the promoter (-909G > C, -162A > G, -108C > T) and two in the coding region (M55L, Q192R) with varying but incomplete linkage disequilibrium. Our previous study showed that functional polymorphisms in PON1 were strongly associated with enzymatic activity in both pregnant women [26-30 weeks of gestation] and neonates. However, there was substantial overlapping of enzyme activities between genotypes. In this study, we investigated whether haplotype (genotype + phase) information would strengthen the genotype-phenotype relationship for PON1. The study consisted of a multiethnic population of 402 mothers and 229 neonates. Haplotypes were imputed by two widely used programs, PHASE and tagSNPs, which yielded very similar results. There were seven haplotypes with a frequency of 5% or higher in at least one ethnic group of the study population. Haplotype composition varied substantially with respect to ethnicity. Haplotypes in Caucasians and African-Americans showed the largest difference, and Caribbean Hispanics seemed to be a mixture of Caucasian and African ancestry. Collectively, the genetic (genotype or haplotype) contribution to PON1 enzymatic activity (measured as phenylacetate hydrolysis) was greater in neonates compared with mothers. Specifically, 16.6% of PON1 variability was explained by genotypes in mothers compared with 30.9% in neonates. Haplotype information offered a slightly increased power in predicting PON1 activity; they explained 35.5% and 19.3% of PON1 variability in neonates and mothers, respectively.

  4. A Case of Probable MHC Class II Deficiency with Disseminated BCGitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyasin, Soheyla; Abolnezhadian, Farhad; Khoshkhui, Maryam

    2015-09-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency disease characterized by abnormality of MHC class II molecules surface expression on peripheral blood lymphocytes and monocytes. Clinical manifestations include extreme susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections but the immunodeficiency is not as severe as SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency), as evidenced by failure to develop disseminated infection after BCG vaccination. Therefore, MHC II deficiency with BCGosis, that is disseminated BCGitis, is not reported commonly. We report an interesting case of BCGosis after vaccination that was diagnosed to have probable MHC II deficiency.

  5. Haplotypes versus genotypes on pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkpatrick Bonnie B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing will soon produce haplotype data for individuals. For pedigrees of related individuals, sequencing appears to be an attractive alternative to genotyping. However, methods for pedigree analysis with haplotype data have not yet been developed, and the computational complexity of such problems has been an open question. Furthermore, it is not clear in which scenarios haplotype data would provide better estimates than genotype data for quantities such as recombination rates. Results To answer these questions, a reduction is given from genotype problem instances to haplotype problem instances, and it is shown that solving the haplotype problem yields the solution to the genotype problem, up to constant factors or coefficients. The pedigree analysis problems we will consider are the likelihood, maximum probability haplotype, and minimum recombination haplotype problems. Conclusions Two algorithms are introduced: an exponential-time hidden Markov model (HMM for haplotype data where some individuals are untyped, and a linear-time algorithm for pedigrees having haplotype data for all individuals. Recombination estimates from the general haplotype HMM algorithm are compared to recombination estimates produced by a genotype HMM. Having haplotype data on all individuals produces better estimates. However, having several untyped individuals can drastically reduce the utility of haplotype data.

  6. Ancient polymorphism and functional variation in the primate MHC-DQA1 5' cis-regulatory region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loisel, Dagan A; Rockman, Matthew V; Wray, Gregory A; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C

    2006-10-31

    Precise regulation of MHC gene expression is critical to vertebrate immune surveillance and response. Polymorphisms in the 5' proximal promoter region of the human class II gene HLA-DQA1 have been shown to influence its transcriptional regulation and may contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. We investigated the evolutionary history of this cis-regulatory region by sequencing the DQA1 5' proximal promoter region in eight nonhuman primate species. We observed unexpectedly high levels of sequence variation and multiple strong signatures of balancing selection in this region. Specifically, the considerable DQA1 promoter region diversity was characterized by abundant shared (or trans-species) polymorphism and a pronounced lack of fixed differences between species. The majority of transcription factor binding sites in the DQA1 promoter region were polymorphic within species, and these binding site polymorphisms were commonly shared among multiple species despite evidence for negative selection eliminating a significant fraction of binding site mutations. We assessed the functional consequences of intraspecific promoter region diversity using a cell line-based reporter assay and detected significant differences among baboon DQA1 promoter haplotypes in their ability to drive transcription in vitro. The functional differentiation of baboon promoter haplotypes, together with the significant deviations from neutral sequence evolution, suggests a role for balancing selection in the evolution of DQA1 transcriptional regulation in primates.

  7. Strong Selection at MHC in Mexicans since Admixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quan Zhou

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mexicans are a recent admixture of Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans. We performed local ancestry analysis of Mexican samples from two genome-wide association studies obtained from dbGaP, and discovered that at the MHC region Mexicans have excessive African ancestral alleles compared to the rest of the genome, which is the hallmark of recent selection for admixed samples. The estimated selection coefficients are 0.05 and 0.07 for two datasets, which put our finding among the strongest known selections observed in humans, namely, lactase selection in northern Europeans and sickle-cell trait in Africans. Using inaccurate Amerindian training samples was a major concern for the credibility of previously reported selection signals in Latinos. Taking advantage of the flexibility of our statistical model, we devised a model fitting technique that can learn Amerindian ancestral haplotype from the admixed samples, which allows us to infer local ancestries for Mexicans using only European and African training samples. The strong selection signal at the MHC remains without Amerindian training samples. Finally, we note that medical history studies suggest such a strong selection at MHC is plausible in Mexicans.

  8. Evolution of MHC class I genes in the European badger (Meles meles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Burke, Terry

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune system and provides a good model with which to understand the evolutionary processes underlying functional genes. Trans-species polymorphism and orthology are both commonly found in MHC genes; however, mammalian

  9. Evolution of MHC class I genes in the European badger (Meles meles)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sin, Yung Wa; Dugdale, Hannah L.; Newman, Chris; Macdonald, David W.; Burke, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a central role in the adaptive immune system and provides a good model with which to understand the evolutionary processes underlying functional genes. Trans-species polymorphism and orthology are both commonly found in MHC genes; however, mammalian M

  10. Pure Parsimony Xor Haplotyping

    CERN Document Server

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Romeo

    2010-01-01

    The haplotype resolution from xor-genotype data has been recently formulated as a new model for genetic studies. The xor-genotype data is a cheaply obtainable type of data distinguishing heterozygous from homozygous sites without identifying the homozygous alleles. In this paper we propose a formulation based on a well-known model used in haplotype inference: pure parsimony. We exhibit exact solutions of the problem by providing polynomial time algorithms for some restricted cases and a fixed-parameter algorithm for the general case. These results are based on some interesting combinatorial properties of a graph representation of the solutions. Furthermore, we show that the problem has a polynomial time k-approximation, where k is the maximum number of xor-genotypes containing a given SNP. Finally, we propose a heuristic and produce an experimental analysis showing that it scales to real-world large instances taken from the HapMap project.

  11. Pure parsimony xor haplotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonizzoni, Paola; Della Vedova, Gianluca; Dondi, Riccardo; Pirola, Yuri; Rizzi, Romeo

    2010-01-01

    The haplotype resolution from xor-genotype data has been recently formulated as a new model for genetic studies. The xor-genotype data is a cheaply obtainable type of data distinguishing heterozygous from homozygous sites without identifying the homozygous alleles. In this paper, we propose a formulation based on a well-known model used in haplotype inference: pure parsimony. We exhibit exact solutions of the problem by providing polynomial time algorithms for some restricted cases and a fixed-parameter algorithm for the general case. These results are based on some interesting combinatorial properties of a graph representation of the solutions. Furthermore, we show that the problem has a polynomial time k-approximation, where k is the maximum number of xor-genotypes containing a given single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). Finally, we propose a heuristic and produce an experimental analysis showing that it scales to real-world large instances taken from the HapMap project.

  12. Malaria haplotype frequency estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigger, Leonore; Vogt, Julia E; Roth, Volker

    2013-09-20

    We present a Bayesian approach for estimating the relative frequencies of multi-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes in populations of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum by using microarray SNP data from human blood samples. Each sample comes from a malaria patient and contains one or several parasite clones that may genetically differ. Samples containing multiple parasite clones with different genetic markers pose a special challenge. The situation is comparable with a polyploid organism. The data from each blood sample indicates whether the parasites in the blood carry a mutant or a wildtype allele at various selected genomic positions. If both mutant and wildtype alleles are detected at a given position in a multiply infected sample, the data indicates the presence of both alleles, but the ratio is unknown. Thus, the data only partially reveals which specific combinations of genetic markers (i.e. haplotypes across the examined SNPs) occur in distinct parasite clones. In addition, SNP data may contain errors at non-negligible rates. We use a multinomial mixture model with partially missing observations to represent this data and a Markov chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the haplotype frequencies in a population. Our approach addresses both challenges, multiple infections and data errors.

  13. Oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) with homozygous 2.7-kb deletion of the P gene and sickle cell disease in a Cameroonian family. Identification of a common TAG haplotype in the mutated P gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquaron, Robert; Soufir, Nadem; Bergé-Lefranc, Jean-Louis; Badens, Catherine; Austerlitz, Frederic; Grandchamp, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we report on a Cameroonian family from the Ewondo ethnic group, presenting with three oculocutaneous albinism type 2 (OCA2) patients homozygous for the 2.7-kb deletion of the P gene. In one of these patients OCA2 was associated with sickle cell anaemia and in two with the sickle cell trait. We took this opportunity to determine single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotypes within the P gene in this family in comparison with a group of 53 OCA2 patients homozygous for the same mutation and with a matched unrelated full-coloured control group of 49 subjects, originating from seven different ethnic groups of Southern Cameroon including Ewondo. A combination of five exonic and intronic SNPs in the OCA2 gene was genotyped by sequencing PCR products. We found 3 different haplotypes (TAGCT, TAGTT and TAGCC with frequencies of 0.66, 0.28 and 0.06, respectively) associated with the mutation in the 53 OCA2 patients, while 11 different haplotypes were observed in the control group. These observations suggest that the mutation appeared on the relatively frequent haplotype TAGCT, and that the two other haplotypes are derived from two independent recombination events. These haplotypic data, associated with a value of 1/15,000 for the prevalence of the 2.7-kb mutation, a present effective population size of 10,000,000 for Cameroon and a recombination rate of 0.0031, allowed us to estimate that this mutation originated 4,100-5,645 years ago.

  14. Genomic architecture of MHC-linked odorant receptor gene repertoires among 16 vertebrate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Pablo Sandro Carvalho; Kellermann, Thomas; Uchanska-Ziegler, Barbara; Ziegler, Andreas

    2010-09-01

    The recent sequencing and assembly of the genomes of different organisms have shown that almost all vertebrates studied in detail so far have one or more clusters of genes encoding odorant receptors (OR) in close physical linkage to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). It has been postulated that MHC-linked OR genes could be involved in MHC-influenced mate choice, comprising both pre- as well as post-copulatory mechanisms. We have therefore carried out a systematic comparison of protein sequences of these receptors from the genomes of man, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, rhesus macaque, mouse, rat, dog, cat, cow, pig, horse, elephant, opossum, frog and zebra fish (amounting to a total of 559 protein sequences) in order to identify OR families exhibiting evolutionarily conserved MHC linkage. In addition, we compared the genomic structure of this region within these 16 species, accounting for presence or absence of OR gene families, gene order, transcriptional orientation and linkage to the MHC or framework genes. The results are presented in the form of gene maps and phylogenetic analyses that reveal largely concordant repertoires of gene families, at least among tetrapods, although each of the eight taxa studied (primates, rodents, ungulates, carnivores, proboscids, marsupials, amphibians and teleosts) exhibits a typical architecture of MHC (or MHC framework loci)-linked OR genes. Furthermore, the comparison of the genomic organization of this region has implications for phylogenetic relationships between closely related taxa, especially in disputed cases such as the evolutionary history of even- and odd-toed ungulates and carnivores. Finally, the largely conserved linkage between distinct OR genes and the MHC supports the concept that particular alleles within a given haplotype function in a concerted fashion during self-/non-self-discrimination processes in reproduction.

  15. Proofreading of Peptide-MHC Complexes through Dynamic Multivalent Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is able to detect and destroy cells that are malignantly transformed or infected by intracellular pathogens. Specific immune responses against these cells are elicited by antigenic peptides that are presented on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the cell surface. Since these MHC I-presented peptides are generated in the cytosol by proteasomal protein degradation, they can be metaphorically described as a window providing immune cells with insights into the state of the cellular proteome. A crucial element of MHC I antigen presentation is the peptide-loading complex (PLC), a multisubunit machinery, which contains as key constituents the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and the MHC I-specific chaperone tapasin (Tsn). While TAP recognizes and shuttles the cytosolic antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Tsn samples peptides in the ER for their ability to form stable complexes with MHC I, a process called peptide proofreading or peptide editing. Through its selection of peptides that improve MHC I stability, Tsn contributes to the hierarchy of immunodominant peptide epitopes. Despite the fact that it concerns a key event in adaptive immunity, insights into the catalytic mechanism of peptide proofreading carried out by Tsn have only lately been gained via biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies. Furthermore, a Tsn homolog called TAP-binding protein-related (TAPBPR) has only recently been demonstrated to function as a second MHC I-specific chaperone and peptide proofreader. Although TAPBPR is PLC-independent and has a distinct allomorph specificity, it is likely to share a common catalytic mechanism with Tsn. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the multivalent protein-protein interactions and the concomitant dynamic molecular processes underlying peptide-proofreading catalysis. We do not only derive a model that

  16. Proofreading of Peptide—MHC Complexes through Dynamic Multivalent Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Tampé, Robert

    2017-01-01

    The adaptive immune system is able to detect and destroy cells that are malignantly transformed or infected by intracellular pathogens. Specific immune responses against these cells are elicited by antigenic peptides that are presented on major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and recognized by cytotoxic T lymphocytes at the cell surface. Since these MHC I-presented peptides are generated in the cytosol by proteasomal protein degradation, they can be metaphorically described as a window providing immune cells with insights into the state of the cellular proteome. A crucial element of MHC I antigen presentation is the peptide-loading complex (PLC), a multisubunit machinery, which contains as key constituents the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and the MHC I-specific chaperone tapasin (Tsn). While TAP recognizes and shuttles the cytosolic antigenic peptides into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Tsn samples peptides in the ER for their ability to form stable complexes with MHC I, a process called peptide proofreading or peptide editing. Through its selection of peptides that improve MHC I stability, Tsn contributes to the hierarchy of immunodominant peptide epitopes. Despite the fact that it concerns a key event in adaptive immunity, insights into the catalytic mechanism of peptide proofreading carried out by Tsn have only lately been gained via biochemical, biophysical, and structural studies. Furthermore, a Tsn homolog called TAP-binding protein-related (TAPBPR) has only recently been demonstrated to function as a second MHC I-specific chaperone and peptide proofreader. Although TAPBPR is PLC-independent and has a distinct allomorph specificity, it is likely to share a common catalytic mechanism with Tsn. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the multivalent protein–protein interactions and the concomitant dynamic molecular processes underlying peptide-proofreading catalysis. We do not only derive a model that

  17. Congruence as a measurement of extended haplotype structure across the genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baschal Erin E

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Historically, extended haplotypes have been defined using only a few data points, such as alleles for several HLA genes in the MHC. High-density SNP data, and the increasing affordability of whole genome SNP typing, creates the opportunity to define higher resolution extended haplotypes. This drives the need for new tools that support quantification and visualization of extended haplotypes as defined by as many as 2000 SNPs. Confronted with high-density SNP data across the major histocompatibility complex (MHC for 2,300 complete families, compiled by the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium (T1DGC, we developed software for studying extended haplotypes. Methods The software, called ExHap (Extended Haplotype, uses a similarity measurement we term congruence to identify and quantify long-range allele identity. Using ExHap, we analyzed congruence in both the T1DGC data and family-phased data from the International HapMap Project. Results Congruent chromosomes from the T1DGC data have between 96.5% and 99.9% allele identity over 1,818 SNPs spanning 2.64 megabases of the MHC (HLA-DRB1 to HLA-A. Thirty-three of 132 DQ-DR-B-A defined haplotype groups have > 50% congruent chromosomes in this region. For example, 92% of chromosomes within the DR3-B8-A1 haplotype are congruent from HLA-DRB1 to HLA-A (99.8% allele identity. We also applied ExHap to all 22 autosomes for both CEU and YRI cohorts from the International HapMap Project, identifying multiple candidate extended haplotypes. Conclusions Long-range congruence is not unique to the MHC region. Patterns of allele identity on phased chromosomes provide a simple, straightforward approach to visually and quantitatively inspect complex long-range structural patterns in the genome. Such patterns aid the biologist in appreciating genetic similarities and differences across cohorts, and can lead to hypothesis generation for subsequent studies.

  18. An overview of the haplotype problems and algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Yuzhong; XU Yun; ZHANG Qiangfeng; CHEN Guoliang

    2007-01-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP),as the most common form of genetic variation,has been widely studied to help analyze the possible association between diseases and genomes.To gain more information,SNPs on a single chromosome are usually studied together,which constitute a haplotype.Gaining haplotypes from biological experiments is usually very costly and time-consuming,which causes people to develop efficient methods to determine haplotypes from the computational angle.Many problems and algorithms about haplotypes have been proposed to reduce the cost of studies of disease association.In general,four categories of problems are widely researched:the haplotype assembly problem,the haplotype inference problem,the haplotype block partition problem,and the haplotype tagging SNP selection problem.The former two problems have been well reviewed by many researchers,whereas the latter two have not been comprehensively surveyed to our knowledge.In this paper,we try to make a detailed introduction to the four problems,especially the latter two.

  19. Haplotype identity between individuals who share a CFTR mutation allele ''identical by descent'' : Demonstration of the usefulness of the haplotype-sharing concept for gene mapping in real populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, HG; vanderMeulen, MA; Rozen, R; Halley, DJJ; Scheffer, H; tenKate, LP; Buys, CHCM; teMeerman, GJ

    1996-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with the A455E mutation, in both the French Canadian and the Dutch population, share a common haplotype over distances of up to 25 cM. French Canadian patients with the 621+1G-->T mutation share a common haplotype of more than 14 cM. In contrast, haplotypes containing t

  20. 扬子鳄种群MHC Ⅱ类B基因第3外元多态性分析%Polymorphism of Exon 3 of MHC Class Ⅱ B Gene in Chinese Alligator (Alligator sinensis)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘辉; 吴孝兵; 晏鹏; 蒋志刚

    2007-01-01

    The polymorphism of MHC class Ⅱ B gene in 14 Chinese alligators was analyzed, which came from three different areas: a wild population from Xuancheng, Anhui, a captive population from Changxing, Zhejiang, and a captive population from Anhui Research Center for Reproduction of Chinese Alligators. The gene fragment was amplified using a pair of specific primers designed from the MHC gene sequence of the spectacled caiman. A total of 34 sequence haplotypes of exon 3 were detected in the sampled Chinese alligators. The numbers of haplotypes of the 3 Chinese alligator populations were 15, 10, and 9, respectively. The overall estimation of the MHC polymorphism in the Chinese alligator population was higher than those in mammals and in cyprinid fish. The rates of nonsynonymous substitutions (dN) occurred at a significantly lower frequency than that of synonymous substitutions (ds), which were not consistent with the common rule. This result might suggest that the polymorphism of exon 3 seemed not to be maintained by the balancing selection. The neutrality test of Tajima excluded the null hypothesis that the polymorphism of exon 3 was generated by a random drift, and the fact that D = -0.401 indicated an excess of rare mutations in the Chinese alligator.The nucleotide diversity of the sequences and the phylogenetic relations were also analyzed, and the results suggested that there was no significant difference in genetic diversity among the 3 populations of Chinese alligator.%分析了取自安徽宣城野生种群、安徽省扬子鳄繁殖研究中心和浙江长兴养殖种群的14条扬子鳄MHCⅡ类B基因第3外元的多态性.在这些扬子鳄样本中共检测到34个单倍型,每个亚种群内检测到的单倍型数量分别为15,9和10个,与其他一些动物如哺乳动物和鲤科鱼类相比,扬子鳄MHC Ⅱ类B基因第3外元多态性较高.另外,非同义替换率显著小于同义替换率,这可能表明扬子鳄种群MHC Ⅱ类B基因第3外元

  1. Analysis of Swine Leukocyte Antigen Haplotypes in Yucatan Miniature Pigs Used as Biomedical Model Animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nu-Ri; Seo, Dong-Won; Choi, Ki-Myung; Ko, Na-Young; Kim, Ji-Ho; Kim, Hyun-Il; Jung, Woo-Young; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2016-03-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is called swine leukocyte antigen (SLA), which controls immune responses and transplantation reactions. The SLA is mapped on pig chromosome 7 (SSC7) near the centromere. In this study, 3 class I (SLA-1, SLA-3, and SLA-2) and 3 class II (DRB1, DQB1, and DQA) genes were used for investigation of SLA haplotypes in Yucatan miniature pigs in Korea. This pig breed is a well-known model organism for biomedical research worldwide. The current study indicated that Korean Yucatan pig population had 3 Class I haplotypes (Lr-4.0, Lr-6.0, and Lr-25.0) and 3 class II haplotypes (Lr-0.5, Lr-0.7, and Lr-0.25). The combinations of SLA class I and II haplotype together, 2 homozygous (Lr-4.5/4.5 and Lr-6.7/6.7) and 3 heterozygous (Lr-4.5/6.7, Lr-4.5/25.25, and Lr-6.7/25.25) haplotypes were identified, including previously unidentified new heterozygous haplotypes (Lr-4.5/4.7). In addition, a new SLA allele typing method using Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer was developed that permitted more rapid identification of SLA haplotypes. These results will facilitate the breeding of SLA homozygous Yucatan pigs and will expedite the possible use of these pigs for the biomedical research, especially xenotransplantation research.

  2. A common haplotype on methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene modifies the effect of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor on blood pressure in essential hypertension patients--a family-based association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanqun; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Niu, Tianhua; Xu, Xin; Xing, Houxun; Chen, Changzhong; Wang, Xiaobin; Zhang, Yan; Peng, Shaojie; Xu, Xiping

    2005-08-01

    Our recent study indicated that MTHFR C677T polymorphism may involve in genetic control of blood pressure response to treatment by benazepril, an ACE inhibitor. Currently, we proposed to further investigate whether short-term blood pressure response to benazepril, was modulated by haplotypes re-constructed from both C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in MTHFR gene. A total of 410 hypertensive patients recruited from 344 nuclear families were treated orally with benazepril at a daily dosage of 10 mg for 15 consecutive days. Blood pressures were measured at baseline and on the 16th day of treatment. In addition, 689 family members of these patients were also genotyped. Among these patients, the frequency of MTHFR A1298C AA, AC and CC genotypes was 74.4%, 23.9%, and 1.7%, respectively. The frequency of MTHFR C677T CC, CT and TT genotypes was 23.7%, 51.2%, and 25.1%, respectively. Only three haplotypes, 677T-1298A (50.8%), 677C-1298A (35.7%), and 677C-1298C (13.5%) were re-constructed. Multivariate regression models with generalized estimating equation (GEE) correction detected that the individuals carrying one copy of haplotype 677C-1298C had significantly lower diastolic and systolic blood pressure response (DeltaDBP and DeltaSBP) to benazepril treatment (p= 0.003 and p =0.043, respectively), in comparison to those without haplotype 677C-1298C. The results of family-based association test further confirmed that haplotype 677C-1298C was more frequently transmitted in subjects with either lower residual of DeltaDBP or DeltaSBP. For residual of DeltaDBP, the p-values are 0.007 in an additive model and 0.005 in a dominant model. For residual of DeltaSBP, the p-values are 0.009 in an additive model and 0.006 in a dominant model. Our findings suggest that MTHFR 677C-1298C haplotype modulate blood pressure responsiveness to shortterm treatment of ACE inhibitor in Chinese essential hypertensive patients.

  3. Fast and accurate haplotype frequency estimation for large haplotype vectors from pooled DNA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliadis Alexandros

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Typically, the first phase of a genome wide association study (GWAS includes genotyping across hundreds of individuals and validation of the most significant SNPs. Allelotyping of pooled genomic DNA is a common approach to reduce the overall cost of the study. Knowledge of haplotype structure can provide additional information to single locus analyses. Several methods have been proposed for estimating haplotype frequencies in a population from pooled DNA data. Results We introduce a technique for haplotype frequency estimation in a population from pooled DNA samples focusing on datasets containing a small number of individuals per pool (2 or 3 individuals and a large number of markers. We compare our method with the publicly available state-of-the-art algorithms HIPPO and HAPLOPOOL on datasets of varying number of pools and marker sizes. We demonstrate that our algorithm provides improvements in terms of accuracy and computational time over competing methods for large number of markers while demonstrating comparable performance for smaller marker sizes. Our method is implemented in the "Tree-Based Deterministic Sampling Pool" (TDSPool package which is available for download at http://www.ee.columbia.edu/~anastas/tdspool. Conclusions Using a tree-based determinstic sampling technique we present an algorithm for haplotype frequency estimation from pooled data. Our method demonstrates superior performance in datasets with large number of markers and could be the method of choice for haplotype frequency estimation in such datasets.

  4. Classical sickle beta-globin haplotypes exhibit a high degree of long-range haplotype similarity in African and Afro-Caribbean populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jallow Muminatou

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sickle (βs mutation in the beta-globin gene (HBB occurs on five "classical" βs haplotype backgrounds in ethnic groups of African ancestry. Strong selection in favour of the βs allele – a consequence of protection from severe malarial infection afforded by heterozygotes – has been associated with a high degree of extended haplotype similarity. The relationship between classical βs haplotypes and long-range haplotype similarity may have both anthropological and clinical implications, but to date has not been explored. Here we evaluate the haplotype similarity of classical βs haplotypes over 400 kb in population samples from Jamaica, The Gambia, and among the Yoruba of Nigeria (Hapmap YRI. Results The most common βs sub-haplotype among Jamaicans and the Yoruba was the Benin haplotype, while in The Gambia the Senegal haplotype was observed most commonly. Both subtypes exhibited a high degree of long-range haplotype similarity extending across approximately 400 kb in all three populations. This long-range similarity was significantly greater than that seen for other haplotypes sampled in these populations (P s mutation. Conclusion Two different classical βs haplotypes, sampled from different populations, exhibit comparable and extensive long-range haplotype similarity and strong LD. This LD extends across the adjacent recombination hotspot, and is discernable at distances in excess of 400 kb. Although the multi-centric geographic distribution of βs haplotypes indicates strong subdivision among early Holocene sub-Saharan populations, we find no evidence that selective pressures imposed by falciparum malaria varied in intensity or timing between these subpopulations. Our observations also suggest that cis-acting loci, which may influence outcomes in sickle cell disease, could lie considerable distances away from β-globin.

  5. Alternative haplotypes of antigen processing genes in zebrafish diverged early in vertebrate evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Sean C.; Hernandez, Kyle M.; Wcisel, Dustin J.; Kettleborough, Ross N.; Stemple, Derek L.; Andrade, Jorge; de Jong, Jill L. O.

    2016-01-01

    Antigen processing and presentation genes found within the MHC are among the most highly polymorphic genes of vertebrate genomes, providing populations with diverse immune responses to a wide array of pathogens. Here, we describe transcriptome, exome, and whole-genome sequencing of clonal zebrafish, uncovering the most extensive diversity within the antigen processing and presentation genes of any species yet examined. Our CG2 clonal zebrafish assembly provides genomic context within a remarkably divergent haplotype of the core MHC region on chromosome 19 for six expressed genes not found in the zebrafish reference genome: mhc1uga, proteasome-β 9b (psmb9b), psmb8f, and previously unknown genes psmb13b, tap2d, and tap2e. We identify ancient lineages for Psmb13 within a proteasome branch previously thought to be monomorphic and provide evidence of substantial lineage diversity within each of three major trifurcations of catalytic-type proteasome subunits in vertebrates: Psmb5/Psmb8/Psmb11, Psmb6/Psmb9/Psmb12, and Psmb7/Psmb10/Psmb13. Strikingly, nearby tap2 and MHC class I genes also retain ancient sequence lineages, indicating that alternative lineages may have been preserved throughout the entire MHC pathway since early diversification of the adaptive immune system ∼500 Mya. Furthermore, polymorphisms within the three MHC pathway steps (antigen cleavage, transport, and presentation) are each predicted to alter peptide specificity. Lastly, comparative analysis shows that antigen processing gene diversity is far more extensive than previously realized (with ancient coelacanth psmb8 lineages, shark psmb13, and tap2t and psmb10 outside the teleost MHC), implying distinct immune functions and conserved roles in shaping MHC pathway evolution throughout vertebrates. PMID:27493218

  6. A new polymorphic and multicopy MHC gene family related to nonmammalian class I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leelayuwat, C.; Degli-Esposti, M.A.; Abraham, L.J. [Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); Townend, D.C. [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Dawkins, R.L. [Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia)]|[Univ. of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)]|[Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia)

    1994-12-31

    The authors have used genomic analysis to characterize a region of the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) spanning {approximately} 300 kilobases (kb) between TNF and HLA-B. This region has been suggested to carry genetic factors relevant to the development of autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis (MG) and insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Genomic sequence was analyzed for coding potential, using two neural network programs, GRAIL and GeneParser. A genomic probe, JAB, containing putative coding sequences (PERB11) located 60 kb centromeric of HLA-B, was used for northern analysis of human tissues. Multiple transcripts were detected. Southern analysis of genomic DNA and overlapping YAC clones, covering the region from BAT1 to HLA-F, indicated that there are at least five copies of PERB11, four of which are located within this region of the MHC. The partial cDNA sequence of PERB11 was obtained from poly-A RNA derived from skeletal muscle. The putative amino acid sequence of PERB11 shares {approximately} 30% identity to MHC class I molecules from various species, including reptiles, chickens, and frogs, as well as to other MHC class I-like molecules, such as the IgG FcR of the mouse and rat and the human Zn-{alpha}2-glycoprotein. From direct comparison of amino acid sequences, it is concluded that PERB11 is a distinct molecule more closely related to nonmammalian than known mammalian MHC class I molecules. Genomic sequence analysis of PERB11 from five MHC ancestral haplotypes (AH) indicated that the gene is polymorphic at both DNA and protein level. The results suggest that the authors have identified a novel polymorphic gene family with multiple copies within the MHC. 48 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Fetal Hemoglobin in Sickle Cell Anemia: Genetic Studies of the Arab-Indian Haplotype

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo, Duyen; Bae, Harold; Steinberg, Martin H.; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Melista, Efthymia; Safaya, Surinder; Farrar, Lindsay A.; Suliman, Ahmed M.; Albuali, Waleed H; Al Bagshi, Muneer H.; Akinsheye, Idowu; Gallagher, Patrick; Luo, Hong-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia is common in the Middle East and India where the HbS gene is sometimes associated with the Arab-Indian (AI) β-globin gene (HBB) cluster haplotype. In this haplotype of sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels are 3-4 fold higher than those found in patients with HbS haplotypes of African origin. Little is known about the genetic elements that modulate HbF in AI haplotype patients. We therefor studied Saudi HbS homozygotes with the AI haplotype (mean HbF 19.2±7.0%, ...

  8. Antigen-presenting genes and genomic copy number variations in the Tasmanian devil MHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuanyuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii is currently under threat of extinction due to an unusual fatal contagious cancer called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD. DFTD is caused by a clonal tumour cell line that is transmitted between unrelated individuals as an allograft without triggering immune rejection due to low levels of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC diversity in Tasmanian devils. Results Here we report the characterization of the genomic regions encompassing MHC Class I and Class II genes in the Tasmanian devil. Four genomic regions approximately 960 kb in length were assembled and annotated using BAC contigs and physically mapped to devil Chromosome 4q. 34 genes and pseudogenes were identified, including five Class I and four Class II loci. Interestingly, when two haplotypes from two individuals were compared, three genomic copy number variants with sizes ranging from 1.6 to 17 kb were observed within the classical Class I gene region. One deletion is particularly important as it turns a Class Ia gene into a pseudogene in one of the haplotypes. This deletion explains the previously observed variation in the Class I allelic number between individuals. The frequency of this deletion is highest in the northwestern devil population and lowest in southeastern areas. Conclusions The third sequenced marsupial MHC provides insights into the evolution of this dynamic genomic region among the diverse marsupial species. The two sequenced devil MHC haplotypes revealed three copy number variations that are likely to significantly affect immune response and suggest that future work should focus on the role of copy number variations in disease susceptibility in this species.

  9. Selective pressures on MHC class II genes in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) as inferred by hierarchical analysis of population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdegen, M; Babik, W; Radwan, J

    2014-11-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex, which are the most polymorphic of all vertebrate genes, are a pre-eminent system for the study of selective pressures that arise from host-pathogen interactions. Balancing selection capable of maintaining high polymorphism should lead to the homogenization of MHC allele frequencies among populations, but there is some evidence to suggest that diversifying selection also operates on the MHC. However, the pattern of population structure observed at MHC loci is likely to depend on the spatial and/or temporal scale examined. Here, we investigated selection acting on MHC genes at different geographic scales using Venezuelan guppy populations inhabiting four regions. We found a significant correlation between MHC and microsatellite allelic richness across populations, which suggests the role of genetic drift in shaping MHC diversity. However, compared to microsatellites, more MHC variation was explained by differences between populations within larger geographic regions and less by the differences between the regions. Furthermore, among proximate populations, variation in MHC allele frequencies was significantly higher compared to microsatellites, indicating that selection acting on MHC may increase population structure at small spatial scales. However, in populations that have significantly diverged at neutral markers, the population-genetic signature of diversifying selection may be eradicated in the long term by that of balancing selection, which acts to preserve rare alleles and thus maintain a common pool of MHC alleles.

  10. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in sickle cell patients from southwest Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Z; Karimi, M; Haghshenass, M; Merat, A

    2003-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia in Iran is accompanied by a high level of HbF and mild clinical presentation. Here we report haplotypes of the beta gene cluster found in 81 randomly selected sickle cell patients, including 47 sickle cell anemia (SS), 17 sickle cell trait (AS), and 17 sickle/thalassemia (S/thal) from southwest Iran. We found all five common typical haplotypes as well as five atypical haplotypes in our patients. Except for four patients with homozygous Benin haplotype, none of the other African typical haplotypes were found in a homozygous state. Arab-Indian was found to be the most prevalent haplotype in the study population. This haplotype accounted for 51.1% as the homozygous form in SS patients, where 69.1% of chromosomes in these patients had the Arab-Indian haplotype. Bantu A2 was the second most prevalent haplotype among all patients. The mean %HbF in SS patients was 27.83 and in the homozygous Arab-Indian haplotype it was still higher (30.40%), while in AS patients the %HbF was only 1.20. The high %Ggamma chain (71.81) in the Arab-Indian homozygous haplotype was concomitant with the presence of an Xmn I site in both chromosomes. The presence of the Arab-Indian haplotype as the predominant haplotype might be suggestive of a gene flow to/from Saudi Arabia or India. More haplotype investigations of a normal population can clarify the high incidence of Bantu A2 haplotype in our population.

  11. Haplotype reconstruction error as a classical misclassification problem: introducing sensitivity and specificity as error measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Lamina

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Statistically reconstructing haplotypes from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes, can lead to falsely classified haplotypes. This can be an issue when interpreting haplotype association results or when selecting subjects with certain haplotypes for subsequent functional studies. It was our aim to quantify haplotype reconstruction error and to provide tools for it. METHODS AND RESULTS: By numerous simulation scenarios, we systematically investigated several error measures, including discrepancy, error rate, and R(2, and introduced the sensitivity and specificity to this context. We exemplified several measures in the KORA study, a large population-based study from Southern Germany. We find that the specificity is slightly reduced only for common haplotypes, while the sensitivity was decreased for some, but not all rare haplotypes. The overall error rate was generally increasing with increasing number of loci, increasing minor allele frequency of SNPs, decreasing correlation between the alleles and increasing ambiguity. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that, with the analytical approach presented here, haplotype-specific error measures can be computed to gain insight into the haplotype uncertainty. This method provides the information, if a specific risk haplotype can be expected to be reconstructed with rather no or high misclassification and thus on the magnitude of expected bias in association estimates. We also illustrate that sensitivity and specificity separate two dimensions of the haplotype reconstruction error, which completely describe the misclassification matrix and thus provide the prerequisite for methods accounting for misclassification.

  12. Refinement of the MHC risk map in a scandinavian primary sclerosing cholangitis population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Næss

    Full Text Available Genetic variants within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC represent the strongest genetic susceptibility factors for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC. Identifying the causal variants within this genetic complex represents a major challenge due to strong linkage disequilibrium and an overall high physical density of candidate variants. We aimed to refine the MHC association in a geographically restricted PSC patient panel.A total of 365 PSC cases and 368 healthy controls of Scandinavian ancestry were included in the study. We incorporated data from HLA typing (HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB3, -DRB1, -DQB1 and single nucleotide polymorphisms across the MHC (n = 18,644; genotyped and imputed alongside previously suggested PSC risk determinants in the MHC, i.e. amino acid variation of DRβ, a MICA microsatellite polymorphism and HLA-C and HLA-B according to their ligand properties for killer immunoglobulin-like receptors. Breakdowns of the association signal by unconditional and conditional logistic regression analyses demarcated multiple PSC associated MHC haplotypes, and for eight of these classical HLA class I and II alleles represented the strongest association. A novel independent risk locus was detected near NOTCH4 in the HLA class III region, tagged by rs116212904 (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 2.32 [1.80, 3.00], P = 1.35×10-11.Our study shows that classical HLA class I and II alleles, predominantly at HLA-B and HLA-DRB1, are the main risk factors for PSC in the MHC. In addition, the present assessments demonstrated for the first time an association near NOTCH4 in the HLA class III region.

  13. Temporal variation at the MHC class IIb in wild populations of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Bonnie A; Ramnarine, Indar W; Neff, Bryan D

    2010-07-01

    Understanding genetic diversity in natural populations is a fundamental objective of evolutionary biology. The immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are excellent candidates to study such diversity because they are highly polymorphic in populations. Although balancing selection may be responsible for maintaining diversity at these functionally important loci, temporal variation in selection pressure has rarely been examined. We examine temporal variation in MHC class IIB diversity in nine guppy (Poecilia reticulata) populations over two years. We found that five of the populations changed significantly more at the MHC than at neutral (microsatellite) loci as measured by F(ST), which suggests that the change at the MHC was due to selection and not neutral processes. Additionally, pairwise population differentiation measures at the MHC were higher in 2007 than in 2006, with the signature of selection changing from homogenizing to diversifying selection or neutral evolution. Interestingly, within the populations the magnitude of the change at the MHC between years was related to the change in the proportion of individuals infected by a common parasite, indicating a link between genetic structure and the parasite. Our data thereby implicate temporal variation in selective pressure as an important mechanism maintaining diversity at the MHC in wild populations.

  14. Understanding Y haplotype matching probability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Charles H

    2014-01-01

    The Y haplotype population-genetic terrain is better explored from a fresh perspective rather than by analogy with the more familiar autosomal ideas. For haplotype matching probabilities, versus for autosomal matching probabilities, explicit attention to modelling - such as how evolution got us where we are - is much more important while consideration of population frequency is much less so. This paper explores, extends, and explains some of the concepts of "Fundamental problem of forensic mathematics - the evidential strength of a rare haplotype match". That earlier paper presented and validated a "kappa method" formula for the evidential strength when a suspect matches a previously unseen haplotype (such as a Y-haplotype) at the crime scene. Mathematical implications of the kappa method are intuitive and reasonable. Suspicions to the contrary raised in rest on elementary errors. Critical to deriving the kappa method or any sensible evidential calculation is understanding that thinking about haplotype population frequency is a red herring; the pivotal question is one of matching probability. But confusion between the two is unfortunately institutionalized in much of the forensic world. Examples make clear why (matching) probability is not (population) frequency and why uncertainty intervals on matching probabilities are merely confused thinking. Forensic matching calculations should be based on a model, on stipulated premises. The model inevitably only approximates reality, and any error in the results comes only from error in the model, the inexactness of the approximation. Sampling variation does not measure that inexactness and hence is not helpful in explaining evidence and is in fact an impediment. Alternative haplotype matching probability approaches that various authors have considered are reviewed. Some are based on no model and cannot be taken seriously. For the others, some evaluation of the models is discussed. Recent evidence supports the adequacy of

  15. Short communication: casein haplotype variability in sicilian dairy goat breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigli, I; Maizon, D O; Riggio, V; Sardina, M T; Portolano, B

    2008-09-01

    In the Mediterranean region, goat milk production is an important economic activity. In the present study, 4 casein genes were genotyped in 5 Sicilian goat breeds to 1) identify casein haplotypes present in the Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana, Messinese, Derivata di Siria, and Maltese goat breeds; and 2) describe the structure of the Sicilian goat breeds based on casein haplotypes and allele frequencies. In a sample of 540 dairy goats, 67 different haplotypes with frequency >or=0.01 and 27 with frequency >or=0.03 were observed. The most common CSN1S1-CSN2-CSN1S2-CSN3 haplotype for Derivata di Siria and Maltese was FCFB (0.17 and 0.22, respectively), whereas for Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana and Messinese was ACAB (0.06, 0.23, and 0.10, respectively). According to the haplotype reconstruction, Argentata dell'Etna, Girgentana, and Messinese breeds presented the most favorable haplotype for cheese production, because the casein concentration in milk of these breeds might be greater than that in Derivata di Siria and Maltese breeds. Based on a cluster analysis, the breeds formed 2 main groups: Derivata di Siria, and Maltese in one group, and Argentata dell'Etna and Messinese in the other; the Girgentana breed was between these groups but closer to the latter.

  16. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    There is very little known about the long-term evolution of the MHC and MHC-like molecules. This is because both the theory (the evolutionary questions and models) and the practice (the animals systems, functional assays and reagents to identify and characterize these molecules) have been difficu...

  17. Antigen presentation by MHC-dressed cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masafumi eNakayama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional antigen presenting cells (APCs such as conventional dendritic cells (DCs process protein antigens to MHC-bound peptides and then present the peptide-MHC complexes to T cells. In addition to this canonical antigen presentation pathway, recent studies have revealed that DCs and non-APCs can acquire MHC class I (MHCI and/or MHC class II (MHCII from neighboring cells through a process of cell-cell contact-dependent membrane transfer called trogocytosis. These MHC-dressed cells subsequently activate or regulate T cells via the preformed antigen peptide-MHC complexes without requiring any further processing. In addition to trogocytosis, intercellular transfer of MHCI and MHCII can be mediated by secretion of membrane vesicles such as exosomes from APCs, generating MHC-dressed cells. This review focuses on the physiological role of antigen presentation by MHCI- or MHCII-dressed cells, and also discusses differences and similarities between trogocytosis and exosome-mediated transfer of MHC.

  18. Structural Properties of MHC Class II Ligands, Implications for the Prediction of MHC Class II Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kasper Winther; Buus, Søren; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    properties of MHC class II ligands. Here, we perform one such large-scale analysis. A large set of SYFPEITHI MHC class II ligands covering more than 20 different HLA-DR molecules was analyzed in terms of their secondary structure and surface exposure characteristics in the context of the native structure......Major Histocompatibility class II (MHC-II) molecules sample peptides from the extracellular space allowing the immune system to detect the presence of foreign microbes from this compartment. Prediction of MHC class II ligands is complicated by the open binding cleft of the MHC class II molecule...... of the corresponding source protein. We demonstrated that MHC class II ligands are significantly more exposed and have significantly more coil content than other peptides in the same protein with similar predicted binding affinity. We next exploited this observation to derive an improved prediction method for MHC...

  19. Innate lymphoid cells and the MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinette, M L; Colonna, M

    2016-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a new class of immune cells that include natural killer (NK) cells and appear to be the innate counterparts to CD4(+) helper T cells and CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells based on developmental and functional similarities. Like T cells, both NK cells and other ILCs also show connections to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In human and mouse, NK cells recognize and respond to classical and nonclassical MHC I molecules as well as structural homologues, whereas mouse ILCs have recently been shown to express MHC II. We describe the history of MHC I recognition by NK cells and discuss emerging roles for MHC II expression by ILC subsets, making comparisons between both mouse and human when possible.

  20. Interactions within the MHC contribute to the genetic architecture of celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Gad; Kikianty, Eder; Wang, Qiao; Rawlinson, Dave; Shi, Fan; Haviv, Izhak; Stern, Linda

    2017-01-01

    Interaction analysis of GWAS can detect signal that would be ignored by single variant analysis, yet few robust interactions in humans have been detected. Recent work has highlighted interactions in the MHC region between known HLA risk haplotypes for various autoimmune diseases. To better understand the genetic interactions underlying celiac disease (CD), we have conducted exhaustive genome-wide scans for pairwise interactions in five independent CD case-control studies, using a rapid model-free approach to examine over 500 billion SNP pairs in total. We found 14 independent interaction signals within the MHC region that achieved stringent replication criteria across multiple studies and were independent of known CD risk HLA haplotypes. The strongest independent CD interaction signal corresponded to genes in the HLA class III region, in particular PRRC2A and GPANK1/C6orf47, which are known to contain variants for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and early menopause, co-morbidities of celiac disease. Replicable evidence for statistical interaction outside the MHC was not observed. Both within and between European populations, we observed striking consistency of two-locus models and model distribution. Within the UK population, models of CD based on both interactions and additive single-SNP effects increased explained CD variance by approximately 1% over those of single SNPs. The interactions signal detected across the five cohorts indicates the presence of novel associations in the MHC region that cannot be detected using additive models. Our findings have implications for the determination of genetic architecture and, by extension, the use of human genetics for validation of therapeutic targets. PMID:28282431

  1. Microsatellite diversity and crossover regions within homozygous and heterozygous SLA haplotypes of different pig breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Asako; Uenishi, Hirohide; Kawata, Hisako; Tanaka-Matsuda, Maiko; Shigenari, Atsuko; Flori, Laurence; Chardon, Patrick; Lunney, Joan K; Kulski, Jerzy K; Inoko, Hidetoshi

    2008-07-01

    Our aim was to investigate microsatellite (MS) diversity and find crossover regions at 42 polymorphic MS loci in the swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) genomic region of 72 pigs with different well-defined homozygous and heterozygous SLA haplotypes. We analyzed the genetic polymorphisms of 42 MS markers in 23 SLA homozygous-heterozygous, common pig breeds with 12 SLA serological haplotypes and 49 National Institutes of Health (NIH) and Clawn homozygous-heterozygous miniature pigs with nine SLA serological or genotyped haplotypes including four recombinant haplotypes. In comparing the same and different haplotypes, both haplospecific patterns and allelic variations were observed at the MS loci. Some of the shared haplotype blocks extended over 2 Mb suggesting the existence of strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the entire SLA region. Crossover regions were easily defined by the MS markers within the class I and/or III region in the NIH and Clawn recombinant haplotypes. The present haplotype comparison shows that our set of MS markers provides a fast and cost-efficient alternative, or complementary, method to the serological or sequence-based determination of the SLA alleles for the characterization of SLA haplotypes and/or the crossover regions between different haplotypes.

  2. Mapping the genetic diversity of HLA haplotypes in the Japanese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Woei-Yuh; Liu, Xuanyao; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kimura, Ryosuke; Nabika, Toru; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Tabara, Yasuharu; Yamamoto, Ken; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kato, Norihiro

    2015-12-09

    Japan has often been viewed as an Asian country that possesses a genetically homogenous community. The basis for partitioning the country into prefectures has largely been geographical, although cultural and linguistic differences still exist between some of the districts/prefectures, especially between Okinawa and the mainland prefectures. The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) region has consistently emerged as the most polymorphic region in the human genome, harbouring numerous biologically important variants; nevertheless the presence of population-specific long haplotypes hinders the imputation of SNPs and classical HLA alleles. Here, we examined the extent of genetic variation at the MHC between eight Japanese populations sampled from Okinawa, and six other prefectures located in or close to the mainland of Japan, specifically focusing at the haplotypes observed within each population, and what the impact of any variation has on imputation. Our results indicated that Okinawa was genetically farther to the mainland Japanese than were Gujarati Indians from Tamil Indians, while the mainland Japanese from six prefectures were more homogeneous than between northern and southern Han Chinese. The distribution of haplotypes across Japan was similar, although imputation was most accurate for Okinawa and several mainland prefectures when population-specific panels were used as reference.

  3. Haplotype structure of the beta2-adrenergic receptor gene in 814 Danish Caucasian subjects and association with body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Kamp; Nielsen, Morten; Koefoed, Pernille

    2009-01-01

    with body mass index (BMI). The SNPs showed organization into 13 distinct haplotypes and 41 haplotype pairs. The study identified four common haplotypes: ACCCC (10.1 +/- 0.3 %), ACCCG (27.9 +/- 0.3 %), GCCAC (10.8 +/- 0.1 %) and GGCCG (41.0 +/- 0.2 %) (frequencies (SD), seen in 91 % of the population....... In the total population (mean age +/- SD: 50 +/- 16 years), BMI was not related to haplotype pairs, individual SNPs or allelic haplotypes. However, in subjects ... to individual SNPs. In subjects subjects (BMI

  4. Approximation properties of haplotype tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreiseitl Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are locations at which the genomic sequences of population members differ. Since these differences are known to follow patterns, disease association studies are facilitated by identifying SNPs that allow the unique identification of such patterns. This process, known as haplotype tagging, is formulated as a combinatorial optimization problem and analyzed in terms of complexity and approximation properties. Results It is shown that the tagging problem is NP-hard but approximable within 1 + ln((n2 - n/2 for n haplotypes but not approximable within (1 - ε ln(n/2 for any ε > 0 unless NP ⊂ DTIME(nlog log n. A simple, very easily implementable algorithm that exhibits the above upper bound on solution quality is presented. This algorithm has running time O((2m - p + 1 ≤ O(m(n2 - n/2 where p ≤ min(n, m for n haplotypes of size m. As we show that the approximation bound is asymptotically tight, the algorithm presented is optimal with respect to this asymptotic bound. Conclusion The haplotype tagging problem is hard, but approachable with a fast, practical, and surprisingly simple algorithm that cannot be significantly improved upon on a single processor machine. Hence, significant improvement in computatational efforts expended can only be expected if the computational effort is distributed and done in parallel.

  5. Generation of a genomic tiling array of the human Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC and its application for DNA methylation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ottaviani Diego

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is essential for human immunity and is highly associated with common diseases, including cancer. While the genetics of the MHC has been studied intensively for many decades, very little is known about the epigenetics of this most polymorphic and disease-associated region of the genome. Methods To facilitate comprehensive epigenetic analyses of this region, we have generated a genomic tiling array of 2 Kb resolution covering the entire 4 Mb MHC region. The array has been designed to be compatible with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP, array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and expression profiling, including of non-coding RNAs. The array comprises 7832 features, consisting of two replicates of both forward and reverse strands of MHC amplicons and appropriate controls. Results Using MeDIP, we demonstrate the application of the MHC array for DNA methylation profiling and the identification of tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs. Based on the analysis of two tissues and two cell types, we identified 90 tDMRs within the MHC and describe their characterisation. Conclusion A tiling array covering the MHC region was developed and validated. Its successful application for DNA methylation profiling indicates that this array represents a useful tool for molecular analyses of the MHC in the context of medical genomics.

  6. NLRC5 controls basal MHC class I gene expression in an MHC enhanceosome-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neerincx, Andreas; Rodriguez, Galaxia M; Steimle, Viktor; Kufer, Thomas A

    2012-05-15

    Nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat (NLR) proteins play important roles in innate immune responses as pattern-recognition receptors. Although most NLR proteins act in cell autonomous immune pathways, some do not function as classical pattern-recognition receptors. One such NLR protein is the MHC class II transactivator, the master regulator of MHC class II gene transcription. In this article, we report that human NLRC5, which we recently showed to be involved in viral-mediated type I IFN responses, shuttles to the nucleus and activates MHC class I gene expression. Knockdown of NLRC5 in different human cell lines and primary dermal fibroblasts leads to reduced MHC class I expression, whereas introduction of NLRC5 into cell types with very low expression of MHC class I augments MHC class I expression to levels comparable to those found in lymphocytes. Expression of NLRC5 positively correlates with MHC class I expression in human tissues. Functionally, we show that both the N-terminal effector domain of NLRC5 and its C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domain are needed for activation of MHC class I expression. Moreover, nuclear shuttling and function depend on a functional Walker A motif. Finally, we identified a promoter sequence in the MHC class I promoter, the X1 box, to be involved in NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene activation. Taken together, this suggested that NLRC5 acts in a manner similar to class II transactivator to drive MHC expression and revealed NLRC5 as an important regulator of basal MHC class I expression.

