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Sample records for common interventional cardiology

  1. Almanac 2012: Interventional cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Pascal Meier; Adam Timmis

    2013-01-01

    The field of interventional cardiology continues to progress quickly. The efficacy of percutaneous interventions with newer generation drug-eluting stents has advanced a lot over the last decade. This improvement in stent performance has broadened the level of indication towards more complex interventions such as left main and multi-vessel PCI. Major improvements continue in the field of medical co-therapy such as antiplatelet therapies (bivalirudin, prasugrel, and ticagrelor) and this will f...

  2. Patient radiation doses in the most common interventional cardiology procedures in Croatia: first results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnić, Z; Krpan, T; Faj, D; Kubelka, D; Ramac, J Popić; Posedel, D; Steiner, R; Vidjak, V; Brnić, V; Visković, K; Baraban, V

    2010-02-01

    Apart from its benefits, the interventional cardiology (IC) is known to generate high radiation doses to patients and medical staff involved. The European Union Medical Exposures Directive 97/43/Euroatom strongly recommend patient dosimetry in interventional radiology, including IC. IC patient radiation doses in four representative IC rooms in Croatia were investigated. Setting reference levels for these procedures have difficulties due to the large difference in procedure complexity. Nevertheless, it is important that some guideline values are available as a benchmark to guide the operators during these potentially high-dose procedures. Local and national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) were proposed as a guidance. A total of 138 diagnostic (coronary angiography, CA) and 151 therapeutic (PTCA, stenting) procedures were included. Patient irradiation was measured in terms of kerma-area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time (FT) and number of cine-frames (F). KAP was recorded using calibrated KAP-meters. DRLs of KAP, FT and F were calculated as third quartile values rounded up to the integer. Skin doses were assessed on a selected sample of high skin dose procedures, using radiochromic films, and peak skin doses (PSD) were presented. A relative large range of doses in IC was detected. National DRLs were proposed as follows: 32 Gy cm(2), 6.6 min and 610 frames for CA and 72 Gy cm(2), 19 min and 1270 frames for PTCA. PSD 2 Gy in 8 % of selected patients. Measuring the patient doses in radiological procedures is required by law, but rarely implemented in Croatia. The doses recorded in the study are acceptable when compared with the literature, but optimisation is possible. The preliminary DRL values proposed may be used as a guideline for local departments, and should be a basis for radiation reduction measures and quality assurance programmes in IC in Croatia.

  3. [Quality assurance in interventional cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gülker, H

    2009-10-01

    Quality assurance in clinical studies aiming at approval of pharmaceutical products is submitted to strict rules, controls and auditing regulations. Comparative instruments to ensure quality in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures are not available in interventional cardiology, likewise in other fields of cardiovascular medicine. Quality assurance simply consists of "quality registers" with basic data not externally controlled. Based on the experiences of clinical studies and their long history of standardization it is assumed that these data may be severely flawed thus being inappropriate to set standards for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The precondition for quality assurance are quality data. In invasive coronary angiography and intervention medical indications, the decision making process interventional versus surgical revascularization, technical performance and after - care are essential aspects affecting quality of diagnostics and therapy. Quality data are externally controlled data. To collect quality data an appropriate infrastructure is a necessary precondition which is not existent. For an appropriate infrastructure investments have to be done both to build up as well as to sustain the necessary preconditions. As long as there are no infrastructure and no investments there will be no "quality data". There exist simply registers of data which are not proved to be a basis for significant assurance and enhancement in quality in interventional coronary cardiology. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.

  4. Evolution of interventional cardiology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wei-feng

    2009-01-01

    @@ On the occasion of the 60th anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China, I am honored to review the interventional treatment of cardiovascular diseases in China. It is really interesting to evaluate the progress in such a field that did not exist 25 years ago in this country in the present context with the term "interventional cardiology".

  5. Women in interventional cardiology: The French experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vautrin, E; Marlière, S; Bellemain-Appaix, A; Gilard, M; Manzo-Silberman, S

    2016-12-01

    Exploring the discrepancy in sex-ratio among interventional cardiologists by analysing the population of the female interventionalist. Despite an increase number of women who graduate from medical school in France during the last generation today, women represent only 24% of all cardiologists and 3% are interventional cardiologists. To face this international gender-based issue of interventional cardiology, committees were established in US (WIN) and recently within the EAPCI: the Women EAPCI chaired by Drs Mehilli and Mauri. In France, the Intervention'Elles committee emerged in order to participate in this concern. As a first initiative, the Intervention'Elles group launched an e-survey to obtain information on the population of French female interventional cardiologists, focused on demography, work patterns, maternity and radiation exposure. Mean age is 40 years old (±7,4), 68% are working in large volume center, 28% have also structural interventional activity. Only 40% have left arm coverage. Despite 80% of French female interventional cardiologists wear personal dosimeters only 45% of them have a dosimetry feedback. Interestingly, even if 54% of women have children (mean: 1.9±1) 28% of them report that childbearing had interfered with their career plan. This questionnaire identifies for the first time the women population in interventional cardiology in France and highlights some of the issues encountered in more detail. This first descriptive step would help to develop strategies for attaining gender equality in interventional cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Occupational hazards of interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smilowitz, Nathaniel R.; Balter, Stephen; Weisz, Giora, E-mail: gw2128@columbia.edu

    2013-07-15

    Complex catheter-based interventions and rising case volumes confer occupational risks to interventional cardiologists. Despite advances in technology, modern interventional procedures are performed in a manner remarkably similar to the techniques pioneered decades ago. Percutaneous interventions are associated with operator orthopedic injuries, exposures to blood borne pathogens, and the effects of chronic radiation exposure from fluoroscopy. This review highlights the occupational hazards of interventional procedures and provides a glimpse at the technologies and techniques that may reduce risks to operators in the catheterization laboratory.

  7. [Emergent strategies in interventional cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Rodriguez-Granillo (Gaston); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J. Aoki (Jiro)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractDespite the advances in the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease, sudden cardiac death is still unacceptably prevalent. Patients with ischemic heart disease usually require a combination of therapies (drugs and coronary intervention) and may continue to experience symptoms.

  8. [Emergent strategies in interventional cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Rodriguez-Granillo (Gaston); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); J. Aoki (Jiro)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractDespite the advances in the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease, sudden cardiac death is still unacceptably prevalent. Patients with ischemic heart disease usually require a combination of therapies (drugs and coronary intervention) and may continue to experience symptoms.

  9. Radiation monitoring in interventional cardiology: a requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, T.; Uruchurtu, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    The increasing of procedures using fluoroscopy in interventional cardiology procedures may increase medical and patients to levels of radiation that manifest in unintended outcomes. Such outcomes may include skin injury and cancer. The cardiologists and other staff members in interventional cardiology are usually working close to the area under examination and they receive the dose primarily from scattered radiation from the patient. Mexico does not have a formal policy for monitoring and recording the radiation dose delivered in hemodynamic establishments. Deterministic risk management can be improved by monitoring the radiation delivered from X-ray devices. The objective of this paper is to provide cardiologist, techniques, nurses, and all medical staff an information on DR levels, about X-ray risks and a simple a reliable method to control cumulative dose.

  10. The Year in Cardiology 2013: coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Wijns, William

    2014-02-01

    The year 2013 was rich of new developments in cardiology, and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in particular. This overview article will focus on contributions in the following areas: training for PCI, appropriateness and indications; access site selection, risk scores, peri-procedural myocardial infarction; trial results and long-term follow-up; PCI for specific patient and lesion subsets, including acute coronary syndrome and ST-segment myocardial infarction; prevention of ischemic and reperfusion injury; stent thrombosis and new coronary stents and scaffolds.

  11. Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Fahey, Tom; Schroeder, Knut

    2004-01-01

    This article describes recent developments in cardiology and cardiovascular disease that are likely to be relevant to primary healthcare professionals and their patients. The following subject areas are covered: Primary prevention: recent developments in pharmacological interventions, drug interactions, and drugs that are likely to cause harm; cardiovascular risk estimation and shared decision making with patients; and new developments in 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.Second...

  12. Occupational eye dose in interventional cardiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Koichi; Kaga, Yuji; Sota, Masahiro; Meguro, Taiichiro; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2017-04-03

    It is important to measure the radiation dose [3-mm dose equivalent, Hp(3)] in the eye. This study was to determine the current occupational radiation eye dose of staff conducting interventional cardiology procedures, using a novel direct eye dosimeter. We measured the occupational eye dose [Hp(3)] in physicians and nurses in a catheterization laboratory for 6-months. The eye doses [Hp(3)] of 12 physicians (9 with Pb glasses, 3 without), and 11 nurses were recorded using a novel direct eye dosimeter, the DOSIRIS(TM). We placed dosimeters above and under the glasses. We also estimated the eye dose [0.07-mm dose equivalent] using a neck personal dosimeter. The eye doses among interventional staff ranked in the following order: physicians without Pb glasses > physicians with Pb glasses > nurses. The shielding effect of the glasses (0.07-mm Pb) in a clinical setting was approximately 60%. In physicians who do not wear Pb glasses, the eye dose may exceed the new regulatory limit for IR staff. We found good correlations between the neck dosimeter dose and eye dosimeter dose (inside or outside glasses, R(2) = 0.93 and R(2) = 0.86, respectively) in physicians. We recommend that interventional physicians use an eye dosimeter for correct evaluation of the lens dose.

  13. Contrast-induced nephropathy in interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarsky D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Doron Sudarsky, Eugenia NikolskyCardiology Department, Rambam Health Care Campus and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, IsraelAbstract: Development of contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN, ie, a rise in serum creatinine by either ≥0.5 mg/dL or by ≥25% from baseline within the first 2–3 days after contrast administration, is strongly associated with both increased inhospital and late morbidity and mortality after invasive cardiac procedures. The prevention of CIN is critical if long-term outcomes are to be optimized after percutaneous coronary intervention. The prevalence of CIN in patients receiving contrast varies markedly (from <1% to 50%, depending on the presence of well characterized risk factors, the most important of which are baseline chronic renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Other risk factors include advanced age, anemia, left ventricular dysfunction, dehydration, hypotension, renal transplant, low serum albumin, concomitant use of nephrotoxins, and the volume of contrast agent. The pathophysiology of CIN is likely to be multifactorial, including direct cytotoxicity, apoptosis, disturbances in intrarenal hemodynamics, and immune mechanisms. Few strategies have been shown to be effective to prevent CIN beyond hydration, the goal of which is to establish brisk diuresis prior to contrast administration, and to avoid hypotension. New strategies of controlled hydration and diuresis are promising. Studies are mixed on whether prophylactic oral N-acetylcysteine reduces the incidence of CIN, although its use is generally recommended, given its low cost and favorable side effect profile. Agents which have been shown to be ineffective or harmful, or for which data supporting routine use do not exist, include fenoldopam, theophylline, dopamine, calcium channel blockers, prostaglandin E1, atrial natriuretic peptide, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors.Keywords: contrast-induced nephropathy, contrast media

  14. Radiation-induced noncancer risks in interventional cardiology: optimisation of procedures and staff and patient dose reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhonghua; AbAziz, Aini; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted.

  15. Radiation-Induced Noncancer Risks in Interventional Cardiology: Optimisation of Procedures and Staff and Patient Dose Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairuddin Md Yusof, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Concerns about ionizing radiation during interventional cardiology have been increased in recent years as a result of rapid growth in interventional procedure volumes and the high radiation doses associated with some procedures. Noncancer radiation risks to cardiologists and medical staff in terms of radiation-induced cataracts and skin injuries for patients appear clear potential consequences of interventional cardiology procedures, while radiation-induced potential risk of developing cardiovascular effects remains less clear. This paper provides an overview of the evidence-based reviews of concerns about noncancer risks of radiation exposure in interventional cardiology. Strategies commonly undertaken to reduce radiation doses to both medical staff and patients during interventional cardiology procedures are discussed; optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures is highlighted. PMID:24027768

  16. Interventional cardiology in Europe 1993. Working Group on Coronary Circulation of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, B J; Meier, B; Bonzel, T; Fabian, J; Heyndrickx, G; Morice, M C; Mühlberger, V; Piscione, F; Rothman, M; Wijns, W; van den Brand, M

    1996-09-01

    An annual survey on cardiac interventions in Europe is performed by the working group on Coronary Circulation of the European Society of Cardiology with the help of the national societies of cardiology. A questionnaire about cardiac interventions in 1993 was mailed to a representative of the national societies of 35 members of the European Society of Cardiology. The data collection of coronary interventions was delayed by slow backreporting and from 10 of the 35 national members data were missing or grossly incomplete. They were excluded from the analysis. A total of 756,822 coronary angiograms were reported resulting in an incidence of 1146 +/- 1024 per 10(6) inhabitants, ranging from 24 (Romania) to 3499 (Germany). This represents an increase of 12% compared to 1992. Germany (279,882 cases), France (157,237), the United Kingdom (77,000), Italy (44,934) and Spain (37,591) registered 79% of all the coronary angiograms performed. A total of 183,728 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty cases were reported in 1993, 24% more than in 1992. On average, they accounted for 18 +/- 7% (range 8 (Romania) to 35% (Sweden) of the coronary angiograms. Most of these percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (82%) were confined to a single vessel. In 13% only, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty took place immediately after the diagnostic study. Adjusted per capita. Germany ranks first with 873 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties per 10(6) inhabitants, followed by France (737), Holland (725), Belgium (713), and Switzerland (665). The European mean of percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties per 10(6) inhabitants was 270 +/- 279, representing an increase of 14% compared with 1992. A major in-hospital complication was reported in 3.8% of the patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: 0.6% hospital deaths, 1.5% emergency coronary artery bypass grafting, and 1.7% myocardial infarctions. In 1993 stents were

  17. The value of independent specialty designation for interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, James C; Powell, Wayne A; Gray, Dawn R; Duffy, Peter L

    2017-01-01

    Interventional cardiology has finally completed, after 26 years of advocacy, a professional hat trick: independent board certification, membership as a unique specialty in the American Medical Association House of Delegates (AMA HOD), and recognition by the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services (CMS) as a separate medical specialty. This article points out how these distinctions for interventional cardiology and its professional society, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), have led to clear and definite benefits for interventional cardiologists and their patients. We focus on the least understood of these three-recognition by CMS and its implications for reimbursement and quality assessment for interventional cardiologists. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Preliminary reference levels in interventional cardiology

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    Neofotistou, V. [Department of Medical Physics, Regional Athens General Hospital, 154 Mesogion Avenue, 11527, Athens (Greece); Vano, E. [Department of Medical Physics, Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Padovani, R. [Servizio di Fisica Medica, Ospedale S. Maria della Misericordia, Udine (Italy); Kotre, J.; Willis, S. [Department of Regional Medical Physics, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle (United Kingdom); Dowling, A. [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, St. James' s Hospital and Haughton Institute, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Toivonen, M. [STUK, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinski (Finland); Kottou, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Athens University, Athens (Greece); Tsapaki, V. [Department of Bioengineering, Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center, Athens (Greece); Bernardi, G. [Unita Operativa de Cardiologia, Ospedale S. Maria d. Misericordia, Udine (Italy); Faulkner, K. [Quality Assurance Reference Center, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle (United Kingdom)

    2003-10-01

    This article describes the European DIMOND approach to defining reference levels (RLs) for radiation doses delivered to patients during two types of invasive cardiology procedures, namely coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Representative centres of six European countries recorded patients' doses in terms of dose-area product (DAP), fluoroscopy time and number of radiographic exposures, using X-ray equipment that has been subject to constancy testing. In addition, a DAP trigger level for cardiac procedures which should alert the operator to possible skin injury, was set to 300 Gy x cm{sup 2}. The estimation of maximum skin dose was recommended in the event that a DAP trigger level was likely to be exceeded. The proposed RLs for CA and PTCA were for DAP 45 Gy x cm{sup 2} and 75 Gy x cm{sup 2}, for fluoroscopy time 7.5 min and 17 min and for number of frames 1250 and 1300, respectively. The proposed RLs should be considered as a first approach to help in the optimisation of these procedures. More studies are required to establish certain ''tolerances'' from the proposed levels taking into account the complexity of the procedure and the patient's size. (orig.)

  19. Preliminary results of quality assurance implementation in interventional cardiology

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    Nikodemova, D. [Slovak Medical Univ., Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The dramatic increase in the frequency of the interventional procedures reflects the significant benefit which directly affects the patient. However parallel is this benefit accompanied by some concern about the consequent increase in doses to patient and staff. The question of safety has prompted the European commission and Who to issue and advise to conduct research in the area of the intervention radiology and to prepare standard protocols for quality assurance of interventional procedures. The presentation is focused on the optimization of interventional procedures in cardiology with aim to reduce the risk level of high exposures and to elaborate national standard methods of quality assurance program, as well as, the procedures used for the case of overexposure. Study was conducted at Slovak Institute of Cardiology, as well as, at Slovak Pediatric Cardiology Center, where wide variation of specific interventional procedures are performed. Skin dose date of patient were measured by Unfors Patient Skin Dosemeter P.S.D. - 4 and the values of Dose area products followed during all examinations. All technical parameters used for examinations were identified. Simultaneously were measured the personal doses of the medical staff present by the examinations. For personal dose measurements Unfors E.D.D.30 dose meter was used, as well as, T.L.D. for measurements of doses on extremities. Preliminary results confirm wide spread of patient doses and professional doses of medical staff. The causes of this spread will by discussed. (authors)

  20. Almanac 2012: interventional cardiology. The national society journals present selected research that has driven recent advances in clinical cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Pascal

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The field of interventional cardiology continues to progress quickly. The efficacy of percutaneous interventions with newer generation drug-eluting stents has advanced a lot over the last decade. This improvement in stent performance has broadened the level of indication towards more complex interventions such as left main and multivessel PCI. Major improvements continue in the field of medical co-therapy such as antiplatelet therapies (bivalirudin, prasugrel, ticagrelor and this will further improve outcomes of PCI. The same is true for intravascular imaging such as ultrasound IVUS and optical coherence tomography OCT. However, interventional cardiology has become a rather broad field, also including alcohol septal ablation for hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy, etc. At the moment, the fastest growing area is the structural interventions, especially for aortic valve stenosis (transcatheter aortic valve implantation TAVI and for mitral regurgitation (mitral clipping.This review covers recent advances in all these different fields of interventional cardiology.

  1. Ionizing radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: current radiation protection practice of invasive cardiology operators in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuckiene, Zivile; Jurenas, Martynas; Cibulskaite, Inga

    2016-09-01

    Ionizing radiation management is among the most important safety issues in interventional cardiology. Multiple radiation protection measures allow the minimization of x-ray exposure during interventional procedures. Our purpose was to assess the utilization and effectiveness of radiation protection and optimization techniques among interventional cardiologists in Lithuania. Interventional cardiologists of five cardiac centres were interviewed by anonymized questionnaire, addressing personal use of protective garments, shielding, table/detector positioning, frame rate (FR), resolution, field of view adjustment and collimation. Effective patient doses were compared between operators who work with and without x-ray optimization. Thirty one (68.9%) out of 45 Lithuanian interventional cardiologists participated in the survey. Protective aprons were universally used, but not the thyroid collars; 35.5% (n  =  11) operators use protective eyewear and 12.9% (n  =  4) wear radio-protective caps; 83.9% (n  =  26) use overhanging shields, 58.1% (n  =  18)-portable barriers; 12.9% (n  =  4)-abdominal patient's shielding; 35.5% (n  =  11) work at a high table position; 87.1% (n  =  27) keep an image intensifier/receiver close to the patient; 58.1% (n  =  18) reduce the fluoroscopy FR; 6.5% (n  =  2) reduce the fluoro image detail resolution; 83.9% (n  =  26) use a 'store fluoro' option; 41.9% (N  =  13) reduce magnification for catheter transit; 51.6% (n  =  16) limit image magnification; and 35.5% (n  =  11) use image collimation. Median effective patient doses were significantly lower with x-ray optimization techniques in both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Many of the ionizing radiation exposure reduction tools and techniques are underused by a considerable proportion of interventional cardiology operators. The application of basic radiation protection tools and

  2. COMPARING MEASURED AND CALCULATED DOSES IN INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY PROCEDURES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira da Silva, M W; Canevaro, L V; Hunt, J; Rodrigues, B B D

    2017-03-16

    Interventional cardiology requires complex procedures and can result in high doses and dose rates to the patient and medical staff. The many variables that influence the dose to the patient and staff include the beam position and angle, beam size, kVp, filtration, kerma-area product and focus-skin distance. A number of studies using the Monte Carlo method have been undertaken to obtain prospective dose assessments. In this paper, detailed irradiation scenarios were simulated mathematically and the resulting dose estimates were compared with real measurements made previously under very similar irradiation conditions and geometries. The real measurements and the calculated doses were carried out using or simulating an interventional cardiology system with a flat monoplane detector installed in a dedicated room with an Alderson phantom placed on the procedure table. The X-ray spectra, beam angles, focus-skin distance, measured kerma-area product and filtration were simulated, and the real dose measurements and calculated doses were compared. It was shown that the Monte Carlo method was capable of reproducing the real dose measurements within acceptable levels of uncertainty.

  3. Comparison of interventional cardiology in two European countries: a nationwide Internet based registry study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, T; Gudnadottir, G S; Lagerqvist, B; Eyjolfsson, K; Nilsson, T; Thorgeirsson, G; Thorgeirsson, G; Andersen, K; James, S

    2013-09-30

    The practice of interventional cardiology differs between countries and regions. In this study we report the results of the first nation-wide long-term comparison of interventional cardiology in two countries using a common web-based registry. The Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR) was used to prospectively and continuously collect background-, quality-, and outcome parameters for all coronary angiographies (CA) and percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) performed in Iceland and Sweden during one year. The rate of CA per million inhabitants was higher in Iceland than in Sweden. A higher proportion of patients had CA for stable angina in Iceland than in Sweden, while the opposite was true for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Left main stem stenosis was more commonly found in Iceland than in Sweden. The PCI rate was similar in the two countries as was the general success rate of PCI, achievement of complete revascularisation and the overall stent use. Drug eluting stents were more commonly used in Iceland (23% vs. 19%). The use of fractional flow reserve (0.2% vs. 10%) and the radial approach (0.6% vs. 33%) was more frequent in Sweden than in Iceland. Serious complications and death were very rare in both countries. By prospectively comparing interventional cardiology in two countries, using a common web based registry online, we have discovered important differences in technique and indications. A discovery such as this can lead to a change in clinical practice and inspire prospective multinational randomised registry trials in unselected, real world populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Meta-analysis of non-randomized studies in interventional cardiology: a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliano Pio Navarese

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Utilisation of meta-analysis is becoming more and more common in interventional cardiology. The aim of this statistical approach is to collect a large number of patients from randomized clinical studies and nonrandomized registries in order to obtain a pooled estimate of the results. Nevertheless, simply pooling these results without a correct methodological approach can easily lead to biased conclusions. In this report we analyse the possible methodological drawbacks of such an approach and we suggest a simplified check-list of items to be considered in the effort of building-up a meta-analysis from non-randomized studies.

  5. Zoning and workstation analysis in interventional cardiology; Zonage et etude de poste en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degrange, J.P. [RP-Consult, 42 rue Pouchet, 75017 Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    As interventional cardiology can induce high doses not only for patients but also for the personnel, the delimitation of regulated areas (or zoning) and workstation analysis (dosimetry) are very important in terms of radioprotection. This paper briefly recalls methods and tools for the different steps to perform zoning and workstation analysis. It outlines the peculiarities of interventional cardiology, presents methods and tools adapted to interventional cardiology, and then discusses the same issues but for workstation analysis. It also outlines specific problems which can be met, and their possible adapted solutions

  6. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.es

    2008-08-07

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 {mu}Gy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 {mu}Gy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  7. Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2008-08-01

    Radiation dose and image quality for paediatric protocols in a biplane x-ray system used for interventional cardiology have been evaluated. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and image quality using a test object and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) phantoms have been measured for the typical paediatric patient thicknesses (4-20 cm of PMMA). Images from fluoroscopy (low, medium and high) and cine modes have been archived in digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) format. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), figure of merit (FOM), contrast (CO), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) have been computed from the images. Data on dose transferred to the DICOM header have been used to test the values of the dosimetric display at the interventional reference point. ESAK for fluoroscopy modes ranges from 0.15 to 36.60 µGy/frame when moving from 4 to 20 cm PMMA. For cine, these values range from 2.80 to 161.10 µGy/frame. SNR, FOM, CO, CNR and HCSR are improved for high fluoroscopy and cine modes and maintained roughly constant for the different thicknesses. Cumulative dose at the interventional reference point resulted 25-45% higher than the skin dose for the vertical C-arm (depending of the phantom thickness). ESAK and numerical image quality parameters allow the verification of the proper setting of the x-ray system. Knowing the increases in dose per frame when increasing phantom thicknesses together with the image quality parameters will help cardiologists in the good management of patient dose and allow them to select the best imaging acquisition mode during clinical procedures.

  8. Radiation exposure to cardiologists performing interventional cardiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delichas, Miltiadis; Psarrakos, Kyriakos; Molyvda-Athanassopoulou, Elisabeth E-mail: moly@med.auth.gr; Giannoglou, Georgios; Sioundas, Anastasios; Hatziioannou, Konstantinos; Papanastassiou, Emmanouil

    2003-12-01

    Medical doctors, who practice interventional cardiology, receive a noticeable radiation dose. In this study, we measured the radiation dose to 9 cardiologists during 144 procedures (72 coronary angiographies and 70 percutaneus translumined coronary angioplasties) in two Greek hospitals. Absorbed doses were measured with TLD placed underneath and over the lead apron at the thyroid protective collar. Based on these measurements, the effective dose was calculated using the Niklason method. In addition, dose area product (DAP) was registered. The effective doses, E, were normalised to the total DAP measured in each procedure, producing the E/DAP index. The mean effective dose values were found to be in the range of 1.2-2.7 {mu}Sv while the mean E/DAP values are in the range of 0.010-0.035 {mu}Sv/Gy cm{sup 2}. The dependence of dose to the X-ray equipment, the exposure parameters and the technique of the cardiologist were examined. Taking under consideration the laboratories' annual workload, the maximum annual dose was estimated to be 1.9 and 2.8 mSv in the two hospitals.

  9. Early cardiology assessment and intervention reduces mortality following myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery (MINS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Alina; Pattenden, Holly; Leung, Maria; Davies, Simon; George, David A.; Raubenheimer, Hilgardt; Niwaz, Zakiyah

    2016-01-01

    Background Myocardial injury after non-cardiac surgery (MINS) is defined as troponin elevation of ≥0.03 ng/mL associated with 3.87-fold increase in early mortality. We sought to determine the impact of cardiology intervention on mortality in patients who developed MINS after general thoracic surgery. Methods A retrospective review was performed in patients over 5 years. Troponin was routinely measured and levels ≥0.04 ng/mL classified as positive. Data acquisition and mortality status was obtained via medical records and NHS tracing systems. Thirty-day mortality was compared on MINS cohort using Fisher’s exact square testing and logistic regression analysis. Results Troponin levels were measured in 491 (96%) of 511 patients. Eighty (16%) patients fulfilled the MINS criteria. Sixty-one (76%) received early cardiology consult and “myocardial infarction” stated in four (5%) patients. Risk assessment (for AMI) was undertaken; 20 (25%) patients were commenced on aspirin, four (5%) on β-blockers and one (1%) underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Forty-nine (61%) patients received primary risk factor modifications and 26 (33%) had outpatient follow-up. There were no significant differences in the proportion of patients who died within 30 days post-operatively in the MINS group of 2.6% compared to the non-MINS group of 1.6% (P=0.625). The odds ratio for 30-day mortality in the MINS group was 1.69 (95% CI: 0.34 to 8.57, P=0.522). Conclusions MINS is common after general thoracic surgery. Early cardiology intervention reduced the expected hazard ratio of early death from 3.87 to an odds ratio of 1.69 with no significant difference in 30-day mortality for patients who developed MINS. PMID:27162667

  10. A summary of recommendations for occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Ariel; Hian, Sim Kui; Miller, Donald L; Le Heron, John; Padovani, Renato; Vano, Eliseo

    2013-02-01

    The radiation dose received by cardiologists during percutaneous coronary interventions, electrophysiology procedures, and other interventional cardiology procedures can vary by more than an order of magnitude for the same type of procedure and for similar patient doses. There is particular concern regarding occupational dose to the lens of the eye. This document provides recommendations for occupational radiation protection for physicians and other staff in the interventional suite. Simple methods for reducing or minimizing occupational radiation dose include minimizing fluoroscopy time and the number of acquired images; using available patient dose reduction technologies; using good imaging-chain geometry; collimating; avoiding high-scatter areas; using protective shielding; using imaging equipment whose performance is controlled through a quality assurance program; and wearing personal dosimeters so that you know your dose. Effective use of these methods requires both appropriate education and training in radiation protection for all interventional cardiology personnel, and the availability of appropriate protective tools and equipment. Regular review and investigation of personnel monitoring results, accompanied as appropriate by changes in how procedures are performed and equipment used, will ensure continual improvement in the practice of radiation protection in the interventional suite. These recommendations for occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology and electrophysiology have been endorsed by the Asian Pacific Society of Interventional Cardiology, the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions, the Latin American Society of Interventional Cardiology, and the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions.

  11. Trends in percutaneous coronary intervention from 2004 to 2013 according to the Portuguese National Registry of Interventional Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Hélder; Teles, Rui Campante; Costa, Marco; da Silva, Pedro Canas; Ferreira, Rui Cruz; da Gama Ribeiro, Vasco; Santos, Ricardo; e Abreu, Pedro Farto; de Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne; Marques, Jorge; Fernandes, Renato; Brandão, Vítor; Martins, Dinis; Drummond, António; Pipa, João Luís; Seca, Luís; Calisto, João; Baptista, José; Matias, Fernando; Ramos, José Sousa; Pereira-Machado, Francisco; Silva, João Carlos; Almeida, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present paper is to report trends in Portuguese interventional cardiology from 2004 to 2013 and to compare them with other European countries. Based on the Portuguese National Registry of Interventional Cardiology and on official data from the Directorate-General of Health, we give an overview of developments in coronary interventions from 2004 to 2013. In 2013, 36 810 diagnostic catheterization procedures were performed, representing an increase of 34% compared to 2007 and a rate of 3529 coronary angiograms per million population. Coronary interventions increased by 65% in the decade from 2004 to 2013, with a total of 13 897 procedures and a rate of 1333 coronary interventions per million population in 2013. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) increased by 265% from 2004 to 2013 (1328 vs. 3524), an adjusted rate of 338 primary PCIs per million, representing 25% of total angioplasties. Stents were the most frequently used devices, drug-eluting stents being used in 73% in 2013. Radial access increased from 4.1% in 2004 to 57.9% in 2013. Interventional cardiology in Portugal has been expanding since 2004. We would emphasize the fact that in 2013 all Portuguese interventional cardiology centers were participating in the National Registry of Interventional Cardiology, as well as the growth in primary PCI and increased use of radial access.

  12. Spanish Cardiac Catheterization and Coronary Intervention Registry. 24th Official Report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology (1990-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Del Blanco, Bruno; Hernández Hernández, Felipe; Rumoroso Cuevas, José Ramón; Trillo Nouche, Ramiro

    2015-12-01

    The Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology presents its annual report on the data from the registry of the activity in Spain in 2014. Data were voluntarily provided by participating centers. The information was introduced online and was analyzed by the Steering Committee of the Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology. Data were reported by 106 hospitals. A total of 140 461 diagnostic procedures (125 484 coronary angiograms) were performed, representing a rate of 3014 diagnostic studies per million population. This year, the number of percutaneous coronary interventions increased to 67 611, giving a rate of 1447 interventions per million population. A total of 94 458 stents were implanted, including 64 057 drug-eluting stents and 2424 biodegradable intracoronary devices. Of the total number of percutaneous coronary interventions, 17 825 were in acute myocardial infarction, representing 26.4% of all coronary interventions. A radial approach was used in 74% of diagnostic procedures and in 70.4% of interventional procedures. The use of renal denervation decreased, whereas over 125 mitral leak closures were performed. Transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures exceeded 1300 implantations per year, a 27% increase from 2013. The registry for 2014 shows a slight increase in coronary disease activity despite no increase in the management of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. Drug-eluting intracoronary devices now comprise over 70% of all intracoronary devices. A continual increase is only seen in certain structural interventional techniques, such as transcatheter aortic valve implantation and perivalvular leak closure. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Simulation-based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy observed in congenital heart disease patients. While medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians currently have limited knowledge of important fluid mechanical parameters. Treatment decisions are therefore often made using anatomical information alone, despite the known links between fluid mechanics and disease progression. Patient-specific simulations now offer the means to provide this missing information, and, more importantly, to perform in-silico testing of new surgical designs at no risk to the patient. In this talk, we will outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We will then present new methodology for coupling optimization with simulation and uncertainty quantification to customize treatments for individual patients. Finally, we will present examples in pediatric cardiology that illustrate the potential impact of these tools in the clinical setting.

  14. Simulation based planning of surgical interventions in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison L.

    2013-10-01

    Hemodynamics plays an essential role in the progression and treatment of cardiovascular disease. However, while medical imaging provides increasingly detailed anatomical information, clinicians often have limited access to hemodynamic data that may be crucial to patient risk assessment and treatment planning. Computational simulations can now provide detailed hemodynamic data to augment clinical knowledge in both adult and pediatric applications. There is a particular need for simulation tools in pediatric cardiology, due to the wide variation in anatomy and physiology in congenital heart disease patients, necessitating individualized treatment plans. Despite great strides in medical imaging, enabling extraction of flow information from magnetic resonance and ultrasound imaging, simulations offer predictive capabilities that imaging alone cannot provide. Patient specific simulations can be used for in silico testing of new surgical designs, treatment planning, device testing, and patient risk stratification. Furthermore, simulations can be performed at no direct risk to the patient. In this paper, we outline the current state of the art in methods for cardiovascular blood flow simulation and virtual surgery. We then step through pressing challenges in the field, including multiscale modeling, boundary condition selection, optimization, and uncertainty quantification. Finally, we summarize simulation results of two representative examples from pediatric cardiology: single ventricle physiology, and coronary aneurysms caused by Kawasaki disease. These examples illustrate the potential impact of computational modeling tools in the clinical setting.

  15. Radiation-induced eye lens changes and risk for cataract in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Rehani, M; Minamoto, A; Sim, K H; Liew, H B; Vano, E

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have reported a significant increase in eye lens opacities among staff in the cardiac catheterization laboratory but indicated further studies are needed to confirm the findings. To evaluate the prevalence of opacities in eyes of cardiologists, radiographers and nurses working in interventional cardiology. The eyes of 52 staff in interventional cardiology facilities and 34 age- and sex-matched unexposed controls were screened in a cardiology conference held in Kuala Lumpur by dilated slit-lamp examination, and posterior lens changes were graded. Individual cumulative lens X-ray exposures were calculated from responses to a questionnaire in terms of workload and working practice. The prevalence of posterior lens opacities among interventional cardiologists was 53%, while in nurses and radiographers it was 45%. Corresponding relative risks were 2.6 (95% CI: 1.2-5.4) and 2.2 (95% CI: 0.98-4.9), for interventional cardiologists and support staff, respectively. This study confirms a statistically significant increase in radiation-associated posterior lens changes in the eyes of interventional cardiology staff. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Staff lens doses in interventional urology. A comparison with interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Fernandez, J M; Resel, L E; Moreno, J; Sanchez, R M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate radiation doses to the lens of urologists during interventional procedures and to compare them with values measured during interventional radiology, cardiology and vascular surgery. The measurements were carried out in a surgical theatre using a mobile C-arm system and electronic occupational dosimeters (worn over the lead apron). Patient and staff dose measurements were collected in a sample of 34 urology interventions (nephrolithotomies). The same dosimetry system was used in other medical specialties for comparison purposes. Median and 3rd quartile values for urology procedures were: patient doses 30 and 40 Gy cm(2); personal dose equivalent Hp(10) over the apron (μSv/procedure): 393 and 848 (for urologists); 21 and 39 (for nurses). Median values of over apron dose per procedure for urologists resulted 18.7 times higher than those measured for radiologists and cardiologists working with proper protection (using ceiling suspended screens) in catheterisation laboratories, and 4.2 times higher than the values measured for vascular surgeons at the same hospital. Comparison with passive dosimeters worn near the eyes suggests that dosimeters worn over the apron could be a reasonable conservative estimate for ocular doses for interventional urology. Authors recommend that at least the main surgeon uses protective eyewear during interventional urology procedures.

  17. Spanish cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention registry. 22nd official report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology (1990-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Del Blanco, Bruno; Rumoroso Cuevas, Jose Ramón; Hernández Hernández, Felipe; Trillo Nouche, Ramiro

    2013-11-01

    The Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology presents the yearly report on the data collected for the Spanish registry. Institutions provided their data voluntarily (online) and the information was analyzed by the Working Group's Steering Committee. Data were provided by 109 hospitals (71 public and 38 private) that mainly treat adults. There were 136,912 diagnostic procedures, 120, 441 of which were coronary angiograms, slightly fewer than the year before, with a rate of 2979 diagnostic studies per million population. Percutaneous coronary interventions increased slightly to 65,909 procedures, for a rate of 1434 interventions per million population. Of the 99,110 stents implanted, 62% were drug-eluting stents. In all, 17,125 coronary interventions were carried out during the acute phase of myocardial infarction, 10.5% more than in 2011, representing 25.9% of the total number of coronary interventions. The most frequently performed intervention for adult congenital heart disease was atrial septal defect closure (292 procedures). The use of percutaneous mitral valvuloplasty continued to decline (258 procedures) and percutaneous aortic valve implantations increased by only 10% in 2012. In 2012, the only increase in hemodynamic activity occurred in the field of ST-elevation myocardial infarction, and the increasing trend had slowed for percutaneous aortic valve implantation and other procedures affecting structure. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative study between ultrasonography and optical coherence tomography in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Vélez, Félix; de la Torre-Hernández, José María; Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Zueco-Gil, José Javier; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2009-07-01

    In this work, we present clinical images of IVUS and OCT in the evaluation of pharmacological stent endothelization. These preliminary imaging results are analyzed and compared in order to determine the ability of these technologies to visualize relevant intravascular features of interest in interventional cardiology. The results enable to compare the performance of both techniques and to evaluate their potential for clinical purposes.

  19. Temporal Trends in Utilization of Transthoracic Echocardiography for Common Outpatient Pediatric Cardiology Diagnoses over the Past 15 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ritu; Travers, Curtis D; McCracken, Courtney E; Samai, Cyrus; Campbell, Robert M; Slesnick, Timothy C; Border, William L

    2017-03-01

    No data exist regarding the temporal trends in utilization of transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) in an outpatient pediatric cardiology setting. This study evaluates the trends in utilization of TTE for common diagnoses known to have low diagnostic yield and the factors influencing these trends. Patients evaluated at our pediatric cardiology clinics from January 2000 to December 2014 and discharged with final diagnoses of innocent murmur, noncardiac chest pain, benign syncope, and palpitations were included. Variables collected retrospectively included patient age, sex, insurance type, distance from clinic, and ordering physician's years of experience since fellowship. Of the 74,881 patients seen by 35 physicians, 36,053 (48.1%) had a TTE. The TTE rates increased from the beginning of 2000 to the end of 2004 (5.2% per year; P trends persisted after adjusting for all these factors. After an initial surge in TTE utilization from 2000 to 2004, there was a steady decline. This study identifies some important factors influencing these trends. This information could help design quality interventions, but additional factors need to be explored since the trends persist despite adjusting for these factors. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Echocardiography. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Spanish Cardiac Catheterization and Coronary Intervention Registry. 23rd official report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology (1990-2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García del Blanco, Bruno; Hernández Hernández, Felipe; Rumoroso Cuevas, José Ramón; Trillo Nouche, Ramiro

    2014-12-01

    The Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology presents its yearly report on the data from the registry of the activity in Spain corresponding to 2013. The centers introduce their data online voluntarily and the information is analyzed by the Steering Committee of the Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization. In 2013, 104 hospitals sent their data (72 public centers and 32 private). In all, 136 715 diagnostic studies were performed (120 358 coronary angiograms), with a slight decrease with respect to 2012, a reduction that was also observed in the rate, which was 2944 diagnostic studies per million population. A total of 65 912 interventional procedures were carried out during a phase of stability, for a rate of 1419 interventions per million population. Other techniques included the implantation of 99 417 stents and 1384 biodegradable intracoronary devices (64% of them drug-eluting devices). There were 18 337 procedures in acute myocardial infarction, for an increase of 7% with respect to 2012 and representing 27.8% of all the percutaneous coronary interventions. Radial access was the approach used in 71% of the diagnostic procedures and in 65% of the interventional procedures. The performance of renal denervation has nearly doubled with respect to 2012. For the first time, more than 1000 transcatheter aortic valve implantation procedures were carried out in 1 year, although the frequency increased only slightly (23%). There continued to be a slight increase in the activity in cardiac catheterization in association with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, whereas, with the exception of recently introduced, highly specific procedures, the use of the remainder of the procedures, among them transcatheter aortic valve implantation, leveled off. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Spanish Cardiac Catheterization and Coronary Intervention Registry. 25th Official Report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology (1990-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Quevedo, Pilar; Serrador, Ana; Pérez de Prado, Armando; Pan, Manuel

    2016-12-01

    The Working Group on Cardiac Catheterization and Interventional Cardiology presents its annual report on the data from the registry of the activity in 2015. All Spanish hospitals with catheterization laboratories were invited to voluntarily contribute their activity data. The information was collected online and analyzed mostly by an independent company. In 2015, 106 centers participated in the national register; 73 of these centers are public. A total of 145 836 diagnostic studies were conducted, among which 128 669 were coronary angiograms. These figures are higher than in previous years. The Spanish average of total diagnoses per million population was 3127. The number of coronary interventional procedures was very similar (67 671), although there was a slight increase in the complexity of coronary interventions: 7% in multivessel treatment and 8% in unprotected left main trunk treatment. A total of 98 043 stents were implanted, of which 74 684 were drug-eluting stents. A total of 18 418 interventional procedures were performed in the acute myocardial infarction setting, of which 81.9% were primary angioplasties. The radial approach was used in 73.3% of the diagnostic procedures and in 76.1% of interventional ones. The number of transcatheter aortic valve implantations continued to increase (1586), as well as the number of left atrial appendage closures (331). An increase in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in acute myocardial infarction was reported in 2015. The use of the radial approach and drug-eluting stents also increased in therapeutic procedures. The progressive increase in structural procedures seen in previous years continued. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. [The practical clinical guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología on interventional cardiology: coronary angioplasty and other technics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, E; Alfonso, F; Alonso, J J; Asín, E; Elizaga, J; Iñiguez, A; Revuelta, J M

    2000-02-01

    Interventional cardiology has had an extraordinary expansion in last years. This clinical guideline is a review of the scientific evidence of the techniques in relation to clinical and anatomic findings. The review includes: 1. Coronary arteriography. 2. Coronary balloon angioplasty. 3. Coronary stents. 4. Other techniques: directional atherectomy, rotational atherectomy, transluminal extraction atherectomy, cutting balloon, laser angioplasty and transmyocardial laser and endovascular radiotherapy. 5. Platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitors. 6. New diagnostic techniques: intravascular ultrasound, coronary angioscopy, Doppler and pressure wire. For the recommendations we have used the classification system: class I, IIa, IIb, III like in the guidelines of the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.

  3. Design principles for the use of simulation as an aid in interventional cardiology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    Learning complex skills through simulation is a goal for training physicians in specialties such as interventional cardiology, where traditional training puts patients at risk. Intuitively, interactive simulation of anatomy, pathology and therapeutic actions should lead to shortening of the learning curve for novice or inexperienced physicians. An accurate recreation of the interactions among anatomy, pathology and therapeutic actions is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for the development of a simulation-based training system. In addition to real-time graphic interactivity coupled with haptic response, a successful training tool will require features of a 'learning system' such as: an embedded curriculum, functionality that allows rehearsal and practice, hypertext links to educational information, personal archiving, and instructor review and testing capabilities. We describe how such a system might look for the field of interventional cardiology, and suggest that designing a simulation with both technical and pedagogical fidelity is essential in developing simulation-based training systems in any field of medicine.

  4. Estimation of staff lens doses during interventional procedures. Comparing cardiology, neuroradiology and interventional radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Sanchez, R M; Fernandez, J M

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this article is to estimate lens doses using over apron active personal dosemeters in interventional catheterisation laboratories (cardiology IC, neuroradiology IN and radiology IR) and to investigate correlations between occupational lens doses and patient doses. Active electronic personal dosemeters placed over the lead apron were used on a sample of 204 IC procedures, 274 IN and 220 IR (all performed at the same university hospital). Patient dose values (kerma area product) were also recorded to evaluate correlations with occupational doses. Operators used the ceiling-suspended screen in most cases. The median and third quartile values of equivalent dose Hp(10) per procedure measured over the apron for IC, IN and IR resulted, respectively, in 21/67, 19/44 and 24/54 µSv. Patient dose values (median/third quartile) were 75/128, 83/176 and 61/159 Gy cm(2), respectively. The median ratios for dosemeters worn over the apron by operators (protected by the ceiling-suspended screen) and patient doses were 0.36; 0.21 and 0.46 µSv Gy(-1) cm(-2), respectively. With the conservative approach used (lens doses estimated from the over apron chest dosemeter) we came to the conclusion that more than 800 procedures y(-1) and per operator were necessary to reach the new lens dose limit for the three interventional specialties. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Association of Physician Certification in Interventional Cardiology with In-Hospital Outcomes of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorilli, Paul N.; Minges, Karl E.; Herrin, Jeph; Messenger, John C.; Ting, Henry H.; Nallamothu, Brahmajee K.; Lipner, Rebecca S.; Hess, Brian J.; Holmboe, Eric S.; Brennan, Joseph J.; Curtis, Jeptha P.

    2015-01-01

    Background The value of American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification has been questioned. We evaluated the association of interventional cardiology (ICARD) certification with in-hospital outcomes of patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in 2010. Methods and Results We identified physicians who performed ≥10 PCIs in 2010 in the CathPCI Registry and determined ICARD status using ABIM data. We compared in-hospital outcomes of patients treated by certified and non-certified physicians using hierarchical multivariable models adjusted for differences in patient characteristics and PCI volume. Primary endpoints were all-cause in-hospital mortality and bleeding complications. Secondary endpoints included emergency coronary artery bypass grafting, vascular complications, and a composite of any adverse outcome. With 510,708 PCI procedures performed by 5,175 physicians, case mix and unadjusted outcomes were similar among certified and non-certified physicians. The adjusted risks of in-hospital mortality (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.02-1.19) and emergency CABG (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.12-1.56) were higher in the non-ICARD certified group, but the risks of bleeding, vascular complications, and the composite endpoint were not statistically significantly different between groups. Conclusions We did not observe a consistent association between ICARD certification and the outcomes of PCI procedures. Although there was a significantly higher risk of mortality and emergency CABG in patients treated by non-ICARD certified physicians, the risks of vascular complications and bleeding were similar. Our findings suggest that ICARD certification status alone is not a strong predictor of patient outcomes, and indicate a need to enhance the value of subspecialty certification. PMID:26384518

  6. Mapping intravascular ultrasound controversies in interventional cardiology practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Maresca

    Full Text Available Intravascular ultrasound is a catheter-based imaging modality that was developed to investigate the condition of coronary arteries and assess the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques in particular. Since its introduction in the clinic 20 years ago, use of intravascular ultrasound innovation has been relatively limited. Intravascular ultrasound remains a niche technology; its clinical practice did not vastly expand, except in Japan, where intravascular ultrasound is an appraised tool for guiding percutaneous coronary interventions. In this qualitative research study, we follow scholarship on the sociology of innovation in exploring both the current adoption practices and perspectives on the future of intravascular ultrasound. We conducted a survey of biomedical experts with experience in the technology, the practice, and the commercialization of intravascular ultrasound. The collected information enabled us to map intravascular ultrasound controversies as well as to outline the dynamics of the international network of experts that generates intravascular ultrasound innovations and uses intravascular ultrasound technologies. While the technology is praised for its capacity to measure coronary atherosclerotic plaque morphology and is steadily used in clinical research, the lack of demonstrated benefits of intravascular ultrasound guided coronary interventions emerges as the strongest factor that prevents its expansion. Furthermore, most of the controversies identified were external to intravascular ultrasound technology itself, meaning that decision making at the industrial, financial and regulatory levels are likely to determine the future of intravascular ultrasound. In light of opinions from the responding experts', a wider adoption of intravascular ultrasound as a stand-alone imaging modality seems rather uncertain, but the appeal for this technology may be renewed by improving image quality and through combination with

  7. Optimisation of interventional cardiology procedures; Optimisation des procedures en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar, Olivier [SELARL, Cardiologie Interventionnelle Imagerie Cardiaque - CIIC, 8, place de la Cathedrale - 37042 Tours (France)

    2011-07-15

    Radiation-guided procedures in interventional cardiology include diagnostic and/or therapeutic procedures, primarily coronary catheterization and coronary angioplasty. Application of the principles of radiation protection and the use of optimised procedures are contributing to dose reduction while maintaining the radiological image quality necessary for performance of the procedures. The mandatory training in patient radiation protection and technical training in the use of radiology devices mean that implementing continuous optimisation of procedures is possible in practice. This optimisation approach is the basis of patient radiation protection; when associated with the wearing of protective equipment it also contributes to the radiation protection of the cardiologists. (author)

  8. Doses received by organs in interventional cardiology; Les doses recues aux organes en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccia, C. [Centre d' Assurance de qualite des Applications Technologiques dans le domaine de la Sante, (CAATS) - 43, Bd du Marechal Joffre, 92 - Bourg-La-Reine (France)

    2009-07-01

    After a discussion of several publications about patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology, the author recalls that the in vivo assessment of the dose received by some organs is uneasy because invasive. Therefore, the assessment requires the use of physical or mathematical dosimetric phantoms which simulate patient morphology as well as the incident photon attenuation phenomenon. He evokes some characteristics and applications of these phantoms. He outlines the different sources and origins of the dose received by the patient, and discusses results obtained by collecting data from 177 patients submitted to diagnosis or therapeutic procedures

  9. Skin dosimetry of patients during interventional cardiology procedures in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukupova, Lucie; Novak, Leos

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine distribution of air kerma-area product, fluoro time and number of frames values for the two most frequent procedures in the interventional cardiology, to reconstruct skin dose distributions for some patients undergoing coronarography and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty procedures. Patient dose data were obtained from X-ray unit dose monitoring software report from one hospital and the reconstructions were performed in MATLAB. Dependence of maximum skin dose on air kerma-area product, fluoro time and number of frames was determined to assess trigger levels of these quantities, which can indicate possible exceeding of the 2 Gy skin dose threshold.

  10. A national programme for patient and staff dose monitoring in interventional cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, R; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Sotil, J; Carrera, F; Armas, J; Rosales, F; Pifarre, X; Escaned, J; Angel, J; Diaz, J F; Bosa, F; Saez, J R; Goicolea, J

    2011-09-01

    A national programme on patient and staff dose evaluation in interventional cardiology made in cooperation with the haemodynamic section of the Spanish Society of Cardiology has recently been launched. Its aim is to propose a set of national diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for patients as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and to initiate several optimisation actions to improve radiological protection of both patients and staff. Six hospitals have joined the programme and accepted to submit their data to a central database. First to be acquired were the quality control data of the X-ray systems and radiation doses of patients and professionals. The results from 9 X-ray systems, 1467 procedures and staff doses from 43 professionals were gathered. Provisional DRLs resulted in 44 Gy cm(2) for coronary angiography and 78 Gy cm(2) for interventions. The X-ray systems varied up to a factor of 5 for dose rates in reference conditions. Staff doses showed that 50 % of interventional cardiologists do not use their personal dosemeters correctly.

  11. Interventional cardiology, where real life and science do not necessarily meet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    Evidence-based diagnosis, decision-making, and therapy appear a must these days. Generating and publishing evidence is a tedious job according to ever new and tightened research practice regulations. Rules will never prevent the typical human behaviour from showing the new thing to be shinier and the old thing dustier than they really are. The medical community is solicited to concoct a meal that is gullible for patients, authorities, and third-party payers out of the available evidence (after applying some conversion factors correcting the common bias of the researchers), anticipation of what will be the evidence tomorrow, common sense, and digested experience. Examples of misguidance by poorly produced or misinterpreted evidence are plentiful in interventional cardiology as they are in other disciplines. Coronary stents, for instance, were first underestimated due to the fact that they were generally used in bailout situations where the outcome remained rather dismal in spite of the salvaging potential of stents. Then they were overused quite uncritically rather to the detriment of the patient. Now with the high quality of the modern drug-eluting stents (DESs), the overuse persists but is no longer a concern. However, the enhanced potential of DESs compared with bare-metal stents was poorly exploited for >10 years because of reports that slipped through the meshes of good review and publication practice to convey the untenable message that bare-metal stents were preferable in many situations. As other examples, use of the fractional flow reserve (FFR) for decision-making has to be questioned despite prominently published reports recommending it. Fixing a lesion is today easier and hardly more complication prone than assessing it with the FFR. Closure of the patent foramen ovale may never be properly applied, because the collection of the understandably requested evidence takes decades, a follow-up duration that makes research unattractive to physicians and

  12. Dose to patients and professionals in cardiology interventional: Progress of multicenter group Doccaci; Dosis a pacientes y a profesionales en cardiologia intervencionista: Avances del grupo multicentrico DOCCACI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, R. M.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J. M.; Goicolea Ruigomez, J.; Pifarre, X.; Escaned, J.; Rovira, J. J.; Garcia del Blanco, B.; Carrera, F.; Diaz, J. F.; Ordiales, J. M.; Nogales, J. M.; Hernandez, J.; Bosa, F.; Rosales, F.; Saez, J. R.; Soler, M. M.; Romero, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    The multidisciplinary group and multicenter DOCCACI (dosimetry and quality assurance in interventional cardiology), sponsored by the section of haemodynamics of the Spanish society of Cardiology, is intended to propose reference levels to doses received by patients in interventional cardiology procedures such as recommended by the International Commission on radiological protection It also investigates the doses received by professionals, in particular dose in Crystallyne whose recommended limit dose has been reduced recently from 150 to 20 mSv/year. (Author)

  13. Paediatric interventional cardiology: flat detector versus image intensifier using a test object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E; Ubeda, C; Martinez, L C; Leyton, F; Miranda, P

    2010-12-07

    Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values and image quality parameters were measured and compared for two biplane angiography x-ray systems dedicated to paediatric interventional cardiology, one equipped with image intensifiers (II) and the other one with dynamic flat detectors (FDs). Polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of different thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 16 cm, and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were used. The parameters of the image quality evaluated were noise, signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SdNR), high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and three figures of merit combining entrance doses and signal-to-noise ratios or HCSR. The comparisons showed a better behaviour of the II-based system in the low contrast region over the whole interval of thicknesses. The FD-based system showed a better performance in HCSR. The FD system evaluated would need around two times more dose than the II system evaluated to reach a given value of SdNR; moreover, a better spatial resolution was measured (and perceived in conventional monitors) for the system equipped with flat detectors. According to the results of this paper, the use of dynamic FD systems does not lead to an automatic reduction in ESAK or to an automatic improvement in image quality by comparison with II systems. Any improvement also depends on the setting of the x-ray systems and it should still be possible to refine these settings for some of the dynamic FDs used in paediatric cardiology.

  14. Paediatric interventional cardiology: flat detector versus image intensifier using a test object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vano, E.; Ubeda, C.; Martinez, L. C.; Leyton, F.; Miranda, P.

    2010-12-01

    Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values and image quality parameters were measured and compared for two biplane angiography x-ray systems dedicated to paediatric interventional cardiology, one equipped with image intensifiers (II) and the other one with dynamic flat detectors (FDs). Polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of different thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 16 cm, and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were used. The parameters of the image quality evaluated were noise, signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SdNR), high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and three figures of merit combining entrance doses and signal-to-noise ratios or HCSR. The comparisons showed a better behaviour of the II-based system in the low contrast region over the whole interval of thicknesses. The FD-based system showed a better performance in HCSR. The FD system evaluated would need around two times more dose than the II system evaluated to reach a given value of SdNR; moreover, a better spatial resolution was measured (and perceived in conventional monitors) for the system equipped with flat detectors. According to the results of this paper, the use of dynamic FD systems does not lead to an automatic reduction in ESAK or to an automatic improvement in image quality by comparison with II systems. Any improvement also depends on the setting of the x-ray systems and it should still be possible to refine these settings for some of the dynamic FDs used in paediatric cardiology.

  15. Paediatric interventional cardiology: flat detector versus image intensifier using a test object

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vano, E [Radiology Department, Medicine School, Complutense University and San Carlos University Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Ubeda, C [Clinical Sciences Department, Faculty of the Science of Health and CIHDE, Tarapaca University, 18 de Septiembre 2222, Arica (Chile); Martinez, L C [Medical Physics and Radiation Protection Service, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid (Spain); Leyton, F [Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago (Chile); Miranda, P, E-mail: eliseov@med.ucm.e [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Avenida Antonio Varaas 360, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-12-07

    Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) values and image quality parameters were measured and compared for two biplane angiography x-ray systems dedicated to paediatric interventional cardiology, one equipped with image intensifiers (II) and the other one with dynamic flat detectors (FDs). Polymethyl methacrylate phantoms of different thicknesses, ranging from 8 to 16 cm, and a Leeds TOR 18-FG test object were used. The parameters of the image quality evaluated were noise, signal-difference-to-noise ratio (SdNR), high contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and three figures of merit combining entrance doses and signal-to-noise ratios or HCSR. The comparisons showed a better behaviour of the II-based system in the low contrast region over the whole interval of thicknesses. The FD-based system showed a better performance in HCSR. The FD system evaluated would need around two times more dose than the II system evaluated to reach a given value of SdNR; moreover, a better spatial resolution was measured (and perceived in conventional monitors) for the system equipped with flat detectors. According to the results of this paper, the use of dynamic FD systems does not lead to an automatic reduction in ESAK or to an automatic improvement in image quality by comparison with II systems. Any improvement also depends on the setting of the x-ray systems and it should still be possible to refine these settings for some of the dynamic FDs used in paediatric cardiology.

  16. Patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology at the University Hospital of Osijek.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faj, Dario; Steiner, Robert; Trifunovic, Dejan; Faj, Zlatan; Kasabasic, Mladen; Kubelka, Dragan; Brnic, Zoran

    2008-01-01

    The interventional cardiology was recently implemented at the University Hospital of Osijek. Patients' absorbed doses during coronary angiography (CA) and the percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures were measured and compared with published data and international standards. All patients undergoing CA or PTCA procedures during a 1-month period were included in the study. Patients' doses are expressed in terms of dose area product (DAP) per procedure. The patients' DAPs ranged from 2.6 to 210 Gy cm2 (average of 59 Gy cm2) during CAs, and from 61 to 220 Gy cm2 (average of 120 Gy cm2) during PTCAs. Patients' doses during CAs and PTCAs at the University Hospital of Osijek are in good agreement with the published ones. In complex cases, the radiochromic dosimetry films were used to show possible dose distributions across patient's skin. The film dosimetry showed a limitation of using only DAP values for the estimation of skin injuries risk.

  17. The current and future state of interventional cardiology: a critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    After 75 years of invasive and over 50 years of interventional cardiology, cardiac catheter-based procedures have become the most frequently used interventions of modern medicine. Patients undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) outnumber those with coronary artery bypass surgery by a factor of 2 to 4. The default approach to PCI is the implantation of a (drug-eluting) stent, in spite of the fact that it improves the results of balloon angioplasty only in about 25% of cases. The dominance of stenting over conservative therapy or balloon angioplasty on one hand and bypass surgery on the other hand is a flagrant example of how medical research is digested an applied in real life. Apart from electrophysiological interventions, closure ot the patent foramen ovale and percutaneous replacement of the aortic valve in the elderly have the potential of becoming daily routine procedures in catheterization laboratories around the world. Stem cell regeneration of vessels or heart muscle, on the other hand, may remain a dream never to come true.

  18. A study of the relationship between peak skin dose and cumulative air kerma in interventional neuroradiology and cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neil, S; Padgham, C; Martin, C J [Health Physics, Gartnavel Royal Hospital, Glasgow G12 0XH (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-01

    A study of peak skin doses (PSDs) during neuroradiology and cardiology interventional procedures has been carried out using Gafchromic XR-RV2 film. Use of mosaics made from squares held in cling film has allowed doses to the head to be mapped successfully. The displayed cumulative air kerma (CAK) has been calibrated in terms of cumulative entrance surface dose (CESD) and results indicate that this can provide a reliable indicator of the PSD in neuroradiology. Results linking PSD to CESD for interventional cardiology were variable, but CAK is still considered to provide the best option for use as an indicator of potential radiation-induced effects. A CESD exceeding 3 Gy is considered a suitable action level for triggering follow-up of patients in neuroradiology and cardiology for possible skin effects. Application of dose action levels defined in this way would affect 8% of neurological embolisation procedures and 5% of cardiology ablation and multiple stent procedures at the hospitals where the investigations were carried out. A close relationship was observed between CESD and dose-area product (DAP) for particular types of procedure, and DAPs of 200-300 Gy cm{sup 2} could be used as trigger levels where CAK readings were not available. The DAP value would depend on the mean field size and would need to be determined for each application.

  19. Evaluation and quantification of reprocessing modification in single-use devices in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessarolo, Francesco; Ferrari, Paolo; Silvia, Bortoluzzi; Motta, Antonella; Migliaresi, Claudio; Zennaro, Lucio; Rigo, Adelio; Guarrera, Giovanni Maria; Nollo, Giandomenico

    2004-11-01

    The increasing demand in interventional cardiology urges for reprocessing of single-use-labelled medical devices. To fulfil this aim, accurate and validated regeneration protocols are mandatory to guarantee sterility, functionality and safeness. The reprocessing protocol was realized by decontamination with chloro-donors, cleaning with enzymatic solutions and hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization. Reprocessing effects on ablation and electrophysiology catheters were evaluated by assessing physical-chemical changes on surfaces and bulks, as a function of the reprocessing cycles number. Conventional optical microscopy and environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) underlined the presence of micro-scratches on the polyurethane shaft surface. A clear correlation was found between surface damages and number of reprocessing cycles. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed the occurrence of physical-chemical etching of the polyurethane shaft caused by the hydrogen peroxide plasma sterilization, with increasing of nano-roughness at increasing number of the reprocessing cycles. UV-Vis spectra performed on the incubation solution of polymeric shaft sample, showed an absorbance increase at about 208 nm. This fact could be attributed to the water elution from the polymer of low molecular weight oligomers. The presence of hydrolysis products of the polymeric shaft after incubation demands both the characterization of the products released in the solution and the chemical characterization of the water exposed surface.

  20. Multiple procedures and cumulative individual radiation exposure in interventional cardiology: A long-term retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weltermann, Birgitta M.; Rock, Thomas; Berndt, Peter; Viehmann, Anja; Reinders, Sabrina; Gesenhues, Stefan [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute for General Medicine, University Hospital, Essen (Germany); Brix, Gunnar; Schegerer, Alexander [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Department of Radiation Protection and Health, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Various studies address discrepancies between guideline recommendations for coronary angiographies and clinical practice. While the issue of the appropriateness of recurrent angiographies was studied focusing on the role of the cardiologist, little is known about individual patients' histories and the associated radiation exposures. We analyzed all patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in an academic teaching practice who underwent at least one angiography with or without intervention between 2004 and 2009. All performed angiographies in these patients were analyzed and rated by three physicians for appropriateness levels according to cardiology guidelines. Typical exposure data from the medical literature were used to estimate individual radiation exposure. In the cohort of 147 patients, a total of 441 procedures were analyzed: between 1981 and 2009, three procedures were performed per patient (range 1-19) on average. Appropriateness ratings were 'high/intermediate' in 71 %, 'low/no' in 27.6 % and data were insufficient for ratings in 1.4 %. Procedures with 'low/no' ratings were associated with potentially avoidable exposures of up to 186 mSv for single patients. Using retrospective data, we exemplify the potential benefit of guideline adherence to decrease patients' radiation exposures. (orig.)

  1. Assessment of the occupational eye lens dose for clinical staff in interventional radiology, cardiology and neuroradiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Artur; Kadesjö, Nils; Palmgren, Charlotta; Marteinsdottir, Maria; Segerdahl, Tony; Fransson, Annette

    2017-03-20

    In accordance with recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the current European Basic Safety Standards has adopted a reduced occupational eye lens dose limit of 20 mSv yr(-1). The radiation safety implications of this dose limit is of concern for clinical staff that work with relatively high dose x-ray angiography and interventional radiology. Presented in this work is a thorough assessment of the occupational eye lens dose based on clinical measurements with active personal dosimeters worn by staff during various types of procedures in interventional radiology, cardiology and neuroradiology. Results are presented in terms of the estimated equivalent eye lens dose for various medical professions. In order to compare the risk of exceeding the regulatory annual eye lens dose limit for the widely different clinical situations investigated in this work, the different medical professions were separated into categories based on their distinct work pattern: staff that work (a) regularly beside the patient, (b) in proximity to the patient and (c) typically at a distance from the patient. The results demonstrate that the risk of exceeding the annual eye lens dose limit is of concern for staff category (a), i.e. mainly the primary radiologist/cardiologist. However, the results also demonstrate that the risk can be greatly mitigated if radiation protection shields are used in the clinical routine. The results presented in this work cover a wide range of clinical situations, and can be used as a first indication of the risk of exceeding the annual eye lens dose limit for staff at other medical centres.

  2. Patient Dose Values during Interventional Cardiology Examinations in Yazd Hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verginia Tsapaki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The number of interventional cardiology (IC procedures has increased rapidly. Coronary angiography (CA and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA are now widely performed as a matter of routine and they are considered safe procedures for experienced cardiologists. However, it is also known that these procedures are associated with high radiation doses due to long fluoroscopy time (T, and large number of cineradiography frames (F. These levels of radiation may even lead to radiation skin injuries under certain conditions. "nPatients and Methods: A detailed study of radiation doses received by 168 patients who underwent CA, and 84 patients who underwent PTCA using 3 angiography x-ray systems in two hospitals of Yazd-Iran is presented. An air kerma-area product (KAP meter was used for patient dosimetry. KAP, fluoroscopy time and total number cine frames for CA and PTCA procedures were recorded for each patient. "nResults: Mean ± SD of KAP in CA and PTCA were 33 Gy.cm2 ± 18.8 Gy.cm2 and 80.3 Gy.cm2 ± 65.6 Gy.cm2, respectively. The comparison showed that CA KAP (33Gy.cm2, fluoroscopy time (2.7±2.4min, and cine frames number (571±149 except of on case, were lower than (P<0.001 the results of other studies and mean KAP due to PTCA procedures, except for three cases, were not significantly different from the other references' results. "nConclusion: The high-level expert cardiologists could not have a significant effect on the decrease of patient dose since they should also teach angiography examinations to medicine students. With increasing patient BMI the value of KAP increased, but the fluoroscopy time and cine frames number did not change significantly. In addition, the results showed that the use of flat panel detector was not sufficient for decreasing patient dose and the system's adjustment was more important.

  3. Consensus document on the radial approach in percutaneous cardiovascular interventions: position paper by the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions and Working Groups on Acute Cardiac Care** and Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamon, Martial; Pristipino, Christian; Di Mario, Carlo; Nolan, James; Ludwig, Josef; Tubaro, Marco; Sabate, Manel; Mauri-Ferré, Josepa; Huber, Kurt; Niemelä, Kari; Haude, Michael; Wijns, William; Dudek, Dariusz; Fajadet, Jean; Kiemeneij, Ferdinand

    2013-03-01

    Radial access use has been growing steadily but, despite encouraging results, still varies greatly among operators, hospitals, countries and continents. Twenty years from its introduction, it was felt that the time had come to develop a common evidence-based view on the technical, clinical and organisational implications of using the radial approach for coronary angiography and interventions. The European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) has, therefore, appointed a core group of European and non-European experts, including pioneers of radial angioplasty and operators with different practices in vascular access supported by experts nominated by the Working Groups on Acute Cardiac Care and Thrombosis of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). Their goal was to define the role of the radial approach in modern interventional practice and give advice on technique, training needs, and optimal clinical indications.

  4. What should a fellow-in-training expect at national cardiovascular conferences? The interventional cardiology fellows' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiramijyan, Sarkis; Didier, Romain; Koifman, Edward; Negi, Smita I

    It has become challenging for cardiovascular fellows-in-training (FIT) to determine which national cardiovascular conference (NCC) to attend given the broad range of meetings and the breadth of information offered. The aim of this study was to report our own experiences of the utility and individual strengths of the NCCs and to further understand the interventional cardiology (IC) FITs' viewpoint regarding the benefits of the individual NCCs. A survey was formulated with questions and scenarios regarding topics deemed to be of highest importance for an IC-FIT. The survey emphasized experiences regarding the utility and benefits of the NCCs, time management, optimization of acquired education, and specific interests in clinical and research topics. The completely anonymous survey was sent via an email format to a total of 234, majority of IC (fourth and fifth years) and a minority of general (third year), FITs. A completed survey response was received from 131 of the fellows (56%). The results demonstrated that the IC-FITs endorsed that the small, focused sub-specialty interventional meetings vs. the large society general meetings were more beneficial in regard to the didactic education offered. In addition, the IC-FITs indicated that pre-planning for the meetings is the most beneficial approach in optimizing one's education and that the caliber of expert faculty, case-based and live-case presentations are among the most important aspects of the meetings. Interventional cardiology FITs prefer the small sub-specialty interventional meetings over the large society general NCCs in regard to the benefits of didactic learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Glycaemic management in type 1 and 2 diabetes patients undergoing interventional cardiology procedures. Heart and Diabetes Working Group. Sociedad Espan˜ola de Cardiologı´a. Sociedad Espan˜ola de Diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-García, Angeles; Moreno Gómez, Raúl; Miranda Guardiola, Faustino; Artola-Menéndez, Sara; Lisbona-Gil, Arturo

    2012-03-03

    Despite the growing number of therapeutic alternatives available as well as general reviews and treatment guidelines for the treatment of diabetes, physicians are often left without a clear pathway of therapy to follow in specific clinical contexts such as interventional cardiology. The present document proposes a consensus treatment algorithm, based both on a critical appraisal of evidence from recent clinical trials and on value judgements supported by the authors' collective clinical knowledge and experience, in an attempt to guide practitioners when choosing the most appropriate alternatives in the context of glycemic management in type 1 and 2 diabetic patients scheduled to undergo interventional cardiology procedures in a haemodynamic laboratory. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  6. Extremity and eye lens doses in interventional radiology and cardiology procedures: first results of the ORAMED project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domienik, J; Brodecki, M; Carinou, E; Donadille, L; Jankowski, J; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Nikodemova, D; Ruiz-Lopez, N; Sans-Mercé, M; Struelens, L; Vanhavere, F

    2011-03-01

    The main objective of WP1 of the ORAMED (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff) project is to obtain a set of standardised data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff in interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) and to optimise staff protection. A coordinated measurement program in different hospitals in Europe will help towards this direction. This study aims at analysing the first results of the measurement campaign performed in IR and IC procedures in 34 European hospitals. The highest doses were found for pacemakers, renal angioplasties and embolisations. Left finger and wrist seem to receive the highest extremity doses, while the highest eye lens doses are measured during embolisations. Finally, it was concluded that it is difficult to find a general correlation between kerma area product and extremity or eye lens doses.

  7. Local patient dose diagnostic reference levels in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile using age bands and patient weight values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, Carlos, E-mail: cubeda@uta.cl [Medical Technology Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty, Tarapaca University, Arica 1000000 (Chile); Miranda, Patricia [Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago 7500539 (Chile); Vano, Eliseo [Radiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Complutense University and IdIS, San Carlos Hospital, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: To present the results of a patient dose evaluation program in pediatric cardiology and propose local diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for different types of procedure and age range, in addition to suggesting approaches to correlate patient dose values with patient weight. This study was the first conducted in Latin America for pediatric interventional cardiology under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency. Methods: Over three years, the following data regarding demographic and patient dose values were collected: age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time (FT), and two dosimetric quantities, dose-area product (DAP) and cumulative dose (CD), at the patient entrance reference point. The third quartile values for FT, DAP, CD, number of cine series, and the DAP/body weight ratio were proposed as the set of quantities to use as local DRLs. Results: Five hundred and seventeen patients were divided into four age groups. Sample sizes by age group were 120 for <1 yr; 213 for 1 to <5 yr; 82 for 5 to <10 yr; and 102 for 10 to <16 yr. The third quartile values obtained for DAP by diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and age range were 1.17 and 1.11 Gy cm{sup 2} for <1 yr; 1.74 and 1.90 Gy cm{sup 2} for 1 to <5 yr; 2.83 and 3.22 Gy cm{sup 2} for 5 to <10 yr; and 7.34 and 8.68 Gy cm{sup 2} for 10 to <16 yr, respectively. The third quartile value obtained for the DAP/body weight ratio for the full sample of procedures was 0.17 (Gy cm{sup 2}/kg) for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Conclusions: The data presented in this paper are an initial attempt at establishing local DRLs in pediatric interventional cardiology, from a large sample of procedures for the standard age bands used in Europe, complemented with the values of the ratio between DAP and patient weight. This permits a rough estimate of DRLs for different patient weights and the refining of these values for the age bands when there

  8. A comparison of the quality of the information available on the internet on interventional radiology, vascular surgery, and cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Alsafi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context and Aims: Internet use is rapidly expanding and increasingly plays a substantial role in patient education. We sought to evaluate and compare the quality of information available to patients online on three closely linked specialties: Interventional radiology (IR, cardiology, and vascular surgery. Materials and Methods: We searched the leading three search engines for the terms: "Interventional Radiology", "cardiology," and "vascular surgery," collating the top 50 hits from each search. After excluding duplicates and irrelevant sites, 43, 25, and 36 sites remained, respectively. Sites were analyzed using the LIDA instrument (an online tool for assessing health-related websites and Fleisch Reading Ease Scores (FRES were compared across the different search terms and correlated with the country of origin and certification by the Health on the Net (HON Foundation. Results: There was no significant difference ( P>0.05 in the total LIDA, accessibility, usability or reliability scores between the three specialties. HONCode certification was associated with higher LIDA (83.1±1.6 vs. 71.53±0.8 ( P<0.0001, reliability (75.7±3.6 vs. 49.0±1.6 ( P<0.0001 and FRES (37.4±4.0 vs. 29.7±1.4 ( P=0.0441. Conclusion: Websites are generally well designed and easy to use; the majority however, lacks currency and reliability. Despite similarity in quality of online information, there is a disparity in knowledge of IR; this may be due to low web-traffic figures of IR sites. Wikipedia′s user-generated content, ranks highly in major search engines, as such; this could serve as means of disseminating reliable health information to patients.

  9. Cardiological-interventional therapy of coronary artery disease today; Kardiologisch-interventionelle Therapie der koronaren Herzerkrankung heute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynen, K.; Henssge, R. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik fuer Kardiologie

    1999-07-01

    The current importance of the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease may be deduced from the exponential increase in procedures performed in Germany in the last decade - at least 125,840 in 1996. Today, by improved catheter and balloon materials as well as by growing experience of the cardiologists, even complex lesions may be treated. Limitations of balloon angioplasty include acute vessel closure and restenosis - newer angioplasty devices like directional or rotational atherectomy or excimer-laser angioplasty did not overcome these limitations; only by coronary stenting, acute vessel closure could be managed and the likelihood of restenosis - at least in particular groups of patients - could be reduced. For a few years, intracoronary brachytherapy of the segments dilated with beta- or gamma-emitters has been seeking to reduce restenosis rate; the department of cardiology of the Dresden Cardiovascular Institute is participating in such a multicentre study using the beta-emitter {sup 188}renium. Further main topics of our department represent primary angioplasty in patients with acute myocardial infarction and invasive diagnostic or interventional procedures by the transradial approach. (orig.)

  10. The Year in Cardiology 2013: valvular heart disease (focus on catheter-based interventions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grube, Eberhard; Sinning, Jan-Malte; Vahanian, Alec

    2014-02-01

    2013 was the year of transcatheter heart valve interventions. Not least because of the 2012 European guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), the multidisciplinary heart team approach became an established concept. Decision-making, when a patient is too 'sick' for surgery and too 'healthy' for catheter-based interventions, is complex, since VHD is often seen at an older age and, as a consequence, there is a higher frequency of co-morbidity and frailty. However, before TAVI and other transcatheter heart valve interventions can be expanded to intermediate-risk patients, evidence in favour of this less invasive treatment has to be provided by upcoming randomized clinical trials.

  11. Automated volume of interest delineation and rendering of cone beam CT images in interventional cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Cristian; Schäfer, Dirk; Eshuis, Peter; Carroll, John; Grass, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Interventional C-arm systems allow the efficient acquisition of 3D cone beam CT images. They can be used for intervention planning, navigation, and outcome assessment. We present a fast and completely automated volume of interest (VOI) delineation for cardiac interventions, covering the whole visceral cavity including mediastinum and lungs but leaving out rib-cage and spine. The problem is addressed in a model based approach. The procedure has been evaluated on 22 patient cases and achieves an average surface error below 2mm. The method is able to cope with varying image intensities, varying truncations due to the limited reconstruction volume, and partially with heavy metal and motion artifacts.

  12. Dual antiplatelet therapy with prasugrel or ticagrelor versus clopidogrel in interventional cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Peter; Dridi, Nadia Paarup; Holmvang, Lene

    2013-01-01

    For several years, clopidogrel plus aspirin has been the dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) of choice for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation. More recently, prasugrel and ticagrelor have demonstrated greater effica...

  13. Evaluating a Dutch cardiology primary care plus intervention on the Triple Aim outcomes: study design of a practice-based quantitative and qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjel, Tessa C C; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke D; Struijs, Jeroen N; Baan, Caroline A; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2017-09-06

    In an attempt to deal with the pressures on the health-care system and to guarantee sustainability, changes are needed. This study focuses on a cardiology primary care plus intervention. Primary care plus (PC+) is a new health-care delivery model focused on substitution of specialist care in the hospital setting with specialist care in the primary care setting. The intervention consists of a cardiology PC+ centre in which cardiologists, supported by other health-care professionals, provide consultations in a primary care setting. The PC+ centre aims to improve the health of the population and quality of care as experienced by patients, and reduce the number of referrals to hospital-based outpatient specialist care in order to reduce health-care costs. These aims reflect the Triple Aim principle. Hence, the objectives of the study are to evaluate the cardiology PC+ centre in terms of the Triple Aim outcomes and to evaluate the process of the introduction of PC+. The study is a practice-based, quantitative study with a longitudinal observational design, and an additional qualitative study to supplement, interpret and improve the quantitative study. The study population of the quantitative part will consist of adult patients (≥18 years) with non-acute and low-complexity cardiology-related health complaints, who will be referred to the cardiology PC+ centre (intervention group) or hospital-based outpatient cardiology care (control group). All eligible patients will be asked to complete questionnaires at three different time points consisting of questions about their demographics, health status and experience of care. Additionally, quantitative data will be collected about health-care utilization and related health-care costs at the PC+ centre and the hospital. The qualitative part, consisting of semi-structured interviews, focus groups, and observations, is designed to evaluate the process as well as to amplify, clarify and explain quantitative results. This study

  14. Patients radiation dose values during interventional cardiology examinations in university hospital, Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Su [The Institute of Health Science Research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Joun Hyuk [Dept. of Radio-technology, Wonkwang Health Science University, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hae Kyoung [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, CHA University, Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jung Min [Dept. of Radiological Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Byung Ryul [Dept. of Cardiology, Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The use of cardiac angiography (CA) and the interventional procedures is rapidly increasing due to the increase in modern adult diseases. Cardiovascular intervention (CI) is an examination method where radiation is applied to the same area for a long period, and thus may cause skin injury. In this study, we investigate the diagnostic reference level (DRL) of the cardiovascular intervention (CI) carried out by medical institutions and use it as a tool to reduce patient exposure dose. In this study, the DRL was set by acquiring information about the cumulative fluoroscopy time, cumulative fluoroscopy dose-area product (DAP), radiography DAP, cumulative DAP, air kerma, number of video clips, and the total number of images from the cardiac angiography and interventional procedures performed on 147 patients. The DAPs corresponding to the DRL of cardiac angiography( CA) and that of the interventional procedures were shown to be 44.4Gy·cm{sup 2} and 298.6Gy·cm{sup 2}, respectively; the corresponding DRLs of fluoroscopy time were shown to be 191.5s and 1935.3s, respectively. A DRL is not a strict upper bound for radiation exposure. However, the process of setting, enacting, and reviewing the DRLs for the dose by medical institutions will contribute to a reduction in the unnecessary exposure dose of patients.