  7. MHC Region and Its Related Disease Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is one of the most gene dense regions in the human genome and many disorders, including primary immune deficiencies, autoimmune conditions, infections, cancers and mental disorder have been found to be associated with this region. However, due to a high...... detection as well as HLA gene typing and large structural variation detection using optical mapping technic, to provide comprehensive and accurate information of the MHC region and apply them into disease causal mutation’s fine-mapping....

  8. In Vivo Characterization of Human APOA5 Haplotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Akiyama, Jennifer; Chapman-Helleboid, Audrey; Fruchart, Jamila; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2006-10-01

    Increased plasma triglycerides concentrations are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies support a reproducible genetic association between two minor haplotypes in the human apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) and increased plasma triglyceride concentrations. We thus sought to investigate the effect of these minor haplotypes (APOA5*2 and APOA5*3) on ApoAV plasma levels through the precise insertion of single-copy intact APOA5 haplotypes at a targeted location in the mouse genome. While we found no difference in the amount of human plasma ApoAV in mice containing the common APOA5*1 and minor APOA5*2 haplotype, the introduction of the single APOA5*3 defining allele (19W) resulted in 3-fold lower ApoAV plasma levels consistent with existing genetic association studies. These results indicate that S19W polymorphism is likely to be functional and explain the strong association of this variant with plasma triglycerides supporting the value of sensitive in vivo assays to define the functional nature of human haplotypes.

  9. JAK2 GGCC haplotype in MPL mutated myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietra, Daniela; Casetti, Ilaria; Da Vià, Matteo C; Elena, Chiara; Milanesi, Chiara; Rumi, Elisa

    2012-07-01

    JAK2 (V617F) is associated with a genetic predisposition to its acquisition,as it is preferentially found in subjects with a common constitutional JAK2 haplotype known as 46/1 or GGCC. A recent study suggests that a genetic predisposition to acquisition of MPL mutation may exist in sporadic patients, since an association was found with the JAK2 46/1 haplotype. We genotyped 509 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN), 7% of which carrying a somatic mutation of MPL Exon 10. We found that the JAK2 GGCC haplotype was closely associated with JAK2 (V617F) (OR 1.84, P < 0.001) but not with MPL mutations (OR 0.98), suggesting a different genetic background for these molecular lesions.

  10. HaplotypeCN: copy number haplotype inference with Hidden Markov Model and localized haplotype clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Jen Lin

    Full Text Available Copy number variation (CNV has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states.

  11. HaplotypeCN: Copy Number Haplotype Inference with Hidden Markov Model and Localized Haplotype Clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Jen; Chen, Yu-Tin; Hsu, Shu-Ni; Peng, Chien-Hua; Tang, Chuan-Yi; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Hsieh, Wen-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV) has been reported to be associated with disease and various cancers. Hence, identifying the accurate position and the type of CNV is currently a critical issue. There are many tools targeting on detecting CNV regions, constructing haplotype phases on CNV regions, or estimating the numerical copy numbers. However, none of them can do all of the three tasks at the same time. This paper presents a method based on Hidden Markov Model to detect parent specific copy number change on both chromosomes with signals from SNP arrays. A haplotype tree is constructed with dynamic branch merging to model the transition of the copy number status of the two alleles assessed at each SNP locus. The emission models are constructed for the genotypes formed with the two haplotypes. The proposed method can provide the segmentation points of the CNV regions as well as the haplotype phasing for the allelic status on each chromosome. The estimated copy numbers are provided as fractional numbers, which can accommodate the somatic mutation in cancer specimens that usually consist of heterogeneous cell populations. The algorithm is evaluated on simulated data and the previously published regions of CNV of the 270 HapMap individuals. The results were compared with five popular methods: PennCNV, genoCN, COKGEN, QuantiSNP and cnvHap. The application on oral cancer samples demonstrates how the proposed method can facilitate clinical association studies. The proposed algorithm exhibits comparable sensitivity of the CNV regions to the best algorithm in our genome-wide study and demonstrates the highest detection rate in SNP dense regions. In addition, we provide better haplotype phasing accuracy than similar approaches. The clinical association carried out with our fractional estimate of copy numbers in the cancer samples provides better detection power than that with integer copy number states. PMID:24849202

  12. Haplotype-based association analysis of the MAPT locus in Late Onset Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morris John C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD is a common sporadic form of the illness, affecting individuals above the age of 65 yrs. A prominent hypothesis for the aetiopathology of Alzheimer's disease is that in the presence of a β-amyloid load, individuals expressing a pathogenic form of tau protein (MAPT are at increased risk for developing the disease. Genetic studies in this pursuit have, however, yielded conflicting results. A recent study showed a significant haplotype association (H1c with AD. The current study is an attempt to replicate this association in an independently ascertained cohort. Results In this report we present the findings of a haplotype analysis at the MAPT locus. We failed to detect evidence of association of the H1c haplotype at the MAPT locus with LOAD. None of the six SNPs forming the H1c haplotype showed evidence of association with disease. In addition, nested clade analysis suggested the presence of independent mutations at multiple points in the haplotype network or homoplasy at the MAPT locus. Such homoplasy can confound single SNP tests for association. We do not detect evidence that the set of SNPs forming the H1c haplotype in general or rs242557 in particular are pathogenic for LOAD. Conclusion In conclusion, we employed two contemporary haplotype analysis tools to perform haplotype association analysis at the MAPT locus. Our data suggest that the tagged SNPs forming the H1c haplotype do not have a causal role in the pathogenesis of LOAD.

  13. Genomic plasticity of the immune-related Mhc class I B region in macaque species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bontrop Ronald E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sharp contrast to humans and great apes, the expanded Mhc-B region of rhesus and cynomolgus macaques is characterized by the presence of differential numbers and unique combinations of polymorphic class I B genes per haplotype. The MIB microsatellite is closely linked to the single class I B gene in human and in some great apes studied. The physical map of the Mhc of a heterozygous rhesus monkey provides unique material to analyze MIB and Mamu-B copy number variation and then allows one to decipher the compound evolutionary history of this region in primate species. Results In silico research pinpointed 12 MIB copies (duplicons, most of which are associated with expressed B-genes that cluster in a separate clade in the phylogenetic tree. Generic primers tested on homozygous rhesus and pedigreed cynomolgus macaques allowed the identification of eight to eleven MIB copies per individual. The number of MIB copies present per haplotype varies from a minimum of three to six in cynomolgus macaques and from five to eight copies in rhesus macaques. Phylogenetic analyses highlight a strong transpecific sharing of MIB duplicons. Using the physical map, we observed that, similar to MIB duplicons, highly divergent Mamu-B genes can be present on the same haplotype. Haplotype variation as reflected by the copy number variation of class I B loci is best explained by recombination events, which are found to occur between MIBs and Mamu-B. Conclusion The data suggest the existence of highly divergent MIB and Mamu-B lineages on a given haplotype, as well as variable MIB and B copy numbers and configurations, at least in rhesus macaque. Recombination seems to occur between MIB and Mamu-B loci, and the resulting haplotypic plasticity at the individual level may be a strategy to better cope with pathogens. Therefore, evolutionary inferences based on the multiplicated MIB loci but also other markers close to B-genes appear to be promising for

  14. Haplotype studies in Wilson disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.R.; Bull, P.C.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M. (Univ. of Toronto (Canada))

    1994-01-01

    In 51 families with Wilson disease, the authors have studied DNA haplotypes of dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms (CA repeats) in the 13q14.3 region, to examine these markers for association with the Wilson disease gene (WND). In addition to a marker (D13S133) described elsewhere, the authors have developed three new highly polymorphic markers (D13S314, D13S315, and D13S316) close to the WND locus. The authors have examined the distribution of marker alleles at the loci studied and have found that D13S314, D13S133, and D13S316 each show nonrandom distribution on chromosomes carrying the WND mutation. The authors have studied haplotypes of these three markers and have found that there are highly significant differences between WND and normal haplotypes in northern European families. These findings have important implications for mutation detection and molecular diagnosis in families with Wilson disease. 25 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Description and prediction of peptide-MHC binding: the 'human MHC project'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, S

    1999-01-01

    MHC molecules are crucially involved in controlling the specific immune system. They are highly polymorphic receptors sampling peptides from the cellular environment and presenting these peptides for scrutiny by immune cells. Recent advances in combinatorial peptide chemistry have improved the de...... the description and prediction of peptide-MHC binding. It is envisioned that a complete mapping of human immune reactivities will be possible....

  16. The MHC motif viewer: a visualization tool for MHC binding motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    In vertebrates, the onset of cellular immune reactions is controlled by presentation of peptides in complex with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules to T cell receptors. In humans, MHCs are called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs). Different MHC molecules present different subsets...

  17. Haplotype identity between individuals who share a CFTR mutation allele 'identical by descent': Demonstration of the usefulness of the haplotype-sharing concept for gene mapping in real populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. de Vries (Hendrik); M.A. van der Meulen (Martin); R. Rozen (Rima); D.J.J. Halley (Dicky); H. Scheffer (Hans); L.P. ten Kate; C.H.C.M. Buys; G.J. Te Meerman (Gerard)

    1996-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with the A455E mutation, in both the French Canadian and the Dutch population, share a common haplotype over distances of up to 25 cM. French Canadian patients with the 621+1G→T mutation share a common haplotype of more than 14 cM. In contras

  18. Establishment of a resource population of SLA haplotype-defined Korean native pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Han-Ok; Ho, Chak-Sum; Lee, Yu-Joo; Cho, In-Cheol; Lee, Sung-Soo; Ko, Moon-Suck; Park, Chankyu; Smith, Douglas M; Jeon, Jin-Tae; Lee, Jun-Heon

    2010-05-01

    The highly polymorphic porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or the swine leukocyte antigens (SLA), has been repeatedly associated with variations in swine immune response to pathogens and vaccines as well as with production traits. The SLA antigens are also important targets for immunological recognition of foreign tissue grafts. We recently established a resource population of Korean native pigs as models for human transplantation and xenotransplantation research. In this study, 115 animals derived from three generations of the Korean native pigs were genotyped for three SLA class I (SLA-2, SLA-3 and SLA-1) and three SLA class II loci (DRB1, DQB1, DQA) using PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) at the allele group resolution. A total of seven SLA haplotypes (Lr-5.34, Lr-7.23, Lr-31.13, Lr-56.23, Lr-56.30, Lr-59.1, Lr-65.34), comprising six unique class I and five unique class II haplotypes, were characterized in the founding animals. Class I haplotype Lr-65.0 and class II haplotype Lr-0.34 were novel; and together with Lr-56.0 these haplotypes appeared to be breed-specific. In the progeny population, Lr-7.23 and Lr-56.30 appeared to be the most prevalent haplotypes with frequencies of 34.7% and 31.6%, respectively; the overall homozygosity was 27.4%. This resource population of SLA-defined Korean native pigs will be useful as large animal models for various transplantation and xenotransplantation experiments, as well as for dissecting the roles of SLA proteins in swine disease resistance and production traits.

  19. Prion gene haplotypes of U.S. cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harhay Gregory P

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE is a fatal neurological disorder characterized by abnormal deposits of a protease-resistant isoform of the prion protein. Characterizing linkage disequilibrium (LD and haplotype networks within the bovine prion gene (PRNP is important for 1 testing rare or common PRNP variation for an association with BSE and 2 interpreting any association of PRNP alleles with BSE susceptibility. The objective of this study was to identify polymorphisms and haplotypes within PRNP from the promoter region through the 3'UTR in a diverse sample of U.S. cattle genomes. Results A 25.2-kb genomic region containing PRNP was sequenced from 192 diverse U.S. beef and dairy cattle. Sequence analyses identified 388 total polymorphisms, of which 287 have not previously been reported. The polymorphism alleles define PRNP by regions of high and low LD. High LD is present between alleles in the promoter region through exon 2 (6.7 kb. PRNP alleles within the majority of intron 2, the entire coding sequence and the untranslated region of exon 3 are in low LD (18.0 kb. Two haplotype networks, one representing the region of high LD and the other the region of low LD yielded nineteen different combinations that represent haplotypes spanning PRNP. The haplotype combinations are tagged by 19 polymorphisms (htSNPS which characterize variation within and across PRNP. Conclusion The number of polymorphisms in the prion gene region of U.S. cattle is nearly four times greater than previously described. These polymorphisms define PRNP haplotypes that may influence BSE susceptibility in cattle.

  20. Major histocompatibility complex genes in the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, van S.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes a study of the major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) genes of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). The molecules encoded by Mhc genes play an essential role in the specific immune response, by presenting antigens to T lymphocytes. Knowledge of the Mhc of carp, therefore, cont

  1. Genetic relationships among native americans based on beta-globin gene cluster haplotype frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cassia Mousinho-Ribeiro

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of b-globin gene haplotypes was studied in 209 Amerindians from eight tribes of the Brazilian Amazon: Asurini from Xingú, Awá-Guajá, Parakanã, Urubú-Kaapór, Zoé, Kayapó (Xikrin from the Bacajá village, Katuena, and Tiriyó. Nine different haplotypes were found, two of which (n. 11 and 13 had not been previously identified in Brazilian indigenous populations. Haplotype 2 (+ - - - - was the most common in all groups studied, with frequencies varying from 70% to 100%, followed by haplotype 6 (- + + - +, with frequencies between 7% and 18%. The frequency distribution of the b-globin gene haplotypes in the eighteen Brazilian Amerindian populations studied to date is characterized by a reduced number of haplotypes (average of 3.5 and low levels of heterozygosity and intrapopulational differentiation, with a single clearly predominant haplotype in most tribes (haplotype 2. The Parakanã, Urubú-Kaapór, Tiriyó and Xavante tribes constitute exceptions, presenting at least four haplotypes with relatively high frequencies. The closest genetic relationships were observed between the Brazilian and the Colombian Amerindians (Wayuu, Kamsa and Inga, and, to a lesser extent, with the Huichol of Mexico. North-American Amerindians are more differentiated and clearly separated from all other tribes, except the Xavante, from Brazil, and the Mapuche, from Argentina. A restricted pool of ancestral haplotypes may explain the low diversity observed among most present-day Brazilian and Colombian Amerindian groups, while interethnic admixture could be the most important factor to explain the high number of haplotypes and high levels of diversity observed in some South-American and most North-American tribes.

  2. MHC class IIB additive and non-additive effects on fitness measures in the guppy Poecilia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, B A; Neff, B D

    2009-12-01

    The genetic architecture of fitness at the class IIB gene of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in the guppy Poecilia reticulata was analysed. Diversity at the MHC is thought to be maintained by some form of balancing selection; heterozygote advantage, frequency-dependent selection or spatially and temporally fluctuating selection. Here these hypotheses are evaluated by using an algorithm that partitions the effect of specific MHC allele and genotypes on fitness measures. The effect of MHC genotype on surrogate measures of fitness was tested, including growth rate (at high and low bulk food diets), parasite load following a parasite challenge and survival. The number of copies of the Pore_a132 MHC allele was inversely related to infection by Gyrodactylus flukes and it appeared to be positively related to faster growth. Also, genotypes combining the Pore_a132 or other relatively common alleles paired with rare MHC alleles produced both advantageous and detrimental non-additive effects. Thus, the genetic architecture underlying fitness at the MHC is complex in the P. reticulata.

  3. β3 Integrin Haplotype Influences Gene Regulation and Plasma von Willebrand Factor Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Katie E; Bray, Paul F; Grant, Peter J; Carter, Angela M

    2008-01-01

    The Leu33Pro polymorphism of the gene encoding β3 integrin (ITGB3) is associated with acute coronary syndromes and influences platelet aggregation. Three common promoter polymorphisms have also been identified. The aims of this study were to (1) investigate the influence of the ITGB3 −400C/A, −425A/C and −468G/A promoter polymorphisms on reporter gene expression and nuclear protein binding and (2) determine genotype and haplotype associations with platelet αIIbβ3 receptor density. Promoter haplotypes were introduced into an ITGB3 promoter-pGL3 construct by site directed mutagenesis and luciferase reporter gene expression analysed in HEL and HMEC-1 cells. Binding of nuclear proteins was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The association of ITGB3 haplotype with platelet αIIbβ3 receptor density was determined in 223 subjects. Species conserved motifs were identified in the ITGB3 promoter in the vicinity of the 3 polymorphisms. The GAA, GCC, AAC, AAA and ACC constructs induced ~50% increased luciferase expression relative to the GAC construct in both cell types. Haplotype analysis including Leu33Pro indicated 5 common haplotypes; no associations between ITGB3 haplotypes and receptor density were found. However, the GCC-Pro33 haplotype was associated with significantly higher vWF activity (128.6 [112.1–145.1]%) compared with all other haplotypes (107.1 [101.2–113.0]%, p=0.02). In conclusion, the GCC-Pro33 haplotype was associated with increased vWF activity but not with platelet αIIbβ3 receptor density, which may indicate ITGB3 haplotype influences endothelial function. PMID:18045606

  4. Association between Gene Haplotypes and Growth Traits in Japanese Hinai-dori Crossbred Chickens

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    Hideaki Takahashi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL for body weight and average daily gain in a common region between ADL0198 (chr 1: 171.7 Mb and ABR0287 (chr 1: 173.4 Mb on chicken chromosome 1 in an F2 resource population produced by crossing low- and high-growth lines of the Hinai-dori breed. Motilin receptor (MLNR is a candidate gene affecting growth traits in the region. In this study, we genotyped polymorphisms of the MLNR gene and investigated its association with growth traits in a Hinai-dori F2 intercross population. All the exons of the MLNR gene in the parental population were subjected to PCR amplification, nucleotide sequenced and haplotypes identified. To distinguish resultant diplotype individuals in the F2 population, a mismatch amplification mutation assay was performed. Three haplotypes (Haplotypes 1–3 were accordingly identified. Six genotypes produced by the combination of three haplotypes (Haplotype 1, 2, and 3 were examined in order to identify associations between MLNR haplotypes and growth traits. The data showed that Haplotype 1 was superior to Haplotype 2 and 3 in body weight at 10 and 14 weeks of age, average daily gain between 4 and 10 weeks, 10 and 14 weeks, and 0 and 14 weeks of age in female in F2 females. It was concluded that MLNR is a useful marker of growth traits and could be used to develop strategies for improving growth traits in the Hinai-dori breed.

  5. Clarifying haplotype ambiguity of NAT2 in multi-national cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Agundez, Jose A G; Martinez, Carmen; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) is the key enzyme in aromatic amine metabolism. NAT2 genotyping requires a subsequent determination of the haplotype pairs (formerly: alleles) to derive the acetylation status. The chromosomal phase of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is unclear for about 2/3 of the genotypes. We investigated NAT2 genotypes of 1,234 bladder cancer cases and 2,207 controls from Germany, Hungary, Pakistan and Venezuela plus 696 further German cancer cases. We reconstructed NAT2 haplotypes using PHASE v2.1.1. We analysed if the variability of the NAT2 haplotypes affected the haplotype reconstruction. Furthermore, we compared population haplotype frequencies in three Caucasian control cohorts (German, Hungarian, Spanish), in Pakistanis and Venezuelans and the impact on bladder cancer. We conclude that a common haplotype reconstruction is feasible, enhances precision and reliability. Hungarian controls showed the largest intra-ethnic variability whereas the Pakistanis showed a haplotype distribution typical for Caucasians. The main differences could be observed for the slow haplotypes *5B, *6A and *7B. The association of slow NAT2 genotypes with bladder cancer risk was most prominent in the Venezuelan study group.

  6. Haplotypes of beta S chromosomes among patients with sickle cell anemia from Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Y; Kutlar, F; Kutlar, A; McKie, V C; Huisman, T H

    1986-01-01

    Fetal hemoglobin and G gamma levels have been correlated with the presence or absence of eight restriction sites within the beta globin gene cluster (haplotypes) for numerous sickle cell anemia patients from Georgia. The most common haplotypes were #19 (Benin) and #20 (CAR); all patients with haplotype combinations 19/19, 20/20, and 19/20 were severely affected with low Hb F and low G gamma levels. A modified #19 beta S chromosome with a -G gamma-G gamma- globin gene arrangement, instead of -G gamma-A gamma-, was present in SS and SC newborn babies with G gamma values above 80%. Haplotype #3 (Senegal) was present among 15% of the beta S chromosomes; the two adult patients with the 3/3 combination were mildly affected with high Hb F and G gamma values. The haplotype AT with the variant A gamma T chain was a rarity. A new haplotype was found in one 17-year-old SS patient and five of his Hb S heterozygous relatives. This haplotype is associated with an increased production of Hb F in heterozygous and homozygous Hb S individuals; this Hb F contained primarily A gamma chains. A comparison was made between the different haplotypes among SS patients and normal Black individuals, and a remarkable similarity was noted in the fetal hemoglobin data for subjects with these different chromosomes.

  7. A new 500 kb haplotype associated with high CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers predicts a less severe expression of hereditary hemochromatosis

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    Mascarenhas Cláudia

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hereditary Hemochromatosis(HH is a common genetic disorder of iron overload where the large majority of patients are homozygous for one ancestral mutation in the HFE gene. In spite of this remarkable genetic homogeneity, the condition is clinically heterogeneous, varying from a severe disease to an asymptomatic phenotype with only abnormal biochemical parameters. The recent recognition of the variable penetrance of the HH mutation in different large population studies demands the need to search for new modifiers of its phenotypic expression. The present study follows previous observations that MHC class-I linked genetic markers, associated with the setting of CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers, could be clinically relevant modifiers of the phenotypic expression in HH, and aimed to find new markers that could be used as more reliable prognostic variables. Methods Haplotype analysis, including seven genetic markers within a 1 Mb region around the microsatellite D6S105 was performed in a group of 56 previously characterized C282Y homozygous Portuguese patients. Parameters analyzed in this study were total body iron stores, clinical manifestations related with HH and immunological parameters (total lymphocyte numbers, CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers. An independent group of 10 C282Y homozygous patients from Vancouver, Canada, were also included in this study and analyzed for the same parameters. Results A highly conserved ancestral haplotype defined by the SNP markers PGBD1-A, ZNF193-A, ZNF165-T (designated as A-A-T was found associated with both abnormally low CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers and the development of a severe clinical expression of HH. In a small proportion of patients, another conserved haplotype defined by the SNP markers PGBD1-G, ZNF193-G, ZNF165-G (designated as G-G-G was found associated with high CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers and a milder clinical expression. Remarkably, the two conserved haplotypes defined in Portuguese

  8. The MHC motif viewer: a visualization tool for MHC binding motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Hoof, Ilka; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    of peptides, and knowledge of their binding specificities is important for understanding differences in the immune response between individuals. Algorithms predicting which peptides bind a given MHC molecule have recently been developed with high prediction accuracy. The utility of these algorithms...... is hampered by the lack of tools for browsing and comparing specificity of these molecules. We have developed a Web server, MHC Motif Viewer, which allows the display of the binding motif for MHC class I proteins for human, chimpanzee, rhesus monkey, mouse, and swine, as well as HLA-DR protein sequences...

  9. Selection, diversity and evolutionary patterns of the MHC class II DAB in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials

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    Otten Celine

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on the genetic architecture and diversity of the MHC has focused mainly on eutherian mammals, birds and fish. So far, studies on model marsupials used in laboratory investigations indicated very little or even no variation in MHC class II genes. However, natural levels of diversity and selection are unknown in marsupials as studies on wild populations are virtually absent. We used two endemic South American mouse opossums, Gracilinanus microtarsus and Marmosops incanus, to investigate characteristic features of MHC selection. This study is the first investigation of MHC selection in free-ranging Neotropical marsupials. In addition, the evolutionary history of MHC lineages within the group of marsupials was examined. Results G. microtarsus showed extensive levels of MHC diversity within and among individuals as 47 MHC-DAB alleles and high levels of sequence divergence were detected at a minimum of four loci. Positively selected codon sites were identified, of which most were congruent with human antigen binding sites. The diversity in M. incanus was rather low with only eight observed alleles at presumably two loci. However, these alleles also revealed high sequence divergence. Again, positive selection was identified on specific codon sites, all congruent with human ABS and with positively selected sites observed in G. microtarsus. In a phylogenetic comparison alleles of M. incanus interspersed widely within alleles of G. microtarsus with four alleles being present in both species. Conclusion Our investigations revealed extensive MHC class II polymorphism in a natural marsupial population, contrary to previous assumptions. Furthermore, our study confirms for the first time in marsupials the presence of three characteristic features common at MHC loci of eutherian mammals, birds and fish: large allelic sequence divergence, positive selection on specific sites and trans-specific polymorphism.

  10. MHC-unrestricted lysis of MUC1-expressing cells by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen E; Rewers-Felkins, Kathleen A; Quinlin, Imelda S; Fogler, William E; Phillips, Catherine A; Townsend, Mary; Robinson, William; Philip, Ramila

    2008-01-01

    Many human adenocarcinomas can be killed in vitro by targeted cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL); however, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restrictions are typically required. The MUC1 antigen is common in many human adenocarcinomas, and is associated with a variable number of tandem repeats. It has been proposed that antigens with such repeated epitopes may be vulnerable to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing without MHC-restriction. Therefore, it is possible that MUC1-expressing malignant cells may be killed by targeted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte in the absence of MHC-restriction. In this study, a human MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cell line was used to determine if cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of MUC1-expressing adenocarcinoma cells requires MHC-restriction. Specifically, MUC1-stimulated human mononuclear cells (M1SMC) were observed to kill human MUC1-transfected, MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cells, but not the mock-transfected, non-MUC1-expressing murine mammary carcinoma cells. Furthermore, the killing was blocked by antibody to MUC1, indicating MUC1-specific killing. In conclusion, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte killing of MUC1-expressing adenocarcinoma cells can be MHC-unrestricted.

  11. Susceptibility of amphibians to chytridiomycosis is associated with MHC class II conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Arnaud; Cashins, Scott D; Grogan, Laura; Skerratt, Lee F; Hunter, David; McFadden, Michael; Scheele, Benjamin; Brannelly, Laura A; Macris, Amy; Harlow, Peter S; Bell, Sara; Berger, Lee; Waldman, Bruce

    2015-04-22

    The pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can cause precipitous population declines in its amphibian hosts. Responses of individuals to infection vary greatly with the capacity of their immune system to respond to the pathogen. We used a combination of comparative and experimental approaches to identify major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) alleles encoding molecules that foster the survival of Bd-infected amphibians. We found that Bd-resistant amphibians across four continents share common amino acids in three binding pockets of the MHC-II antigen-binding groove. Moreover, strong signals of selection acting on these specific sites were evident among all species co-existing with the pathogen. In the laboratory, we experimentally inoculated Australian tree frogs with Bd to test how each binding pocket conformation influences disease resistance. Only the conformation of MHC-II pocket 9 of surviving subjects matched those of Bd-resistant species. This MHC-II conformation thus may determine amphibian resistance to Bd, although other MHC-II binding pockets also may contribute to resistance. Rescuing amphibian biodiversity will depend on our understanding of amphibian immune defence mechanisms against Bd. The identification of adaptive genetic markers for Bd resistance represents an important step forward towards that goal.

  12. Regulation of MHC II and CD1 antigen presentation: from ubiquity to security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelin, Catherine; Sloma, Ivan; Charron, Dominique; Mooney, Nuala

    2009-02-01

    MHC class II and CD1-mediated antigen presentation on various APCs [B cells, monocytes, and dendritic cells (DC)] are subject to at least three distinct levels of regulation. The first one concerns the expression and structure of the antigen-presenting molecules; the second is based on the extracellular environment and signals of danger detected. However, a third level of regulation, which has been largely overlooked, is determined by lateral associations between antigen-presenting molecules and other proteins, their localization in specialized microdomains within the plasma membrane, and their trafficking pathways. This review focuses on features common to MHC II and CD1 molecules in their ability to activate specific T lymphocytes with the objective of addressing one basic question: What are the mechanisms regulating antigen presentation by MHC II and CD1 molecules within the same cell? Recent studies in immature DC, where MHC II and CD1 are coexpressed, suggest that the invariant chain (Ii) regulates antigen presentation by either protein. Ii could therefore favor MHC II or CD1 antigen presentation and thereby discriminate between antigens.

  13. Population genetic segmentation of MHC-correlated perfume preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmerli, A; Schweisgut, C; Kaegi, M

    2012-04-01

    It has become difficult to find a matching perfume. An overwhelming number of 300 new perfumes launch each year, and marketing campaigns target pre-defined groups based on gender, age or income rather than on individual preferences. Recent evidence for a genetic basis of perfume preferences, however, could be the starting point for a novel population genetic approach to better match perfumes with people's preferences. With a total of 116 participants genotyped for alleles of three loci of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), the aim of this study was to test whether common MHC alleles could be used as genetic markers to segment a given population into preference types. Significant deviations from random expectations for a set of 10 common perfume ingredients indicate how such segmentation could be achieved. In addition, preference patterns of participants confronted with images that contained a sexual communication context significantly differed in their ratings for some of the scents compared with participants confronted with images of perfume bottles. This strongly supports the assumption that genetically correlated perfume preferences evolved in the context of sexual communication. The results are discussed in the light of perfume customization. © 2011 The Authors. ICS © 2011 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  14. Evaluation of logistic Bayesian LASSO for identifying association with rare haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Swati; Papachristou, Charalampos

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that rare variants may hold the key to unraveling the genetic transmission mechanism of many common complex traits. Currently, there is a dearth of statistical methods that are powerful enough to detect association with rare haplotypes. One of the recently proposed methods is logistic Bayesian LASSO for case-control data. By penalizing the regression coefficients through appropriate priors, logistic Bayesian LASSO weeds out the unassociated haplotypes, making it possible for the associated rare haplotypes to be detected with higher powers. We used the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 simulated data to evaluate the behavior of logistic Bayesian LASSO in terms of its power and type I error under a complex disease model. We obtained knowledge of the simulation model, including the locations of the functional variants, and we chose to focus on two genomic regions in the MAP4 gene on chromosome 3. The sample size was 142 individuals and there were 200 replicates. Despite the small sample size, logistic Bayesian LASSO showed high power to detect two haplotypes containing functional variants in these regions while maintaining low type I errors. At the same time, a commonly used approach for haplotype association implemented in the software hapassoc failed to converge because of the presence of rare haplotypes. Thus, we conclude that logistic Bayesian LASSO can play an important role in the search for rare haplotypes.

  15. MHC Class II epitope predictive algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole; Buus, S

    2010-01-01

    in the predictions. All attempts to make ab initio predictions based on protein structure have failed to reach predictive performances similar to those that can be obtained by data-driven methods. Thousands of different MHC-II alleles exist in humans. Recently developed pan-specific methods have been able to make...

  16. The MHC molecules of nonmammalian vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufman, J; Skjoedt, K; Salomonsen, J

    1990-01-01

    to develop. There is no molecular evidence yet to decide whether vertebrate immune systems (and particularly the MHC molecules) are evolutionarily related to invertebrate allorecognition systems, and the functional evidence can be interpreted either way. Even among the vertebrates, there is great...

  17. Estimating haplotype effects for survival data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas; Martinussen, Torben; Silver, J

    2010-01-01

    Genetic association studies often investigate the effect of haplotypes on an outcome of interest. Haplotypes are not observed directly, and this complicates the inclusion of such effects in survival models. We describe a new estimating equations approach for Cox's regression model to assess haplo...

  18. MHC class II polymorphism is associated with a canine SLE-related disease complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbe, Maria; Jokinen, Päivi; Hermanrud, Christina; Kennedy, Lorna J; Strandberg, Erling; Hansson-Hamlin, Helene; Lohi, Hannes; Andersson, Göran

    2009-08-01

    Nova Scotia duck tolling retrievers are predisposed to a SLE-related disease complex including immune-mediated rheumatic disease (IMRD) and steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis (SRMA). IMRD involves symptoms that resemble those seen in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, SLE, or SLE-related diseases, in humans. This disease complex involves persistent lameness, stiffness, mainly after resting, and palpable pain from several joints of extremities. The majority of affected dogs display antinuclear autoantibody (ANA)-reactivity. SRMA is manifested in young dogs with high fever and neck stiffness and can be treated with corticosteroids. We have investigated the possible role of MHC class II as a genetic risk factor in IMRD and SRMA etiology. We performed sequence-based typing of the DLA-DRB1, -DQA1, and -DQB1 class II loci in a total of 176 dogs including 51 IMRD (33 ANA-positive), 49 SRMA cases, and 78 healthy controls (two dogs were both IMRD- and SRMA-affected). Homozygosity for the risk haplotype DRB1*00601/DQA1*005011/DQB1*02001 increased the risk for IMRD (OR = 4.9; ANA-positive IMRD: OR = 7.2) compared with all other genotypes. There was a general heterozygote advantage, homozygotes had OR = 4.4 (ANA-positive IMRD: OR = 8.9) compared with all heterozygotes. The risk haplotype contains the five amino acid epitope RARAA, known as the shared epitope for rheumatoid arthritis. No association was observed for SRMA. We conclude that DLA class II is a highly significant genetic risk factor for ANA-positive IMRD. The results indicate narrow diversity of DLA II haplotypes and identify an IMRD-related risk haplotype, which becomes highly significant in homozygous dogs.

  19. Analysis of SNPs and haplotypes in vitamin D pathway genes and renal cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Karami

    Full Text Available In the kidney vitamin D is converted to its active form. Since vitamin D exerts its activity through binding to the nuclear vitamin D receptor (VDR, most genetic studies have primarily focused on variation within this gene. Therefore, analysis of genetic variation in VDR and other vitamin D pathway genes may provide insight into the role of vitamin D in renal cell carcinoma (RCC etiology. RCC cases (N = 777 and controls (N = 1,035 were genotyped to investigate the relationship between RCC risk and variation in eight target genes. Minimum-p-value permutation (Min-P tests were used to identify genes associated with risk. A three single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP sliding window was used to identify chromosomal regions with a False Discovery Rate of <10%, where subsequently, haplotype relative risks were computed in Haplostats. Min-P values showed that VDR (p-value = 0.02 and retinoid-X-receptor-alpha (RXRA (p-value = 0.10 were associated with RCC risk. Within VDR, three haplotypes across two chromosomal regions of interest were identified. The first region, located within intron 2, contained two haplotypes that increased RCC risk by approximately 25%. The second region included a haplotype (rs2239179, rs12717991 across intron 4 that increased risk among participants with the TC (OR = 1.31, 95% CI = 1.09-1.57 haplotype compared to participants with the common haplotype, TT. Across RXRA, one haplotype located 3' of the coding sequence (rs748964, rs3118523, increased RCC risk 35% among individuals with the variant haplotype compared to those with the most common haplotype. This study comprehensively evaluated genetic variation across eight vitamin D pathway genes in relation to RCC risk. We found increased risk associated with VDR and RXRA. Replication studies are warranted to confirm these findings.

  20. Direct determination of MUC5B promoter haplotypes based on the method of single-strand conformation polymorphism and their statistical estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamio, Koichiro; Matsushita, Ikumi; Tanaka, Goh; Ohashi, Jun; Hijikata, Minako; Nakata, Koh; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Azuma, Arata; Kudoh, Shoji; Keicho, Naoto

    2004-09-01

    Haplotype-based human genome research is important in identifying disease susceptibility genes efficiently. Although haplotype reconstruction by statistical methods is widely used, direct haplotype determination by molecular techniques has also been developed as a complementary method for statistical estimation. In this study, we demonstrate a molecular haplotyping method making use of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) gels. We identified 10 common SNPs and a dinucleotide insertion/deletion polymorphism within 2-kb region upstream of the transcription initiation site of MUC5B and determined haplotype structure, dividing the region into two DNA fragments. Real haplotypes were determined unambiguously by our SSCP-based analysis with fragments longer than 1 kb. Haplotypes reconstructed from diploid genotypes in the same region by the statistical methods including EM algorithm were also evaluated. Direct comparison between statistical estimation and direct determination of haplotypes revealed that major haplotypes containing multiple marker sites showing strong LD are estimated in great accuracy but that a variety of haplotypes reflecting weak LD are not reconstructed precisely enough. Our data can be helpful in implementing molecular haplotyping or statistical estimation, since usage of these methods may be determined depending on the haplotype structures.

  1. MHC class II super-enhancer increases surface expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ and affects cytokine production in autoimmune vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Giulio; Hayashi, Masahiro; Jin, Ying; Yorgov, Daniel; Santorico, Stephanie A; Holcomb, Cherie; Rastrou, Melinda; Erlich, Henry; Tengesdal, Isak W; Dagna, Lorenzo; Neff, C Preston; Palmer, Brent E; Spritz, Richard A; Dinarello, Charles A

    2016-02-02

    Genetic risk for autoimmunity in HLA genes is most often attributed to structural specificity resulting in presentation of self-antigens. Autoimmune vitiligo is strongly associated with the MHC class II region. Here, we fine-map vitiligo MHC class II genetic risk to three SNPs only 47 bp apart, located within a predicted super-enhancer in an intergenic region between HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQA1, localized by a genome-wide association study of 2,853 Caucasian vitiligo patients. The super-enhancer corresponds to an expression quantitative trait locus for expression of HLA-DR and HLA-DQ RNA; we observed elevated surface expression of HLA-DR (P = 0.008) and HLA-DQ (P = 0.02) on monocytes from healthy subjects homozygous for the high-risk SNP haplotype. Unexpectedly, pathogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects homozygous for the high-risk super-enhancer haplotype exhibited greater increase in production of IFN-γ and IL-1β than cells from subjects homozygous for the low-risk haplotype. Specifically, production of IFN-γ on stimulation of dectin-1, mannose, and Toll-like receptors with Candida albicans and Staphylococcus epidermidis was 2.5- and 2.9-fold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects, respectively (P = 0.007 and P = 0.01). Similarly, production of IL-1β was fivefold higher in high-risk subjects than in low-risk subjects (P = 0.02). Increased production of immunostimulatory cytokines in subjects carrying the high-risk haplotype may act as an "adjuvant" during the presentation of autoantigens, tying together genetic variation in the MHC with the development of autoimmunity. This study demonstrates that for risk of autoimmune vitiligo, expression level of HLA class II molecules is as or more important than antigen specificity.

  2. MHC Genes Linked to Autoimmune Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deitiker, Philip; Atassi, M Zouhair

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs), or autoinflammatoiy diseases, are growing in complexity as diagnoses improve and many factors escalate disease risk. Considerable genetic similarity is found among ADs, and they are frequently associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes. However, a given disease may be associated with more than one human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allotype, and a given HLA may be associated with more than one AD. The associations of non-MHC genes with AD present an additional problem, and the situation is further complicated by the role that other factors, such as age, diet, therapeutic drugs, and regional influences, play in disease. This review discusses some of the genetics and biochemistry of HLA-linked AD and inflammation, covering some of the best-studied examples and summarizing indicators for class I- and II-mediated disease. However, the scope of this review limits a detailed discussion of all known ADs.

  3. Prediction of MHC class I binding peptides, using SVMHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elofsson Arne

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-cells are key players in regulating a specific immune response. Activation of cytotoxic T-cells requires recognition of specific peptides bound to Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules. MHC-peptide complexes are potential tools for diagnosis and treatment of pathogens and cancer, as well as for the development of peptide vaccines. Only one in 100 to 200 potential binders actually binds to a certain MHC molecule, therefore a good prediction method for MHC class I binding peptides can reduce the number of candidate binders that need to be synthesized and tested. Results Here, we present a novel approach, SVMHC, based on support vector machines to predict the binding of peptides to MHC class I molecules. This method seems to perform slightly better than two profile based methods, SYFPEITHI and HLA_BIND. The implementation of SVMHC is quite simple and does not involve any manual steps, therefore as more data become available it is trivial to provide prediction for more MHC types. SVMHC currently contains prediction for 26 MHC class I types from the MHCPEP database or alternatively 6 MHC class I types from the higher quality SYFPEITHI database. The prediction models for these MHC types are implemented in a public web service available at http://www.sbc.su.se/svmhc/. Conclusions Prediction of MHC class I binding peptides using Support Vector Machines, shows high performance and is easy to apply to a large number of MHC class I types. As more peptide data are put into MHC databases, SVMHC can easily be updated to give prediction for additional MHC class I types. We suggest that the number of binding peptides needed for SVM training is at least 20 sequences.

  4. Fetal hemoglobin in sickle cell anemia: genetic studies of the Arab-Indian haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Duyen; Bae, Harold; Steinberg, Martin H; Sebastiani, Paola; Solovieff, Nadia; Baldwin, Clinton T; Melista, Efthymia; Safaya, Surinder; Farrer, Lindsay A; Al-Suliman, Ahmed M; Albuali, Waleed H; Al Bagshi, Muneer H; Naserullah, Zaki; Akinsheye, Idowu; Gallagher, Patrick; Luo, Hong-yuan; Chui, David H K; Farrell, John J; Al-Ali, Amein K; Alsultan, Abdulrahman

    2013-06-01

    Sickle cell anemia is common in the Middle East and India where the HbS gene is sometimes associated with the Arab-Indian (AI) β-globin gene (HBB) cluster haplotype. In this haplotype of sickle cell anemia, fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels are 3-4 fold higher than those found in patients with HbS haplotypes of African origin. Little is known about the genetic elements that modulate HbF in AI haplotype patients. We therefore studied Saudi HbS homozygotes with the AI haplotype (mean HbF 19.2±7.0%, range 3.6 to 39.6%) and employed targeted genotyping of polymorphic sites to explore cis- and trans- acting elements associated with high HbF expression. We also described sequences which appear to be unique to the AI haplotype for which future functional studies are needed to further define their role in HbF modulation. All cases, regardless of HbF concentration, were homozygous for AI haplotype-specific elements cis to HBB. SNPs in BCL11A and HBS1L-MYB that were associated with HbF in other populations explained only 8.8% of the variation in HbF. KLF1 polymorphisms associated previously with high HbF were not present in the 44 patients tested. More than 90% of the HbF variance in sickle cell patients with the AI haplotype remains unexplained by the genetic loci that we studied. The dispersion of HbF levels among AI haplotype patients suggests that other genetic elements modulate the effects of the known cis- and trans-acting regulators. These regulatory elements, which remain to be discovered, might be specific in the Saudi and some other populations where HbF levels are especially high.

  5. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil

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    Wellington dos Santos Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5'ε, HindIII-Gγ, HindIII-ªγ, HincII-'ψβ1 and HincII-3''ψβ1 were analyzed in three populations (n = 114 from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the "quilombo community", from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+----,3(----+,4(-+--+and6(-++-+onthe βA chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (-++++and 14 (++--+, were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16 had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin and CAR (Central African Republic, with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil.

  6. Low enzymatic activity haplotypes of the human catechol-O-methyltransferase gene: enrichment for marker SNPs.

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    Andrea G Nackley

    Full Text Available Catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT is an enzyme that plays a key role in the modulation of catechol-dependent functions such as cognition, cardiovascular function, and pain processing. Three common haplotypes of the human COMT gene, divergent in two synonymous and one nonsynonymous (val(158met position, designated as low (LPS, average (APS, and high pain sensitive (HPS, are associated with experimental pain sensitivity and risk of developing chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. APS and HPS haplotypes produce significant functional effects, coding for 3- and 20-fold reductions in COMT enzymatic activity, respectively. In the present study, we investigated whether additional minor single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, accruing in 1 to 5% of the population, situated in the COMT transcript region contribute to haplotype-dependent enzymatic activity. Computer analysis of COMT ESTs showed that one synonymous minor SNP (rs769224 is linked to the APS haplotype and three minor SNPs (two synonymous: rs6267, rs740602 and one nonsynonymous: rs8192488 are linked to the HPS haplotype. Results from in silico and in vitro experiments revealed that inclusion of allelic variants of these minor SNPs in APS or HPS haplotypes did not modify COMT function at the level of mRNA folding, RNA transcription, protein translation, or enzymatic activity. These data suggest that neutral variants are carried with APS and HPS haplotypes, while the high activity LPS haplotype displays less linked variation. Thus, both minor synonymous and nonsynonymous SNPs in the coding region are markers of functional APS and HPS haplotypes rather than independent contributors to COMT activity.

  7. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington dos Santos Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5'ε, HindIII-Gγ, HindIII-ªγ, HincII-'ψβ1 and HincII-3''ψβ1 were analyzed in three populations (n = 114 from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the "quilombo community", from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+----,3(----+,4(-+--+and6(-++-+onthe βA chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (-++++and 14 (++--+, were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16 had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin and CAR (Central African Republic, with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil.

  8. β-globin haplotypes in normal and hemoglobinopathic individuals from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos Silva, Wellington; de Nazaré Klautau-Guimarães, Maria; Grisolia, Cesar Koppe

    2010-07-01

    Five restriction site polymorphisms in the β-globin gene cluster (HincII-5' ε, HindIII-(G) γ, HindIII-(A) γ, HincII- ψβ1 and HincII-3' ψβ1) were analyzed in three populations (n = 114) from Reconcavo Baiano, State of Bahia, Brazil. The groups included two urban populations from the towns of Cachoeira and Maragojipe and one rural Afro-descendant population, known as the "quilombo community", from Cachoeira municipality. The number of haplotypes found in the populations ranged from 10 to 13, which indicated higher diversity than in the parental populations. The haplotypes 2 (+ - - - -), 3 (- - - - +), 4 (- + - - +) and 6 (- + + - +) on the β(A) chromosomes were the most common, and two haplotypes, 9 (- + + + +) and 14 (+ + - - +), were found exclusively in the Maragojipe population. The other haplotypes (1, 5, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 16) had lower frequencies. Restriction site analysis and the derived haplotypes indicated homogeneity among the populations. Thirty-two individuals with hemoglobinopathies (17 sickle cell disease, 12 HbSC disease and 3 HbCC disease) were also analyzed. The haplotype frequencies of these patients differed significantly from those of the general population. In the sickle cell disease subgroup, the predominant haplotypes were BEN (Benin) and CAR (Central African Republic), with frequencies of 52.9% and 32.4%, respectively. The high frequency of the BEN haplotype agreed with the historical origin of the afro-descendant population in the state of Bahia. However, this frequency differed from that of Salvador, the state capital, where the CAR and BEN haplotypes have similar frequencies, probably as a consequence of domestic slave trade and subsequent internal migrations to other regions of Brazil.

  9. Complementarity of Binding Motifs is a General Property of HLA-A and HLA-B Molecules and Does Not Seem to Effect HLA Haplotype Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Xiangyu; De Boer, Rob J; van Baarle, Debbie; Maiers, Martin; Kesmir, Can

    2013-01-01

    Different human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent) are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune) disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B) using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP). We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and -B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favoring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases.

  10. Complementarity of binding motifs is a general property of HLA-A and HLA-B molecules and does not seem to effect HLA haplotype composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyu eRao

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Different HLA haplotypes (i.e., the specific combinations of HLA-A, -B, -DR alleles inherited together from one parent are observed in different frequencies in human populations. Some haplotypes, like HLA-A1-B8, are very frequent, reaching up to 10% in the Caucasian population, while others are very rare. Numerous studies have identified associations between HLA haplotypes and diseases, and differences in haplotype frequencies can in part be explained by these associations: the stronger the association with a severe (autoimmune disease, the lower the expected HLA haplotype frequency. The peptide repertoires of the HLA molecules composing a haplotype can also influence the frequency of a haplotype. For example, it would seem advantageous to have HLA molecules with non-overlapping binding specificities within a haplotype, as individuals expressing such an haplotype would present a diverse set of peptides from viruses and pathogenic bacteria on the cell surface. To test this hypothesis, we collect the proteome data from a set of common viruses, and estimate the total ligand repertoire of HLA class I haplotypes (HLA-A-B using in silico predictions. We compare the size of these repertoires to the HLA haplotype frequencies reported in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP. We find that in most HLA-A and HLA-B pairs have fairly distinct binding motifs, and that the observed haplotypes do not contain HLA-A and –B molecules with more distinct binding motifs than random HLA-A and HLA-B pairs. In addition, the population frequency of a haplotype is not correlated to the distinctness of its HLA-A and HLA-B peptide binding motifs. These results suggest that there is a not a strong selection pressure on the haplotype level favouring haplotypes having HLA molecules with distinct binding motifs, which would result the largest possible presented peptide repertoires in the context of infectious diseases.

  11. Canis mtDNA HV1 database: a web-based tool for collecting and surveying Canis mtDNA HV1 haplotype in public database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Quan Ke; Chung, Dung Anh; Tran, Hoang-Dung

    2017-06-26

    Canine and wolf mitochondrial DNA haplotypes, which can be used for forensic or phylogenetic analyses, have been defined in various schemes depending on the region analyzed. In recent studies, the 582 bp fragment of the HV1 region is most commonly used. 317 different canine HV1 haplotypes have been reported in the rapidly growing public database GenBank. These reported haplotypes contain several inconsistencies in their haplotype information. To overcome this issue, we have developed a Canis mtDNA HV1 database. This database collects data on the HV1 582 bp region in dog mitochondrial DNA from the GenBank to screen and correct the inconsistencies. It also supports users in detection of new novel mutation profiles and assignment of new haplotypes. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database (CHD) contains 5567 nucleotide entries originating from 15 subspecies in the species Canis lupus. Of these entries, 3646 were haplotypes and grouped into 804 distinct sequences. 319 sequences were recognized as previously assigned haplotypes, while the remaining 485 sequences had new mutation profiles and were marked as new haplotype candidates awaiting further analysis for haplotype assignment. Of the 3646 nucleotide entries, only 414 were annotated with correct haplotype information, while 3232 had insufficient or lacked haplotype information and were corrected or modified before storing in the CHD. The CHD can be accessed at http://chd.vnbiology.com . It provides sequences, haplotype information, and a web-based tool for mtDNA HV1 haplotyping. The CHD is updated monthly and supplies all data for download. The Canis mtDNA HV1 database contains information about canine mitochondrial DNA HV1 sequences with reconciled annotation. It serves as a tool for detection of inconsistencies in GenBank and helps identifying new HV1 haplotypes. Thus, it supports the scientific community in naming new HV1 haplotypes and to reconcile existing annotation of HV1 582 bp sequences.

  12. Atypical beta(s) haplotypes are generated by diverse genetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zago, M A; Silva, W A; Dalle, B; Gualandro, S; Hutz, M H; Lapoumeroulie, C; Tavella, M H; Araujo, A G; Krieger, J E; Elion, J; Krishnamoorthy, R

    2000-02-01

    The majority of the chromosomes with the beta(S) gene have one of the five common haplotypes, designated as Benin, Bantu, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian haplotypes. However, in every large series of sickle cell patients, 5-10% of the chromosomes have less common haplotypes, usually referred to as "atypical" haplotypes. In order to explore the genetic mechanisms that could generate these atypical haplotypes, we extended our analysis to other rarely studied polymorphic markers of the beta(S)-gene cluster, in a total of 40 chromosomes with uncommon haplotypes from Brazil and Cameroon. The following polymorphisms were examined: seven restriction site polymorphisms of the epsilongammadeltabeta-cluster, the pre-(G)gamma framework sequence including the 6-bp deletion/insertion pattern, HS-2 LCR (AT)xR(AT)y and pre-beta (AT)xTy repeat motifs, the GC/TT polymorphism at -1105-1106 of (G)gamma-globin gene, the C/T polymorphism at -551 of the beta-globin gene, and the intragenic beta-globin gene framework. Among the Brazilian subjects, the most common atypical structure (7/16) was a Bantu 3'-subhaplotype associated with different 5'-sequences, while in two chromosomes a Benin 3'-subhaplotype was associated with two different 5'-subhaplotypes. A hybrid Benin/Bantu configuration was also observed. In three chromosomes, the atypical haplotype differed from the typical one by the change of a single restriction site. In 2/134 chromosomes identified as having a typical Bantu RFLP-haplotype, a discrepant LCR repeat sequence was observed, probably owing to a crossover 5' to the epsilon-gene. Among 80 beta(S) chromosomes from Cameroon, 22 were associated with an atypical haplotype. The most common structure was represented by a Benin haplotype (from the LCR to the beta-gene) with a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In two cases a Bantu LCR was associated with a Benin haplotype and a non-Benin segment 3' to the beta-globin gene. In three other cases, a more complex

  13. MHC class I genes in a New World primate, the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), have evolved by an active process of loci turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadavid, L F; Mejía, B E; Watkins, D I

    1999-03-01

    Lymphocytes of a New World primate, the cotton-top tamarin (Saguinus oedipus), express classical G-related major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules with unusually limited polymorphism and variability. Three G-related loci, an F locus, an E locus, and two pseudogenes (So-N1 and So-N3) have been identified by cDNA library screening and extensive PCR analysis of both cDNA and genomic DNA from the cotton-top tamarin. Furthermore, each genus of the subfamily Callitrichinae (tamarins and marmosets) appears to express its own unique set of MHC class I genes, likely due to a rapid turnover of loci. The rapid emergence of unique MHC class I genes in the Callitrichinae genera, resulting from an active process of duplication and inactivation of loci, may account for the limited diversity of the MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin. To determine the nature of the entire complement of MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin, we synthesized a genomic DNA library and screened it with MHC class I-specific probes. We isolated nine new MHC class I pseudogenes from this library. These newly isolated tamarin G-related MHC class I pseudogenes are not closely related to any of their functional counterparts in the tamarin, suggesting that they do not share a recent common ancestral gene with the tamarin's currently expressed MHC class I loci. In addition, these tamarin sequences display a high rate of nonsynonymous substitutions in their putative peptide binding region. This indicates that the genes from which they have derived were likely subject to positive selection and, therefore, were once functional. Our data support the notion that an extremely high rate of loci turnover is largely responsible for the limited diversity of the MHC class I genes in the cotton-top tamarin.

  14. Mitochondrial haplotypes reveal a strong genetic structure for three Indian sheep breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardeshi, V C; Kadoo, N Y; Sainani, M N; Meadows, J R S; Kijas, J W; Gupta, V S

    2007-10-01

    This survey represents the first characterization of mitochondrial DNA diversity within three breeds of Indian sheep (two strains of the Deccani breed, as well as the Bannur and Garole breeds) from different geographic regions and with divergent phenotypic characteristics. A 1061-bp fragment of the mitochondrial genome spanning the control region, a portion of the 12S rRNA gene and the complete phenyl tRNA gene, was sequenced from 73 animals and compared with the corresponding published sequence from European and Asian breeds and the European Mouflon (Ovis musimon). Analysis of all 156 sequences revealed 73 haplotypes, 52 of which belonged to the Indian breeds. The three Indian breeds had no haplotypes in common, but one Indian haplotype was shared with European and other Asian breeds. The highest nucleotide and haplotype diversity was observed in the Bannur breed (0.00355 and 0.981 respectively), while the minimum was in the Sangamneri strain of the Deccani breed (0.00167 and 0.882 respectively). All 52 Indian haplotypes belonged to mitochondrial lineage A. Therefore, these Indian sheep are distinct from other Asian and European breeds studied so far. The relationships among the haplotypes showed strong breed structure and almost no introgression among these Indian breeds, consistent with Indian sheep husbandry, which discourages genetic exchange between breeds. These results have implications for the conservation of India's ovine biodiversity and suggest a common origin for the breeds investigated.

  15. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-López, Nidia; Ovando-Medina, Isidro; Salvador-Figueroa, Miguel; Molina-Freaner, Francisco; Avendaño-Arrazate, Carlos H; Vázquez-Ovando, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations) and genetic origin (based on a previous study). We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels) types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038). Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80) with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1) for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach) and four genetic groups (genetic approach). This common haplotype (ancient) derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (F ST = 0) and SAMOVA (F ST = 0.04393) results. One population (Mazatán) showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding.

  16. Unique haplotypes of cacao trees as revealed by trnH-psbA chloroplast DNA

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    Nidia Gutiérrez-López

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cacao trees have been cultivated in Mesoamerica for at least 4,000 years. In this study, we analyzed sequence variation in the chloroplast DNA trnH-psbA intergenic spacer from 28 cacao trees from different farms in the Soconusco region in southern Mexico. Genetic relationships were established by two analysis approaches based on geographic origin (five populations and genetic origin (based on a previous study. We identified six polymorphic sites, including five insertion/deletion (indels types and one transversion. The overall nucleotide diversity was low for both approaches (geographic = 0.0032 and genetic = 0.0038. Conversely, we obtained moderate to high haplotype diversity (0.66 and 0.80 with 10 and 12 haplotypes, respectively. The common haplotype (H1 for both networks included cacao trees from all geographic locations (geographic approach and four genetic groups (genetic approach. This common haplotype (ancient derived a set of intermediate haplotypes and singletons interconnected by one or two mutational steps, which suggested directional selection and event purification from the expansion of narrow populations. Cacao trees from Soconusco region were grouped into one cluster without any evidence of subclustering based on AMOVA (FST = 0 and SAMOVA (FST = 0.04393 results. One population (Mazatán showed a high haplotype frequency; thus, this population could be considered an important reservoir of genetic material. The indels located in the trnH-psbA intergenic spacer of cacao trees could be useful as markers for the development of DNA barcoding.

  17. Genetic basis for MHC-dependent mate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2007-01-01

    Genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), best known for their role in immune recognition and transplantation success, are also involved in modulating mate choice in mice. Early studies with inbred, congenic mouse lines showed that mate choice tended to favor nonself MHC types. A similar phenomenon was demonstrated with semi-wild mice as well. Subsequent studies showed that, rather than nonself choices, it was more accurate to say that mice chose nonparental MHC types for mates since preferences for nonself could be reversed if mice were fostered from birth on parents with nonself MHC types. Other studies have demonstrated that parent-offspring recognition is also regulated by MHC-determined signals suggesting that this system is one of general importance for mouse behavior. Many studies have now demonstrated that volatile mouse body odors are regulated by MHC genes and it is presumably these odor differences that underlie mate choice and familial recognition. Recent studies have shown that many odorants are controlled by the MHC but the mechanism by which MHC genes exert their influence has not been identified. Surprisingly, not only are volatile body odors influenced by MHC genes but so too are nonvolatile signals. Peptides bound to the MHC protein may also function in individual recognition. The extent to which this system is involved in mate choice of other species is unclear although there are some suggestive studies. Indeed, there is tentative evidence that MHC differences, presumably acting via odor changes, may influence human partner selection. Further studies should clarify both the mechanism underlying MHC influence on body odors as well as the generality of their importance in mate selection.

  18. The Haplotyping Problem: An Overview of Computational Models and Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paola Bonizzoni; Gianluca Della Vedova; Riccardo Dondi; Jing Li

    2003-01-01

    The investigation of genetic differences among humans has given evidence that mutations in DNA sequences are responsible for some genetic diseases. The most common mutation is the one that involves only a single nucleotide of the DNA sequence, which is called a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). As a consequence, computing a complete map of all SNPs occurring in the human populations is one of the primary goals of recent studies in human genomics. The construction of such a map requires to determine the DNA sequences that from all chromosomes. In diploid organisms like humans, each chromosome consists of two sequences called haplotypes. Distinguishing the information contained in both haplotypes when analyzing chromosome sequences poses several new computational issues which collectively form a new emerging topic of Computational Biology known as Haplotyping.This paper is a comprehensive study of some new combinatorial approaches proposed in this research area and it mainly focuses on the formulations and algorithmic solutions of some basic biological problems. Three statistical approaches are briefly discussed at the end of the paper.

  19. Insights into HLA-G genetics provided by worldwide haplotype diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick C Castelli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human Leucocyte Antigen G (HLA-G belongs to the family of nonclassical HLA class I genes, located within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC. HLA-G has been the target of most recent research regarding the function of class I nonclassical genes. The main features that distinguish HLA-G from classical class I genes are: a limited protein variability; b alternative splicing generating several membrane bound and soluble isoforms; c short cytoplasmic tail; d modulation of immune response (immune tolerance; e restricted expression to certain tissues. In the present work, we describe the HLA-G gene structure and address the HLA-G variability and haplotype diversity among several populations around the world, considering each of its major segments (promoter, coding and 3’untranslated regions. For this purpose, we developed a pipeline to reevaluate the 1000Genomes data and recover miscalled or missing genotypes and haplotypes. It became clear that the overall structure of the HLA-G molecule has been maintained during the evolutionary process and that most of the variation sites found in the HLA-G coding region are either coding synonymous or intronic mutations. In addition, only a few frequent and divergent extended haplotypes are found when the promoter, coding and 3’ untranslated regions are evaluated together. The divergence is particularly evident for the regulatory regions. The population comparisons confirmed that most of the HLA-G variability has originated before human dispersion from Africa and that the allele and haplotype frequencies have probably been shaped by strong selective pressures.

  20. Extensive diversification of MHC in Chinese giant salamanders Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC) reveals novel splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rong; Chen, Zhong-yuan; Wang, Jun; Yuan, Jiang-di; Liao, Xiang-yong; Gui, Jian-Fang; Zhang, Qi-Ya

    2014-02-01

    A series of MHC alleles (including 26 class IA, 27 class IIA, and 17 class IIB) were identified from Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC). These genes are similar to classical MHC molecules in terms of characteristic domains, functional residues, deduced tertiary structures and genetic diversity. The majority of variation between alleles is found in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), which is driven by positive Darwinian selection. The coexistence of two isoforms in MHC IA, IIA, and IIB alleles are shown: one full-length transcript and one novel splice variant. Despite lake of the external domains, these variants exhibit similar subcellular localization with the full-length transcripts. Moreover, the expression of MHC isoforms are up-regulated upon in vivo and in vitro stimulation with Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV), suggesting their potential roles in the immune response. The results provide insights into understanding MHC variation and function in this ancient and endangered urodele amphibian.

  1. Extended HLA haplotypes in a Carib Amerindian population: the Yucpa of the Perija Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layrisse, Z; Guedez, Y; Domínguez, E; Paz, N; Montagnani, S; Matos, M; Herrera, F; Ogando, V; Balbas, O; Rodríguez-Larralde, A

    2001-09-01

    Eleven MHC loci haplotypes have been defined among a Carib speaking Amerindian population; the Yucpa, inhabiting the northern section of the Perija Range, on the limits between Colombia and Venezuela. This tribe has been known with the name of "Motilones mansos" and is located close to the Chibcha-Paeze speaking Bari or "Motilones bravos." Seventy-three full blooded Yucpa living at the villages of Aroy, Marewa, and Peraya, were selected using a genealogy previously collected by an anthropologist and tested for Bf-C4AB complement allotypes and by serology, high resolution PCR-SSO and SBT typing for HLA class 1 and class 2 alleles. Combinations of 6 HLA-A, 6 HLA-B, 5 HLA-C, 1 Bf, 3 C4AB, 3 DQA1, 3DQB1 and 2 DPA1 and 2 DPB1 alleles present in this population originate 17 different haplotypes, 3 of which represent 63% of the haplotypic constitution of the tribe. The presence of 13 individuals homozygous for 11-loci haplotypes corroborates the existence of the following allelic combinations: DRB1*0411 DQA1*03011 DQB1*0302 DPA1*01 DPB1*0402 with HLA-A*6801 C*0702 B*3909 BfS C4 32 (f = 0.3372) or with A*0204 C*0702 B*3905 (f = 0.1977) and a third haplotype which differs only in DRB1*0403 and A*2402 (f = 0.0930). The results demonstrate the isolation of the tribe and the existence of high frequencies of a reduced number of "Amerindian" ancestral and novel class 1 and class 2 alleles (B*1522, DRB1*0807) with significant linkage disequilibria. These results will be useful to test the hypothesis that differentiation of Amerindian tribal groups will have to rely on haplotypes and micropolymorphism rather than allelic lineage frequencies due to the uniformity shown thus far by the putative descendants of the original Paleo-Indians.

  2. Rare missense variants within a single gene form yin yang haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, David

    2016-01-01

    Yin yang haplotype pairs differ at every SNP. They would not be accounted for by population models that incorporate sequential mutation, with or without recombination. Previous reports have claimed that there is a tendency for common SNPs to form yin yang haplotypes more often than would be expected by sequential mutation or by a random sample of all possible haplotypic arrangements of alleles. In the course of analysing next-generation sequencing data, instances of yin yang haplotypes being formed by very rare variants within a single gene were observed. As an example, this report describes a completely yin yang haplotype formed by eight rare missense variants in the ABCA13 gene. Of 1000 genome subjects, 21 have a copy of the alternate allele at all eight of these positions and a single subject is homozygous for all of them. None of the other 1070 subjects possesses any of the altetrnates. Thus, the eight alternate alleles are always found together and never occur separately. The existence of such yin yang haplotypes has important implications for statistical methods for analysing rare variants. Also, they may be of use for gaining a better understanding of the history of human populations.

  3. Extended haplotypes in rheumatoid arthritis and preliminary evidence for an interaction with immunoglobulin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttick, A; Briggs, D; Welsh, K; Jacoby, R; Williamson, E; Jones, V

    1986-06-01

    The incidence of extended haplotypes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex was compared between 20 probands with RA, their unaffected family members, and 42 controls. One haplotype only, HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2, was significantly increased in the patient group, whereas HLA-B7 BfS C4A*3 C4B*1 DR2 GLO1, which was the most common haplotype in the control groups, was absent. The immunoglobulin allotype Glm(2) was significantly increased in frequency in the RA patients, and analysis showed that of the seven patients carrying Bw62-DR4, five were G1m(2) positive. Further, the increase in frequency of the phenotype Gm(1,2,17,21,3,5,23) was also significant and was carried by two of four probands with the extended haplotype HLA-Bw62 BfS C4A*3 C4B*3 DR4 GLO2 and by one proband also bearing this haplotype but with a null allele at the C4A locus. The striking association of G1m(2) and Bw62 with DR4 in our patients suggests that in interaction of immunoglobulin genes with DR4 is stronger when DR4 is associated with particular haplotypes rather than with DR4 in general.

  4. Minor differences in haplotype frequency estimates can produce very large differences in heterogeneity test statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ke

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tests for association between a haplotype and disease are commonly performed using a likelihood ratio test for heterogeneity between case and control haplotype frequencies. Using data from a study of association between heroin dependence and the DRD2 gene, we obtained estimated haplotype frequencies and the associated likelihood ratio statistic using two different computer programs, MLOCUS and GENECOUNTING. We also carried out permutation testing to assess the empirical significance of the results obtained. Results Both programs yielded similar, though not identical, estimates for the haplotype frequencies. MLOCUS produced a p value of 1.8*10-15 and GENECOUNTING produced a p value of 5.4*10-4. Permutation testing produced a p value 2.8*10-4. Conclusion The fact that very large differences occur between the likelihood ratio statistics from the two programs may reflect the fact that the haplotype frequencies for the combined group are not constrained to be equal to the weighted averages of the frequencies for the cases and controls, as they would be if they were directly observed rather than being estimated. Minor differences in haplotype frequency estimates can result in very large differences in the likelihood ratio statistic and associated p value.

  5. KIR polymorphisms modulate peptide-dependent binding to an MHC class I ligand with a Bw6 motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud D Colantonio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs and their MHC class I ligands play a central role in the regulation of natural killer (NK cell responses to viral pathogens and tumors. Here we identify Mamu-A1*00201 (Mamu-A*02, a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque with a canonical Bw6 motif, as a ligand for Mamu-KIR3DL05. Mamu-A1*00201 tetramers folded with certain SIV peptides, but not others, directly stained primary NK cells and Jurkat cells expressing multiple allotypes of Mamu-KIR3DL05. Differences in binding avidity were associated with polymorphisms in the D0 and D1 domains of Mamu-KIR3DL05, whereas differences in peptide-selectivity mapped to the D1 domain. The reciprocal exchange of the third predicted MHC class I-contact loop of the D1 domain switched the specificity of two Mamu-KIR3DL05 allotypes for different Mamu-A1*00201-peptide complexes. Consistent with the function of an inhibitory KIR, incubation of lymphocytes from Mamu-KIR3DL05(+ macaques with target cells expressing Mamu-A1*00201 suppressed the degranulation of tetramer-positive NK cells. These observations reveal a previously unappreciated role for D1 polymorphisms in determining the selectivity of KIRs for MHC class I-bound peptides, and identify the first functional KIR-MHC class I interaction in the rhesus macaque. The modulation of KIR-MHC class I interactions by viral peptides has important implications to pathogenesis, since it suggests that the immunodeficiency viruses, and potentially other types of viruses and tumors, may acquire changes in epitopes that increase the affinity of certain MHC class I ligands for inhibitory KIRs to prevent the activation of specific NK cell subsets.

  6. MPID-T2: a database for sequence-structure-function analyses of pMHC and TR/pMHC structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Javed Mohammed; Cheruku, Harish Reddy; Tong, Joo Chuan; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2011-04-15

    Sequence-structure-function information is critical in understanding the mechanism of pMHC and TR/pMHC binding and recognition. A database for sequence-structure-function information on pMHC and TR/pMHC interactions, MHC-Peptide Interaction Database-TR version 2 (MPID-T2), is now available augmented with the latest PDB and IMGT/3Dstructure-DB data, advanced features and new parameters for the analysis of pMHC and TR/pMHC structures. http://biolinfo.org/mpid-t2. shoba.ranganathan@mq.edu.au Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Susceptibility to anti-glomerular basement membrane disease and Goodpasture syndrome is linked to MHC class II genes and the emergence of T cell-mediated immunity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, R; Danoff, T M; Okada, H; Neilson, E G

    1997-11-01

    We developed a new mouse model of human anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) disease to better characterize the genetic determinants of cell-mediated injury. While all major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes (H-2a, k, s, b, and d) immunized with alpha3 NC1 domains of type IV collagen produce anti-alpha3(IV) NC1 antibodies that cross-react with human Goodpasture [anti-GBM/anti-alpha3(IV) NC1] autoantibodies, only a few strains developed nephritis and lung hemorrhage associated with Goodpasture syndrome. Crescentic glomerulonephritis and lung hemorrhage were MHC-restricted in haplotypes H-2s, b, and d (A beta/A alpha region in H-2s) and associated with the emergence of an IL-12/Th1-like T cell phenotype. Lymphocytes or anti-alpha3(IV) NC1 antibodies from nephritogenic strains transfer disease to syngeneic recipients. However, passive transfer of isogenic alpha3(IV) NC1 antibodies into -/- T cell receptor-deficient mice failed to produce nephritis. Finally, nephritis and its associated IL-12/Th1-like T cell response attenuate in disease-susceptible mice tolerized orally to alpha3(IV) collagen before immunization. Our findings suggest collectively, as a hypothesis, that anti-GBM antibodies in mice only facilitate disease in MHC haplotypes capable of generating nephritogenic lymphocytes with special T cell repertoires.

  8. MHC Universal Cells Survive in an Allogeneic Environment after Incompatible Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constança Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell, tissue, and organ transplants are commonly performed for the treatment of different diseases. However, major histocompatibility complex (MHC diversity often prevents complete donor-recipient matching, resulting in graft rejection. This study evaluates in a preclinical model the capacity of MHC class I-silenced cells to engraft and grow upon allogeneic transplantation. Short hairpin RNA targeting β2-microglobulin (RN_shβ2m was delivered into fibroblasts derived from LEW/Ztm (RT1l (RT1-Al rats using a lentiviral-based vector. MHC class I (RT1-A- expressing and -silenced cells were injected subcutaneously in LEW rats (RT1l and MHC-congenic LEW.1W rats (RT1u, respectively. Cell engraftment and the status of the immune response were monitored for eight weeks after transplantation. In contrast to RT1-A-expressing cells, RT1-A-silenced fibroblasts became engrafted and were still detectable eight weeks after allogeneic transplantation. Plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were significantly higher in animals transplanted with RT1-A-expressing cells than in those receiving RT1-A-silenced cells. Furthermore, alloantigen-specific T-cell proliferation rates derived from rats receiving RT1-A-expressing cells were higher than those in rats transplanted with RT1-A-silenced cells. These data suggest that silencing MHC class I expression might overcome the histocompatibility barrier, potentially opening up new avenues in the field of cell transplantation and regenerative medicine.

  9. MHC Universal Cells Survive in an Allogeneic Environment after Incompatible Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Constança; Wedekind, Dirk; Müller, Thomas; Vahlsing, Stefanie; Horn, Peter A.; Seltsam, Axel; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Cell, tissue, and organ transplants are commonly performed for the treatment of different diseases. However, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity often prevents complete donor-recipient matching, resulting in graft rejection. This study evaluates in a preclinical model the capacity of MHC class I-silenced cells to engraft and grow upon allogeneic transplantation. Short hairpin RNA targeting β2-microglobulin (RN_shβ2m) was delivered into fibroblasts derived from LEW/Ztm (RT1l) (RT1-Al) rats using a lentiviral-based vector. MHC class I (RT1-A-) expressing and -silenced cells were injected subcutaneously in LEW rats (RT1l) and MHC-congenic LEW.1W rats (RT1u), respectively. Cell engraftment and the status of the immune response were monitored for eight weeks after transplantation. In contrast to RT1-A-expressing cells, RT1-A-silenced fibroblasts became engrafted and were still detectable eight weeks after allogeneic transplantation. Plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ were significantly higher in animals transplanted with RT1-A-expressing cells than in those receiving RT1-A-silenced cells. Furthermore, alloantigen-specific T-cell proliferation rates derived from rats receiving RT1-A-expressing cells were higher than those in rats transplanted with RT1-A-silenced cells. These data suggest that silencing MHC class I expression might overcome the histocompatibility barrier, potentially opening up new avenues in the field of cell transplantation and regenerative medicine. PMID:24350288

  10. MHC class II DQB diversity in the Japanese black bear, Ursus thibetanus japonicus

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    Yasukochi Yoshiki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are one of the most important genetic systems in the vertebrate immune response. The diversity of MHC genes may directly influence the survival of individuals against infectious disease. However, there has been no investigation of MHC diversity in the Asiatic black bear (Ursus thibetanus. Here, we analyzed 270-bp nucleotide sequences of the entire exon 2 region of the MHC DQB gene by using 188 samples from the Japanese black bear (Ursus thibetanus japonicus from 12 local populations. Results Among 185 of 188 samples, we identified 44 MHC variants that encoded 31 different amino acid sequences (allotypes and one putative pseudogene. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that MHC variants detected from the Japanese black bear are derived from the DQB locus. One of the 31 DQB allotypes, Urth-DQB*01, was found to be common to all local populations. Moreover, this allotype was shared between the black bear on the Asian continent and the Japanese black bear, suggesting that Urth-DQB*01 might have been maintained in the ancestral black bear population for at least 300,000 years. Our findings, from calculating the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions, indicate that balancing selection has maintained genetic variation of peptide-binding residues at the DQB locus of the Japanese black bear. From examination of genotype frequencies among local populations, we observed a considerably lower level of observed heterozygosity than expected. Conclusions The low level of observed heterozygosity suggests that genetic drift reduced DQB diversity in the Japanese black bear due to a bottleneck event at the population or species level. The decline of DQB diversity might have been accelerated by the loss of rare variants that have been maintained by negative frequency-dependent selection. Nevertheless, DQB diversity of the black bear appears to be relatively high compared with some other

  11. Cystic fibrosis in Afro-Brazilians: XK haplotypes analysis supports the European origin of p.F508del mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, D A S; Faucz, F R; de Alexandre, R B; Santana, M A; de Souza, E L S; Reis, F J C; Pereira-Ferrari, L; Sotomaior, V S; Culpi, L; Phillips, J A; Raskin, S

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common autosomal recessive disorder, being the p.F508del the most frequent mutation. Also, a nearby restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) named XK (KM19 and XV2C) is non-randomly associated with specific CF alleles. Our aim was to analyze the occurrence of the p.F508del mutation and XK haplotypes in Afro-Brazilians CF patients and controls, since these data is available for the other two main ethnic groups found in Brazil (Euro-Brazilians and Brazilian Amerindians), contributing for the whole comprehension of these haplotypes in the Brazilian population. A total of 103 patients and 54 controls were studied. PCR and PCR-RFLP methodologies were used to identify the presence of the p.F508del and the XK haplotype in the subjects. The combined data show that 84.2% of p.F508del mutation is associated with haplotype B and only 15.8% with haplotype A; no other haplotypes were found to be associated with this mutation. Our data suggest that the occurrence of p.F508del mutation and haplotype B in Afro-Brazilian patients occurs probably due to admixture with Euro-descendants. Therefore this mutation and haplotype could be used as a admixture marker.

  12. Exposing the specific roles of the invariant chain isoforms in shaping the MHC class II peptidome

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Simon eFortin; Maryse eCloutier; Jacques eThibodeau

    2013-01-01

    The peptide repertoire (peptidome) associated with MHC class II molecules (MHCIIs) is influenced by the polymorphic nature of the peptide binding groove but also by cell-intrinsic factors. The invariant chain (Ii) chaperones MHCIIs, affecting their folding and trafficking. Recent discoveries relating to Ii functions have provided insights as to how it edits the MHCII peptidome. In humans, the Ii gene encodes four different isoforms for which structure-function analyses have highlighted common...

  13. Founder mitochondrial haplotypes in Amerindian populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailliet, G; Rothhammer, F; Carnese, F R; Bravi, C M; Bianchi, N O

    1994-07-01

    It had been proposed that the colonization of the New World took place by three successive migrations from northeastern Asia. The first one gave rise to Amerindians (Paleo-Indians), the second and third ones to Nadene and Aleut-Eskimo, respectively. Variation in mtDNA has been used to infer the demographic structure of the Amerindian ancestors. The study of RFLP all along the mtDNA and the analysis of nucleotide substitutions in the D-loop region of the mitochondrial genome apparently indicate that most or all full-blooded Amerindians cluster in one of four different mitochondrial haplotypes that are considered to represent the founder maternal lineages of Paleo-Indians. We have studied the mtDNA diversity in 109 Amerindians belonging to 3 different tribes, and we have reanalyzed the published data on 482 individuals from 18 other tribes. Our study confirms the existence of four major Amerindian haplotypes. However, we also found evidence supporting the existence of several other potential founder haplotypes or haplotype subsets in addition to the four ancestral lineages reported. Confirmation of a relatively high number of founder haplotypes would indicate that early migration into America was not accompanied by a severe genetic bottleneck.

  14. MHCcluster, a method for functional clustering of MHC molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Lundegaard, Claus; Buus, Søren;

    2013-01-01

    binding specificity. The method has a flexible web interface that allows the user to include any MHC of interest in the analysis. The output consists of a static heat map and graphical tree-based visualizations of the functional relationship between MHC variants and a dynamic TreeViewer interface where...

  15. The systems biology of MHC class II antigen presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Petra

    2012-01-01

    Major histocompatibility class II molecules (MHC class II) are one of the key regulators of adaptive immunity because of their specific expression by professional antigen presenting cells (APC). They present peptides derived from endocytosed material to T helper lymphocytes. Consequently, MHC class

  16. A Method for Calling Copy Number Polymorphism Using Haplotypes

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    Gun Ho eJang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP and copy number variation (CNV are both widespread characteristic of the human genome, but are often called separately on common genotyping platforms. To capture integrated SNP and CNV information, methods have been developed for calling allelic specific copy numbers or so called copy number polymorphism (CNP, using limited inter-marker correlation. In this paper, we proposed a haplotype-based maximum likelihood method to call CNP, which takes advantage of the valuable multi-locus linkage disequilibrium (LD information in the population. We also developed a computationally efficient EM algorithm to estimate haplotype frequencies and optimize individual CNP calls simultaneously, even at presence of missing data. Through simulations, we demonstrated our model is more sensitive and accurate in detecting various CNV regions, compared with commonly-used CNV calling methods including PennCNV, another hidden Markov model using CNP, a scan statistic, segCNV, and cnvHap. Our method often performs better in the regions with higher LD, in longer CNV regions, and in common CNV than the opposite. We implemented our method on the genotypes of 90 HapMap CEU samples and 23 patients with acute lung injury (ALI. For each ALI patient the genotyping was performed twice. The CNPs from our method show good consistency and accuracy comparable to others.

  17. Haplotyping as perfect phylogeny: a direct approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafna, Vineet; Gusfield, Dan; Lancia, Giuseppe; Yooseph, Shibu

    2003-01-01

    A full haplotype map of the human genome will prove extremely valuable as it will be used in large-scale screens of populations to associate specific haplotypes with specific complex genetic-influenced diseases. A haplotype map project has been announced by NIH. The biological key to that project is the surprising fact that some human genomic DNA can be partitioned into long blocks where genetic recombination has been rare, leading to strikingly fewer distinct haplotypes in the population than previously expected (Helmuth, 2001; Daly et al., 2001; Stephens et al., 2001; Friss et al., 2001). In this paper we explore the algorithmic implications of the no-recombination in long blocks observation, for the problem of inferring haplotypes in populations. This assumption, together with the standard population-genetic assumption of infinite sites, motivates a model of haplotype evolution where the haplotypes in a population are assumed to evolve along a coalescent, which as a rooted tree is a perfect phylogeny. We consider the following algorithmic problem, called the perfect phylogeny haplotyping problem (PPH), which was introduced by Gusfield (2002) - given n genotypes of length m each, does there exist a set of at most 2n haplotypes such that each genotype is generated by a pair of haplotypes from this set, and such that this set can be derived on a perfect phylogeny? The approach taken by Gusfield (2002) to solve this problem reduces it to established, deep results and algorithms from matroid and graph theory. Although that reduction is quite simple and the resulting algorithm nearly optimal in speed, taken as a whole that approach is quite involved, and in particular, challenging to program. Moreover, anyone wishing to fully establish, by reading existing literature, the correctness of the entire algorithm would need to read several deep and difficult papers in graph and matroid theory. However, as stated by Gusfield (2002), many simplifications are possible and the

  18. pRB is required for interferon-gamma-induction of the MHC class II abeta gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X; Pattenden, S; Bremner, R

    1999-09-02

    pRB is required for IFN-gamma-induction of MHC class II in human tumor cell lines, providing a potential link between tumor suppressors and the immune system. However, other genes, such as cyclin D1, show pRB-dependency only in tumor cells, so by analogy, pRB may not be necessary for cII-regulation in normal cells. Here, we demonstrate that induction of the mouse MHC class II I-A heterodimer is normal in RB+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), but deficient in RB-/- MEFs. Inducibility is restored in RB-/- MEFs stably transfected with wild type RB cDNA or infected with an adenovirus expressing pRB. Thus, involvement of pRB in MHC class II expression is conserved in the mouse and is not an aberrant feature of tumorigenic, aneuploid, human tumor cells. Although cII genes are generally induced in a coordinate fashion, suggesting a common mechanism, we found that pRB was specifically required for induction of the Abeta, but not Aalpha or other MHC cII genes including Ebeta, Ii and H2-Malpha. Finally, IFN-gamma-induction of class II transactivator (CIITA), was pRB-independent, suggesting that pRB works downstream of this master-regulator of MHC class II expression.

  19. Distribution of CD163-positive cell and MHC class II-positive cell in the normal equine uveal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Yuto; Matsuda, Kazuya; Okamoto, Minoru; Takehana, Kazushige; Hirayama, Kazuko; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    Antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the uveal tract participate in ocular immunity including immune homeostasis and the pathogenesis of uveitis. In horses, although uveitis is the most common ocular disorder, little is known about ocular immunity, such as the distribution of APCs. In this study, we investigated the distribution of CD163-positive and MHC II-positive cells in the normal equine uveal tract using an immunofluorescence technique. Eleven eyes from 10 Thoroughbred horses aged 1 to 24 years old were used. Indirect immunofluorescence was performed using the primary antibodies CD163, MHC class II (MHC II) and CD20. To demonstrate the site of their greatest distribution, positive cells were manually counted in 3 different parts of the uveal tract (ciliary body, iris and choroid), and their average number was assessed by statistical analysis. The distribution of pleomorphic CD163- and MHC II-expressed cells was detected throughout the equine uveal tract, but no CD20-expressed cells were detected. The statistical analysis demonstrated the distribution of CD163- and MHC II-positive cells focusing on the ciliary body. These results demonstrated that the ciliary body is the largest site of their distribution in the normal equine uveal tract, and the ciliary body is considered to play important roles in uveal and/or ocular immune homeostasis. The data provided in this study will help further understanding of equine ocular immunity in the normal state and might be beneficial for understanding of mechanisms of ocular disorders, such as equine uveitis.

  20. Five amino acids in three HLA proteins explain most of the association between MHC and seropositive rheumatoid arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Sandor, Cynthia; Stahl, Eli A; Freudenberg, Jan; Lee, Hye-Soon; Jia, Xiaoming; Alfredsson, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Robert M Plenge; Peter K Gregersen; De Bakker, Paul I. W.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic association of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) to rheumatoid arthritis risk has commonly been attributed to HLA-DRB1 alleles. Yet controversy persists about the causal variants in HLA-DRB1 and the presence of independent effects elsewhere in the MHC. Using existing genome-wide SNP data in 5,018 seropositive cases and 14,974 controls, we imputed and tested classical alleles and amino acid polymorphisms for HLA-A, B, C, DPA1, DPB1, DQA1, DQB1, and DRB1 along with 3,117 SN...

  1. IL7Rα expression and upregulation by IFNβ in dendritic cell subsets is haplotype-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona C McKay

    Full Text Available The IL7Rα gene is unequivocally associated with susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS. Haplotype 2 (Hap 2 confers protection from MS, and T cells and dendritic cells (DCs of Hap 2 exhibit reduced splicing of exon 6, resulting in production of relatively less soluble receptor, and potentially more response to ligand. We have previously shown in CD4 T cells that IL7Rα haplotypes 1 and 2, but not 4, respond to interferon beta (IFNβ, the most commonly used immunomodulatory drug in MS, and that haplotype 4 (Hap 4 homozygotes have the highest risk of developing MS. We now show that IL7R expression increases in myeloid cells in response to IFNβ, but that the response is haplotype-dependent, with cells from homozygotes for Hap 4 again showing no response. This was shown using freshly derived monocytes, in vitro cultured immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells, and by comparing homozygotes for the common haplotypes, and relative expression of alleles in heterozygotes (Hap 4 vs not Hap 4. As for T cells, in all myeloid cell subsets examined, Hap 2 homozygotes showed a trend for reduced splicing of exon 6 compared to the other haplotypes, significantly so in most conditions. These data are consistent with increased signaling being protective from MS, constitutively and in response to IFNβ. We also demonstrate significant regulation of immune response, chemokine activity and cytokine biosynthesis pathways by IL7Rα signaling in IFNβ -treated myeloid subsets. IFNβ-responsive genes are over-represented amongst genes associated with MS susceptibility. IL7Rα haplotype may contribute to MS susceptibility through reduced capacity for IL7Rα signalling in myeloid cells, especially in the presence of IFNβ, and is currently under investigation as a predictor of therapeutic response.

  2. Spatial and temporal distribution of the neutral polymorphisms in the last ZFX intron: analysis of the haplotype structure and genealogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaruzelska, J; Zietkiewicz, E; Batzer, M; Cole, D E; Moisan, J P; Scozzari, R; Tavaré, S; Labuda, D

    1999-07-01

    With 10 segregating sites (simple nucleotide polymorphisms) in the last intron (1089 bp) of the ZFX gene we have observed 11 haplotypes in 336 chromosomes representing a worldwide array of 15 human populations. Two haplotypes representing 77% of all chromosomes were distributed almost evenly among four continents. Five of the remaining haplotypes were detected in Africa and 4 others were restricted to Eurasia and the Americas. Using the information about the ancestral state of the segregating positions (inferred from human-great ape comparisons), we applied coalescent analysis to estimate the age of the polymorphisms and the resulting haplotypes. The oldest haplotype, with the ancestral alleles at all the sites, was observed at low frequency only in two groups of African origin. Its estimated age of 740 to 1100 kyr corresponded to the time to the most recent common ancestor. The two most frequent worldwide distributed haplotypes were estimated at 550 to 840 and 260 to 400 kyr, respectively, while the age of the continentally restricted polymorphisms was 120 to 180 kyr and smaller. Comparison of spatial and temporal distribution of the ZFX haplotypes suggests that modern humans diverged from the common ancestral stock in the Middle Paleolithic era. Subsequent range expansion prevented substantial gene flow among continents, separating African groups from populations that colonized Eurasia and the New World.

  3. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes in relation to risk of coronary events and coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardys, Isabella; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; de Maat, Moniek P M

    2007-02-01

    Fibrin network structure has been correlated with coronary disease. Fibrinogen gamma and alpha (FGG and FGA) gene haplotypes (chromosome 4q28) may be associated with fibrin network structure, and thereby with rigidity of the fibrin clot and sensitivity of the fibrin clot to the fibrinolytic system. Through these mechanisms they may influence risk of cardiovascular disease. We set out to investigate the relation between combined fibrinogen FGG and FGA gene haplotypes, representing the common variation of the fibrinogen FGG and FGA genes, coronary events and measures of coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis. The study was embedded in the Rotterdam Study, a prospective population-based study among men and women aged >or=55 years. Common haplotypes were studied using seven tagging SNPs across a 30-kb region with the FGG and FGA genes. Incident coronary events were registered, and carotid intima-media thickness, carotid plaques, ankle-arm index, aortic calcification and coronary calcification were assessed. Seven haplotypes with frequencies >1% covered 97.5% of the genetic variation. In 5,667 participants without history of coronary heart disease (CHD), 733 CHD cases occurred during a median follow-up time of 11.9 years. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes were not associated with coronary events. Fibrinogen gene haplotypes did not show a consistent association with measures of coronary and extracoronary atherosclerosis. In conclusion, fibrinogen FGG and FGA gene haplotypes are not associated with coronary events, coronary atherosclerosis or extracoronary atherosclerosis. Confirmation of these findings by future population-based studies is warranted.

  4. MHC-linked susceptibility to a bacterial infection, but no MHC-linked cryptic female choice in whitefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedekind, C; Walker, M; Portmann, J; Cenni, B; Müller, R; Binz, T

    2004-01-01

    Non-random gamete fusion is one of several potential cryptic female choice mechanisms that have been postulated and that may enhance the survival probability of the offspring. Previous studies have found that gamete fusion in mice is influenced by genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. Here we test (i) whether there is MHC-dependent gamete fusion in whitefish (Coregonus sp.) and (ii) whether there is a link between the MHC and embryo susceptibility to an infection by the bacterium Pseudomonas fuorescens. We experimentally bred whitefish and reared sibships in several batches that either experienced or did not experience strong selection by P. fluorescens. We then determined the MHC class II B1 genotype of 1016 surviving larvae of several full sibships. We found no evidence for MHC-linked gamete fusion. However, in one of seven sibships we found a strong connection between the MHC class II genotype and embryo susceptibility to P. fluorescens. This connection was still significant after correcting for multiple testing. Hence, the MHC class II genotype can considerably influence embryo survival in whitefish, but gamete fusion seems to be random with respect to the MHC.

  5. Inducible nitric oxide synthase haplotype associated with migraine and aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de O S Mansur, Thiago; Gonçalves, Flavia M; Martins-Oliveira, Alisson; Speciali, Jose G; Dach, Fabiola; Lacchini, Riccardo; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2012-05-01

    Migraine is a complex neurological disorder with a clear neurogenic inflammatory component apparently including enhanced nitric oxide (NO) formation. Excessive NO amounts possibly contributing to migraine are derived from increased expression and activity of inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We tested the hypothesis that two functional, clinically relevant iNOS genetic polymorphisms (C(-1026)A-rs2779249 and G2087A-rs2297518) are associated with migraine with or without aura. We studied 142 healthy women without migraine (control group) and 200 women with migraine divided into two groups: 148 with migraine without aura (MWA) and 52 with aura (MA). Genotypes were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction using the Taqman(®) allele discrimination assays. The PHASE 2.1 software was used to estimate the haplotypes. The A allele for the G2087A polymorphism was more commonly found in the MA group than in the MWA group (28 vs. 18%; P 0.05). The haplotype combining both A alleles for the two polymorphisms was more commonly found in the MA group than in the control group or in the MWA group (19 vs. 10 or 8%; P = 0.0245 or 0.0027, respectively). Our findings indicate that the G2087A and the C(-1026)A polymorphism in the iNOS gene affect the susceptibility to migraine with aura when their effects are combined within haplotypes, whereas the G2087A affects the susceptibility to aura in migraine patients. These finding may have therapeutic implications when examining the effects of selective iNOS inhibitors.

  6. HLA class I and class II conserved extended haplotypes and their fragments or blocks in Mexicans: implications for the study of genetic diversity in admixed populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Zúñiga

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes are highly polymorphic and informative in disease association, transplantation, and population genetics studies with particular importance in the understanding of human population diversity and evolution. The aim of this study was to describe the HLA diversity in Mexican admixed individuals. We studied the polymorphism of MHC class I (HLA-A, -B, -C, and class II (HLA-DRB1, -DQB1 genes using high-resolution sequence based typing (SBT method and we structured the blocks and conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs in 234 non-related admixed Mexican individuals (468 haplotypes by a maximum likelihood method. We found that HLA blocks and CEHs are primarily from Amerindian and Caucasian origin, with smaller participation of African and recent Asian ancestry, demonstrating a great diversity of HLA blocks and CEHs in Mexicans from the central area of Mexico. We also analyzed the degree of admixture in this group using short tandem repeats (STRs and HLA-B that correlated with the frequency of most probable ancestral HLA-C/-B and -DRB1/-DQB1 blocks and CEHs. Our results contribute to the analysis of the diversity and ancestral contribution of HLA class I and HLA class II alleles and haplotypes of Mexican admixed individuals from Mexico City. This work will help as a reference to improve future studies in Mexicans regarding allotransplantation, immune responses and disease associations.

  7. Different patterns of evolution in the centromeric and telomeric regions of group A and B haplotypes of the human killer cell Ig-like receptor locus.

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    Chul-Woo Pyo

    Full Text Available The fast evolving human KIR gene family encodes variable lymphocyte receptors specific for polymorphic HLA class I determinants. Nucleotide sequences for 24 representative human KIR haplotypes were determined. With three previously defined haplotypes, this gave a set of 12 group A and 15 group B haplotypes for assessment of KIR variation. The seven gene-content haplotypes are all combinations of four centromeric and two telomeric motifs. 2DL5, 2DS5 and 2DS3 can be present in centromeric and telomeric locations. With one exception, haplotypes having identical gene content differed in their combinations of KIR alleles. Sequence diversity varied between haplotype groups and between centromeric and telomeric halves of the KIR locus. The most variable A haplotype genes are in the telomeric half, whereas the most variable genes characterizing B haplotypes are in the centromeric half. Of the highly polymorphic genes, only the 3DL3 framework gene exhibits a similar diversity when carried by A and B haplotypes. Phylogenetic analysis and divergence time estimates, point to the centromeric gene-content motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes having emerged ~6 million years ago, contemporaneously with the separation of human and chimpanzee ancestors. In contrast, the telomeric motifs that distinguish A and B haplotypes emerged more recently, ~1.7 million years ago, before the emergence of Homo sapiens. Thus the centromeric and telomeric motifs that typify A and B haplotypes have likely been present throughout human evolution. The results suggest the common ancestor of A and B haplotypes combined a B-like centromeric region with an A-like telomeric region.

  8. HLA micropolymorphisms strongly affect peptide-MHC multimer-based monitoring of antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buuren, Marit M; Dijkgraaf, Feline E; Linnemann, Carsten; Toebes, Mireille; Chang, Cynthia X L; Mok, Juk Yee; Nguyen, Melanie; van Esch, Wim J E; Kvistborg, Pia; Grotenbreg, Gijsbert M; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2014-01-15

    Peptide-MHC (pMHC) multimers have become one of the most widely used tools to measure Ag-specific T cell responses in humans. With the aim of understanding the requirements for pMHC-based personalized immunomonitoring, in which individuals expressing subtypes of the commonly studied HLA alleles are encountered, we assessed how the ability to detect Ag-specific T cells for a given peptide is affected by micropolymorphic differences between HLA subtypes. First, analysis of a set of 10 HLA-A*02:01-restricted T cell clones demonstrated that staining with pMHC multimers of seven distinct subtypes of the HLA-A*02 allele group was highly variable and not predicted by sequence homology. Second, to analyze the effect of minor sequence variation in a clinical setting, we screened tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes of an HLA-A*02:06 melanoma patient with either subtype-matched or HLA-A*02:01 multimers loaded with 145 different melanoma-associated Ags. This revealed that of the four HLA-A*02:06-restricted melanoma-associated T cell responses observed in this patient, two responses were underestimated and one was overlooked when using subtype-mismatched pMHC multimer collections. To our knowledge, these data provide the first demonstration of the strong effect of minor sequence variation on pMHC-based personalized immunomonitoring, and they provide tools to prevent this issue for common variants within the HLA-A*02 allele group.

  9. Separation of Y-chromosomal haplotypes from male DNA mixtures via multiplex haplotype-specific extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2015-11-01

    In forensic analysis, the interpretation of DNA mixtures is the subject of ongoing debate and requires expertise knowledge. Haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) is an alternative method that enables the separation of large chromosome fragments or haplotypes by using magnetic beads in conjunction with allele-specific probes. HSE thus allows physical separation of the components of a DNA mixture. Here, we present the first multiplex HSE separation of a Y-chromosomal haplotype consisting of six Yfiler short tandem repeat markers from a mixture of male DNA.

  10. Mhc-linked survival and lifetime reproductive success in a wild population of great tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepil, Irem; Lachish, Shelly; Sheldon, Ben C

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) genes are frequently used as a model for adaptive genetic diversity. Although associations between Mhc and disease resistance are frequently documented, little is known about the fitness consequences of Mhc variation in wild populations. Further, most work to date has involved testing associations between Mhc genotypes and fitness components. However, the functional diversity of the Mhc, and hence the mechanism by which selection on Mhc acts, depends on how genotypes map to the functional properties of Mhc molecules. Here, we test three hypotheses that relate Mhc diversity to fitness: (i) the maximal diversity hypothesis, (ii) the optimal diversity hypothesis and (iii) effect of specific Mhc types. We combine mark-recapture methods with analysis of long-term breeding data to investigate the effects of Mhc class I functional diversity (Mhc supertypes) on individual fitness in a wild great tit (Parus major) population. We found that the presence of three different Mhc supertypes was associated with three different components of individual fitness: survival, annual recruitment and lifetime reproductive success (LRS). Great tits possessing Mhc supertype 3 experienced higher survival rates than those that did not, whereas individuals with Mhc supertype 6 experienced higher LRS and were more likely to recruit offspring each year. Conversely, great tits that possessed Mhc supertype 5 had reduced LRS. We found no evidence for a selective advantage of Mhc diversity, in terms of either maximal or optimal supertype diversity. Our results support the suggestion that specific Mhc types are an important determinant of individual fitness.

  11. Psoriasis regression analysis of MHC loci identifies shared genetic variants with vitiligo.

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    Kun-Ju Zhu

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with genetic components of both immune system and the epidermis. PSOR1 locus (6q21 has been strongly associated with psoriasis; however, it is difficult to identify additional independent association due to strong linkage disequilibrium in the MHC region. We performed stepwise regression analyses of more than 3,000 SNPs in the MHC region genotyped using Human 610-Quad (Illumina in 1,139 cases with psoriasis and 1,132 controls of Han Chinese population to search for additional independent association. With four regression models obtained, two SNPs rs9468925 in HLA-C/HLA-B and rs2858881 in HLA-DQA2 were repeatedly selected in all models, suggesting that multiple loci outside PSOR1 locus were associated with psoriasis. More importantly we find that rs9468925 in HLA-C/HLA-B is associated with both psoriasis and vitiligo, providing first important evidence that two major skin diseases share a common genetic locus in the MHC, and a basis for elucidating the molecular mechanism of skin disorders.

  12. Role of non-classical MHC class I molecules in cancer immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Grazyna; Escors, David; Breckpot, Karine; Guerrero-Setas, David

    2013-01-01

    Growing neoplasms employ various mechanisms to evade immunosurveillance. The expression of non-classical MHC class I molecules by both immune and malignant cells in the tumor microenvironment constitute of the strategies used by tumors to circumvent the cytotoxic activity of effector cells of the immune system. The overexpression of HLA-G, -E, and -F is a common finding across a variety of malignancies. However, while the presence of HLA-G and HLA-E has been recently correlated with poor clinical outcome, information on the clinicopathological significance of HLA-F is limited. In the present review, we summarize studies on non-classical MHC class I molecules with special emphasis on their role in the modulation of anticancer immune responses. PMID:24482746

  13. Haplotype Analysis Discriminates Genetic Risk for DR3-Associated Endocrine Autoimmunity and Helps Define Extreme Risk for Addison’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Peter R.; Baschal, Erin E.; Fain, Pam R.; Triolo, Taylor M.; Nanduri, Priyaanka; Siebert, Janet C.; Armstrong, Taylor K.; Babu, Sunanda R.; Rewers, Marian J.; Gottlieb, Peter A.; Barker, Jennifer M.; Eisenbarth, George S.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Multiple autoimmune disorders (e.g. Addison’s disease, type 1 diabetes, celiac disease) are associated with HLA-DR3, but it is likely that alleles of additional genes in linkage disequilibrium with HLA-DRB1 contribute to disease. Objective: The objective of the study was to characterize major histocompatability complex (MHC) haplotypes conferring extreme risk for autoimmune Addison’s disease (AD). Design, Setting, and Participants: Eighty-six 21-hydroxylase autoantibody-positive, nonautoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1, Caucasian individuals collected from 1992 to 2009 with clinical AD from 68 families (12 multiplex and 56 simplex) were genotyped for HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQB1, MICA, HLA-B, and HLA-A as well as high density MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis for 34. Main Outcome Measures: AD and genotype were measured. Result: Ninety-seven percent of the multiplex individuals had both HLA-DR3 and HLA-B8 vs. 60% of simplex AD patients (P = 9.72 × 10−4) and 13% of general population controls (P = 3.00 × 10−19). The genotype DR3/DR4 with B8 was present in 85% of AD multiplex patients, 24% of simplex patients, and 1.5% of control individuals (P = 4.92 × 10−191). The DR3-B8 haplotype of AD patients had HLA-A1 less often (47%) than controls (81%, P = 7.00 × 10−5) and type 1 diabetes patients (73%, P = 1.93 × 10−3). Analysis of 1228 SNPs across the MHC for individuals with AD revealed a shorter conserved haplotype (3.8) with the loss of the extended conserved 3.8.1 haplotype approximately halfway between HLA-B and HLA-A. Conclusion: Extreme risk for AD, especially in multiplex families, is associated with haplotypic DR3 variants, in particular a portion (3.8) but not all of the conserved 3.8.1 haplotype. PMID:20631027

  14. Haplotypes and Sequence Variation in the Ovine Adiponectin Gene (ADIPOQ

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    Qing-Ming An

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adiponectin gene (ADIPOQ plays an important role in energy homeostasis. In this study five separate regions (regions 1 to 5 of ovine ADIPOQ were analysed using PCR-SSCP. Four different PCR-SSCP patterns (A1-D1, A2-D2 were detected in region-1 and region-2, respectively, with seven and six SNPs being revealed. In region-3, three different patterns (A3-C3 and three SNPs were observed. Two patterns (A4-B4, A5-B5 and two and one SNPs were observed in region-4 and region-5, respectively. In total, nineteen SNPs were detected, with five of them in the coding region and two (c.46T/C and c.515G/A putatively resulting in amino acid changes (p.Tyr16His and p.Lys172Arg. In region-1, -2 and -3 of 316 sheep from eight New Zealand breeds, variants A1, A2 and A3 were the most common, although variant frequencies differed in the eight breeds. Across region-1 and region-3, nine haplotypes were identified and haplotypes A1-A3, A1-C3, B1-A3 and B1-C3 were most common. These results indicate that the ADIPOQ gene is polymorphic and suggest that further analysis is required to see if the variation in the gene is associated with animal production traits.