  15. Percutaneous interventions in cardiology in Poland in the year 2014. Summary report of the Association of Cardiovascular Interventions of the Polish Cardiac Society AISN PTK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siudak, Zbigniew; Legutko, Jacek; Parma, Radosław; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Bartuś, Stanisław; Dobrzycki, Sławomir; Grygier, Marek; Moszura, Tomasz; Pawłowski, Tomasz; Dudek, Dariusz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Board of the Association of Cardiovascular Interventions of the Polish Cardiac Society (AISN PTK) publishes annual data from the National PCI Registry (ORPKI) operated by the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow. Aim For the first time the AISN PTK report is based on the new electronic database implemented in Poland on January 1st, 2014. Material and methods In 2014, there were 155 invasive cardiology centers registered in the ORPKI database (an increase by 1 center in comparison to 2013) and 92% of them had 24/7 percutaneous (PCI) duty. For the first time the number of catheterization laboratories (cath labs) in Poland remained stable, and even though there was an increase by 1 in absolute numbers, 2 cath labs ceased to admit patients in 2014. This means that the number of active cath labs per 1 million inhabitants is similar to last year and equals 4. Results In comparison to 2013, there was a significant increase in the total number of coronary angiographies. There were 226 713 angiographies in 2014. The total number of PCI procedures was 126 241, which is 5.1% more than in 2013. Conclusions There was a significant increase in the overall number of coronary angiographies and PCIs in Poland in 2014. The use of attributes of modern interventional cardiology such as drug-eluting stents and bioabsorbable vascular stents is growing as well as more frequent choice of a radial access site by PCI operators even in ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. One should also note a significant rise in the use of additional imaging or diagnostic tools such as fractional flow reserve, intravascular ultrasound and optical coherent tomography. PMID:26677356

  16. Occupational cataracts and lens opacities in interventional cardiology. The O'CLOC study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Sophie; Bertrand, Alexandre; Bernier, Marie-Odile [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Lab. of Epidemiology

    2010-07-01

    Interventional cardiologists are repeatedly and acutely exposed to scattered ionizing radiation (X-rays) during their diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. These exposures may cause damages to the eye lenses and induce early cataracts known as radiation-induced cataracts. The O'CLOC study is an ongoing epidemiological study designed to test the hypothesis of an increased risk of cataract among interventional cardiologists as compared with unexposed cardiologists. This paper summarizes a detailed article on the O'CLOC study protocol that has been published elsewhere. (orig.)

  17. CHARACTERIZATION AND EXPERIMENTAL MEASUREMENTS OF SCATTER DOSE AT CARDIOLOGIST'S EYES DURING PAEDIATRIC INTERVENTIONAL CARDIOLOGY PROCEDURES IN COSTA RICA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Salazar, Luisa; Retana, Viviana; Santos, Freddy; Salvador, Lourdes; Sáenz, Carlos; Quesada, Cristhian; Gavarrete, Manuel; Picado, Marcela; Arce, Luis

    2017-03-21

    This paper presents the results of the first characterization and experimental measurements of scatter dose at cardiologist's eyes for the only X-ray system that performs all paediatric Interventional cardiology procedures in Costa Rica. Entrance surface air kerma (ESAK) and the scatter dose values were measured on phantoms of 4-20 cm thicknesses of polymethyl methacrylate slabs. Image quality was evaluated using DICOM images of a test object Leeds TOR 18-FG, through the numerical parameters signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), high-contrast spatial resolution (HCSR) and figure of merit (FOM). When PMMA thickness is increased and during a move from low fluoroscopy to cine modes, ESAK, SNR, HCSR and FOM values range from 0.44 to 391.0 μGy fr-1; 2.8 to 14.89; 3.17 to 15.54 and 0.51 to 79.94, respectively. The highest scattered dose rates recorded during the simulations were 1.79 and 8.04 mSv h-1 for the high fluoroscopy and cine modes, respectively.

  18. The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population radiation dose in a 'health-care level I' representative region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo Cornetto, Andrea; Aimonetto, Stefania; Pisano, Francesco; Giudice, Marcello; Sicuro, Marco; Meloni, Teodoro; Tofani, Santi

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluates per-procedure, collective and per capita effective dose to the population by interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed during 2002-11 at the main hospital of Aosta Valley Region that can be considered as representative of the health-care level I countries, as defined by the UNSCEAR, based on its socio-demographic characteristics. IC procedures investigated were often multiple procedures in patients older than 60 y. The median extreme dose-area product values of 300 and 22 908 cGycm(2) were found for standard pacemaker implantation and coronary angioplasty, respectively, while the relative mean per-procedure effective dose ranged from 0.7 to 47 mSv. A 3-fold increase in frequency has been observed together with a correlated increase in the delivered per capita dose (0.05-0.27 mSv y(-1)) and the collective dose (5.8-35 man Sv y(-1)). Doses increased particularly from 2008 onwards mainly because of the introduction of coronary angioplasty procedures in the authors' institution. IC practice contributed remarkably in terms of effective dose to the population, delivering ∼10% of the total dose by medical ionising radiation examination categories.

  19. Patient cumulative radiation exposure in interventional cardiology; Exposition cumulee aux rayonnements ionisants des patients en cardiologie interventionnelle: caracteristiques cliniques et dosimetriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernier, M.O.; Jacob, S.; Laurier, D. [Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire (IRSN), DRPH, SRBE, LEPID, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Maccia, C. [Centre d' assurance de qualite des applications technologiques dans le domaine de la sante - CAATS, Bourg-la-Reine (France); Bar, O.; Blanchard, D. [Clinique Saint-Gatien, Tours (France); Catelinois, O. [Institut de veille sanitaire, St Maurice (France)

    2012-01-15

    Interventional cardiology procedures can involve potentially high doses of radiation to the patients. Stochastic effects of ionising radiation - radiation-induced cancers in the long term - may occur. We analysed clinical characteristics and dosimetric data in a population of patients undergoing interventional cardiology. In all, 1 591 patients who had undergone coronarography and/or angioplasty in the course of a year at the Saint-Gatien Clinic in Tours (France) were included. Information on patients' individual clinical characteristics and Dose-Area Product values were collected. Organ doses to the lung, oesophagus, bone marrow and breast were mathematically evaluated. The median age of patients was 70 years. Their median cumulative dose-area product value was 48.4 Gy.cm{sup 2} for the whole year and the median effective dose was 9.7 mSv. The median organ doses were 41 mGy for the lung, 31 mGy for the oesophagus, 10 mGy for the bone marrow and 4 mGy for the breast. Levels of doses close to the heart appear to be rather high in the case of repeated interventional cardiology procedures. Clinical characteristics should be taken into account when planning epidemiological studies on potential radiation-induced cancers. (authors)

  20. The Polish Interventional Cardiology TAVI Survey (PICTS): adoption and practice of transcatheter aortic valve implantation in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Radosław; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Ochała, Andrzej; Witkowski, Adam; Dudek, Dariusz; Siudak, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Few studies have assessed the development of transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) in Poland since its introduction in 2008, and data on current TAVI activity or practice are missing. Aim To assess the dynamics of TAVI adoption in Poland and to detect differences among Polish centres in TAVI practice and decision-making. Material and methods The Polish Interventional Cardiology TAVI Survey (PICTS) was approved by the Polish Association of Cardiovascular Interventions and presented to all 21 national TAVI centres. Between 2008 and 2015 the cumulative number of TAVI performed in Poland was 2189. The annual number of TAVI rose from 8 in 2008 to 670 in 2015 (0.21 to 17.4 implants per million inhabitants, respectively). Results The median TAVI experience per centre was 80 procedures (95% CI: 38.1–154.6). In 2015 the TAVI penetration rate reached 5.12% of the estimated eligible Polish population. Inoperable and high-risk patients are treated with TAVI in all centres, with 52% of Heart Teams also qualifying medium-risk patients. The rate of transfemoral implantations increased to 83.2% of all procedures in 2015, while transapical implantations decreased to 12%. The frequency of subclavian, direct aortic or transcarotid routes in 2015 was below 3% each. Conclusions The PICTS survey observed a positive but slow rate of adoption of TAVI in Poland. When compared to Western European countries, our findings highlight a significant treatment gap in high or prohibitive surgical risk patients with severe aortic stenosis. Remarkable variations in TAVI practices among Polish TAVI centres warrant publication of joint national guidelines and recommendations. PMID:28344612

  1. Acute ischemic heart disease and interventional cardiology: a time for pause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brophy James M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major change has occurred in the last few years in the therapeutic approach to patients presenting with all forms of acute coronary syndromes. Whether or not these patients present initially to tertiary cardiac care centers, they are now routinely referred for early coronary angiography and increasingly undergo percutaneous revascularization. This practice is driven primarily by the angiographic image and technical feasibility. Concomitantly, there has been a decline in expectant or ischemia-guided medical management based on specific clinical presentation, response to initial treatment, and results of noninvasive stratification. This 'tertiarization' of acute coronary care has been fuelled by the increasing sophistication of the cardiac armamentarium, the peer-reviewed publication of clinical studies purporting to show the superiority of invasive cardiac interventions, and predominantly supporting (non-peer-reviewed editorials, newsletters, and opinion pieces. Discussion This review presents another perspective, based on a critical reexamination of the evidence. The topics addressed are: reperfusion treatment of ST-elevation myocardial infarction; the indications for invasive intervention following thrombolysis; the role of invasive management in non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction and unstable angina; and cost-effectiveness and real world considerations. A few cases encountered in recent practice in community and tertiary hospitals are presented for illustrative purposes The numerous and far-reaching scientific, economic, and philosophical implications that are a consequence of this marked change in clinical practice as well as healthcare, decisional and conflict of interest issues are explored. Summary The weight of evidence does not support the contemporary unfocused broad use of invasive interventional procedures across the spectrum of acute coronary clinical presentations. Excessive and unselective recourse to

  2. Pediatric patient doses in interventional cardiology procedures; Doses em paciente pediatrico em procedimentos de cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, R.B.; Murata, C.H.; Moreira, A.C., E-mail: rbitelli2012@gmail.com, E-mail: camila.murata@gmail.com, E-mail: antonio.xray@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Pulista de Medicina; Khoury, H.J.; Borras, C., E-mail: hjkhoury@gmail.com, E-mail: cariborras@starpower.net [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, M.S.R da, E-mail: msrochas2003@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The radiation doses from interventional procedures is relevant when treating children because of their greater radiosensitivity compared with adults. The purposes of this paper were to estimate the dose received by 18 pediatric patients who underwent cardiac interventional procedures and to correlate the maximum entrance surface air kerma (Ke,max), estimated with radiochromic films, with the cumulative air kerma values displayed at the end of procedures. This study was performed in children up to 6 years. The study was performed in two hospitals, one located in Recife and the other one in São Paulo. The x-ray imaging systems used were Phillips Allura 12 model with image intensifier system and a Phillips Allura FD10 flat panel system. To estimate the Ke,max on the patient’s skin radiochromic films(Gafchromic XR-RV2) were used. These values were estimated from the maximum optical density measured on film using a calibration curve. The results showed cumulative air kerma values ranging from 78.3- 500.0mGy, with a mean value of 242,3 mGy. The resulting Ke,max values ranged from 20.0-461.8 mGy, with a mean value of 208,8 mGy. The Ke,max values were correlated with the displayed cumulative air kerma values. The correlation factor R² was 0.78, meaning that the value displayed in the equipment’s console can be useful for monitoring the skin absorbed dose throughout the procedure. The routine fluoroscopy time records is not able by itself alert the physician about the risk of dose exceeding the threshold of adverse reactions, which can vary from an early erythema to serious harmful skin damage. (author)

  3. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiología Intervencionista; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    This article provides a brief summary of the relevant recommendations and references related to percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. The goal was to provide the clinician with concise, evidence-based contemporary recommendations, and the supporting documentation to encourage their application. The full text includes disclosure of all relevant relationships with industry for each writing committee member. A fundamental aspect of all expert consensus statements is that these carefully developed, evidence-based documents can neither encompass all clinical circumstances, nor replace the judgment of individual physicians in management of each patient. The science of medicine is rooted in evidence, and the art of medicine is based on the application of this evidence to the individual patient. This expert consensus statement has adhered to these principles for optimal management of patients requiring percutaneous mechanical circulatory support. © 2015 by The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, the Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery.

  4. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Jr, Sidney C

    2010-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT...

  5. ACCF/AHA/ASE/ASNC/HFSA/HRS/SCAI/SCCT/SCMR/STS 2013 multimodality appropriate use criteria for the detection and risk assessment of stable ischemic heart disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Heart Failure Society of America, Heart Rhythm Society, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance, and Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Doherty, John U; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Rosenbaum, Lisa; Shaw, Leslee J; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2014-01-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical presentations for stable ischemic heart disease (SIHD...

  6. Does digital flat detector technology tip the scale towards better image quality or reduced patient dose in interventional cardiology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogaert, E. [Ghent University, Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: evelien.bogaert@ugent.be; Bacher, K. [Ghent University, Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: klaus.bacher@ugent.be; Lapere, R. [Ghent University, Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: regine.lapere@ugent.be; Thierens, H. [Ghent University, Department of Medical Physics and Radiation Protection, Proeftuinstraat 86, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)], E-mail: hubert.thierens@ugent.be

    2009-11-15

    As dynamic flat-panel detectors (FD) are introduced in interventional cardiology (IC), the relation between patient dose and image quality (IQ) needs to be reconsidered for this type of image receptor. On one hand this study investigates IQ of a FD system by means of a threshold contrast-detail analysis and compares it to an image intensifier (II) system on a similar X-ray setup. On the other hand patient dose for coronary angiography (CA) procedures on both systems is compared by Dose-Area Product (DAP)-registration of a patient population. The comparative IQ study was performed for a range of entrance dose rates (EDR) covering the fluoroscopy and cinegraphy working mode. In addition the IQ investigation was extended to a similar study under automatic brightness control (ABC). As well the systematic study of IQ as a function of EDR as the study performed under ABC point to a better IQ for FD in cinegraphy mode and no difference between both systems in fluoroscopy mode. The patient population study resulted in mean DAP values of 31 Gy cm{sup 2} (II system) and 33 Gy cm{sup 2} (FD system) (p = 0.68) for CA procedures. As well total DAP as contributions of fluoroscopy and cinegraphy on both systems are not significantly different. To conclude, we could state that profit was taken from the intrinsic better performance of the FD for cinegraphy mode in producing higher quality images in this mode but without any effect on patient dose for CA procedures.

  7. Pilot program on patient dosimetry in pediatric interventional cardiology in Chile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, Carlos; Vano, Eliseo; Miranda, Patricia; Leyton, Fernando [Clinical Sciences Department, Radiological Sciences Center, Health Sciences Faculty and CHIDE, Tarapaca University, Arica (Chile); Radiology Department, Complutense University and San Carlos Hospital, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Hemodynamic Department, Cardiovascular Service, Luis Calvo Mackenna Hospital, Santiago (Chile); Institute of Public Health of Chile, Marathon 1000, Nunoa, Santiago, Chile and Faculty of Medicine, Diego Portales University, Santiago (Chile)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to present the results of a pilot program on patient dosimetry carried out in Chile during the last 5 yr, using a biplane x-ray angiography system settled for pediatrics. This research was conducted in Latin America under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) supporting programs on radiological protection (RP) of patients. Methods: Patient age, gender, weight, height, number of cine series, total number of cine frames, fluoroscopy time, and two dosimetric quantities [air kerma-area product (P{sub ka}) and cumulative dose (CD) at the patient entrance reference point] were recorded for each procedure. Results: The study includes 544 patients grouped into four age groups. The distributions by age group were 150 for <1 yr; 203 for 1 to <5 yr; 97 for 5 to <10 yr; and 94 for 10 to <16 yr. Median values of P{sub ka} and CD for the four age groups were 0.94, 1.46, 2.13, and 5.03 Gy cm{sup 2} and 23.9, 26.8, 33.5, and 51.6 mGy, respectively. No significant statistical differences were found between diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. A moderate correlation (r = 0.64) was seen between P{sub ka} and patient weight. Conclusions: The dose values reported in this paper were lower than those published in the previous work for the same age groups as a result of the optimization actions carried out by cardiologists and medical physicists with the support of the IAEA. Methodology and results will be used as a starting point for a wider survey in Chile and Latin America with the goal to obtain regional diagnostic reference levels as recently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for interventional procedures.

  8. Percutaneous Therapy for Tricuspid Regurgitation: A New Frontier for Interventional Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapadia, Samir R; Krishnaswamy, Amar; Tuzcu, E Murat

    2017-03-23

    Functional tricuspid regurgitation (FTR) is common, whether in association with mitral or aortic valve disease or presenting as an isolated valvular disease. Several studies have shown that TR is associated with poor patient outcomes, though a cause-and-effect relationship of TR to mortality has not been proven. Similarly the impact of surgical treatment of TR on outcomes needs well-controlled randomized trials that are under planning. The current professional society guidelines for treatment of TR are based on expert opinions with a level of evidence C for all indications. Transcatheter therapies for valvular heart disease are often based on established surgical techniques. When surgical therapy has well studied benefits including a reduction in mortality (e.g. aortic valve replacement for aortic stenosis), percutaneous therapies can be compared to surgery with survival as an endpoint. Similarly, the safety of surgical therapies (e.g. surgical aortic valve replacement) can serve as a benchmark for the safety of percutaneous treatment. In establishing percutaneous treatments for TR, on the other hand, there are several challenges: 1) the severity of TR and RV dysfunction are often difficult to determine; 2) the impact of TR on mortality or heart failure outcomes is not as clearly defined; and 3) surgical treatments are multiple without robust data for indications and outcomes. Importantly, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is interested in providing expedited access for devices that fill an unmet clinical need by demonstrating appropriate intermediate and surrogate endpoints. Therefore, the aforementioned challenges also present opportunities to better define how trials for percutaneous treatments of TR can be conducted as we move forward (Table).

  9. Organ doses of the cardiologists and their assistants during interventional cardiology procedures at teaching general hospitals in Mashhad/ Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahreyni Toosi, M.; Zare, H.; Bayani, Sh.; Esmaili, S. [Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Medical Physics Dep., Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Protection of medical personnel in interventional cardiology is now days one of the most important issues of radiological protection. Due to the rapid increase of coronary heart disease in developed and developing countries, application of interventional techniques such as coronary angiography and angioplasty have also increased sharply over past two decades. While these procedures are carried out cardiologists and their assistants are remained close to the patient and within the hot area of the radiation field. Therefore they are subject to receive significant doses of radiation. In this study doses received by critical and more vulnerable organs of cardiologists and their assistants were measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (T.L.D.). T.L.D. measurements were carried for 115 coronary angiography (C.A.) and 30 pre-cutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (P.T.C.A.) procedures at teaching general hospitals in Mashhad-Iran. Doses received by thyroid, gonad, right and left hands of the study groups were measured. For this purpose T.L.D. were placed on and underneath of the lead apron adjacent to gonads and on the wrist of both hands. The results of this study imply that: a) For both groups left hands are subject to receiving the highest mean dose (0.18 mGy/P.T.C.A.) b) Thyroid mean dose per P.T.C.A. received by the T.L.D. chips on the shield is 0.72 mGy and is much higher than corresponding value for the T.L.D. placed underneath the shield. c) Gonads would receive the highest mean dose per P.T.C.A. (0.16 mGy), second to left hand, if lead apron is not worn, but lead apron reduces the dose by a factor of nearly six. d) General speaking assistants, mostly stood on the right side of cardiologists, receive smaller dose. e) P.T.C.A. induces a higher dose to all organs of both cardiologists and their assistants when compared with the corresponding doses arising from C.A. procedure. (authors)

  10. Patient radiation doses in interventional cardiology in the U.S.: Advisory data sets and possible initial values for U.S. reference levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Donald L.; Hilohi, C. Michael; Spelic, David C. [Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Avenue, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To determine patient radiation doses from interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S and to suggest possible initial values for U.S. benchmarks for patient radiation dose from selected interventional cardiology procedures [fluoroscopically guided diagnostic cardiac catheterization and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)]. Methods: Patient radiation dose metrics were derived from analysis of data from the 2008 to 2009 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey of cardiac catheterization. This analysis used deidentified data and did not require review by an IRB. Data from 171 facilities in 30 states were analyzed. The distributions (percentiles) of radiation dose metrics were determined for diagnostic cardiac catheterizations, PCI, and combined diagnostic and PCI procedures. Confidence intervals for these dose distributions were determined using bootstrap resampling. Results: Percentile distributions (advisory data sets) and possible preliminary U.S. reference levels (based on the 75th percentile of the dose distributions) are provided for cumulative air kerma at the reference point (K{sub a,r}), cumulative air kerma-area product (P{sub KA}), fluoroscopy time, and number of cine runs. Dose distributions are sufficiently detailed to permit dose audits as described in National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Report No. 168. Fluoroscopy times are consistent with those observed in European studies, but P{sub KA} is higher in the U.S. Conclusions: Sufficient data exist to suggest possible initial benchmarks for patient radiation dose for certain interventional cardiology procedures in the U.S. Our data suggest that patient radiation dose in these procedures is not optimized in U.S. practice.

  11. Avian cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Anneliese; Wilson, G Heather

    2003-01-01

    The field of avian cardiology is continually expanding. Although a great deal of the current knowledge base has been derived from poultry data, research and clinical reports involving companion avian species have been published. This article will present avian cardiovascular anatomy and physiology, history and physical examination considerations in the avian cardiac disease patient, specific diagnostic tools, cardiovascular disease processes, and current therapeutic modalities.

  12. 建立双心医学三道干预防线%Establishment of Three-level Intervention in Psycho-cardiology Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琦玲; 胡大一

    2015-01-01

    Psycho-cardiology medicine concerns cardiovascular diseases and psychological barriers. The two kinds of disease interact as both cause and effect and exert influence on each other. They have become major health problems. Psycho-cardiology medicine pays close attention to both cardiovascular diseases and mental disorder , which enables people to achieve comprehensive health. However,the prevalence of psycho-cardiology diseases is increasing year by year due to a lack of wide attention given by medical community. Therefore,timely and effective intervention measures are particularly important. To make medical humanities integrated into clinical and improve people′s health level,this paper introduced the three-level intervention in psycho-cardiology medicine,which is of great significance for the timely and effective treatment of patients with psycho-cardiology diseases and rational allocation and utilization of medical resources.%双心医学关注的是心血管疾病和心理障碍,此两种疾病互为因果,互相影响,已成为最严重的健康问题之一。双心医学倡导在关注心血管疾病的同时关注患者的心理疾患,使之达到真正意义上的健康。目前尚未引起医学界的普遍重视,双心疾病的患者数量逐年增多,因此及时有效的干预措施尤为重要。为使医学人文融入临床,提高人们健康水平,本文介绍了双心医学的三道干预防线,有助于双心疾病患者得到及时有效的治疗和促进医疗资源合理分配与利用。

  13. Patient exposure: description of cumulative irradiation of patients treated in interventional cardiology; Exposition des patients: description de l'irradiation cumulee des patients traites en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odile Bernier, M.O. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Laboratoire d ' Epidemiologie, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2009-07-01

    Despite its clinical benefits, interventional cardiology induces cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation and may entail an important irradiation of the patient at the cutaneous level as well as for organs at the vicinity of the heart. The author briefly reports a study performed on a sample of 1591 patients who have been submitted to at least one corono-graphy or one angioplasty during 2005. Based on clinical characteristics and dose-area-product measurements, the doses received by lung, oesophagus, bone medulla and breast have been computed

  14. Kerma rate evaluation in the air in a room interventional cardiology; Avaliacao da taxa de Kerma no ar em uma sala de cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Real, Jessica V.; Luz, Renata M. da, E-mail: jessica.real@pucrs.br, E-mail: renata.luz@pucrs.br [Hospital Sao Lucas (HSL/PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Fröhlich, Bruna D.; Silva, Ana Maria Marques da, E-mail: bruna.frohlich@acad.pucrs.br, E-mail: ana.marques@pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, the number of interventional cardiology procedures is increasing. However, due to the long time of fluoroscopy in these procedures, care teams can receive high doses of radiation. The radiation scattered by the patient is not uniform, and their assessment is of utmost importance. This study aimed to estimate and map the kerma rate in the air at the time of the gonads, in an interventional cardiology room, seeking to optimize the dose absorbed by individuals occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. For data collection, the room was divided into quadrants of 1m{sup 2}, totaling 40 collection points. The simulator was positioned so that its entry surface was located in the interventional reference point. Were chosen the conditions that simulate angiography and angioplasty procedures performed in the service. The data were obtained for height of 1 meter, gonad region. The results obtained for kerma rates in air, in quadrants, show that higher measured values was in the vicinity of the X-ray tube. Has been found that the medical staff are more exposed, because of its location during the procedure, around the table. The law of the inverse square distance of the farthest points of the X-ray tube were verified.

  15. Cardiology Mannequin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Education of medical students in cardiology requires access to patients having a variety of different forms of heart disease. But bringing together student, instructor and patient is a difficult and expensive process that does not benefit the patient. An alternate approach is substitution of a lifelike mannequin capable of simulating many conditions of heart disease. The mannequin pictured below, together with a related information display, is an advanced medical training system whose development benefited from NASA visual display technology and consultative input from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The mannequin system represents more than 10 years of development effort by Dr. Michael S. Gordon, professor of cardiology at the University of Miami (Florida) School of Medicine.

  16. Operators exposed to ionizing irradiation in interventional cardiology: evaluation; Evaluation de l'irradiation ionisante des operateurs en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amri, C.; Chaari, N.; Henchi, M.A.; Abdallah, B.; Akrout, M.; Khalfallah, T. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Monastir, Service de Medecine du Travail et de Pathologie Professionnelle, Faculte de Medecine de Monastir (Tunisia); Bedoui, M.H. [Faculte de Medecine de Monastir, Lab. de Biophysique (Tunisia); Ben Hamda, K.; Gamra, H. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Monastir, Service de Cardiologie (Tunisia)

    2007-02-15

    Ionizing radiation is widely used in medical practice for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. There is a risk of adverse effects for exposed operators. To evaluate the exposure in interventional imagery, we carried out a descriptive six-month cross-sectional study using electronic dosimeters 1-36, Dosicard and DMC100. This study was conducted in the interventional cardiology unit of the Monastir hospital. Mean radioscopic time was both procedure- and operator-dependent. It was 6.06 minutes for coronarography and 21.41 minutes for angioplasty. The highest equivalent exposure per procedure involved the hands, about 99.5 {mu}Sv versus 14 {mu}Sv on the neck and 34 {mu}Sv on feet. The annual equivalent showed that all operators had a low exposure level. Exposure for crystalline lens and upper limbs were respectively 1.93 mSv and 14.02 mSv per year in invasive cardiology. Such amounts are largely under the norms proposed by the national center of radioprotection. In addition, annual effective exposure level was low for all operators; the maximum was 2.5 mSv. his study enabled a real-time evaluation of radiation exposed level of operators. Exposure levels can be measured directly by he operator ensuring a permanent follow-up of radiation expo re. Despite the low exposure level noted in this study, radioprotection measures must be respected. (authors)

  17. [Nuclear cardiology: the present functions and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xiaoli; Fan, Chengzhong

    2013-02-01

    For the past decade, the diagnosis and treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD) has shifted from the traditional model by evaluating coronary artery stenosis with morphological imaging methods to a novel model by focusing on the detection of ischemia for risk stratification. The myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has become the most commonly used stress imaging technique for the diagnosis and treatment of patients with suspected or known CAD. It has got strong supports, including those of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ACC/AHA/ASNC) and other numerous clinical guidelines. They all stressed that the SPECT MPI is recommended to be used as the "gate keeper" to coronary angiography in order to prevent unnecessary intervention test and save the cost. However, in China the introduction and application of nuclear cardiology was late and highly unbalanced. This leads to the lack of understanding of nuclear cardiology in some clinicians, and there often is misunderstanding on correct selection of coronary angiography, cardiac CT, CT coronary angiography and others for diagnosis and treatment of CAD which results in a trend of over-application of these traditional techniques. In this article, we will focus on the status of nuclear cardiology, including SPECT, positron emission tomography (PET) MPI in the patients with CAD for the diagnosis of ischemia, risk stratification and management decision-making, and also compare it with the traditional morphological imaging techniques. In addition, we will briefly introduce the recent advances in cardiac hybrid imaging and molecular imaging. The aim of this paper is to popularize the knowledge of nuclear cardiology, and promote the rational application of nuclear cardiology in China.

  18. Scatter radiation dose at height of the lens and image quality in interventional cardiology; Nivel de radiacao na altura do cristalino em cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leguees, Fernando A. Leyton

    2016-07-01

    Cardiologist and other staff members receive high doses of scattered radiation. Cases of radiation-induced cataract among cardiology professionals have been reported in studies, estimates for the dose to eye lens ranged from 450 to 900 mSv per year (without ceiling suspended screen), over several years. Recent surveys regarding high prevalence of lens changes likely induced by radiation exposure suggest an urgent need for improved radiation safety and training, use of eye protection during catheterization procedures, and improved occupational dosimetry. In view of the evidence of radiation injuries, the ICRP recommends limiting the radiation dose to the lens to 20 mSv per year for occupational exposure. A system for optimizing the radiation exposure is the measurement of entrance surface air kerma (K{sub a,e}) and kerma-area product (P{sub KA}) for patient and scattered dose or dose rate at the position for the staff, under clinical working conditions using phantoms and defined technical factors. Correlating K{sub a,e} and P{sub KA} with the scatter dose, applying the attenuation factors protective devices can enable estimation of the lens doses for operators. The purpose of this work is: to study the possibility of establishing a procedure which is useful for scientific societies and the regulatory authority in the prevention and control of IOE dose and to control and improve the quality of procedures in interventional cardiology as an initiative to raise awareness and optimization of radiological protection. Measurements were taken in different cardiac laboratories. Clinical working conditions were reproduced during the experiments for the different hemodynamic angiographic projections and operating modes used in fluoroscopy and cine. A first K{sub a,e} rate reference proposal for the characterization of angiography for the different acquisition modes were 16; 35; 40 and 220 (mGy/min), respectively. Considering the typical PKA values to patient in interventional

  19. Assessment of clinical occupational dose reduction effect of a new interventional cardiology shield for radial access combined with a scatter reducing drape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, Paddy; Lynch, J; Eder, H; Maguire, S; Fox, E; Doyle, B; Casserly, I; McCann, H; Foley, D

    2015-11-01

    To assess the occupational dose reduction effect of a new interventional cardiology shield for radial access combined with a scatter reducing drape. Transradial access for catheterization has been shown to increase occupational radiation dose. Current shielding techniques are primarily based on the femoral access. This article looks at the clinical occupational combined dose reduction effect of a commercially available shield and drape which is specific to access type. The evaluation took place in a busy interventional cardiology laboratory, with a single plane 30×40 cm flat panel detector (Siemens Artis Zee, Germany). Radiation exposure to staff was measured using electronic personal dosimeters (Unfors RaysafeAB, Sweden) placed at the collar. Patient radiation exposure was assessed using screening time and dose area product per case. Both staff and patient radiation exposure were monitored for a number of case types and operators before, during, and after deployment of the new shield and drapes. The cardiologists' overall median collar badge reading per case reduced from 15.4 μSv per case without the shield/drape combination to 7.3 μSv per case with the shield drape combination in situ (P<0.001). The radiographers badge reading was reduced from 4.2 μSv per case without to 2.5 μSv per case with the shield drape combination in situ (P<0.001). There was no statistical difference in the cardiac technician's badge reading. Patient's dose area product was not significantly affected by the placement of the shield and drape combination. The shield/drape combination can significantly reduce operator exposure in a cardiac catheterization laboratory. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Tele-cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molefi, M; Fortuin, J; Wynchank, S

    2006-01-01

    After defining tele-medicine, we describe its situation in the public health service of South Africa and its application to cardiology. Methods of communication relevant to tele-cardiology are outlined, together with their bearing on primary healthcare. The range of tele-cardiological applications to electrocardiology, echocardiology, auscultation, imaging and pathology are indicated. Tele-cardiology's contributions to a range of cardiological problems and types of management are described briefly. Finally, a mention is made of the relevance of tele-medicine to education and the costs related to cardiology, with an indication of some future needs for tele-cardiology.

  1. ANUARIO 2012: CARDIOLOGÍA INTERVENCIONISTA. LAS REVISTAS DE LAS SOCIEDADES NACIONALES PRESENTAN UNA SELECCIÓN DE LAS INVESTIGACIONES QUE HAN IMPULSADO AVANCES RECIENTES EN CARDIOLOGÍA CLÍNICA / Almanac 2012: Interventional Cardiology. The National Society Journals present selected research that has driven recent advances in Clinical Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Meier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: El campo de la cardiología intervencionista sigue avanzando rápidamente. La eficacia de las intervenciones percutáneas con las nuevas generaciones de stents liberadores de fármacos ha avanzado mucho en la última década. Esta mejora en el rendimiento del stent ha ampliado el nivel de indicación hacia intervenciones más complejas tales como intervencionismo del tronco coronario izquierdo y de múltiples vasos. En el campo del tratamiento médico coadyuvante continúan los grandes avances, como lo es el tratamiento antiplaquetario (bivalirudina, prasugrel, ticagrelor que mejorará aún más los resultados del intervencionismo coronario percutáneo. Lo mismo ocurre para la imagenología intravascular como es el caso del ultrasonido intravascular y la tomografía de coherencia óptica. Sin embargo, la cardiología intervencionista se ha convertido en un campo bastante amplio, que incluye también la ablación septal con alcohol para la miocardiopatía hipertrófica obstructiva, etc. En la actualidad, las intervenciones estructurales constituyen el área de mayor crecimiento, sobre todo para la estenosis válvular aórtica (implantación de válvula aórtica transcatéter y la regurgitación mitral (clipping mitral. En esta revisión se tratan los avances recientes en todos estos diferentes campos de la cardiología intervencionista / Abstract: The field of interventional cardiology continues to progress quickly. The efficacy of percutaneous interventions with newer generation drug-eluting stents has advanced a lot over the last decade. This improvement in stent performance has broadened the level of indication towards more complex interventions such as left main and multi-vessel PCI. Major improvements continue in the field of medical co-therapy such as antiplatelet therapies (bivalirudin, prasugrel, ticagrelor and this will further improve outcomes of PCI. The same is true for intravascular imaging such as ultrasound IVUS and

  2. Llama cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boon, J A; Knight, A P; Moore, D H

    1994-07-01

    Auscultatory, ECG, and echocardiographic data have been presented for healthy llamas. The literature, however, contains little information on the incidence of congenital and acquired heart disease in the llama. Data compiled from the medical records at CSU-VTH and the VMDB provide an indication of the types of cardiac disease to be found in llamas in North America. A wide variety of congenital cardiac defects are found in llamas, the most prevalent defect of which is VSD. Llamas tend to do well with this defect but are unlikely to be useful pack animals. Acquired heart disease primarily involved inflammatory processes of the pericardium, endocardium, epicardium, and myocardium, and pericardial effusion without documented inflammatory disease. Although not every cardiac murmur necessitates a complete cardiac work-up, every effort should be made to compile accurate medical histories and physical findings related to the cardiac disease in llamas in order to advance our knowledge of these disorders. There also is a need to use available technologies to better define cardiac abnormalities in the llama and accurately report these findings in the literature before cardiology of llamas is fully understood.

  3. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care: Endorsed by the American Heart Assocation, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-05-19

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015 The Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, The American College of Cardiology Foundation, The Heart Failure Society of America, and The Society for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Cardiology update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the year 2014, there were certain remarkable trials that have changed the practice of cardiology and beyond that these tried to explained some long awaited unanswered questions. Like SIMPLICITY HTN-3 trial clearly explained the uselessness of renal denervation therapy in systemic hypertension. PARADIGM-HF trial provided positive data that may be useful to enrich the basket of medical treatment with a new drug LCZ 696 after a long time. Another important meta-analysis in heart failure questioned the status of beta blockers as standard therapy to improve prognosis in patients with concomitant heart failure and atrial fibrillation . In myocardial infraction , CvLPRIT trial supported the concept of complete revascularization at the time of primary PCI and TASTE trials failed to show expected benefit of thrombus aspiration in acute MI. FFR got more strength from FAME 2 trial. Another important question that was addressed in SECURITY trial was optimal duration of DAPT after second generation DES implantation. One year follow-up results of ABSORB II suggested that bioresorbable scaffolds are currently facing problem of stent thrombosis that might be taken care in near future with improvement in strut technology. Successful use of "Heart in a box" machine provided a major thrust for cardiac transplantation. SEARCH-AF evaluated the efficacy of a novel mobile health technology in the real world to screen for atrial fibrillation (now called as life style disease. A Meta-analysis provided a more comprehensive picture of the new oral anticoagulants as a therapeutic option in atrial fibrillation. Positive results for trans catheter pm-VSD closure in paediatric population were also demonstrated by a randomized controlled trial. Role of corticosteroids in tubercular pericarditis also got the answer in a trial published in 2014.

  5. The contribution of interventional cardiology procedures to the population radiation dose in a ‘health-care level I’ representative region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo Cornetto, Andrea; Aimonetto, Stefania; Pisano, Francesco; Giudice, Marcello; Sicuro, Marco; Meloni, Teodoro; Tofani, Santi

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluates per-procedure, collective and per capita effective dose to the population by interventional cardiology (IC) procedures performed during 2002–11 at the main hospital of Aosta Valley Region that can be considered as representative of the health-care level I countries, as defined by the UNSCEAR, based on its socio-demographic characteristics. IC procedures investigated were often multiple procedures in patients older than 60 y. The median extreme dose-area product values of 300 and 22 908 cGycm2 were found for standard pacemaker implantation and coronary angioplasty, respectively, while the relative mean per-procedure effective dose ranged from 0.7 to 47 mSv. A 3-fold increase in frequency has been observed together with a correlated increase in the delivered per capita dose (0.05–0.27 mSv y−1) and the collective dose (5.8–35 man Sv y−1). Doses increased particularly from 2008 onwards mainly because of the introduction of coronary angioplasty procedures in the authors’ institution. IC practice contributed remarkably in terms of effective dose to the population, delivering ∼10 % of the total dose by medical ionising radiation examination categories. PMID:26012484

  6. Recommendations of the European Board for the Specialty Cardiology (EBSC) for education and training in basic cardiology in Europe. The Executive Committee of the European Board for the Specialty Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The Cardiology Monosection of the UEMS and the European Society of Cardiology have created a European Board for the Specialty of Cardiology whose task is to prove guidelines for training and training institutions. The recommendations are presented here and in summary require at least 3 years education and training in basic cardiology (after at least 2 years of a common trunk of general internal medicine) at an approved institution with adequate exposure to all aspects of adult cardiological practice.

  7. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie d'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella(®); left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. 2015 SCAI/ACC/HFSA/STS Clinical Expert Consensus Statement on the Use of Percutaneous Mechanical Circulatory Support Devices in Cardiovascular Care (Endorsed by the American Heart Association, the Cardiological Society of India, and Sociedad Latino Americana de Cardiologia Intervencion; Affirmation of Value by the Canadian Association of Interventional Cardiology-Association Canadienne de Cardiologie D'intervention).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rihal, Charanjit S; Naidu, Srihari S; Givertz, Michael M; Szeto, Wilson Y; Burke, James A; Kapur, Navin K; Kern, Morton; Garratt, Kirk N; Goldstein, James A; Dimas, Vivian; Tu, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Although historically the intra-aortic balloon pump has been the only mechanical circulatory support device available to clinicians, a number of new devices have become commercially available and have entered clinical practice. These include axial flow pumps, such as Impella®; left atrial to femoral artery bypass pumps, specifically the TandemHeart; and new devices for institution of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. These devices differ significantly in their hemodynamic effects, insertion, monitoring, and clinical applicability. This document reviews the physiologic impact on the circulation of these devices and their use in specific clinical situations. These situations include patients undergoing high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention, those presenting with cardiogenic shock, and acute decompensated heart failure. Specialized uses for right-sided support and in pediatric populations are discussed and the clinical utility of mechanical circulatory support devices is reviewed, as are the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines.

  9. Quality control for invasive cardiology: Holland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plokker, H W

    1996-10-01

    Although no official registration of indications, treatments and results in patients with coronary heart disease has taken place in Holland, the following authorities and commissions have introduced guidelines for quality control: the Dutch government, the Dutch Society of Cardiology, the Working Group on Interventional Cardiology and the health insurers. Until 1991, the right to perform coronary interventions was tied to a license issued by the Ministry of Health. New recommendations were delineated 5 years ago: at least 500 interventions must be annually performed by 5 interventional cardiologists, i.e. ca. 100 interventions annually per cardiologist. No interventional cardiology may be performed without an in-house cardiac surgery and vice versa. In a survey by the Dutch Society of Cardiology on the quality of the Dutch centers, PTCA-mortality was ca. 0.3%, infarction rate was ca. 2%. An emergency bypass operation was necessary in 1.0 to 1.6% of the cases; the surgical team was on immediate alert for 11% of the patients. Selection of patients without risk was deemed impossible. Despite objections by some members the Dutch Society of Cardiology, it was recommended that cardiac surgery and interventions should not be separated. Data from health insurers showed no inappropriate indications for PTCA. The DUCAT-study, which used the RAND criteria, showed PTCA indications to be correct in more than 90% of the cases. The Dutch government wants to control the expansion of PTCA centers, so it is no wonder that waiting lists are becoming longer.