  15. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G; Hart, Elizabeth A; Coggill, Penny C; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G R; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC.

  16. Haplotypes, sub-haplotypes and geographical distribution in Omani patients with sickle cell disease

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    Suha Mustafa Hassan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that patients homozygous for the sickle cell disease (SCD mutation have an identical genotype, the severity of the disease can be extremely variable. The hemoglobin (Hb S mutation has been described on five different haplotypes with different clinical expression. Identifying the genotypes, haplotypes and sub-haplotypes of the β gene cluster in Oman needs to be studied in more details to establish a correlation between the genotype/haplotype and phenotype diversity observed in SCD patients for prognostic purposes, accurate diagnosis and thus planning for the best tailored treatment. We have investigated 125 HbS homozygotes from different parts of Oman and determined their haplotypes and sub-haplotypes and correlated this to the hematological and clinical expression. We have found 11 haplotype combinations differently distributed in the country, with the Asian/Asian HbS haplotype being the most predominant. Sub-haplotypes was only found among patients with CAR/OmanI haplotype. As expected, the correlation between haplotypes, sub-haplotypes and disease severity was mainly associated with HbF expression. Our study on haplotype/phenotype correlation has shown which major haplotypes occur in the different regions of Oman. Furthermore, neither the haplotype or sub-haplotype nor the HbF alone appeared to be fully associable with the variable clinical phenotypes. External factors do occur and are associated with the expression of the disease.  尽管镰状细胞突变病(SCD)患者拥有相同的基因类型,但患者的病患程度却大相径庭。血红蛋白(Hb)S突变有五种不同的单体型,各种类型在临床表现上也不相同。为了识别在阿曼地区β基因簇的基因型、单体型,亚单体型,需要研究更多以SCD患者预后为目的,关于其观察到的基因型、单体型,表型多样性之间联系的更多细节,以便作出准确的诊断,为各

  17. Understanding the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns of malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockham, Carinna; Piel, Frédéric B; Gupta, Sunetra; Penman, Bridget S

    2015-12-01

    The malaria-protective β-globin polymorphisms, sickle-cell (β(S)) and β(0)-thalassaemia, are canonical examples of human adaptation to infectious disease. Occurring on distinct genetic backgrounds, they vary markedly in their patterns of linked genetic variation at the population level, suggesting different evolutionary histories. β(S) is associated with five classical restriction fragment length polymorphism haplotypes that exhibit remarkable specificity in their geographical distributions; by contrast, β(0)-thalassaemia mutations are found on haplotypes whose distributions overlap considerably. Here, we explore why these two polymorphisms display contrasting spatial haplotypic distributions, despite having malaria as a common selective pressure. We present a meta-population genetic model, incorporating individual-based processes, which tracks the evolution of β-globin polymorphisms on different haplotypic backgrounds. Our simulations reveal that, depending on the rate of mutation, a large population size and/or high population growth rate are required for both the β(S)- and the β(0)-thalassaemia-like patterns. However, whilst the β(S)-like pattern is more likely when population subdivision is high, migration low and long-distance migration absent, the opposite is true for β(0)-thalassaemia. Including gene conversion has little effect on the overall probability of each pattern; however, when inter-haplotype fitness variation exists, gene conversion is more likely to have contributed to the diversity of haplotypes actually present in the population. Our findings highlight how the contrasting spatial haplotype patterns exhibited by β(S) and β(0)-thalassaemia may provide important indications as to the evolution of these adaptive alleles and the demographic history of the populations in which they have evolved.

  18. Evidence of positive selection towards Zebuine haplotypes in the BoLA region of Brangus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goszczynski, D E; Corbi-Botto, C M; Durand, H M; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Munilla, S; Peral-Garcia, P; Cantet, R J C; Giovambattista, G

    2017-07-14

    The Brangus breed was developed to combine the superior characteristics of both of its founder breeds, Angus and Brahman. It combines the high adaptability to tropical and subtropical environments, disease resistance, and overall hardiness of Zebu cattle with the reproductive potential and carcass quality of Angus. It is known that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, also known as bovine leucocyte antigen: BoLA), located on chromosome 23, encodes several genes involved in the adaptive immune response and may be responsible for adaptation to harsh environments. The objective of this work was to evaluate whether the local breed ancestry percentages in the BoLA locus of a Brangus population diverged from the estimated genome-wide proportions and to identify signatures of positive selection in this genomic region. For this, 167 animals (100 Brangus, 45 Angus and 22 Brahman) were genotyped using a high-density single nucleotide polymorphism array. The local ancestry analysis showed that more than half of the haplotypes (55.0%) shared a Brahman origin. This value was significantly different from the global genome-wide proportion estimated by cluster analysis (34.7% Brahman), and the proportion expected by pedigree (37.5% Brahman). The analysis of selection signatures by genetic differentiation (F st ) and extended haplotype homozygosity-based methods (iHS and Rsb) revealed 10 and seven candidate regions, respectively. The analysis of the genes located within these candidate regions showed mainly genes involved in immune response-related pathway, while other genes and pathways were also observed (cell surface signalling pathways, membrane proteins and ion-binding proteins). Our results suggest that the BoLA region of Brangus cattle may have been enriched with Brahman haplotypes as a consequence of selection processes to promote adaptation to subtropical environments.

  19. Determination of haplotypes at structurally complex regions using emulsion haplotype fusion PCR

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    Tyson Jess

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotyping and massively-parallel sequencing projects result in a vast amount of diploid data that is only rarely resolved into its constituent haplotypes. It is nevertheless this phased information that is transmitted from one generation to the next and is most directly associated with biological function and the genetic causes of biological effects. Despite progress made in genome-wide sequencing and phasing algorithms and methods, problems assembling (and reconstructing linear haplotypes in regions of repetitive DNA and structural variation remain. These dynamic and structurally complex regions are often poorly understood from a sequence point of view. Regions such as these that are highly similar in their sequence tend to be collapsed onto the genome assembly. This is turn means downstream determination of the true sequence haplotype in these regions poses a particular challenge. For structurally complex regions, a more focussed approach to assembling haplotypes may be required. Results In order to investigate reconstruction of spatial information at structurally complex regions, we have used an emulsion haplotype fusion PCR approach to reproducibly link sequences of up to 1kb in length to allow phasing of multiple variants from neighbouring loci, using allele-specific PCR and sequencing to detect the phase. By using emulsion systems linking flanking regions to amplicons within the CNV, this led to the reconstruction of a 59kb haplotype across the DEFA1A3 CNV in HapMap individuals. Conclusion This study has demonstrated a novel use for emulsion haplotype fusion PCR in addressing the issue of reconstructing structural haplotypes at multiallelic copy variable regions, using the DEFA1A3 locus as an example.

  20. Manipulation of MHC-I/TCR Interaction for Immune Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingjun Liu; Bin Gao

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy involving the transfer of autologous tumor or virus-reactive T lymphocytes has been demonstrated to he effective in the eradication of cancer and vitally infected cells. Identification of MHC-restricted antigens and progress in generation of adaptive immune responses have provided new direction for such treatment for severe pathologies such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. Here we review the latest development about the molecular basis of MHC-I/TCR interaction, and it's manipulation including enhanced MHC-I expression, modification of peptide and engineered TCR for clinical applications such as vaccine design, tumor therapy and autoimmune diseases. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2008;5(3):171-182.

  1. Globally dispersed Y chromosomal haplotypes in wild and domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, J R S; Hanotte, O; Drögemüller, C; Calvo, J; Godfrey, R; Coltman, D; Maddox, J F; Marzanov, N; Kantanen, J; Kijas, J W

    2006-10-01

    To date, investigations of genetic diversity and the origins of domestication in sheep have utilised autosomal microsatellites and variation in the mitochondrial genome. We present the first analysis of both domestic and wild sheep using genetic markers residing on the ovine Y chromosome. Analysis of a single nucleotide polymorphism (oY1) in the SRY promoter region revealed that allele A-oY1 was present in all wild bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis), two subspecies of thinhorn sheep (Ovis dalli), European Mouflon (Ovis musimon) and the Barbary (Ammontragis lervia). A-oY1 also had the highest frequency (71.4%) within 458 domestic sheep drawn from 65 breeds sampled from Africa, Asia, Australia, the Caribbean, Europe, the Middle East and Central Asia. Sequence analysis of a second locus, microsatellite SRYM18, revealed a compound repeat array displaying fixed differences, which identified bighorn and thinhorn sheep as distinct from the European Mouflon and domestic animals. Combined genotypic data identified 11 male-specific haplotypes that represented at least two separate lineages. Investigation of the geographical distribution of each haplotype revealed that one (H6) was both very common and widespread in the global sample of domestic breeds. The remaining haplotypes each displayed more restricted and informative distributions. For example, H5 was likely founded following the domestication of European breeds and was used to trace the recent transportation of animals to both the Caribbean and Australia. A high rate of Y chromosomal dispersal appears to have taken place during the development of domestic sheep as only 12.9% of the total observed variation was partitioned between major geographical regions.

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies new HLA class II haplotypes strongly protective against narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hor, Hyun; Kutalik, Zoltán; Dauvilliers, Yves;

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder with the strongest human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association ever reported. Since the associated HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype is common in the general population (15-25%), it has been suggested that it is almost necessary but not sufficient for developing ...

  3. Haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies from nuclear families with only one parent available.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qin; Flury, Christine; Simianer, Henner

    2006-01-01

    Recent literature has suggested that haplotype inference through close relatives, especially from nuclear families can be an alternative strategy in determining the linkage phase. In this paper, haplotype reconstruction and estimation of haplotype frequencies via expectation maximization (EM) algorithm including nuclear families with only one parent available is proposed. Parent and his (her) child are treated as parent-child pair with one shared haplotype. This reduces the number of potential haplotype pairs for both parent and child separately, resulting in a higher accuracy of the estimation. In a series of simulations, the comparisons of PHASE, GENEHUNTER, EM-based approach for complete nuclear families and our approach are carried out. In all situations, EM-based approach for trio data is comparable but slightly worse error rate than PHASE, our approach is slightly better and much faster than PHASE for incomplete trios, the performance of GENEHUNTER is very bad in simple nuclear family settings and dramatically decreased with the number of markers being increased. On the other hand, the comparison result of different sampling designs demonstrates that sampling trios is the most efficient design to estimate haplotype frequencies in populations under same genotyping cost.

  4. Identification of HAVCR1 gene haplotypes associated with mRNA expression levels and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Lozano, José Raúl; Abad, Cristina; Escalera, Ana; Torres, Belén; Fernández, Olga; García, Alicia; Sánchez-Román, Julio; Sabio, José-Mario; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Raya-Alvarez, Enrique; Núñez-Roldán, Antonio; Martín, Javier; González-Escribano, María Francisca

    2010-08-01

    Human HAVCR1 gene maps on 5q33.2, a region linked with susceptibility to allergic and autoimmune diseases. The aims of the present study were to define the haplotypes of HAVCR1 gene taking into account both HapMap Project SNP haplotypes and exon 4 variants, to investigate a possible relationship between these haplotypes and mRNA expression levels, and to assess whether HAVCR1 gene is involved in susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Genotyping of three ins/del variants in the exon 4 was performed by fragment length analysis. Five tag SNPs genotypes and mRNA levels were determined using TaqMan assays. We defined four major haplotypes in our population: the two major haplotypes (named haplotypes A and B) bear both the 5383_5397del variant and the two most common SNP sets found in the CEU population. Quantification analysis revealed that genotype B/B had the highest median of mRNA expression levels (vs. BX + XX, p < 0.0001). Additionally, frequency of the genotype BB was significantly higher in RA patients than in controls (12.3 vs. 5.9% in controls, p = 0.0046, p (c) = 0.014, OR = 2.23, 95% CI 1.23-4.10). Our results support a relationship between HAVCR1 haplotypes and mRNA expression levels, and suggest an association of this gene with autoimmune diseases.

  5. Analysis of the adequate size of a cord blood bank and comparison of HLA haplotype distributions between four populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haimila, Katri; Penttilä, Antti; Arvola, Anne; Auvinen, Marja-Kaisa; Korhonen, Matti

    2013-02-01

    The number of units and especially the number of different HLA haplotypes present in a cord blood (CB) bank is a crucial determinant of its usefulness. We generated data relevant to the development of our national CB in Finland. The HLA haplotype distribution was examined between specific populations. We developed graphical ways of data presentation that enable easy visualization of differences. First, we estimated the optimal size of a CB bank for Finland and found that approximately 1700 units are needed to provide a 5/6 HLA-matched donor for 80% of Finnish patients. Secondly, we evaluated HLA haplotype distributions between four locations, Finland, Japan, Sweden and Belgium. Our results showed that the Japanese Tokyo Cord Blood Bank differs in both the frequency and distribution of haplotypes from the European banks. The European banks (Finnish Cord Blood Registry, The Swedish National Cord Blood Bank, and Marrow Donor Program-Belgium) have similar frequencies of common haplotypes, but 26% of the haplotypes in the Finnish CB bank are unique, which justifies the existence of a national bank. The tendency to a homogenous HLA haplotype distribution in banks underlines the need for targeting recruitment at the poorly represented minority populations.

  6. Antigen, allele, and haplotype frequencies report of the ASHI minority antigens workshops: part 1, African-Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachary, A A; Bias, W B; Johnson, A; Rose, S M; Leffell, M S

    2001-10-01

    HLA typing was performed on 977 African Americans residing throughout most of the United States. Class I and class II antigens and class II alleles were defined for all individuals and class I alleles were determined for a subset of individuals. The occurrence of 854 of the individuals in family groups permitted direct counting of allele and haplotype frequencies. The data were analyzed for antigen, allele, and haplotype frequencies; recombination frequencies; segregation distortion; distribution of haplotype frequencies; linkage disequilibria; and geographic distribution of DR antigens. Tables of the antigen, allele, the most common two and three point haplotypes, and 88 extended haplotypes that include class I and class II alleles are presented. Notable findings include a lower than expected frequency of recombination between the B and DR loci (theta= 0.0013), lower than expected frequency of inheritance (44.5% vs 54.5%) of the DRB1*1503; DQB1*0602 haplotype, lower than anticipated linkage disequilibrium values for DR; DQ haplotypes, and a skewed geographic distribution of DR antigens.

  7. Novel harmful recessive haplotypes identified for fertility traits in Nordic Holstein cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Nielsen, Ulrik Sander; Aamand, Gert Pedersen;

    2013-01-01

    Using genomic data, lethal recessives may be discovered from haplotypes that are common in the population but never occur in the homozygote state in live animals. This approach only requires genotype data from phenotypically normal (i.e. live) individuals and not from the affected embryos that die...... harboring possible recessive lethal alleles. Effects of the identified haplotypes were estimated on two fertility traits: non-return rates and calving interval. Out of the eight identified genomic regions, six regions were confirmed as having an effect on fertility. The information can be used to avoid...

  8. A Novel Model on DST-Induced Transplantation Tolerance by the Transfer of Self-Specific Donor tTregs to a Haplotype-Matched Organ Recipient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr Gregoriussen, Angelica Maria; Bohr, Henrik Georg

    2017-01-01

    Donor-specific blood transfusion (DST) can lead to significant prolongation of allograft survival in experimental animal models and sometimes human recipients of solid organs. The mechanisms responsible for the beneficial effect on graft survival have been a topic of research and debate for decades and are not yet fully elucidated. Once we discover how the details of the mechanisms involved are linked, we could be within reach of a procedure making it possible to establish donor-specific tolerance with minimal or no immunosuppressive medication. Today, it is well established that CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are indispensable for maintaining immunological self-tolerance. A large number of animal studies have also shown that Tregs are essential for establishing and maintaining transplantation tolerance. In this paper, we present a hypothesis of one H2-haplotype-matched DST-induced transplantation tolerance (in mice). The formulated hypothesis is based on a re-interpretation of data from an immunogenetic experiment published by Niimi and colleagues in 2000. It is of importance that the naïve recipient mice in this study were never immunosuppressed and were therefore fully immune competent during the course of tolerance induction. Based on the immunological status of the recipients, we suggest that one H2-haplotype-matched self-specific Tregs derived from the transfusion blood can be activated and multiply in the host by binding to antigen-presenting cells presenting allopeptides in their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II (MHC-II). We also suggest that the endothelial and epithelial cells within the solid organ allograft upregulate the expression of MHC-II and attract the expanded Treg population to suppress inflammation within the graft. We further suggest that this biological process, here termed MHC-II recruitment, is a vital survival mechanism for organs (or the organism in general) when attacked by an immune system.

  9. Regulation of MHC Class II-Peptide Complex Expression by Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Jin eCho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available MHC class II (MHC-II molecules are present on antigen presenting cells (APCs and these molecules function by binding antigenic peptides and presenting these peptides to antigen-specific CD4+ T cells. APCs continuously generate and degrade MHC-II molecules, and ubiquitination of MHC-II has recently been shown to be a key regulator of MHC-II expression in dendritic cells (DCs. In this mini-review we will examine the mechanism by which the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I regulates MHC-II expression on APCs and will discuss the functional consequences of altering MHC-II ubiquitination.

  10. Phylogeography of Japanese horse chestnut (Aesculus turbinata) in the Japanese Archipelago based on chloroplast DNA haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Kanako; Kaneko, Yuko; Ito, Satoshi; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Sakio, Hitoshi; Hoshizaki, Kazuhiko; Suzuki, Wajiro; Yamanaka, Norikazu; Setoguchi, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    Japanese horse chestnut (Aesculus turbinata: Hippocastanaceae) is one of the typical woody plants that grow in temperate riparian forests in the Japanese Archipelago. To analyze the phylogeography of this plant in the Japanese Archipelago, we determined cpDNA haplotypes for 337 samples from 55 populations covering the entire distribution range. Based on 1,313 bp of two spacers, we determined ten haplotypes that are distinguished from adjacent haplotypes by one or two steps. Most of the populations had a single haplotype, suggesting low diversity. Spatial analysis of molecular variance suggested three obvious phylogeographic structures in western Japan, where Japanese horse chestnut is scattered and isolated in mountainous areas. Conversely, no clear phylogeographic structure was observed from the northern to the southern limit of this species, including eastern Japan, where this plant is more common. Rare and private haplotypes were also found in southwestern Japan, where Japanese horse chestnuts are distributed sparsely. These findings imply that western Japan might have maintained a relatively large habitat for A. turbinata during the Quaternary climatic oscillations, while northerly regions could not.

  11. Molecular Pathology and Haplotype Analysis of Wilson Disease in Mediterranean Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figus, Annalena; Angius, Andrea; Loudianos, Georgios; Bertini, Chiara; Dessì, Valeria; Loi, Angela; Deiana, Manila; Lovicu, Mario; Olla, Nazario; Sole, Gabriella; De Virgiliis, Stefano; Lilliu, Franco; Farci, Anna Maria Giulia; Nurchi, Annamaria; Giacchino, Raffaella; Barabino, Arrigo; Marazzi, Maria; Zancan, Lucia; Greggio, Nella A.; Marcellini, Matilde; Solinas, Antonello; Deplano, Angelo; Barbera, Cristiana; Devoto, Marcella; Ozsoylu, Sinasi; Kocak, Nurten; Akar, Nejat; Karayalcin, Selin; Mokini, Vahe; Cullufi, Paskal; Balestrieri, Angelo; Cao, Antonio; Pirastu, Mario

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed mutations and defined the chromosomal haplotype in 127 patients of Mediterranean descent who were affected by Wilson disease (WD), 39 Sardinians, 49 Italians, 33 Turks, and 6 Albanians. Haplotypes were derived by use of the microsatellite markers D13S301, D13S296, D13S297, and D13S298, which are linked to the WD locus. There were five common haplotypes in Sardinians, three in Italians, and two in Turks, which accounted for 85%, 32%, and 30% of the WD chromosomes, respectively. We identified 16 novel mutations: 8 frameshifts, 7 missense mutations, and 1 splicing defect. In addition, we detected the previously described mutations: 2302insC, 3404delC, Argl320ter, Gly944-Ser, and Hisl070Gin. Of the new mutations detected, two, the 1515insT on haplotype I and 2464delC on haplotype XVI, accounted for 6% and 13%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromosomes in the Sardinian population. Mutations H1070Q, 2302insC, and 2533delA represented 13%, 8%, and 8%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromosomes in other Mediterranean populations. The remaining mutations were rare and limited to one or two patients from different populations. Thus, WD results from some frequent mutations and many rare defects. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:8533760

  12. Molecular pathology and haplotype analysis of Wilson disease in Mediterranean populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figus, A.; Farcia, A.M.G.; Nurchi, A. [Universita degli Studi di Cagliari (Italy)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We analyzed mutations and defined the chromosomal haplotype in 127 patients of Mediterranean descent who were affected in Wilson disease (WD): 39 Sardinians, 49 Italians, 33 Turks, and 6 Albanians. Haplotypes were derived by use of the microsatellite markers D13S301, D13S296, D13S297, and D13S298, which are linked to the WD locus. There were five common haplotypes in Sardinians, three in Italians, and two in Turks, which accounted for 85%, 32%, and 30% of the WD chromosomes, respectively. We identified 16 novel mutations: 8 frameshifts, 7 missense mutations, and 1 splicing defect. In addition, we detected the previously described mutations: 2302insC, 3404delC, Arg1320ter, Gly944Ser, and His1070Gin. Of the new mutations detected, two, the 1515insT on haplotype I and 2464delC on haplotype XVI, accounted for 6% and 13%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromsomes in the Sardinian populations. Mutations H1070Q, 2302insC, and 2533delA represented 13%, 8%, and 8%, respectively, of the mutations in WD chromsomes in other Mediterranean populations. The remaining mutations were rare and limited to one or two patients from different populations. Thus, WD results from some frequent mutations and many rare defects. 28 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  13. Haplotype diversity of 17 Y-str loci in an admixed population from the Brazilian Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francez, Pablo Abdon da Costa; Ramos, Luiz Patrick Vidal; de Jesus Brabo Ferreira Palha, Teresinha; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista

    2012-01-01

    The allelic and haplotype frequencies of 17 Y-STR loci most commonly used in forensic testing were estimated in a sample of 138 unrelated healthy males from Macapá, in the northern Amazon region of Brazil. The average gene diversity was 0.6554 ± 0.3315. 134 haplotypes of the 17 loci were observed, 130 of them unique and four present in two individuals each. The haplotype diversity index was 0.9996 + 0.0009, with the most frequent haplogroups being R1b (52.2%), E1b1b (11.6%), J2 (10.1%) and Q (7.2%). Most haplogroups of this population belonged to European male lineages (89.2%), followed by Amerindian (7.2%) and African (3.6%) lineages. PMID:22481873

  14. Epigenetic regulations in the IFNγ signalling pathway: IFNγ-mediated MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells is associated with DNA demethylation of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlková, Veronika; Štěpánek, Ivan; Hrušková, Veronika; Šenigl, Filip; Mayerová, Veronika; Šrámek, Martin; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Indrová, Marie; Hejhal, Tomáš; Dérian, Nicolas; Klatzmann, David; Six, Adrien; Reiniš, Milan

    2014-08-30

    Downregulation of MHC class I expression on tumour cells, a common mechanism by which tumour cells can escape from specific immune responses, can be associated with coordinated silencing of antigen-presenting machinery genes. The expression of these genes can be restored by IFNγ. In this study we documented association of DNA demethylation of selected antigen-presenting machinery genes located in the MHC genomic locus (TAP-1, TAP-2, LMP-2, LMP-7) upon IFNγ treatment with MHC class I upregulation on tumour cells in several MHC class I-deficient murine tumour cell lines (TC-1/A9, TRAMP-C2, MK16 and MC15). Our data also documented higher methylation levels in these genes in TC-1/A9 cells, as compared to their parental MHC class I-positive TC-1 cells. IFNγ-mediated DNA demethylation was relatively fast in comparison with demethylation induced by DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine, and associated with increased histone H3 acetylation in the promoter regions of APM genes. Comparative transcriptome analysis in distinct MHC class I-deficient cell lines upon their treatment with either IFNγ or epigenetic agents revealed that a set of genes, significantly enriched for the antigen presentation pathway, was regulated in the same manner. Our data demonstrate that IFNγ acts as an epigenetic modifier when upregulating the expression of antigen-presenting machinery genes.

  15. Evolution of nonclassical MHC-dependent invariant T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edholm, Eva-Stina; Grayfer, Leon; Robert, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    TCR-mediated specific recognition of antigenic peptides in the context of classical MHC molecules is a cornerstone of adaptive immunity of jawed vertebrate. Ancillary to these interactions, the T cell repertoire also includes unconventional T cells that recognize endogenous and/or exogenous antigens in a classical MHC-unrestricted manner. Among these, the mammalian nonclassical MHC class I-restricted invariant T cell (iT) subsets, such as iNKT and MAIT cells, are now believed to be integral to immune response initiation as well as in orchestrating subsequent adaptive immunity. Until recently the evolutionary origins of these cells were unknown. Here we review our current understanding of a nonclassical MHC class I-restricted iT cell population in the amphibian Xenopus laevis. Parallels with the mammalian iNKT and MAIT cells underline the crucial biological roles of these evolutionarily ancient immune subsets.

  16. Two independent apolipoprotein a5 Haplotypes influence human plasma triglyceride levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Olivier, Michael; Hubacek, Jaroslav A.; Krauss, Ronald M.; Rubin, Edward M.; Cohen, Jonathan C.

    2002-09-16

    The recently identified apolipoprotein A5 gene (APOA5) has been shown to play an important role in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations in humans and mice. We previously identified an APOA5 haplotype (designated APOA5*2) that is present in {approx}16 percent of Caucasians and is associated with increased plasma triglyceride concentrations. In this report we describe another APOA5 haplotype (APOA5*3) containing the rare allele of the single nucleotide polymorphism c.56C>G that changes serine to tryptophan at codon 19 and is independently associated with high plasma triglyceride levels in three different populations. In a sample of 264 Caucasian men and women with plasma triglyceride concentrations above the 90th percentile or below the 10th percentile, the APOA5*3 haplotype was more than three-fold more common in the group with high plasma triglyceride levels. In a second independently ascertained sample of Caucasian men and women (n 1/4 419) who were studied while consuming their self-selected diets as well as after high-carbohydrate diets and high-fat diets, the APOA5*3 haplotype was associated with increased plasma triglyceride levels on all three dietary regimens. In a third population comprising 2660 randomly selected individuals, the APOA5*3 haplotype was found in 12 percent of Caucasians, 14 percent of African-Americans and 28 percent of Hispanics and was associated with increased plasma triglyceride levels in both men and women in each ethnic group. These findings establish that the APOA5 locus contributes significantly to inter-individual variation in plasma triglyceride levels in humans. Together, the APOA5*2 and APOA5*3 haplotypes are found in 25 50 percent of African-Americans, Hispanics and Caucasians and support the contribution of common human variation to quantitative phenotypes in the general population.

  17. MHC-correlated mate choice in humans: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlicek, Jan; Roberts, S Craig

    2009-05-01

    Extremely high variability in genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) in vertebrates is assumed to be a consequence of frequency-dependent parasite-driven selection and mate preferences based on promotion of offspring heterozygosity at MHC, or potentially, genome-wide inbreeding avoidance. Where effects have been found, mate choice studies on rodents and other species usually find preference for MHC-dissimilarity in potential partners. Here we critically review studies on MHC-associated mate choice in humans. These are based on three broadly different aspects: (1) odor preferences, (2) facial preferences and (3) actual mate choice surveys. As in animal studies, most odor-based studies demonstrate disassortative preferences, although there is variation in the strength and nature of the effects. In contrast, facial attractiveness research indicates a preference for MHC-similar individuals. Results concerning MHC in actual couples show a bias towards similarity in one study, dissimilarity in two studies and random distribution in several other studies. These vary greatly in sample size and heterogeneity of the sample population, both of which may significantly bias the results. This pattern of mixed results across studies may reflect context-dependent and/or life history sensitive preference expression, in addition to higher level effects arising out of population differences in genetic heterogeneity or cultural and ethnic restrictions on random mating patterns. Factors of special relevance in terms of individual preferences are reproductive status and long- vs. short-term mating context. We discuss the idea that olfactory and visual channels may work in a complementary way (i.e. odor preference for MHC-dissimilarity and visual preference for MHC-similarity) to achieve an optimal level of genetic variability, methodological issues and interesting avenues for further research.

  18. Chemotherapeutics and radiation stimulate MHC class I expression through elevated interferon-beta signaling in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Wan

    Full Text Available Low doses of anticancer drugs have been shown to enhance antitumor immune response and increase the efficacy of immunotherapy. The molecular basis for such effects remains elusive, although selective depletion of T regulatory cells has been demonstrated. In the current studies, we demonstrate that topotecan (TPT, a topoisomerase I-targeting drug with a well-defined mechanism of action, stimulates major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I expression in breast cancer cells through elevated expression/secretion of interferon-β (IFN-β and activation of type I IFN signaling. First, we show that TPT treatment elevates the expression of both total and cell-surface MHC I in breast cancer cells. Second, conditioned media from TPT-treated breast cancer ZR-75-1 cells induce elevated expression of cell-surface MHC I in drug-naïve recipient cells, suggesting the involvement of cytokines and/or other secreted molecules. Consistently, TPT-treated cells exhibit elevated expression of multiple cytokines such as IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8. Third, either knocking down the type I interferon receptor subunit 1 (IFNAR1 or addition of neutralizing antibody against IFN-β results in reduced MHC I expression in TPT-treated cells. Together, these results suggest that TPT induces increased IFN-β autocrine/paracrine signaling through type I IFN receptor, resulting in the elevated MHC I expression in tumor cells. Studies have also demonstrated that other chemotherapeutic agents (e.g. etoposide, cisplatin, paclitaxel and vinblastine similarly induce increased IFN-β secretion and elevated MHC I expression. In addition, conditioned media from γ-irradiated donor cells are shown to induce IFN-β-dependent MHC I expression in unirradiated recipient cells. In the aggregate, our results suggest that many cancer therapeutics induce elevated tumor antigen presentation through MHC I, which could represent a common mechanism for enhanced antitumor immune response through

  19. Control of Her-2 tumor immunity and thyroid autoimmunity by MHC and regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Jennifer B; Kong, Yi-chi M; Meroueh, Chady; Snower, Daniel P; David, Chella S; Ho, Ye-Shih; Wei, Wei-Zen

    2007-07-15

    Immune reactivity to self-antigens in both cancer and autoimmune diseases can be enhanced by systemic immune modulation, posing a challenge in cancer immunotherapy. To distinguish the genetic and immune regulation of tumor immunity versus autoimmunity, immune responses to human ErbB-2 (Her-2) and mouse thyroglobulin (mTg) were tested in transgenic mice expressing Her-2 that is overexpressed in several cancers, and HLA-DRB1*0301 (DR3) that is associated with susceptibility to several human autoimmune diseases, as well as experimental autoimmune thyroiditis (EAT). To induce Her-2 response, mice were electrovaccinated with pE2TM and pGM-CSF encoding the extracellular and transmembrane domains of Her-2 and the murine granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, respectively. To induce EAT, mice received mTg i.v. with or without lipopolysaccharide. Depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) with anti-CD25 monoclonal antibody enhanced immune reactivity to Her-2 as well as mTg, showing control of both Her-2 and mTg responses by Treg. When immunized with, Her-2xDR3 and B6xDR3 mice expressing H2(b)xDR3 haplotype developed more profound mTg response and thyroid pathology than Her-2 or B6 mice that expressed the EAT-resistant H2(b) haplotype. In Her-2xDR3 mice, the response to mTg was further amplified when mice were also immunized with pE2TM and pGM-CSF. On the contrary, Her-2 reactivity was comparable whether mice expressed DR3 or not. Therefore, induction of Her-2 immunity was independent of DR3 but development of EAT was dictated by this allele, whereas Tregs control the responses to both self-antigens. These results warrant close monitoring of autoimmunity during cancer immunotherapy, particularly in patients with susceptible MHC class II alleles.

  20. Female rose bitterling prefer MHC-dissimilar males: experimental evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Reichard

    Full Text Available The role of genetic benefits in female mate choice remains a controversial aspect of sexual selection theory. In contrast to "good allele" models of sexual selection, "compatible allele" models of mate choice predict that females prefer mates with alleles complementary to their own rather than conferring additive effects. While correlative results suggest complementary genetic effects to be plausible, direct experimental evidence is scarce. A previous study on the Chinese rose bitterling (Rhodeus ocellatus demonstrated a positive correlation between female mate choice, offspring growth and survival, and the functional dissimilarity between the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC alleles of males and females. Here we directly tested whether females used cues associated with MHC genes to select genetically compatible males in an experimental framework. By sequentially pairing females with MHC similar and dissimilar males, based on a priori known MHC profiles, we showed that females discriminated between similar and dissimilar males and deposited significantly more eggs with MHC dissimilar males. Notably, the degree of dissimilarity was an important factor for female decision to mate, possibly indicating a potential threshold value of dissimilarity for decision making, or of an indirect effect of the MHC.

  1. Viral immune evasion: Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weijer, Michael L; Luteijn, Rutger D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-03-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. In the course of evolution, many viruses have acquired inhibitors that target essential stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Studies on these immune evasion proteins reveal fascinating strategies used by viruses to elude the immune system. Viral immunoevasins also constitute great research tools that facilitate functional studies on the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, allowing the investigation of less well understood routes, such as TAP-independent antigen presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous proteins. Viral immunoevasins have also helped to unravel more general cellular processes. For instance, basic principles of ER-associated protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been resolved using virus-induced degradation of MHC class I as a model. This review highlights how viral immunoevasins have increased our understanding of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation.

  2. MHC class II polymorphisms, autoreactive T-cells and autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue eTsai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex (MHC genes, also known as human leukocyte antigen genes (HLA in humans, are the prevailing contributors of genetic susceptibility to autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D, Multiple Sclerosis (MS, and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA, among others (Todd and Wicker, 2001;MacKay et al., 2002;Hafler et al., 2007. Although the pathways through which MHC molecules afford autoimmune risk or resistance remain to be fully mapped out, it is generally accepted that they do so by shaping the central and peripheral T cell repertoires of the host towards autoimmune proclivity or resistance, respectively. Disease-predisposing MHC alleles would both spare autoreactive thymocytes from central tolerance and bias their development towards a pathogenic phenotype. Protective MHC alleles, on the other hand, would promote central deletion of autoreactive thymocytes and skew their development towards non-pathogenic phenotypes. This interpretation of the data is at odds with two other observations: that in MHC-heterozygous individuals, resistance is dominant over susceptibility; and that it is difficult to understand how deletion of one or a few clonal autoreactive T cell types would suffice to curb autoimmune responses driven by hundreds if not thousands of autoreactive T cell specificities. This review provides an update on current advances in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying MHC class II-associated autoimmune disease susceptibility and/or resistance and attempts to reconcile these seemingly opposing concepts.

  3. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Walshe, J.M. [Middlesex Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  4. Analysis of porcine MHC expression profile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Fanbo; CHEN Chen; DENG Yajun; YU Jun; HU Songnian

    2005-01-01

    The porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC, also named swine leukocyte antigen, SLA) is associated not only with immune responsibility and disease susceptibility, but also with some reproductive and productive traits such as growth rate and carcass composition. As yet systematical research on SLA expression profile is not reported. In order to illustrate SLA expression comprehensively and deepen our understanding of its function, we outlined the expression profile of SLA in 51 tissues of Landrace by analyzing a large amount of ESTs produced by "Sino-Danish Porcine Genome Project". In addition, we also compared the expression profile of SLA in several tissues from different development stages and from another breed (Erhualian). The result shows: (i) classical SLA genes are highly expressed in immune tissues and middle part of intestine; (ii) although SLA-3 is an SLA Ia gene, its expression abundance and pattern are quite different from those of the other two SLA Ia genes. The same phenomenon is seen in HLA-C expression, suggesting that the two genes may function similarly and undergo convergent evolution; (iii) except in jejunum, the antigen presenting genes are more highly expressed in breed Erhualian than in Landrace. The difference might associate with the higher resistance to bad conditions (including pathogens) of Erhualian and higher growth rates of Landrace.

  5. Improved pan-specific MHC class I peptide-binding predictions using a novel representation of the MHC-binding cleft environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrasco Pro, S.; Zimic, M.; Nielsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    of different MHC data sets including human leukocyte antigen (HLA), non-human primates (chimpanzee, macaque and gorilla) and other animal alleles (cattle, mouse and swine). From these constructs, we showed that by focusing on MHC sequence positions found to be polymorphic across the MHC molecules used to train...

  6. FMR1 CGG repeat distribution and linked microsatellite-SNP haplotypes in normal Mexican Mestizo and indigenous populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix-López, Xóchitl Adriana; Argüello-García, Raúl; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M; Peñaloza-Espinoza, Rosenda I; Buentello-Malo, Leonor; Estrada-Mena, Francisco Javier; Ramos-Kuri, Manuel; Gómez, Fabio Salamanca; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2006-10-01

    The (CGG)n repeat size distribution in the FMR1 gene was studied in healthy individuals: 80 X chromosomes of Mexican Mestizos from Mexico City and 33 X chromosomes of Mexican Amerindians from three indigenous communities (Purepechas, Nahuas, and Tzeltales), along with alleles and haplotypes defined by two microsatellite polymorphic markers (DXS548 and FRAXAC1) and two single nucleotide polymorphisms (FMRA and FMRB). Genetic frequencies of Mestizo and Amerindian subpopulations were statistically similar in almost all cases and thus were considered one population for comparisons with other populations. Sixteen (CGG)n alleles in the 17-38 size range were observed, and the most common were the 25 (38.0%), 26 (28.3%), and 24 (12.3%) repeat alleles. This pattern differs from most other populations reported, but a closer relation to Amerindian, European, and African populations was found, as expected from the historical admixture that gave rise to Mexican Mestizos. The results of the CA repeats analysis at DXS548-FRAXAC1 were restricted to nine haplotypes, of which haplotypes 7-4 (52.2%), 8-4 (23.8%), and 7-3 (11.5%) were predominant. The modal haplotype 7-4, instead of the nearly universal haplotype 7-3, had been reported exclusively in Eastern Asian populations. Likewise, only seven different FRAXAC1-FMRA-FMRB haplotypes were observed, including five novel haplotypes (3TA, 4TA, 3 - A, 4 - A, and 5 - A), compared with Caucasians. Of these, haplotypes - A (78.7%) and 3 - A (13.2%) were the most common in the Mexican population. These data suggest a singular but relatively low genetic diversity at FMR1 in the studied Mexican populations that may be related to the recent origin of Mestizos and the low admixture rate of Amerindians.

  7. Development of a simultaneous high resolution typing method for three SLA class II genes, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 and the analysis of SLA class II haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, MinhThong; Choi, Hojun; Choi, Min-Kyeung; Cho, Hyesun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Seo, Han Geuk; Cha, Se-Yeon; Seo, Kunho; Dadi, Hailu; Park, Chankyu

    2015-06-15

    The characterization of the genetic variations of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is essential to understand the relationship between the genetic diversity of MHC molecules and disease resistance and susceptibility in adaptive immunity. We previously reported the development of high-resolution individual locus typing methods for three of the most polymorphic swine leukocyte antigens (SLA) class II loci, namely, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1. In this study, we extensively modified our previous protocols and developed a method for the simultaneous amplification of the three SLA class II genes and subsequent analysis of individual loci using direct sequencing. The unbiased and simultaneous amplification of alleles from the all three hyper-polymorphic and pseudogene containing genes such as MHC genes is extremely challenging. However, using this method, we demonstrated the successful typing of SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, and SLA-DRB1 for 31 selected individuals comprising 26 different SLA class II haplotypes which were identified from 700 animals using the single locus typing methods. The results were identical to the known genotypes from the individual locus typing. The new method has significant benefits over the individual locus typing, including lower typing cost, use of less biomaterial, less effort and fewer errors in handling large samples for multiple loci. We also extensively characterized the haplotypes of SLA class II genes and reported three new haplotypes. Our results should serve as a basis to investigate the possible association between polymorphisms of MHC class II and differences in immune responses to exogenous antigens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CITA/NLRC5: A critical transcriptional regulator of MHC class I gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Isaac; Vijayan, Saptha; Sidiq, Tabasum; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-07-08

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play essential roles in the development and activation of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator) has been recognized as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, albeit knowledge about the regulatory mechanism of MHC class I gene expression had been limited. Recently identified MHC class I transactivator (CITA), or NLRC5, also belongs to the NLR protein family and constitutes a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes. In addition to MHC class I genes, CITA/NLRC5 induces the expression of β2 -microglobulin, TAP1 and LMP2, essential components of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Therefore, CITA/NLRC5 and CIITA are transcriptional regulators that orchestrate the concerted expression of critical components in the MHC class I and class II pathways, respectively. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):349-357, 2016.

  9. Vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 (Vkorc1 haplotype diversity in mouse priority strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohn Michael H

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms in the vitamin K-epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 gene, Vkorc1, could affect blood coagulation and other vitamin K-dependent proteins, such as osteocalcin (bone Gla protein, BGP. Here we sequenced the Vkorc1 gene in 40 mouse priority strains. We analyzed Vkorc1 haplotypes with respect to prothrombin time (PT and bone mineral density and composition (BMD and BMC; phenotypes expected to be vitamin K-dependent and represented by data in the Mouse Phenome Database (MPD. Findings In the commonly used laboratory strains of Mus musculus domesticus we identified only four haplotypes differing in the intron or 5' region sequence of the Vkorc1. Six haplotypes differing by coding and non-coding polymorphisms were identified in the other subspecies of Mus. We detected no significant association of Vkorc1 haplotypes with PT, BMD and BMC within each subspecies of Mus. Vkorc1 haplotype sequences divergence between subspecies was associated with PT, BMD and BMC. Conclusion Phenotypic variation in PT, BMD and BMC within subspecies of Mus, while substantial, appears to be dominated by genetic variation in genes other than the Vkorc1. This was particularly evident for M. m. domesticus, where a single haplotype was observed in conjunction with virtually the entire range of PT, BMD and BMC values of all 5 subspecies of Mus included in this study. Differences in these phenotypes between subspecies also should not be attributed to Vkorc1 variants, but should be viewed as a result of genome wide genetic divergence.

  10. Contrasting patterns of selection between MHC I and II across populations of Humboldt and Magellanic penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallaberry-Pincheira, Nicole; González-Acuña, Daniel; Padilla, Pamela; Dantas, Gisele P M; Luna-Jorquera, Guillermo; Frere, Esteban; Valdés-Velásquez, Armando; Vianna, Juliana A

    2016-10-01

    The evolutionary and adaptive potential of populations or species facing an emerging infectious disease depends on their genetic diversity in genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). In birds, MHC class I deals predominantly with intracellular infections (e.g., viruses) and MHC class II with extracellular infections (e.g., bacteria). Therefore, patterns of MHC I and II diversity may differ between species and across populations of species depending on the relative effect of local and global environmental selective pressures, genetic drift, and gene flow. We hypothesize that high gene flow among populations of Humboldt and Magellanic penguins limits local adaptation in MHC I and MHC II, and signatures of selection differ between markers, locations, and species. We evaluated the MHC I and II diversity using 454 next-generation sequencing of 100 Humboldt and 75 Magellanic penguins from seven different breeding colonies. Higher genetic diversity was observed in MHC I than MHC II for both species, explained by more than one MHC I loci identified. Large population sizes, high gene flow, and/or similar selection pressures maintain diversity but limit local adaptation in MHC I. A pattern of isolation by distance was observed for MHC II for Humboldt penguin suggesting local adaptation, mainly on the northernmost studied locality. Furthermore, trans-species alleles were found due to a recent speciation for the genus or convergent evolution. High MHC I and MHC II gene diversity described is extremely advantageous for the long-term survival of the species.

  11. Hypothesis: Targeted Ikkβ deletion upregulates MIF signaling responsiveness and MHC class II expression in mouse hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine S Koch

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Katherine S Koch, Hyam L LeffertHepatocyte Growth Control and Stem Cell Laboratory, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF is causally related to the pathogenesis of chronic liver disease but its hepatocellular mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Scattered reports in the literature hint at functional connections between the expression of MIF and major histocompatibility complex (MHC Class II molecules. Not surprisingly, these relationships have not yet been explored in hepatocytes because MIF and MHC Class II cell surface receptors are commonly expressed by other cell types including various antigen presenting cells of the immune system. On the other hand, mounting evidence suggests that heteromeric MIF receptors share a common molecule with intracellular MHC Class II complexes, viz., CD74, which also serves as the MHC Class II chaperone; and, while it is unclear what cancer-related role(s MHC Class II receptors might play, increasing evidence suggests that MIF and CD74 are also implicated in the biology of hepatocellular carcinoma. These reports are provocative for two reasons: firstly, Ikkβ Δhep mice carrying hepatocyte-targeted deletions of Ikkβ, an IκB kinase complex subunit required for the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB (nuclear factor-κB, have been shown to display heightened susceptibilities to hepatotoxins and chemical hepatocarcinogens; secondly, microarray profiling observations indicate that Ikkβ Δhep hepatocytes constitutively and “ectopically” overexpress genes, particularly CD74, CD44 (a MIF-receptor subunit and MHC Class II I-A/E β and I-A α chains, and gene families that regulate host immune process and immune defense responses. These findings together suggest that Ikkβ Δhep mice might express functional MIF and MHC Class II receptors, leading to increased hepatocellular sensitivity to

  12. Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC Markers in Conservation Biology

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    Katherine Belov

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Human impacts through habitat destruction, introduction of invasive species and climate change are increasing the number of species threatened with extinction. Decreases in population size simultaneously lead to reductions in genetic diversity, ultimately reducing the ability of populations to adapt to a changing environment. In this way, loss of genetic polymorphism is linked with extinction risk. Recent advances in sequencing technologies mean that obtaining measures of genetic diversity at functionally important genes is within reach for conservation programs. A key region of the genome that should be targeted for population genetic studies is the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC. MHC genes, found in all jawed vertebrates, are the most polymorphic genes in vertebrate genomes. They play key roles in immune function via immune-recognition and -surveillance and host-parasite interaction. Therefore, measuring levels of polymorphism at these genes can provide indirect measures of the immunological fitness of populations. The MHC has also been linked with mate-choice and pregnancy outcomes and has application for improving mating success in captive breeding programs. The recent discovery that genetic diversity at MHC genes may protect against the spread of contagious cancers provides an added impetus for managing and protecting MHC diversity in wild populations. Here we review the field and focus on the successful applications of MHC-typing for conservation management. We emphasize the importance of using MHC markers when planning and executing wildlife rescue and conservation programs but stress that this should not be done to the detriment of genome-wide diversity.

  13. Polymorphism and molecular phylogenetic analysis of MHC B -G locus in 9 indigenous chicken breeds%9个地方鸡种MHCB-G座位多态性及其分子系统进化分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屠云洁; 苏一军; 王克华; 张学余; 李国辉; 殷建玫

    2012-01-01

    以我国9个地方鸡为研究对象,对其MHC B-G座位全基因序列进行测序,以揭示这9个地方鸡种MHC B -G基因的遗传多样性,并构建其系统进化树.结果表明,9个地方鸡种MHC B-G基因序列具有较高的遗传多样性,在9个地方鸡种中共存在666个突变位点,其中单一位点突变554个,简约信息112个,共缺失782 bp.核苷酸多样度(Pi)为0.03079±0.004 39,平均核昔酸差异(K)为182.639.9个地方鸡品种为9个单倍型,单倍型多样度为1.00±0.052.9个鸡种MHC B-G基因Kiumura双参数遗传距离范围为0.010~0.070,鹿苑鸡与新狼山鸡的遗传距离最小,为0.010;茶花鸡与东乡绿壳蛋鸡遗传距离最大,为0.070.根据9个鸡品种MHC B-G基因全序列构建的NJ树和ME树,茶花鸡单独聚为1类,其他8个品种被聚为2大类.Tajima's D值为-1.5546,且差异不显著(0.10>P>0.05),说明MHC B -G基因为负向选择,不遵循中性进化理论,MHC B -G基因多态性不是遗传漂变的结果,而是自然选择和人工选择的结果.%The MHC B - G locus in nine indigenous chicken breeds was sequenced to explore genetic diversity in these nine chicken breeds and to construct their phylogenetic tree. The study revealed that the genetic diversity of the MHC B - G locus in these breeds was relatively high, where there were 666 polymophic sites, among of which singleton variable sites were 554, parsimony informative sites were 112. Sites with alignment gaps or missing data were 782 bp. Nucleotide diversity ( P,) was 0. 030 79 ± 0. 004 39. Average number of nucleotide differences (K) was 182. 639. There was nine haplotypes in nine chicken breeds. The haplotype diversity was 1. 00 ±0. 052. Kimura 2 - parameter distance between nine chicken breeds was 0.010 -0.070, where the minimum was 0.010 between Luyuan and Newlangshan, while the maximum was 0.070 between Chahua and Dongxiang blue. Neighbor - Joining (NJ) tree and Minimum -Evolution (ME) tree based on MHC B - G DNA

  14. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mutations and haplotypes in Mexican Mestizos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arámbula, E; Aguilar L, J C; Vaca, G

    2000-08-01

    In a screening for glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency in 1985 unrelated male subjects from the general population (Groups A and B) belonging to four states of the Pacific coast, 21 G-6-PD-deficient subjects were detected. Screening for mutations at the G-6-PD gene by PCR-restriction enzyme in these 21 G-6-PD-deficient subjects as well as in 14 G-6-PD-deficient patients with hemolytic anemia belonging to several states of Mexico showed two common G-6-PD variants: G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) (19 cases) and G-6-PD A-(376G/968C) (9 cases). In 7 individuals the mutations responsible for the enzyme deficiency remain to be determined. Furthermore, four silent polymorphic sites at the G-6-PD gene (PvuII, PstI, 1311, and NlaIII) were investigated in the 28 individuals with G-6-PD A- variants and in 137 G-6-PD normal subjects. As expected, only 10 different haplotypes were observed. To date, in our project aiming to determine the molecular basis of G-6-PD deficiency in Mexico, 60 unrelated G-6-PD-deficient Mexican males-25 in previous studies and 35 in the present work-have been studied. More than 75% of these individuals are from states of the Pacific coast (Sinaloa, Nayarit, Jalisco, Michoacán, Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas). The results show that although G-6-PD deficiency is heterogeneous at the DNA level in Mexico, only three polymorphic variants have been observed: G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) (36 cases), G-6-PD A-(376G/968C) (13 cases), and G-6-PD Seattle(844C) (2 cases). G-6-PD A- variants are relatively distributed homogeneously and both variants explain 82% of the overall prevalence of G-6-PD deficiency. The variant G-6-PD A-(202A/376G) represents 73% of the G-6-PD A- alleles. Our data also show that the variant G-6-PD A-(376G/968C)-which has been observed in Mexico in the context of two different haplotypes-is more common than previously supposed. The three polymorphic variants that we observed in Mexico are on the same haplotypes as found in subjects from

  15. Ligation of MHC class I molecules on peripheral blood T lymphocytes induces new phenotypes and functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregenholt, S; Röpke, M; Skov, S;

    1996-01-01

    Microgram concentrations of immobilized anti-MHC class I (MHC-I) Ab induced proliferation of resting CD3+ T cells from peripheral blood. In contrast, soluble Ab did not activate T cells. Exposure of T cells to immobilized anti-MHC-I Ab for only 24 h was followed by proliferation and development....... These data clearly demonstrate that ligation of the MHC-I complex on T cells may induce both positive and negative signals. Since the physiologic ligands for MHC-I molecules are TCR and the CD8 molecules, our data may suggest that MHC-I molecules are instrumental in cellular interactions between T cells....

  16. Bioinformatics prediction of swine MHC class I epitopes from Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    of the host cell antiviral machinery, to the deceptive induction of a non-neutralizing antibody response through decoy antigen presentation. This, combined with a very high mutation rate, has hampered the development of safe and effective vaccines. With the overall aim to design a vaccine that induces...... an effective CTL response against PRRSV, we have taken a bioinformatics approach to identify common PRRSV epitopes predicted to react broadly with predominant swine MHC (SLA) alleles. First, the genomic integrity and sequencing method was examined for 334 available complete PRRSV type 2 genomes leaving 104...