  10. Expert consensus (SBC/SBHCI) on the use of drug-eluting stents: recommendations of the Brazilian society of interventional cardiology/ Brazilian society of cardiology for the Brazilian public single healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Valter C; Mattos, Luiz Alberto P; Caramori, Paulo R A; Perin, Marco A; Mangione, José A; Machado, Bruno M; Coelho, Wilson M C; Bueno, Ronaldo R L

    2006-10-01

    The authors review percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) evolution and its growing application in myocardial revascularization for patients with coronary heart disease in Brazil and worldwide. PCI was introduced in 1977 using only the catheter balloon. Limitations of this method (acute occlusion and coronary restenosis) led to the adoption of coronary stents and more recently the advent of drug-eluting stents2, which were developed to drastically reduce restenosis rates. These developments allowed the exponential growth of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures in Brazil which have replaced many bypass surgery procedures and have become the gold standard for the majority of symptomatic patients suffering from coronary artery disease. The preference for this procedure gained new dimensions in 2000 when the Brazilian Public Healthcare System (SUS) began reimbursing for stent procedures. This measure exemplified the importance of the Public Healthcare System's participation in incorporating medical advances and offering a high standard of cardiovascular treatment to a large portion of the Brazilian population. It is emphasized that prevention of in-stent restenosis is complex due to its unpredictable and ubiquitous occurrence. Control of this condition improves quality of life and reduces the recurrence of angina pectoris, the need to perform new revascularization procedures and hospital readmissions. The overall success of the drug-eluting stents has proven to be reliable and consistent in overcoming restenosis and has some beneficial impact for all clinical and angiographic conditions. This paper discusses the adoption and criteria for the use of drug-eluting stents in other countries as well as the recommendations established by the Brazilian Society of Interventional Cardiology for their reimbursement by SUS. The incorporation of new healthcare technology involves two distinct stages. During the first stage, the product is registered with the

  11. Needlestick Injuries in Interventional Radiology Are Common and Underreported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deipolyi, Amy R; Prabhakar, Anand M; Naidu, Sailendra; Oklu, Rahmi

    2017-06-19

    Purpose To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for needlesticks in interventional radiology physicians, as well as the attitudes, behaviors, and conditions that promote or interfere with reporting of these injuries. Materials and Methods A total of 3889 interventional radiologists from academic and private practice in the United States were surveyed by emailing all interventional radiologist members of the Society of Interventional Radiology, including attending-level physicians and trainees (April-August 2016). The institutional review board waived the need for consent. Questions inquired about the nature, frequency, and type of needlestick and sharps injuries and whether and to whom these incidents were reported. Stepwise regression was used to determine variables predicting whether injuries were reported. Results In total, 908 (23%) interventional radiologists completed at least a portion of the survey. Eight hundred fourteen (91%) of 895 respondents reported a prior needlestick injury, 583 (35%) of 895 reported at least one injury while treating an HIV-positive patient, and 626 (71%) of 884 reported prior training regarding needlestick injury. There was, on average, one needlestick for every 5 years of practice. Most needlestick or sharps injuries were self inflicted (711 [87%] of 817) and involved a hollow-bore device (464 [56%] of 824). Only 566 (66%) of 850 injuries were reported. The most common reasons for not reporting included perceived lack of utility of reporting (79 [28%] of 282), perceived low risk for injury (56 [20%] of 282), noncontaminated needle (53 [19%] of 282), too-lengthy reporting process (37 [13%] of 282), and associated stigma (23 [8%] of 282). Only 156 (25%) of 624 respondents informed their significant other. Stepwise regression assessing variables affecting the likelihood of reporting showed that male sex (P = .009), low-risk patient (P < .0001), self injury (P = .010), trainee status (P < .0001), and the total number of prior

  12. Full characterization of the X-ray system in order to evaluate patient dose in interventional cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotelo, E.; Gigirey, P.; Zubillaga, J.; Wagner, M. [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). School for Medical Technology. Hospital Dr. Manuel Quintela; Paolini, G. [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). School of Sciences; Duran, A. [Universidad de la Republica, Montevideo (Uruguay). Hospital Dr. Manuel Quintela. Dept. of Cardiology

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate interventional radiology x-ray system performance in order to analyze its influence on patient dose. Entrance air kerma rate in fluoroscopy modes and air kerma per image in cine modes were measured at the entrance of PMMA slabs (10 to 30 cm) in two interventional x-ray systems. Air kerma evaluation was performed in all image intensifiers (II) diameters and in all fluoroscopy and cine modes used in the clinical practice with an ionization chamber. High and low contrast resolution was evaluated for all PMMA thickness, II and modes, with two quality image tests (NEMA XR 21 and Leeds TOR-18FG). Significant differences were found in air kerma rate and air kerma per image in both x-ray systems for comparable II and modes. For example, for 24 cm PMMA thickness in fluoroscopic high dose mode, in one x-ray system delivers 0.49 mGy/s and the other one 1.87 mGy/s. However, differences in image quality were not significant. In the same conditions described above, Leeds test showed: 0.032 (low contrast) and 1.25 lp mm (spatial frequency). In addition, when phantom thickness increase, image quality decreases in x-ray systems, but in one of them, the difference is high. Results show that patient dose and image quality depend on the x-ray system characteristics. Due to this it is essential to perform a complete evaluation of the x-ray system in order to help interventional cardiologists (radiologists) to learn possibilities of dose reduction with no lose of image quality. (author)

  13. Ferret cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac disease in pet ferrets is common and includes dilated cardiomyopathy, arrhythmias, and acquired valvular disease. Clinical presentation of cardiac disease in ferrets may be similar to dog or cats, although hind limb weakness may be a prominent feature. Radiography, ECG, and ultrasound are all useful tools in the diagnosis of cardiac disease in ferrets. Therapeutics for cardiac disease in ferrets is based on recommendations for dogs and cats. The prognosis for cardiac disease in ferrets varies from fair to guarded, depending on underlying disease.

  14. Reptile cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease in reptiles generally is considered an uncommon finding in captive animals, but no large-scale, cross-sectional studies have been performed to determine its prevalence. It is possible that cardiovascular disease is more common than is generally accepted and that the current belief results from limited clinical and diagnostic experience. This article offers guidance drawn from the author's clinical experience and the available literature. It is important that veterinarians pursue a thorough history, physical examination, and diagnostic work-up when managing cardiovascular disease in a reptile case. Veterinarians working with these cases should document their findings and share them with their colleagues to build an evidence-based foundation for reptile medicine.

  15. Evaluation of patients skin dose undergoing interventional cardiology procedure using radiochromic films; Avaliacao da dose na pele de pacientes submetidos a procedimentos de cardiologia intervencionista usando filmes radiocromicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mauro W. Oliveira da; Canevaro, Lucia V. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Fisica Medica; Rodrigues, Barbara B. Dias [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    In interventional cardiology (IC), coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) procedures are the most frequent ones. Since the 1990s, the number of IC procedures has increased rapidly. It is also known that these procedures are associated with high radiation doses due to long fluoroscopy time (FT) and large number of cine-frames (CF) acquired to document the procedure. Mapping skin doses in IC is useful to find the probability of skin injuries, to detect areas of overlapping field, and to get a permanent record of the most exposed areas of skin. The purpose of this study was to estimate the maximum skin dose (MSD) in patients undergoing CA and PTCA, and to compare these values with the reference levels proposed in the literature. Patients' dose measurements were carried out on a sample of 38 patients at the hemodynamic department, in four local hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, using Gafchromic XR-RV2 films. In PTCA procedures, the median and third quartile values of MSD were estimated at 2.5 and 5.3 Gy, respectively. For the CA procedures, the median and third quartile values of MSD were estimated at 0.5 and 0.7 Gy, respectively. In this paper, we used the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and we found a fairly strong correlation between FT and MSD (r=0.8334, p<0.0001), for CA procedures. The 1 Gy threshold for deterministic effects was exceeded in nine patients. The use of Gafchromic XR-RV2 films was shown to be an effective method to measure MSD and the dose distribution map. The method is effective to identify the distribution of radiation fields, thus allowing the follow-up of the patient to investigate the appearance of skin injuries. (author)

  16. Flat detector computed tomography in diagnostic and interventional pediatric cardiology; Flachdetektor-Computertomografie in der diagnostischen und interventionellen Kinderkardiologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moesler, J.; Dittrich, S.; Gloeckler, M. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Pediatric Cardiology; Rompel, O. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Radiology

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: In this study the use of flat detector computed tomography (FD-CT) in the catheterization of patients with congenital heart disease was evaluated. Application reports were created for various issues based on the achieved image quality in diverse anatomical regions. Materials and Methods: FD-CT was applied in 176 cases during catheterization between January 2010 and April 2012. A five-point Likert scale ('essential' to 'misleading') was used to evaluate image quality. All cases were analyzed retrospectively and application reports for the visualization of the aorta, pulmonary arteries, pulmonary veins, semilunar valves, cavopulmonary connections and atrial baffles were generated. Contrast dye consumption and radiation dose were evaluated. Results: During the observation period FD-CT was applied in all 176 cases. The mean patient age was 7.0 years (0.01 - 42.53 years). The clinical value of FD-CT was rated superior to conventional angiography in 96.6 % of the cases and was never rated as 'misleading'. FD-CT was rated 'essential' in 3.4 % of all cases, 'very useful' in 77.3 % of all cases, 'useful' in 15.9 % of all cases and 'not useful' in 3.4 % of all cases. The mean dose-area product was 99 {mu}Gym{sup 2} (19.3 - 1276.6 {mu}Gym{sup 2}), and the used contrast dye was 1.76 ml/kg (0.9 - 5 ml/kg). Application reports for the visualization of different anatomical regions are demonstrated. Conclusion: FD-CT is a new and auxiliary procedure in diagnostic and interventional catheterization of patients with congenital heart disease. Particularly extracardiac structures can be displayed in three-dimensional high resolution and be used for diagnosis, surgical planning and 3 D navigation. (orig.)

  17. American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... much more! class="box-li"> Journal of Nuclear Cardiology Official publication of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Clinical Guidelines Procedures, Appropriate Use Criteria, Information Statements ...

  18. New technologies in interventional cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.G. Violaris (Andonis); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe limitations of balloon angioplasty have led to the introduction of new devices designed to improve the short- and long-term efficacy of percutaneous revascularization techniques. Preliminary single-operator experience and registry data have suggested that these devices may be useful

  19. Optimal duration of dual anti-platelet therapy after percutaneous coronary intervention: 2016 consensus position of the Italian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barillà, Francesco; Pelliccia, Francesco; Borzi, Mauro; Camici, Paolo; Cas, Livio Dei; Di Biase, Matteo; Indolfi, Ciro; Mercuro, Giuseppe; Montemurro, Vincenzo; Padeletti, Luigi; Filardi, Pasquale Perrone; Vizza, Carmine D; Romeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Definition of the optimal duration of dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) is an important clinical issue, given the large number of patients having percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the costs and risks of pharmacologic therapy, the consequences of stent thrombosis, and the potential benefits of DAPT in preventing ischaemic outcomes beyond stent thrombosis. Nowadays, the rationale for a prolonged duration of DAPT should be not only the prevention of stent thrombosis, but also the prevention of ischaemic events unrelated to the coronary stenosis treated with index PCI. A higher predisposition to athero-thrombosis may persist for years after an acute myocardial infarction, and even stable patients with a history of prior myocardial infarction are at high risk for major adverse cardiovascular events. Recently, results of pre-specified post-hoc analyses of randomized clinical trials, including the PEGASUS-TIMI 54 trial, have shed light on strategies of DAPT in various clinical situations, and should impact the next rounds of international guidelines, and also routine practice. Accordingly, the 2015 to 2016 the Board of the Italian Society of Cardiology addressed newer recommendations on duration of DAPT based on most recent scientific information. The document states that physicians should decide duration of DAPT on an individual basis, taking into account ischaemic and bleeding risks of any given patient. Indeed, current controversy surrounding optimal duration of DAPT clearly reflects the fact that, nowadays, a one size fits all strategy cannot be reliably applied to patients treated with PCI. Indeed, patients usually have factors for both increased ischaemic and bleeding risks that must be carefully evaluated to assess the benefit/risk ratio of prolonged DAPT. Personalized management of DAPT must be seen as a dynamic prescription with regular re-evaluations of the risk/benefit to the patient according to changes in his/her clinical profile. Also, in order to

  20. Auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder: common phenomenology, common cause, common interventions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon eMccarthy-Jones

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH: ‘hearing voices’ are found in both schizophrenia and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In this paper we first demonstrate that AVH in these two diagnoses share a qualitatively similar phenomenology. We then show that the presence of AVH in schizophrenia is often associated with earlier exposure to traumatic/emotionally overwhelming events, as it is by definition in PTSD. We next argue that the content of AVH relates to earlier traumatic events in a similar way in both PTSD and schizophrenia, most commonly having direct or indirect thematic links to emotionally overwhelming events, rather than being direct re-experiencing. We then propose, following cognitive models of PTSD, that the reconstructive nature of memory may be able to account for the nature of these associations between trauma and AVH content, as may threat-hypervigilance and the individual’s personal goals. We conclude that a notable subset of people diagnosed with schizophrenia with AVH are having phenomenologically and aetiologically identical experiences to PTSD patients who hear voices. As such we propose that the iron curtain between AVH in PTSD (often termed ‘dissociative AVH’ and AVH in schizophrenia (so-called ‘psychotic AVH’ needs to be torn down, as these are often the same experience. One implication of this is that these trauma-related AVH require a common trans-diagnostic treatment strategy. Whilst antipsychotics are already increasingly being used to treat AVH in PTSD, we argue for the centrality of trauma-based interventions for trauma-based AVH in both PTSD and in people diagnosed with schizophrenia.

  1. Reporting nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trägårdh, Elin; Hesse, Birger; Knuuti, Juhani

    2015-01-01

    are available; therefore, an European position statement on how to report nuclear cardiology might be useful. The current paper combines the limited existing evidence with expert consensus, previously published recommendations as well as current clinical practices. For all the applications discussed......, and conclusion of the report. The statement also discusses recommended terminology in nuclear cardiology, image display, and preliminary reports. It is hoped that this statement may lead to more attention to create well-written and standardized nuclear cardiology reports and eventually lead to improved clinical...

  2. Department of Cardiology of Seep Quality of Patients with Hospital and Nursing Interventions%心内科住院患者睡眠质量分析与护理干预

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文静; 杨静; 金雁; 宋淑平; 郭晓霞; 李明波

    2012-01-01

    目的:了解心内科住院患者睡眠质量,分析睡眠障碍的原因,探讨改善患者睡眠障碍的有效护理对策.方法:对我院2010年5月-2010年12月心内科109例住院睡眠障碍患者采取问卷调查及深入访谈相结合的方法进行调查,找出心内科患者睡眠障碍的原因;随后,将109例患者随机分为两组,对照组实行组常规护理,干预组实行有针对性的护理,7d后对对两组患者睡眠障碍进行测评.结果:心内科患者睡眠障碍症状为:入眠时间长,早醒,觉醒次数多,醒后再入眠难;睡眠障碍原因为:患者自身疾病、心理、环境、其他及综合因素所致.通过有针对性的护理干预后,两组有较大差距(P<0.05),干预组患者睡眠障碍改善明显,干预组好于对照组,表明护理干预可有效改善患者的睡眠质量.结论:疾病因素、心理因素以及生活习惯是影响心内科住院患者睡眠质量的主要因素,通过科学有效的护理干预措施,可以改善心内科患者的睡眠质量,提高患者的身心健康.%Objective: Understanding of sleep quality of patients with hospitalized Department of Cardiology, analyzing the causes of sleep disorders, sleep disorders patients with of an effective improvement of nursing. Methods:Our hospital in May 2010-2010 Department of Cardiology 109 cases in December hospitalized patients with sleep disorders questionnaire and in-depth interview to a combination of methods of investigation, Department of Cardiology to find out the reasons for patients with sleep disorders; then the 109 patients randomized Divided into two groups, the implementation of routine care group, the intervention group and targeted nursing practice, 7d after the two groups were carried out evaluation of sleep disorders. Results: Department of Cardiology patients with symptoms of sleep disorders: sleep for a long time, early awakening, awakening more often, difficult to sleep after awake; sleep disorders due to

  3. Review on the guide for clinical good practices: the example of interventional cardiology; Point sur le guide des bonnes pratiques cliniques: exemple de la cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livarek, B. [Service de Cardiologie, Centre Hospitalier de Versailles, 177 route de Versailles, 78153 Le Chesnay Cedex (France)

    2009-07-01

    The author discusses the objectives and the challenges of the drafting of a guide for good practice when using ionizing radiations in cardiology. Main challenges deal with obtaining radioprotection with an optimal reduction of doses but without loosing information quality, and also with the determination of reference levels (this issue is at the root of the good practice definition). A work group has been set to draft this guide

  4. [Perspectives in cardiological research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, W

    2004-08-01

    German cardiological research is confronted with increasing difficulties. Clinical research is restricted by regulations, such as the working hours protecting law, the revised version of the legal articles against corruption and acceptance of advantage as well as by many parts of law for the general frame of the university structures. In addition more and more administrative duties are tranferred to doctors engaged in research. Furthermore cardiology is at a disadvantage as only part of the net profits for cardiological services are tranferred to the responsible clinic. Likewise the facilities for cooperation are increasingly restricted, as basic science institutions originally allocated to cardiological research, are now devoted to other subjects and as many pharmaceutical firms have left the country. Cardiology in our country is practically not supported by private research organizations. Research projects are, therefore, predominantly financed by grants from the Bundeministerium für Bildung und Forschung and by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. The financial resources for research in our country are declining and much smaller compared, e. g., to the USA. As a consequence of the shortage of resources not only are the weak projects turned down; it is feared that also the very innovative projects are likewise excluded for entering unknown territory. In periods of financial restrictions the central office and the experts evaluating the projects have a special responsibility, which cannot be met by technical objections, such as e. g., an "unsufficient impact factor". In order to improve the conditions for cardiological research the net profits for cardiological services should be transferred unrestricted to the responsible clinic. The acceptance rate of cardiologcal projects may be increased by more intensive cooperation. At the end, the principle of help by self-help also applies to cardiological research; the British Heart Foundation has developed into an

  5. ICRP PUBLICATION 120: Radiological protection in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousins, C; Miller, D L; Bernardi, G; Rehani, M M; Schofield, P; Vañó, E; Einstein, A J; Geiger, B; Heintz, P; Padovani, R; Sim, K-H

    2013-02-01

    Cardiac nuclear medicine, cardiac computed tomography (CT), interventional cardiology procedures, and electrophysiology procedures are increasing in number and account for an important share of patient radiation exposure in medicine. Complex percutaneous coronary interventions and cardiac electrophysiology procedures are associated with high radiation doses. These procedures can result in patient skin doses that are high enough to cause radiation injury and an increased risk of cancer. Treatment of congenital heart disease in children is of particular concern. Additionally, staff(1) in cardiac catheterisation laboratories may receive high doses of radiation if radiological protection tools are not used properly. The Commission provided recommendations for radiological protection during fluoroscopically guided interventions in Publication 85, for radiological protection in CT in Publications 87 and 102, and for training in radiological protection in Publication 113 (ICRP, 2000b,c, 2007a, 2009). This report is focused specifically on cardiology, and brings together information relevant to cardiology from the Commission's published documents. There is emphasis on those imaging procedures and interventions specific to cardiology. The material and recommendations in the current document have been updated to reflect the most recent recommendations of the Commission. This report provides guidance to assist the cardiologist with justification procedures and optimisation of protection in cardiac CT studies, cardiac nuclear medicine studies, and fluoroscopically guided cardiac interventions. It includes discussions of the biological effects of radiation, principles of radiological protection, protection of staff during fluoroscopically guided interventions, radiological protection training, and establishment of a quality assurance programme for cardiac imaging and intervention. As tissue injury, principally skin injury, is a risk for fluoroscopically guided interventions

  6. Impact of Nursing Intervention on Inpatients' Falls in Department of Cardiology%护理干预对心内科住院患者跌倒的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲丽; 郑英花; 李壮; 丁欣; 李利英; 杨怡

    2011-01-01

    目的:探讨护理干预对心内科住院患者跌倒的影响,为临床护理及有效预防跌倒提供科学有效的依据.方法:对我院2010年1月-2010年7月心内科991例住院患者进行问卷调查与深入的访谈,对患者进行跌倒风险评估及危险因素分析,实施护理干预后再次评估.结果:心内科住院患者发生跌倒的危险系数高,属于高危密集人群.实施使用床栏、使用固定及身体约束带、对患者及家属进行安全教育和改善科室环境护理措施后,跌倒发生率有显著下降.结论:对患者进行跌倒风险评估后,有针对性的实施护理干预,可以有效的降低心内科住院患者跌倒发生率,提高患者的生存质量,保护患者住院期间的安全.%Objective: To explore the effects of nursing intervention on inpatients' falls in Department of Cardiology, and to provide a scientific and effective basis for clinical care in prevention of falls. Methods: A total of 991 inpatients in Department of Cardiol ogy, admitted into our hospital from January 2010 to July 2010,were conducted a questionnaire survey. The inpatients were given assessment of falls risk , analysis of risk factors and nursing intervention. Results: The inpatients in Department of Cardiology belonged to high-risk populations and easy to fall.So use of bed rails, fixed protection and body restraint strap, as well as safety education for patients and their families and improvement of the environmental and nursing measures in the department, can significantly reduce the incidence of falls. Conclusion: After assessment of fall risks of inpatients, the implementation of targeted nursing interventions can effectively reduce the incidence of falls of inpatients in Department of Cardiology and improve the quality of life of inpatients and protect them during the hospitalization.

  7. Cardiology without borders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael Wolk

    2004-01-01

    @@ Cardiovascular disease takes place in a border-free world. The challenge at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and anywhere else in the world is to hold patient care above the artificial barriers raised by geopolitical issues. Fundamentally, the goal of ACC members or of any cardiology societies in the world is to provide excellent patient care. Cardiovascular disease is essentially the same throughout the world. Where there are minor variations among individuals, as clinicians we find priceless opportunity to learn. Expanding- rather contracting -our experience base helps us as individuals to realize our best potential as practitioners.

  8. Artificial intelligence in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonderman, Diana

    2017-10-04

    Decision-making is complex in modern medicine and should ideally be based on available data, structured knowledge and proper interpretation in the context of an individual patient. Automated algorithms, also termed artificial intelligence that are able to extract meaningful patterns from data collections and build decisions upon identified patterns may be useful assistants in clinical decision-making processes. In this article, artificial intelligence-based studies in clinical cardiology are reviewed. The text also touches on the ethical issues and speculates on the future roles of automated algorithms versus clinicians in cardiology and medicine in general.

  9. Hippocrates, cardiology, Confucius and the Yellow Emperor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T O

    2001-12-01

    Although Hippocrates (460-c.375 BC) has been traditionally recognized as the Father of Medicine, the fact that he was seminal in the development of cardiology is much less well known. Evidence is presented to support the notion that Hippocrates could also be considered the Father of Cardiology. Hippocrates also had many of the teachings and practices in common with Confucius (c.551-c.479 BC) and the Yellow Emperor of China (2695-2589 BC). Whereas Confucius was not a physician, the Yellow Emperor was an ancient Chinese physician whose Huang Di Neijing, the Yellow Emperor's Canon of Internal Medicine, is the oldest known treatise of medicine in existence.

  10. The genome and cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Henning; Diness, Birgitte Rode; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    cardiac diseases. Clinical and genetic cascade family screening of the relatives to patients with inherited cardiac diseases is now organized in a national network of centres of cardiology, sharing pedigrees, clinical and genetic information. This gives unique opportunities for offering focused...

  11. A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

  12. A Systematic Review of Common Physiotherapy Interventions in School-Aged Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Liz; Baker, Richard; Harvey, Adrienne

    2010-01-01

    This systematic review focused on the common conventional physiotherapy interventions used with children with cerebral palsy (CP), aged 4 to 18 years, and critically appraised the recent evidence of each of these interventions using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence. The search strategy yielded 34 articles after…

  13. Nursing intervention to prevent the falls and falling out of bed in elderly patients of cardiology%护理干预对预防心内科老年患者跌倒及坠床的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林媛媛

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨护理干预对预防心内科老年患者跌倒及坠床的临床价值。方法选择患者200例,分为两组,各100例,观察组针对跌倒和坠床进行护理干预,对照组则为实施特殊护理干预,比较两组患者发生跌倒和坠床事件比例,并统计两组整天护理满意度。结果观察组发生跌倒和坠床事件比例均显著低于对照组(P<0.05),观察组满意度为96.0%,显著高于对照组的81.0%(P<0.05)。结论针对老年心内科患者跌倒及坠床进行针对性护理,能显著减少跌倒和坠床率,提高护理满意度,值得临床重视。%Objective To investigate the effect of nursing intervention to prevent the falls and falling out of bed in elderly patients of cardiology. Methods 200 cases were divided into two groups, each 100 cases, the observation group were used the nursing intervention for falls and falling out of bed, the control group were implemented without special nursing intervention,then were the proportion of falls and fall-bed incident rate and satisfaction were compared.Results There were incidents of falls and falling out of bed proportion in the observation group were significantly lower than control group(P<0.05), satisfaction with the observation group was 96.0%, it was significantly higher than 81.0% in control group(P<0.05).Conclusion Nursing intervention to prevent the falls and falling out of bed in elderly patients of cardiology can significantly reduce the rate of falls and falling out of bed, it can improve care and satisfaction, so it is worthy of attention.

  14. University cardiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borozanov, V

    2013-01-01

    In distant 1972, within framework of the Internal Clinic, a cardiologic department was organized which was soon, on 29.XII.1974, transformed into the Cardiology Clinic, later the Institute for Heart Diseases, and in 2008 was renamed the University Cardiology Clinic. The greater part of its foundation was possible owing to Prof. Dimitar Arsov and Prof. Radovan Percinkovski, who was the clinic's first director in the period from 1974 to 1984. In 1985, the Clinic moved into its own new building, and in that way was physically detached from the Internal Clinics. Until its move to the new building, the Clinic functioned in the Internal Clinics building, organized as an outpatient polyclinic and inpatient infirmary department with clinical beds, a coronary intensive care unit and a haemodynamics laboratory equipped with the most modern equipment of that time. Today the Clinic functions through two integral divisions: an inpatient infirmary department which comprises an intensive coronary care unit and fourteen wards which altogether have 139 clinical beds, and the diagnostic centre which comprises an emergency clinic and day hospital, a communal and consultative outpatients' clinic functioning on a daily basis, through which some 300-350 patients pass every day, and diagnostic laboratories with a capacity of nearly 100 non-invasive and 20-30 invasive diagnostic procedures daily. The Clinic is a teaching base, and its doctors are educators of students at the Medical, Dental and Pharmacy Faculties, and also of students at the High School for Nurses and X-ray technicians, but also for those in Internal Medicine and especially Cardiology. The Clinic is also a base for scientific Masters' and post-doctoral studies, and such higher degrees are achieved not only by doctors who work here, but also by doctors from Medical Centres both in the country and abroad. Doctors working in this institution publish widely, not only a great number of books and monographs, but also original

  15. Behavioral cardiology: current advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Alan

    2014-07-08

    Growing epidemiological evidence identifies key domains relevant to behavioral cardiology, including health behaviors, emotions, mental mindsets, stress management, social connectedness, and a sense of purpose. Each of these domains exists along a continuum, ranging from positive factors that promote health, to negative factors, which are pathophysiological. To date, there has been relatively little translation of this growing knowledge base into cardiology practice. Four initiatives are proposed to meet this challenge: 1) promulgating greater awareness of the potency of psychosocial risks factors; 2) overcoming a current "artificial divide" between conventional and psychosocial risk factors; 3) developing novel cost-effective interventions using Internet and mobile health applications, group-based counseling, and development of tiered-care behavioral management; and 4) in recognition that "one size does not fit all" with respect to behavioral interventions, developing specialists who can counsel patients in multidisciplinary fashion and use evidence-based approaches for promoting patient motivation and execution of health goals. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. 心内科老年患者睡眠质量的分析及护理干预方法%Analysis Sleep Quality in Elderly Cardiology Patients and Propose Specific Nursing Interventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任淑杰

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨内科老年患者睡眠质量情况,提供针对性的护理干预措施。方法根据我院接收的60例心内科老年患者来进行研究分析,按照患者入院的顺序来进行分组,观察组和对照组均有30例患者,对这些患者的睡眠质量进行改善,对照组使用常规护理,观察组使用优质护理,比较分析护理前后匹兹堡睡眠质量指数(PSQI)。结果疾病因素、环境因素、心里因素是心内科老年患者睡眠质量受到影响的主要因素,观察组患者接受护理后,其匹兹堡睡眠质量指数比对照组优秀。结论针对性护理干预能改善心内科老年患者的疾病状态,住院环境、心里状态,对患者的睡眠质量具有非常大的帮助。%Objective To investigate the quality of sleep in elderly patients in department of internal medicine, and to provide the nursing intervention measures. Methods According to our hospital received 60 cases of cardiology in elderly patients to conduct research and analysis, according to the order of patients admitted to the groups, the observation group and the control group were 60 patients, of these patients sleep quality was improved, the control group used routine nursing, the observation group made with high quality of nursing, the comparative analysis of nursing before and after the Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI). Results Disease factors, environmental factors, psychological factors is affected by the department of cardiology, sleep quality of elderly patients with the main factors, patients in the observation group received nursing. The Pittsburgh sleep quality index compared with the control group, the excellent. Conclusion Targeted nursing intervention to the disease state in elderly patients with cardiac medicine, hospital environment, state of mind, the sleep quality of patients with a very big help.

  17. Cardiology Still a Man's Field, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162700.html Cardiology Still a Man's Field, Survey Finds Women less ... Dr. Claire Duvernoy, chair of the Women in Cardiology Council at the American College of Cardiology (ACC). ...

  18. Post hoc evaluation of a common-sense intervention for asthma management in community pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seubert, Liza; Schneider, Carl R; Clifford, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to evaluate a common-sense, behavioural change intervention to implement clinical guidelines for asthma management in the community pharmacy setting. Design The components of the common-sense intervention were described in terms of categories and dimensions using the Intervention Taxonomy (ITAX) and Behaviour Change Techniques (BCTs) using the Behaviour Change Wheel (BCW), Capability, Opportunity and Motivation-Behaviour (COM-B) System and Behaviour Change Techniques Taxonomy (BCTTv1). The retrospective application of these existing tools facilitated evaluation of the mechanism, fidelity, logistics and rationale of the common-sense intervention. Intervention The initial intervention study was conducted in 336 community pharmacies in the metropolitan area of Perth, Western Australia. Small-group workshops were conducted in 25 pharmacies; 162 received academic detailing and 149 acted as controls. The intervention was designed to improve pharmacy compliance with guidelines for a non-prescription supply of asthma reliever medications. Results Retrospective application of ITAX identified mechanisms for the short-acting β agonists intervention including improving knowledge, behavioural skills, problem-solving skills, motivation and self-efficacy. All the logistical elements were considered in the intervention design but the duration and intensity of the intervention was minimal. The intervention was delivered as intended (as a workshop) to 13.4% of participants indicating compromised fidelity and significant adaptation. Retrospective application of the BCW, COM-B system and BCTTv1 identified 9 different behaviour change techniques as the rationale for promoting guideline-based practice change. Conclusions There was a sound rationale and clear mechanism for all the components of the intervention but issues related to logistics, adaptability and fidelity might have affected outcomes. Small group workshops could be a useful implementation strategy in

  19. Computer diagnosis in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Wilfred Ewing

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reports upon the emergence of a novel cognitive, computer-based technology which may lead to significantly improved methods of cardiological diagnosis and a rapid and inexpensive method of cardiological screening.The technology ‘Virtual Scanning’ illustrates how, in blood, the reaction of proteins and their reactive substrates releases light; that the colour and intensity of this bioluminescence is unique to each reaction and it’s rate; and that the development of pathologies influence cognition and visual perception. This illustrates that the function of the autonomic nervous system is linked to that of the physiological systems and that the rate of biochemical reactions, and the progression of disease, can be measured by a cognitive test procedure and used as an indication of the disease(s affecting heart function.The article discusses the limitations of the conventional biomarker technique, and the potential value of non-invasive cognitive techniques, such as Virtual Scanning, to the medical practitioner. Finally, it discusses how the ability of Virtual Scanning to diagnose disease from its presymptomatic origins may lead to improved diagnostic accuracy and significantly reduced costs.

  20. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutte, H.; Petersen, C. Leth; Kjaer, A.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear cardiology is an essential part of functional, non-invasive, cardiac imaging. Significant advances have been made in nuclear cardiology since planar (201)thallium ((201)TI) scintigraphy was introduced for the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) perfusion nearly 40 years ago. The use...... of nuclear cardiology has been steadily increasing over the last 20 years with important steps being the introduction of (99m)technetium- ((99m)Tc)-labelled perfusion radiotracers, the change from only planar to now much more single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography......-coronary cardiac diseases. The advances in nuclear cardiology are discussed under the four headlines of: 1) myocardial perfusion, 2) cardiac performance including LV and right ventricular (RV) function, 3) myocardial metabolism, and 4) experimental nuclear cardiology Udgivelsesdato: 2008/6...

  1. Impact of a Preventive Cardiology Curriculum on Knowledge and Attitudes of First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitia, Marie C.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A study of 54 first-year Marshall University (West Virginia) medical students found that a preventive cardiology curriculum improved both knowledge of and attitudes about preventive cardiology in general and on all 4 subscales (epidemiological evidence, risk factor characteristics, pathophysiology, primary interventions). (Author/MSE)

  2. ACCF/SCAI/STS/AATS/AHA/ASNC/HFSA/SCCT 2012 appropriate use criteria for coronary revascularization focused update: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Dehmer, Gregory J; Hirshfeld, John W; Smith, Peter K; Spertus, John A; Masoudi, Frederick A; Dehmer, Gregory J; Patel, Manesh R; Smith, Peter K; Chambers, Charles E; Ferguson, T Bruce; Garcia, Mario J; Grover, Frederick L; Holmes, David R; Klein, Lloyd W; Limacher, Marian C; Mack, Michael J; Malenka, David J; Park, Myung H; Ragosta, Michael; Ritchie, James L; Rose, Geoffrey A; Rosenberg, Alan B; Russo, Andrea M; Shemin, Richard J; Weintraub, William S; Wolk, Michael J; Bailey, Steven R; Douglas, Pamela S; Hendel, Robert C; Kramer, Christopher M; Min, James K; Patel, Manesh R; Shaw, Leslee; Stainback, Raymond F; Allen, Joseph M

    2012-04-01

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an update of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization frequently considered. In the initial document, 180 clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, extent of medical therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document, and the definition of appropriateness was unchanged. The technical panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate and likely to improve patients' health outcomes or survival. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate revascularization is considered inappropriate and unlikely to improve health outcomes or survival. Scores in the mid-range (4 to 6) indicate a clinical scenario for which the likelihood that coronary revascularization will improve health outcomes or survival is uncertain. In general, as seen with the prior AUC, the use of coronary revascularization for patients with acute coronary syndromes and combinations of significant symptoms and/or ischemia is appropriate. In contrast, revascularization of asymptomatic patients or patients with low-risk findings on noninvasive testing and minimal medical therapy are viewed less favorably. The technical panel felt that based on recent studies, coronary artery bypass grafting remains an appropriate method of revascularization for patients with high burden of coronary artery disease (CAD

  3. Picture archiving and communication systems (PACS) of dynamic image processing for cardiologic diagnostics of transportation workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnedenko, Valeri G.; Ioseliani, D. G.; Nikiforov, S. N.; Fainberg, Evgeny M.

    2002-04-01

    Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) are the most perspective branch of medical technologies development. One of the most mass, cheap and effective methods of diagnostics and treatment of cardio-vascular diseases is interventional cardiology based on angiologic procedures. The principal difference of PACS for interventional cardiology is in necessity of gaining, analysis and archiving of dynamic images (angiology scenes). Russian Research Center > has developed and successfully implemented the first Russian PACS for interventional cardiology - complex for diagnostics, monitoring and treatment of cardio-vascular disease > which is described later in the article.

  4. Common mental disorders in asylum seekers and refugees: umbrella review of prevalence and intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrini, Giulia; Purgato, Marianna; Ballette, Francesca; Nosè, Michela; Ostuzzi, Giovanni; Barbui, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been a progressive rise in the number of asylum seekers and refugees displaced from their country of origin, with significant social, economic, humanitarian and public health implications. In this population, up-to-date information on the rate and characteristics of mental health conditions, and on interventions that can be implemented once mental disorders have been identified, are needed. This umbrella review aims at systematically reviewing existing evidence on the prevalence of common mental disorders and on the efficacy of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions in adult and children asylum seekers and refugees resettled in low, middle and high income countries. We conducted an umbrella review of systematic reviews summarizing data on the prevalence of common mental disorders and on the efficacy of psychosocial and pharmacological interventions in asylum seekers and/or refugees. Methodological quality of the included studies was assessed with the AMSTAR checklist. Thirteen reviews reported data on the prevalence of common mental disorders while fourteen reviews reported data on the efficacy of psychological or pharmacological interventions. Although there was substantial variability in prevalence rates, we found that depression and anxiety were at least as frequent as post-traumatic stress disorder, accounting for up to 40% of asylum seekers and refugees. In terms of psychosocial interventions, cognitive behavioral interventions, in particular narrative exposure therapy, were the most studied interventions with positive outcomes against inactive but not active comparators. Current epidemiological data needs to be expanded with more rigorous studies focusing not only on post-traumatic stress disorder but also on depression, anxiety and other mental health conditions. In addition, new studies are urgently needed to assess the efficacy of psychosocial interventions when compared not only with no treatment but also each other

  5. Mobile apps in cardiology: review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Herreros-González, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    .... The aim of this paper is to study the literature on mobile systems and applications currently available, as well as the existing apps related to cardiology from the leading app stores and to then...

  6. [Percutaneous coronary intervention of unprotected left main coronary compared with coronary artery bypass grafting; a 3 years experience in the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología de México].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Aguilar, Carlos; Abundes-Velasco, Arturo; Eid-Lidt, Guering; Piña-Reyna, Yigal; Gaspar-Hernández, Jorge

    2016-08-20

    The best revascularization method of the unprotected left main is a current and evolving topic. Within 3 years, 2439 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) were registered. We included all the patients with PCI of the unprotected left main, n=48 and matched with patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), n=50. Mayor adverse cerebral-cardiac events (MACCE) were assessed in-hospital and out-hospital during a 16 months follow up. PCI showed higher risk profile that CABG group; logEuroSCORE 16±21 vs. 5±6, p=0.001; clinical Syntax 77±74 vs 53±39, p=0.04. In-hospital MACCE (14% vs 18%, p= 0.64) were similar. The post-procedure ST myocardial infarction was less frequent in with PCI (0 vs 10%), p=0.03. The PCI group showed less MACCE (2.3% vs 18%, p=0.01) and a favorable trend in death (2.3% vs 12%, p=0.08) and cardiac death (2.3% vs. 8%, p=0.24) when patients presenting with cardiogenic shock were excluded. MACCE were comparable between PCI and CABG groups; (15 vs 12%, p=0.46) in the out-hospital phase. Survival without MACCE, death or cardiac death were comparable between groups (log rank, p=0.38, p=0.44 y p=0.16). Even though the clinical and peri-procedural risk profile of the PCI patients were higher, the in-hospital and out-hospital efficacy and safety were comparable with CABG. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Review of paediatric cardiology services in district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Hannah; Singh, Yogen

    2016-03-01

    Following the Safe and Sustainable review of Paediatric Services in 2012/2013, National Health Service England recommended that local paediatric cardiology services should be provided by specially trained paediatricians with expertise in cardiology in all non-specialist hospitals. To understand the variation in local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom. An internet-based questionnaire was sent out via the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology Special Interest Group and the Neonatologists with Interest in Cardiology and Haemodynamics contact databases and the National Health Service directory. Non-responders were followed-up via telephone. The response rate was 80% (141 of 177 hospitals), and paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were available in 68% of those. Local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology were provided in 96 hospitals (68%), whereas specialist outreach clinics were held in 123 centres (87%). A total of 11 hospitals provided neither specialist outreach clinics nor any local cardiology clinics led by paediatricians with expertise in cardiology. Paediatric echocardiography services were provided in 83% of the hospitals, 12-lead electrocardiogram in 96%, Holter electrocardiogram in 91%, and exercise testing in only 47% of the responding hospitals. Telemedicine facilities were established in only 52% of the centres, where sharing echocardiogram images via picture archiving and communication system was used most commonly. There has been a substantial increase in the availability of paediatricians with expertise in cardiology since 2008. Most of the hospitals are well-supported by specialist cardiology centres via outreach clinics; however, there remains significant variation in the local paediatric cardiology services provided across district general hospitals in the United Kingdom.

  8. Workplace interventions for common mental disorders: a systematic meta-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, S; Modini, M; Christensen, H; Mykletun, A; Bryant, R; Mitchell, P B; Harvey, S B

    2016-03-01

    Depression and anxiety disorders are the leading cause of sickness absence and long-term work incapacity in most developed countries. The present study aimed to carry out a systematic meta-review examining the effectiveness of workplace mental health interventions, defined as any intervention that a workplace may either initiate or facilitate that aims to prevent, treat or rehabilitate a worker with a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or both. Relevant reviews were identified via a detailed systematic search of academic and grey literature databases. All articles were subjected to a rigorous quality appraisal using the AMSTAR assessment. Of the 5179 articles identified, 140 studies met the inclusion criteria, of which 20 were deemed to be of moderate or high quality. Together, these reviews analysed 481 primary research studies. Moderate evidence was identified for two primary prevention interventions; enhancing employee control and promoting physical activity. Stronger evidence was found for CBT-based stress management although less evidence was found for other secondary prevention interventions, such as counselling. Strong evidence was also found against the routine use of debriefing following trauma. Tertiary interventions with a specific focus on work, such as exposure therapy and CBT-based and problem-focused return-to-work programmes, had a strong evidence base for improving symptomology and a moderate evidence base for improving occupational outcomes. Overall, these findings demonstrate there are empirically supported interventions that workplaces can utilize to aid in the prevention of common mental illness as well as facilitating the recovery of employees diagnosed with depression and/or anxiety.

  9. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  10. Medication reconciliation in patients hospitalized in a cardiology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Gabriella Fernandes; Santos, Gláucia Noblat de Carvalho; Santos, Gláucia Beisl Noblat de Carvalho; Rosa, Mário Borges; Noblat, Lúcia de Araújo Costa Beisl

    2014-01-01

    To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies. This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied) or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies. A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%). Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3%) were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7%) discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2%) were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%). Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6%) were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4%) were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4%) as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6%) were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm. The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit.

  11. Medication reconciliation in patients hospitalized in a cardiology unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Fernandes Magalhães

    Full Text Available To compare drugs prescribed on hospital admission with the list of drugs taken prior to admission for adult patients admitted to a cardiology unit and to identify the role of a pharmacist in identifying and resolving medication discrepancies.This study was conducted in a 300 bed university hospital in Brazil. Clinical pharmacists taking medication histories and reconciling medications prescribed on admission with a list of drugs used prior to admission. Discrepancies were classified as justified (e.g., based on the pharmacotherapeutic guidelines of the hospital studied or unintentional. Treatments were reviewed within 48 hours following hospitalization. Unintentional discrepancies were further classified according to the categorization of medication error severity. Pharmacists verbally contacted the prescriber to recommend actions to resolve the discrepancies.A total of 181 discrepancies were found in 50 patients (86%. Of these discrepancies, 149 (82.3% were justified changes to the patient's home medication regimen; however, 32 (17.7% discrepancies found in 24 patients were unintentional. Pharmacists made 31 interventions and 23 (74.2% were accepted. Among unintentional discrepancies, the most common was a different medication dose on admission (42%. Of the unintentional discrepancies 13 (40.6% were classified as error without harm, 11 (34.4% were classified as error without harm but which could affect the patient and require monitoring, 3 (9.4% as errors could have resulted in harm and 5 (15.6% were classified as circumstances or events that have the capacity to cause harm.The results revealed a high number of unintentional discrepancies and the pharmacist can play an important role by intervening and correcting medication errors at a hospital cardiology unit.

  12. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A.; Matlock, Daniel D.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2017-01-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists in practice are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as “geriatric conditions” such as cognitive impairment and frailty which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine into everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a “geriatric cardiologist” may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. PMID:27476988

  13. Geriatric Cardiology: An Emerging Discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, John A; Matlock, Daniel D; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-09-01

    Given changing demographics, patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in developed countries are now older and more complex than even a decade ago. This trend is expected to continue into the foreseeable future; accordingly, cardiologists are encountering patients with a greater number of comorbid illnesses as well as "geriatric conditions," such as cognitive impairment and frailty, which complicate management and influence outcomes. Simultaneously, technological advances have widened the therapeutic options available for patients, including those with the most advanced CV disease. In the setting of these changes, geriatric cardiology has recently emerged as a discipline that aims to adapt principles from geriatric medicine to everyday cardiology practice. Accordingly, the tasks of a "geriatric cardiologist" may include both traditional evidence-based CV management plus comprehensive geriatric assessment, medication reduction, team-based coordination of care, and explicit incorporation of patient goals into management. Given that the field is still in its relative infancy, the training pathways and structure of clinical programs in geriatric cardiology are still being delineated. In this review, we highlight the rationale behind geriatric cardiology as a discipline, several current approaches by geriatric cardiology programs, and future directions for the field. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Common Elements Treatment Approach based on a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention: implementation in the Colombian Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Gabriela Pacichana-Quinayáz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to the limited supply of mental health services for Afro-Colombian victims of violence, a Common Elements Treatment Approach (CETA intervention has been implemented in the Colombian Pacific. Given the importance of improvement in mental health interventions for this population, it is necessary to characterize this process. This article seeks to describe the implementation of CETA for Afro-Colombian victims of violence in Buenaventura and Quibdó, Colombia through case studieswith individual in-depth interviews with Lay Psychosocial Community Workers (LPCW, supervisors, and coordinators responsible for implementing CETA. From this six core categories were obtained: 1. Effect of armed conflict and poverty 2. Trauma severity 3. Perceived changes with CETA 4. Characteristics and LPCW’s performance 5. Afro-Colombian culturalapproach and 6. Strategies to promote users’ well-being.Colombian Pacific’s scenario implies several factors, such as the active armed conflict, economic crisis, and lack of mental health care resources, affecting the implementation process and the intervention effects. This implies the need to establish and strengthen partnerships between institutions in order to administer necessary mental health care for victims of violence in the Colombian Pacific.

  15. Common Elements Treatment Approach based on a Cognitive Behavioral Intervention: implementation in the Colombian Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacichana-Quinayáz, Sara Gabriela; Osorio-Cuéllar, Gisel Viviana; Bonilla-Escobar, Francisco Javier; Fandiño-Losada, Andrés; Gutiérrez-Martínez, María Isabel

    2016-06-01

    Due to the limited supply of mental health services for Afro-Colombian victims of violence, a Common Elements Treatment Approach (CETA) intervention has been implemented in the Colombian Pacific. Given the importance of improvement in mental health interventions for this population, it is necessary to characterize this process. This article seeks to describe the implementation of CETA for Afro-Colombian victims of violence in Buenaventura and Quibdó, Colombia through case studieswith individual in-depth interviews with Lay Psychosocial Community Workers (LPCW), supervisors, and coordinators responsible for implementing CETA. From this six core categories were obtained: 1. Effect of armed conflict and poverty 2. Trauma severity 3. Perceived changes with CETA 4. Characteristics and LPCW's performance 5. Afro-Colombian culturalapproach and 6. Strategies to promote users' well-being.Colombian Pacific's scenario implies several factors, such as the active armed conflict, economic crisis, and lack of mental health care resources, affecting the implementation process and the intervention effects. This implies the need to establish and strengthen partnerships between institutions in order to administer necessary mental health care for victims of violence in the Colombian Pacific.

  16. Consensus on timing of intervention for common congenital heart diseases: part I - acyanotic heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P Syamasundar

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review/editorial is to discuss how and when to treat the most common acyanotic congenital heart defects (CHD); the discussion of cyanotic heart defects will be presented in a subsequent editorial. By and large, the indications and timing of intervention are decided by the severity of the lesion. Balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty is the treatment of choice for valvar pulmonary stenosis and the indication for intervention is peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient >50 mmHg across the pulmonary valve. For aortic valve stenosis, balloon aortic valvuloplasty appears to be the first therapeutic procedure of choice; the indications for balloon dilatation of aortic valve are peak-to-peak systolic pressure gradient across the aortic valve in excess of 70 mmHg irrespective of the symptoms or a gradient ≥ 50 mmHg with either symptoms or electrocardiographic ST-T wave changes indicative of myocardial perfusion abnormality. The indications for intervention in coarctation of the aorta are significant hypertension and/or congestive heart failure along with a pressure gradient in excess of 20 mmHg across the coarctation; the type of intervention varies with age at presentation and the anatomy of coarctation: surgical intervention for neonates and young infants, balloon angioplasty for discrete native coarctation in children, and stents in adolescents and adults. Long segment coarctations or those associated with hypoplasia of the isthmus or transverse aortic arch require surgical treatment in younger children and stents in adolescents and adults. For post-surgical aortic recoarctation, balloon angioplasty in young children and stents in adolescents and adults are treatment options. Transcatheter closure methods are currently preferred for ostium secundum atrial septal defects (ASDs); the indications for occlusion are right ventricular volume overload by echocardiogram. Ostium primum, sinus venosus and coronary sinus ASDs require surgical closure. For all ASDs

  17. A study to enhance medical students’ professional decision-making, using teaching interventions on common medications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Wilcock

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To create sustained improvements in medical students’ critical thinking skills through short teaching interventions in pharmacology. Method: The ability to make professional decisions was assessed by providing year-4 medical students at a UK medical school with a novel medical scenario (antenatal pertussis vaccination. Forty-seven students in the 2012 cohort acted as a pretest group, answering a questionnaire on this novel scenario. To improve professional decision-making skills, 48 students from the 2013 cohort were introduced to three commonly used medications, through tutor-led 40-min teaching interventions, among six small groups using a structured presentation of evidence-based medicine and ethical considerations. Student members then volunteered to peer-teach on a further three medications. After a gap of 8 weeks, this cohort (post-test group was assessed for professional decision-making skills using the pretest questionnaire, and differences in the 2-year groups analysed. Results: Students enjoyed presenting on medications to their peers but had difficulty interpreting studies and discussing ethical dimensions; this was improved by contextualising information via patient scenarios. After 8 weeks, most students did not show enhanced clinical curiosity, a desire to understand evidence, or ethical questioning when presented with a novel medical scenario compared to the previous year group who had not had the intervention. Students expressed a high degree of trust in guidelines and expert tutors and felt that responsibility for their own actions lay with these bodies. Conclusion: Short teaching interventions in pharmacology did not lead to sustained improvements in their critical thinking skills in enhancing professional practice. It appears that students require earlier and more frequent exposure to these skills in their medical training.

  18. A study to enhance medical students’ professional decision-making, using teaching interventions on common medications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, Jane; Strivens, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Aim To create sustained improvements in medical students’ critical thinking skills through short teaching interventions in pharmacology. Method The ability to make professional decisions was assessed by providing year-4 medical students at a UK medical school with a novel medical scenario (antenatal pertussis vaccination). Forty-seven students in the 2012 cohort acted as a pretest group, answering a questionnaire on this novel scenario. To improve professional decision-making skills, 48 students from the 2013 cohort were introduced to three commonly used medications, through tutor-led 40-min teaching interventions, among six small groups using a structured presentation of evidence-based medicine and ethical considerations. Student members then volunteered to peer-teach on a further three medications. After a gap of 8 weeks, this cohort (post-test group) was assessed for professional decision-making skills using the pretest questionnaire, and differences in the 2-year groups analysed. Results Students enjoyed presenting on medications to their peers but had difficulty interpreting studies and discussing ethical dimensions; this was improved by contextualising information via patient scenarios. After 8 weeks, most students did not show enhanced clinical curiosity, a desire to understand evidence, or ethical questioning when presented with a novel medical scenario compared to the previous year group who had not had the intervention. Students expressed a high degree of trust in guidelines and expert tutors and felt that responsibility for their own actions lay with these bodies. Conclusion Short teaching interventions in pharmacology did not lead to sustained improvements in their critical thinking skills in enhancing professional practice. It appears that students require earlier and more frequent exposure to these skills in their medical training. PMID:26051556

  19. Design of a realistic radiation field for the calibration of dosimeters used in interventional radiology cardiology (medical personnel dosimetry); Conception d'un champ de rayonnements realiste pour l'etalonnage des dosimetres utilises en radiologie cardiologie interventionnelle (dosimetrie du personnel medical)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordy, J.M.; Daures, J.; Denoziere, M.; Gouriou, J. [CEA Saclay, LIST, Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Itie, Ch.; Donadile, L. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), 92263 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Struelens, L. [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN) (Belgium); Schultz, F. [Delft University of Technology, Applied Physics-RRR-RIH, Pays Bas (Netherlands)

    2010-07-01

    The authors present the principle to determine the reference value in terms of individual dose equivalent for a calibration installation specifically designed to emulate a radiation field faced at a workstation during interventional cardiology or radiology. They present the workstation configuration which includes the patient and the surgeon. They report the study of the calibration installation where the patient and surgeon are replaced by 'phantoms', and indicate the various fluence spectra obtained at different locations corresponding to different parts of the human body. They compare the simulated and measured spectra

  20. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  1. Physician Requirements-1990. For Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracy, Octavious; Birchette-Pierce, Cheryl

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in cardiology were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. The determination of physician requirements was based on an adjusted needs rather than a demand or utilization model. For each illness, manpower requirements were modified by the…

  2. Assessing Competence in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Apul E.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    In response to the need to assure physician competence, a rating scale was developed at the University of Minnesota Medical School for use in evaluating clinical competence in pediatric cardiology. It was tested on first- and second-year specialists. Development and testing procedures are described. (JT)

  3. Recent advances in nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo [Dept. Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Nuclear cardiology is one of the major fields of nuclear medicine practice. Myocardial perfusion studies using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have played a crucial role in the management of coronary artery diseases. Positron emission tomography (PET) has also been considered an important tool for the assessment of myocardial viability and perfusion. However, the recent development of computed tomography (CT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies and growing concerns about the radiation exposure of patients remain serious challenges for nuclear cardiology. In response to these challenges, remarkable achievements and improvements are currently in progress in the field of myocardial perfusion imaging regarding the applicable software and hardware. Additionally, myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET) is receiving increasing attention owing to its unique capability of absolute myocardial blood flow estimation. An F-18-labeled perfusion agent for PET is under clinical trial with promising interim results. The applications of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and F-18 sodium fluoride (NaF) to cardiovascular diseases have revealed details on the basic pathophysiology of ischemic heart diseases. PET/MRI seems to be particularly promising for nuclear cardiology in the future. Restrictive diseases, such as cardiac sarcoidosis and amyloidosis, are effectively evaluated using a variety of nuclear imaging tools. Considering these advances, the current challenges of nuclear cardiology will become opportunities if more collaborative efforts are devoted to this exciting field of nuclear medicine.

  4. Accurate diagnosis of CHD by Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Hannah C; Massey, Hannah; Yates, Robert W M; Kelsall, A Wilfred

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology assess children with a full history, examination, and often perform an echocardiogram. A minority are then referred to an outreach clinic run jointly with a visiting paediatric cardiologist. The accuracy of the echocardiography diagnosis made by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology is unknown. Materials and methods We conducted a retrospective review of clinic letters for children seen in the outreach clinic for the first time between March, 2004 and March, 2011. Children with CHD diagnosed antenatally or elsewhere were excluded. We recorded the echocardiography diagnosis made by the paediatric cardiologist and previously by the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology. The Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology referred 317/3145 (10%) children seen in the local cardiac clinics to the outreach clinic over this period, and among them 296 were eligible for inclusion. Their median age was 1.5 years (range 1 month-15.1 years). For 244 (82%) children, there was complete diagnostic agreement between the Paediatrician with Expertise in Cardiology and the paediatric cardiologist. For 29 (10%) children, the main diagnosis was identical with additional findings made by the paediatric cardiologist. The abnormality had resolved in 17 (6%) cases by the time of clinic attendance. In six (2%) patients, the paediatric cardiologist made a different diagnosis. In total, 138 (47%) patients underwent a surgical or catheter intervention. Discussion Paediatricians with Expertise in Cardiology can make accurate diagnoses of CHD in children referred to their clinics. This can allow effective triage of children attending the outreach clinic, making best use of limited specialist resources.

  5. [Heart rate recovery after exercise in subjects undergoing cardiologic rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejer, Anna; Urzedowicz, Beata; Rembek-Wieliczko, Magdalena; Koziróg, Marzena; Ciećwierz, Julita; Kowalski, Jan

    2012-12-01

    Research indicates that slow heart rate recovery 1-2 minutes after exercise is a predictor of cardiovascular mortality, sudden mortality as well. It is hardly related to myocardial ischemia; most of all, it is related to impaired activities of the parasympathetic system. The purpose of this study was to assess HRR in subjects after a surgical treatment (percutaneous coronary intervention - PCI) of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), undergoing cardiologic rehabilitation. The study comprised 58 subjects, 42 men and 16 women aged 49-68 (56.8 +/- 7.6) after ACS treated with PCI undergoing cardiologic rehabilitation (stage 2)--group I. The comparative group comprised 34 subjects, 25 men and 9 women aged 46-61 (55.5 +/- 8.9 lat) who were clinically healthy and who underwent a single sub-maximal exercise test--group II. In subjects undergoing rehabilitation, an exercise test was performed twice --before and after stage 2 of rehabilitation. HRR was defined as a difference between the peak heart rate and those after the 1st (HRR1) and 2nd (HRR) minute of recovery. After stationary rehabilitation as a part of stage 2 of cardiologic rehabilitation, HRR2 was 26.3 +/- 10.6/min and was 40.8/min +/- 13.8/min; both these values were not significantly different from values observed in healthy subjects (p > 0.05). Significant increase in HRR1 and HRR2 was observed after the completion of stage 2 of cardiologic rehabilitation in ill subjects (p < 0.05) as compared to initial values. In subjects after ACS treated with PCI, it is observed that HRR changes back to normal values observed in healthy subjects as a result of underwent cardiologic rehabilitation. HRR should become an important factor in assessing effectiveness of conducted cardiologic rehabilitation.

  6. History of German pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzen, P

    2002-01-01

    Due to the isolation of German medicine in World War II accompanied by the destruction of many hospitals, German pediatricians did not show any serious interest in the treatment of children with congenital heart diseases, nor did they take notice of the progress achieved by Helen Taussig, Alfred Blalock and other cardiologists and surgeons in the western world. This problem was even worse in East Germany. Only a few German internists and forward-looking surgeons were able and ready to take care of this group of principally operable children in places like Bonn/Düsseldorf, Marburg/Munich, Berlin, and Hamburg. However, in the early 1950s some directors of pediatrics at university hospitals--largely motivated by the cardiac surgeons--allowed or even encouraged younger colleagues to concentrate on pediatric cardiology and to begin application of heart catheterization and angiocardiography. In 1960 a group of colleagues interested in pediatric cardiology met for the first time in Frankfurt and became the nucleus of the future "working group" (1969) and finally the "German Society of Pediatric Cardiology" (1974). By 1972 pediatric cardiology had been approved as an independent (sub)specialty. Colleagues and friends from surrounding countries (Austria, Great Britain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the Netherlands) and also from the US and some eastern countries were either members or regular guests during or between the meetings. Pediatric cardiology is now represented in Germany by specialized practitioners, trainees and assistants who work in both community and university hospitals, and in specialized departments. Due to the foresightedness of the Chief of Pediatrics, Prof. G. Joppich, the first Chair of Pediatric Cardiology was founded in Göttingen in 1960 under the direction of A. Beuren. Another model of interdisciplinary cooperation between pediatric cardiologists, bioengineers, mathematicians and computer scientists was established in Kiel in 1966. In other places

  7. Mobile apps in cardiology: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Herreros-González, Jesús

    2013-07-24

    Cardiovascular diseases are the deadliest diseases worldwide, with 17.3 million deaths in 2008 alone. Among them, heart-related deaths are of the utmost relevance; a fact easily proven by the 7.25 million deaths caused by ischemic heart disease alone in that year. The latest advances in smartphones and mHealth have been used in the creation of thousands of medical apps related to cardiology, which can help to reduce these mortality rates. The aim of this paper is to study the literature on mobile systems and applications currently available, as well as the existing apps related to cardiology from the leading app stores and to then classify the results to see what is available and what is missing, focusing particularly on commercial apps. Two reviews have been developed. One is a literature review of mobile systems and applications, retrieved from several databases and systems such as Scopus, PubMed, IEEE Xplore, and Web of Knowledge. The other is a review of mobile apps in the leading app stores, Google play for Android and Apple's App Store for iOS. Search queries up to May 2013 located 406 papers and 710 apps related to cardiology and heart disease. The most researched section in the literature associated with cardiology is related to mobile heart (and vital signs) monitoring systems and the methods involved in the classification of heart signs in order to detect abnormal functions. Other systems with a significant number of papers are mobile cardiac rehabilitation systems, blood pressure measurement, and systems for the detection of heart failure. The majority of apps for cardiology are heart monitors and medical calculators. Other categories with a high number of apps are those for ECG education and interpretation, cardiology news and journals, blood pressure tracking, heart rate monitoring using an external device, and CPR instruction. There are very few guides on cardiac rehabilitation and apps for the management of the cardiac condition, and there were no

  8. Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology Specialist Heart Failure Curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology...... Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint...

  9. Paediatric cardiology: the last 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Malcolm E

    2015-01-01

    In the last half-century, the outlook for children with heart disease has changed dramatically. Morphologists have transformed our understanding of heart defects. Improved imaging methods, such as echocardiography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have made diagnostic cardiac catheterisation almost redundant. However, interventional catheterisation has flourished as transcatheter procedures have replaced surgery for many lesions. The ability to pharmacologically manipulate the duct has revolutionised the management of the sick neonate with major heart disease. Better surgical techniques, such as deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest, allow repair of lesions in early infancy before irreversible complications develop. Advances in anaesthesia and intensive care have been integral. New sub-disciplines, such as fetal cardiology and electrophysiology, have emerged. The sum of these numerous developments is enormous. Lesions that were previously considered lethal are now routinely treated. Consequently, the great majority of children with major heart disease now reach adulthood in good health.

  10. [Problems in cardiology specialty training in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Armağan

    2012-04-01

    Cardiology Specialty Training in our country should be made in accordance with the law numbered 1219 on the Practice of Medicine and Related Arts, and according to the Medical and Dental Specialist Training Regulation which is published according to the 9th article of this law. The duration of Cardiology Specialist Training has been defined as 4 years in our country. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC), European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS), and the European Cardiology Section Foundation (ECSF) define the duration of Cardiology Specialist Training as 6 years. Therefore, insufficient Cardiology residency training occurs in our country due to the shortened length of time. In this report, the problems of the Cardiology Specialist Training in Turkey will be addressed under different headings.

  11. How to Practice Sports Cardiology: A Cardiology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Christine E

    2015-07-01

    The rigorous cardiovascular (CV) demands of sport, combined with training-related cardiac adaptations, render the athlete a truly unique CV patient and sports cardiology a truly unique discipline. Cardiologists are advised to adopt a systematic approach to the CV evaluation of athletes, taking into consideration the individual sports culture, sports-specific CV demands, CV adaptations and their appearance on cardiac testing, any existing or potential interaction of the heart with the internal and external sports environment, short- and long-term CV risks, and potential effect of performance-enhancing agents and antidoping regulations. This article outlines the systematic approach, provides a detailed example, and outlines contemporary sports cardiology core competencies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. ACCF/SCCT/ACR/AHA/ASE/ASNC/NASCI/SCAI/SCMR 2010 appropriate use criteria for cardiac computed tomography. A report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, the American College of Radiology, the American Heart Association, the American Society of Echocardiography, the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, the North American Society for Cardiovascular Imaging, the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, and the Society for Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Allen J; Cerqueira, Manuel; Hodgson, John McB; Mark, Daniel; Min, James; O'Gara, Patrick; Rubin, Geoffrey D; Kramer, Christopher M; Berman, Daniel; Brown, Alan; Chaudhry, Farooq A; Cury, Ricardo C; Desai, Milind Y; Einstein, Andrew J; Gomes, Antoinette S; Harrington, Robert; Hoffmann, Udo; Khare, Rahul; Lesser, John; McGann, Christopher; Rosenberg, Alan; Schwartz, Robert; Shelton, Marc; Smetana, Gerald W; Smith, Sidney C

    2010-11-23

    The American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF), along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, conducted an appropriate use review of common clinical scenarios where cardiac computed tomography (CCT) is frequently considered. The present document is an update to the original CCT/cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) appropriateness criteria published in 2006, written to reflect changes in test utilization, to incorporate new clinical data, and to clarify CCT use where omissions or lack of clarity existed in the original criteria (1). The indications for this review were drawn from common applications or anticipated uses, as well as from current clinical practice guidelines. Ninety-three clinical scenarios were developed by a writing group and scored by a separate technical panel on a scale of 1 to 9 to designate appropriate use, inappropriate use, or uncertain use. In general, use of CCT angiography for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients with low or intermediate risk or pretest probability for coronary artery disease (CAD) was viewed favorably, whereas testing in high-risk patients, routine repeat testing, and general screening in certain clinical scenarios were viewed less favorably. Use of noncontrast computed tomography (CT) for calcium scoring was rated as appropriate within intermediate- and selected low-risk patients. Appropriate applications of CCT are also within the category of cardiac structural and functional evaluation. It is anticipated that these results will have an impact on physician decision making, performance, and reimbursement policy, and that they will help guide future research.

  13. ACC/AATS/AHA/ASE/ASNC/SCAI/SCCT/STS 2016 Appropriate Use Criteria for Coronary Revascularization in Patients With Acute Coronary Syndromes : A Report of the American College of Cardiology Appropriate Use Criteria Task Force, American Association for Thoracic Surgery, American Heart Association, American Society of Echocardiography, American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, and the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Manesh R; Calhoon, John H; Dehmer, Gregory J; Grantham, James Aaron; Maddox, Thomas M; Maron, David J; Smith, Peter K

    2017-03-06

    The American College of Cardiology, Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, Society of Thoracic Surgeons, and American Association for Thoracic Surgery, along with key specialty and subspecialty societies, have completed a 2-part revision of the appropriate use criteria (AUC) for coronary revascularization. In prior coronary revascularization AUC documents, indications for revascularization in acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and stable ischemic heart disease were combined into 1 document. To address the expanding clinical indications for coronary revascularization, and in an effort to align the subject matter with the most current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines, the new AUC for coronary artery revascularization were separated into 2 documents addressing ACS and stable ischemic heart disease individually. This document presents the AUC for ACS. Clinical scenarios were developed to mimic patient presentations encountered in everyday practice and included information on symptom status, presence of clinical instability or ongoing ischemic symptoms, prior reperfusion therapy, risk level as assessed by noninvasive testing, fractional flow reserve testing, and coronary anatomy. This update provides a reassessment of clinical scenarios that the writing group felt to be affected by significant changes in the medical literature or gaps from prior criteria. The methodology used in this update is similar to the initial document but employs the recent modifications in the methods for developing AUC, most notably, alterations in the nomenclature for appropriate use categorization. A separate, independent rating panel scored the clinical scenarios on a scale of 1 to 9. Scores of 7 to 9 indicate that revascularization is considered appropriate for the clinical scenario presented. Scores of 1 to 3 indicate that revascularization is considered rarely appropriate for the clinical scenario, whereas scores in the mid-range (4 to 6

  14. Cardiology update 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Verma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the latter half of 2016, the Danish study evaluated the need of automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator in nonischemic cardiomyopathies group of heart failure population. HOPE-3 in 2016 expanded the dimension of statin use. Novel age, biomarker, and clinical history stroke risk score for atrial fibrillation was validated. Success of Phase 2b clinical trial for CSL112 was one more step to reduce the ischemic events in the postmyocardial infarction period. On the one hand, NORSTENT study compared the bare-metal stents with drug-eluting stent, and on the other hand, 3-year follow-up data of ABSORB II trail discussed the performance of bioresorbable scaffolds. NOBLE and EXCEL trials evaluated the coronary intervention with coronary artery bypass graft in the left main coronary artery disease. Reduction of major adverse cardiac event with low-density lipoprotein cholesterol <50 mg/dl was analyzed with alirocumab. Fractional flow reserve was tested as a tool to decide treatment modality in patients with stable coronary artery disease. Natural history of rheumatic heart disease in the current era was described in REMEDY study. A few technological advancements in cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator technology were also approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Birth prevalence and pattern of congenital heart disease in North India were presented.

  15. History of Cardiology in India

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga a...

  16. History of Cardiology in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. History of Cardiology in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Mrinal Kanti; Kumar, Soumitra; Deb, Pradip Kumar; Mishra, Sundeep

    2015-01-01

    History as a science revolves around memories, travellers' tales, fables and chroniclers' stories, gossip and trans-telephonic conversations. Medicine itself as per the puritan's definition is a non-exact science because of the probability-predictability-sensitivity-specificity factors. Howsoever, the chronicles of Cardiology in India is quite interesting and intriguing. Heart and circulation was known to humankind from pre-Vedic era. Various therapeutics measures including the role of Yoga and transcendental meditation in curing cardiovascular diseases were known in India. Only recently there has been resurgence of the same globally. There have been very few innovations in Cardiology in India. The cause of this paucity possibly lie in the limited resources. This has a vicious effect on the research mentality of the population who are busy in meeting their daily requirements. This socio-scientific aspect needs a thorough study and is beyond the scope of the present documentation. Present is the future of past and so one must not forget the history which is essentially past that give the present generation the necessary fulcrum to stand in good stead. The present article essentially aims to pay tribute to all the workers and pioneers in the field of Cardiology in India, who in spite of limited resources ventured in an unchartered arena. PMID:26071301

  18. Cultural Adaptation of Minimally Guided Interventions for Common Mental Disorders: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Eva; Chowdhary, Neerja; Maercker, Andreas; Albanese, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Background Cultural adaptation of mental health care interventions is key, particularly when there is little or no therapist interaction. There is little published information on the methods of adaptation of bibliotherapy and e-mental health interventions. Objective To systematically search for evidence of the effectiveness of minimally guided interventions for the treatment of common mental disorders among culturally diverse people with common mental disorders; to analyze the extent and effects of cultural adaptation of minimally guided interventions for the treatment of common mental disorders. Methods We searched Embase, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and PsycINFO for randomized controlled trials that tested the efficacy of minimally guided or self-help interventions for depression or anxiety among culturally diverse populations. We calculated pooled standardized mean differences using a random-effects model. In addition, we administered a questionnaire to the authors of primary studies to assess the cultural adaptation methods used in the included primary studies. We entered this information into a meta-regression to investigate effects of the extent of adaptation on intervention efficacy. Results We included eight randomized controlled trials (RCTs) out of the 4911 potentially eligible records identified by the search: four on e-mental health and four on bibliotherapy. The extent of cultural adaptation varied across the studies, with language translation and use of metaphors being the most frequently applied elements of adaptation. The pooled standardized mean difference for primary outcome measures of depression and anxiety was -0.81 (95% CI -0.10 to -0.62). Higher cultural adaptation scores were significantly associated with greater effect sizes (P=.04). Conclusions Our results support the results of previous systematic reviews on the cultural adaptation of face-to-face interventions: the extent of cultural adaptation has an effect on intervention efficacy

  19. A "Common Factors" Approach to Developing Culturally Tailored HIV Prevention Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owczarzak, Jill; Phillips, Sarah D.; Filippova, Olga; Alpatova, Polina; Mazhnaya, Alyona; Zub, Tatyana; Aleksanyan, Ruzanna

    2016-01-01

    The current dominant model of HIV prevention intervention dissemination involves packaging interventions developed in one context, training providers to implement that specific intervention, and evaluating the extent to which providers implement it with fidelity. Research shows that providers rarely implement these programs with fidelity due to…

  20. Adapting evidence-based interventions using a common theory, practices, and principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane; Swendeman, Dallas; Becker, Kimberly D

    2014-01-01

    Hundreds of validated evidence-based intervention programs (EBIP) aim to improve families' well-being; however, most are not broadly adopted. As an alternative diffusion strategy, we created wellness centers to reach families' everyday lives with a prevention framework. At two wellness centers, one in a middle-class neighborhood and one in a low-income neighborhood, popular local activity leaders (instructors of martial arts, yoga, sports, music, dancing, Zumba), and motivated parents were trained to be Family Mentors. Trainings focused on a framework that taught synthesized, foundational prevention science theory, practice elements, and principles, applied to specific content areas (parenting, social skills, and obesity). Family Mentors were then allowed to adapt scripts and activities based on their cultural experiences but were closely monitored and supervised over time. The framework was implemented in a range of activities (summer camps, coaching) aimed at improving social, emotional, and behavioral outcomes. Successes and challenges are discussed for (a) engaging parents and communities; (b) identifying and training Family Mentors to promote children and families' well-being; and (c) gathering data for supervision, outcome evaluation, and continuous quality improvement. To broadly diffuse prevention to families, far more experimentation is needed with alternative and engaging implementation strategies that are enhanced with knowledge harvested from researchers' past 30 years of experience creating EBIP. One strategy is to train local parents and popular activity leaders in applying robust prevention science theory, common practice elements, and principles of EBIP. More systematic evaluation of such innovations is needed.

  1. Screening for mental disorders in cardiology outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, M.; Rasmussen, A.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare the frequency of mental disorders in cardiology outpatients to the number of patients with psychological problems identified by cardiologists. In a cardiology outpatient service, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these 86......, were frequent in cardiology outpatients. Even in cases where the cardiologists identified psychological problems, the diagnosis had no consequence, as none of the patients was offered relevant treatment Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  2. Process evaluation of a problem solving intervention to prevent recurrent sickness absence in workers with common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, Iris; Bültmann, Ute; Nielsen, Karina; van Rhenen, Willem; de Boer, Michiel R; van der Klink, Jac J L

    2014-01-01

    Common mental disorders (CMDs) are a major cause of sickness absence. Twenty to 30% of the workers who return to work after sickness absence due to CMDs experience recurrent sickness absence. We developed the Stimulating Healthy participation And Relapse Prevention (SHARP)-at work intervention, a problem solving intervention delivered by occupational physicians (OPs), to prevent recurrent sickness absence in this worker population in The Netherlands. A process evaluation was conducted alongside a cluster-randomised controlled trial to (1) evaluate whether the SHARP-at work intervention was implemented according to the protocol and differed from treatment in the control group, and (2) to investigate the relationship between the key elements of the intervention and the effect outcome (i.e. recurrent sickness absence). We collected process data for both the intervention and control group on recruitment, reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, context and satisfaction. Data on recurrent sickness absence was collected through the registry system of the collaborating occupational health service. The study was performed in the Netherlands, and between 2010 and 2012, 154 OPs and 158 participants participated. Compared to the control group, participants in the intervention group more frequently had two or more consultations with the OP (odds ratio [OR] = 3.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2-8.8) and completed more assignments (OR = 33.8, 95% CI = 10.4-109.5) as recommended in the intervention protocol. OPs and participants were satisfied with the intervention and rated it as applicable. Several individual intervention components were linked to the effect outcome. The process evaluation showed that the SHARP-at work intervention was conducted according to the protocol for the majority of the participants and well-received by OPs and participants. Furthermore, the intervention differed from treatment in the control group. Overall, the results provide

  3. Big Data for cardiology: novel discovery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer-Schönberger, Viktor

    2016-03-21

    Big Data promises to change cardiology through a massive increase in the data gathered and analysed; but its impact goes beyond improving incrementally existing methods. The potential of comprehensive data sets for scientific discovery is examined, and its impact on the scientific method generally and cardiology in particular is posited, together with likely consequences for research and practice. Big Data in cardiology changes how new insights are being discovered. For it to flourish, significant modifications in the methods, structures, and institutions of the profession are necessary. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Nuclear Medicine in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanesi, Ornella; Stellin, Giovanni; Zucchetta, Pietro

    2017-03-01

    Accurate cardiovascular imaging is essential for the successful management of patients with congenital heart disease (CHD). Echocardiography and angiography have been for long time the most important imaging modalities in pediatric cardiology, but nuclear medicine has contributed in many situations to the comprehension of physiological consequences of CHD, quantifying pulmonary blood flow symmetry or right-to-left shunting. In recent times, remarkable improvements in imaging equipments, particularly in multidetector computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have led to the progressive integration of high resolution modalities in the clinical workup of children affected by CHD, reducing the role of diagnostic angiography. Technology has seen a parallel evolution in the field of nuclear medicine, with the advent of hybrid machines, as SPECT/CT and PET/CT scanners. Improved detectors, hugely increased computing power, and new reconstruction algorithms allow for a significant reduction of the injected dose, with a parallel relevant decrease in radiation exposure. Nuclear medicine retains its distinctive capability of exploring at the tissue level many functional aspects of CHD in a safe and reproducible way. The lack of invasiveness, the limited need for sedation, the low radiation burden, and the insensitivity to body habitus variations make nuclear medicine an ideal complement of echocardiography. This is particularly true during the follow-up of patients with CHD, whose increasing survival represent a great medical success and a challenge for the health system in the next decades. Metabolic imaging using (18)FDG PET/CT has expanded its role in the management of infection and inflammation in adult patients, particularly in cardiology. The same expansion is observed in pediatric cardiology, with an increasing rate of studies on the use of FDG PET for the evaluation of children with vasculitis, suspected valvular infection or infected prosthetic devices. The

  5. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  6. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  7. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  8. The history of veterinary cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, James W

    2013-03-01

    Throughout civilization, animals have played a pivotal role in the advancement of science and medicine. From as early as 400 BC when Hippocrates recognized that diseases had natural causes, the steadfast advances made by biologists, scientists, physicians and scholars were fueled by timely and important facts and information- much of it gained through animal observations that contributed importantly to understanding anatomy, physiology, and pathology. There have been many breakthroughs and historic developments. For example, William Harvey in the 16th and 17th centuries clarified the importance of the circulatory system, aided by observations in dogs and pigs, which helped to clarify and confirm his concepts. The nineteenth century witnessed advances in physical examination techniques including auscultation and percussion. These helped create the basis for enhanced proficiency in clinical cardiology. An explosion of technologic advances that followed in the 20th century have made possible sophisticated, accurate, and non-invasive diagnostics. This permitted rapid patient assessment, effective monitoring, the development of new cardiotonic drugs, clinical trials to assess efficacy, and multi-therapy strategies. The latter 20th century has marshaled a dizzying array of advances in medical genetics and molecular science, expanding the frontiers of etiologies and disease mechanisms in man, with important implications for animal health. Veterinary medicine has evolved during the last half century, from a trade designed to serve agrarian cultures, to a diverse profession supporting an array of career opportunities ranging from private, specialty practice, to highly organized, specialized medicine and subspecialty academic training programs in cardiology and allied disciplines.