  17. Selection assisted by a BoLA-DR/DQ haplotype against susceptibility to bovine dermatophilosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maillard Jean-Charles

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bovine dermatophilosis is a severe skin infection of tropical ruminants inducing a severe loss in productivity and a 15% mortality rate. This disease is caused by the actinomycete bacterium Dermatophilus congolensis associated with the tick Amblyomma variegatum. Currently there are no prospects for a vaccine, and acaricide or antibiotic control is hampered by the development of chemoresistance. Animal breeders have observed that dermatophilosis susceptibility seems to be determined genetically, and we previously identified a BoLA-DRB3-DQB class II haplotype marker for high (R2 = 0.96 susceptibility to the disease. With this marker, we developed a successful eugenic selection procedure for zebu Brahman cattle in Martinique (FWI. Over a period of five years, a marked reduction in disease prevalence, from 0.76 to 0.02 was achieved, and this low level has been maintained over the last two years. The selection procedure, based on a genetic marker system targeting the highly polymorphic BoLA locus, eliminates only those individuals which are at the highest risk of contracting the disease. In the present work, we discuss the properties of this system, including the "heterozygote advantage" and the "frequency dependence" theories, and examine their involvement in the biological mechanisms at the host/pathogen interface. We speculate on the exact role of the MHC molecules in the control of the disease, how the natural selection pressure imposed by the pathogens selectively maintains MHC diversity, and how our results can be practically applied for integrated control of dermatophilosis in developing countries.

  18. Genomic sequence of 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' haplotype C and its comparison with haplotype A and B genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haapalainen, Minna; Schott, Thomas; Thompson, Sarah M.; Smith, Grant R.; Nissinen, Anne I.; Pirhonen, Minna

    2017-01-01

    Haplotypes A and B of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (CLso) are associated with diseases of solanaceous plants, especially Zebra chip disease of potato, and haplotypes C, D and E are associated with symptoms on apiaceous plants. To date, one complete genome of haplotype B and two high quality draft genomes of haplotype A have been obtained for these unculturable bacteria using metagenomics from the psyllid vector Bactericera cockerelli. Here, we present the first genomic sequences obtained for the carrot-associated CLso. These two genomic sequences of haplotype C, FIN114 (1.24 Mbp) and FIN111 (1.20 Mbp), were obtained from carrot psyllids (Trioza apicalis) harboring CLso. Genomic comparisons between the haplotypes A, B and C revealed that the genome organization differs between these haplotypes, due to large inversions and other recombinations. Comparison of protein-coding genes indicated that the core genome of CLso consists of 885 ortholog groups, with the pan-genome consisting of 1327 ortholog groups. Twenty-seven ortholog groups are unique to CLso haplotype C, whilst 11 ortholog groups shared by the haplotypes A and B, are not found in the haplotype C. Some of these ortholog groups that are not part of the core genome may encode functions related to interactions with the different host plant and psyllid species. PMID:28158295

  19. Understanding TR binding to pMHC complexes: how does a TR scan many pMHC complexes yet preferentially bind to one.

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    Javed Mohammed Khan

    Full Text Available Understanding the basis of the binding of a T cell receptor (TR to the peptide-MHC (pMHC complex is essential due to the vital role it plays in adaptive immune response. We describe the use of computed binding (free energy (BE, TR paratope, pMHC epitope, molecular surface electrostatic potential (MSEP and calculated TR docking angle (θ to analyse 61 TR/pMHC crystallographic structures to comprehend TR/pMHC interaction. In doing so, we have successfully demonstrated a novel/rational approach for θ calculation, obtained a linear correlation between BE and θ without any "codon" or amino acid preference, provided an explanation for TR ability to scan many pMHC ligands yet specifically bind one, proposed a mechanism for pMHC recognition by TR leading to T cell activation and illustrated the importance of the peptide in determining TR specificity, challenging the "germline bias" theory.

  20. The effect of genealogy-based haplotypes on genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Fernando, Rohan L.; Su, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Genomic prediction uses two sources of information: linkage disequilibrium between markers and quantitative trait loci, and additive genetic relationships between individuals. One way to increase the accuracy of genomic prediction is to capture more linkage disequilibrium by regression...... on haplotypes instead of regression on individual markers. The aim of this study was to investigate the accuracy of genomic prediction using haplotypes based on local genealogy information. Methods A total of 4429 Danish Holstein bulls were genotyped with the 50K SNP chip. Haplotypes were constructed using...... local genealogical trees. Effects of haplotype covariates were estimated with two types of prediction models: (1) assuming that effects had the same distribution for all haplotype covariates, i.e. the GBLUP method and (2) assuming that a large proportion (pi) of the haplotype covariates had zero effect...

  1. Convergent myotonic dystrophy (DM) haplotypes on 19q13.3: Potential inconsistencies in human disease gene localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsilfidis, C. [Eye Research Institute of Canada, Toronto (Canada); Whiting, E.J. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada); Korneluk, R.G. [Univ. of Ottawa (Canada)]|[Childrens Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Myotonic dystrophy (DM) is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disease which has been shown to be caused by an unstable trinucleotide repeat located on chromosome 19q. We have conducted extensive haplotype analysis on 103 DM chromosome using thirteen 19q13.3 loci identifying 18 RFLPs, spanning a physical distance of 1.3 Mb containing the myotonic dystrophy gene. Three major haplotypes, H1, H2 and H3, comprising 45.6% of the DM chromosomes, were observed in our population. The later two haplotypes, observed exclusively on DM chromosomes of French Canadian origin, contain a 500 kb core region that is identical. The low frequency of this core on normal chromosomes (0.8%) is consistent with a mapping of the DM gene within this region. However, the DM mutation is found 160 kb distal to the point of divergence between these two haplotypes. In contrast, the 450 kb shared by haplotypes H1 and H2 contain the DM mutation. Further, analysis of the DM region using a polymorphic microsatellite GJ-VSSM2 located 15 kb telomeric to the DM gene revealed strong allelic association of allele V on DM chromosomes (present on 6% of normal and 88.2% of DM chromosomes). The fact that allele V was found on all DM chromosomes with the three major haplotypes is indicative of their common origin and includes the two French Canadian haplotypes which share a region proximal to the DM mutation. This analysis indicates that convergent haplotypes, in the absence of a more extensive linkage disequilibrium analysis, may lead to a spurious disease gene localization.

  2. PLCz functional haplotypes modulating promoter transcriptional activity are associated with semen quality traits in Chinese Holstein bulls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Pan

    Full Text Available The sperm-specific phospholipase C zeta (PLCz is a candidate sperm-borne oocyte-activating factor that triggers a characteristic series of physiological stimuli via cytoplasmic Ca(2+ oscillations during fertilization. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PLCz gene expression remain largely unknown. To explore the genetic variations in the 5'-flanking region of the PLCz gene and their common haplotypes in Chinese Holstein bulls, as well as to determine whether these variations affect bovine semen quality traits and transcriptional activity, DNA samples were collected from Chinese Holstein bulls and sequenced for the identification of genetic variants in the 5'-flanking region of PLCz. Two genetic variants were identified, and their haplotypic profiles were constructed. The two novel genetic variations (g. -456 G>A and g. +65 T>C were genotyped in 424 normal Chinese Holstein bulls. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that both loci are in transcription factor binding sites of the core promoter region. The association studies revealed that the two genetic variations and their haplotype combinations significantly affected semen quality traits. Using serially truncated constructs of the bovine PLCz promoters and the luciferase reporter, we found that a 726 bp (-641 nt to +112 nt fragment constitutes the core promoter region. Furthermore, four haplotypes, H1H1 (GTGT, H2H2 (GCGC, H3H3 (ATAT, and H4H4 (ACAC, were significantly associated with semen quality traits and successfully transfected into MLTC-1 cell lines. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the different haplotypes exhibited distinct promoter activities. Maximal promoter activity was demonstrated by the H2H2 haplotypes, as compared with the other haplotypes. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report on genetic variants and their respective haplotypes in the 5'-flanking region of PLCz gene that can influence the semen quality of Chinese Holstein bulls as

  3. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and haplotypes (Apa I, Bsm I, Fok I, Taq I) in Turkish psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikbas, Ibrahim; Sanlı, Berna; Tepeli, Emre; Ergin, Seniz; Aktan, Sebnem; Bagci, Huseyin

    2012-11-01

    Psoriasis is an inflammatory disease characterized by increased squamous cell proliferation and impaired differentiation. Vitamin D, Calcitriol, and its analogues are successfully used for psoriasis therapy. However, it is unknown why some psoriasis patients are resistant to Vitamin D therapy. Vitamin D mediates its activity by a nuclear receptor. It is suggested that polymorphisms and haplotypes in the VDR gene may explain the differences in response to vitamin D therapy. In this study, 102 psoriasis patients and 102 healthy controls were studied for VDR gene polymorphisms. The Fok I, Bsm I, Apa I and Taq I polymorphisms were examined by PCR-RFLP, and 50 subjects received vitamin D therapy to evaluate the association between VDR gene polymorphisms and response to vitamin D therapy. Existence of cutting site is shown by capital letters, and lack was shown by lower case. The haplotypes were analysed by CHAPLIN. There was significant difference in allele frequency of T and genotype frequency of Tt between cases and controls (p values 0.038 and 0.04, respectively). The Aa and bb genotypes were significantly higher in early onset than late onset psoriasis (p values 0.008 and 0.04, respectively). The genotypes Ff, ff and TT are significantly different between vitamin D3 therapy responders and non-responders (p values 0.04, 0.0001, 0.009, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing importance of VDR gene haplotypes in psoriasis, the significance of the Wald and LR (Likelihood Ratio) statistics (p=0,0042) suggest that FfBbAatt is a disease-susceptibility haplotype. Haplotype analysis is a recent and commonly used method in genetic association studies. Our results reveal a previously unidentified susceptibility haplotype and indicate that certain haplotypes are important in the resistance to vitamin D3 therapy and the onset of psoriasis. The haplotypes can give valuable data where genotypes unable to do.

  4. Inheritance of the Bantu/Benin haplotype causes less severe hemolytic and oxidative stress in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxycarbamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Jéssika V; Silva, Danilo G H; Torres, Lidiane S; Belini-Junior, Edis; Barberino, Willian M; Oliveira, Renan G; Carrocini, Gisele C S; Gelaleti, Gabriela B; Lobo, Clarisse L C; Bonini-Domingos, Claudia R

    2016-07-01

    Beta S-globin gene cluster haplotypes (β(S)-haplotypes) can modulate the response to hydroxycarbamide (HC) treatment in sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients. In Brazil, the most common haplotypes are Bantu and Benin, and both confer a poor prognosis for patients when untreated with HC. We evaluated oxidative and hemolytic biomarkers in 48 SCA patients undergoing HC treatment separated in three subgroups: Bantu/Bantu, Bantu/Benin and Benin/Benin haplotype. On the basis of reduced haptoglobin (HP) levels, patients with Bantu/Bantu haplotypes had 3.0% higher hemolysis degree when compared with those with Bantu/Benin haplotypes (P=0.01). The Benin/Benin patients had 53.6% greater lipid peroxidation index than the Bantu/Bantu patients (P=0.01) because of evaluated thiobarbituric acid reactive species levels. The Bantu/Benin subgroup had intermediate levels of hemolytic and oxidative stress markers compared with the homozygous subgroups. Through strict inclusion criteria adopted, as well as consolidated and well-described hemolytic and the oxidative parameters evaluated, we suggest a haplotype-interaction response to HC treatment mediated by a 'balance' between the genetic factors of each haplotype studied.

  5. iHAP – integrated haplotype analysis pipeline for characterizing the haplotype structure of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Yun Ping

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advent of genotype data from large-scale efforts that catalog the genetic variants of different populations have given rise to new avenues for multifactorial disease association studies. Recent work shows that genotype data from the International HapMap Project have a high degree of transferability to the wider population. This implies that the design of genotyping studies on local populations may be facilitated through inferences drawn from information contained in HapMap populations. Results To facilitate analysis of HapMap data for characterizing the haplotype structure of genes or any chromosomal regions, we have developed an integrated web-based resource, iHAP. In addition to incorporating genotype and haplotype data from the International HapMap Project and gene information from the UCSC Genome Browser Database, iHAP also provides capabilities for inferring haplotype blocks and selecting tag SNPs that are representative of haplotype patterns. These include block partitioning algorithms, block definitions, tag SNP definitions, as well as SNPs to be "force included" as tags. Based on the parameters defined at the input stage, iHAP performs on-the-fly analysis and displays the result graphically as a webpage. To facilitate analysis, intermediate and final result files can be downloaded. Conclusion The iHAP resource, available at http://ihap.bii.a-star.edu.sg, provides a convenient yet flexible approach for the user community to analyze HapMap data and identify candidate targets for genotyping studies.

  6. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Chong, Amanda Y; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C; Ray, David A; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs.

  7. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerachai Jaratlerdsiri

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs.

  8. Allelic and haplotype variation of major histocompatibility complex class II DRB1 and DQB loci in the St Lawrence beluga (Delphinapterus leucas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    In order to assess levels of major histocompatibility complex (Mhc) variation within the St Lawrence beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) the variation at the beluga Mhc DRB1 class II locus was assessed by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the peptide-binding region for 313 whales collected from 13 sampling locations across North America. In addition, samples from west Greenland and the St Lawrence were also typed at the DQB locus, allowing comparison to a previous study and assessment of linkage disequilibrium of alleles at the two loci. Comparisons of DRB1 and DQB allele frequencies among all sampling locations indicated genetic structure (alpha St Lawrence, Hudson Strait, Bering Sea, Cunningham Inlet, and Davis Strait (minus Cunningham Inlet), except the St Lawrence and Hudson Strait for the DQB locus. In the St Lawrence population, six of the eight DRB1 alleles are present representing all five known allelic lineages. Evidence of linkage disequilibrium between the DRB1 and DQB is present in two sampling locations, the St Lawrence and Nuussuaq (alpha = 0.05). Analysis of probable DRB1-DQB haplotypes among groups of beluga suggests a haplotype reduction in the St Lawrence.

  9. Haplotype analysis of the CAG and CCG repeats in 21 Brazilian families with Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinho, Luciana de A; Rocha, Catielly F; Medina-Acosta, Enrique; Barboza, Hazel N; da Silva, Antônio F Alves; Pereira, Simão P F; da Silva, Iane Dos Santos; Paradela, Eduardo R; Figueiredo, André L dos S; Nogueira, Eduardo de M; Alvarenga, Regina M P; Hernan Cabello, Pedro; dos Santos, Suely R; Paiva, Carmen L A

    2012-12-01

    We studied the allelic profile of CAG and CCG repeats in 61 Brazilian individuals in 21 independent families affected by Huntington's disease (HD). Thirteen individuals had two normal alleles for HD, two had one mutable normal allele and no HD phenotype, and forty-six patients carried at least one expanded CAG repeat allele. Forty-five of these individuals had one expanded allele and one individual had one mutable normal allele (27 CAG repeats) and one expanded allele (48 CAG repeats). Eleven of these forty-five subjects had a mutant allele with reduced penetrance, and thirty-four patients had a mutant allele with complete penetrance. Inter- and intragenerational investigations of CAG repeats were also performed. We found a negative correlation between the number of CAG repeats and the age of disease onset (r=-0.84; Pdisease onset (r=0.06). We found 40 different haplotypes and the analysis showed that (CCG)(10) was linked to a CAG normal allele in 19 haplotypes and to expanded alleles in two haplotypes. We found that (CCG)(7) was linked to expanded CAG repeats in 40 haplotypes (95.24%) and (CCG)(10) was linked to expanded CAG repeats in only two haplotypes (4.76%). Therefore, (CCG)(7) was the most common allele in HD chromosomes in this Brazilian sample. It was also observed that there was a significant association of (CCG)(7) with the expanded CAG alleles (χ(2)=6.97, P=0.0084). Worldwide, the most common CCG alleles have 7 or 10 repeats. In Western Europe, (CCG)(7) is the most frequent allele, similarly to our findings.

  10. Correlated evolution of nucleotide substitution rates and allelic variation in Mhc-DRB lineages of primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Groot Natasja G

    2009-04-01

    we used phylogenetic models that control for similarity between species, due to common descent, and focused on variations within a single lineage (DRB1*03, the positive relationship between different substitution rates and allelic polymorphisms was still robust. Finally, we found the same effects to emerge in the analyses that eliminated within-species variation in MHC traits by using strictly single population-level studies. However, in a set of contrasting analyses, in which we focused on the non-functional DRB6 locus, the correlation between substitution rates and allelic variation was not prevalent. Conclusion Our results indicate that positive selection for the generation of allelic polymorphism acting on the functional part of the protein has consequences for the nucleotide substitution rate along the whole exon 2 sequence of the Mhc-DRB gene. Additionally, we proved that an increased substitution rate can promote allelic variation within lineages. Consequently, the evolution of different characteristics of genetic polymorphism is not independent.

  11. Haplotypes of NOS3 Gene Polymorphisms in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsa, Lova Satyanarayana; Rangaraju, Advithi; Vengaldas, Viswamitra; Latifi, Mona; Jahromi, Hossein Mehraban; Ananthapur, Venkateshwari; Nallari, Pratibha

    2013-01-01

    Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM) is characterized by systolic dysfunction, followed by heart failure necessitating cardiac transplantation. The genetic basis is well established by the identification of mutations in sarcomere and cytoskeleton gene/s. Modifier genes and environmental factors are also considered to play a significant role in the variable expression of the disease, hence various mechanisms are implicated and one such mechanism is oxidative stress. Nitric Oxide (NO), a primary physiological transmitter derived from endothelium seems to play a composite role with diverse anti-atherogenic effects as vasodilator. Three functional polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene viz., T-786C of the 5′ flanking region, 27bp VNTR in intron4 and G894T of exon 7 were genotyped to identify their role in DCM. A total of 115 DCM samples and 454 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by PCR -RFLP method. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and appropriate statistical tests were employed. A significant association of TC genotype (T-786C) with an odds ratio of 1.74, (95% CI 1.14 - 2.67, p = 0.01) was observed in DCM. Likewise the GT genotypic frequency of G894T polymorphism was found to be statistically significant (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.34–3.27, p = 0.0011), with the recessive allele T being significantly associated with DCM (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.18 - 2.30, p = 0.003). The haplotype carrying the recessive alleles of G894T and T-786C, C4bT was found to exhibit 7 folds increased risk for DCM compared to the controls. Hence C4bT haplotype could be the risk haplotype for DCM. Our findings suggest the possible implication of NOS3 gene in the disease phenotype, wherein NOS3 may be synergistically functioning in DCM associated heart failure via the excessive production of NO in cardiomyocytes resulting in decreased myocardial contractility and systolic dysfunction, a common feature of DCM

  12. Haplotypes of NOS3 gene polymorphisms in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lova Satyanarayana Matsa

    Full Text Available Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM is characterized by systolic dysfunction, followed by heart failure necessitating cardiac transplantation. The genetic basis is well established by the identification of mutations in sarcomere and cytoskeleton gene/s. Modifier genes and environmental factors are also considered to play a significant role in the variable expression of the disease, hence various mechanisms are implicated and one such mechanism is oxidative stress. Nitric Oxide (NO, a primary physiological transmitter derived from endothelium seems to play a composite role with diverse anti-atherogenic effects as vasodilator. Three functional polymorphisms of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3 gene viz., T-786C of the 5' flanking region, 27bp VNTR in intron4 and G894T of exon 7 were genotyped to identify their role in DCM. A total of 115 DCM samples and 454 controls were included. Genotyping was carried out by PCR -RFLP method. Allelic and genotypic frequencies were computed in both control & patient groups and appropriate statistical tests were employed. A significant association of TC genotype (T-786C with an odds ratio of 1.74, (95% CI 1.14 - 2.67, p = 0.01 was observed in DCM. Likewise the GT genotypic frequency of G894T polymorphism was found to be statistically significant (OR 2.10, 95% CI 1.34-3.27, p = 0.0011, with the recessive allele T being significantly associated with DCM (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.18 - 2.30, p = 0.003. The haplotype carrying the recessive alleles of G894T and T-786C, C4bT was found to exhibit 7 folds increased risk for DCM compared to the controls. Hence C4bT haplotype could be the risk haplotype for DCM. Our findings suggest the possible implication of NOS3 gene in the disease phenotype, wherein NOS3 may be synergistically functioning in DCM associated heart failure via the excessive production of NO in cardiomyocytes resulting in decreased myocardial contractility and systolic dysfunction, a common feature of DCM

  13. Selection of Proteins for Human MHC Class Ⅱ Presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jiang; Ole Lund; Jinquan Tan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the predicted function of proteins eluded from human MHC class Ⅱ molecules. Peptides that are presented by MHC class Ⅱ were obtained from the SYFPEITHI database and the corresponding proteins were found in the SWISSPROT database. The functions of these proteins were predicted using the protfun server. Our analysis showed that human proteins presented by MHC class Ⅱ molecules are likely to be in the cell envelope, be a receptor or involved in immune responses. Presented proteins from bacteria and virus, on the other hand, are more likely to be involved in regulatory functions, translation, transcription as well as replication. These results can lead to better understanding the autoimmunity and the response to infections.

  14. Selection of Proteins for Human MHC Class Ⅱ Presentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiJiang; OleLund; JinquanTan

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the predicted function of proteins eluded from human MHC class Ⅱ molecules. Peptides that are presented by MHC class Ⅱ were obtained from the SYFPEITH! database and the corresponding proteins were found in the SWISSPROT database. The functions of these proteins were predicted using the protfun server. Our analysis showed that human proteins presented by MHC class Ⅱ molecules are likely to be in the cell envelope, be a receptor or involved in immune responses. Presented proteins from bacteria and virus, on the other hand, are more likely to be involved in regulatory functions, translation, transcription as well as replication. These results can lead to better understanding the autoimmunity and the response to infections. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2005; 2(1):49-56.

  15. BoLA-6*01301 and BoLA-6*01302, two allelic variants of the A18 haplotype, present the same epitope from the Tp1 antigen of Theileria parva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svitek, N; Awino, E; Nene, V; Steinaa, L

    2015-09-15

    We have recently shown that the BoLA-A18 variant haplotype (BoLA-6*01302) is more prevalent than the BoLA-A18 haplotype (BoLA-6*01301) in a sample of Holstein/Friesian cattle in Kenya. These MHC class I allelic variants differ by a single amino acid polymorphism (Glu97 to Leu97) in the peptide-binding groove. We have previously mapped an 11-mer peptide epitope from the Theileria parva antigen Tp1 (Tp1214-224) that is presented by BoLA-6*01301. Crystal structure data indicates that Glu97 in the MHC molecule plays a role in epitope binding through electro-static interaction with a lysine residue in position 5 of the epitope, which also functions as an additional anchor residue. In contrast to expectations, we demonstrate that the amino acid substitution in BoLA-6*01302 does not divert the CTL response away from Tp1214-224. The two MHC molecules exhibit similar affinity for the Tp1 epitope and can present the epitope to parasite-specific CTLs derived from either BoLA allelic variants. These data confirm that this BoLA polymorphism does not alter Tp1 epitope specificity and that both allelic variants can be used for Tp1 vaccine studies. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Haplotype diversity in mitochondrial DNA hypervariable region in a population of southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, C; Gonzalez, R S; Pereira, A C; Cardena, M M S G

    2014-07-01

    Brazilian population derives from Native Amerindians, Europeans, and Africans. Southeastern Brazil is the most populous region of the country. The present study intended to characterize the maternal genetic ancestry of 290 individuals from southeastern (Brazil) population. Thus, we made the sequencing of the three hypervariable regions (HV1, HV2, and HV3) of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The statistical analyses were made using Arlequin software, and the median-joining haplotype networks were generated using Network software. The analysis of three hypervariable regios showed 230 (79.3 %) unique haplotypes and the most common haplotype was "263G" carried by 12 (4.1 %) individuals. The strikingly high variability generated by intense gene flow is mirrored in a high sequence diversity (0.9966 ± 0.0010), and the probability of two random individuals showing identical mtDNA haplotypes were 0.0068. The analysis of haplogroup distribution revealed that 36.9 % (n = 107) presented Amerindian haplogroups, 35.2 % (n = 102) presented African haplogroups, 27.6 % (n = 80) presented European haplogroups, and one (0.3 %) individual presented East Asian haplogroup, evidencing that the southeastern population is extremely heterogeneous and the coexistence of matrilineal lineages with three different phylogeographic origins. The genetic diversity found in the mtDNA control region in the southeastern Brazilian population reinforces the importance of increased national database in order to be important and informative in forensic cases.

  17. Molecular definition of red cell Rh haplotypes by tightly linked SphI RFLPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C H; Reid, M E; Chen, Y; Coghlan, G; Okubo, Y

    1996-01-01

    The Rh blood group system of human red cells contains five major antigens D, C/c, and E/e (the latter four designated "non-D") that are specified by eight gene complexes known as Rh haplotypes. In this paper, we report on the mapping of RH locus and identification of a set of SphI RFLPs that are tightly linked with the Rh structural genes. Using exon-specific probes, we have localized the SphI cleavage sites resulting in these DNA markers and derived a comprehensive map for the RH locus. It was found that the SphI fragments encompassing exons 4-7 of the Rh genes occur in four banding patterns or frameworks that correspond to the distribution and segregation of the common Rh haplotypes. This linkage disequilibrium allowed a genotype-phenotype correlation and direct determination of Rh zygosity related to the Rh-positive or Rh-negative status (D/D, D/d, and d/d). Studies on the occurrence of SphI RFLPs in a number of rare Rh variants indicated that Rh phenotypic diversity has taken place on different haplotype backgrounds and has arisen by diverse genetic mechanisms. The molecular definition of Rh haplotypes by SphI RFLP frameworks should provide a useful procedure for genetic counseling and prenatal assessment of Rh alloimmunization.

  18. Haplotype frequencies at the DRD2 locus in populations of the East European Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulich Alexey I

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It was demonstrated previously that the three-locus RFLP haplotype, TaqI B-TaqI D-TaqI A (B-D-A, at the DRD2 locus constitutes a powerful genetic marker and probably reflects the most ancient dispersal of anatomically modern humans. Results We investigated TaqI B, BclI, MboI, TaqI D, and TaqI A RFLPs in 17 contemporary populations of the East European Plain and Siberia. Most of these populations belong to the Indo-European or Uralic language families. We identified three common haplotypes, which occurred in more than 90% of chromosomes investigated. The frequencies of the haplotypes differed according to linguistic and geographical affiliation. Conclusion Populations in the northwestern (Byelorussians from Mjadel', northern (Russians from Mezen' and Oshevensk, and eastern (Russians from Puchezh parts of the East European Plain had relatively high frequencies of haplotype B2-D2-A2, which may reflect admixture with Uralic-speaking populations that inhabited all of these regions in the Early Middle Ages.

  19. Haplotype mapping of a diploid non-meiotic organism using existing and induced aneuploidies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Legrand

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Haplotype maps (HapMaps reveal underlying sequence variation and facilitate the study of recombination and genetic diversity. In general, HapMaps are produced by analysis of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP segregation in large numbers of meiotic progeny. Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, is an obligate diploid that does not appear to undergo meiosis. Thus, standard methods for haplotype mapping cannot be used. We exploited naturally occurring aneuploid strains to determine the haplotypes of the eight chromosome pairs in the C. albicans laboratory strain SC5314 and in a clinical isolate. Comparison of the maps revealed that the clinical strain had undergone a significant amount of genome rearrangement, consisting primarily of crossover or gene conversion recombination events. SNP map haplotyping revealed that insertion and activation of the UAU1 cassette in essential and non-essential genes can result in whole chromosome aneuploidy. UAU1 is often used to construct homozygous deletions of targeted genes in C. albicans; the exact mechanism (trisomy followed by chromosome loss versus gene conversion has not been determined. UAU1 insertion into the essential ORC1 gene resulted in a large proportion of trisomic strains, while gene conversion events predominated when UAU1 was inserted into the non-essential LRO1 gene. Therefore, induced aneuploidies can be used to generate HapMaps, which are essential for analyzing genome alterations and mitotic recombination events in this clonal organism.

  20. Sequence of a complete chicken BG haplotype shows dynamic expansion and contraction of two gene lineages with particular expression patterns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Salomonsen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many genes important in immunity are found as multigene families. The butyrophilin genes are members of the B7 family, playing diverse roles in co-regulation and perhaps in antigen presentation. In humans, a fixed number of butyrophilin genes are found in and around the major histocompatibility complex (MHC, and show striking association with particular autoimmune diseases. In chickens, BG genes encode homologues with somewhat different domain organisation. Only a few BG genes have been characterised, one involved in actin-myosin interaction in the intestinal brush border, and another implicated in resistance to viral diseases. We characterise all BG genes in B12 chickens, finding a multigene family organised as tandem repeats in the BG region outside the MHC, a single gene in the MHC (the BF-BL region, and another single gene on a different chromosome. There is a precise cell and tissue expression for each gene, but overall there are two kinds, those expressed by haemopoietic cells and those expressed in tissues (presumably non-haemopoietic cells, correlating with two different kinds of promoters and 5' untranslated regions (5'UTR. However, the multigene family in the BG region contains many hybrid genes, suggesting recombination and/or deletion as major evolutionary forces. We identify BG genes in the chicken whole genome shotgun sequence, as well as by comparison to other haplotypes by fibre fluorescence in situ hybridisation, confirming dynamic expansion and contraction within the BG region. Thus, the BG genes in chickens are undergoing much more rapid evolution compared to their homologues in mammals, for reasons yet to be understood.

  1. Evolution of MHC class I in the Order Crocodylia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P

    2014-01-01

    have mostly focused on model species. However, the investigation of this region in non-avian reptiles is still in its infancy. To provide insights into the evolutionary mechanisms that have shaped the diversity of this region in the Order Crocodylia, we investigated MHC class I exon 3, intron 3...... events of gene duplication, particularly in Crocodilidae. These findings enhance our understanding of MHC class I evolution and provide a preliminary framework for comparative studies of other non-avian reptiles as well as diversity assessment within Crocodylia....

  2. Haplotyping using a combination of polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis and haplotype-specific PCR amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huitong; Li, Shaobin; Liu, Xiu; Wang, Jiqing; Luo, Yuzhu; Hickford, Jon G H

    2014-12-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) may have an impact on phenotype, but it may also be influenced by multiple SNPs within a gene; hence, the haplotype or phase of multiple SNPs needs to be known. Various methods for haplotyping SNPs have been proposed, but a simple and cost-effective method is currently unavailable. Here we describe a haplotyping approach using two simple techniques: polymerase chain reaction-single-strand conformational polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and haplotype-specific PCR. In this approach, individual regions of a gene are analyzed by PCR-SSCP to identify variation that defines sub-haplotypes, and then extended haplotypes are assembled from the sub-haplotypes either directly or with the additional use of haplotype-specific PCR amplification. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by haplotyping ovine FABP4 across two variable regions that contain seven SNPs and one indel. The simplicity of this approach makes it suitable for large-scale studies and/or diagnostic screening.

  3. A fast and accurate algorithm for diploid individual haplotype reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingli; Liang, Binbin

    2013-08-01

    Haplotypes can provide significant information in many research fields, including molecular biology and medical therapy. However, haplotyping is much more difficult than genotyping by using only biological techniques. With the development of sequencing technologies, it becomes possible to obtain haplotypes by combining sequence fragments. The haplotype reconstruction problem of diploid individual has received considerable attention in recent years. It assembles the two haplotypes for a chromosome given the collection of fragments coming from the two haplotypes. Fragment errors significantly increase the difficulty of the problem, and which has been shown to be NP-hard. In this paper, a fast and accurate algorithm, named FAHR, is proposed for haplotyping a single diploid individual. Algorithm FAHR reconstructs the SNP sites of a pair of haplotypes one after another. The SNP fragments that cover some SNP site are partitioned into two groups according to the alleles of the corresponding SNP site, and the SNP values of the pair of haplotypes are ascertained by using the fragments in the group that contains more SNP fragments. The experimental comparisons were conducted among the FAHR, the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms by using the haplotypes on chromosome 1 of 60 individuals in CEPH samples, which were released by the International HapMap Project. Experimental results under different parameter settings indicate that the reconstruction rate of the FAHR algorithm is higher than those of the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms, and the running time of the FAHR algorithm is shorter than those of the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms. Moreover, the FAHR algorithm has high efficiency even for the reconstruction of long haplotypes and is very practical for realistic applications.

  4. Functional Haplotypes in Interleukin 4 Gene Associated with Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Marcia Pinto Alves; Rossa, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Chronic periodontitis (CP) is an infectious inflammatory disease that affects tooth-supporting structures and in which dental plaque bacteria, immune mechanisms and genetic predisposition play important roles. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) is a key anti-inflammatory cytokine with relevant action in imbalances in inflamed periodontal tissue. Individuals carrying the TCI/CCI genotype (S-haplotype) of the IL-4 gene are 5 times more susceptible to CP, whereas the CTI/TTD genotype (P-haplotype) confers protection against CP. Compared with the S-haplotype, subjects with the P-haplotype produce higher levels of the IL-4 protein after non-surgical periodontal therapy. The present in vitro study aimed to investigate the functionality of IL-4 haplotypes in immune cells to obtain insight into the influence of these genetic variations in regulating immune responses to CP-associated bacteria. Peripheral blood was collected from 6 subjects carrying each haplotype, and their immune cells were challenged with periodontopathogens to compare responses of the different haplotypes with regard to gene expression, protein secretion and the immunophenotype of T helper responses. We found higher IL-4 mRNA and protein levels in the P-haplotype, which also presented higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, cells from S-haplotype subjects responded with higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. S-haplotype individuals exhibited significantly greater polarization toward the Th1 phenotype, whereas the P-haplotype was associated with an attenuated response to periodontopathogens, with suggestive skewing toward Th2/M2 phenotypes. In conclusion, IL-4 genetic variations associated with susceptibility to or protection against chronic periodontitis are directly associated with influencing the response of immune cells to periodontopathogens. PMID:28114408

  5. A Single Amino Acid Difference within the α-2 Domain of Two Naturally Occurring Equine MHC Class I Molecules Alters the Recognition of Gag and Rev Epitopes by Equine Infectious Anemia Virus-Specific CTL1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mealey, Robert H.; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Leib, Steven R.; Littke, Matt H.; McGuire, Travis C.

    2012-01-01

    Although CTL are critical for control of lentiviruses, including equine infectious anemia virus, relatively little is known regarding the MHC class I molecules that present important epitopes to equine infectious anemia virus-specific CTL. The equine class I molecule 7-6 is associated with the equine leukocyte Ag (ELA)-A1 haplotype and presents the Env-RW12 and Gag-GW12 CTL epitopes. Some ELA-A1 target cells present both epitopes, whereas others are not recognized by Gag-GW12-specific CTL, suggesting that the ELA-A1 haplotype comprises functionally distinct alleles. The Rev-QW11 CTL epitope is also ELA-A1-restricted, but the molecule that presents Rev-QW11 is unknown. To determine whether functionally distinct class I molecules present ELA-A1-restricted CTL epitopes, we sequenced and expressed MHC class I genes from three ELA-A1 horses. Two horses had the 7-6 allele, which when expressed, presented Env-RW12, Gag-GW12, and Rev-QW11 to CTL. The other horse had a distinct allele, designated 141, encoding a molecule that differed from 7-6 by a single amino acid within the α-2 domain. This substitution did not affect recognition of Env-RW12, but resulted in more efficient recognition of Rev-QW11. Significantly, CTL recognition of Gag-GW12 was abrogated, despite Gag-GW12 binding to 141. Molecular modeling suggested that conformational changes in the 141/Gag-GW12 complex led to a loss of TCR recognition. These results confirmed that the ELA-A1 haplotype is comprised of functionally distinct alleles, and demonstrated for the first time that naturally occurring MHC class I molecules that vary by only a single amino acid can result in significantly different patterns of epitope recognition by lentivirus-specific CTL. PMID:17082657

  6. A Novel Therapeutic Vaccine for Metastatic Mammary Carcinoma: Focusing MHC/Peptide Complexes to Lipid Rafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    CSF and IL-4. see below c. Measure MHC class I and II transfer by flow cytometry using fluorescent antibodies to both CD11c and either donor MHC...by ELISA . Attempts to transfect and screen 4T1 cells with the model antigens ova and HA were unsuccessful. Because of this, task 6 can not be...tetramethylindodicarbocynanine DTR, diphtheria toxin receptor DTx, diphtheria toxin HEL, hen egg lysozyme pMHC, peptide-MHC Abstract Tumor cells that

  7. HLA A19 subtypes and B loci related haplotype in selected caste groups from the Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankarkumar U

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Indian population has been broadly classified as Aryans of Northern India and Dravidians of South India. The present study was undertaken to compile available data and investigate the genetic diversity of HLA A19 subtypes in Indians and its associated B locus haplotype frequency distribution at the population level. The study revealed that A33 was common among the selected North Indian caste groups (Aryans while A31 was common among the selected South Indian caste groups (Dravidians. The haplotypes A33-B44 and A19-B35 were characteristic to Aryans while haplotypes A19-B22 and A19-B7 were characteristic to Dravidians. Further novel haplotypes such as A19-B14 and A33-B49 were unique to Parsis and Sourastran caste. A low frequency of A29 was observed among the A19 subtype repertoire. Prevalence of HLA A33 and A31 among North Indians (Aryans and South Indians (Dravidians along with their unique haplotypes may be a consequence of the founder effect, racial admixture or selection pressure due to environmental factors among this population.

  8. A comprehensive haplotype analysis of the XPC genomic sequence reveals a cluster of genetic variants associated with sensitivity to tobacco-smoke mutagens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondelli, Catherine M; El-Zein, Randa A; Wickliffe, Jeffrey K; Etzel, Carol J; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z

    2010-05-01

    The impact of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the DNA repair gene XPC on DNA repair capacity (DRC) and genotoxicity has not been comprehensively determined. We constructed a comprehensive haplotype map encompassing all common XPC SNPs and evaluated the effect of Bayesian-inferred haplotypes on DNA damage associated with tobacco smoking, using chromosome aberrations (CA) as a biomarker. We also used the mutagen-sensitivity assay, in which mutagen-induced CA in cultured lymphocytes are determined, to evaluate the haplotype effects on DRC. We hypothesized that if certain XPC haplotypes have functional effects, a correlation between these haplotypes and baseline and/or mutagen-induced CA would exist. Using HapMap and single nucleotide polymorphism (dbSNP) databases, we identified 92 SNPs, of which 35 had minor allele frequencies >or= 0.05. Bayesian inference and subsequent phylogenetic analysis identified 21 unique haplotypes, which segregated into six distinct phylogenetically grouped haplotypes (PGHs A-F). A SNP tagging approach used identified 11 tagSNPs representing these 35 SNPs (r(2) = 0.80). We utilized these tagSNPs to genotype a population of smokers matched to nonsmokers (n = 123). Haplotypes for each individual were reconstituted and PGH designations were assigned. Relationships between XPC haplotypes and baseline and/or mutagen-induced CA were then evaluated. We observed significant interaction among smoking and PGH-C (p = 0.046) for baseline CA where baseline CA was 3.5 times higher in smokers compared to nonsmokers. Significant interactions among smoking and PGH-D (p = 0.023) and PGH-F (p = 0.007) for mutagen-induced CA frequencies were also observed. These data indicate that certain XPC haplotypes significantly alter CA and DRC in smokers and, thus, can contribute to cancer risk.

  9. MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells in health and disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souwer, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    MHC class II antigen presentation by B cells is important to activate CD4+ T cells that stimulate the B cell to produce antibodies. Besides this, disruption of MHC class II antigen presentation could play a role in immune escape by tumor cells. This thesis describes MHC class II antigen presentation

  10. A genome-wide survey of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC genes and their paralogues in zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figueroa Felipe

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genomic organisation of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC varies greatly between different vertebrates. In mammals, the classical MHC consists of a large number of linked genes (e.g. greater than 200 in humans with predominantly immune function. In some birds, it consists of only a small number of linked MHC core genes (e.g. smaller than 20 in chickens forming a minimal essential MHC and, in fish, the MHC consists of a so far unknown number of genes including non-linked MHC core genes. Here we report a survey of MHC genes and their paralogues in the zebrafish genome. Results Using sequence similarity searches against the zebrafish draft genome assembly (Zv4, September 2004, 149 putative MHC gene loci and their paralogues have been identified. Of these, 41 map to chromosome 19 while the remaining loci are spread across essentially all chromosomes. Despite the fragmentation, a set of MHC core genes involved in peptide transport, loading and presentation are still found in a single linkage group. Conclusion The results extend the linkage information of MHC core genes on zebrafish chromosome 19 and show the distribution of the remaining MHC genes and their paralogues to be genome-wide. Although based on a draft genome assembly, this survey demonstrates an essentially fragmented MHC in zebrafish.

  11. Social pairing of Seychelles warblers under reduced constraints : MHC, neutral heterozygosity, and age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, David J.; Brouwer, Lyanne; Mannarelli, Maria-Elena; Burke, Terry; Komdeur, Jan; Richardson, David S.

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and significance of precopulatory mate choice remains keenly debated. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) plays a key role in vertebrate adaptive immunity, and variation at the MHC influences individual survival. Although MHC-dependent mate choice has been documented in certain

  12. NetMHCpan, a method for MHC class I binding prediction beyond humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Peters, B; Sidney, J;

    2009-01-01

    .0, a method that generates quantitative predictions of the affinity of any peptide-MHC class I interaction. NetMHCpan-2.0 has been trained on the hitherto largest set of quantitative MHC binding data available, covering HLA-A and HLA-B, as well as chimpanzee, rhesus macaque, gorilla, and mouse MHC class I...

  13. Heterozygote advantage fails to explain the high degree of polymorphism of the MHC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Boer, R.J.; Borghans, J.A.M.; Boven, M.;

    2004-01-01

    Major histocompatibility (MHC) molecules are encoded by extremely polymorphic genes and play a crucial role in vertebrate immunity. Natural selection favors MHC heterozygous hosts because individuals heterozygous at the MHC can present a larger diversity of peptides from infectious pathogens than...

  14. MHC class II B diversity in blue tits : A preliminary study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rivero-de Aguilar, Juan; Schut, Elske; Merino, Santiago; Martinez, Javier; Komdeur, Jan; Westerdahl, Helena

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we partly characterize major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II B in the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus). A total of 22 individuals from three different European locations: Spain, The Netherlands, and Sweden were screened for MHC allelic diversity. The MHC genes were investigate

  15. Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC Related Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA Haplotype Sharing among Southern East Asian Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rika Yuliwulandari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human leukocyte antigens (HLAs play important roles in the immune systems to response to various pathogens and disease among individuals. The aim of this study was analyze the HLA allele and haplotype frequencies of Southern East Asian population that show high incidence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC to evaluate the shared HLA haplotype contribution to NPC susceptibility among the population and analyses the genetic affinities between the population. We collect information of HLA haplotype from our previous study, other published paper, and HLA database in 19 population during 2005 to 2015. Haplotype frequencies were estimated using the maximum likelihood method based on an expectation maximization algorithm with ARLEQUIN v.2.0 software. We also calculated the genetic distance among 19 Southern East Asians based on HLA allele frequency using modified Cavalli-Sforza (DA distance method. Then, a phylogenetic tree was constructed using DISPAN software and principal component analysis (PCA was performed using XLSTAT-PRO software. A33-B58-DR3 haplotype, tightly linked to NPC, was commonly observed in all populations, supporting the high incidence of NPC in the populations. In addition, A2-B46 haplotype also associated with NPC, was also commonly found in several population that may also have a role in the disease development. The conclusion is the HLA haplotype sharing has an important role than the HLA allele sharing. The A33-B58-DR3 haplotype and A2-B46-DR9 haplotype in this study could be related to NPC in the Southern East Asian populations. The observed haplotype needs to be tested in the real patients to confirm the assumption. Abstrak Human leukocyte antigens (HLAs berperan penting dalam sistem imun untuk merespons berbagai patogen dan penyakit di antara individu yang berbeda. Tujuan penelitian ini menganalisis frekuensi alel dan haplotipe HLA populasi Southern East Asia yang menunjukkan insidensi yang tinggi terhadap

  16. Reconstruction of N-acetyltransferase 2 haplotypes using PHASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golka, Klaus; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Samimi, Mirabutaleb; Bolt, Hermann M; Selinski, Silvia

    2008-04-01

    The genotyping of N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) by PCR/RFLP methods yields in a considerable percentage ambiguous results. To resolve this methodical problem a statistical approach was applied. PHASE v2.1.1, a statistical program for haplotype reconstruction was used to estimate haplotype pairs from NAT2 genotyping data, obtained by the analysis of seven single nucleotide polymorphisms relevant for Caucasians. In 1,011 out of 2,921 (35%) subjects the haplotype pairs were clearcut by the PCR/RFLP data only. For the majority of the data the applied method resulted in a multiplicity (2-4) of possible haplotype pairs. Haplotype reconstruction using PHASE v2.1.1 cleared this ambiguity in all cases but one, where an alternative haplotype pair was considered with a probability of 0.029. The estimation of the NAT2 haplotype is important because the assignment of the NAT2 alleles *12A, *12B, *12C or *13 to the rapid or slow NAT2 genotype has been discussed controversially. A clear assignment is indispensable in surveys of human bladder cancer caused by aromatic amine exposures. In conclusion, PHASE v2.1.1 software allowed an unambiguous haplotype reconstruction in 2,920 of 2,921 cases (>99.9%).

  17. A method for haplotype inference in general pedigrees without recombination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG ChunKao; WANG ZhiPeng; QIU XiaoTian; ZHANG Qin

    2007-01-01

    The abundance of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) makes the haplotype-based method instead of single-maker-oriented method the main approach to association studies on QTL mapping. The key problem in haploptype-based method is how to reconstruct haplotypes from genotype data. Directly assaying haplotypes in diploid individuals by experimental methods is too expensive, therefore the in silico haplotyping-determination methods are the major choice at the present. This paper presents a rapid and reliable algorithm for haplotype reconstruction for tightly linked SNPs in general pedigrees. It is based on six rules and consists of three steps. First, the parental origins of alleles in offspring are assigned conditional on genotypes in parent-offspring trios; second, the redundant haplotypes are eliminated based on the six rules; and finally, the most likely haplotype combinations are chosen via maximum likelihood method. Our method was verified and compared with PEDPHASE by simulated data with different pedigree sizes, numbers of loci, and proportions of missing genotypes. The result shows that our algorithm was superior to PEDPHASE in terms of computing time and accuracy of haplotype estimation. The computing time for 100 runs was 10-15 times less and the accuracy was 4%-10% higher than PEDPHASE. The result also indicates that our method was very robust and was hardly affected by pedigree size, number of loci, and proportion of missing genotypes.

  18. Restriction digestion method for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli

    Science.gov (United States)

    A restriction digestion method has been developed for haplotyping the potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli Sulc., an economically important pest of solanaceous crops. This method differentiates the four known potato psyllid haplotypes by utilizing restriction enzyme digestion of a portion of the ...

  19. Five novel glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency haplotypes correlating with disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallol Ashraf

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD, EC 1.1.1.49 deficiency is caused by one or more mutations in the G6PD gene on chromosome X. An association between enzyme levels and gene haplotypes remains to be established. Methods In this study, we determined G6PD enzyme levels and sequenced the coding region, including the intron-exon boundaries, in a group of individuals (163 males and 86 females who were referred to the clinic with suspected G6PD deficiency. The sequence data were analysed by physical linkage analysis and PHASE haplotype reconstruction. Results All previously reported G6PD missense changes, including the AURES, MEDITERRANEAN, A-, SIBARI, VIANGCHAN and ANANT, were identified in our cohort. The AURES mutation (p.Ile48Thr was the most common variant in the cohort (30% in males patients followed by the Mediterranean variant (p.Ser188Phe detectable in 17.79% in male patients. Variant forms of the A- mutation (p.Val68Met, p.Asn126Asp or a combination of both were detectable in 15.33% of the male patients. However, unique to this study, several of such mutations co-existed in the same patient as shown by physical linkage in males or PHASE haplotype reconstruction in females. Based on 6 non-synonymous variants of G6PD, 13 different haplotypes (13 in males, 8 in females were identified. Five of these were previously unreported (Jeddah A, B, C, D and E and were defined by previously unreported combinations of extant mutations where patients harbouring these haplotypes exhibited severe G6PD deficiency. Conclusions Our findings will help design a focused population screening approach and provide better management for G6PD deficiency patients.

  20. Phasing for medical sequencing using rare variants and large haplotype reference panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Kevin; Kretzschmar, Warren; Delaneau, Olivier; Marchini, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: There is growing recognition that estimating haplotypes from high coverage sequencing of single samples in clinical settings is an important problem. At the same time very large datasets consisting of tens and hundreds of thousands of high-coverage sequenced samples will soon be available. We describe a method that takes advantage of these huge human genetic variation resources and rare variant sharing patterns to estimate haplotypes on single sequenced samples. Sharing rare variants between two individuals is more likely to arise from a recent common ancestor and, hence, also more likely to indicate similar shared haplotypes over a substantial flanking region of sequence. Results: Our method exploits this idea to select a small set of highly informative copying states within a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) phasing algorithm. Using rare variants in this way allows us to avoid iterative MCMC methods to infer haplotypes. Compared to other approaches that do not explicitly use rare variants we obtain significant gains in phasing accuracy, less variation over phasing runs and improvements in speed. For example, using a reference panel of 7420 haplotypes from the UK10K project, we are able to reduce switch error rates by up to 50% when phasing samples sequenced at high-coverage. In addition, a single step rephasing of the UK10K panel, using rare variant information, has a downstream impact on phasing performance. These results represent a proof of concept that rare variant sharing patterns can be utilized to phase large high-coverage sequencing studies such as the 100 000 Genomes Project dataset. Availability and implementation: A webserver that includes an implementation of this new method and allows phasing of high-coverage clinical samples is available at https://phasingserver.stats.ox.ac.uk/. Contact: marchini@stats.ox.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27153703

  1. Major histocompatibility (MH) class II ß gene polymorphism influences disease resistance of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakus, K.L.; Wiegertjes, G.F.; Jurecka, P.M.; Walker, P.D.; Pilarczyk, A.; Irnazarow, I.

    2009-01-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are crucial elements of adaptive immunity. High polymorphism renders the MHC genes highly suitable for studies on association with disease resistance. In common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), there are two paralogous groups of MH class II B genes, Cyca

  2. Haplotype-resolved genome sequencing of a Gujarati Indian individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman, Jacob O; Mackenzie, Alexandra P; Adey, Andrew; Hiatt, Joseph B; Patwardhan, Rupali P; Sudmant, Peter H; Ng, Sarah B; Alkan, Can; Qiu, Ruolan; Eichler, Evan E; Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Haplotype information is essential to the complete description and interpretation of genomes, genetic diversity and genetic ancestry. Although individual human genome sequencing is increasingly routine, nearly all such genomes are unresolved with respect to haplotype. Here we combine the throughput of massively parallel sequencing with the contiguity information provided by large-insert cloning to experimentally determine the haplotype-resolved genome of a South Asian individual. A single fosmid library was split into a modest number of pools, each providing ∼3% physical coverage of the diploid genome. Sequencing of each pool yielded reads overwhelmingly derived from only one homologous chromosome at any given location. These data were combined with whole-genome shotgun sequence to directly phase 94% of ascertained heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into long haplotype blocks (N50 of 386 kilobases (kbp)). This method also facilitates the analysis of structural variation, for example, to anchor novel insertions to specific locations and haplotypes.

  3. Haplotype map of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumni, Imen; Ben Mustapha, Maha; Sassi, Sarra; Zorai, Amine; Ben Mansour, Ikbel; Douzi, Kais; Chouachi, Dorra; Mellouli, Fethi; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Abbes, Salem

    2014-01-01

    β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD). To determine the chromosomal background of β (S) Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5' region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII) region of two fetal ((G)γ and (A)γ) genes and the 5' region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 "extended haplotypes". These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD.

  4. TCR/pMHC Optimized Protein crystallization Screen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulek, Anna M.; Madura, Florian; Fuller, Anna; Holland, Christopher J.; Schauenburg, Andrea J.A.; Sewell, Andrew K.; Rizkallah, Pierre J.; Cole, David K.

    2012-01-01

    The interaction between the clonotypic αβ T cell receptor (TCR), expressed on the T cell surface, and peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules, expressed on the target cell surface, governs T cell mediated autoimmunity and immunity against pathogens and cancer. Structural investigations of this interaction have been limited because of the challenges inherent in the production of good quality TCR/pMHC protein crystals. Here, we report the development of an ‘intelligently designed’ crystallization screen that reproducibly generates high quality TCR/pMHC complex crystals suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies, thereby reducing protein consumption. Over the last 2 years, we have implemented this screen to produce 32 T cell related protein structures at high resolution, substantially contributing to the current immune protein database. Protein crystallography, used to study this interaction, has already extended our understanding of the molecular rules that govern T cell immunity. Subsequently, these data may help to guide the intelligent design of T cell based therapies that target human diseases, underlining the importance of developing optimized approaches for crystallizing novel TCR/pMHC complexes. PMID:22705983

  5. Colonizing the world in spite of reduced MHC variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gangoso, Laura; Alcaide, Miguel; Grande, Juan M;

    2012-01-01

    the genus) is very high, falcons exhibit ancestrally low intra- and interspecific MHC variability. This pattern is not due to the inadvertent survey of paralogous genes or pseudogenes. Further, patterns of variation in mitochondrial or other nuclear genes do not indicate a generalized low level of genome-wide...

  6. General Framework for Meta-Analysis of Haplotype Association Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Zhao, Jing Hua; An, Ping; Guo, Xiuqing; Jensen, Richard A; Marten, Jonathan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Meidtner, Karina; Boeing, Heiner; Campbell, Archie; Rice, Kenneth M; Scott, Robert A; Yao, Jie; Schulze, Matthias B; Wareham, Nicholas J; Borecki, Ingrid B; Province, Michael A; Rotter, Jerome I; Hayward, Caroline; Goodarzi, Mark O; Meigs, James B; Dupuis, Josée

    2016-04-01

    For complex traits, most associated single nucleotide variants (SNV) discovered to date have a small effect, and detection of association is only possible with large sample sizes. Because of patient confidentiality concerns, it is often not possible to pool genetic data from multiple cohorts, and meta-analysis has emerged as the method of choice to combine results from multiple studies. Many meta-analysis methods are available for single SNV analyses. As new approaches allow the capture of low frequency and rare genetic variation, it is of interest to jointly consider multiple variants to improve power. However, for the analysis of haplotypes formed by multiple SNVs, meta-analysis remains a challenge, because different haplotypes may be observed across studies. We propose a two-stage meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype analysis results. In the first stage, each cohort estimate haplotype effect sizes in a regression framework, accounting for relatedness among observations if appropriate. For the second stage, we use a multivariate generalized least square meta-analysis approach to combine haplotype effect estimates from multiple cohorts. Haplotype-specific association tests and a global test of independence between haplotypes and traits are obtained within our framework. We demonstrate through simulation studies that we control the type-I error rate, and our approach is more powerful than inverse variance weighted meta-analysis of single SNV analysis when haplotype effects are present. We replicate a published haplotype association between fasting glucose-associated locus (G6PC2) and fasting glucose in seven studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium and we provide more precise haplotype effect estimates.

  7. Predicting MHC class I epitopes in large datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lengauer Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental screening of large sets of peptides with respect to their MHC binding capabilities is still very demanding due to the large number of possible peptide sequences and the extensive polymorphism of the MHC proteins. Therefore, there is significant interest in the development of computational methods for predicting the binding capability of peptides to MHC molecules, as a first step towards selecting peptides for actual screening. Results We have examined the performance of four diverse MHC Class I prediction methods on comparatively large HLA-A and HLA-B allele peptide binding datasets extracted from the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis resource (IEDB. The chosen methods span a representative cross-section of available methodology for MHC binding predictions. Until the development of IEDB, such an analysis was not possible, as the available peptide sequence datasets were small and spread out over many separate efforts. We tested three datasets which differ in the IC50 cutoff criteria used to select the binders and non-binders. The best performance was achieved when predictions were performed on the dataset consisting only of strong binders (IC50 less than 10 nM and clear non-binders (IC50 greater than 10,000 nM. In addition, robustness of the predictions was only achieved for alleles that were represented with a sufficiently large (greater than 200, balanced set of binders and non-binders. Conclusions All four methods show good to excellent performance on the comprehensive datasets, with the artificial neural networks based method outperforming the other methods. However, all methods show pronounced difficulties in correctly categorizing intermediate binders.

  8. MHC class Jb-restricted cell responses to Listeria monocytogenes infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerksiek, K M; Pamer, E G

    1999-12-01

    Murine infection with Listeria monocytogenes induces CD8+ T cell responses specific for bacterial peptides that are presented on the infected cell surface by MHC class Ia and MHC class Ib molecules. We have used MHC tetramers to demonstrate that CD8+ T cells restricted by the H2-M3 MHC class Ib molecules constitute a substantial portion of the T cell response to L. monocytogenes infection. The in vivo size and kinetics of MHC class Ib-restricted T cell populations suggests that they play a prominent role in bacterial clearance following primary L. monocytogenes infection.

  9. Measurement of peptide-MHC interactions in solution using the spin column filtration assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Soren; Lise Lauemøller, S; Stryhn, A

    2001-01-01

    This unit describes how peptide-MHC complexes can be generated in vitro using affinity-purified MHC and synthetic peptide. The unit first describes how the interaction between peptide and MHC interaction can be measured in an accurate, quantitative biochemical assay. This procedure has been...... optimized for efficient separation of free peptide and MHC-bound peptide through a novel principle, termed "gradient centrifugation." The first two support protocols describe how to set up a biochemical fluid-phase binding reaction between peptide and MHC class I and class II, respectively. Also...

  10. MHC B-L基因多态性与鸡白痢沙门氏菌易感性的关联分析%Association of MHC B-L gene polymorphism with susceptibility of Salmonella pullorum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张泽樘; 龚超; 陈卓宇; 张细权; 罗庆斌

    2012-01-01

    为研究MHCB-L基因的多态性与鸡白痢沙门氏菌感染之间的关系,采用PCR产物直接测序技术对供试鸡MHcRL基因外显子2进行单核苷酸多态性检测,分别利用Plinkl.07软件和PHASEV2.1软件进行病例一对照关联分析和单倍型分析。结果发现,在270bp的序列内共检测到42个单核苷酸多态性位点(SNPs)。C.280C>A位点等位基因在病例一对照样本中的分布存在显著差异(P<0.05);C.246G>T、C.249A>G位点基因型在病例一对照样本中的分布存在显著差异(P<0.05)。C.229T>A和C.249A>G位点组成的单倍型与抗鸡白痢性状差异不显著(P>0.05);同时C.285G>A、C.287A>T和C.288C>A位点组成的单倍型与抗鸡白痢性状的差异也不显著(P>0.05)。结果表明,MHCB-L基因外显子2多态性与抗鸡白痢性状显著相关,为开展沙门氏茵抗性分子标记辅助选择研究提供了一定的依据。%To study the association between MHC B-L gene polymorphism and Salmonella pullorum infection,polymerase chain reaction sequence-based typing method was used to detect the polymorphism of MHC B-L gene exon 2. The Plinkl. 07 and PHASE V2. 1 software was used as case-control association study and haplotype analysis, respectively. There were 42 single nucleotide polymorphisms(SNPs) in 270 bp DNA sequence. The distribution of C. 280C〉A alleles had a significant difference in case-control samples. The distribution of C. 246G〉T and C. 249A〉G genotypes had a significant difference in case-control samples. Haplotypes within the C. 229T〉A and C. 249A〉G sites and within the C. 285G〉A,C. 287A〉T and C. 288C〉A sites did not associate with anti-pullorum disease trait. The results showed that the polymorphism of MHC B-L gene exon 2 was significant associated with anti-pullorum disease trait, and provided some bases for developing marker assisted selection programmes for anti-salmonellosis.

  11. MHC and non-MHC genes regulate elimination of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity mediating T lymphocyte activity in parallel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Marker, O

    1989-01-01

    The course of systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mouse strains differing in the MHC or non-MHC background. Virus clearance rates differed significantly between H-2 identical strains as well as between congenic strains differing in the H-2L subregion, indicat......The course of systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus was studied in mouse strains differing in the MHC or non-MHC background. Virus clearance rates differed significantly between H-2 identical strains as well as between congenic strains differing in the H-2L subregion...

  12. Are molecular haplotypes worth the time and expense? A cost-effective method for applying molecular haplotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Levenstien

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Because current molecular haplotyping methods are expensive and not amenable to automation, many researchers rely on statistical methods to infer haplotype pairs from multilocus genotypes, and subsequently treat these inferred haplotype pairs as observations. These procedures are prone to haplotype misclassification. We examine the effect of these misclassification errors on the false-positive rate and power for two association tests. These tests include the standard likelihood ratio test (LRTstd and a likelihood ratio test that employs a double-sampling approach to allow for the misclassification inherent in the haplotype inference procedure (LRTae. We aim to determine the cost-benefit relationship of increasing the proportion of individuals with molecular haplotype measurements in addition to genotypes to raise the power gain of the LRTae over the LRTstd. This analysis should provide a guideline for determining the minimum number of molecular haplotypes required for desired power. Our simulations under the null hypothesis of equal haplotype frequencies in cases and controls indicate that (1 for each statistic, permutation methods maintain the correct type I error; (2 specific multilocus genotypes that are misclassified as the incorrect haplotype pair are consistently misclassified throughout each entire dataset; and (3 our simulations under the alternative hypothesis showed a significant power gain for the LRTae over the LRTstd for a subset of the parameter settings. Permutation methods should be used exclusively to determine significance for each statistic. For fixed cost, the power gain of the LRTae over the LRTstd varied depending on the relative costs of genotyping, molecular haplotyping, and phenotyping. The LRTae showed the greatest benefit over the LRTstd when the cost of phenotyping was very high relative to the cost of genotyping. This situation is likely to occur in a replication study as opposed to a whole-genome association study.

  13. HLA DRB1*DQB1* haplotype in HTLV-I-associated familial infective dermatitis may predict development of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaGrenade, L.; Miller, W.; Pate, E.; Rodgers-Johnson, P. [Univ. of the West Indies, Mona (Jamaica)] [and others

    1996-01-02

    A possible causal association between infective dermatitis and HTLV-I infection was reported in 1990 and confirmed in 1992. We now report familial infective dermatitis (ID) occurring in a 26-year-old mother and her 9-year-old son. The mother was first diagnosed with ID in 1969 at the age of 2 years in Dermatology Unit at the University Hospital of the West Indies (U.H.W.I.) in Jamacia. The elder of her 2 sons was diagnosed with ID at the age of 3 years, also at U.H.W.I. Both mother and son are HTLV-I-seropositive. A second, younger son, currently age 2 years, is also HTLV-I-seropositive, but without clinical evidence of ID. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC), class II, human leucocyte antigen (HLA) genotyping documented a shared class II haplotype, DRB1*DQB1* (1101-0301), in the mother and her 2 sons. This same haplotype has been described among Japanese patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), and has been associated with a possible pathologically heightened immune response to HTLV-I infection. The presence of this haplotype in these familial ID cases with clinical signs of HAM/TSP may have contributed to their risk for development of HAM/TSP. The unaffected, HTLV-I-seropositive, younger son requires close clinical follow-up. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Interaction of TAPBPR, a tapasin homolog, with MHC-I molecules promotes peptide editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Giora I.; Zhao, Huaying; Mage, Michael G.; Boyd, Lisa F.; Jiang, Jiansheng; Dolan, Michael A.; Venna, Ramesh; Norcross, Michael A.; McMurtrey, Curtis P.; Hildebrand, William; Schuck, Peter; Natarajan, Kannan; Margulies, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Peptide loading of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules is central to antigen presentation, self-tolerance, and CD8+ T-cell activation. TAP binding protein, related (TAPBPR), a widely expressed tapasin homolog, is not part of the classical MHC-I peptide-loading complex (PLC). Using recombinant MHC-I molecules, we show that TAPBPR binds HLA-A*02:01 and several other MHC-I molecules that are either peptide-free or loaded with low-affinity peptides. Fluorescence polarization experiments establish that TAPBPR augments peptide binding by MHC-I. The TAPBPR/MHC-I interaction is reversed by specific peptides, related to their affinity. Mutational and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies confirm the structural similarities of TAPBPR with tapasin. These results support a role of TAPBPR in stabilizing peptide-receptive conformation(s) of MHC-I, permitting peptide editing. PMID:26869717

  15. One-pot, mix-and-read peptide-MHC tetramers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leisner, Christian Valdemar Vinge; Loeth, Nina; Lamberth, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    biochemical steps such as chromatographic purification, concentration etc. Such cumbersome production protocols have limited dissemination and restricted availability of peptide-MHC tetramers effectively precluding large-scale screening strategies involving many different peptide-MHC tetramers. METHODOLOGY...... molecules can be refolded in vitro, tetramerized with streptavidin, and used for specific T cell staining-all in a one-pot reaction without any intervening purification steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have developed an efficient "one-pot, mix-and-read" strategy for peptide-MHC tetramer generation......, and demonstrated specific T cell straining comparable to a commercially available MHC-tetramer. Here, seven peptide-MHC tetramers representing four different human MHC (HLA) class I proteins have been generated. The technique should be readily extendable to any binding peptide and pre-biotinylated MHC (at...

  16. Accounting for haplotype phase uncertainty in linkage disequilibrium estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulle, B; Frigessi, A; Edvardsen, H; Kristensen, V; Wojnowski, L

    2008-02-01

    The characterization of linkage disequilibrium (LD) is applied in a variety of studies including the identification of molecular determinants of the local recombination rate, the migration and population history of populations, and the role of positive selection in adaptation. LD suffers from the phase uncertainty of the haplotypes used in its calculation, which reflects limitations of the algorithms used for haplotype estimation. We introduce a LD calculation method, which deals with phase uncertainty by weighting all possible haplotype pairs according to their estimated probabilities as evaluated by PHASE. In contrast to the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm as implemented in the HAPLOVIEW and GENETICS packages, our method considers haplotypes based on the entire genetic information available for the candidate region. We tested the method using simulated and real genotyping data. The results show that, for all practical purposes, the new method is advantageous in comparison with algorithms that calculate LD using only the most probable haplotype or bilocus haplotypes based on the EM algorithm. The new method deals especially well with low LD regions, which contribute strongly to phase uncertainty. Altogether, the method is an attractive alternative to standard LD calculation procedures, including those based on the EM algorithm. We implemented the method in the software suite R, together with an interface to the popular haplotype calculation package PHASE.

  17. Oral HPV infection and MHC class II deficiency (A study of two cases with atypical outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guirat-Dhouib Naouel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major histocompatibility complex class II deficiency, also referred to as bare lymphocyte syndrome is a rare primary Immunodeficiency disorder characterized by a profondly deficient human leukocyte antigen class II expression and a lack of cellular and humoral immune responses to foreign antigens. Clinical manifestations include extreme susceptibility to viral, bacterial, and fungal infections. The infections begin in the first year of life and involve usually the respiratory system and the gastrointestinal tract. Severe malabsorption with failure to thrive ensues, often leading to death in early childhood. Bone marrow transplantation is the curative treatment. Case reports Here we report two cases with a late outcome MHC class II deficiency. They had a long term history of recurrent bronchopulmonary and gastrointestinal infections. Bone marrow transplantation could not be performed because no compatible donor had been identified. At the age of 12 years, they developed oral papillomatous lesions related to HPV (human papillomavirus. The diagnosis of HPV infection was done by histological examination. HPV typing performed on the tissue obtained at biopsy showed HPV type 6. The lesions were partially removed after two months of laser treatment. Conclusions Viral infections are common in patients with MHC class II and remain the main cause of death. Besides warts caused by HPV infection do not exhibit a propensity for malignant transformation; they can cause great psychosocial morbidity.

  18. One-pot, mix-and-read peptide-MHC tetramers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Leisner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL recognize complexes of peptide ligands and Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I molecules presented at the surface of Antigen Presenting Cells (APC. Detection and isolation of CTL's are of importance for research on CTL immunity, and development of vaccines and adoptive immune therapy. Peptide-MHC tetramers have become important reagents for detection and enumeration of specific CTL's. Conventional peptide-MHC-tetramer production involves recombinant MHC production, in vitro refolding, biotinylation and tetramerization; each step followed by various biochemical steps such as chromatographic purification, concentration etc. Such cumbersome production protocols have limited dissemination and restricted availability of peptide-MHC tetramers effectively precluding large-scale screening strategies involving many different peptide-MHC tetramers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have developed an approach whereby any given tetramer specificity can be produced within 2 days with very limited effort and hands-on time. The strategy is based on the isolation of correctly oxidized, in vivo biotinylated recombinant MHC I heavy chain (HC. Such biotinylated MHC I HC molecules can be refolded in vitro, tetramerized with streptavidin, and used for specific T cell staining-all in a one-pot reaction without any intervening purification steps. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have developed an efficient "one-pot, mix-and-read" strategy for peptide-MHC tetramer generation, and demonstrated specific T cell straining comparable to a commercially available MHC-tetramer. Here, seven peptide-MHC tetramers representing four different human MHC (HLA class I proteins have been generated. The technique should be readily extendable to any binding peptide and pre-biotinylated MHC (at this time we have over 40 different pre-biotinylated HLA proteins. It is simple, robust, and versatile technique with a very broad application

  19. Maximum-likelihood estimation of haplotype frequencies in nuclear families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Tim; Knapp, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The importance of haplotype analysis in the context of association fine mapping of disease genes has grown steadily over the last years. Since experimental methods to determine haplotypes on a large scale are not available, phase has to be inferred statistically. For individual genotype data, several reconstruction techniques and many implementations of the expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for haplotype frequency estimation exist. Recent research work has shown that incorporating available genotype information of related individuals largely increases the precision of haplotype frequency estimates. We, therefore, implemented a highly flexible program written in C, called FAMHAP, which calculates maximum likelihood estimates (MLEs) of haplotype frequencies from general nuclear families with an arbitrary number of children via the EM-algorithm for up to 20 SNPs. For more loci, we have implemented a locus-iterative mode of the EM-algorithm, which gives reliable approximations of the MLEs for up to 63 SNP loci, or less when multi-allelic markers are incorporated into the analysis. Missing genotypes can be handled as well. The program is able to distinguish cases (haplotypes transmitted to the first affected child of a family) from pseudo-controls (non-transmitted haplotypes with respect to the child). We tested the performance of FAMHAP and the accuracy of the obtained haplotype frequencies on a variety of simulated data sets. The implementation proved to work well when many markers were considered and no significant differences between the estimates obtained with the usual EM-algorithm and those obtained in its locus-iterative mode were observed. We conclude from the simulations that the accuracy of haplotype frequency estimation and reconstruction in nuclear families is very reliable in general and robust against missing genotypes.

  20. Rapid DNA haplotyping using a multiplex heteroduplex approach: application to Duchenne muscular dystrophy carrier testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, T W; Wenger, G D; Papp, A C; Snyder, P J; Sedra, M S; Bartolo, C; Moore, J W; Highsmith, W E

    1995-01-01

    A new strategy has been developed for rapid haplotype analysis based on an initial multiplex amplification of several polymorphic sites, followed by heteroduplex detection. Heteroduplexes formed between two different alleles are detected because they migrate differently than the corresponding homoduplexes in Hydrolink-MDE gel. This simple, rapid method does not depend on specific sequences such as restriction enzyme sites or CA boxes and does not require the use of isotope. This approach has been tested using commonly occurring polymorphisms spanning the dystrophin gene as a model. We describe the use of the method to assign the carrier status of females in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) pedigrees. The method may be used for other genetic diseases when mutations are unknown or there are few dinucleotide markers in the gene proximity, and for the identification of haplotype backgrounds of mutant alleles.

  1. Haplotype Inference on Pedigrees with Recombinations, Errors, and Missing Genotypes via SAT solvers

    CERN Document Server

    Pirola, Yuri; Biffani, Stefano; Stella, Alessandra; Bonizzoni, Paola

    2011-01-01

    The Minimum-Recombinant Haplotype Configuration problem (MRHC) has been highly successful in providing a sound combinatorial formulation for the important problem of genotype phasing on pedigrees. Despite several algorithmic advances and refinements that led to some efficient algorithms, its applicability to real datasets has been limited by the absence of some important characteristics of these data in its formulation, such as mutations, genotyping errors, and missing data. In this work, we propose the Haplotype Configuration with Recombinations and Errors problem (HCRE), which generalizes the original MRHC formulation by incorporating the two most common characteristics of real data: errors and missing genotypes (including untyped individuals). Although HCRE is computationally hard, we propose an exact algorithm for the problem based on a reduction to the well-known Satisfiability problem. Our reduction exploits recent progresses in the constraint programming literature and, combined with the use of state-o...

  2. Characterization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC DRB exon 2 and DRA exon 3 fragments in a primary terrestrial rabies vector (Procyon lotor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarrah Castillo

    Full Text Available The major histocompatibility complex (MHC presents a unique system to explore links between genetic diversity and pathogens, as diversity within MHC is maintained in part by pathogen driven selection. While the majority of wildlife MHC studies have investigated species that are of conservation concern, here we characterize MHC variation in a common and broadly distributed species, the North American raccoon (Procyon lotor. Raccoons host an array of broadly distributed wildlife diseases (e.g., canine distemper, parvovirus and raccoon rabies virus and present important human health risks as they persist in high densities and in close proximity to humans and livestock. To further explore how genetic variation influences the spread and maintenance of disease in raccoons we characterized a fragment of MHC class II DRA exon 3 (250 bp and DRB exon 2 (228 bp. MHC DRA was found to be functionally monomorphic in the 32 individuals screened; whereas DRB exon 2 revealed 66 unique alleles among the 246 individuals screened. Between two and four alleles were observed in each individual suggesting we were amplifying a duplicated DRB locus. Nucleotide differences between DRB alleles ranged from 1 to 36 bp (0.4-15.8% divergence and translated into 1 to 21 (1.3-27.6% divergence amino acid differences. We detected a significant excess of nonsynonymous substitutions at the peptide binding region (P = 0.005, indicating that DRB exon 2 in raccoons has been influenced by positive selection. These data will form the basis of continued analyses into the spatial and temporal relationship of the raccoon rabies virus and the immunogenetic response in its primary host.

  3. The DR3(w18),DQw4 Haplotype Differs from DR3(w17),DQw2 Haplotypes at Multiple Class II Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    DR3, members of the DRw52 family, are especially important because of the association of DR3 with a number of autoimmune diseases such as insulin...dependent diabetes, myasthenia gravis, and Graves’ disease [13]. We have begun a study of a DR3 haplotype, DR3(w 18), commonly found in the American...molecules. Proc Nail Acad Sci USA 83:3968, 1986. 5. Ball E, Stastny P: Antigen specific HLA-restriction determinant distinct from HLA-DR. Immunogenetics

  4. Haplotype transmission analysis provides evidence of association for DISC1 to schizophrenia and suggests sex-dependent effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennah, William; Varilo, Teppo; Kestilä, Marjo; Paunio, Tiina; Arajärvi, Ritva; Haukka, Jari; Parker, Alex; Martin, Rory; Levitzky, Steve; Partonen, Timo; Meyer, Joanne; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Peltonen, Leena; Ekelund, Jesper

    2003-12-01

    We have previously reported a linkage peak on 1q42 in a Finnish schizophrenia sample. In this study we genotyped 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 1q42 covering the three candidate genes TRAX, DISC1 and DISC2, using a study sample of 458 Finnish families ascertained for schizophrenia. Two-point and haplotype association analysis revealed a significant region of interest within the DISC1 gene. A common haplotype (HEP3) was observed to be significantly under-transmitted to affected individuals (P=0.0031). HEP3 represents a two SNP haplotype spanning from intron 1 to exon 2 of DISC1. This haplotype also displayed sex differences in transmission distortion, the under-transmission being significant only to affected females (P=0.00024). Three other regions of interest were observed in the TRAX and DISC genes. However, analysis of only those families with complete genotype information specifically highlights the HEP3 haplotype as a true observation. The finding of a common under-transmitted SNP haplotype might imply that this particular allele offers some protection from the development of schizophrenia. Analysis of component-traits of schizophrenia, derived from the Operational Criteria Checklist of Psychotic Illness (OCCPI), displayed association of HEP3 to features of the general phenotype of schizophrenia, including traits representing delusions, hallucinations and negative symptoms. This study provides further evidence for the hypothesis that the DISC1 gene is involved in the aetiology of schizophrenia, and implies a putative sex difference for the effect of the gene. Our findings would also encourage more detailed analyses of the effect of DISC1 on the component-traits of schizophrenia.

  5. The Effect of Haplotype-Block Definitions on Inference of Haplotype-Block Structure and htSNPs Selection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KeyueDing; KaixinZhou; JingZhang; JoanneKnight; XuegongZhang; YanShen

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently suggested that the human genome is organized as a series of haplotype blocks, and efforts to create a genome-wide haplotype map are already underway. Several computational algorithms have been proposed to partition the genome. However, little is known about their behaviors in relation to the haplotype-block partitioning and haplotypetagging SNPs selection. Here, we present a systematic comparison of three classes of haplotype-block partition definitions, a diversity-based method, a linkage-disequilibrium (LD)-based method, and a recombination-based method.The data used were derived from a coalescent simulation under both a uniform recombination model and one that assumes recombination hotspots. There were considerable differences in haplotype information loss in the measure of entropy when the partition methods were compared under different population-genetics scenarios. Under both recombination models, the results from the LD-based definition and the recombination-based definition were more similar to each other than were the results from the diversity-based definition. This work demonstrates that when undertaking haplotype-based association mapping, the choice of haplotype-block definition and SNP selection requires careful consideration.

  6. Preparation of Polyclonal Antibodies Against MHC Ⅱα and MHC Ⅱβ of Mangrove Red Snapper (Lutjanus argentimaculatus)%紫红笛鲷MHC Ⅱα和MHC Ⅱβ多克隆抗体的制备

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王天燕; 常虹; 余时琛; 陈璐; 蔡中华

    2013-01-01

    目的:制备紫红笛鲷主要组织相溶性复合体MHC Ⅱα和MHC Ⅱβ多克隆抗体,为蛋白水平研究紫红笛鲷MHCⅡ分子提供理论和实践依据.方法:从已有的紫红笛鲷cDNA文库菌中分别克隆其MHC Ⅱα和MHC Ⅱ3分子的部分开放阅读框,与PQE-30构建表达载体,转入大肠杆菌E.coli M15以IPTG诱导表达;纯化得到的重组蛋白与弗氏佐剂混合乳化后注射新西兰大白兔制备多克隆抗体,再以酶联免疫吸附(ELISA)和免疫印迹(Western blot)检测所获抗血清的效价及效果.结果:①重组表达和纯化得到紫红笛鲷MHC Ⅱα和MHC Ⅱβ部分肽链.②制备的紫红笛鲷MHC Ⅱα和MHC Ⅱβ兔抗血清效价都大于1:25600,达到预期水平.③以获得的紫红笛鲷MHC Hα和MHC Ⅱβ兔抗血清分别与紫红笛鲷头肾巨噬细胞蛋白进行免疫印迹,显示两种抗血清能分别杂合出各自的目标蛋白,说明制备的多克隆抗体实际应用效果良好.结论:紫红笛鲷MHC Ⅱα和MHC Ⅱβ多克隆抗血清制备成功.%Objective: To prepare the polyclonal antibodies against MHC Ⅱα and MHC Ⅱβ of mangrove red snapper. Methods: A partial of MHC Ⅱα and MHC Up chain was cloned from the cDNA library of mangrove red snapper, respectively. The PCR products were inserted into the expression vectors pQE30 and transformed into the E. coli M15. By inducing of IPTG, the recombinant proteins of MHC Ⅱα and MHC Ⅱβ fragments were purified, respectively. The proteins were thoroughly mixed with Freund's adjuvant, and injected rabbit. The antiserums were detected by ELISA and Western blot. Results: ① The recombinant proteins of MHC Ⅱα and MHC Ⅱβ fragments were purified successfully. ② The antiserums against MHC Ⅱα and MHC Ⅱβ both had a high titer above 1:25600. ③The western blot of head kidney macrophages showed the specification of MHC Ⅱα and MHC Ⅱβ antiserums, respectively. Conclusions: The high titer and specific polyclonal

  7. Origin and plasticity of MHC I-associated self peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Verteuil, Danielle; Granados, Diana Paola; Thibault, Pierre; Perreault, Claude

    2012-07-01

    Endogenous peptides presented by MHC I molecules represent the essence of self for CD8 T lymphocytes. These MHC I peptides (MIPs) regulate all key events that occur during the lifetime of CD8 T cells. CD8 T cells are selected on self-MIPs, sustained by self-MIPs, and activated in the presence of self-MIPs. Recently, large-scale mass spectrometry studies have revealed that the self-MIP repertoire is more complex and plastic than previously anticipated. The composition of the self-MIP repertoire varies from one cell type to another and can be perturbed by cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors including dysregulation of cellular metabolism and infection. The complexity and plasticity of the self-MIP repertoire represent a major challenge for the maintenance of self tolerance and can have pervasive effects on the global functioning of the immune system.

  8. MHC I Stabilizing Potential of Computer-Designed Octapeptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M. Wisniewska

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are presented for 180 in silico designed octapeptide sequences and their stabilizing effects on the major histocompatibility class I molecule H-2Kb. Peptide sequence design was accomplished by a combination of an ant colony optimization algorithm with artificial neural network classifiers. Experimental tests yielded nine H-2Kb stabilizing and 171 nonstabilizing peptides. 28 among the nonstabilizing octapeptides contain canonical motif residues known to be favorable for MHC I stabilization. For characterization of the area covered by stabilizing and non-stabilizing octapeptides in sequence space, we visualized the distribution of 100,603 octapeptides using a self-organizing map. The experimental results present evidence that the canonical sequence motives of the SYFPEITHI database on their own are insufficient for predicting MHC I protein stabilization.

  9. Assembly of MHC class I molecules within the endoplasmic reticulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yinan; Williams, David B

    2006-01-01

    MHC class I molecules bind cytosolically derived peptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and present them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. A major focus of our laboratory has been to understand the functions of the diverse proteins involved in the intracellular assembly of MHC class I molecules. These include the molecular chaperones calnexin and calreticulin, which enhance the proper folding and subunit assembly of class I molecules and also retain assembly intermediates within the ER; ERp57, a thiol oxidoreductase that promotes heavy chain disulfide formation and proper assembly of the peptide loading complex; tapasin, which recruits class I molecules to the TAP peptide transporter and enhances the loading of high affinity peptide ligands; and Bap31, which is involved in clustering assembled class I molecules at ER exit sites for export along the secretory pathway. This review describes our contributions to elucidating the functions of these proteins; the combined effort of many dedicated students and postdoctoral fellows.

  10. MHC Class I Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BarryFlutter; BinGao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class I molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class I complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class I expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class I presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  11. MHC Class Ⅰ Antigen Presentation- Recently Trimmed and Well Presented

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Barry Flutter; Bin Gao

    2004-01-01

    Presentation of antigenic peptide to T cells by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class Ⅰ molecules is the key to the cellular immune response. Non-self intracellular proteins are processed into short peptides and transported into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where they are assembled with class Ⅰ molecules assisted by several chaperone proteins to form trimeric complex. MHC class Ⅰ complex loaded with optimised peptides travels to the cell surface of antigen presentation cells to be recognised by T cells. The cells presenting non-self peptides are cleared by CD8 positive T cells. In order to ensure that T cells detect an infection or mutation within the target cells the process of peptide loading and class Ⅰ expression must be carefully regulated. Many of the cellular components involved in antigen processing and class Ⅰ presentation are known and their various functions are now becoming clearer. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):22-30.

  12. NetMHC-3.0: accurate web accessible predictions of human, mouse and monkey MHC class I affinities for peptides of length 8-11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lamberth, K; Harndahl, M

    2008-01-01

    been used to predict possible MHC-binding peptides in a series of pathogen viral proteomes including SARS, Influenza and HIV, resulting in an average of 75–80% confirmed MHC binders. Here, the performance is further validated and benchmarked using a large set of newly published affinity data, non...

  13. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms in Phytophthora infestans: new haplotypes are identified and re-defined by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-Hui; Qi, Ming-Xing; Qin, Yu-Xuan; Zhu, Jie-Hua; Gui, Xiu-Mei; Tao, Bu; Xu, Xiao-Hu; Zhang, Fu-Guang

    2013-11-01

    Polymorphisms of mitochondrial DNA (mt-DNA) are particularly useful for monitoring specific pathogen populations like Phytophthora infestans. Basically type I and II of P. infestans mt-DNA were categorized by means of polymorphism lengths caused by an ~2 kb insertion, which can be detected via restriction enzyme digestion. In addition genome sequencing of haplotype Ib has been used as a simple Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method to indirectly identify type I and II alterations through EcoR I restriction enzyme DNA fragment patterns of the genomic P4 area. However, with the common method, wrong mt-DNA typing occurs due to an EcoR I recognition site mutation in the P4 genomic area. Genome sequencing of the four haplotypes (Ia, Ib, IIa, and IIb) allowed us to thoroughly examine mt-DNA polymorphisms and we indentified two hypervariable regions (HVRs) named HVRi and HVRii. The HVRi length polymorphism caused by a 2 kb insertion/deletion was utilized to identify mt-DNA types I and II, while another length polymorphism in the HVRii region is caused by a variable number of tandem repeats (n = 1, 2, or 3) of a 36 bp sized DNA stretch and was further used to determine mt-DNA sub-types, which were described as R(n = 1, 2, or 3). Finally, the P. infestans mt-DNA haplotypes were re-defined as IR(1) or IIR(2) according to PCR derived HVRi and HVRii length polymorphisms. Twenty-three isolates were chosen to verify the feasibility of our new approach for identifying mt-DNA haplotypes and a total of five haplotypes (IR(1), IR(2), IR(3), IIR(2) and IIR(3)) were identified. Additionally, we found that six isolates determined as type I by our method were mistakenly identified as type II by the PCR-RFLP technique. In conclusion, we propose a simple and rapid PCR method for identification of mt-DNA haplotypes based on sequence analyses of the mitochondrial P. infestans genome.

  14. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang; Huang, Shujia; Sun, Yuhui; Tong, Xin; Xie, Yinlong; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Hailong; Zheng, Hancheng; Li, Jian; Li, Bo; Wang, Yu; Yang, Fang; Sun, Peng; Liu, Siyang; Gao, Peng; Huang, Haodong; Sun, Jing; Chen, Dan; He, Guangzhu; Huang, Weihua; Huang, Zheng; Li, Yue; Tellier, Laurent C A M; Liu, Xiao; Feng, Qiang; Xu, Xun; Zhang, Xiuqing; Bolund, Lars; Krogh, Anders; Kristiansen, Karsten; Drmanac, Radoje; Drmanac, Snezana; Nielsen, Rasmus; Li, Songgang; Wang, Jian; Yang, Huanming; Li, Yingrui; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun

    2015-06-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should aid in translating genotypes to phenotypes for the development of personalized medicine.

  15. De novo assembly of a haplotype-resolved human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Wu, Honglong; Luo, Ruibang

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is diploid, and knowledge of the variants on each chromosome is important for the interpretation of genomic information. Here we report the assembly of a haplotype-resolved diploid genome without using a reference genome. Our pipeline relies on fosmid pooling together with whole-genome...... of novel coding sequences that could not be aligned to the human reference genome, which include at least six predicted genes. This haplotype-resolved genome represents the most complete de novo human genome assembly to date. Application of our approach to identify individual haplotype differences should...... shotgun strategies, based solely on next-generation sequencing and hierarchical assembly methods. We applied our sequencing method to the genome of an Asian individual and generated a 5.15-Gb assembled genome with a haplotype N50 of 484 kb. Our analysis identified previously undetected indels and 7.49 Mb...

  16. Haplotype Map of Sickle Cell Anemia in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imen Moumni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available β-Globin haplotypes are important to establish the ethnic origin and predict the clinical development of sickle cell disease patients (SCD. To determine the chromosomal background of βS Tunisian sickle cell patients, in this first study in Tunisia, we have explored four polymorphic regions of β-globin cluster on chromosome 11. It is the 5′ region of β-LCR-HS2 site, the intervening sequence II (IVSII region of two fetal (γG and γA genes and the 5′ region of β-globin gene. The results reveal a high molecular diversity of a microsatellite configuration describing the sequences haplotypes. The linkage disequilibrium analysis showed various haplotype combinations giving 22 “extended haplotypes”. These results confirm the utility of the β-globin haplotypes for population studies and contribute to knowledge of the Tunisian gene pool, as well as establishing the role of genetic markers in physiopathology of SCD.

  17. Neuronal MHC Class I Expression Is Regulated by Activity Driven Calcium Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Lv

    Full Text Available MHC class I (MHC-I molecules are important components of the immune system. Recently MHC-I have been reported to also play important roles in brain development and synaptic plasticity. In this study, we examine the molecular mechanism(s underlying activity-dependent MHC-I expression using hippocampal neurons. Here we report that neuronal expression level of MHC-I is dynamically regulated during hippocampal development after birth in vivo. Kainic acid (KA treatment significantly increases the expression of MHC-I in cultured hippocampal neurons in vitro, suggesting that MHC-I expression is regulated by neuronal activity. In addition, KA stimulation decreased the expression of pre- and post-synaptic proteins. This down-regulation is prevented by addition of an MHC-I antibody to KA treated neurons. Further studies demonstrate that calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC is important in relaying KA simulation activation signals to up-regulated MHC-I expression. This signaling cascade relies on activation of the MAPK pathway, which leads to increased phosphorylation of CREB and NF-κB p65 while also enhancing the expression of IRF-1. Together, these results suggest that expression of MHC-I in hippocampal neurons is driven by Ca2+ regulated activation of the MAPK signaling transduction cascade.

  18. Mechanistic understanding and significance of small peptides interaction with MHC class II molecules for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afridi, Saifullah; Hoessli, Daniel C; Hameed, Muhammad Waqar

    2016-07-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are expressed by antigen-presenting cells and stimulate CD4(+) T cells, which initiate humoral immune responses. Over the past decade, interest has developed to therapeutically impact the peptides to be exposed to CD4(+) T cells. Structurally diverse small molecules have been discovered that act on the endogenous peptide exchanger HLA-DM by different mechanisms. Exogenously delivered peptides are highly susceptible to proteolytic cleavage in vivo; however, it is only when successfully incorporated into stable MHC II-peptide complexes that these peptides can induce an immune response. Many of the small molecules so far discovered have highlighted the molecular interactions mediating the formation of MHC II-peptide complexes. As potential drugs, these small molecules open new therapeutic approaches to modulate MHC II antigen presentation pathways and influence the quality and specificity of immune responses. This review briefly introduces how CD4(+) T cells recognize antigen when displayed by MHC class II molecules, as well as MHC class II-peptide-loading pathways, structural basis of peptide binding and stabilization of the peptide-MHC complexes. We discuss the concept of MHC-loading enhancers, how they could modulate immune responses and how these molecules have been identified. Finally, we suggest mechanisms whereby MHC-loading enhancers could act upon MHC class II molecules.

  19. Unconventional T lymphocytes - recombinant MHC molecules pave the way

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    T cells are central orchestrators and effectors of the adaptive immune system. CD8+ T cells that recognize peptide antigens presented on MHC class I molecules are believed to play a central role in fighting viral infections, intracellular pathogens and cancer. The use of recombinant peptide-HLA class I complexes that mimic the natural ligands of human CD8+ T cells should greatly facilitate the manipulation and analysis of such cells, allowing further insight in their biology and opening thera...

  20. Population-specific recombination sites within the human MHC region

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Genetic rearrangement by recombination is one of the major driving forces for genome evolution, and recombination is known to occur in non-random, discreet recombination sites within the genome. Mapping of recombination sites has proved to be difficult, particularly, in the human MHC region that is complicated by both population variation and highly polymorphic HLA genes. To overcome these problems, HLA-typed individuals from three representative populations: Asian, European an...

  1. A female signal reflects MHC genotype in a social primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benavides Julio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Males from many species are believed to advertise their genetic quality through striking ornaments that attract mates. Yet the connections between signal expression, body condition and the genes associated with individual quality are rarely elucidated. This is particularly problematic for the signals of females in species with conventional sex roles, whose evolutionary significance has received little attention and is poorly understood. Here we explore these questions in the sexual swellings of female primates, which are among the most conspicuous of mammalian sexual signals and highly variable in size, shape and colour. We investigated the relationships between two components of sexual swellings (size and shape, body condition, and genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC in a wild baboon population (Papio ursinus where males prefer large swellings. Results Although there was no effect of MHC diversity on the sexual swelling components, one specific MHC supertype (S1 was associated with poor body condition together with swellings of small size and a particular shape. The variation in swelling characteristics linked with the possession of supertype S1 appeared to be partially mediated by body condition and remained detectable when taking into account the possession of other supertypes. Conclusions These findings suggest a pathway from immunity genes to sexual signals via physical condition for the first time in females. They further indicate that mechanisms of sexual selection traditionally assigned to males can also operate in females.

  2. MHC adaptive divergence between closely related and sympatric African cichlids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Blais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The haplochromine cichlid species assemblages of Lake Malawi and Victoria represent some of the most important study systems in evolutionary biology. Identifying adaptive divergence between closely-related species can provide important insights into the processes that may have contributed to these spectacular radiations. Here, we studied a pair of sympatric Lake Malawi species, Pseudotropheus fainzilberi and P. emmiltos, whose reproductive isolation depends on olfactory communication. We tested the hypothesis that these species have undergone divergent selection at MHC class II genes, which are known to contribute to olfactory-based mate choice in other taxa. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Divergent selection on functional alleles was inferred from the higher genetic divergence at putative antigen binding sites (ABS amino acid sequences than at putatively neutrally evolving sites at intron 1, exon 2 synonymous sequences and exon 2 amino acid residues outside the putative ABS. In addition, sympatric populations of these fish species differed significantly in communities of eukaryotic parasites. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that local host-parasite coevolutionary dynamics may have driven adaptive divergence in MHC alleles, influencing odor-mediated mate choice and leading to reproductive isolation. These results provide the first evidence for a novel mechanism of adaptive speciation and the first evidence of adaptive divergence at the MHC in closely related African cichlid fishes.

  3. Properties of MHC class I presented peptides that enhance immunogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorg J A Calis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available T-cells have to recognize peptides presented on MHC molecules to be activated and elicit their effector functions. Several studies demonstrate that some peptides are more immunogenic than others and therefore more likely to be T-cell epitopes. We set out to determine which properties cause such differences in immunogenicity. To this end, we collected and analyzed a large set of data describing the immunogenicity of peptides presented on various MHC-I molecules. Two main conclusions could be drawn from this analysis: First, in line with previous observations, we showed that positions P4-6 of a presented peptide are more important for immunogenicity. Second, some amino acids, especially those with large and aromatic side chains, are associated with immunogenicity. This information was combined into a simple model that was used to demonstrate that immunogenicity is, to a certain extent, predictable. This model (made available at http://tools.iedb.org/immunogenicity/ was validated with data from two independent epitope discovery studies. Interestingly, with this model we could show that T-cells are equipped to better recognize viral than human (self peptides. After the past successful elucidation of different steps in the MHC-I presentation pathway, the identification of variables that influence immunogenicity will be an important next step in the investigation of T-cell epitopes and our understanding of cellular immune responses.

  4. MHC associations with clinical and autoantibody manifestations in European SLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D L; Fernando, M M A; Taylor, K E; Chung, S A; Nititham, J; Alarcón-Riquelme, M E; Barcellos, L F; Behrens, T W; Cotsapas, C; Gaffney, P M; Graham, R R; Pons-Estel, B A; Gregersen, P K; Harley, J B; Hauser, S L; Hom, G; Langefeld, C D; Noble, J A; Rioux, J D; Seldin, M F; Vyse, T J; Criswell, L A

    2014-04-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a clinically heterogeneous disease affecting multiple organ systems and characterized by autoantibody formation to nuclear components. Although genetic variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is associated with SLE, its role in the development of clinical manifestations and autoantibody production is not well defined. We conducted a meta-analysis of four independent European SLE case collections for associations between SLE sub-phenotypes and MHC single-nucleotide polymorphism genotypes, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and variant HLA amino acids. Of the 11 American College of Rheumatology criteria and 7 autoantibody sub-phenotypes examined, anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibody subsets exhibited the highest number and most statistically significant associations. HLA-DRB1*03:01 was significantly associated with both sub-phenotypes. We found evidence of associations independent of MHC class II variants in the anti-Ro subset alone. Conditional analyses showed that anti-Ro and anti-La subsets are independently associated with HLA-DRB1*0301, and that the HLA-DRB1*03:01 association with SLE is largely but not completely driven by the association of this allele with these sub-phenotypes. Our results provide strong evidence for a multilevel risk model for HLA-DRB1*03:01 in SLE, where the association with anti-Ro and anti-La antibody-positive SLE is much stronger than SLE without these autoantibodies.

  5. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in males from Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Simonsen, Bo;

    2009-01-01

    A total of 272 males from Greenland were typed for 11 Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y System (Promega). A total of 146 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0.9887....

  6. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Julie; Nadeau, Philippe; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Labuda, Damian

    2010-01-28

    Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data.

  7. Haplotype allelic classes for detecting ongoing positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lefebvre Jean-François

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Natural selection eliminates detrimental and favors advantageous phenotypes. This process leaves characteristic signatures in underlying genomic segments that can be recognized through deviations in allelic or haplotypic frequency spectra. To provide an identifiable signature of recent positive selection that can be detected by comparison with the background distribution, we introduced a new way of looking at genomic polymorphisms: haplotype allelic classes. Results The model combines segregating sites and haplotypic information in order to reveal useful data characteristics. We developed a summary statistic, Svd, to compare the distribution of the haplotypes carrying the selected allele with the distribution of the remaining ones. Coalescence simulations are used to study the distributions under standard population models assuming neutrality, demographic scenarios and selection models. To test, in practice, haplotype allelic class performance and the derived statistic in capturing deviation from neutrality due to positive selection, we analyzed haplotypic variation in detail in the locus of lactase persistence in the three HapMap Phase II populations. Conclusions We showed that the Svd statistic is less sensitive than other tests to confounding factors such as demography or recombination. Our approach succeeds in identifying candidate loci, such as the lactase-persistence locus, as targets of strong positive selection and provides a new tool complementary to other tests to study natural selection in genomic data.

  8. Association testing by haplotype-sharing methods applicable to whole-genome analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolte, Ilja M.; Vries, André R. de; Spijker, Geert T.; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Brinza, Dumitru; Zelikovsky, Alexander; Meerman, Gerard J. te

    2007-01-01

    We propose two new haplotype-sharing methods for identifying disease loci: the haplotype sharing statistic (HSS), which compares length of shared haplotypes between cases and controls, and the CROSS test, which tests whether a case and a control haplotype show less sharing than two random

  9. Maori origins, Y-chromosome haplotypes and implications for human history in the Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, P A; Passarino, G; Lin, A A; Marzuki, S; Oefner, P J; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Chambers, G K

    2001-04-01

    An assessment of 28 pertinent binary genetic markers on the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) in New Zealand Maori and other relevant populations has revealed a diverse genetic paternal heritage of extant Maori. A maximum parsimony phylogeny was constructed in which nine of the 25 possible binary haplotypes were observed. Although approximately 40% of the samples have haplotypes of unequivocal European origin, an equivalent number of samples have a single binary haplotype that is also observed in Indonesia and New Guinea, indicative of common indigenous Melanesian ancestry. The balance of the lineages has either typical East Asian signatures or alternative compositions consistent with their affinity to Melanesia or New Guinea. Molecular analysis of mtDNA variation confirms the presence of a single predominant characteristic Southeast Asian (9-bp deletion in the Region V) lineage. The Y-chromosome results support a pattern of complex interrelationships between Southeast Asia, Melanesia, and Polynesia, in contrast to mtDNA and linguistic data, which uphold a rapid and homogeneous Austronesian expansion. The Y-chromosome data highlight a distinctive gender-modulated pattern of differential gene flow in the history of Polynesia. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Rh phenotype, allele and haplotype frequencies among 51,857 blood donors in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makroo, Raj; Gupta, Richa; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Rosamma, Nakamatathil L

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to provide information on the frequencies of Rh antigens, alleles, phenotypes, and haplotypes from our region in India and to compare them with those from other races. This observational study was conducted on blood donors from March 2009 to August 2011 using a fully automated system for Rh typing of blood cells. The data were collected and calculations done to determine the antigen, phenotypes, allele and haplotype frequencies. The chi square test was used for comparisons between the results of our study and those of other studies. A total of 51,857 donors were included in this study. The most common Rh antigen found was "e". DCCee was the most prevalent phenotype in our study with the phenotype distribution being significantly different between our study and other studies from different regions of the world. We have determined the prevalence of Rh antigens and Rh phenotypes in the North Indian blood donor population and derived the allele and haplotype frequencies in the same population. The Rh blood group distribution in this population was different from that in other populations.

  11. Transgenic mice with -6A haplotype of the human angiotensinogen gene have increased blood pressure compared with -6G haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sudhir; Tillinger, Andrej; Mopidevi, Brahmaraju; Pandey, Varunkumar G; Chauhan, Chetankumar K; Fiering, Steven N; Warming, Soren; Kumar, Ashok

    2010-12-24

    Hypertension is a serious risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene locus is associated with human essential hypertension. The human AGT (hAGT) gene has an A/G polymorphism at -6, and the -6A allele is associated with increased blood pressure. However, transgenic mice containing 1.2 kb of the promoter with -6A of the hAGT gene show neither increased plasma AGT level nor increased blood pressure compared with -6G. We have found that the hAGT gene has three additional SNPs (A/G at -1670, C/G at -1562, and T/G at -1561). Variants -1670A, -1562C, and -1561T almost always occur with -6A, and variants -1670G, -1562G, and -1561G almost always occur with -6G. Therefore, the hAGT gene may be subdivided into either -6A or -6G haplotypes. We show that these polymorphisms affect the binding of HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor to the promoter, and a reporter construct containing a 1.8-kb hAGT gene promoter with -6A haplotype has 4-fold increased glucocorticoid-induced promoter activity as compared with -6G haplotype. In order to understand the physiological significance of these haplotypes in an in vivo situation, we have generated double transgenic mice containing either the -6A or -6G haplotype of the hAGT gene and the human renin gene. Our ChIP assay shows that HNF-1α and glucocorticoid receptor have stronger affinity for the chromatin obtained from the liver of transgenic mice containing -6A haplotype. Our studies also show that transgenic mice containing -6A haplotype have increased plasma AGT level and increased blood pressure as compared with -6G haplotype. Our studies explain the molecular mechanism involved in association of the -6A allele of the hAGT gene with hypertension.