  9. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  10. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  11. Comparative assessment of the pattern of anti-hypertensive drugs prescribed in medicine and cardiology outpatient department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhargav Gaikwad

    2016-10-01

    Results :The present study which was conducted for a period of 6 months in the medicine and cardiology OPD showed unequal distribution of the patients in the medicine and cardiology OPD, with 223 patients attended medicine OPD while 434 patients attended cardiology OPD. Amongst the patients attending medicine OPD, majority of the patients (61.88% were stage 1 hypertensive (>140/90mmHg according to JNC VII classification whereas majority (69.38% of those attending cardiology OPD were stage II hypertensive (>160/100. calcium channel blockers (CCB were the most commonly prescribed drug in medicine OPD followed by angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI whereas beta blockers (BB were most commonly prescribed in cardiology OPD followed by ACEI. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2016; 5(5.000: 1958-1965

  12. Innovation in intervention : new devices in interventional cardiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Branden, B.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis reports on the application of several new devices for percutaneous treatment of structural heart disease. A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a tunnellike communication between the right and the left atrium and has been associated with the occurrence of cryptogenic stroke. PFO closure has pr

  13. Adherence to the 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation Appropriate Use Criteria for Cardiac Computed Tomography: Quality Analysis at a Tertiary Referral Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Manavjot S; Lumish, Heidi; Uthamalingam, Shanmugam; Engel, Leif-Christopher; Abbara, Suhny; Brady, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Udo; Ghoshhajra, Brian B

    2016-03-01

    In November 2010, the American College of Cardiology Foundation published revised appropriateness criteria (AC) for cardiac computed tomography (CT). We evaluated adherence to these criteria by providers of different subspecialties at a tertiary referral center. Reports of 383 consecutive patients who underwent clinically indicated cardiac CT from December 1, 2010, to July 31, 2011, were reviewed by physicians with appropriate training in cardiac CT. Scans were classified as appropriate, inappropriate, or uncertain based on the revised 2010 AC. Studies that did not fall under any of the specified indications were labeled as unclassified. Adherence to the AC was also analyzed as a function of provider type. Research scans were excluded from this analysis. Three hundred eight exams (80%) were classified as appropriate; 26 (7%), as inappropriate; 30 (8%), as uncertain; and 19 (5%), as unclassified. Of the 19 (5%) unclassified cardiac CT exams, the most common indication was for evaluation of suspected aortic dissection. Three hundred five exams (80%) were referred by cardiologists; 73 (19%), by internists; and 5 (1%), by neurologists. Of the 305 cardiology-referred studies, 221 (73%) were ordered by general cardiologists; 28 (9%), by interventional cardiologists; and 56 (19%), by electrophysiologists. There was no significant difference in adherence to the criteria between provider specialties or between cardiology subspecialties (P > 0.05). high across provider specialties.

  14. Overview of recent advances in molecular cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Zhongjie

    2006-01-01

    Molecular cardiology is a new and fast-growing area of cardiovascular medicine that aims to apply molecular biology techniques for the mechanistic investigation, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease. As an emerging discipline, it has changed conceptual thinking of cardiovascular development, disease etiology and pathophysiology. Although molecular cardiology is still at a very early stage, it has opened a promising avenue for understanding and controlling cardiovascul...

  15. Get into Reading as an intervention for common mental health problems: exploring catalysts for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowrick, Christopher; Billington, Josie; Robinson, Jude; Hamer, Andrew; Williams, Clare

    2012-06-01

    There is increasing evidence for the efficacy of non-medical strategies to improve mental health and well-being. Get into Reading is a shared reading intervention which has demonstrable acceptability and feasibility. This paper explores potential catalysts for change resulting from Get into Reading. Two weekly reading groups ran for 12 months, in a GP surgery and a mental health drop-in centre, for people with a GP diagnosis of depression and a validated severity measure. Data collection included quantitative measures at the outset and end of the study, digital recording of sessions, observation and reflective diaries. Qualitative data were analysed thematically and critically compared with digital recordings. The evidence suggested a reduction in depressive symptoms for Get into Reading group participants. Three potential catalysts for change were identified: literary form and content, including the balance between prose and poetry; group facilitation, including social awareness and communicative skills; and group processes, including reflective and syntactic mirroring. This study has generated hypotheses about potential change processes of Get into Reading groups. Evidence of clinical efficacy was limited by small sample size, participant attrition and lack of controls. The focus on depression limited the generalisability of findings to other clinical groups or in non-clinical settings. Further research is needed, including assessment of the social and economic impact and substantial trials of the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of this intervention.

  16. Common usage of cardiologic anatomical terminology: critical analysis and a trilingual discussion proposal Uso comum da terminologia anatômica cardiológica: análise crítica e proposta de discussão trilingue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lins Werneck

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Terminology and Lexicography have been especially addressed to the Allied Health Sciences regarding discussion of case reports or concerning publication of scientific articles. The knowledge of Human Anatomy enables the understanding of medical terms and the refinement of Medical Terminology makes possible a better anatomicomedical communication in a highly technical level. Most of the scientific publications in both Anatomy and Medicine are found only in English and most of dictionaries or search resources available do not have specificity enough to explain anatomicomedical, terminological, or lexicographical occurrences. OBJECTIVE: To design and produce a multilingual terminological dictionary (Latim-English-Portuguese-Spanish containing a list of English anatomicomedical terms in common usage in cardiology subspecialties addressed to medical students and professionals, to other allied health sciences professionals, and to translators working in this specific field. METHODS: Terms, semantical and grammatical components were selected to compose an anatomicocardiological corpus. The adequacy to the thematic terminological research requests and the translation reliability level will be settled from the terminology specificity in contrast to the semantics, as well as from a peer survey of the main terms used by national and international experts in specialized journals, Internet sites, and from text-books on Anatomy and Cardiology. The inclusion criteria will be the terms included in the English, Portuguese, and Spanish Terminologia Anatomica - the official terminology of the anatomical sciences; nonofficial technical commonly used terms which lead to terminology or translation misunderstanding often being a source of confusion. RESULTS: A table with a sample of the 508 most used anatomical cardiologic terms in English language peer-reviewed journals of cardiology and (pediatric and adult thoracic surgery is shown. CONCLUSIONS: The

  17. Current status of preventive cardiology training among United States cardiology fellowships and comparison to training guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pack, Quinn R; Keteyian, Steven J; McBride, Patrick E; Weaver, W Douglas; Kim, Henry E

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated preventive cardiology education in United States cardiology fellowship programs and their adherence to Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium training guidelines, which recommend 1 month of training, faculty with expertise, and clinical experience in cardiac rehabilitation, lipid disorder management, and diabetes management as a part of the prevention curricula. We sent an anonymous survey to United States cardiology program directors and their chief fellow. The survey assessed the program curricula, rotation structure, faculty expertise, obstacles, and recommended improvements. The results revealed that 24% of surveyed programs met the Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium guidelines with a dedicated 1-month rotation in preventive cardiology, 24% had no formalized training in preventive cardiology, and 30% had no faculty with expertise in preventive cardiology, which correlated with fewer rotations in prevention than those with specialized faculty (p = 0.009). Fellows rotated though the following experiences (% of programs): cardiac rehabilitation, 71%; lipid management, 37%; hypertension, 15%; diabetes, 7%; weight management/obesity, 6%; cardiac nutrition, 6%; and smoking cessation, 5%. The program directors cited "lack of time" as the greatest obstacle to providing preventive cardiology training and the chief fellows reported "lack of a developed curriculum" (p = 0.01). The most recommended improvement was for the American College of Cardiology to develop a web-based curriculum/module. In conclusion, most surveyed United States cardiology training programs currently do not adhere to basic preventive cardiovascular medicine Core Cardiovascular Training Symposium recommendations. Additional attention to developing curricular content and structure, including the creation of an American College of Cardiology on-line knowledge module might improve fellowship training in preventive cardiology.

  18. The effect evaluation of Nursing intervention on the sleep disorders of the elderly hospitalized patients from Cardiology%护理干预对心内科老年住院患者睡眠障碍的效果评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利贤

    2013-01-01

    Objective On the basis of understanding the sleep status and the risk factors of sleep ,to evaluate the effect of Nursing intervention on the sleep disorders of the elderly hospitalized patients from Cardiology.Methods Investigating the Sleep quality of 285 elderly hospitalized patients through PSQI questionnaire Before and af-ter the nursing intervention.Results In the causes of sleep disorders,the top three is the disease itself factors(41.4%),hospital environment change(22.5%)and psy-chological factors(17.5%).The incidence of sleep disorders reduces from 74.4%before nursing intervention to 45.3% after the intervention(χ2=19.204,P0.05)before and after the nursing intervention.Conclusion The sleep quality of elderly hospitalized patients from Cardiology is bad,it is effective to take active and effective nursing intervention measures .%目的在了解心内科老年住院患者的睡眠状况及影响睡眠的原因的基础上,评价护理干预对心内科老年住院患者睡眠障碍的效果。方法通过对心内科住院的285例老年病人(年龄≥60岁)护理干预前后的匹兹堡睡眠质量指数的比较,评价护理干预措施的效果。结果在睡眠障碍发生原因调查中,主要为疾病本身因素(41.4%)、住院环境改变(22.5%)和心理因素(17.5%)。老年人睡眠障碍的发生率由护理干预前的74.4%降低到干预后的45.3%(χ2=19.204,P<0.01),PSQI平均总得分由12.02+2.11分降低到7.82+2.57分(t=10.035,P<0.01)。7个因子中,只有习惯性睡眠效率和白天功能紊乱未有明显改善(P>0.05)。结论心内科老年住院患者睡眠质量较差,采取有针对性的护理干预措施能够有效改善患者的睡眠质量。

  19. Management of common ailments requiring referral in the pharmacy: a mystery shopping intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jack Charles; Schneider, Carl Richard; Faraj, Renee; Wilson, Frances; de Almeida Neto, Abilio Cesar; Moles, Rebekah Jane

    2017-08-01

    Background Pharmacists can play a key role in managing ailments through their primary roles of supplying over-the-counter (non-prescription) medicines and advice-giving. It must be ensured that pharmacy staff practise in an evidence-based, guideline-compliant manner. To achieve this, mystery shopping can be used as an intervention to assess and train pharmacy staff. Objective To determine if repeated student pharmacist mystery shopping with immediate feedback affected the outcome of scenarios requiring referral to a medical practitioner. To determine what, if any, factors may influence whether referral occurred. Setting Thirteen community pharmacies across metropolitan Sydney, Australia. Methods Sixty-one student pharmacist mystery shoppers visited 13 community pharmacies across metropolitan Sydney once weekly over nine weeks between March-October 2015 to conduct audio-recorded mystery shopping visits with assigned scenarios (asthma, dyspepsia, diarrhoea). Students returned to the pharmacy immediately to provide staff members with feedback. Pharmacy staff were scored by mystery shoppers according to a standardised scoresheet. Score data and other characteristics, such as the assigned scenario, were analysed via correlation and logistic regression modelling. Main outcome measure Whether a student mystery shopper was appropriately referred to a medical practitioner based on the presenting symptoms. Results 158 visits were eligible for analysis. Referral to a medical practitioner was appropriately made in 66% of visits. The regression model provided an R2 value of 0.73; the questioning score of the interaction and if a pharmacist was involved in the interaction were significant predictor of appropriate outcome (p 0.05). Conclusions Mystery shopping with feedback did not improve pharmacy staff performance over time. Increased questioning and involvement of a pharmacist in the interaction were significant predictors of referral to a medical practitioner occurring.

  20. Position paper nuclear cardiology: Update 2008. State-of-the-art of scintigraphic methods; Positionspapier Nuklearkardiologie: Update 2008. Aktueller Stand der szintigraphischen Methodik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefers, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Bengel, F. [Johns Hopkins Univ. Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States). Cardiovascular Nuclear Medicine; Buell, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (DE). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin] (and others)

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology is well established in clinical diagnostic algorithms for many years. This is an update 2008 of the first common position paper of the German Association of Nuclear Medicine and the German Association of Cardiology, Heart and Circulation Research published in 2001 aiming at an overview of state-of-the-art scintigraphic methods.

  1. National Utilization Patterns of Steroid Injection and Operative Intervention for Treatment of Common Hand Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Erika D.; Swiatek, Peter R.; Chung, Kevin C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a population-level analysis of practice trends and probability of surgery based on the number of steroid injections for common hand conditions. Methods Patients at least 18 years old receiving injection or surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), trigger finger (TF), or De Quervain tenovaginitis (DQ) were identified for inclusion using the 2009–2013 Truven MarketScan databases. The number of injections performed was counted, and time between injection and operation was calculated for patients receiving both treatments. A multivariable logistic regression model was created to evaluate the odds of undergoing surgery based on the number of injections performed, controlling for patient age, sex, comorbidities, and insurance type. Results The study sample included 251,030 patients who underwent steroid injection or operative release for CTS (n=129,917), TF (n=102,778), and DQ (n=18,335). The majority of CTS patients were managed with immediate surgery (71%), whereas most patients with TF and DQ were managed initially with injection (74% and 84%, respectively). Among patients receiving both an injection and an operation, a single injection was the most common practice prior to surgery (69%, 58%, and 67% of patients with CTS, TF, and DQ, respectively). Multiple injections for DQ and TF were associated with relatively low predicted probability of surgery (17% and 26%, respectively, after 2 injections). However, the predicted probability of surgery after two injections was higher in patients with CTS (44%). Conclusions Given the associated probability of surgery after multiple injections for the three hand conditions examined, the practice of repeat injections should be critically examined to determine whether underuse or overuse is present and whether efficiency and resource utilization can be improved upon. Level of Evidence Level II (retrospective prognostic study) PMID:26774548

  2. Cardiological (pharmaco)therapy and dental practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugemann, J.; Van Gelder, I.C.; van der Meer, J.; Zijlstra, F.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years much progress has been made in the treatment of acute coronary syndromes, heart failure and cardiac rhythm disturbances. Polypharmacy including two antiplatelet drugs (aspirin and clopidogrel) is common in many patients after a percutaneous coronary intervention using a 'stent'. Disc

  3. [Sports cardiology - a general practice oriented update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Christian

    2014-08-01

    As a sub-speciality, Sports Cardiology focuses on sport and physical training interacting with cardiac issues. Particularly, Sports Cardiology deals with the so-called "Sports Paradox", which implicates the fact the on one side regular physical training leads to a multitude of relevant health benefits. But on the other hand, exercise can also be a trigger for sudden cardiac death, particularly in case of an underlying cardiac disease. However, health benefits by regular training outweigh potential risks by far, but only if an adequate cardiac screening and individual recommendations for sports participation have been provided. This review highlights various aspects of Sports Cardiology like strategies to prevent sudden cardiac death in sports and training recommendations in patients with an underlying cardiovascular disease.

  4. Cardiac magnetic resonance in clinical cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas; Kumar; Rodrigo; Bagur

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, cardiac magnetic resonance(CMR) has transformed from a research tool to a widely used diagnostic method in clinical cardiology. This method can now make useful, unique contributions to the work-up of patients with ischemic and non-ischemic heart disease. Advantages of CMR, compared to other imaging methods, include very high resolution imaging with a spatial resolution up to 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm in plane, a large array of different imaging sequences to provide in vivo tissue characterization, and radiationfree imaging. The present manuscript highlights the relevance of CMR in the current clinical practice and new perspectives in cardiology.

  5. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  6. Measures of Knowledge and Attitude Toward Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Charlene A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The development and validation of an inventory of preventive cardiology at the University of Virginia is described. The inventory contains two instruments designed to measure medical students' preinstructional and postinstructional knowledge of and attitude toward preventive cardiology. (Author/MLW)

  7. POSITIONS OF CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKER LERCANIDIPINE ACCORDING TO EVIDENCE BASED CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Lukina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data of evidence based cardiology including results of international clinical trials on efficacy and safety of the modern calcium channel blocker (CCB, lercanidipine, are presented. Results of these trials show the firm position of lercanidipine in the modern cardiology and confirm that treatment with lercanidipine leads to significant reduction of systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP with no effect on heart rate (HR. Peripheral edema (the common side effect of CCBs occurs rarer with lercanidipine treatment than this with any other CCB treatment. Lercanidipine can be recommended to patients with concomitant diseases due to its additional features.

  8. Online educational tools developed by Heart improve the knowledge and skills of hospital doctors in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran; Rafiq, Isma; Hall, Roger

    2007-07-01

    We conducted this study to find out if online learning packages in cardiology enabled users to increase their knowledge and skills. We also looked at how acceptable users found these packages. The journal Heart in association with BMJ Learning produced a series of modules on common cardiology problems. The modules involved a pre-test, a number of interactive cases and a post-test. A total of 1786 users completed these modules. Doing the modules enabled users to improve their score from the pre-test to the post-test by a significant amount (p<0.001). Feedback to the modules was very positive.

  9. Using the common sense model to design interventions for the prevention and management of chronic illness threats: from description to process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAndrew, Lisa M; Musumeci-Szabó, Tamara J; Mora, Pablo A; Vileikyte, Loretta; Burns, Edith; Halm, Ethan A; Leventhal, Elaine A; Leventhal, Howard

    2008-05-01

    In this article, we discuss how one might use the common sense model of self-regulation (CSM) for developing interventions for improving chronic illness management. We argue that features of that CSM such as its dynamic, self-regulative (feedback) control feature and its system structure provide an important basis for patient-centered interventions. We describe two separate, ongoing interventions with patients with diabetes and asthma to demonstrate the adaptability of the CSM. Finally, we discuss three additional factors that need to be addressed before planning and implementing interventions: (1) the use of top-down versus bottom-up intervention strategies; (2) health care interventions involving multidisciplinary teams; and (3) fidelity of implementation for tailored interventions.

  10. Molecular imaging: a new approach to nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrucki, L.W.; Sinusas, A.J. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven (United States). Section of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear cardiology has historically played an important role in detection of cardiovascular disease as well as risk statification. With the growth of molecular biology have come new therapeutic interventions and the requirement for new diagnostic imaging approaches. Noninvasive targeted radiotracer based as well as transporter gene imaging strategies are evolving to meet these new needs, but require the development of an interdisciplinary approach which focuses on molecular processes, as well as the pathogenesis and progression of disease. This progress has been made possible with the availability of transgenic animal models along with many technological advances. Future adaptations of the developing experimental procedures and instrumentations will allow for the smooth translation and application to clinical practice. This review is intended as a brief overview on the subject molecular imaging. Basic concepts and historical perspective of molecular imaging will be reviewed first, followed by description of current technology, and concluding with current applications in cardiology. The emphasis will be on the use of both single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracers, although other imaging modalities will be also briefly discussed. The specific approaches presented here will include receptor-based and reporter gene imaging of natural and therapeutical angiogenesis.

  11. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  12. Evaluation of Cardiology Training and Manpower Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Forrest H., Ed.; Mendenhall, Robert C., Ed.

    Begun in June, 1971 and completed in October 1973, the study had the following specific goals: to define the cardiologist's role; to determine cardiology training program objectives; to determine manpower needs for cardiologists; and to determine the educational needs of cardiologists. The major information was sought from all active cardiologists…

  13. An Evaluation of a Clerkship In Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edson, John N.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Evaluation of the clinical clerkship in Cardiology for general practitioners proves there is an urgent need for continuing post graduate medical education for general practitioners. Clerkship was offered jointly by the Long Island College Hospital and the State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York. (IR)

  14. What can functional imaging do for cardiology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucignani, G. [Milan Univ. (Italy). Scientific Institute H S. Raffele, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    1996-03-01

    New technologies including echo-cardiography and magnetic resonance imaging have been developed and their use validated for cardiology by comparison with nuclear studies. The size of market will influence significantly the industrial strategies of the future. The future of nuclear medicine is related to technological, methodological, biochemical, physiological and clinical expertise of the nuclear medicine physicians.

  15. Healthy Lifestyle Interventions to Combat Noncommunicable Disease—A Novel Nonhierarchical Connectivity Model for Key Stakeholders: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association, European Society of Cardiology, European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation, and American College of Preventive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ross; Guazzi, Marco; Lianov, Liana; Whitsel, Laurie; Berra, Kathy; Lavie, Carl J; Kaminsky, Leonard; Williams, Mark; Hivert, Marie-France; Franklin, Nina Cherie; Myers, Jonathan; Dengel, Donald; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M; Pinto, Fausto J; Cosentino, Francesco; Halle, Martin; Gielen, Stephan; Dendale, Paul; Niebauer, Josef; Pelliccia, Antonio; Giannuzzi, Pantaleo; Corra, Ugo; Piepoli, Massimo F; Guthrie, George; Shurney, Dexter

    2015-08-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have become the primary health concern for most countries around the world. Currently, more than 36 million people worldwide die from NCDs each year, accounting for 63% of annual global deaths; most are preventable. The global financial burden of NCDs is staggering, with an estimated 2010 global cost of $6.3 trillion (US dollars) that is projected to increase to $13 trillion by 2030. A number of NCDs share one or more common predisposing risk factors, all related to lifestyle to some degree: (1) cigarette smoking, (2) hypertension, (3) hyperglycemia, (4) dyslipidemia, (5) obesity, (6) physical inactivity, and (7) poor nutrition. In large part, prevention, control, or even reversal of the aforementioned modifiable risk factors are realized through leading a healthy lifestyle (HL). The challenge is how to initiate the global change, not toward increasing documentation of the scope of the problem but toward true action-creating, implementing, and sustaining HL initiatives that will result in positive, measurable changes in the previously defined poor health metrics. To achieve this task, a paradigm shift in how we approach NCD prevention and treatment is required. The goal of this American Heart Association/European Society of Cardiology/European Association for Cardiovascular Prevention and Rehabilitation/American College of Preventive Medicine policy statement is to define key stakeholders and highlight their connectivity with respect to HL initiatives. This policy encourages integrated action by all stakeholders to create the needed paradigm shift and achieve broad adoption of HL behaviors on a global scale.

  16. Hypothesizing Music Intervention Enhances Brain Functional Connectivity Involving Dopaminergic Recruitment: Common Neuro-correlates to Abusable Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Simpatico, Thomas; Febo, Marcelo; Rodriquez, Chris; Dushaj, Kristina; Li, Mona; Braverman, Eric R; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2017-07-01

    The goal of this review is to explore the clinical significance of music listening on neuroplasticity and dopaminergic activation by understanding the role of music therapy in addictive behavior treatment. fMRI data has shown that music listening intensely modifies mesolimbic structural changes responsible for reward processing (e.g., nucleus accumbens [NAc]) and may control the emotional stimuli's effect on autonomic and physiological responses (e.g., hypothalamus). Music listening has been proven to induce the endorphinergic response blocked by naloxone, a common opioid antagonist. NAc opioid transmission is linked to the ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine release. There are remarkable commonalities between listening to music and the effect of drugs on mesolimbic dopaminergic activation. It has been found that musical training before the age of 7 results in changes in white-matter connectivity, protecting carriers with low dopaminergic function (DRD2A1 allele, etc.) from poor decision-making, reward dependence, and impulsivity. In this article, we briefly review a few studies on the neurochemical effects of music and propose that these findings are relevant to the positive clinical findings observed in the literature. We hypothesize that music intervention enhances brain white matter plasticity through dopaminergic recruitment and that more research is needed to explore the efficacy of these therapies.

  17. A importância do controle de qualidade em serviços de hemodinâmica e cardiologia intervencionista The relevance of quality control in services of hemodynamics and interventional cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eara de Souza Luz

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o desempenho de um equipamento de raios X utilizado em radiologia intervencionista e a qualidade de imagem produzida, aplicando alguns testes de controle de qualidade. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: O equipamento de raios X testado foi da marca Philips (Integris H3000, do serviço de hemodinâmica de um hospital do Rio de Janeiro. Foram utilizados objetos de teste de Leeds para avaliar a qualidade da imagem, e um sistema Radcal 9015 para medições dosimétricas. RESULTADOS: Nos modos high e normal, os valores medidos das taxas de kerma no ar foram diferentes dos esperados. Em alguns casos, os valores das taxas medidas não foram afetados pelo uso de diferentes modos de magnificação. A avaliação da qualidade da imagem apresentou resultados diferentes dos valores recomendados pelas normas. Isto pode levar à obtenção de imagens de menor qualidade e ao aumento da exposição à radiação de pacientes e profissionais. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados mostraram a importância da aplicação periódica de testes de controle de qualidade, que permitem monitorar o desempenho do equipamento e estimar a exposição dos pacientes e trabalhadores. Os resultados obtidos sugerem a necessidade de uma revisão no sistema de aquisição de imagens do equipamento.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the performance and quality of images of a x-ray equipment utilized in interventional radiology, by means of some tests of quality control. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Measurements have been performed on a Philips Integris H3000 x-ray equipment dedicated to interventional procedures in the hemodynamics laboratory of a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil. Leeds test objects have been used to evaluate the image quality. Dosimetric measurements have been developed with a Radcal 9015 dosimetric system. RESULTS: In high and normal modes, the air kerma rates have been different from the expected results. In some cases, values have not been affected by the use of different

  18. Developing effective invasive cardiology services. Guideline report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, P L; Franc, C W; Lewis, S J

    1988-01-01

    Diseases of the heart are the leading cause of death and the major reason for days stayed in the hospital and discharges from the hospital. Nearly 1 million Americans died last year from cardiac disease, and over 60 million suffer from some form of cardiac disease. Conservatively stated, 300,000 cardiac surgeries and 600,000 cardiac catheterizations are performed annually, and the number is rising. Therefore, heart disease is understandably big business for hospitals and physicians. The organization of cardiac delivery systems is changing dramatically, primarily as the result of advancements made in the nonsurgical treatment of cardiac disease. The balance of power is shifting from cardiac surgery to cardiology, resulting in political and economic consequences for hospitals. Cardiac diagnosis is also undergoing a transformation, as less invasive procedures increase in sophistication. As hospitals consider their options in this market and observe physicians, medical groups, and alternative delivery systems providing competing services, the strategic alternatives become confusing and decidedly difficult. This report is written as a guide to assist hospitals in understanding the technological forces underlying the changing market and the effect these changes will have on the ownership, organization, and structure of delivery systems and, most specifically, on the delivery of cardiovascular services. Because of the tremendous interest in invasive cardiology services and the significance of the financial, organizational, and quality commitment involved in the delivery of invasive cardiology services, this guideline report addresses primarily those services. Noninvasive technologies also are addressed because of their importance to a cardiology program, the magnitude of the technological changes taking place, and their potential impact on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease. The report begins with a discussion of the general planning issues that provide the

  19. Reduction in downstream test utilization following introduction of coronary computed tomography in a cardiology practice

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsberg, Ronald P.; Budoff, Matthew J.; Thomson, Louise E; Friedman, John D.; Berman, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    To compare utilization of non-invasive ischemic testing, invasive coronary angiography (ICA), and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures before and after introduction of 64-slice multi-detector row coronary computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) in a large urban primary and consultative cardiology practice. We utilized a review of electronic medical records (NotesMD®) and the electronic practice management system (Megawest®) encompassing a 4-year period from 2004 to 2007 to dete...

  20. Pulmonary Edema Assessed by Ultrasound: Impact in Cardiology and Intensive Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Pablo A; Cianciulli, Tomás F

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary edema is a frequent condition found in adult patients hospitalized in cardiology wards and intensive care units. Ultrasonography is a diagnostic modality with a high sensitivity for the detection of extravascular lung water, visualized as B lines, and usually caused by cardiogenic or noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. This paper highlights a simple method for the assessment of patients with pulmonary edema, which allows for a differential diagnosis of its possible mechanism and contributes to therapeutic intervention guiding and monitoring.

  1. Use of smartphone technology in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang H; Silva, Jennifer N A

    2016-05-01

    Smartphone-based technologies along with broadband connectivity are changing the way modern cardiology is practiced. The ever broadening connectivity and increasing capabilities of smartphone-based technologies can better monitor, diagnose, and prevent cardiovascular diseases. Researchers can leverage the ubiquitous use of smartphone-based technologies and their constant stream of biometric data to establish large community-based clinical research studies. Patient engagement is enhanced with constant and on-demand access to physicians, daily self-monitoring, and expanding social networks. On the other hand, the exponential growth of smartphone-based technologies invariably disrupts the traditional healthcare model and leaves a vacuum in the infrastructure, medico-legal apparatus, and reimbursement systems that need to be addressed. In this review, we present a comprehensive discussion of the various applications utilizing smartphone-based technologies in cardiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Using Social Media to Characterize Public Sentiment Toward Medical Interventions Commonly Used for Cancer Screening: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, Omar; Blumberg, Seth; Ladabaum, Uri; Sinha, Sidhartha R

    2017-06-07

    Although cancer screening reduces morbidity and mortality, millions of people worldwide remain unscreened. Social media provide a unique platform to understand public sentiment toward tools that are commonly used for cancer screening. The objective of our study was to examine public sentiment toward colonoscopy, mammography, and Pap smear and how this sentiment spreads by analyzing discourse on Twitter. In this observational study, we classified 32,847 tweets (online postings on Twitter) related to colonoscopy, mammography, or Pap smears using a naive Bayes algorithm as containing positive, negative, or neutral sentiment. Additionally, we characterized the spread of sentiment on Twitter using an established model to study contagion. Colonoscopy-related tweets were more likely to express negative than positive sentiment (negative to positive ratio 1.65, 95% CI 1.51-1.80, Pcancer screening. Given the growing use of social media, public health interventions to improve cancer screening should use the health perceptions of the population as expressed in social network postings about tests that are frequently used for cancer screening, as well as other people they may influence with such postings.

  3. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in imaging instrumentation for nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Sung; Kovalski, Gil; Sharir, Tali; Lee, Dong Soo

    2017-07-17

    Advances in imaging instrumentation and technology have greatly contributed to nuclear cardiology. Dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras incorporating novel, highly efficient detector, collimator, and system designs have emerged with the expansion of nuclear cardiology. Solid-state radiation detectors incorporating cadmium zinc telluride, which directly convert radiation to electrical signals and yield improved energy resolution and spatial resolution and enhanced count sensitivity geometries, are increasingly gaining favor as the detector of choice for application in dedicated cardiac SPECT systems. Additionally, hybrid imaging systems in which SPECT and PET are combined with X-ray CT are currently widely used, with PET/MRI hybrid systems having also been recently introduced. The improved quantitative SPECT/CT has the potential to measure the absolute quantification of myocardial blood flow and flow reserve. Rapid development of silicon photomultipliers leads to enhancement in PET image quality and count rates. In addition, the reduction of emission-transmission mismatch artifacts via application of accurate time-of-flight information, and cardiac motion de-blurring aided by anatomical images, are emerging techniques for further improvement of cardiac PET. This article reviews recent advances such as these in nuclear cardiology imaging instrumentation and technology, and the corresponding diagnostic benefits.

  5. The Development of Robotic Technology in Cardiac and Vascular Interventions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ali Pourdjabbar; Lawrence Ang; Ryan R. Reeves; Mitul P. Patel; Ehtisham Mahmud

    2017-01-01

    Robotic technology has been used in cardiovascular medicine for over a decade, and over that period its use has been expanded to interventional cardiology and percutaneous coronary and peripheral vascular interventions...

  6. [Informed consent in cardiology. The Committee on Informed Consent of the Commission on Professional Matters of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de los Reyes López, M; Iñíguez Romo, A; Goicolea de Oro, A; Funes López, B; Castro Beiras, A

    1998-10-01

    In the last thirty years, the clinical relationship between physicians and patients has been rather modified. There are several factors that have contributed to this change: a) New ways to execute medical practises, specially referred to the development of new techniques; b) Cultural changes in our western society, mainly in the mediterranean area, where there has been progress in the recognition of patients' autonomy to decide about their own lives, health and their own bodies; c) The increasing number of lawsuits, complaints and judgements about the problems that clinical information involves, particularly the informed consent in clinical practise. We consider it necessary to make an extensive and deep discussion from all of the areas in Medicine and Law, to analyze the different ethical and legal parts of the informed consent. For that reason the Spanish Society of Cardiology offers their members a basic document in order to reflect about these facts, developing arguments, justifications and supports. This document has also considered models, conditions to their applicability according to Spanish law, and the experience we have had. Finally, there is a list of diagnostic procedures and interventional practises in cardiology that might be preceded by a written informed consent document. We considered them by the name of Spanish Society of Cardiology recommendations.

  7. Training residents/fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Emory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert M

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric cardiology fellowship is a very busy time, with new responsibilities, new knowledge, new technology and fast pace. Above and beyond the science and art of pediatric cardiology, we emphasize that our cardiology fellows are in the middle of the "people business", with additional roles and responsibilities as they serve their patients and communities. This manuscript provides insight into these opportunities for our pediatric cardiac professionals.

  8. Occupational dose constraints in interventional cardiology procedures: the DIMOND approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsapaki, Virginia [Medical Physics Department, Konstantopoulio Agia Olga Hospital, Athens (Greece); Kottou, Sophia [Medical Physics Department, Athens University, Medical School, Athens (Greece); Vano, Eliseo [Medical Physics Service and Radiology Department, San Carlos University Hospital and Complutense University, Madrid (Spain); Komppa, Tuomo [Stuk, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Padovani, Renato [Servizio di Fisica Medica, Ospedale S Maria della Misericordia, Udine (Italy); Dowling, Annita [Medical Physics and Bioengineering Department, St James' s Hospital and Haughton Institute, Dublin (Ireland); Molfetas, Michael [Medical Physics Department, ' Evangelismos' Hospital, Athens (Greece); Neofotistou, Vassiliki [Medical Physics Department, Regional Athens General Hospital ' G Gennimatas' , Athens (Greece)

    2004-03-21

    Radiation fields involved in angiographic suites are most uneven with intensity and gradient varying widely with projection geometry. The European Commission DIMOND III project addressed among others, the issues regarding optimization of staff doses with an attempt to propose preliminary occupational dose constraints. Two thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were used to assess operators' extremity doses (left shoulder and left foot) during 20 coronary angiographies (CAs) and 20 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasties (PTCAs) in five European centres. X-ray equipment, radiation protection measures used and the dose delivered to the patient in terms of dose-area product (DAP) were recorded so as to subsequently associate them with operator's dose. The range of staff doses noted for the same TLD position, centre and procedure type emphasizes the importance of protective measures and technical characteristics of x-ray equipment. Correlation of patient's DAP with staff shoulder dose is moderate whereas correlation of patient's DAP with staff foot dose is poor in both CA and PTCA. Therefore, it is difficult to predict operator's dose from patient's DAP mainly due to the different use of protective measures. A preliminary occupational dose constraint value was defined by calculating cardiologists' annual effective dose and found to be 0.6 mSv.

  9. A dedicated lab for interventional cardiology and hybrid surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, F. [KinderSpital Zurich (Switzerland). Department of Congenital Heart Disease/Pediatric Cardiology

    2004-07-01

    Pediatric interventionalists and surgeons treating congenital heart defects at the KinderSpital children's hospital in Zurich, Switzerland, use a ''hybrid'' approach to minimize the incidence and extent of open-heart surgery. The hybrid approach combines catheterization and surgical techniques in a single procedure, performed in the same lab. The combined cardiac cath lab/surgery suite is equipped with a Philips Integris Allura BH5000 9''/9'' biplane system, designed to meet all the requirements for pediatric applications, including the need to keep the quantity of contrast agent and the radiation dose to the minimum. Wherever possible, diagnostic X-ray examinations are supplemented by MR and Ultrasound. (orig.)

  10. MICROCIRCULATORY ISCHEMIA AND STATINS: LESSONS OF INTERVENTION CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An. A. Alexandrov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Review is devoted to the pathogenesis of microcirculatory ischemia. Microcirculatory dysfunction has been identified in different groups of patients including syndrome X, diabetes mellitus 2 type, coronary heart disease. In coronary patients after transluminal angioplasty microcirculatory dysfunction is the reason of phenomenon of “non-reflow”. In result the procedure of revascularization is less effective. Therapy by statins can be beneficial for patients with microcirculatory ischemia.

  11. Mapping Intravascular Ultrasound Controversies in Interventional Cardiology Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maresca, D.; Adams, S.; Maresca, B.; Van der Steen, A.F.W.

    2014-01-01

    Intravascular ultrasound is a catheter-based imaging modality that was developed to investigate the condition of coronary arteries and assess the vulnerability of coronary atherosclerotic plaques in particular. Since its introduction in the clinic 20 years ago, use of intravascular ultrasound innova

  12. Vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales en un hospital de cardiología Nosocomial infections surveillance in a cardiology and thoracic diseases hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio D. Molina-Gamboa

    1999-01-01

    vigilancia eficaz que elimine al mínimo las fluctuaciones en la captación de los casos durante el periodo vacacional del personal del equipo de control de infecciones, ya que el subregistro de los casos puede traer como consecuencia la pérdida de control sobre las infecciones hospitalarias y la aparición de brotes epidémicos.OBJECTIVES. To describe a nosocomial infection surveillance in a cardiology and thoracic diseases hospital in Northern Mexico during its initial months of activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Restrospective report of nosocomial infection surveillance performed by the infection control team with patient visits, clinical records, microbiology reports, and direct information obtained by health personnel. General and specific infection rates were analized by the chi² test and the Student t test. RESULTS. General infection rate was 4.99 during the 17 month period. Monthly infection rates changed significantly during infection control team vacations. By site of infection, surgical wound infection were the most common (1.14, followed by urinary tract infections (1.08, and bacteremia (0.72. However, when we grouped bacteremias and other cateter related infections, this intravascular access related infections were the most frequent (1.73. Gram positive organisms were most commonly isolated in nosocomial infections, except in pneumonias (gram negative organism and urinary tract infections (Candida spp.. Mortality related to nosocomial infection was high (21.7%, and at least one third of those deaths was directly related to the infection. In hospital stay and cost were also increase with nosocomial infections. CONCLUSIONS. Nosocomial infection is common in interventional cardiology hospitals, producing high mortality and rising costs and length of stay. We need a more efective nosocomial infections surveillance system to eliminate changes in monthly case detection produced by the infection control team vacations, since this underregistry could result in lost of

  13. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed: a reply to a “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about a r...

  14. Common variants in genes related to lipid and energy metabolism are associated with weight loss after an intervention in overweight/obese adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Moleres

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Some SNPs related to lipid and energy metabolism may be implicated not only in the development of obesity and associated comorbidities, but also in the weight loss response after a nutritional intervention. Objective: In this context, the present study analyzed four SNPs located within four genes known to be associated with obesity and other obesity-related complications, and their putative role in a weight-loss intervention in overweight/obese adolescents. Methods: The study population consisted of 199 overweight/obese adolescents (13-16 yr old undergoing 10 weeks of a weight loss multidisciplinary intervention: the EVASYON programme (www.estudioevasyon.org. Adolescents were genotyped for 4 SNPs, and anthropometric measurements and biochemical markers were analyzed at the beginning and after the intervention. Results: Interestingly, APOA5(rs662799 was associated with the baseline anthropometric and biochemical outcomes, whereas FTO (rs9939609 seemed to be related with the change of these values after the 10-week intervention. The other two SNPs, located in the CETP (rs1800777 and the APOA1 (rs670 genes, showed important relationships with adiposity markers. Specifically, a combined model including both SNPs turned up to explain up to 24% of BMI-SDS change after 10 weeks of the multidisciplinary intervention, which may contribute to understand the weight loss response. Conclusion: Common variants in genes related to lipid and energy metabolism may influence not only biochemical outcomes but also weight loss response after a multidisciplinary intervention carried out in obese/overweight adolescents.

  15. Clinical cardiology consultation at non-cardiology departments: stepchild of patient care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellings, D.A.; Symersky, T.; Ottervanger, J.P.; Ramdat Misier, A.R.; Boer, M.J. de

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although patient care in cardiology departments may be of high quality, patients with cardiac disease in other departments tend to receive less attention from cardiologists. Driven by the shorter duration of admission nowadays and the fact that consultations are often performed in

  16. A case study of technology transfer: Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, G.

    1974-01-01

    Research advancements in cardiology instrumentation and techniques are summarized. Emphasis is placed upon the following techniques: (1) development of electrodes which show good skin compatibility and wearer comfort; (2) contourography - a real time display system for showing the results of EKGs; (3) detection of arteriosclerosis by digital computer processing of X-ray photos; (4) automated, noninvasive systems for blood pressure measurement; (5) ultrasonoscope - a noninvasive device for use in diagnosis of aortic, mitral, and tricuspid valve disease; and (6) rechargable cardiac pacemakers. The formation of a biomedical applications team which is an interdisciplinary team to bridge the gap between the developers and users of technology is described.

  17. Caos, complejidad y cardiología

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Lavín,Manuel

    2012-01-01

    La ciencia es una disciplina en constante evolución. La medicina moderna está basada en la ciencia. El paradigma médico vigente es lineal y reduccionista. Existe una nueva teoría general avalada por cálculos computacionales avanzados, la teoría del caos y la complejidad. Esta nueva visión probablemente modificará la práctica de la medicina. La cardiología fue una puerta de entrada de la complejidad, al campo de la medicina. El caos y los fractales son fenómenos frecuentes en la fisiología car...