  12. Cordyceps militaris Enhances MHC-restricted Antigen Presentation via the Induced Expression of MHC Molecules and Production of Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seulmee; Park, Yoonhee; Kim, Seulah; Oh, Hee-Eun; Ko, Young-Wook; Han, Shinha; Lee, Seungjeong; Lee, Chong-Kil; Cho, Kyunghae

    2010-01-01

    Background Cordyceps militarys water extract (CME) has been reported to exert antitumor and immunomodulatory activities in vivo and in vitro. However, the therapeutic mechanism has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of CME on the antigen presenting function of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Methods Dendritic cells (DCs) were cultured in the presence of CME, and then allowed to phagocytose microspheres containing ovalbumin (OVA). After washing and fixing the efficacy of OVA, peptide presentation by DCs were evaluated using CD8 and CD4 T cells. Also, we confirmed the protein levels of proinflammatory cytokines through western blot analysis. Results CME enhanced both MHC class I and class II-restricted presentation of OVA in DCs. In addition, the expression of both MHC class I and II molecules was enhanced, but there was no changes in the phagocytic activity of exogenous OVA. Furthermore, CME induced the protein levels of iNOS, COX-2, proinflammatory cytokines, and nuclear p65 in a concentration-dependent manner, as determined by western blot. Conclusion These results provide an understanding of the mechanism of the immuno-enhancing activity of CME on the induction of MHC-restricted antigen presentation in relation to their actions on APCs. PMID:20844738

  13. Genomic identification of founding haplotypes reveals the history of the selfing species Capsella rubella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Brandvain

    Full Text Available The shift from outcrossing to self-fertilization is among the most common evolutionary transitions in flowering plants. Until recently, however, a genome-wide view of this transition has been obscured by both a dearth of appropriate data and the lack of appropriate population genomic methods to interpret such data. Here, we present a novel population genomic analysis detailing the origin of the selfing species, Capsella rubella, which recently split from its outcrossing sister, Capsella grandiflora. Due to the recency of the split, much of the variation within C. rubella is also found within C. grandiflora. We can therefore identify genomic regions where two C. rubella individuals have inherited the same or different segments of ancestral diversity (i.e. founding haplotypes present in C. rubella's founder(s. Based on this analysis, we show that C. rubella was founded by multiple individuals drawn from a diverse ancestral population closely related to extant C. grandiflora, that drift and selection have rapidly homogenized most of this ancestral variation since C. rubella's founding, and that little novel variation has accumulated within this time. Despite the extensive loss of ancestral variation, the approximately 25% of the genome for which two C. rubella individuals have inherited different founding haplotypes makes up roughly 90% of the genetic variation between them. To extend these findings, we develop a coalescent model that utilizes the inferred frequency of founding haplotypes and variation within founding haplotypes to estimate that C. rubella was founded by a potentially large number of individuals between 50 and 100 kya, and has subsequently experienced a twenty-fold reduction in its effective population size. As population genomic data from an increasing number of outcrossing/selfing pairs are generated, analyses like the one developed here will facilitate a fine-scaled view of the evolutionary and demographic impact of the

  14. Genotype variability and haplotype profile of ABCB1 (MDR1) gene polymorphisms in Macedonian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumovska, Zorica; Nestorovska, Aleksandra K; Sterjev, Zoran; Filipce, Ana; Dimovski, Aleksandar; Suturkova, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the most common ABCB1 (MDR1, P-glycoprotein) polymorphisms in the population of R. Macedonia and compare the allele and haplotype frequencies with the global geographic data reported from different ethnic populations. The total of 107 healthy Macedonian individuals from the general population was included. Genotypes for the ABCB1 for three polymorphisms C1236T [rs1128503], G2677A/T [rs2032582] and C3435T [rs1045642] were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. Obtained allele frequencies for these three SNPs were similar to those observed in other European Caucasians. The detected genotype frequencies were 33.6% for 1236CC, 44.9% for 1236CT and 21.5% for 1236TT in exon 12; 32.7%, 44.9% and 22.4% for 2677GG, 2677GT and 2677GT consecutively in exon 21; and 25.2% for 3435CC, 52.3% for 3435CT and 22.5% for 3435TT in exon 26.Strong LD was observed in our study among all three SNPs with the highest association confirmed for C1236T and G2677T ((D'=0.859, r2=0.711). Eight different haplotypes were identified and the most prominent was the CGC haplotype (45.3%). Our study was the first to have documented the distribution of ABCB1 alleles, genotypes and haplotypes in the population of R. Macedonia. The obtained results can help in the prediction of different response to the drugs that are P-glycoprotein substrates. Additionally, in the era of individualized medicine the determination of the P-glycoprotein genotype might be a good predictive marker for determination of the subpopulations with higher risk to certain diseases.

  15. Genetic link between Asians and native Americans: evidence from HLA genes and haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, K; Ohashi, J; Bannai, M; Juji, T

    2001-09-01

    We have been studying polymorphisms of HLA class I and II genes in East Asians including Buryat in Siberia, Mongolian, Han Chinese, Man Chinese, Korean Chinese, South Korean, and Taiwan indigenous populations in collaboration with many Asian scientists. Regional populations in Japan, Hondo-Japanese, Ryukyuan, and Ainu, were also studied. HLA-A, -B, and -DRB1 gene frequencies were subjected to the correspondence analysis and calculation of DA distances. The correspondence analysis demonstrated several major clusters of human populations in the world. "Mongoloid" populations were highly diversified, in which several clusters such as Northeast Asians, Southeast Asians, Oceanians, and Native Americans were observed. Interestingly, an indigenous population in North Japan, Ainu, was placed relatively close to Native Americans in the correspondence analysis. Distribution of particular HLA-A, -B, -DRB1 alleles and haplotypes was also analyzed in relation to migration and dispersal routes of ancestral populations. A number of alleles and haplotypes showed characteristic patterns of regional distribution. For example, B39-HR5-DQ7 (B*3901-DRB1*1406-DQB1*0301) was shared by Ainu and Native Americans. A24-Cw8-B48 was commonly observed in Taiwan indigenous populations, Maori in New Zealand, Orochon in Northeast China, Inuit, and Tlingit. These findings further support the genetic link between East Asians and Native Americans. We have proposed that various ancestral populations in East Asia, marked by different HLA haplotypes, had migrated and dispersed through multiple routes. Moreover, relatively small genetic distances and the sharing of several HLA haplotypes between Ainu and Native Americans suggest that these populations are descendants of some Upper Paleolithic populations of East Asia.

  16. Remarkable variation in maize genome structure inferred from haplotype diversity at the bz locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Dooner, Hugo K

    2006-11-21

    Maize is probably the most diverse of all crop species. Unexpectedly large differences among haplotypes were first revealed in a comparison of the bz genomic regions of two different inbred lines, McC and B73. Retrotransposon clusters, which comprise most of the repetitive DNA in maize, varied markedly in makeup, and location relative to the genes in the region and genic sequences, later shown to be carried by two helitron transposons, also differed between the inbreds. Thus, the allelic bz regions of these Corn Belt inbreds shared only a minority of the total sequence. To investigate further the variation caused by retrotransposons, helitrons, and other insertions, we have analyzed the organization of the bz genomic region in five additional cultivars selected because of their geographic and genetic diversity: the inbreds A188, CML258, and I137TN, and the land races Coroico and NalTel. This vertical comparison has revealed the existence of several new helitrons, new retrotransposons, members of every superfamily of DNA transposons, numerous miniature elements, and novel insertions flanked at either end by TA repeats, which we call TAFTs (TA-flanked transposons). The extent of variation in the region is remarkable. In pairwise comparisons of eight bz haplotypes, the percentage of shared sequences ranges from 25% to 84%. Chimeric haplotypes were identified that combine retrotransposon clusters found in different haplotypes. We propose that recombination in the common gene space greatly amplifies the variability produced by the retrotransposition explosion in the maize ancestry, creating the heterogeneity in genome organization found in modern maize.

  17. HLA-DQB1, -DQA1, -DRB1 linkage disequilibrium and haplotype diversity in a Mestizo population from Guadalajara, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, L M; Baltazar, L M; Perea, F J; Gallegos-Arreola, M P; Flores, S E; Sandoval, L; Olivares, N; Lorenz, M G O; Xu, H; Barton, S A; Chakraborty, R; Rivas, F

    2004-05-01

    HLA-DQB1, -DQA1, and -DRB1 genes were typed by polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) in 159 healthy volunteers from 32 families living in Guadalajara, Mexico. Three-locus genotype data from all family members were used to infer haplotypes in 54 unrelated individuals of the sample, from which estimate of segregating haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium (LD) between loci were computed. Genotype distributions were concordant with Hardy-Weinberg expectations (HWE) for all three loci, and allele distributions were similar to the ones observed in other Latin-American populations. Of the 56 distinct three-site (DQB1-DQA1-DRB1) haplotypes observed in the sample, the five most common (i.e., with frequencies of five counts or more) were: *0302-*0301-*04, *0201-*0201-*07, *0301-*0501-*14, *0402-*0401-*08, and *0501-*0101-*01. These common three-locus haplotypes also contributed to the majority of the significant two-locus linkage disequilibria of these three sites.

  18. Variable NK cell receptors and their MHC class I ligands in immunity, reproduction and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parham, Peter; Moffett, Ashley

    2013-02-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have roles in immunity and reproduction that are controlled by variable receptors that recognize MHC class I molecules. The variable NK cell receptors found in humans are specific to simian primates, in which they have progressively co-evolved with MHC class I molecules. The emergence of the MHC-C gene in hominids drove the evolution of a system of NK cell receptors for MHC-C molecules that is most elaborate in chimpanzees. By contrast, the human system of MHC-C receptors seems to have been subject to different selection pressures that have acted in competition on the immunological and reproductive functions of MHC class I molecules. We suggest that this compromise facilitated the development of the bigger brains that enabled archaic and modern humans to migrate out of Africa and populate other continents.

  19. MHC class I loci of the Bar-Headed goose (Anser indicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinglong Liang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available MHC class I proteins mediate functions in anti-pathogen defense. MHC diversity has already been investigated by many studies in model avian species, but here we chose the bar-headed goose, a worldwide migrant bird, as a non-model avian species. Sequences from exons encoding the peptide-binding region (PBR of MHC class I molecules were isolated from liver genomic DNA, to investigate variation in these genes. These are the first MHC class I partial sequences of the bar-headed goose to be reported. A preliminary analysis suggests the presence of at least four MHC class I genes, which share great similarity with those of the goose and duck. A phylogenetic analysis of bar-headed goose, goose and duck MHC class I sequences using the NJ method supports the idea that they all cluster within the anseriforms clade.

  20. Exposing the specific roles of the invariant chain isoforms in shaping the MHC class II peptidome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Simon eFortin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The peptide repertoire (peptidome associated with MHC class II molecules (MHCIIs is influenced by the polymorphic nature of the peptide binding groove but also by cell-intrinsic factors. The invariant chain (Ii chaperones MHCIIs, affecting their folding and trafficking. Recent discoveries relating to Ii functions have provided insights as to how it edits the MHCII peptidome. In humans, the Ii gene encodes four different isoforms for which structure-function analyses have highlighted common properties but also some non-redundant roles. Another layer of complexity arises from the fact that Ii heterotrimerizes, a characteristic that has the potential to affect the maturation of associated MHCIIs in many different ways, depending on the isoform combinations. Here, we emphasize the peptide editing properties of Ii and discuss the impact of the various isoforms on the MHCII peptidome.

  1. Exposing the Specific Roles of the Invariant Chain Isoforms in Shaping the MHC Class II Peptidome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jean-Simon; Cloutier, Maryse; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2013-12-13

    The peptide repertoire (peptidome) associated with MHC class II molecules (MHCIIs) is influenced by the polymorphic nature of the peptide binding groove but also by cell-intrinsic factors. The invariant chain (Ii) chaperones MHCIIs, affecting their folding and trafficking. Recent discoveries relating to Ii functions have provided insights as to how it edits the MHCII peptidome. In humans, the Ii gene encodes four different isoforms for which structure-function analyses have highlighted common properties but also some non-redundant roles. Another layer of complexity arises from the fact that Ii heterotrimerizes, a characteristic that has the potential to affect the maturation of associated MHCIIs in many different ways, depending on the isoform combinations. Here, we emphasize the peptide editing properties of Ii and discuss the impact of the various isoforms on the MHCII peptidome.

  2. Dataset size and composition impact the reliability of performance benchmarks for peptide-MHC binding predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Sidney, John; Buus, Søren;

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is important to accurately determine the performance of peptide: MHC binding predictions, as this enables users to compare and choose between different prediction methods and provides estimates of the expected error rate. Two common approaches to determine prediction performance...... are cross-validation, in which all available data are iteratively split into training and testing data, and the use of blind sets generated separately from the data used to construct the predictive method. In the present study, we have compared cross-validated prediction performances generated on our last...... benchmark dataset from 2009 with prediction performances generated on data subsequently added to the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB) which served as a blind set. Results: We found that cross-validated performances systematically overestimated performance on the blind set. This was found not to be due...

  3. Antigen-specific tumor vaccine efficacy in vivo against prostate cancer with low class I MHC requires competent class II MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, Yilin C; McDonagh, Kevin T; Overwijk, Willem W; Restifo, Nicholas P; Sanda, Martin G

    2002-11-01

    Cancers can escape immune recognition by means of evading class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) -mediated recognition by cytotoxic T lymphocytes. However, immunization strategies targeting defined tumor-associated antigens have not been extensively characterized in murine prostate cancer models. Therefore, we evaluated antigen-specific, antitumor immunity after antigen-encoding vaccinia immunization against mouse prostate cancer cells expressing a model tumor-associated antigen (beta-galactosidase) and exhibiting partially deficient class I MHC. Low class I MHC expression in beta-galactosidase-expressing D7RM-1 prostate cancer cells was shown by fluorescence activated cell sorting, and deficient class I MHC-mediated antigen presentation was shown in resistance of D7RM-1 to cytolysis by beta-galactosidase-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Despite partially deficient class I MHC presenting function, immunization with vaccinia encoding beta-galactosidase conferred antigen-specific protection against D7RM-1 cancer. Antigen-specific immunity was recapitulated in beta(2)m knockout mice (with deficient class I MHC and CTL function), confirming that class I MHC antigen presentation was not required for immunity against tumor partially deficient in class I MHC. Conversely, antigen-specific antitumor immunity was abrogated in A(b)beta knockout mice (with deficient class II MHC and helper T cell function), demonstrating a requirement for functional class II MHC. Resistant tumors from the otherwise effectively immunized beta(2)m knockout mice (among which tumor progression had been reduced or delayed) showed reduced target antigen expression, corroborating antigen-specificity (and showing an alternative immune escape mechanism), whereas antigen expression (like tumor growth) was unaffected among A(b)beta knockout mice. Our results demonstrate that class I MHC-restricted antigen presentation and CTL activity is neither necessary nor sufficient for antigen

  4. Production of a Locus- and Allele-Specific Monoclonal Antibody for the Characterization of SLA-1*0401 mRNA and Protein Expression Levels in MHC-Defined Microminipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kametani, Yoshie; Ohshima, Shino; Miyamoto, Asuka; Shigenari, Atsuko; Takasu, Masaki; Imaeda, Noriaki; Matsubara, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Masafumi; Shiina, Takashi; Kamiguchi, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ryuji; Kitagawa, Hitoshi; Kulski, Jerzy K; Hirayama, Noriaki; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Ando, Asako

    2016-01-01

    The class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) presents self-developed peptides to specific T cells to induce cytotoxity against infection. The MHC proteins are encoded by multiple loci that express numerous alleles to preserve the variability of the antigen-presenting ability in each species. The mechanism regulating MHC mRNA and protein expression at each locus is difficult to analyze because of the structural and sequence similarities between alleles. In this study, we examined the correlation between the mRNA and surface protein expression of swine leukocyte antigen (SLA)-1*0401 after the stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) by Staphylococcus aureus superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). We prepared a monoclonal antibody (mAb) against a domain composed of Y102, L103 and L109 in the α2 domain. The Hp-16.0 haplotype swine possess only SLA-1*0401, which has the mAb epitope, while other haplotypes possess 0 to 3 SLA classical class I loci with the mAb epitopes. When PBMCs from SLA-1*0401 homozygous pigs were stimulated, the SLA-1*0401 mRNA expression level increased until 24 hrs and decreased at 48 hrs. The kinetics of the interferon regulatory transcription factor-1 (IRF-1) mRNA level were similar to those of the SLA-1*0401 mRNA. However, the surface protein expression level continued to increase until 72 hrs. Similar results were observed in the Hp-10.0 pigs with three mAb epitopes. These results suggest that TSST-1 stimulation induced both mRNA and surface protein expression of class I SLA in the swine PBMCs differentially and that the surface protein level was sustained independently of mRNA regulation.

  5. Systematic Characterisation of Cellular Localisation and Expression Profiles of Proteins Containing MHC Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juncker, Agnieszka; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Weinhold, Nils

    2009-01-01

    that most proteins containing MHC class I ligands were localised to the intracellular parts of the cell including the cytoplasm and nucleus. MHC class II ligand donors were, on the other hand, mostly membrane proteins. Conclusions/Significance: The results contribute to the ongoing debate concerning...... the nature of MHC ligand-containing proteins and can be used to extend the existing methods for MHC ligand predictions by including the source protein's localisation and expression profile. Improving the current methods is important in the growing quest for epitopes that can be used for vaccine or diagnostic...

  6. Structure of a pheromone receptor-associated MHC molecule with an open and empty groove.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the murine vomeronasal organ (VNO express a family of class Ib major histocompatibility complex (MHC proteins (M10s that interact with the V2R class of VNO receptors. This interaction may play a direct role in the detection of pheromonal cues that initiate reproductive and territorial behaviors. The crystal structure of M10.5, an M10 family member, is similar to that of classical MHC molecules. However, the M10.5 counterpart of the MHC peptide-binding groove is open and unoccupied, revealing the first structure of an empty class I MHC molecule. Similar to empty MHC molecules, but unlike peptide-filled MHC proteins and non-peptide-binding MHC homologs, M10.5 is thermally unstable, suggesting that its groove is normally occupied. However, M10.5 does not bind endogenous peptides when expressed in mammalian cells or when offered a mixture of class I-binding peptides. The F pocket side of the M10.5 groove is open, suggesting that ligands larger than 8-10-mer class I-binding peptides could fit by extending out of the groove. Moreover, variable residues point up from the groove helices, rather than toward the groove as in classical MHC structures. These data suggest that M10s are unlikely to provide specific recognition of class I MHC-binding peptides, but are consistent with binding to other ligands, including proteins such as the V2Rs.

  7. Structure of a Pheromone Receptor-Associated Mhc Molecule With An Open And Empty Groove

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, R.; Huey-Tubman, K.E.; Dulac, C.; Bjorkman, P.J.; /Caltech /Harvard U.

    2006-10-06

    Neurons in the murine vomeronasal organ (VNO) express a family of class Ib major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins (M10s) that interact with the V2R class of VNO receptors. This interaction may play a direct role in the detection of pheromonal cues that initiate reproductive and territorial behaviors. The crystal structure of M10.5, an M10 family member, is similar to that of classical MHC molecules. However, the M10.5 counterpart of the MHC peptide-binding groove is open and unoccupied, revealing the first structure of an empty class I MHC molecule. Similar to empty MHC molecules, but unlike peptide-filled MHC proteins and non-peptide-binding MHC homologs, M10.5 is thermally unstable, suggesting that its groove is normally occupied. However, M10.5 does not bind endogenous peptides when expressed in mammalian cells or when offered a mixture of class I-binding peptides. The F pocket side of the M10.5 groove is open, suggesting that ligands larger than 8-10-mer class I-binding peptides could fit by extending out of the groove. Moreover, variable residues point up from the groove helices, rather than toward the groove as in classical MHC structures. These data suggest that M10s are unlikely to provide specific recognition of class I MHC-binding peptides, but are consistent with binding to other ligands, including proteins such as the V2Rs.

  8. HIV-1 Nef sequesters MHC-I intracellularly by targeting early stages of endocytosis and recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirk, Brennan S; Pawlak, Emily N; Johnson, Aaron L; Van Nynatten, Logan R; Jacob, Rajesh A; Heit, Bryan; Dikeakos, Jimmy D

    2016-11-14

    A defining characteristic of HIV-1 infection is the ability of the virus to persist within the host. Specifically, MHC-I downregulation by the HIV-1 accessory protein Nef is of critical importance in preventing infected cells from cytotoxic T-cell mediated killing. Nef downregulates MHC-I by modulating the host membrane trafficking machinery, resulting in the endocytosis and eventual sequestration of MHC-I within the cell. In the current report, we utilized the intracellular protein-protein interaction reporter system, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), in combination with super-resolution microscopy, to track the Nef/MHC-I interaction and determine its subcellular localization in cells. We demonstrate that this interaction occurs upon Nef binding the MHC-I cytoplasmic tail early during endocytosis in a Rab5-positive endosome. Disruption of early endosome regulation inhibited Nef-dependent MHC-I downregulation, demonstrating that Nef hijacks the early endosome to sequester MHC-I within the cell. Furthermore, super-resolution imaging identified that the Nef:MHC-I BiFC complex transits through both early and late endosomes before ultimately residing at the trans-Golgi network. Together we demonstrate the importance of the early stages of the endocytic network in the removal of MHC-I from the cell surface and its re-localization within the cell, which allows HIV-1 to optimally evade host immune responses.

  9. Establishment of a quantitative ELISA capable of determining peptide - MHC class I interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C; Kristensen, N; Blicher, T;

    2002-01-01

    Many different assays for measuring peptide-MHC interactions have been suggested over the years. Yet, there is no generally accepted standard method available. We have recently generated preoxidized recombinant MHC class I molecules (MHC-I) which can be purified to homogeneity under denaturing...... dependent manner. Here, we exploit the availability of these molecules to generate a quantitative ELISA-based assay capable of measuring the affinity of the interaction between peptide and MHC-I. This assay is simple and sensitive, and one can easily envisage that the necessary reagents, standards...

  10. Parasite load and MHC diversity in undisturbed and agriculturally modified habitats of the ornate dragon lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, Jacek; Kuduk, Katarzyna; Levy, Esther; LeBas, Natasha; Babik, Wiesław

    2014-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene polymorphism is thought to be driven by host-parasite co-evolution, but the evidence for an association between the selective pressure from parasites and the number of MHC alleles segregating in a population is scarce and inconsistent. Here, we characterized MHC class I polymorphism in a lizard whose habitat preferences (rock outcrops) lead to the formation of well-defined and stable populations. We investigated the association between the load of ticks, which were used as a proxy for the load of pathogens they transmit, and MHC class I polymorphism across populations in two types of habitat: undisturbed reserves and agricultural land. We hypothesized that the association would be positive across undisturbed reserve populations, but across fragmented agricultural land populations, the relationship would be distorted by the loss of MHC variation due to drift. After controlling for habitat, MHC diversity was not associated with tick number, and the habitats did not differ in this respect. Neither did we detect a difference between habitats in the relationship between MHC and neutral diversity, which was positive across all populations. However, there was extensive variation in the number of MHC alleles per individual, and we found that tick number was positively associated with the average number of alleles carried by lizards across reserve populations, but not across populations from disturbed agricultural land. Our results thus indicate that local differences in selection from parasites may contribute to MHC copy number variation within species, but habitat degradation can distort this relationship.

  11. NetMHC-3.0: accurate web accessible predictions of human, mouse and monkey MHC class I affinities for peptides of length 8-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lamberth, Kasper; Harndahl, Mikkel; Buus, Søren; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2008-07-01

    NetMHC-3.0 is trained on a large number of quantitative peptide data using both affinity data from the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB) and elution data from SYFPEITHI. The method generates high-accuracy predictions of major histocompatibility complex (MHC): peptide binding. The predictions are based on artificial neural networks trained on data from 55 MHC alleles (43 Human and 12 non-human), and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) for additional 67 HLA alleles. As only the MHC class I prediction server is available, predictions are possible for peptides of length 8-11 for all 122 alleles. artificial neural network predictions are given as actual IC(50) values whereas PSSM predictions are given as a log-odds likelihood scores. The output is optionally available as download for easy post-processing. The training method underlying the server is the best available, and has been used to predict possible MHC-binding peptides in a series of pathogen viral proteomes including SARS, Influenza and HIV, resulting in an average of 75-80% confirmed MHC binders. Here, the performance is further validated and benchmarked using a large set of newly published affinity data, non-redundant to the training set. The server is free of use and available at: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHC.

  12. Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Promoter Haplotypes and Residential Traffic-Related Air Pollution Jointly Influence Exhaled Nitric Oxide Level in Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad T Salam

    Full Text Available Exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO, a biomarker of airway inflammation, predicts asthma risk in children. We previously found that the promoter haplotypes in inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS2 and exposure to residential traffic independently influence FeNO level. Because NOS2 is inducible by environmental exposures such as traffic-related exposure, we tested the hypothesis that common NOS2 promoter haplotypes modulate the relationship between residential traffic-related exposure and FeNO level in children.In a cross-sectional population-based study, subjects (N = 2,457; 7-11 year-old were Hispanic and non-Hispanic white children who participated in the Southern California Children's Health Study and had FeNO measurements. For residential traffic, lengths of local roads within circular buffers (50m, 100m and 200m radii around homes around the subjects' homes were estimated using geographic information system (GIS methods. We interrogated the two most common NOS2 promoter haplotypes that were found to affect FeNO level.The relationship between local road lengths within 100m and 200m circular buffers and FeNO level varied significantly by one of the NOS2 promoter haplotypes (P-values for interaction between road length and NOS2 promoter haplotype = 0.02 and 0.03, respectively. In children who had ≤250m of local road lengths within 100m buffer around their homes, those with two copies of the haplotype had significantly lower FeNO (adjusted geometric mean = 11.74ppb; 95% confidence intervals (CI: 9.99 to 13.80 than those with no copies (adjusted geometric mean = 15.28ppb; 95% CI: 14.04 to 16.63 with statistically significant trend of lower FeNO level with increasing number of haplotype copy (P-value for trend = 0.002. In contrast, among children who had >250m of local road lengths within 100m buffer, FeNO level did not significantly differ by the haplotype copy-number (P-value for trend = 0.34. Similar interactive effects of this haplotype and local

  13. Associations of Haplotypes Upstream of IRS1 with Insulin Resistance, Type 2 Diabetes, Dyslipidemia, Preclinical Atherosclerosis, and Skeletal Muscle LOC646736 mRNA Levels

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    Selma M. Soyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The genomic region ~500 kb upstream of IRS1 has been implicated in insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, adverse lipid profile, and cardiovascular risk. To gain further insight into this chromosomal region, we typed four SNPs in a cross-sectional cohort and subjects with type 2 diabetes recruited from the same geographic region. From 16 possible haplotypes, 6 haplotypes with frequencies >0.01 were observed. We identified one haplotype that was protective against insulin resistance (determined by HOMA-IR and fasting plasma insulin levels, type 2 diabetes, an adverse lipid profile, increased C-reactive protein, and asymptomatic atherosclerotic disease (assessed by intima media thickness of the common carotid arteries. BMI and total adipose tissue mass as well as visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue mass did not differ between the reference and protective haplotypes. In 92 subjects, we observed an association of the protective haplotype with higher skeletal muscle mRNA levels of LOC646736, which is located in the same haplotype block as the informative SNPs and is mainly expressed in skeletal muscle, but only at very low levels in liver or adipose tissues. These data suggest a role for LOC646736 in human insulin resistance and warrant further studies on the functional effects of this locus.

  14. Effects of the number of markers per haplotype and clustering of haplotypes on the accuracy of QTL mapping and prediction of genomic breeding values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Windig, J.J.; Knol, E.F.; Schrooten, C.; Vereijken, A.L.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to compare the effect of haplotype definition on the precision of QTL-mapping and on the accuracy of predicted genomic breeding values. In a multiple QTL model using identity-by-descent (IBD) probabilities between haplotypes, various haplotype definitions were tested i.e. i

  15. 4G/5G polymorphism and haplotypes of SERPINE1 in atherosclerotic diseases of coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Werner; Schrempf, Matthias; Erl, Anna; Mueller, Jakob C; Hoppmann, Petra; Schömig, Albert; Kastrati, Adnan

    2010-06-01

    We assessed the association between common variation at the SERPINE1 (PAI1) locus and myocardial infarction (MI). Haplotype-tagging polymorphisms, including the 4G/5G deletion/insertion polymorphism and seven single nucleotide polymorphisms, were analysed in a German sample containing 3,657 cases with MI and 1,211 controls. The association between the 4G/5G polymorphism and MI was examined in a meta-analysis of data extracted from 32 studies (13,267 cases/14,716 controls). In addition, the relation between the 4G/5G polymorphism and coronary diseases, comprising MI, coronary artery disease, coronary heart disease, or the acute coronary syndrome, was assessed in a combined analysis enclosing 43 studies (17,278 cases/18,039 controls). None of the tagging polymorphisms was associated with MI in the present sample (p 4G allele carriers was 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.87-1.19) compared to the 5G5G genotype. None of 13 common (frequency >1.0%) 8-marker haplotypes was related to the risk of MI. In a meta-analysis specifically addressing the association with MI, no elevated risk was found in the carriers of the 4G allele (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.99-1.16; p = 0.11). A more general combined analysis of coronary diseases showed a marginally increased risk in 4G allele carriers (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.00-1.16; p = 0.044). In essence, tagging polymorphisms, including the 4G/5G polymorphism, and common haplotypes of the SERPINE1 gene region were not associated with MI in a German sample, and no compelling evidence was obtained for a relationship of the 4G/5G polymorphism to MI and coronary atherosclerosis in a meta-analysis.

  16. High-resolution haplotype block structure in the cattle genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jungwoo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bovine HapMap Consortium has generated assay panels to genotype ~30,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 501 animals sampled from 19 worldwide taurine and indicine breeds, plus two outgroup species (Anoa and Water Buffalo. Within the larger set of SNPs we targeted 101 high density regions spanning up to 7.6 Mb with an average density of approximately one SNP per 4 kb, and characterized the linkage disequilibrium (LD and haplotype block structure within individual breeds and groups of breeds in relation to their geographic origin and use. Results From the 101 targeted high-density regions on bovine chromosomes 6, 14, and 25, between 57 and 95% of the SNPs were informative in the individual breeds. The regions of high LD extend up to ~100 kb and the size of haplotype blocks ranges between 30 bases and 75 kb (10.3 kb average. On the scale from 1–100 kb the extent of LD and haplotype block structure in cattle has high similarity to humans. The estimation of effective population sizes over the previous 10,000 generations conforms to two main events in cattle history: the initiation of cattle domestication (~12,000 years ago, and the intensification of population isolation and current population bottleneck that breeds have experienced worldwide within the last ~700 years. Haplotype block density correlation, block boundary discordances, and haplotype sharing analyses were consistent in revealing unexpected similarities between some beef and dairy breeds, making them non-differentiable. Clustering techniques permitted grouping of breeds into different clades given their similarities and dissimilarities in genetic structure. Conclusion This work presents the first high-resolution analysis of haplotype block structure in worldwide cattle samples. Several novel results were obtained. First, cattle and human share a high similarity in LD and haplotype block structure on the scale of 1–100 kb. Second, unexpected

  17. Geographic distribution of haplotype diversity at the bovine casein locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moazami-Goudarzi Katy

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic diversity of the casein locus in cattle was studied on the basis of haplotype analysis. Consideration of recently described genetic variants of the casein genes which to date have not been the subject of diversity studies, allowed the identification of new haplotypes. Genotyping of 30 cattle breeds from four continents revealed a geographically associated distribution of haplotypes, mainly defined by frequencies of alleles at CSN1S1 and CSN3. The genetic diversity within taurine breeds in Europe was found to decrease significantly from the south to the north and from the east to the west. Such geographic patterns of cattle genetic variation at the casein locus may be a result of the domestication process of modern cattle as well as geographically differentiated natural or artificial selection. The comparison of African Bos taurus and Bos indicus breeds allowed the identification of several Bos indicus specific haplotypes (CSN1S1*C-CSN2*A2-CSN3*AI/CSN3*H that are not found in pure taurine breeds. The occurrence of such haplotypes in southern European breeds also suggests that an introgression of indicine genes into taurine breeds could have contributed to the distribution of the genetic variation observed.

  18. [Hemoglobin beta S haplotype in the Kebili region (southern Tunisia)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frikha, M; Fakhfakh, F; Mseddi, S; Gargouri, J; Ghali, L; Labiadh, Z; Harrabi, M; Souissi, T; Ayadi, H

    1998-04-01

    Sickle cell anemia is a monogenic hereditary disease characterized by a mutation in the beta globin gene. Five major haplotypes associated with the beta S mutation have been defined: Benin, Bantu, Senegalian, Camerounian, and Arabo-Indian. Previous studies in northern Tunisia showed that sickle cell anemia was of Benin origin in this region. Patients from the south of Tunisia, mainly from the Kebili region, were not previously concerned. In this study, we have determined the beta S haplotype and evaluated phenotypical expression of the disease in 14 patients from this latter region. The use of four restriction endonucleases having polymorphic sites in the beta globin gene showed that all patients had the Benin haplotype, confirming the Benin origin of sickle cell anemia in Tunisia. This haplotype is associated with an heterogeneous expression of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) with extremes varying from 2.4 to 16.3% and a mean expression rate of 8.16%, which is in accordance with literature data. In spite of the haplotype homogeneity in our patients, clinical heterogeneity was noted. A unique case of alpha-thalassemia could not explain this heterogeneity. In contrast, we found a certain correlation between fetal hemoglobin expression and clinical severity.

  19. Visualization of haplotype sharing patterns in pedigree samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sulgi; Saad, Mohamad; Tsuang, Debby W; Wijsman, Ellen M

    2014-01-01

    A particular approach to the visualization of descent of founder DNA copies in a pedigree has been suggested, which helps to understand haplotype sharing patterns among subjects of interest. However, the approach does not provide the information in an ideal format to show haplotype sharing patterns. Therefore, we aimed to find an efficient way to visualize such sharing patterns and to demonstrate that our tool provides useful information for finding an informative subset of subjects for a sequence study. The visualization package, SharedHap, computes and visualizes a novel metric, the SharedHap proportion, which quantifies haplotype sharing among a set of subjects of interest. We applied SharedHap to simulated and real pedigree datasets to illustrate the approach. SharedHap successfully represents haplotype sharing patterns that contribute to linkage signals in both simulated and real datasets. Using the visualizations we were also able to find ideal sets of subjects for sequencing studies. Our novel metric that can be computed using the SharedHap package provides useful information about haplotype sharing patterns among subjects of interest. The visualization of the SharedHap proportion provides useful information in pedigree studies, allowing for a better selection of candidate subjects for use in further sequencing studies. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. The relative importance of the X-linked FCP locus and beta-globin haplotypes in determining haemoglobin F levels: a study of SS patients homozygous for beta S haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y P; Maier-Redelsperger, M; Smith, K D; Contu, L; Ducroco, R; de Montalembert, M; Belloy, M; Elion, J; Dover, G J; Girot, R

    1997-03-01

    Five factors have been hypothesized to influence the 20-fold variation in fetal haemoglobin (Hb F) levels in sickle cell anaemia (SS): age sex, alpha-globin gene number, beta-globin haplotype, and the X-linked F-cell production locus (FCP) that regulates the production of Hb F containing erythrocytes (F cells). We analysed the association of these factors with Hb F levels in 112 SS patients living in France who are homozygous for the three common African beta-globin haplotypes (Benin, Bantu or Central African Republic and Senegal). We found that: (1) FCP accounts for about 40% of the overall variation in Hb F levels, (2) when the FCP influence is removed, beta-globin haplotype is associated with 14% of the remaining Hb F variation, and (3) the other factors have little influence. Comparison with our previous study of SS individuals in Jamaica leads to the following conclusions: (1) the X-linked FCP locus is a major determinant of Hb F levels in SS disease, (2) factors linked to the beta-globin haplotype have only a small effect on the variation in Hb F levels, in either the homozygous or heterozygous state, and (3)approximately half of the variation in Hb F levels still remains to be explained.

  1. A study of 82 extended HLA haplotypes in HFE-C282Y homozygous hemochromatosis subjects: relationship to the genetic control of CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers and severity of iron overload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacerda Rosa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been recently demonstrated that CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers are genetically transmitted in association with the MHC class I region. The present study was designed with the objective of narrowing the region associated with the setting of CD8+ T-lymphocyte numbers in a population of C282Y homozygous hemochromatosis subjects, in whom a high prevalence of abnormally low CD8+ T-lymphocyte counts has been described. Methods The study includes 43 C282Y homozygous subjects fully characterized both phenotypically and genotypically. Clinical characterization includes measurements of iron parameters at diagnosis (transferrin saturation and serum ferritin, total body iron stores and T-cell immunophenotyping determined by flow cytometry. Genetic characterization includes HLA class I alleles (A, B and C and four additional microsatellite markers (D6S265, D6S2222, D6S105 and D6S2239 spanning 5 Megabases in the 6p21.3 region. Results Eighty-two extended C282Y carrying haplotypes were defined. Single-locus analysis revealed that the HLA-A region was associated with CD8+ T-cell numbers. Multivariate analysis showed that the combinations of the most common HLA-A alleles (HLA-A*03, -A*02 and -A*01 were associated with significantly lower numbers of CD8+ T-lymphocytes (0.30 ± 0.14 × 106/ml, in comparison with subjects carrying only one copy of those alleles (0.46 ± 0.19 × 106/ml and subjects without any copy of those alleles (0.79 ± 0.15 × 106/ml;p = 0.0001. No differences were observed in CD8+ T-cell counts among control subjects carrying the same combinations of HLA-A alleles (0.47 ± 0.14; 0.45 ± 0.21 and 0.41 ± 0.17 × 106/ml, respectively, therefore not supporting a direct effect of HLA specificity but rather an indirect association with a locus close to HLA-A. Multivariate analysis showed that the combination of the most common HLA-A alleles also have an impact on the clinical expression of HH in terms of iron stores, in males

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies new HLA class II haplotypes strongly protective against narcolepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hor, Hyun; Kutalik, Zoltán; Dauvilliers, Yves;

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder with the strongest human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association ever reported. Since the associated HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602 haplotype is common in the general population (15-25%), it has been suggested that it is almost necessary but not sufficient for developing...... narcolepsy. To further define the genetic basis of narcolepsy risk, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 562 European individuals with narcolepsy (cases) and 702 ethnically matched controls, with independent replication in 370 cases and 495 controls, all heterozygous for DRB1*1501-DQB1...... ratio = 0.02; P narcolepsy susceptibility....

  3. Five adults with mild sickle cell anemia share a beta S chromosome with the same haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakioglu, I; Hattori, Y; Kutlar, A; Mathew, C; Huisman, T H

    1985-11-01

    Five adult SS patients from Qatar, Turkey, and South Africa with mild disease, had greatly elevated Hb F and specific patterns of polymorphic sites on their beta S chromosomes. One subject had an alpha-thalassemia (-alpha/-alpha). The haplotypes were the common type #19, associated with severe disease, and type #31, not seen thus far in an SS patient (numbering system of Antonarakis et al). The data suggest that modifications in the DNA of the beta S #31 chromosome promotes the synthesis of gamma chains.

  4. Automated benchmarking of peptide-MHC class I binding predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Thomas; Metushi, Imir G.; Greenbaum, Jason;

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Numerous in silico methods predicting peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules have been developed over the last decades. However, the multitude of available prediction tools makes it non-trivial for the end-user to select which tool to use for a given...... the public access to frequent, up-to-date performance evaluations of all participating tools. To overcome potential selection bias in the data included in the IEDB, a strategy was implemented that suggests a set of peptides for which different prediction methods give divergent predictions as to their binding...

  5. Cheetah paradigm revisited: MHC diversity in the world's largest free-ranging population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Prieto, Aines; Wachter, Bettina; Sommer, Simone

    2011-04-01

    For more than two decades, the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) has been considered a paradigm of disease vulnerability associated with low genetic diversity, particularly at the immune genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Cheetahs have been used as a classic example in numerous conservation genetics textbooks as well as in many related scientific publications. However, earlier studies used methods with low resolution to quantify MHC diversity and/or small sample sizes. Furthermore, high disease susceptibility was reported only for captive cheetahs, whereas free-ranging cheetahs show no signs of infectious diseases and a good general health status. We examined whether the diversity at MHC class I and class II-DRB loci in 149 Namibian cheetahs was higher than previously reported using single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, cloning, and sequencing. MHC genes were examined at the genomic and transcriptomic levels. We detected ten MHC class I and four class II-DRB alleles, of which nine MHC class I and all class II-DRB alleles were expressed. Phylogenetic analyses and individual genotypes suggested that the alleles belong to four MHC class I and three class II-DRB putative loci. Evidence of positive selection was detected in both MHC loci. Our study indicated that the low number of MHC class I alleles previously observed in cheetahs was due to a smaller sample size examined. On the other hand, the low number of MHC class II-DRB alleles previously observed in cheetahs was further confirmed. Compared with other mammalian species including felids, cheetahs showed low levels of MHC diversity, but this does not seem to influence the immunocompetence of free-ranging cheetahs in Namibia and contradicts the previous conclusion that the cheetah is a paradigm species of disease vulnerability.

  6. No evidence for MHC class I-based disassortative mating in a wild population of great tits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepil, I; Radersma, R; Santure, A W; De Cauwer, I; Slate, J; Sheldon, B C

    2015-03-01

    Genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are regarded as a potentially important target of mate choice due to the fitness benefits that may be conferred to the offspring. According to the complementary genes hypothesis, females mate with MHC dissimilar males to enhance the immunocompetence of their offspring or to avoid inbreeding depression. Here, we investigate whether selection favours a preference for maximally dissimilar or optimally dissimilar MHC class I types, based on MHC genotypes, average amino acid distances and the functional properties of the antigen-binding sites (MHC supertypes); and whether MHC type dissimilarity predicts relatedness between mates in a wild great tit population. In particular, we explore the role that MHC class I plays in female mate choice decisions while controlling for relatedness and spatial population structure, and examine the reproductive fitness consequences of MHC compatibility between mates. We find no evidence for the hypotheses that females select mates on the basis of either maximal or optimal MHC class I dissimilarity. A weak correlation between MHC supertype sharing and relatedness suggests that MHC dissimilarity at functional variants may not provide an effective index of relatedness. Moreover, the reproductive success of pairs did not vary with MHC dissimilarity. Our results provide no support for the suggestion that selection favours, or that mate choice realizes, a preference for complimentary MHC types.

  7. A substantially lower frequency of uninformative matches between 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotypes in north Western Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Vanderheyden, Nancy; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Decorte, Ronny

    2014-07-01

    The analysis of human short tandem repeats of the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs) provides a powerful tool in forensic cases for male sex identification, male lineage identification and identification of the geographical origin of male lineages. As the commonly used 12 and 17 Y-STR multiplexes do not discriminate between some unrelated males, additional Y-STRs were implemented in the PowerPlex(®) Y23 System to supplement the existing commercial Y-STR kits. Until today, the forensic value of a (near) 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotype match between an unknown DNA donor and a certain biological sample in a database is not yet well studied. This will be of huge interest for cases where an autosomal DNA profile yields no match to a DNA database and the database is used for familial searching (male relative(s) of the offender) or for the estimation of the geographical origin of the offender. In order to value (near) 23 Y-STR haplotype matches in a local sample from Western Europe, we selected the region of Flanders (Belgium) due to the already present knowledge on its Y-chromosomal variants. Many Y-chromosomes of this region were previously genotyped with Y-SNPs at a high resolution of the most recently updated Y-chromosomal tree and the deep-rooted genealogy of each DNA donor was already established. By comparing (near) matches of 23 versus 17 Y-STR haplotypes between patrilineal-unrelated males, a substantial lower number of uninformative (near) 23 Y-STR haplotype matches has been observed compared to 17 Y-STR haplotypes. Furthermore, the use of SNP data was informative to discriminate >60% of unrelated males with an (near) identical 17 Y-STR match while SNP data was only necessary to discriminate about 10% of unrelated males with a 23 Y-STR haplotype that differed at only two Y-STRs. This shows the higher value of the Y23 haplotype within familial DNA searching and the estimation of the geographical origin of a DNA donor. Therefore, the use of the PowerPlex(®) Y23 System instead

  8. A haplotype at STAT2 Introgressed from neanderthals and serves as a candidate of positive selection in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Watkins, Joseph C; Hammer, Michael F

    2012-08-10

    Signals of archaic admixture have been identified through comparisons of the draft Neanderthal and Denisova genomes with those of living humans. Studies of individual loci contributing to these genome-wide average signals are required for characterization of the introgression process and investigation of whether archaic variants conferred an adaptive advantage to the ancestors of contemporary human populations. However, no definitive case of adaptive introgression has yet been described. Here we provide a DNA sequence analysis of the innate immune gene STAT2 and show that a haplotype carried by many Eurasians (but not sub-Saharan Africans) has a sequence that closely matches that of the Neanderthal STAT2. This haplotype, referred to as N, was discovered through a resequencing survey of the entire coding region of STAT2 in a global sample of 90 individuals. Analyses of publicly available complete genome sequence data show that haplotype N shares a recent common ancestor with the Neanderthal sequence (~80 thousand years ago) and is found throughout Eurasia at an average frequency of ~5%. Interestingly, N is found in Melanesian populations at ~10-fold higher frequency (~54%) than in Eurasian populations. A neutrality test that controls for demography rejects the hypothesis that a variant of N rose to high frequency in Melanesia by genetic drift alone. Although we are not able to pinpoint the precise target of positive selection, we identify nonsynonymous mutations in ERBB3, ESYT1, and STAT2-all of which are part of the same 250 kb introgressive haplotype-as good candidates.

  9. Frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the human leukocyte antigen system in Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana de Cassia Salvadori

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: HLA allele identification is used in bone marrow transplant programs as HLA compatibility between the donor and recipient may prevent graft rejection. Objective: This study aimed to estimate the frequency of alleles and haplotypes of the HLA system in the region of Bauru and compare these with the frequencies found in other regions of the country. Methods: HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele frequencies and haplotypes were analyzed in a sample of 3542 volunteer donors at the National Registry of Voluntary Bone Marrow Donors (REDOME in Bauru. HLA low resolution typing was performed using reverse line blot with the Dynal Reli(tm SSO-HLA Typing Kit and automated Dynal AutoReli(tm48 device (Invitrogen, USA. Results: Twenty, 36, and 13 HLA-A*, HLA-B*, and HLA-DRB1* allele groups, respectively, were identified. The most common alleles for each locus were HLA-A*02, HLA-B*35, and HLA-DRB1*07. The most frequent haplotype was A*01-B*08-DRB1*03. Allele and haplotype frequencies were compared to other regions in Brazil and the similarities and differences among populations are shown. Conclusion: The knowledge of the immunogenic profile of a population contributes to the comprehension of the historical and anthropological aspects of different regions. Moreover, this helps to find suitable donors quickly, thereby shortening waiting lists for transplants and thus increasing survival rates among recipients.

  10. The DAOA/G30 locus and affective disorders: haplotype based association study in a polydiagnostic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapp Michael

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DAOA/G30 (D-amino acid oxidase activator gene complex at chromosomal region 13q32-33 is one of the most intriguing susceptibility loci for the major psychiatric disorders, although there is no consensus about the specific risk alleles or haplotypes across studies. Methods In a case-control sample of German descent (affective psychosis: n = 248; controls: n = 188 we examined seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs around DAOA/G30 (rs3916966, rs1935058, rs2391191, rs1935062, rs947267, rs3918342, and rs9558575 for genetic association in a polydiagnostic approach (ICD 10; Leonhard's classification. Results No single marker showed evidence of overall association with affective disorder neither in ICD10 nor Leonhard's classification. Haplotype analysis revealed no association with recurrent unipolar depression or bipolar disorder according to ICD10, within Leonhard's classification manic-depression was associated with a 3-locus haplotype (rs2391191, rs1935062, and rs3916966; P = 0.022 and monopolar depression with a 5-locus combination at the DAOA/G30 core region (P = 0.036. Conclusion Our data revealed potential evidence for partially overlapping risk haplotypes at the DAOA/G30 locus in Leonhard's affective psychoses, but do not support a common genetic contribution of the DAOA/G30 gene complex to the pathogenesis of affective disorders.

  11. Haplotyping a single triploid individual based on genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingli; Chen, Xixi; Li, Xianchen

    2014-01-01

    The minimum error correction model is an important combinatorial model for haplotyping a single individual. In this article, triploid individual haplotype reconstruction problem is studied by using the model. A genetic algorithm based method GTIHR is presented for reconstructing the triploid individual haplotype. A novel coding method and an effectual hill-climbing operator are introduced for the GTIHR algorithm. This relatively short chromosome code can lead to a smaller solution space, which plays a positive role in speeding up the convergence process. The hill-climbing operator ensures algorithm GTIHR converge at a good solution quickly, and prevents premature convergence simultaneously. The experimental results prove that algorithm GTIHR can be implemented efficiently, and can get higher reconstruction rate than previous algorithms.

  12. Detecting disease-predisposing variants: The haplotype method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, A.M.; Thomson, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    For many HLA-associated diseases, multiple alleles - and, in some cases, multiple loci - have been suggested as the causative agents. The haplotype method for identifying disease-predisposing amino acids in a genetic region is a stratification analysis. We show that, for each haplotype combination containing all the amino acid sites involved in the disease process, the relative frequencies of amino acid variants at sites not involved in disease but in linkage disequilibrium with the disease-predisposing sites are expected to be the same in patients and controls. The haplotype method is robust to mode of inheritance and penetrance of the disease and can be used to determine unequivocally whether all amino acid sites involved in the disease have not been identified. Using a resampling technique, we developed a statistical test that takes account of the nonindependence of the sites sampled. Further, when multiple sites in the genetic region are involved in disease, the test statistic gives a closer fit to the null expectation when some - compared with none - of the true predisposing factors are included in the haplotype analysis. Although the haplotype method cannot distinguish between very highly correlated sites in one population, ethnic comparisons may help identify the true predisposing factors. The haplotype method was applied to insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) HLA class II DQA1-DQB1 data from Caucasian, African, and Japanese populations. Our results indicate that the combination DQA1 No. 52 (Arg predisposing) DQB1 No. 57 (Asp protective), which has been proposed as an important IDDM agent, does not include all the predisposing elements. With rheumatoid arthritis HLA class H DRB1 data, the results were consistent with the shared-epitope hypothesis. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. SNP haplotype mapping in a small ALS family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Dick Krueger

    Full Text Available The identification of genes for monogenic disorders has proven to be highly effective for understanding disease mechanisms, pathways and gene function in humans. Nevertheless, while thousands of Mendelian disorders have not yet been mapped there has been a trend away from studying single-gene disorders. In part, this is due to the fact that many of the remaining single-gene families are not large enough to map the disease locus to a single site in the genome. New tools and approaches are needed to allow researchers to effectively tap into this genetic gold-mine. Towards this goal, we have used haploid cell lines to experimentally validate the use of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP arrays to define genome-wide haplotypes and candidate regions, using a small amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS family as a prototype. Specifically, we used haploid-cell lines to determine if high-density SNP arrays accurately predict haplotypes across entire chromosomes and show that haplotype information significantly enhances the genetic information in small families. Panels of haploid-cell lines were generated and a 5 centimorgan (cM short tandem repeat polymorphism (STRP genome scan was performed. Experimentally derived haplotypes for entire chromosomes were used to directly identify regions of the genome identical-by-descent in 5 affected individuals. Comparisons between experimentally determined and in silico haplotypes predicted from SNP arrays demonstrate that SNP analysis of diploid DNA accurately predicted chromosomal haplotypes. These methods precisely identified 12 candidate intervals, which are shared by all 5 affected individuals. Our study illustrates how genetic information can be maximized using readily available tools as a first step in mapping single-gene disorders in small families.

  14. Identification of MHC class II restricted T‐cell‐mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Stryhn, Anette

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide...... blocking with HLA class I and II subtype antibodies in the ELISPOT assay culture, none of the eight antigenic peptides induced HLA class I restricted CD8+ T‐cell responses. Instead all responses were blocked by pan‐HLA class II and anti‐HLA‐DR antibodies. In addition, CD4+ T‐cell depletion before the 10...

  15. LRRK2 G2019S mutation: frequency and haplotype data in South African Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardien, Soraya; Marsberg, Angelica; Keyser, Rowena; Lombard, Debbie; Lesage, Suzanne; Brice, Alexis; Carr, Jonathan

    2010-07-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are the most significant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). The exact function of LRRK2 is currently unknown but the presence of multiple protein interaction domains including WD40 and ankyrin indicates that it may act a scaffold for assembly of a multi-protein signaling complex. The G2019S mutation in LRRK2 represents the most clinically relevant PD-causing mutation and has been found in both familial and sporadic forms of the disorder. This mutation is situated in the highly conserved kinase MAPKKK domain, and has been found in up to 40% of PD patients from North African Arabic, 30% of Ashkenazi Jewish and approximately 10% of Portuguese and Spanish populations. Although extensively investigated in numerous European and North American populations, studies on the frequency of G2019S in African countries have been rare. The present study is the first on the South African population. High-resolution melt analysis was used to identify the G2019S mutation and it was found in 2% (4/205) of the patients studied. G2019S was not found in any of the Black PD patients screened. In all four G2019S-positive probands the mutation was shown to be present on the common haplotype referred to as haplotype 1. This reveals that the four South African G2019S-positive probands (three Caucasian and one of mixed ancestry) share a common ancestor with the other haplotype 1-associated families reported worldwide.

  16. The relationship of haplotype in lactotransferrin and its expression levels in Chinese Han ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lanqin Cao; Yanhong Zhou; Xin Li; Hong Yi

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal DNA sequence polymorphisms may contribute to individuality,confer risk for diseases,and most commonly are used as genetic markers in association study.The iron-binding protein lactoferrin inhibits bacterial growth by sequestering essential iron and also exhibits antitumor,anti-inflammatory,and immunoregulatory activities.The gene coding for lactotransferrin (LTF) is polymorphic,with the occurrence of several common alleles in the general population.This genetically determined variation can affect LTF functions.In this study,we determined the distribution of LTF gene polymorphisms (rs1126477,rs1126478,rs2073495,and rs9110) in the Chinese Han population and investigated whether these polymorphisms were associated with increased risk of ovarian carcinoma in the Chinese.It was found that the rs1126477 was correlated significantly with ovarian cancer.The frequency of A allele of rs1126477 was significantly higher in 700 ovarian cancer patients compared with that in the control group of 700 cases (P < 0.01,x2=6.79).The frequency of AA genotype was significantly higher in ovarian cancer patients compared with that in the control group (P < 0.05,x2=6.49).AA genotype is the risk factor of ovarian cancer.The odds ratio (OR) was 2.24 and the 95% confidence interval (CI) was 1.08-4.59,respectively.The ‘A-G-C-C' haplotype constructed with rs1126477,rs1126478,rs2073495,and rs9110 was the risk factor to be ovarian cancer.The expression of LTF gene was lower in individuals with ‘A-G-C-C' haplotype compared with that in individuals without ‘A-G-C-C' haplotype.These findings suggested that rs1126477 could play important roles in ovarian carcinoma physiological processes in the Chinese.

  17. Strict major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule class-specific binding by co-receptors enforces MHC-restricted αβTCR recognition during T lineage subset commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-long eLi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of co-receptor dependent αβTCR recognition, considerable effort has been spent on elucidating the basis of CD4 and CD8 lineage commitment in the thymus. The latter is responsible for generating mature CD4 helper and CD8αβ cytotoxic T cell subsets. Although CD4+ and CD8+ T cell recognition of peptide antigens is known to be MHC class I- and MHC class II-restricted, respectively, the mechanism of single positive (SP thymocyte lineage commitment from bipotential double positive (DP progenitors is not fully elucidated. Classical models to explain thymic CD4 versus CD8 fate determination have included a stochastic selection model or instructional models. The latter are based either on strength of signal or duration of signal impacting fate. More recently, differential co-receptor gene imprinting has been shown to be involved in expression of transcription factors impacting cytotoxic T cell development. Here, we address commitment from a structural perspective, focusing on the nature of co-receptor binding to MHC molecules. By surveying 58 MHC class II and 224 MHC class I crystal structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB, it becomes clear that CD4 cannot bind to MHC I molecules, nor can CD8αβ or CD8αα bind to MHC II molecules. Given that the co-receptor delivers Lck to phosphorylate exposed CD3 ITAMs within a peptide/MHC (pMHC-ligated TCR complex to initiate cell signaling, this strict co-receptor recognition fosters MHC class-restricted SP thymocyte lineage commitment at the DP stage even though both co-receptors are expressed on a single cell. In short, the binding preference of an αβTCR for a peptide complexed with an MHC molecule dictates which co-receptor subsequently binds, thereby supporting development of that subset lineage. How function within the lineage is linked further to biopotential fate determination is discussed.

  18. αβ T cell receptor germline CDR regions moderate contact with MHC ligands and regulate peptide cross-reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaf, Meriem; Holland, Stephan J; Bartok, Istvan; Dyson, Julian

    2016-10-24

    αβ T cells respond to peptide epitopes presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. The role of T cell receptor (TCR) germline complementarity determining regions (CDR1 and 2) in MHC restriction is not well understood. Here, we examine T cell development, MHC restriction and antigen recognition where germline CDR loop structure has been modified by multiple glycine/alanine substitutions. Surprisingly, loss of germline structure increases TCR engagement with MHC ligands leading to excessive loss of immature thymocytes. MHC restriction is, however, strictly maintained. The peripheral T cell repertoire is affected similarly, exhibiting elevated cross-reactivity to foreign peptides. Our findings are consistent with germline TCR structure optimising T cell cross-reactivity and immunity by moderating engagement with MHC ligands. This strategy may operate alongside co-receptor imposed MHC restriction, freeing germline TCR structure to adopt this novel role in the TCR-MHC interface.

  19. Rheumatoid Rescue of Misfolded Cellular Proteins by MHC Class II Molecules: A New Hypothesis for Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arase, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins localized in the endoplasmic reticulum are degraded promptly and thus are not transported outside cells. However, misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum are rescued from protein degradation upon association with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules and are transported to the cell surface by MHC class II molecules without being processed to peptides. Studies on the misfolded proteins rescued by MHC class II molecules have revealed that misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules are specific targets for autoantibodies produced in autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, a strong correlation has been observed between autoantibody binding to misfolded proteins associated with MHC class II molecules and the autoimmune disease susceptibility conferred by each MHC class II allele. These new insights into MHC class II molecules suggest that misfolded proteins rescued from protein degradation by MHC class II molecules are recognized as "neo-self" antigens by immune system and are involved in autoimmune diseases as autoantibody targets.

  20. Machine Learning Reveals a Non-Canonical Mode of Peptide Binding to MHC class II Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Jurtz, Vanessa Isabell; Kaever, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    MHC class II molecules play a fundamental role in the cellular immune system: they load short peptide fragments derived from extracellular proteins and present them on the cell surface. It is currently thought that the peptide binds lying more or less flat in the MHC groove, with a fixed distance...

  1. Porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and analysis of their peptide-binding specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse Eggers; Harndahl, Mikkel; Rasmussen, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    In all vertebrate animals, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are controlled by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) molecules. These are highly polymorphic peptide receptors selecting and presenting endogenously derived epitopes to circulating CTLs. The polymorphism of the MHC...

  2. Identification of MHC class I associated peptides. Development of sensitive mass spectrometric sequence analysis techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong APJM; van der Heeft E; ten Hove GJ; van Gaans-van den Brink JAM; van Els CACM; LOC; LVM

    1996-01-01

    Betreft de ontwikkeling van gevoelige microkolom HPLC-ESI/MS methoden en technieken voor de analyse van MHC klasse I geassocieerde antigeenpeptiden. De analyse bestaat uit de identificatie van T-cel stimulerende peptiden in MHC elutiemengsels van geinfecteerde celkweekculturen gevolgd door de bepal

  3. The Intensity of Human Body Odors and the MHC: Should We Expect a Link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Wedekind

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that genes within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC somehow affect the production of body odors in several vertebrates, including humans. Here we discuss whether variation in the intensity of body odors may be influenced by the MHC. In order to examine this question, we have to control for MHC-linked odor perception on the smeller's side. Such a control is necessary because the perception of pleasantness and intensity seem to be confounded, and the causalities are still unsolved. It has previously been found that intense odors are scored as less pleasant if the signaler and the receiver are of MHC-dissimilar type, but not if they are of MHC similar type. We argue, and first data suggest, that an effect of the degree of MHC-heterozygosity and odor intensity is likely (MHC-homozygotes may normally smell more intense, while there is currently no strong argument for other possible links between the MHC and body odor intensity.

  4. Modes of salmonid MHC class I and II evolution differ from the primate paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shum, B.P.; Guethlein, L.; Flodin, L.R.; Adkison, M.A.; Hedrick, R.P.; Nehring, R.B.; Stet, R.J.M.; Secombes, C.; Parham, P.

    2001-01-01

    Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brown trout (Salmo trutta) represent two salmonid genera separated for 15-20 million years. cDNA sequences were determined for the classical MHC class I heavy chain gene UBA and the MHC class II β-chain gene DAB from 15 rainbow and 10 brown trout. Both genes a

  5. Tapasin-related protein TAPBPR is an additional component of the MHC class I presentation pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyle, Louise H; Hermann, Clemens; Boname, Jessica M

    2013-01-01

    Tapasin is an integral component of the peptide-loading complex (PLC) important for efficient peptide loading onto MHC class I molecules. We investigated the function of the tapasin-related protein, TAPBPR. Like tapasin, TAPBPR is widely expressed, IFN-γ-inducible, and binds to MHC class I couple...

  6. Antigen loading of MHC class I molecules in the endocytic tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Kleijmeer (Monique); J.M. Escola; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); E. Jakobson (Eva); J.M. Griffith (Janice); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); W. Stoorvogel (Willem); C.J.M. Melief (Cornelis); C. Rabouille (Catherine); H.J. Geuze (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractMajor histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules bind antigenic peptides that are translocated from the cytosol into the endoplasmic reticulum by the transporter associated with antigen processing. MHC class I loading independent of this transporter also exists and involves

  7. TLR-induced activation of Btk- Role for endosomal MHC class Ⅱ molecules revealed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joan Ni Gabhann; Caroline A Jefferies

    2011-01-01

    @@ MHC molecules have been shown to play key roles in the immune system including regulating T-cell repertoire development through the process of positive and negative selection.MHC molecules also function to bridge the innate and adaptive immune system through the presentation of processed antigenic peptides to T-cells.

  8. Towards the simplification of MHC typing protocols: targeting classical MHC class II genes in a passerine, the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canal David

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC has drawn the attention of evolutionary biologists due to its importance in crucial biological processes, such as sexual selection and immune response in jawed vertebrates. However, the characterization of classical MHC genes subjected to the effects of natural selection still remains elusive in many vertebrate groups. Here, we have tested the suitability of flanking intron sequences to guide the selective exploration of classical MHC genes driving the co-evolutionary dynamics between pathogens and their passerine (Aves, Order Passeriformes hosts. Findings Intronic sequences flanking the usually polymorphic exon 2 were isolated from different species using primers sitting on conserved coding regions of MHC class II genes (β chain. Taking the pied flycatcher Ficedula hypoleuca as an example, we demonstrate that careful primer design can evade non-classical MHC gene and pseudogene amplification. At least four polymorphic and expressed loci were co-replicated using a single pair of primers in five non-related individuals (N = 28 alleles. The cross-amplification and preliminary inspection of similar MHC fragments in eight unrelated songbird taxa suggests that similar approaches can also be applied to other species. Conclusions Intron sequences flanking the usually polymorphic exon 2 may assist the specific investigation of classical MHC class II B genes in species characterized by extensive gene duplication and pseudogenization. Importantly, the evasion of non-classical MHC genes with a more specific function and non-functional pseudogenes may accelerate data collection and diminish lab costs. Comprehensive knowledge of gene structure, polymorphism and expression profiles may be useful not only for the selective examination of evolutionarily relevant genes but also to restrict chimera formation by minimizing the number of co-amplifying loci.

  9. Haplotypes of the angiotensin II receptor genes AGTR1 and AGTR2 in women with normotensive pregnancy and women with preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Sally; Tower, Clare; Alonso, Pedro; Morgan, Linda; Baker, Phil; Broughton-Pipkin, Fiona; Kalsheker, Noor

    2004-07-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) acts as a growth factor in local systems, mediating diverse effects such as cellular proliferation and apoptosis. These effects are controlled through two main receptor subtypes: AGTR1 and AGTR2. We studied the haplotype frequencies of both receptor genes in women with preeclamptic pregnancies and normotensive pregnant women. We also looked for any association between AGTR1 genotype at sites in the 5' flanking region and binding of AII to platelets, which express AGTR1, in 58 normotensive pregnant women. There were nine common haplotypes of AGTR1, with no significant difference in haplotype frequency between the two groups of women. Platelet AII binding in normotensive pregnant women was associated with the genotype at g.5245C>T in the 5' flanking region of AGTR1 (GenBank AF245699.1), with CC homozygotes at g.5245 having the lowest levels, and g.5245 TT homozygotes having the highest levels (P=0.05). Two novel polymorphisms were identified in AGTR2 (GenBank AY324607.1) at nucleotides g.1701T>C and g.2184A>T. Variation of AGTR2 could be explained by the existence of four common haplotypes. There was evidence for a significant increase in the frequency of the haplotype TAATGC at nucleotides g.1701, g.2041, g.2184, g.4673, g.4679, and g.4975, respectively (P=0.004), in women with preeclampsia. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. ABCB1 haplotype and OPRM1 118A > G genotype interaction in methadone maintenance treatment pharmacogenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barratt DT

    2012-04-01

    deviation 35 ± 5 versus 180 ± 65 mg/day, P < 0.01 and Ctrough (78 ± 22 versus 177 ± 97 ng/mL, P < 0.05 than ABCB1 wild-type subjects. Among subjects with the most common ABCB1 haplotype combination (wild-type with 61A:1199G:1236T:2677T:3435T, the OPRM1 118 A/G genotype was associated with a significantly higher Ctrough than 118 A/A (250 ± 126 versus 108 ± 36 ng/mL, P = 0.016. No ABCB1 haplotype group or OPRM1 genotype was associated with dose or Ctrough without taking into account confounding genetic variability at the other locus. Therefore, two interacting pharmacogenetic determinants of methadone maintenance treatment response were identified, ie, ABCB1, where variants are associated with lower methadone requirements, and OPRM1, where the variant is associated with higher methadone requirements.Conclusion: These opposing pharmacogenetic effects therefore need to be considered in combination when assessing methadone maintenance treatment pharmacogenetics.Keywords: methadone, opiate substitution treatment, ABCB1, P-glycoprotein, OPRM1, receptors, opioid, mu

  11. Selective export of MHC class I molecules from the ER after their dissociation from TAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiliotis, E T; Manley, H; Osorio, M; Zúñiga, M C; Edidin, M

    2000-12-01

    It has been assumed that upon dissociation from TAP, MHC class I molecules exit the ER by nonselective bulk flow. We now show that exit must occur by association with cargo receptors. Inconsistent with exit by bulk flow, loading of MHC class I molecules with high-affinity peptides triggers dissociation from TAP but has no effect on rates of ER-to-Golgi transport. Moreover, peptide-loaded MHC class I molecules accumulate at ER exit sites from which TAP molecules are excluded. Consistent with receptor-mediated exit, ER-to-Golgi transport of MHC class I molecules is independent of their cytoplasmic tails, which themselves lack ER export motifs. In addition, we show that MHC class I molecules associate with the putative cargo receptor BAP31.

  12. Functional recombinant MHC class II molecules and high-throughput peptide-binding assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Sune; Harndahl, Mikkel; Lamberth, Kasper

    2009-01-01

    of peptide-binding assay were developed including a homogeneous, non-radioactive, high-throughput (HTS) binding assay. Binding isotherms were generated allowing the affinities of interaction to be determined. The affinities of the best binders were found to be in the low nanomolar range. Recombinant MHC...... in the generation of MHC-II molecules as reagents to study and manipulate specific T helper cell responses. Methods to generate functional MHC-II molecules recombinantly, and measure their interaction with peptides, would be highly desirable; however, no consensus methodology has yet emerged. RESULTS: We generated....... CONCLUSION: We have successfully developed versatile MHC-II resources, which may assist in the generation of MHC class II -wide reagents, data, and tools....

  13. High-throughput engineering and analysis of peptide binding to class II MHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Boder, Eric T

    2010-07-27

    Class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC-II) proteins govern stimulation of adaptive immunity by presenting antigenic peptides to CD4+ T lymphocytes. Many allelic variants of MHC-II exist with implications in peptide presentation and immunity; thus, high-throughput experimental tools for rapid and quantitative analysis of peptide binding to MHC-II are needed. Here, we present an expression system wherein peptide and MHC-II are codisplayed on the surface of yeast in an intracellular association-dependent manner and assayed by flow cytometry. Accordingly, the relative binding of different peptides and/or MHC-II variants can be assayed by genetically manipulating either partner, enabling the application of directed evolution approaches for high-throughput characterization or engineering. We demonstrate the application of this tool to map the side-chain preference for peptides binding to HLA-DR1 and to evolve novel HLA-DR1 mutants with altered peptide-binding specificity.

  14. Cross-species association of quail invariant chain with chicken and mouse MHC II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fangfang; Wu, Chao; Pan, Ling; Xu, Fazhi; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Weiyi

    2013-05-01

    There are different degrees of similarity among vertebrate invariant chains (Ii). The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quail and other vertebrate Ii MHC class II molecules. The two quail Ii isoforms (qIi-1, qIi-2) were cloned by RACE, and qRT-PCR analysis of different organs showed that their expression levels were positively correlated with MHC II gene (B-LB) transcription levels. Confocal microscopy indicated that quail full-length Ii co-localized with MHC II of quail, chicken or mouse in 293FT cells co-transfected with both genes. Immunoprecipitation and western blotting further indicated that these aggregates corresponded to polymers of Ii and MHC class II molecules. This cross-species molecular association of quail Ii with chicken and mouse MHC II suggests that Ii molecules have a high structural and functional similarity and may thereby be used as potential immune carriers across species.

  15. Structural allele-specific patterns adopted by epitopes in the MHC-I cleft and reconstruction of MHC:peptide complexes to cross-reactivity assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinler A Antunes

    Full Text Available The immune system is engaged in a constant antigenic surveillance through the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. This is an efficient mechanism for detection of intracellular infections, especially viral ones. In this work we describe conformational patterns shared by epitopes presented by a given MHC allele and use these features to develop a docking approach that simulates the peptide loading into the MHC cleft. Our strategy, to construct in silico MHC:peptide complexes, was successfully tested by reproducing four different crystal structures of MHC-I molecules available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB. An in silico study of cross-reactivity potential was also performed between the wild-type complex HLA-A2-NS31073 and nine MHC:peptide complexes presenting alanine exchange peptides. This indicates that structural similarities among the complexes can give us important clues about cross reactivity. The approach used in this work allows the selection of epitopes with potential to induce cross-reactive immune responses, providing useful tools for studies in autoimmunity and to the development of more comprehensive vaccines.

  16. ER stress affects processing of MHC class I-associated peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meloche Sylvain

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral infection and neoplastic transformation trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Thus, a large proportion of the cells that must be recognized by the immune system are stressed cells. Cells respond to ER stress by launching the unfolded protein response (UPR. The UPR regulates the two key processes that control major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I-peptide presentation: protein synthesis and degradation. We therefore asked whether and how the UPR impinges on MHC I-peptide presentation. Results We evaluated the impact of the UPR on global MHC I expression and on presentation of the H2Kb-associated SIINFEKL peptide. EL4 cells stably transfected with vectors coding hen egg lysozyme (HEL-SIINFEKL protein variants were stressed with palmitate or exposed to glucose deprivation. UPR decreased surface expression of MHC I but did not affect MHC I mRNA level nor the total amount of intracellular MHC I proteins. Impaired MHC I-peptide presentation was due mainly to reduced supply of peptides owing to an inhibition of overall protein synthesis. Consequently, generation of H2Kb-SIINFEKL complexes was curtailed during ER stress, illustrating how generation of MHC I peptide ligands is tightly coupled to ongoing protein synthesis. Notably, the UPR-induced decline of MHC I-peptide presentation was more severe when the protein source of peptides was localized in the cytosol than in the ER. This difference was not due to changes in the translation rates of the precursor proteins but to increased stability of the cytosolic protein during ER stress. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that ER stress impairs MHC I-peptide presentation, and that it differentially regulates expression of ER- vs. cytosol-derived peptides. Furthermore, this work illustrates how ER stress, a typical feature of infected and malignant cells, can impinge on cues for adaptive immune recognition.

  17. H pylori receptor MHC class Ⅱ contributes to the dynamic gastric epithelial apoptotic response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David A Bland; Giovanni Suarez; Ellen J Beswick; Johanna C Sierra; Victor E Reyes

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of MHC class Ⅱ in the modulation of gastric epithelial cell apoptosis induced by H pylori infection.METHODS: After stimulating a human gastric epithelial cell line with bacteria or agonist antibodies specific for MHC class Ⅱ and CD95, the quantitation of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic events, including caspase activation,BCL-2 activation, and FADD recruitment, was performed with a fluorometric assay, a cytometric bead array, and confocal microscopy, respectively.RESULTS: Pretreatment of N87 cells with the anti-MHC class Ⅱ IgM antibody RFD1 resulted in a reduction in global caspase activation at 24 h of H pylori infection.When caspase 3 activation was specifically measured,crosslinking of MHC class Ⅱ resulted in a marked reduced caspase activation, while simple ligation of MHC class Ⅱ did not. Crosslinking of MHC class Ⅱ also resulted in an increased activation of the anti-apoptosis molecule BCL-2 compared to simple ligation. Confocal microscope analysis demonstrated that the pretreatment of gastric epithelial cells with a crosslinking anti-MHC class Ⅱ IgM blocked the recruitment of FADD to the cell surface.CONCLUSION: The results presented here demonstrate that the ability of MHC class Ⅱ to modulate gastric epithelial apoptosis is at least partially dependent on its crosslinking. Furthermore, while previous research has demonstrated that MHC class Ⅱ signaling can be proapoptotic during extended ligation, we have shown that the crosslinking of this molecule has anti-apoptotic effects during the earlier time points of H pylori infection.This effect is possibly mediated by the ability of MHC class Ⅱ to modulate the activation of the pro-apoptotic receptor Fas by blocking the recruitment of the accessory molecule FADD, and this delay in apoptosis induction could allow for prolonged cytokine secretion by H pyloriinfected gastric epithelial cells.

  18. A hybrid approach for predicting promiscuous MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Bhasin; G P S Raghava

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, a systematic attempt has been made to develop an accurate method for predicting MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes for a large number of MHC class I alleles. Initially, a quantitative matrix (QM)-based method was developed for 47 MHC class I alleles having at least 15 binders. A secondary artificial neural network (ANN)-based method was developed for 30 out of 47 MHC alleles having a minimum of 40 binders. Combination of these ANN- and QM-based prediction methods for 30 alleles improved the accuracy of prediction by 6% compared to each individual method. Average accuracy of hybrid method for 30 MHC alleles is 92.8%. This method also allows prediction of binders for 20 additional alleles using QM that has been reported in the literature, thus allowing prediction for 67 MHC class I alleles. The performance of the method was evaluated using jack-knife validation test. The performance of the methods was also evaluated on blind or independent data. Comparison of our method with existing MHC binder prediction methods for alleles studied by both methods shows that our method is superior to other existing methods. This method also identifies proteasomal cleavage sites in antigen sequences by implementing the matrices described earlier. Thus, the method that we discover allows the identification of MHC class I binders (peptides binding with many MHC alleles) having proteasomal cleavage site at C-terminus. The user-friendly result display format (HTML-II) can assist in locating the promiscuous MHC binding regions from antigen sequence. The method is available on the web at www.imtech.res.in/raghava/nhlapred and its mirror site is available at http://bioinformatics.uams.edu/mirror/nhlapred/.

  19. Astrocyte cytolysis by MHC class II-specific mouse T cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reder, A T; Lascola, C D; Flanders, S A; Maimone, D; Jensen, M A; Skias, D D; Lancki, D W

    1993-08-01

    The brain is "immunologically privileged," in part because class I and II MHC antigens are not normally present on glia or neurons. However, under certain conditions such as transplantation, glial cells express MHC proteins at levels sufficient for glia to become targets of immune responses. Cultured astrocytes expressing very low levels of MHC class I protein are killed efficiently by MHC class I antigen-specific CTL. Mouse brain allografts, however, are rejected by CD4+ T cells that are likely to be class II MHC-specific. The level of expression of MHC class II antigen needed to trigger specific killing of astrocytes by CD4+ T cells, independent of exogenous antigen, has not been studied. We examined the role of glial class II MHC in the lysis of cultured neonatal mouse astrocytes by an alloreactive murine CD4+ CTL alone. IFN-gamma induced functionally relevant increases in MHC class II antigen on target cells. Astrocytes were lysed by the CD4+ clone only when class II MHC antigens reached levels readily detectable by flow cytometry. MHC class II expression and lysis increased when astrocytes were coincubated with IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha. Conversely, lysis decreased when class II expression was downregulated by IFN-alpha/beta or dbcAMP. Cytolysis by CD4+ clones was blocked by antibodies to CD4 and LFA-1 on T cells, and to ICAM-1 and class II molecules on astrocytes. The role of LFA-1 in CD4+ cell-mediated lysis was greater than that of LFA-1/ICAM-1 in CD8+ T cell-mediated lysis. CD4+ cells may lyse activated astrocytes when the immune privilege of the brain is compromised as in transplantation, tumors, and inflammatory diseases.

  20. Selection at the MHC class IIB locus across guppy (Poecilia reticulata) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, B A; Ramnarine, I W; Neff, B D

    2010-02-01

    The highly diverse genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) are important in the adaptive immune system and are expected to be under selection from pathogens. Thus, the MHC genes provide an exceptional opportunity to investigate patterns of selection within and across populations. In this study, we analyzed genetic variation at the MHC class IIB gene and six microsatellite loci across 10 populations of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in the northern range of Trinidad. We found a high level of diversity at the MHC, with a total of 43 alleles in 142 individuals. At the population level, we found that neutral evolution could not fully account for the variability found at the MHC. Instead, we found that MHC F(ST) statistics were lower than F(ST) derived from the microsatellite loci; 33 of 45 population pairwise estimates for the MHC were significantly lower than those for the microsatellite loci, and MHC F(ST) estimates were consistently lower than those predicted by a coalescent model of neutral evolution. These results suggest a similar selection acting across populations, and we discuss the potential roles of directional and balancing selection. At the sequence level, we found evidence for both positive and purifying selection. Furthermore, positive selection was detected within and adjacent to the putative peptide-binding region (PBR) of the MHC. Surprisingly, we also found a purifying selection at two sites within the putative PBR. Overall, our data provide evidence for selection for functional diversity at the MHC class IIB gene at both the population and nucleotide levels of guppy populations.

  1. Molecular evidence of founder effects of fatal familial insomnia through SNP haplotypes around the D178N mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Ana B; Alfonso-Sánchez, Miguel A; Peña, José A; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Zerr, Inga; Capellari, Sabina; Calero, Miguel; Zarranz, Juan J; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2008-05-01

    This work presents a detailed investigation of the genomic region surrounding the PRNP gene in a sample of patients diagnosed with fatal familial insomnia (FFI) from several European countries, notably Spain. The main focus of the study was to explore the origins of the chromosomes carrying the D178N mutation by designing a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) haplotype around the PRNP gene. Haplotypes were constructed by genotyping six SNPs (rs2756271, rs13040327, rs6037932, rs13045348, rs6116474, and rs6116475) in 25 FFI patients from all over Spain. To augment the geographical scope of our study, 13 further FFI cases from Germany (9) and Italy (4) were also examined. Genotyping of SNPs in conjunction with the analysis of genealogical data for a group of FFI patients revealed the existence of two distinct haplotypes potentially associated with the D178N mutation. Of them, GCATTA-M proved to be the common haplotype of Spanish patients, whereas ACATTA-M was typical of the German cases. It is interesting to note that both haplotypes were identified in the Italian samples: GCATTA-M in a family from the Tuscany region and ACATTA-M in a family from the Veneto region. Our findings suggest the occurrence of two independent D178N-129M mutational events in Europe, preserved and transmitted from one generation to the next until nowadays. Likewise, results based on the analysis of SNP data indicate that previous hypotheses postulating that the D178N mutation had independent origins for each family and that its global distribution was determined by recurrent mutational events must be regarded with caution.

  2. IL6 and CRP haplotypes are associated with COPD risk and systemic inflammation: a case-control study

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    Passos Valéria

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated circulating levels of C-reactive protein (CRP, interleukin (IL-6 and fibrinogen (FG have been repeatedly associated with many adverse outcomes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. To date, it remains unclear whether and to what extent systemic inflammation is primary or secondary in the pathogenesis of COPD. The aim of this study was to examine the association between haplotypes of CRP, IL6 and FGB genes, systemic inflammation, COPD risk and COPD-related phenotypes (respiratory impairment, exercise capacity and body composition. Methods Eighteen SNPs in three genes, representing optimal haplotype-tagging sets, were genotyped in 355 COPD patients and 195 healthy smokers. Plasma levels of CRP, IL-6 and FG were measured in the total study group. Differences in haplotype distributions were tested using the global and haplotype-specific statistics. Results Raised plasma levels of CRP, IL-6 and fibrinogen were demonstrated in COPD patients. However, COPD population was very heterogeneous: about 40% of patients had no evidence of systemic inflammation (CRP CRP gene and CRP plasma levels (P = 0.0004 and IL6 gene and COPD (P = 0.003. Subsequent analysis has shown that IL6 haplotype H2, associated with an increased COPD risk (p = 0.004, OR = 4.82; 1.64 to 4.18, was also associated with very low CRP levels (p = 0.0005. None of the genes were associated with COPD-related phenotypes. Conclusion Our findings suggest that common genetic variation in CRP and IL6 genes may contribute to heterogeneity of COPD population associated with systemic inflammation.

  3. Linkage Disequilibrium Decay and Haplotype Block Structure in the Pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaral, A.J.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Heuven, H.C.M.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) may reveal much about domestication and breed history. Ail investigation was conducted, to analyze the extent of LD, haploblock partitioning, and haplotype diversity within haploblocks across several pig breeds from China and Europe and in European wild boar. In total, 37

  4. Rapid haplotype reconstruction in predigrees with dense marker maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Windig, J.J.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.

    2004-01-01

    Reconstruction of marker phases is not straightforward when parents are untyped. In these cases information from other relatives has to be used. In dense marker maps, however, the space of possible haplotype configurations tends to be too large for procedures such as Monte Carlo Markov chains (MCMC)

  5. Genetics of chloroquine-resistant malaria: a haplotypic view

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    Gauri Awasthi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The development and rapid spread of chloroquine resistance (CQR in Plasmodium falciparum have triggered the identification of several genetic target(s in the P. falciparum genome. In particular, mutations in the Pfcrt gene, specifically, K76T and mutations in three other amino acids in the region adjoining K76 (residues 72, 74, 75 and 76, are considered to be highly related to CQR. These various mutations form several different haplotypes and Pfcrt gene polymorphisms and the global distribution of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes in endemic and non-endemic regions of P. falciparum malaria have been the subject of extensive study. Despite the fact that the Pfcrt gene is considered to be the primary CQR gene in P. falciparum , several studies have suggested that this may not be the case. Furthermore, there is a poor correlation between the evolutionary implications of the Pfcrt haplotypes and the inferred migration of CQR P. falciparum based on CQR epidemiological surveillance data. The present paper aims to clarify the existing knowledge on the genetic basis of the different CQR- Pfcrt haplotypes that are prevalent in worldwide populations based on the published literature and to analyse the data to generate hypotheses on the genetics and evolution of CQR malaria.

  6. Accuracy of genomic selection using different methods to define haplotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calus, M.P.L.; Meuwissen, T.H.E.; Roos, de S.; Veerkamp, R.F.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic selection uses total breeding values for juvenile animals, predicted from a large number of estimated marker haplotype effects across the whole genome. In this study the accuracy of predicting breeding values is compared for four different models including a large number of markers, at diffe

  7. Geographical distribution of a specific mitochondrial haplotype of Zymoseptoria tritici

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    Sameh BOUKEF

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Severity of disease caused by the fungus Zymoseptoria tritici throughout world cereal growing regions has elicited much debate on the potential evolutionary mechanism conferring high adaptability of the pathogen to diverse climate conditions and different wheat hosts (Triticum durum and T. aestivum. Specific mitochondrial DNA sequence was used to investigate geographic distribution of the type 4 haplotype (mtRFLP4 within 1363 isolates of Z. tritici originating from 21 countries. The mtRFLP4 haplotype was detected from both durum and bread wheat hosts with greater frequency on durum wheat. The distribution of mtRFLP4 was limited to populations sampled from the Mediterranean and the Red Sea region. Greater frequencies of mtRFLP4 were found in Tunisia (87% and Algeria (60%. The haplotype was absent within European, Australian, North and South American populations except Argentina. While alternative hypotheses such as climatic adaptation could not be ruled out, it is postulated that mtRFLP4 originated in North Africa (e.g. Tunisia or Algeria as an adaptation to durum wheat as the prevailing cereal crop. The specialized haplotype has subsequently spread as indicated by lower frequency of occurrence in the surrounding Mediterranean countries and on bread wheat hosts.

  8. Bayesian genomic selection: the effect of haplotype lenghts and priors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villumsen, Trine Michelle; Janss, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Breeding values for animals with marker data are estimated using a genomic selection approach where data is analyzed using Bayesian multi-marker association models. Fourteen model scenarios with varying haplotype lengths, hyper parameter and prior distributions were compared to find the scenario ...

  9. Quantitative trait loci and the relevance of phased haplotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Vivi Raundahl

    underlying gentic control both as traditional linkage studies relying on genetic maps and as GWAS where an approach of phasing haplotypes within the QTL have been conducted to validate the regions. Overall, regions of interest have been identified for chronic pleuritis and osteochondrosis in addition to meat...

  10. Haplotype Analysis of Norwegian and Swedish Patients with Acute Intermittent Porphyria (AIP: Extreme Haplotype Heterogeneity for the Mutation R116W

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    Kjersti Tjensvoll

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute intermittent porphyria (AIP, the most common of the acute porphyrias, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS also called porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD. The mutation spectrum in the HMBS gene is characterized by a majority of family specific mutations. Among the exceptions are R116W and W198X, with high prevalence in both the Dutch and Swedish populations. These two mutations were also detected in unrelated Norwegian patients. Thus, Norwegian and Swedish patients were haplotyped using closely linked flanking microsatellites and intragenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to see if the high frequency of these two mutations is due to a founder effect. Twelve intragenic SNPs were determined by a method based on fluorescent restriction enzyme fingerprinting single-strand conformation polymorphism (F-REF-SSCP.

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies SNPs in the MHC class II loci that are associated with self-reported history of whooping cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, George; Ring, Susan M; Davey-Smith, George; Timpson, Nicholas J

    2015-10-15

    Whooping cough is currently seeing resurgence in countries despite high vaccine coverage. There is considerable variation in subject-specific response to infection and vaccine efficacy, but little is known about the role of human genetics. We carried out a case-control genome-wide association study of adult or parent-reported history of whooping cough in two cohorts from the UK: the ALSPAC cohort and the 1958 British Birth Cohort (815/758 cases and 6341/4308 controls, respectively). We also imputed HLA alleles using dense SNP data in the MHC region and carried out gene-based and gene-set tests of association and estimated the amount of additive genetic variation explained by common SNPs. We observed a novel association at SNPs in the MHC class II region in both cohorts [lead SNP rs9271768 after meta-analysis, odds ratio [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] 1.47 (1.35, 1.6), P-value 1.21E - 18]. Multiple strong associations were also observed at alleles at the HLA class II loci. The majority of these associations were explained by the lead SNP rs9271768. Gene-based and gene-set tests and estimates of explainable common genetic variation could not establish the presence of additional associations in our sample. Genetic variation at the MHC class II region plays a role in susceptibility to whooping cough. These findings provide additional perspective on mechanisms of whooping cough infection and vaccine efficacy.

  12. Haplotype analysis of BRCA1 intragenic markers in Iranian patients with familial breast and ovarian cancer

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    Seyed Mohsen Miresmaeili

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Breast Cancer Type 1 Susceptibility gene (BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor gene, involved in DNA damage repair and in 81% of the breast-ovarian cancer families were due to BRCA1. In some clinically investigated genes, the intragenic marker polymorphism is important and the screening of such mutations is faster by using short tandem repeat (STR polymorphism. Individual polymorphism of STR is a good evidence for following inheritance of repeat polymorphism. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate three intragenic BRCA1 marker polymorphisms in families, which have two or more patients with breast/ovarian cancer in comparison to healthy women. Materials and Methods: A total of 107 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients and 93 unrelated healthy women with no clinical phenotype of any malignancy or familial cancer history constitute the study groups. Haplotyping analysis, at 3 intragenic BRCA1 microsatellite markers (D17S855, D17S1322 and D17S1323, were performed for all subject and control groups using labeled primers. Results: After fragment analysis, significance differences were observed as follows: two alleles of D17S855; allele 146 (p=0.02 and 150 (p=0.006, and two alleles of D17S1322, allele 121 (p=0.015 and 142 (p=0.043. These differences were compared with control group. There was significance difference in 8 di/tri allelic haplotypes in present experimental subjects. Some haplotypes were observed to have approximately twice the relation risk for breast cancer. Conclusion: According to recent results, assessment of presence or absence of mentioned alleles in BRCA1 microsatellite can be used for prognosis in individuals, suspected of having or not having the breast cancer.

  13. MHC class II molecules regulate growth in human T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, M; Odum, Niels; Bendtzen, K;

    1994-01-01

    lines tested. Only one of three CD4+, CD45RAhigh, ROhigh T cells responded to class II costimulation. There was no correlation between T cell responsiveness to class II and the cytokine production profile of the T cell in question. Thus, T cell lines producing interferon (IFN)-gamma but not IL-4 (TH1......MHC-class-II-positive T cells are found in tissues involved in autoimmune disorders. Stimulation of class II molecules by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) or bacterial superantigens induces protein tyrosine phosphorylation through activation of protein tyrosine kinases in T cells, and class II signals...... modulate several T cell responses. Here, we studied further the role of class II molecules in the regulation of T cell growth. Costimulation of class II molecules by immobilized HLA-DR mAb significantly enhanced interleukin (IL)-2-supported T cell growth of the majority of CD4+, CD45RAlow, ROhigh T cell...

  14. A third broad lineage of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I in teleost fish; MHC class II linkage and processed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus; Katagiri, Takayuki; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Yanagiya, Kazuyo; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Ototake, Mitsuru; Aoki, Takashi; Hashimoto, Keiichiro; Shiina, Takashi

    2007-04-01

    Most of the previously studied teleost MHC class I molecules can be classified into two broad lineages: "U" and "Z/ZE." However, database reports on genes in cyprinid and salmonid fishes show that there is a third major lineage, which lacks detailed analysis so far. We designated this lineage "L" because of an intriguing linkage characteristic. Namely, one zebrafish L locus is closely linked with MHC class II loci, despite the extensively documented nonlinkage of teleost class I with class II. The L lineage consists of highly variable, nonclassical MHC class I genes, and has no apparent orthologues outside teleost fishes. Characteristics that distinguish the L lineage from most other MHC class I are (1) absence of two otherwise highly conserved tryptophan residues W51 and W60 in the alpha1 domain, (2) a low GC content of the alpha1 and alpha2 exons, and (3) an HINLTL motif including a possible glycosylation site in the alpha3 domain. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) we analyzed several intact L genes in detail, including their genomic organization and transcription pattern. The gene Onmy-LAA is quite different from the genes Onmy-LBA, Onmy-LCA, Onmy-LDA, and Onmy-LEA, while the latter four are similar and categorized as "Onmy-LBA-like." Whereas the Onmy-LAA gene is organized like a canonical MHC class I gene, the Onmy-LBA-like genes are processed and lack all introns except intron 1. Onmy-LAA is predominantly expressed in the intestine, while the Onmy-LBA-like transcripts display a rather homogeneous tissue distribution. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an MHC class I lineage with multiple copies of processed genes, which are intact and transcribed. The present study significantly improves the knowledge of MHC class I variation in teleosts.

  15. Detection of NAM-A1 Natural Variants in Bread Wheat Reveals Differences in Haplotype Distribution between a Worldwide Core Collection and European Elite Germplasm

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    Fabien Cormier

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In wheat, remobilization of nitrogen absorbed before anthesis and regulation of monocarpic senescence is a major issue in breeding for nutrient use efficiency. We identified natural variants of NAM-A1, a gene having the same role as its well-characterized homoeolog NAM-B1, a NAC transcription factor associated with senescence kinetics and nutrient remobilization to the grain. Differences in haplotype frequencies between a worldwide core collection and a panel of European elite varieties were assessed and discussed. Moreover, hypotheses for the loss of function of the most common haplotype in elite European germplasm are discussed.

  16. Recipients with In Utero Induction of Tolerance Upregulated MHC Class I in the Engrafted Donor Skin

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    Jeng-Chang Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The alterations in MHC class I expression play a crucial step in immune evasion of cancer or virus-infected cells. This study aimed to examine whether tolerized grafts modified MHC class I expression. FVB/N mice were rendered tolerant of C57BL/6 alloantigens by in utero transplantation of C57BL/6 marrows. Postnatally, engrafted donor skins and leukocytes were examined for their MHC expression by quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Engrafted donor skins upregulated their MHC class I related gene transcripts after short-term (1~2 weeks or long-term (>1 month engraftment. This biological phenomenon was simultaneously associated with upregulation of TAP1 gene transcripts, suggesting an important role of TAP1 in the regulation of MHC class I pathway. The surface MHC class I molecules of H-2Kb in engrafted donor leukocytes consistently showed overexpression. Conclusively, the induction of allograft tolerance involved biological modifications of donor transplants. The overexpression of MHC class I within engrafted transplants of tolerant mice might be used as the tolerance biomarkers for identifying a state of graft tolerance.

  17. Peptide and Peptide-Dependent Motions in MHC Proteins: Immunological Implications and Biophysical Underpinnings

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    Cory M. Ayres

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Structural biology of peptides presented by class I and class II MHC proteins has transformed immunology, impacting our understanding of fundamental immune mechanisms and allowing researchers to rationalize immunogenicity and design novel vaccines. However, proteins are not static structures as often inferred from crystallographic structures. Their components move and breathe individually and collectively over a range of timescales. Peptides bound within MHC peptide-binding grooves are no exception and their motions have been shown to impact recognition by T cell and other receptors in ways that influence function. Furthermore, peptides tune the motions of MHC proteins themselves, which impacts recognition of peptide/MHC complexes by other proteins. Here, we review the motional properties of peptides in MHC binding grooves and discuss how peptide properties can influence MHC motions. We briefly review theoretical concepts about protein motion and highlight key data that illustrate immunological consequences. We focus primarily on class I systems due to greater availability of data, but segue into class II systems as the concepts and consequences overlap. We suggest that characterization of the dynamic “energy landscapes” of peptide/MHC complexes and the resulting functional consequences is one of the next frontiers in structural immunology.

  18. Disentangling the roles of natural selection and genetic drift in shaping variation at MHC immunity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Jolene T; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Robertson, Bruce C; Jamieson, Ian G

    2011-11-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) forms an integral component of the vertebrate immune response and, due to strong selection pressures, is one of the most polymorphic regions of the entire genome. Despite over 15 years of research, empirical studies offer highly contradictory explanations of the relative roles of different evolutionary forces, selection and genetic drift, acting on MHC genes during population bottlenecks. Here, we take a meta-analytical approach to quantify the results of studies into the effects of bottlenecks on MHC polymorphism. We show that the consequences of selection acting on MHC loci prior to a bottleneck event, combined with drift during the bottleneck, will result in overall loss of MHC polymorphism that is ∼15% greater than loss of neutral genetic diversity. These results are counter to general expectations that selection should maintain MHC polymorphism, but do agree with the results of recent simulation models and at least two empirical studies. Notably, our results suggest that negative frequency-dependent selection could be more important than overdominance for maintaining high MHC polymorphism in pre-bottlenecked populations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Compatibility counts: MHC-associated mate choice in a wild promiscuous primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwensow, Nina; Eberle, Manfred; Sommer, Simone

    2008-03-07

    The mechanisms and temporal aspects of mate choice according to genetic constitution are still puzzling. Recent studies indicate that fitness is positively related to diversity in immune genes (MHC). Both sexes should therefore choose mates of high genetic quality and/or compatibility. However, studies addressing the role of MHC diversity in pre- and post-copulatory mate choice decisions in wild-living animals are few. We investigated the impact of MHC constitution and of neutral microsatellite variability on pre- and post-copulatory mate choice in both sexes in a wild population of a promiscuous primate, the grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus). There was no support for pre-copulatory male or female mate choice, but our data indicate post-copulatory mate choice that is associated with genetic constitution. Fathers had a higher number of MHC supertypes different from those of the mother than randomly assigned males. Fathers also had a higher amino acid distance to the females' MHC as well as a higher total number of MHC supertypes and a higher degree of microsatellite heterozygosity than randomly assigned males. Female cryptic choice may be the underlying mechanism that operates towards an optimization of the genetic constitution of offspring. This is the first study that provides support for the importance of the MHC constitution in post-copulatory mate choice in non-human primates.

  20. Choosy Wolves? Heterozygote Advantage But No Evidence of MHC-Based Disassortative Mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaverni, Marco; Caniglia, Romolo; Milanesi, Pietro; Lapalombella, Silvana; Fabbri, Elena; Randi, Ettore

    2016-03-01

    A variety of nonrandom mate choice strategies, including disassortative mating, are used by vertebrate species to avoid inbreeding, maintain heterozygosity and increase fitness. Disassortative mating may be mediated by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), an important gene cluster controlling immune responses to pathogens. We investigated the patterns of mate choice in 26 wild-living breeding pairs of gray wolf (Canis lupus) that were identified through noninvasive genetic methods and genotyped at 3 MHC class II and 12 autosomal microsatellite (STR) loci. We tested for deviations from random mating and evaluated the covariance of genetic variables at functional and STR markers with fitness proxies deduced from pedigree reconstructions. Results did not show evidences of MHC-based disassortative mating. Rather we found a higher peptide similarity between mates at MHC loci as compared with random expectations. Fitness values were positively correlated with heterozygosity of the breeders at both MHC and STR loci, whereas they decreased with relatedness at STRs. These findings may indicate fitness advantages for breeders that, while avoiding highly related mates, are more similar at the MHC and have high levels of heterozygosity overall. Such a pattern of MHC-assortative mating may reflect local coadaptation of the breeders, while a reduction in genetic diversity may be balanced by heterozygote advantages. © The American Genetic Association 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Orf virus interferes with MHC class I surface expression by targeting vesicular transport and Golgi

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    Rohde Jörg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV, a zoonotic Parapoxvirus, causes pustular skin lesions in small ruminants (goat and sheep. Intriguingly, ORFV can repeatedly infect its host, despite the induction of a specific immunity. These immune modulating and immune evading properties are still unexplained. Results Here, we describe that ORFV infection of permissive cells impairs the intracellular transport of MHC class I molecules (MHC I as a result of structural disruption and fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus. Depending on the duration of infection, we observed a pronounced co-localization of MHC I and COP-I vesicular structures as well as a reduction of MHC I surface expression of up to 50%. These subversion processes are associated with early ORFV gene expression and are accompanied by disturbed carbohydrate trimming of post-ER MHC I. The MHC I population remaining on the cell surface shows an extended half-life, an effect that might be partially controlled also by late ORFV genes. Conclusions The presented data demonstrate that ORFV down-regulates MHC I surface expression in infected cells by targeting the late vesicular export machinery and the structure and function of the Golgi apparatus, which might aid to escape cellular immune recognition.

  2. Peptide-independent stabilization of MHC class I molecules breaches cellular quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Zeynep; Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Abualrous, Esam Tolba; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Janßen, Linda; Van Hateren, Andy; Wiek, Constanze; Hanenberg, Helmut; Momburg, Frank; Achour, Adnane; Elliott, Tim; Springer, Sebastian; Boulanger, Denise

    2014-07-01

    The intracellular trafficking of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins is directed by three quality control mechanisms that test for their structural integrity, which is correlated to the binding of high-affinity antigenic peptide ligands. To investigate which molecular features of MHC-I these quality control mechanisms detect, we have followed the hypothesis that suboptimally loaded MHC-I molecules are characterized by their conformational mobility in the F-pocket region of the peptide-binding site. We have created a novel variant of an MHC-I protein, K(b)-Y84C, in which two α-helices in this region are linked by a disulfide bond that mimics the conformational and dynamic effects of bound high-affinity peptide. K(b)-Y84C shows a remarkable increase in the binding affinity to its light chain, beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), and bypasses all three cellular quality control steps. Our data demonstrate (1) that coupling between peptide and β2m binding to the MHC-I heavy chain is mediated by conformational dynamics; (2) that the folded conformation of MHC-I, supported by β2m, plays a decisive role in passing the ER-to-cell-surface transport quality controls; and (3) that β2m association is also tested by the cell surface quality control that leads to MHC-I endocytosis.

  3. MHC class II expression in human basophils: induction and lack of functional significance.

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    Astrid L Voskamp

    Full Text Available The antigen-presenting abilities of basophils and their role in initiating a Th2 phenotype is a topic of current controversy. We aimed to determine whether human basophils can be induced to express MHC Class II and act as antigen presenting cells for T cell stimulation. Isolated human basophils were exposed to a panel of cytokines and TLR-ligands and assessed for MHC Class II expression. MHC Class II was expressed in up to 17% of isolated basophils following incubation with a combination of IL-3, IFN-γ and GM-CSF for 72 hours. Costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86 were expressed at very low levels after stimulation. Gene expression analysis of MHC Class II-positive basophils confirmed up-regulation of HLA-DR, HLA-DM, CD74 and Cathepsin S. However, MHC Class II expressing basophils were incapable of inducing antigen-specific T cell activation or proliferation. This is the first report of significant cytokine-induced MHC Class II up-regulation, at both RNA and protein level, in isolated human basophils. By testing stimulation with relevant T cell epitope peptide as well as whole antigen, the failure of MHC Class II expressing basophils to induce T cell response was shown not to be solely due to inefficient antigen uptake and/or processing.

  4. Transcriptional profiling of MHC class I genes in rainbow trout infected with infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Eric D.; Purcell, Maureen K.; Thorgaard, Gary H.; Wheeler , Paul A.; Hansen, John D.

    2008-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules are important mediators of cell-mediated immunity in vertebrates. MHC class IA molecules are important for host anti-viral immunity as they present intracellular antigens and regulate natural killer cell (NK) activity. MHC class Ib molecules on the other hand are less understood and have demonstrated diverse immune and non-immune functions in mammals. Rainbow trout possess a single classical MHC IA locus (Onmy-UBA) that is believed to function similar to that of mammalian MHC class Ia. Numerous MHC class Ib genes with undetermined functions have also been described in trout. Here we utilize quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) techniques to survey the levels of basal and inducible transcription for selected trout MHC class Ib genes, sIgM and sentinels of IFN induction in response to viral infection. Basal transcription of all the class Ib genes examined in this study was lower than Onmy-UBA in naïve fish. UBA, along with all of the non-classical genes were induced in fish infected with virus but not in control fish. Our results support a non-classical designation for the majority of the class IB genes surveyed in this study based upon expression levels while also indicating that they may play an important role in anti-viral immunity in trout.

  5. Virus encoded MHC-like decoys diversify the inhibitory KIR repertoire.

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    Paola Carrillo-Bustamante

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are circulating lymphocytes that play an important role in the control of viral infections and tumors. Their functions are regulated by several activating and inhibitory receptors. A subset of these receptors in human NK cells are the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs, which interact with the highly polymorphic MHC class I molecules. One important function of NK cells is to detect cells that have down-regulated MHC expression (missing-self. Because MHC molecules have non polymorphic regions, their expression could have been monitored with a limited set of monomorphic receptors. Surprisingly, the KIR family has a remarkable genetic diversity, the function of which remains poorly understood. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV is able to evade NK cell responses by coding "decoy" molecules that mimic MHC class I. This interaction was suggested to have driven the evolution of novel NK cell receptors. Inspired by the MCMV system, we develop an agent-based model of a host population infected with viruses that are able to evolve MHC down-regulation and decoy molecules. Our simulations show that specific recognition of MHC class I molecules by inhibitory KIRs provides excellent protection against viruses evolving decoys, and that the diversity of inhibitory KIRs will subsequently evolve as a result of the required discrimination between host MHC molecules and decoy molecules.

  6. Improved IBD detection using incomplete haplotype