  18. Role of noninvasive testing in the clinical evaluation of women with suspected coronary artery disease: Consensus statement from the Cardiac Imaging Committee, Council on Clinical Cardiology, and the Cardiovascular Imaging and Intervention Committee, Council on Cardiovascular Radiology and Intervention, American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieres, Jennifer H; Shaw, Leslee J; Arai, Andrew; Budoff, Matthew J; Flamm, Scott D; Hundley, W Gregory; Marwick, Thomas H; Mosca, Lori; Patel, Ayan R; Quinones, Miguel A; Redberg, Rita F; Taubert, Kathryn A; Taylor, Allen J; Thomas, Gregory S; Wenger, Nanette K

    2005-02-08

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality for women in the United States. Coronary heart disease, which includes coronary atherosclerotic disease, myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndromes, and angina, is the largest subset of this mortality, with >240,000 women dying annually from the disease. Atherosclerotic coronary artery disease (CAD) is the focus of this consensus statement. Research continues to report underrecognition and underdiagnosis of CAD as contributory to high mortality rates in women. Timely and accurate diagnosis can significantly reduce CAD mortality for women; indeed, once the diagnosis is made, it does appear that current treatments are equally effective at reducing risk in both women and men. As such, noninvasive diagnostic and prognostic testing offers the potential to identify women at increased CAD risk as the basis for instituting preventive and therapeutic interventions. Nevertheless, the recent evidence-based practice program report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality noted the paucity of women enrolled in diagnostic research studies. Consequently, much of the evidence supporting contemporary recommendations for noninvasive diagnostic studies in women is extrapolated from studies conducted predominantly in cohorts of middle-aged men. The majority of diagnostic and prognostic evidence in cardiac imaging in women and men has been derived from observational registries and referral populations that are affected by selection and other biases. Thus, a better understanding of the potential impact of sex differences on noninvasive cardiac testing in women may greatly improve clinical decision making. This consensus statement provides a synopsis of available evidence on the role of the exercise ECG and cardiac imaging modalities, both those in common use as well as developing technologies that may add clinical value to the diagnosis and risk assessment of the symptomatic and asymptomatic woman with suspected

  19. Comparison of application of 2013 ACC/AHA guideline and 2011 European Society of Cardiology guideline for the management of dyslipidemias for primary prevention in a Turkish cohort

    OpenAIRE

    Y?lmaz, Mustafa; Atar, ?lyas; Has?rc?, Senem; Akyol, Kadirhan; Tekin, Abdullah; Kara?a?lar, Emir; ?ift?i, Or?un; M?derriso?lu, Haldun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a major global cause of death. The common approach in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is to identify patients at high risk for cardiovascular disease. This article analyzes and compares the application of 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) guideline and the 2011 European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guideline for the management of dyslipidemias for primary prevention in Turkish population. M...

  20. Common needs but divergent interventions for U.S. homeless and foster care children: results from a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnick, Cheryl; Tam, Tammy; Zerger, Suzanne

    2012-09-01

    Many children living in homeless situations in the U.S. have temporary stays in foster care, and both populations suffer disproportionately higher rates of physical, psychological and social difficulties compared with other children. However, very little is known about which specific interventions achieve the best outcomes for children in these overlapping transitional living situations. To address this gap, we review existing literature to identify the most promising practices for children living in transition. A standardised vocabulary specific to each of three electronic databases (i.e. Medline, PsychINFO and CINAHL) was employed to identify studies that described an intervention specifically targeting foster care or homeless children and families. Separate systematic searches were conducted for homeless and foster children, and only studies published in English between January 1993 and February 2009 were selected. The final sample (n = 43) of articles described interventions that fell into two categories: mental health (n = 17) and case management (n = 26). No article included a sample containing both homeless and foster care children, and most studies on homeless children used case management interventions while most studies on foster care children focused on mental health interventions. Few articles employed rigorous study designs. Although repeatedly studies have demonstrated the overlap between populations of homeless and foster care children, studies focused on one population or the other. Virtually all studies on both homeless and foster children devised interventions to reduce trauma and family instability; yet, no evidence-based practice addresses the overlapping needs and potentially relevant evidence-based practice for these two populations. An important and vital next step is to establish an effective evidence-based intervention that reduces the impact of trauma on both U.S. populations of children living in transition. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing

  1. The relative effectiveness of practice change interventions in overcoming common barriers to change: a survey of 14 hospitals with experience implementing evidence-based guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Fiona; Doig, Gordon S

    2007-10-01

    Changing practice to reflect current best evidence can be costly and time-consuming. The purpose of this survey was to determine the optimal combination of practice change interventions needed to overcome barriers to practice change commonly encountered in the intensive care unit (ICU). A survey instrument delivered by mail with email follow-up reminders. Fourteen hospitals throughout Australia and New Zealand. Individuals responsible for implementing an evidence-based guideline for nutritional support in the ICU. Practice change interventions were ranked in order of effectiveness and barriers to change were ranked in order of how frequently they were encountered. A response rate of 100% was achieved. Interventions traditionally regarded as strong (academic detailing, active reminders) were ranked higher than those traditionally regarded as moderate (audit and feedback), or weak (posters, mouse mats). The high ranks of the site initiation visit (educational outreach, modest) and in-servicing (didactic lectures, weak) were unexpected, as was the relatively low rank of educationally influential, peer-nominated opinion leaders. Four hospitals reported the same doctor-related barrier as 'most common' and the remaining 10 hospitals reported three different doctor-related barriers, two nursing-related barriers and three organizational barriers as most common. When designing a multifaceted, multi-centre change strategy, the selection of individual practice change interventions should be based on: (1) an assessment of available resources; (2) recognition of the importance of different types of barriers to different sites; (3) the potential for combinations of interventions to have a synergistic effect on practice change, and (4) the potential for combinations of interventions to actually reduce workload.

  2. 1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on processes and skills for education in cardiology in Brazil--executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Marcos Roberto de; Mourilhe-Rocha, Ricardo; Paola, Angelo Amato Vincenzo de; Köhler, Ilmar; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Schneider, Jamil Cherem; Feitosa-Filho, Gilson Soares; Nicolau, José Carlos; Ferreira, João Fernando Monteiro; Morais, Nelson Siqueira de

    2012-02-01

    This article summarizes the "1st Guidelines of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology on Processes and Skills for Education in Cardiology in Brazil," which can be found in full at: . The guideline establishes the education time required in Internal Medicine and Cardiology with Specialization through theoretical and practical training. These requirements must be available at the center forming Specialists in Cardiology and the Cardiology contents.

  3. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P; Andersen, Claus B

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  4. Practical application of natriuretic peptides in paediatric cardiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Julie; Goetze, Jens P; Andersen, Claus B

    2010-01-01

    It is still uncertain if cardiac natriuretic peptides are useful biomarkers in paediatric cardiology. In this review we identify four clinical scenarios in paediatric cardiology, where clinical decision-making can be difficult, and where we feel the paediatric cardiologists need additional...

  5. Targeted prevention of common mental health disorders in university students: randomised controlled trial of a transdiagnostic trait-focused web-based intervention.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Musiat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A large proportion of university students show symptoms of common mental disorders, such as depression, anxiety, substance use disorders and eating disorders. Novel interventions are required that target underlying factors of multiple disorders. AIMS: To evaluate the efficacy of a transdiagnostic trait-focused web-based intervention aimed at reducing symptoms of common mental disorders in university students. METHOD: Students were recruited online (n=1047, age: M=21.8, SD=4.2 and categorised into being at high or low risk for mental disorders based on their personality traits. Participants were allocated to a cognitive-behavioural trait-focused (n=519 or a control intervention (n=528 using computerised simple randomisation. Both interventions were fully automated and delivered online (trial registration: ISRCTN14342225. Participants were blinded and outcomes were self-assessed at baseline, at 6 weeks and at 12 weeks after registration. Primary outcomes were current depression and anxiety, assessed on the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ9 and Generalised Anxiety Disorder Scale (GAD7. Secondary outcome measures focused on alcohol use, disordered eating, and other outcomes. RESULTS: Students at high risk were successfully identified using personality indicators and reported poorer mental health. A total of 520 students completed the 6-week follow-up and 401 students completed the 12-week follow-up. Attrition was high across intervention groups, but comparable to other web-based interventions. Mixed effects analyses revealed that at 12-week follow up the trait-focused intervention reduced depression scores by 3.58 (p<.001, 95%CI [5.19, 1.98] and anxiety scores by 2.87 (p=.018, 95%CI [1.31, 4.43] in students at high risk. In high-risk students, between group effect sizes were 0.58 (depression and 0.42 (anxiety. In addition, self-esteem was improved. No changes were observed regarding the use of alcohol or disordered eating. CONCLUSIONS

  6. [The origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology and of Czech cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widimský, J

    2013-06-01

    The paper presents the origins of the Czech Society of Cardiology on the one hand, and the origins of Czech cardiology on the other. The Czech Society of Cardiology is the third oldest in the world (after the American and German Societies). It was founded in 1929 by Prof. Libenský. As early as in 1933, the Society organised the first international congress of cardiologists in Prague, which was attended by 200 doctors, out of which 50 were from abroad. The most participants came from France and Poland. Other participants came from England, Argentina, Belgium, the Netherlands, Italy, Romania, Spain and Switzerland. The worldwide importance of this congress is apparent from the fact that both the World Society of Cardiology and the European Society of Cardiology (EKS) were founded after World War II in the years 1950 and 1952, i.e. almost 20 years after the first international congress of cardiology in Prague. In 1964, the Fourth Congress of European Society of Cardiology was held in Prague with the participation of 1,500 specialists from 31 countries and chaired by Prof. Pavel Lukl, the later president of EKS (1964- 1968). The paper also presents the work of our specialists in WHO and the history of the international journal Cor et Vasa issued by the Avicenum publishing house in Prague in English and Russian in the years 1958- 1992. An important role in the development of our cardiology was played by certain departments and clinics. In 1951, the Institute for Cardiovascular Research (ÚCHOK) was founded in PrahaKrč, thanks to the initiative of MU Dr. František Kriegl, the Deputy Minister of Health. Its first director was Klement Weber, who published, as early as in 1929, a monograph on arrhythmias -  50 years earlier than arrhythmias started to be at the centre of attention of cardiologists. Klement Weber was one of the doctors of President T. G. Masaryk during his serious disease towards the end of his life. Jan Brod was the deputy of Klement Weber in the

  7. Development of Quality Metrics in Ambulatory Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Devyani; Gurvitz, Michelle; Marelli, Ariane; Anderson, Jeffrey; Baker-Smith, Carissa; Diab, Karim A; Edwards, Thomas C; Hougen, Tom; Jedeikin, Roy; Johnson, Jonathan N; Karpawich, Peter; Lai, Wyman; Lu, Jimmy C; Mitchell, Stephanie; Newburger, Jane W; Penny, Daniel J; Portman, Michael A; Satou, Gary; Teitel, David; Villafane, Juan; Williams, Roberta; Jenkins, Kathy

    2017-02-07

    The American College of Cardiology Adult Congenital and Pediatric Cardiology (ACPC) Section had attempted to create quality metrics (QM) for ambulatory pediatric practice, but limited evidence made the process difficult. The ACPC sought to develop QMs for ambulatory pediatric cardiology practice. Five areas of interest were identified, and QMs were developed in a 2-step review process. In the first step, an expert panel, using the modified RAND-UCLA methodology, rated each QM for feasibility and validity. The second step sought input from ACPC Section members; final approval was by a vote of the ACPC Council. Work groups proposed a total of 44 QMs. Thirty-one metrics passed the RAND process and, after the open comment period, the ACPC council approved 18 metrics. The project resulted in successful development of QMs in ambulatory pediatric cardiology for a range of ambulatory domains. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Heart failure association of the European society of cardiology specialist heart failure curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonagh, Theresa A; Gardner, Roy S; Lainscak, Mitja; Nielsen, Olav W; Parissis, John; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Anker, Stefan D

    2014-02-01

    It is well established that organized care of heart failure patients, including specialist management by cardiologists, improves patient outcomes. In response to this, other national training bodies (the UK and the USA) have developed heart failure subspecialty curricula within their Cardiology Training Curricula. In addition, European Society of Cardiology (ESC) subspecialty curricula exist for Interventional Cardiology and Heart Rhythm Management. The purpose of this heart failure curriculum is to provide a framework which can be used as a blueprint for training across Europe. This blueprint mirrors other ESC curricula. Each section has three components: the knowledge required, the skills which are necessary, and the professionalism (attitudes and behaviours) which should be attained. The programme is designed to last 2 years. The first year is devoted to the specialist heart failure module. The second year allows completion of the optional modules of advanced imaging, device therapy for implanters, cardiac transplantation, and mechanical circulatory support. The second year can also be devoted to continuation of specialist heart failure training and/or research for those not wishing to continue with the advanced modules.

  9. Future prospects of pediatric cardiology in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Hong-fang; DU Jun-bao

    2010-01-01

    @@ In recent years, great progress has been made in the field of pediatric cardiology in China, including the development of diagnostic techniques and patient management and the elucidation of mechanisms responsible for cardiovascular diseases.1 The standardization of key diagnostic skills and patient management pathways, for example, has been continually improved.At the same time, the pathogenesis of pediatric cardiovascular diseases has been studied in depth,resulting in an increasing body of novel research findings with regard to the mechanisms responsible for these diseases. We must be aware, however, that great effort still needs to be made to further explore new diagnostic and treatment strategies and reveal the mysteries of cardiovascular diseases.

  10. [Cardiology in the Morgagni's anatomo pathological work].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo; Iturralde, Pedro; Aranda Fraustro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    In the XVIII century, under the influence of the "systematic spirit", characteristic of the Enlightenment age, pathological anatomy was systematized in the Morgagni's fundamental treatise De sedibus et causis morborum per anatomen indagatis, published as letters in 1761. Certain biographical data of the author are reported here as well as some his more important contributions to cardiology such as the Morgagni's, Adams', Stokes' syndrome. His points of view on sudden death and his observations on post-infarct myocardial rupture, are related also. In his global evaluation of these facts, the speculative approach always predominates. Indeed, in these anatomist's works, we find a good example of the application of epistemologic principles to the medical field.

  11. Application of Contrast Echocardiography in Invasive Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Bulut

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Contrast echocardiography by rendering better imaging of the borders of cardiac chambers is a useful tool for evaluating cardiac function, mass, myocardial vascularization, microvascular structure (small vessel vasculature and viability. Contrast was first started to be used for patients with suboptimal image quality. It can be used in detecting defects in myocardial blood supply in patients with chest pain and determining the success of interventionalprocedures. It can also be of help in demonstrating myocardial viability after reperfusion treatment in patients who had myocardial infarction. It is expected to be used more widely in invasive cardiology for decision making, guiding and determining the success of the procedures. Advances in imaging techniques , development of contrast materials for evaluation of left system, contrast echocardiography may become a routine clinical practice.

  12. [Innovations in cardiology. We are too fast with new methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegeler, A

    2016-03-01

    Cardiology is rapidly developing on many levels. New treatment methods are introduced at ever decreasing intervals. Against the background of economization of other areas in medicine, dangers are lurking here for patients if safety, usefulness and sustainability of the treatment methods cannot be sufficiently proven. The German Federal Ministry of Health (Bundesministerium für Gesundheit, BMG) aims to adjust the regulatory framework for the approval of new medical products to the legal requirements of the European Union. With the establishment of the Institute for Quality Assessment and Transparency in Health Care (Institut für Qualitätssicherung und Transparenz im Gesundheitswesen, IQTIG) more precise quality controls should be carried out. Implantation registers will be soon implemented and the routinely performed quality control of different interventions will be coordinated across different healthcare sectors in order to achieve a better understanding of long-term results. Medicine in general and the safety of patients in particular, ultimately benefit from more stringent controls, neutrality and transparency in the assessment of new methods.

  13. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Oliver; Burchert, Wolfgang [University Hospital of the Ruhr University, Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center North Rhine-Westphalia Bochum, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Pascual, Thomas N.B.; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana [International Atomic Energy Agency, Section of Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging, Division of Human Health, Vienna (Austria); Mercuri, Mathew [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Acampa, Wanda [National Council of Research, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimaging, Naples (Italy); Flotats, Albert [Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Nuclear Medicine Department, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona (Spain); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Kitsiou, Anastasia [Sismanoglio Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Athens (Greece); Knuuti, Juhani [University of Turku, and Turku University Hospital, Turku PET Centre, Turku (Finland); Underwood, S.R. [Imperial College London, National Heart and Lung Institute, London (United Kingdom); Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals, Department of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Vitola, Joao V. [Quanta Diagnostico and Terapia, Curitiba (Brazil); Mahmarian, John J. [Houston Methodist DeBakey Heart and Vascular Center, Department of Cardiology, Houston, TX (United States); Karthikeyan, Ganesan [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Cardiology, New Delhi (India); Better, Nathan [Royal Melbourne Hospital and University of Melbourne, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Rehani, Madan M. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Radiation Protection of Patients Unit, Vienna (Austria); Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Einstein, Andrew J. [Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Collaboration: for the INCAPS Investigators Group

    2016-04-15

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P < 0.001) and of PET was 2.6 ± 1.5 mSv (RoW 3.8 ± 2.5 mSv; P < 0.001). The mean effective doses of SPECT and PET differed between European regions (P < 0.001 and P = 0.002, respectively). The mean quality score was 6.2 ± 1.2, which was higher than the RoW score (5.0 ± 1.1; P < 0.001). Adherence to best practices did not differ significantly among the European regions (range 6 to 6.4; P = 0.73). Of the best practices, stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted dosing were the least commonly used. In Europe, the mean effective dose from nuclear cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in

  14. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Fay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors’ early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Methods Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974–2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. Results One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort to 4.2% (2005 cohort but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort. Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort. The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors’ ‘domestic circumstances’ were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while ‘enthusiasm/commitment’, ‘financial prospects’, ‘experiences of the job so far’ and ‘a particular teacher/department’ were important. Conclusions Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The

  15. Career choices for cardiology: cohort studies of UK medical graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Fay; Lambert, Trevor W; Pitcher, Alex; Goldacre, Michael J

    2013-01-25

    Cardiology is one of the most popular of the hospital medical specialties in the UK. It is also a highly competitive specialty in respect of the availability of higher specialty training posts. Our aims are to describe doctors' early intentions about seeking careers in cardiology, to report on when decisions about seeking a career in cardiology are made, to compare differences between men and women doctors in the choice of cardiology, and to compare early career choices with later specialty destinations. Questionnaire surveys were sent to all UK medical graduates in selected qualification years from 1974-2009, at 1, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years after graduation. One year after graduation, the percentage of doctors specifying cardiology as their first choice of long-term career rose from the mid-1990s from 2.4% (1993 cohort) to 4.2% (2005 cohort) but then fell back to 2.7% (2009 cohort). Men were more likely to give cardiology as their first choice than women (eg 4.1% of men and 1.9% of women in the 2009 cohort). The percentage of doctors who gave cardiology as their first choice of career declined between years one and five after qualification: the fall was more marked for women. 34% of respondents who specified cardiology as their sole first choice of career one year post-graduation were later working in cardiology. 24% of doctors practising as cardiologists several years after qualification had given cardiology as their sole first choice in year one. The doctors' 'domestic circumstances' were a relatively unimportant influence on specialty choice for aspiring cardiologists, while 'enthusiasm/commitment', 'financial prospects', 'experiences of the job so far' and 'a particular teacher/department' were important. Cardiology grew as a first preference one year after graduation to 2005 but is now falling. It consistently attracts a higher percentage of men than women doctors. The correspondence between early choice and later destination was not particularly strong for

  16. Interventions for enhancing return to work in individuals with a common mental illness: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigatu, Y T; Liu, Y; Uppal, M; McKinney, S; Rao, S; Gillis, K; Wang, J

    2016-12-01

    Common mental disorders (CMDs) are highly prevalent in the working population, and are associated with long-term sickness absence and disability. Workers on sick leave with CMDs would benefit from interventions that enable them to successfully return to work (RTW). However, the effectiveness of RTW interventions for workers with a CMD is not well studied. The objective of this review is to assess the effectiveness of existing workplace and clinical interventions that were aimed at enhancing RTW. A systematic review of studies of interventions for improving RTW in workers with a CMD was conducted. The main outcomes were proportion of RTW and sick-leave duration until RTW. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from Medline/PubMed, PsycINFO, EMBASE, SocINDEX, and Human resource and management databases from January 1995 to 2016. Two authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We pooled studies that we deemed sufficiently homogeneous in different comparison groups and assessed the overall quality of the evidence. We reviewed 2347 abstracts from which 136 full-text articles were reviewed and 16 RCTs were included in the analysis. Combined results from these studies suggested that the available interventions did not lead to improved RTW rates over the control group [pooled risk ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-1.12], but reduced the number of sick-leave days in the intervention group compared to the control group, with a mean difference of -13.38 days (95% CI -24.07 to -2.69).

  17. [Neuro-cardiology or cardio-neurology - a new specialization of the future?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widimský, Petr; Štětkářová, Ivana

    2015-05-01

    Acute ischemic stroke is a catastrophic cardiovascular disease with frequent cardiac causes and cerebral consequences, thus the close cooperation between neurologists and cardiologists is necessary for the optimal patient management. Furthermore, recent randomized trials demonstrated, that catheter-based thrombectomy (CBT) is the most effective treatment for properly selected patients. Interventional cardiology with its widespread non-stop services for acute myocardial infarction can fill the existing gaps in coverage of population needs with neurointerventional services. Thus, a new future medical subspecialization may emerge: neurocardiology or cardioneurology.

  18. Integrating cardiology for nuclear medicine physicians. A guide to nuclear medicine physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Movahed, Assad [East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC (United States). Section of Cardiology; Gnanasegaran, Gopinath [Guy' s and St Thomas' Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Buscombe, John R.; Hall, Margaret [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear cardiology is no longer a medical discipline residing solely in nuclear medicine. This is the first book to recognize this fact by integrating in-depth information from both the clinical cardiology and nuclear cardiology literature, and acknowledging cardiovascular medicine as the fundamental knowledge base needed for the practice of nuclear cardiology. The book is designed to increase the practitioner's knowledge of cardiovascular medicine, thereby enhancing the quality of interpretations through improved accuracy and clinical relevance.The text is divided into four sections covering all major topics in cardiology and nuclear cardiology: -Basic Sciences and Cardiovascular Diseases; -Conventional Diagnostic Modalities; -Nuclear Cardiology; -Management of Cardiovascular Diseases. (orig.)

  19. Start from scratch: the prospect of nuclear cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Woo [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The future is always hard to forecast but the prospect of nuclear cardiology has never been more unobtainable than these days. Myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (MPS) has been one of the major nuclear medicine studies for decades, but the annual number of MPS is stagnant or steadily decreasing in Korea and other countries. The challenge from coronary computed tomography (CCT) and the concern of radiation exposure of MPS were the main reasons for the stalemate of nuclear cardiology. Compared to the rapid technological progress of CCT, enabling greater image resolution in conjunction with lower radiation exposure to the patients, development of new radiopharmaceuticals or scintillation imaging techniques has been at a relatively slow pace. Therefore, the future of nuclear cardiology is really dependent on the application of the genuine nuclear medicine principle to patient's management. The review for current update of nuclear cardiology will ensue in the next issue of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  20. Curriculum-based assessment of oral language and listening comprehension: a tool for intervention and progress monitoring in the Common Core State Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Wendy

    2012-05-01

    The Common Core State Standards and a Response to Intervention framework are movements sweeping the nation. Speech-language pathologists are uniquely positioned to play a pivotal role in supporting successful implementation of these movements. This article explores the assessment tools speech-language pathologists SLPs will need to identify and progress monitor critical language/literacy skills such as listening comprehension and oral narratives skills. Foundational research demonstrates that communication units, total words spoken, and major story components are measures that will discriminate between students with adequate language skills and language disorders and are curriculum-based, sensitive to change, and useful to determine the effectiveness of language/literacy interventions. Speech-language pathologist can broaden the impact of their knowledge and skills to improve outcomes for all students.

  1. Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses for Cardiology Fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Munes; Alahdab, Fares; Alsaied, Tarek

    2016-07-01

    Participating in a scholarly activity is one of the training requirements for cardiology fellows. However, it can be very challenging to complete a research project during such a busy period of clinical training. To help the cardiology fellows in choosing and starting off a research project, a light has been shed on the process of conducting a systematic review, and the importance of this research activity, as well as its limitations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Current Status and Future Perspective of Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, June Key [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Coronary artery disease is on the rise over the world. Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a well established technique to detect coronary artery disease and to assess left ventricular function. In addition, it has the unique ability to predict the prognosis of the patients. Moreover, the application of ECG-gated images provided the quantitative data and improved the accuracy. This approach has been proved to be cost-effective and suitable for the emerging economies as well as developed countries. However, the utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures vary widely considering the different countries and region of the world. Korea exits 2-3 times less utilization than Japan, and 20 times than the United States. Recently, with the emerging of new technology, namely cardiac CT, cardiac MR and stress echocardiography, the clinical usefulness of nuclear cardiology has been called in question and its role has been redefined. For the proper promotion of nuclear cardiology, special educations should be conducted since the nuclear cardiology has the contact points between nuclear medicine and cardiology. Several innovations are in horizon which will impact the diagnostic accuracy as well as imaging time and cost savings. Development of new tracers, gamma camera technology and hybrid systems will open the new avenue in cardiac imaging. The future of nuclear cardiology based on molecular imaging is very exciting. The newly defined biologic targets involving atherosclerosis and vascular vulnerability will allow the answers for the key clinical questions. Hybrid techniques including SPECT/CT indicate the direction in which clinical nuclear cardiology may be headed in the immediate future. To what extent nuclear cardiology will be passively absorbed by other modalities, or will actively incorporate other modalities, is up to the present and next generation of nuclear cardiologists.

  3. Common variation in with no-lysine kinase 1 (WNK1) and blood pressure responses to dietary sodium or potassium interventions- family-based association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuqiang; Zheng, Shuhui; Mu, Jianjun; Chu, Chao; Wang, Lan; Wang, Yang; Xiao, Hongyu; Wang, Dan; Cao, Yu; Ren, Keyu; Liu, Enqi; Yuan, Zuyi

    2013-01-01

    Common variations in the gene with no-lysine kinase 1 (WNK1) are associated with hypertension, but because of gene-environment interaction, it is difficult to fully identify the genetic contribution of WNK1 gene polymorphism to blood pressure (BP) variability. The aim of this study was to identify the effect of common WNK1 variants on the shift of BP during strict dietary interventions of salt or potassium intake. A total of 342 subjects from 126 families were selected and sequentially maintained on normal diet for 3 days at baseline, a low-salt diet for 7 days (3g/day, NaCl), then a high-salt diet for 7 days (18 g/day), and high-salt diet with potassium supplementation for another 7 days (4.5 g/day, KCl). Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected from the WNK1 gene. rs880054 and rs12828016 were associated with diastolic BP (DBP) response during the low-or high-sodium intervention, and rs2301880 was significantly associated with systolic BP, DBP and mean arterial pressure responses to the high-sodium intervention (all P<0.05). Unfortunately, no associations for WNK1 SNPs and the constructed haplotype blocks of WNK1 with BP responses to high-salt-and-potassium supplement intervention reached nominal statistical significance. The WNK1 gene might be mechanistically involved in the variation in BP response to dietary sodium and potassium intake among individuals, and might contribute to the variation of this complex phenotype.

  4. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  5. AMERICAN COLLEGE OF CARDIOLOGY, AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION AND EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY GUIDELINES (2006 FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS WITH ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (ENDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fuster

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A report of the American College of Cardiology, American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines and the European Society of Cardiology Committee for practice guidelines.

  6. Electrocardiographic interpretation skills of cardiology residents: are they competent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibbald, Matthew; Davies, Edward G; Dorian, Paul; Yu, Eric H C

    2014-12-01

    Achieving competency at electrocardiogram (ECG) interpretation among cardiology subspecialty residents has traditionally focused on interpreting a target number of ECGs during training. However, there is little evidence to support this approach. Further, there are no data documenting the competency of ECG interpretation skills among cardiology residents, who become de facto the gold standard in their practice communities. We tested 29 Cardiology residents from all 3 years in a large training program using a set of 20 ECGs collected from a community cardiology practice over a 1-month period. Residents interpreted half of the ECGs using a standard analytic framework, and half using their own approach. Residents were scored on the number of correct and incorrect diagnoses listed. Overall diagnostic accuracy was 58%. Of 6 potentially life-threatening diagnoses, residents missed 36% (123 of 348) including hyperkalemia (81%), long QT (52%), complete heart block (35%), and ventricular tachycardia (19%). Residents provided additional inappropriate diagnoses on 238 ECGs (41%). Diagnostic accuracy was similar between ECGs interpreted using an analytic framework vs ECGs interpreted without an analytic framework (59% vs 58%; F(1,1333) = 0.26; P = 0.61). Cardiology resident proficiency at ECG interpretation is suboptimal. Despite the use of an analytic framework, there remain significant deficiencies in ECG interpretation among Cardiology residents. A more systematic method of addressing these important learning gaps is urgently needed. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Filter's importance in nuclear cardiology imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Maria Celeste de; Lima, Ana Luiza S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mails: celeste.fismed@gmail.com; analuslima@gmail.com; Santos, Joyra A. dos [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: joyra@cnen.gov.br; Megueriam, Berdj A. [Hospital Sao Vicente de Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: meguerian@hotmail.com

    2007-07-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical speciality that employs tomography procedures for the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of diseases. One of the most commonly used apparatus is the Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT). To perform exams, a very small amount of a radiopharmaceutical must be given to the patient. Then, a gamma camera is placed in convenient positions to perform the photon counting, which is used to reconstruct a full 3 dimensional distribution of the radionuclide inside the body or organ. This reconstruction provides a 3-dimensional image in spatial coordinates, of the body or organ under study, allowing the physician to give the diagnostic. Image reconstruction is usually worked in the frequency domain, due to a great simplification introduced by the Fourier decomposition of image spectra. After the reconstruction, an inverse Fourier transform must be applied to trace back the image into spatial coordinates. To optimize this reconstruction procedure, digital filters are used to remove undesirable components of frequency, which can 'shadow' relevant physical signatures of diseases. Unfortunately, the efficiency of the applied filter are strongly dependent on its own mathematical parameters. Particularly in this work we demonstrate how filters interfere on image quality in cardiology examinations with SPECT, concerning perfusion and myocardial viability and the importance of the medical physicist in the choice of the right filters avoiding some serious problems that could occur in the inadequate processing of an image damaging the medical diagnosis. (author)

  8. Common Variants in Serum/Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1) and Blood Pressure Responses to Dietary Sodium or Potassium Interventions: A family-Based Association Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chao; Wang, Yang; Wang, Man; Mu, Jian-Jun; Liu, Fu-Qiang; Wang, Lan; Ren, Ke-Yu; Wang, Dan; Yuan, Zu-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Serum/Glucocorticoid Regulated Kinase 1 (SGK1) plays a significant role in regulating renal Na(+) reabsorption, K(+) secretion, and blood pressure (BP). This study aimed to assess the association of common genetic variants in the SGK1 gene with BP responses to controlled dietary sodium or potassium interventions. A total of 334 subjects from 124 families were recruited from the rural areas of northern China. After a three-day baseline observation, they were sequentially maintained a seven-day low-sodium diet (3g/day of NaCl or 51.3 mmol/day of sodium), a seven-day high-sodium diet (18 g/day of NaCl or 307.8 mmol/day of sodium) and a seven-day high-sodium plus potassium supplementation intervention (4.5 g/day of KCl or 60 mmol/day of potassium). Six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the SGK1 gene were selected. After adjustment for multiple testing, SNP rs9376026 was significantly associated with diastolic BP (DBP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) responses to low-sodium intervention (P = 0.018 and 0.022, respectively). However, the associations between selected SNPs in the SGK1 gene and BP responses to high-sodium or high-sodium plus potassium-supplementation intervention did not reach statistical significance. In addition, SNP rs9389154 and two other SNPs (rs1763509 and rs9376026) were associated respectively with systolic BP (SBP) and DBP at baseline (P = 0.040, 0.032, and 0.031, respectively). SNP rs3813344 was significantly associated with SBP, DBP, and MAP (P = 0.049, 0.015 and 0.018, respectively). Our study indicates that the genetic polymorphism in the SGK1 gene is significantly associated with BP responses to dietary sodium intervention. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Speculative Considerations about Some Cardiology Enigmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evora, Paulo Roberto Barbosa; Schmidt, Andre; Arcêncio, Livia; Marin-Neto, José Antonio

    2017-03-17

    Write a review text or point-of-view that takes into account the interests, if not of all, but of most readers of a scientific journal is an arduous task. The editorial can be grounded in published articles, even in a single article of undeniable importance and, it can also represent a trend of specialty. Therefore, especially for the sake of the reader's motivation, the present text was freely designed to discuss some cardiology enigmas in the context of the heart valve and coronary artery disease (CAD). Concerning the CAD five well-known enigmas will be considered: 1) The absence of arteriosclerosis in intramyocardial coronary arteries; 2) The unique and always confirmed superior evolution of the left internal thoracic artery as a coronary graft; 3) The prophylactic left internal thoracic artery graft in mildly-stenosed coronary lesions, and; 4) The high incidence of perioperative atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients with CAD, and; 5) The handling of disease-free saphenous vein graft at the time of reoperation. Concerning the cardiac valve disease these enigmas topics will be discussed: 1) Why some young patients present acute pulmonary edema as the first sign of mitral stenosis, and other patients with significant hemodynamic changes are mildly symptomatic or asymptomatic, and; 2) The enigma of aortic stenosis protection against CAD.

  10. Human gene therapy and imaging: cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Joseph C. [Stanford University School of Medicine, Department of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Yla-Herttuala, Seppo [University of Kuopio, A.I.Virtanen Institute, Kuopio (Finland)

    2005-12-01

    This review discusses the basics of cardiovascular gene therapy, the results of recent human clinical trials, and the rapid progress in imaging techniques in cardiology. Improved understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of coronary heart disease has made gene therapy a potential new alternative for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Experimental studies have established the proof-of-principle that gene transfer to the cardiovascular system can achieve therapeutic effects. First human clinical trials provided initial evidence of feasibility and safety of cardiovascular gene therapy. However, phase II/III clinical trials have so far been rather disappointing and one of the major problems in cardiovascular gene therapy has been the inability to verify gene expression in the target tissue. New imaging techniques could significantly contribute to the development of better gene therapeutic approaches. Although the exact choice of imaging modality will depend on the biological question asked, further improvement in image resolution and detection sensitivity will be needed for all modalities as we move from imaging of organs and tissues to imaging of cells and genes. (orig.)

  11. The contributions of Carl Ludwig to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, H G

    1999-03-01

    The basic instruments for measuring functional cardiovascular parameters and the most important discoveries made by Carl Ludwig and his disciples in cardiovascular physiology are described and put into perspective in regard to the further development of his methods and ideas. The most important apparatus was the kymograph, which, for the first time, made recording and documenting of functional parameters possible. This instrument was also used for the functional evaluation of the isolated perfused frog heart that was developed by Elias Cyon in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. In the isolated frog heart, important phenomena were discovered such as the staircase ('Treppe'), the absolute refractory period and the all-or-none law of the heart. The isolated dog heart was used to determine the origin of the first heart sound, which was characterized as a muscle tone. To measure regional blood flow and eventually cardiac output, a flowmeter ('Stromuhr') was designed. Precise measurements of cardiac output became possible only when Adolf Fick had developed his principle, which served as the basis for the modern indicator methods. Cyon and Ludwig also discoverd the depressor nerve, which constitutes the basis of the baroreceptor reflex. Finally, the precise localization of the vasomotor centre in the ventrolateral medulla was achieved in Ludwig's Leipzig Physiological Institute. This was confirmed more than 100 years later with modern neuroanatomical methods making use of retrograde axonal transport. Thus, Ludwig and his scholars made major substantial contributions to cardiovascular knowledge that can be considered to constitute the basis of modern cardiology.

  12. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed: a reply to a “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Becher, Georg

    2013-01-01

    The “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about...... a recently published, and is in our considered opinion inaccurate and factually incorrect, editorial that has appeared in several journals in toxicology. Some of the shortcomings of the editorial are discussed in detail. We call for a better founded scientific debate which may help to overcome a polarisation...... of views detrimental to reaching a consensus about scientific foundations for endocrine disrupter regulation in the EU....

  13. Science and policy on endocrine disrupters must not be mixed: a reply to a “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The “common sense” intervention by toxicology journal editors regarding proposed European Union endocrine disrupter regulations ignores scientific evidence and well-established principles of chemical risk assessment. In this commentary, endocrine disrupter experts express their concerns about a recently published, and is in our considered opinion inaccurate and factually incorrect, editorial that has appeared in several journals in toxicology. Some of the shortcomings of the editorial are discussed in detail. We call for a better founded scientific debate which may help to overcome a polarisation of views detrimental to reaching a consensus about scientific foundations for endocrine disrupter regulation in the EU. PMID:23981490

  14. [Guideline for the education of the specialist in cardiology in Spain. Comisión Nacional de la Especialidad de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosín Aguilar, J; Plaza Celemín, L; Martín Durán, R; Zarco Gutiérrez, P; López Merino, V; Cortina Llosa, A; Ferreira Montero, I; García-Cosío Mir, F; Castro Beiras, A; Martínez Monzonís, A

    2000-02-01

    This article presents the program for training in cardiology. The document was elaborated by the National Committee of the Specialty of Cardiology, from the Ministry of Health and Ministry of Education, and describes the theoretical and practical aspects of training in cardiology prevailing at present in Spain.

  15. Multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with stable angina: a common approach? Lessons learned from the EHS PCI registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Timm; Möllmann, Helge; Zeymer, Uwe; Hochadel, Matthias; Nef, Holger; Weidinger, Franz; Zahn, Ralf; Hamm, Christian W; Marco, Jean; Gitt, Anselm K

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical characteristics, procedural details, and outcomes of patients undergoing elective multivessel percutaneous coronary intervention (MV-PCI) in Europe. A total of 7113 patients with stable coronary artery disease and at least two major epicardial vessels with ≥ 70% stenosis were included in this analysis of the contemporary Euro Heart Survey PCI registry. Patients undergoing MV-PCI (n = 3376, 47.5%) were compared with those with single-vessel PCI (SV-PCI) (n = 3737, 52.5%). Patients with MV-PCI were more likely to have congestive heart failure, whereas those with SV-PCI more often suffered from noncardiac comorbidities. Hospital mortality (0.1% vs 0.3%) and the incidence of nonfatal postprocedural myocardial infarction (1.0% vs 0.7%) were low in patients with MV-PCI and SV-PCI. In the multivariate analysis, no significant difference in the incidence of hospital death (odds ratio (OR) 0.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.15-1.27) could be observed between the two groups. However, the risk for postprocedural myocardial infarction (OR 1.57, 95% CI 0.93-2.67) tended to be higher among patients undergoing MV-PCI. Independent determinants for performing MV-PCI were age, comorbidities, and coronary anatomy. In Europe almost half of all patients with multivessel disease were treated with MV-PCI. Hospital complications were low, but a trend toward a higher rate of postprocedural myocardial infarctions was seen in patients with MV-PCI.

  16. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults; Kinderkardiologie. Klinik und Praxis der Herzerkrankungen bei Kindern, Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Nikolaus A. [Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler; Kleideiter, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Coesfeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  17. Potential and Limitations of Cochrane Reviews in Pediatric Cardiology: A Systematic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poryo, Martin; Khosrawikatoli, Sara; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Meyer, Sascha

    2017-04-01

    Evidence-based medicine has contributed substantially to the quality of medical care in pediatric and adult cardiology. However, our impression from the bedside is that a substantial number of Cochrane reviews generate inconclusive data that are of limited clinical benefit. We performed a systematic synopsis of Cochrane reviews published between 2001 and 2015 in the field of pediatric cardiology. Main outcome parameters were the number and percentage of conclusive, partly conclusive, and inconclusive reviews as well as their recommendations and their development over three a priori defined intervals. In total, 69 reviews were analyzed. Most of them examined preterm and term neonates (36.2%), whereas 33.3% included also non-pediatric patients. Leading topics were pharmacological issues (71.0%) followed by interventional (10.1%) and operative procedures (2.9%). The majority of reviews were inconclusive (42.9%), while 36.2% were conclusive and 21.7% partly conclusive. Although the number of published reviews increased during the three a priori defined time intervals, reviews with "no specific recommendations" remained stable while "recommendations in favor of an intervention" clearly increased. Main reasons for missing recommendations were insufficient data (n = 41) as well as an insufficient number of trials (n = 22) or poor study quality (n = 19). There is still need for high-quality research, which will likely yield a greater number of Cochrane reviews with conclusive results.

  18. Structured smoking cessation training for health professionals on cardiology wards: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raupach, Tobias; Falk, Jan; Vangeli, Eleni; Schiekirka, Sarah; Rustler, Christa; Grassi, Maria Caterina; Pipe, Andrew; West, Robert

    2014-07-01

    Smoking is a major cardiovascular risk factor, and smoking cessation is imperative for patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event. This study aimed to evaluate a systems-based approach to helping hospitalized smokers quit and to identify implementation barriers. Prospective intervention study followed by qualitative analysis of staff interviews. The prospective intervention study assessed the effects of implementing standard operating procedures (SOPs) for the provision of counselling and pharmacotherapy to smokers admitted to cardiology wards on counselling frequency. In addition, a qualitative analysis of staff interviews was undertaken to examine determinants of physician and nurse behaviour; this sought to understand barriers in terms of motivation, capability, and/or opportunity. A total of 150 smoking patients were included in the study (75 before and 75 after SOP implementation). Before the implementation of SOPs, the proportion of patients reporting to have received cessation counselling from physicians and nurses was 6.7% and 1.3%, respectively. Following SOP implementation, these proportions increased to 38.7% (p motivation, e.g. role incongruence, appeared to be a major barrier. Introduction of a set of standard operating procedures for smoking cessation advice was effective with physicians but not nurses. Analysis of barriers to implementation highlighted lack of motivation rather than capability or opportunity as a major factor that would need to be addressed. © The European Society of Cardiology 2012.

  19. Is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ify; Mordi; Nikolaos; Tzemos

    2014-01-01

    Although the endothelium has a number of important functions, the term endothelial dysfunction is commonly used to describe impairment in its vasodilatory capacity. There have been numerous studies evaluating the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, however assessment of endothelial function is perhaps still primarily thought of as a research tool and has not reached widespread clinical acceptance. In this review we explore the relationship between endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease, its prognostic significance, methods of pharmacological reversal of endothelial dysfunction, and ask the question, is reversal of endothelial dysfunction still an attractive target in modern cardiology?

  20. How changes to the Medicare Benefits Schedule could improve the practice of cardiology and save taxpayer money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Richard W; Nasis, Arthur; Sundararajan, Vijaya

    2015-09-21

    Rising health care costs above inflation are placing serious strains on the sustainability of the Australian Medicare system in its current structure. The Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS), which lists rebates payable to patients for private medical services provided on a fee-for-service basis, is the cornerstone of the Australian health care system. Introduced in the 1980s, the MBS has changed little despite major advances in the evidence base for the practice of cardiology. We outline how we believe sensible changes to the MBS listings for four cardiac services--invasive coronary angiography, computed tomography coronary angiography, stress testing and percutaneous coronary intervention--would improve the clinical practice of cardiology and save substantial amounts of taxpayer money.

  1. Development of a universal psycho-educational intervention to prevent common postpartum mental disorders in primiparous women: a multiple method approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Heather J

    2010-08-01

    in sustainable sleep and settling strategies, and the re-negotiation of the unpaid household workload in non-confrontational ways. Materials include a Facilitators' Handbook, creatively designed worksheets for use in seminars, and a book for couples to take home for reference. A website provides an alternative means of access to the intervention. Conclusions What Were We Thinking! is a postnatal mental health intervention which has the potential to contribute to psychologically-informed routine primary postnatal health care and prevent common mental disorders in women.

  2. Development of a universal psycho-educational intervention to prevent common postpartum mental disorders in primiparous women: a multiple method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather J; Fisher, Jane Rw

    2010-08-18

    re-negotiation of the unpaid household workload in non-confrontational ways. Materials include a Facilitators' Handbook, creatively designed worksheets for use in seminars, and a book for couples to take home for reference. A website provides an alternative means of access to the intervention. What Were We Thinking! is a postnatal mental health intervention which has the potential to contribute to psychologically-informed routine primary postnatal health care and prevent common mental disorders in women.

  3. Improving VTE risk assessment at point of admission to a tertiary centre cardiology ward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiology wards are generally high turnover units, which may receive primary PCI, high-risk NSTEMI patients, and other general cardiac admissions from a large geographical area. Many centres also provide national specialist services for rarer cardiac conditions for which admissions may be lengthy. Cardiac patients have significant risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) as immobility may be due to systolic dysfunction, attachment to continuous monitoring and predisposition to chest pain, or cardiac syncope. It is recommended by NICE that an initial VTE risk assessment is undertaken at the time of patient admission, with reassessment within 24 hours. For this purpose a risk assessment tool is featured on the front of many Trust drug charts. It is noted that this risk assessment is electronic in other trusts. We undertook an audit into the drug chart documentation of VTE risk assessment on the cardiology ward and the Coronary Care Unit (CCU) at The Royal Free Hospital. It was evident that documentation of VTE risk assessment was poor. The audit interventions were; a teaching presentation to the cardiology department, an educational poster, several update emails to the department and the identification of a ‘VTE risk assessment champion’ to audit ongoing compliance. Following these measures the second audit round demonstrated that documentation of initial risk assessment was slightly improved, but significant improvement was seen in documentation of risk assessment at 24 hours post admission. Results from a third audit cycle indicated that the improvement in initial VTE risk assessment was sustained, and that there was a significant sustained improvement in risk assessment at 24 hours (p <0.05). Recommendations for sustained improvement included: redesigning the drug chart so that the VTE risk assessment tool was linked to the VTE prophylaxis prescription box, and designating the responsibility of the initial VTE risk assessment to the on call junior doctor

  4. Development of pediatric cardiology in latin america: accomplishments and remaining challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Horacio; Kreutzer, Christian; Kreutzer, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Until the first quarter of the 20th century, most physicians were more than happy to differentiate congenital heart lesions from rheumatic heart disease, which then was rampant. As early as 1932, Dr Rodolfo Kreutzer, from Buenos Aires, Argentina, was already involved in the study of congenital heart defects. He started off assessing children with a stethoscope and with Einthoven electrocardiography equipment. The cardiac unit at the Buenos Aires Children's Hospital was created in 1936. It established the onset of pediatric cardiology in Argentina and fueled its development in South America. Nearly at the same time, Agustin Castellanos from Cuba also became a pioneer in the assessment of congenital heart disease. He described the clinical applications of intravenous angiocardiography in 1937. Meanwhile in Mexico, Dr Ignacio Chavez founded the National Institute of Cardiology in 1944 in Mexico City. It was the first center in the world to be exclusively devoted to cardiology. From this center, Victor Rubio and Hugo Limon performed the first therapeutic cardiac catheterization in 1953. Meanwhile, Professor Euriclydes Zerbini from Sao Paulo, Brazil, built the largest and most important school of cardiac surgeons in South America. In Santiago, Chile, the Calvo Makenna Hospital was the center where Helmut Jaegger operated on the first infant with extracorporeal circulation in Latin America in 1956. The patient was a 1-month-old baby, with complete transposition of the great arteries, who underwent an Albert procedure. Currently, there are many fully equipped centers all over the region, capable of dealing with most lesions and of providing excellent medical, interventional, and surgical treatment. Outcomes have improved substantially over the last 20 years. These achievements have gone beyond our pioneers' dreams. However, many neonates and young infants die prior to surgery because referral centers are overburdened and have long surgical waiting lists. Clearly, we still

  5. What to Expect from the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P.; Orr, Nicole M.; Dodson, John A.; Rich, Michael W.; Wenger, Nanette K.; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary; Maurer, Mathew S.; Forman, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. While some assume a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, and thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. PMID:26361161

  6. Pediatric Cardiology in India: Onset of a New Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Bagri, Narendra

    2015-07-01

    Pediatric cardiology is outgrowing from the shadows of adult cardiology and cardiac surgery departments in India. It promises to be an attractive and sought-after subspeciality of Pediatrics, dealing with not only congenital cardiac diseases but also metabolic, rheumatic and host of other cardiac diseases. The new government policy shall provide more training avenues for the budding pediatric cardiologists, pediatric cardiac surgeons, pediatric anesthetists, pediatric cardiac intensivists, neonatologists and a host of supportive workforce. The proactive role of Indian Academy of Pediatrics and Pediatric Cardiac Society of India, towards creating a political will at the highest level for framing policies towards building infrastructure, training of workforce and subsidies for pediatric cardiac surgeries and procedures shall fuel the development of multiple tertiary cardiac centers in the country, making pediatric cardiology services accessible to the needy population.

  7. Complementary and alternative medicine: a survey of its use in pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Denise; Whidden, Ashley; Honkanen, Meeri; Dagenais, Simon; Clifford, Tammy; Baydala, Lola; King, W James; Vohra, Sunita

    2014-10-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine is high among children and youth with chronic illnesses, including patients with cardiac conditions. Our goal was to assess the prevalence and patterns of such use among patients presenting to academic pediatric cardiology clinics in Canada. A survey instrument was developed to inquire about current or previous use of complementary and alternative medicine products and practices, including indications, beliefs, sources of information and whether this use was discussed with physicians. Between February and July 2007, the survey was administered to patients (or their parents/guardians) presenting to 2 hospital-based cardiology clinics: the Stollery Children's Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta, and the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario in Ottawa, Ontario. At the Stollery Children's Hospital, 64.1% of the 145 respondents had used complementary and alternative medicine compared with 35.5% of the 31 respondents at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (p = 0.003). Overall, the most common products in current use were multivitamins (70.6%), vitamin C (22.1%), calcium (13.2%), unspecified "cold remedies" (11.8%) and fish oil or omega-3 fatty acids (11.8%). The most common practices in current use were massage (37.5%), faith healing (25.0%), chiropractic (20.0%), aromatherapy (15.0%) and Aboriginal healing (7.5%). Many patients (44.9%) used complementary and alternative medicine products at the same time as conventional prescription drugs. Concurrent use was discussed with physicians or pharmacists by 64.3% and 31.3% of respondents, respectively. Use of complementary and alternative medicine products and practices was high among patients seen in the pediatric cardiology clinics in our study. Most respondents believed that the use of these products and practices was helpful; few reported harms and many did not discuss this use with their physicians, increasing the potential for interactions with prescribed medications.

  8. Common Variants in 40 Genes Assessed for Diabetes Incidence and Response to Metformin and Lifestyle Intervention in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Kathleen A.; McAteer, Jarred B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Franks, Paul W.; Pollin, Toni I.; Hanson, Robert L.; Saxena, Richa; Fowler, Sarah; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Knowler, William C.; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Genome-wide association studies have begun to elucidate the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through targeted complementary approaches affect diabetes incidence in the at-risk population of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and whether they influence a response to preventive interventions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We selected SNPs identified by prior genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes and related traits, or capturing common variation in 40 candidate genes previously associated with type 2 diabetes, implicated in monogenic diabetes, encoding type 2 diabetes drug targets or drug-metabolizing/transporting enzymes, or involved in relevant physiological processes. We analyzed 1,590 SNPs for association with incident diabetes and their interaction with response to metformin or lifestyle interventions in 2,994 DPP participants. We controlled for multiple hypothesis testing by assessing false discovery rates. RESULTS We replicated the association of variants in the metformin transporter gene SLC47A1 with metformin response and detected nominal interactions in the AMP kinase (AMPK) gene STK11, the AMPK subunit genes PRKAA1 and PRKAA2, and a missense SNP in SLC22A1, which encodes another metformin transporter. The most significant association with diabetes incidence occurred in the AMPK subunit gene PRKAG2 (hazard ratio 1.24, 95% CI 1.09–1.40, P = 7 × 10−4). Overall, there were nominal associations with diabetes incidence at 85 SNPs and nominal interactions with the metformin and lifestyle interventions at 91 and 69 mostly nonoverlapping SNPs, respectively. The lowest P values were consistent with experiment-wide 33% false discovery rates. CONCLUSIONS We have identified potential genetic determinants of metformin response. These results merit confirmation in independent samples. PMID:20682687

  9. Nuclear cardiology core syllabus of the European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimelli, Alessia; Neglia, Danilo; Schindler, Thomas H; Cosyns, Bernard; Lancellotti, Patrizio; Kitsiou, Anastasia

    2015-04-01

    The European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging (EACVI) Core Syllabus for Nuclear Cardiology is now available online. The syllabus lists key elements of knowledge in nuclear cardiology. It represents a framework for the development of training curricula and provides expected knowledge-based learning outcomes to the nuclear cardiology trainees. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Clinical applications of exercise nuclear cardiology studies in the era of healthcare reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, D S; Kiat, H; Friedman, J D; Diamond, G

    1995-04-13

    The challenge for nuclear cardiology is to demonstrate that it can provide more information than competitive modalities at comparable or lower cost. In considering patients for nuclear cardiology procedures, presentations can be divided into 9 subsets: within each subset, nuclear cardiology tests should be employed where incremental information is provided over the information available without performing the test. (1) Patients with no known coronary artery disease (CAD); for diagnosis, nuclear imaging is useful in patients with intermediate probability of CAD. For prognosis, assessment is based on extent of ischemia, where we have shown that nuclear testing provides incremental information, especially in patients with a high likelihood of CAD, such as those with typical angina. In the remaining categories (2-9), nuclear cardiology studies are predominantly used for purposes of risk stratification. Here the greatest value is in patients deemed to be at intermediate risk before nuclear testing. (2) Postmyocardial infarction: stress nuclear imaging provides an alternative to angiography for risk assessment of clinically uncomplicated patients. (3) Poor ventricular function: Nuclear testing is particularly useful for differentiating patients with hibernating myocardium (the defect is reversible), with stunned myocardium (no defect is present), or with myocardial infarction (the defect is persistent). (4) Unstable angina: Following current federal guidelines, nuclear imaging in medically stabilized low-to-intermediate risk patients with unstable angina is likely to increase. (5) Postcatheterization patients: Nuclear imaging is useful when there is uncertainty regarding the choice of medical management or revascularization. (6) Pre-noncardiac surgery patients: Nuclear imaging is clearly helpful in patients with intermediate clinical risk and may provide useful information in clinically high-risk patients. (7) Post-PTCA patients: Due to the intermediate likelihood of

  11. Obstructive Thebesian valve: anatomical study and implications for invasive cardiologic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sanjib Kumar; Raheja, Shashi; Tuli, Anita

    2014-03-01

    Thebesian valve is the embryological remnant of the right sinoatrial valve, guarding the coronary sinus (CS) ostium. Advanced invasive and interventional cardiac diagnostic and management tools involve cannulation of the CS ostium. The presence of obstructive Thebesian valves has been reported to lead to unsuccessful cannulation of the CS. We studied the morphology of the Thebesian valve and CS ostium to assess the possible impact of these structures on invasive cardiological procedures. One hundred fifty randomly selected human cadaveric heart specimens fixed in 10% formalin were dissected in the customary routine manner. The Thebesian valves were classified according to their shape as semilunar/fenestrated/biconcave band like and according to their composition as membranous/fibromuscular/fibrous/muscular, and the extent to which the valve covered the CS ostium was also noted. An obstructive Thebesian valve that could interfere with the cannulation of the CS was defined as non-fenestrated (semilunar/biconcave band like) and non-membranous (fibromuscular/fibrous/muscular) valves covering >75% of the CS ostium. Thebesian valves were present in 118 (79%) heart specimens, of which 27 (18%) met the criteria of being obstructive. Semilunar was the most common type of Thebesian valve in terms of shape and was observed in 65 (65/118; 55%) hearts. This type was associated with the least mean craniocaudal (7.9±0.6 mm) and mean transverse (6.25±0.6 mm) diameters of the CS ostium. The mean craniocaudal diameter of the CS ostium (9.4±2.1 mm) was significantly larger (p=0.004) than the mean transverse diameter (7.15±1.5 mm) in specimens with Thebesian valves, and the cranial margin of the CS ostium was free from any attachment of the Thebesian valve in all the types observed (in terms of shape). Hence, attempts to direct the tip of the catheter toward the cranial margin of the CS ostium under direct vision may lead to successful cannulation of the same when conventional

  12. [The beginning of Mexican cardiology in the springtime of the Mexican National Academy of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The National Academy of Medicine was founded 141 years ago during the French intervention. Under the sponsorship of this brand-new medical association, Mexican cardioangiology took its first steps in the medical and surgical field as well. After the falling of the second empire, the medical and surgical advances of this discipline continued. The corresponding publications appeared in different volumes of the "Gaceta Médica de México"; at present journal of the Academy still published in our time. These steps permitted the development of the true cardiologic speciality during 40s of the twentieth century, due to the vision of Professor Ignacio Chávez, father of Mexican cardiology. Some examples of application are the epistemologic criteria in cardiologycal domains such as the conception of Riva-Rocci's sphygmomanometer in Italy in the nineteenth century and the so-called cardiac metabolic therapy in Mexico of our time, are included. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A.

  13. News of the Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology in Rome: the Obvious and Proven - it's not the Same Thing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu. Martsevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available News of the European Society of Cardiology Congress (Rome, 2016 is reviewed. The results of recent randomized controlled trials, observational studies (registers data, common problems in the presentation and interpretation of the reviewed data are discussed.

  14. Mind the Gap: Representation of Medical Education in Cardiology-Related Articles and Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Clint; Berlacher, Kathryn; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Auseon, Alex J

    2016-07-01

    Cardiology fellowship programs are at the interface of medical education and the care of patients suffering from the leading cause of mortality in the United States, yet there is an apparent lack of research guiding the effective education of fellows. We sought to quantify the number of publications in cardiology journals that pertained to the education of cardiology trainees and the number of cardiologists participating in education research. For the period between January and December 2012, we cataloged cardiology-specific and general medical/medical education journals and sorted them by impact factor. Tables of content were reviewed for articles with an educational focus, a cardiology focus, or both. We recorded the authors' areas of medical training, and keywords from each cardiology journal's mission statement were reviewed for emphasis on education. Twenty-six cardiology journals, containing 6645 articles, were reviewed. Only 4 articles had education themes. Ten general medical and 15 medical education journals contained 6810 articles. Of these, only 7 focused on medical education in cardiology, and none focused on cardiology fellowship training. Among the 4887 authors of publications in medical education journals, 25 were cardiologists (less than 1%), and among the 1036 total words in the mission statements of all cardiology journals, the term "education" appeared once. Published educational research is lacking in cardiology training, and few cardiologists appear to be active members of the education scholarship community. Cardiology organizations and academic journals should support efforts to identify target areas of study and publish scholarship in educational innovation.

  15. Anticoagulation control in atrial fibrillation patients present to outpatient clinic of cardiology versus anticoagulant clinics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Xin; MA Chang-sheng; LIU Xiao-hui; DONG Jian-zeng; WANG Jun-nan; CHENG Xiao-jing

    2005-01-01

    @@ Nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in clinical practice, which if untreated results in a doubling of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. AF is an independent predictor of stroke, with an annual risk 5 to 6 times higher than patients in sinus rhythm.1 During recent years, several randomised clinical trials conducted by investigators around the world involving 13 843 participants with NVAF have demonstrated convincingly the value of warfarin therapies for stroke prevention in high risk patients.2-8 However, the dose response of warfarin is complex and its activity is easily altered by concurrent medications, food interactions, alcohol and illnesses. Adherence to medical advice and routine monitoring of the international normalized ratio (INR) is important, because low anticoagulant intensity predisposes the patients to thromboembolic complications and high intensity to haemorrhage. Studies suggested that anticoagulant clinics could improve the quality of anticoagulation control,9 and anticoagulant clinics are common in western countries. However, in China, most AF patients taking warfarin usually attend the outpatient clinic of cardiology, while the quality of anticoagulation control is never investigated. We therefore assessed anticoagulation control in the outpatient clinic of cardiology, and the quality of anticoagulation control since the establishment of anticoagulant clinics.

  16. Weekly Interdisciplinary Colloquy on Cardiology: A Decade of Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrmacher, William H.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    An experimental, continuing, weekly interdisciplinary colloquy on cardiology is described. It is organized between the departments of medicine and physiology of Loyola University Medical Center to promote interaction between basic scientists and practicing physicians in the medical school. (Author/MLW)

  17. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  18. Comparison of Two Educational Strategies in Teaching Preventive Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup-Benham, Christine A.; And Others

    This study assessed the impact of two educational strategies: text only versus text plus small group discussion, among two groups of third-year internal medicine clerkship students in a preventive cardiology course. The course was a required, 12-week Internal Medical clerkship at the University of Texas Medical Branch. The first group reviewed…

  19. What to Expect From the Evolving Field of Geriatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Susan P; Orr, Nicole M; Dodson, John A; Rich, Michael W; Wenger, Nanette K; Blum, Kay; Harold, John Gordon; Tinetti, Mary E; Maurer, Mathew S; Forman, Daniel E

    2015-09-15

    The population of older adults is expanding rapidly, and aging predisposes to cardiovascular disease. The principle of patient-centered care must respond to the preponderance of cardiac disease that now occurs in combination with the complexities of old age. Geriatric cardiology melds cardiovascular perspectives with multimorbidity, polypharmacy, frailty, cognitive decline, and other clinical, social, financial, and psychological dimensions of aging. Although some assume that a cardiologist may instinctively cultivate some of these skills over the course of a career, we assert that the volume and complexity of older cardiovascular patients in contemporary practice warrants a more direct approach to achieve suitable training and a more reliable process of care. We present a rationale and vision for geriatric cardiology as a melding of primary cardiovascular and geriatrics skills, thereby infusing cardiology practice with expanded proficiencies in diagnosis, risks, care coordination, communications, end-of-life, and other competences required to best manage older cardiovascular patients. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. DIHYDROPYRIDINE CALCIUM ANTAGONISTS. POSITION OF NIFEDIPINE IN MODERN CARDIOLOGY PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Garganeeva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Position of nifedipine in modern cardiology practice is highlighted. Nifedipine usage for arterial hypertension therapy , including combined one, stroke prevention, treatment of hypertensive crisis and ischemic heart disease is considered. Advantages of nifedipine innovative formulations are presented. Possible usage of nifedipine in pulmonary hypertension as well as pregnancy is discussed specially.

  1. Burnout, Perceived Stress, and Depression among Cardiology Residents in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Silvina V.; Diez, Juan Cruz Lopez; Arazi, Hernan Cohen; Linetzky, Bruno; Guinjoan, Salvador; Grancelli, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Because medical residency is a stressful time for training physicians, placing residents at increased risk for psychological distress, the authors studied the prevalence of burnout, perceived stress, and depression in cardiology residents in Argentina and examined the association between sociodemographic characteristics and these…

  2. NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY, CURRENT APPLICATIONS IN CLINICAL-PRACTICE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NIEMEYER, MG; VANDERWALL, EE; KUIJPER, AFM; CLEOPHAS, AT; PAUWELS, EKJ

    1995-01-01

    The clinical applications of nuclear cardiology have rapidly expanded since the introduction of suitable imaging cameras and readily applicable isotopes. The currently available methods can provide useful data on estimates of ventricular function and detection of myocardial ischemia for adequate pat

  3. Outcome of children [corrected] with heart murmurs referred from general practice to a paediatrician with expertise in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khushu, Abha; Kelsall, Anthony W; Usher-Smith, Juliet A

    2015-01-01

    Heart murmurs are common in children. The majority are detected incidentally, and congenital heart disease is rare. There are no published United Kingdom guidelines for management of children with murmurs in primary care. Common practice is to refer all children for specialist assessment. To review outcomes of children with heart murmurs who were referred by general practitioners to a clinic conducted by a paediatrician with expertise in cardiology. Design and setting A retrospective review of children referred by general practitioners to a paediatrician with expertise in cardiology. Hospital records of all children under 17 years of age who attended the clinic during 2011 were reviewed. We excluded children previously seen by any cardiology service. There were 313 new primary care referrals, with complete records available for 310 children. Of them, 186 (60%) were referred with a murmur: 154 for an asymptomatic murmur alone, and 32 for a murmur plus additional symptoms or family history of congenital heart disease. All underwent echocardiography. Of the patients, 38 (20%) had congenital heart disease. Younger children were more likely to have congenital heart disease. There was no difference between rates of congenital heart disease in children with or without symptoms or a family history. The finding that a large proportion of children referred by general practitioners with asymptomatic heart murmurs have congenital heart disease supports current referral practice on clinical grounds.

  4. The impact of statin therapy on long-term cardiovascular outcomes in an outpatient cardiology practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Hoang M.; Aronow, Wilbert S.; Mercando, Anthony D.; Kalen, Phoenix; Desai, Harit V.; Gandhi, Kaushang; Sharma, Mala; Amin, Harshad; Lai, Trung M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Statins reduce coronary events in patients with coronary artery disease. Material/Methods Chart reviews were performed in 305 patients (217 men and 88 women, mean age 74 years) not treated with statins during the first year of being seen in an outpatient cardiology practice but subsequently treated with statins. Based on the starting date of statins use, the long-term outcomes of myocardial infarction (MI), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), and coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABGS) before and after statin use were compared. Results Mean follow-up was 65 months before statins use and 66 months after statins use. MI occurred in 31 of 305 patients (10%) before statins, and in 13 of 305 patients (4%) after statins (pcardiology practice reduces the incidence of MI, PCI, and CABGS. PMID:22129898

  5. Understanding surgery choices for breast cancer: how might the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Common Sense Model contribute to decision support interventions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivell, Stephanie; Edwards, Adrian; Elwyn, Glyn; Manstead, Antony S R

    2011-03-01

    To describe the evidence about factors influencing breast cancer patients' surgery choices and the implications for designing decision support in reference to an extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and the Common Sense Model of Illness Representations (CSM). A wide range of factors are known to influence the surgery choices of women diagnosed with early breast cancer facing the choice of mastectomy or breast conservation surgery with radiotherapy. However, research does not always reflect the complexities of decision making and is often atheoretical. A theoretical approach, as provided by the CSM and the TPB, could help to identify and tailor support by focusing on patients' representations of their breast cancer and predicting surgery choices. Literature search and narrative synthesis of data. Twenty-six studies reported women's surgery choices to be influenced by perceived clinical outcomes of surgery, appearance and body image, treatment concerns, involvement in decision making and preferences of clinicians. These factors can be mapped onto the key constructs of both the TPB and CSM and used to inform the design and development of decision support interventions to ensure accurate information is provided in areas most important to patients. The TPB and CSM have the potential to inform the design of decision support for breast cancer patients, with accurate and clear information that avoids leading patients to make decisions they may come to regret. Further research is needed examining how the components of the extended TPB and CSM account for patients' surgery choices. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Motion-compensated hand-held common-path Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography probe for image-guided intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Song, Cheol; Liu, Xuan; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    A motion-compensated hand-held common-path Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography imaging probe has been developed for image guided intervention during microsurgery. A hand-held prototype instrument was designed and fabricated by integrating an imaging fiber probe inside a stainless steel needle which is attached to the ceramic shaft of a piezoelectric motor housed in an aluminum handle. The fiber probe obtains A-scan images. The distance information was extracted from the A-scans to track the sample surface distance and a fixed distance was maintained by a feedback motor control which effectively compensated hand tremor and target movements in the axial direction. Graphical user interface, real-time data processing, and visualization based on a CPU-GPU hybrid programming architecture were developed and used in the implantation of this system. To validate the system, free-hand optical coherence tomography images using various samples were obtained. The system can be easily integrated into microsurgical tools and robotics for a wide range of clinical applications. Such tools could offer physicians the freedom to easily image sites of interest with reduced risk and higher image quality.

  7. Occupational Health Hazards in the Interventional Laboratory: Progress Report of the Multispecialty Occupational Health Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    of the global market for medical imaging technology. The meeting was attended by representatives from MITA, General Electric, Philips, Siemens and...published as official guidance of the Asian Pacific Society of Interventional Cardiology, the Sociedad Latinoamericana de Cardiologia Intervencionista

  8. The dawn of a new era in onco-cardiology: The Kumamoto Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueta, Daisuke; Tabata, Noriaki; Akasaka, Tomonori; Yamashita, Takayoshi; Ikemoto, Tomokazu; Hokimoto, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    The term "onco-cardiology" has been used in reference to cardiotoxicity in the treatment of malignant disease. In actual clinical situations, however, cardiovascular disease (CVD) associated with malignant disease and the concurrence of atherosclerotic disease with malignant disease are commonly observed, complicating the course of treatment. Patients with malignant disease associated with coronary artery disease often die from the cardiovascular disease, so it is essential to classify these disease states. Additionally, the prevalence of these classifications makes it easy to manage patients with malignant disease and coronary artery disease. We divided the broad field of onco-cardiology into 4 classifications based on clinical scenarios (CSs): CS1 represents the so-called paraneoplastic syndrome. CS2 represents cardiotoxicity during treatment of malignant diseases. CS3 represents the concurrence of atherosclerotic disease with malignant disease, and CS4 represents cardiovascular disease with benign tumors. This classification facilitates the management of patients with malignant disease and coronary artery disease by promoting not only the primary but also the secondary prevention of CVD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Is patient size important in dose determination and optimization in cardiology?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reay, J; Chapple, C L; Kotre, C J [Regional Medical Physics Department, Newcastle General Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE4 6BE (United Kingdom)

    2003-12-07

    Patient dose determination and optimization have become more topical in recent years with the implementation of the Medical Exposures Directive into national legislation, the Ionising Radiation (Medical Exposure) Regulations. This legislation incorporates a requirement for new equipment to provide a means of displaying a measure of patient exposure and introduces the concept of diagnostic reference levels. It is normally assumed that patient dose is governed largely by patient size; however, in cardiology, where procedures are often very complex, the significance of patient size is less well understood. This study considers over 9000 cardiology procedures, undertaken throughout the north of England, and investigates the relationship between patient size and dose. It uses simple linear regression to calculate both correlation coefficients and significance levels for data sorted by both room and individual clinician for the four most common examinations, left ventrical and/or coronary angiography, single vessel stent insertion and single vessel angioplasty. This paper concludes that the correlation between patient size and dose is weak for the procedures considered. It also illustrates the use of an existing method for removing the effect of patient size from dose survey data. This allows typical doses and, therefore, reference levels to be defined for the purposes of dose optimization.

  10. Therapeutic approach to patients complaining of high blood pressure in a cardiological emergency room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Gus

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the management of patients complaining of high blood pressure (BP in a cardiological emergency room. METHODS: Patients referred to the cardiological emergency room with the main complaint of high blood pressure were consecutively selected. The prescriptions and the choice of antihypertensive drugs were assessed. The classification of these patients as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies, according to the physician who provided initial care, was recorded. RESULTS: From a total of 858 patients presenting to the emergency room, 80 (9.3% complained of high BP, and 61 (76.3% received antihypertensive drugs. Sublingual nifedipine was the most commonly used drug (59%. One patient received intravenous medication, one patient was hospitalized and 6 patients (7.5% were classified as hypertensive emergencies or pseudoemergencies. CONCLUSION: High BP could seldom be classified as a hypertensive emergency or pseudoemergency, even though it was a frequent complaint (9.3% of visits. Currently, the therapeutic approach is not recommended, even in specialized clinics.

  11. Psychosocial interventions for perinatal common mental disorders delivered by providers who are not mental health specialists in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Clarke

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal common mental disorders (PCMDs are a major cause of disability among women. Psychosocial interventions are one approach to reduce the burden of PCMDs. Working with care providers who are not mental health specialists, in the community or in antenatal health care facilities, can expand access to these interventions in low-resource settings. We assessed effects of such interventions compared to usual perinatal care, as well as effects of interventions based on intervention type, delivery method, and timing.We conducted a systematic review, meta-analysis, and meta-regression. We searched databases including Embase and the Global Health Library (up to 7 July 2013 for randomized and non-randomized trials of psychosocial interventions delivered by non-specialist mental health care providers in community settings and antenatal health care facilities in low- and middle-income countries. We pooled outcomes from ten trials for 18,738 participants. Interventions led to an overall reduction in PCMDs compared to usual care when using continuous data for PCMD symptomatology (effect size [ES] -0.34; 95% CI -0.53, -0.16 but not binary categorizations for presence or absence of PCMDs (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.35, 1.080 [corrected]. We found a significantly larger ES for psychological interventions (three studies; ES -0.46; 95% CI -0.58, -0.33 than for health promotion interventions (seven studies; ES -0.15; 95% CI -0.27, -0.02. Both individual (five studies; ES -0.18; 95% CI -0.34, -0.01 and group (three studies; ES -0.48; 95% CI -0.85, -0.11 interventions were effective compared to usual care, though delivery method was not associated with ES (meta-regression β coefficient -0.11; 95% CI -0.36, 0.14. Combined group and individual interventions (based on two studies had no benefit compared to usual care, nor did interventions restricted to pregnancy (three studies. Intervention timing was not associated with ES (β 0.16; 95% CI -0.16, 0.49. The small number

  12. Safety of pharmacotherapy of osteoporosis in cardiology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapolski, Tomasz; Wysokiński, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The commonest medical conditions following menopause are osteoporosis and atherosclerotic disease. This review considers the safety of pharmacotherapy of osteoporosis in cardiology patients. Drugs used for osteoporosis treatment may have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system. This article has detailed analysed of current drug classes, such as the bisphosphonates and strontium ranelate, as well as reviewed of the controversy surrounding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs). Additionally, we discuss the adverse effects on the heart of calcium and drugs influencing calcium metabolism such as vitamin D, parathormone and calcitonin. We look at the interference between osteoporosis treatment and the drugs used for atherosclerosis. Moreover, the side effects on bones of cardiology drugs are analysed. Lastly, the possible advantages of selected drugs used for cardiovascular diseases in terms of osteoporosis prevention are evaluated.

  13. Nuclear cardiology: Myocardial perfusion and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seldin, D.W. (Lahey Clinic Medical Center, Burlington, MA (United States))

    1991-08-01

    Myocardial perfusion studies continue to be a major focus of research, with new investigations of the relationship of exercise-redistribution thallium imaging to diagnosis, prognosis, and case management. The redistribution phenomenon, which seemed to be fairly well understood a few years ago, is now recognized to be much more complex than originally thought, and various strategies have been proposed to clarify the meaning of persistent defects. Pharmacologic intervention with dipyridamole and adenosine has become available as an alternative to exercise, and comparisons with exercise imaging and catheterization results have been described. Thallium itself is no longer the sole single-photon perfusion radiopharmaceutical; two new technetium agents are now widely available. In addition to perfusion studies, advances in the study of ventricular function have been made, including reports of studies performed in conjunction with technetium perfusion studies, new insights into cardiac physiology, and the prognostic and case-management information that function studies provide. Finally, work has continued with monoclonal antibodies for the identification of areas of myocyte necrosis. 41 references.

  14. Longer-term impact of cardiology e-consults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasfy, Jason H; Rao, Sandhya K; Kalwani, Neil; Chittle, Melissa D; Richardson, Calvin A; Gallen, Kathleen M; Isselbacher, Eric M; Kimball, Alexandra B; Ferris, Timothy G

    2016-03-01

    Cardiac e-consults may be an effective way to deliver value-oriented outpatient cardiology care in an accountable care organization. Initial results of cardiac e-consults have demonstrated high satisfaction among both patients and referring providers, no known adverse events, and low rates of diagnostic testing. Nevertheless, differences between e-consults and traditional consults, effects of e-consults on traditional consult volume, and whether patients seek traditional consults after e-consults are unknown. We established a cardiac e-consult program on January 13, 2014. We then conducted detailed medical record reviews of all patients with e-consults to detect any adverse clinical events and detect subsequent traditional visits to cardiologists. We also performed 2 comparisons. First, we compared age, gender, and referral reason for e-consults vs traditional consults. Second, we compared changes in volume of referrals to cardiology vs other medical specialties that did not have e-consults. From January 13 to December 31, 2014, 1,642 traditional referrals and 165 e-consults were requested. The proportion of e-consults of all evaluations requested over that period was 9.1%. Gender balance was similar among traditional consults and e-consults (44.8% male for e-consults vs 45.0% for traditional consults, P = .981). E-consult patients were younger than traditional consult patients (55.3 vs 60.4 years, P cardiology visit during the follow-up period. E-consults are an effective and safe mechanism to enhance value in outpatient cardiology care, with low rates of bounceback to traditional consults. E-consults can account for nearly one-tenth of total outpatient consultation volume at 1 year within an accountable care organization and are associated with a reduction in traditional referrals to cardiologists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Impact of post myocardial infarction depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines

    OpenAIRE

    Hemanta Dutta; Soumitra Ghosh; DJ Dutta

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depressive symptoms are very usual in patients experiencing a history of myocardial infarction (MI). An individual who has developed depression after an episode of MI becomes non compliant with the treatment of cardiology. Aim: To test the impact of post MI depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines. Settings and design: The study was conducted on patients of acute MI (n=50) attending cardiology outpatient department (OPD) of Assam Medical College and Hospital...

  16. Opening Speech at the 5th Great Wall International Forum on Geriatric Cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen WANG

    2006-01-01

    @@ Good morning, ladies and gentlemen, In the golden autumn of Beijing, on behalf of the Organizing Committee of the Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology, and the Institute of Geriatric Cardiology at Chinese PLA General Hospital, I am very delighted to extend my warmest welcome to the representatives, colleagues and distinguished guests, both domestic and abroad, to the 5th International Forum on Geriatric Cardiology.

  17. Estimated occupational dose in interventional procedures crystalline; Estimacion de la dosis ocupacional en el cristallino en procedimientos interveniconistas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portas Ferradas, B. C.; Chapel Gomez, M. L.; Jimenez Alarcon, J. I.

    2011-07-01

    This paper present the result of the estimated doses in the eyes of workers exposed for radiology procedures and interventional cardiology from measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeter placed near the lens.

  18. Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidbuchel, Hein; Papadakis, Michael; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, Nicole; Carré, François; Dugmore, Dorian; Mellwig, Klaus-Peter; Rasmusen, Hanne Kruuse; Solberg, Erik E; Borjesson, Mats; Corrado, Domenico; Pelliccia, Antonio; Sharma, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum potential benefit at the lowest possible risk. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) advocates systematic preparticipation cardiovascular screening in an effort to identify competitive athletes at risk of exercise-related cardiovascular events and sudden cardiac death. However, the implementation of preparticipation screening is hindered because of lack of structured training and as a result lack of sufficient expertise in the field of sports cardiology. In 2008 the European Society of Cardiology published a core curriculum for the general cardiologist, in which sports cardiology was incorporated within the topic 'Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology'. However, the exponential rise in knowledge and the growing demand for expertise in the field of sports cardiology dictates the need to systematically structure the knowledge base of sports cardiology into a detailed curriculum. We envisage that the curriculum would facilitate more uniform training and guideline implementation throughout Europe, and safeguard that evaluation and guidance of competitive athletes or individuals who wish to engage in leisure-time sports activities is performed by physicians with expertise in the field. The current manuscript provides a comprehensive curriculum for sports cardiology, which may serve as a framework upon which universities and national and international health authorities will develop the training, evaluation and accreditation in sports cardiology.

  19. Optimising decision making on illness absenteeism due to fever and common infections within childcare centres: development of a multicomponent intervention and study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetoom, K K B; Crutzen, R; Bohnen, J M H A; Verhoeven, R; Nelissen-Vrancken, H J M G; Winkens, B; Dinant, G J; Cals, J W L

    2017-07-26

    Evidence has shown that children 0-4 year-old attending childcare are prone to acquire infections compared to children cared for at home, with fever being the most common symptom. Illness absenteeism due to fever and common infections is substantial and mostly driven by unrealistic concerns and negative attitude towards fever of both childcare staff and parents, resulting in illness absenteeism from childcare, work absenteeism among parents and healthcare service use. The objective of this study is to optimise decision making among childcare staff on illness absenteeism due to fever and common infections in childcare. Underlying determinants of behavioural change were targeted by means of a multicomponent intervention. A multicomponent intervention was developed to improve decision making, using the stepwise approach of Intervention Mapping, and in close collaboration with stakeholders and experts. The intervention consisted of 1) a two-hour educational session on fever among childcare staff; 2) an online video for childcare staff and parents emphasising key information of the educational session; 3) a decision tool for childcare staff and parents in the format of a traffic light system to estimate the severity of illness and corresponding advices for childcare staff and parents; 4) an information booklet regarding childhood fever, common infections, and self-management strategies for childcare staff and parents. The multicomponent intervention will be evaluated in a cluster randomised trial with a 12-week follow-up period and absenteeism due to illness (defined as the percentage of childcare days absent due to illness on the total of childcare days during a 12-week period) as primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures are: incidence rate and duration of illness episodes, knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, and risk perception on fever and common infections of childcare staff and parents, healthcare service use in general and paracetamol use, and work

  20. Interventional treatment of common congenital heart diseases the common view of Chinese medical experts.Part Two——Interventional treatment of ventricular septal defect%常见先天性心脏病介入治疗中国专家共识二、室间隔缺损介入治疗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中国医师协会心血管内科分会先心病工作委员会

    2011-01-01

    室间隔缺损(VSD)为最常见的先天性心脏畸形,占先天性心脏病的25% ~ 30%.介入治疗的关键在于适应证的选择,操作技巧和并发症的防治.根据左心室造影图像判断VSD的形态和类型,选择不同类型的封堵器.操作中要避免右房室瓣腱索的缠绕、瓣膜的损伤和心律紊乱的发生.术后应严密观察,及早处理房室传导阻滞等并发症.本文详细介绍了膜部和肌部VSD的诊断,规范化的操作方法,术中和术后可预测的情况处理.%Ventricular septal defect(VSD)is the most common congenital heart disease. it accounts for 25 ~ 30% of all congenital heart diseases. The key points of interventional treatment for VSD are the careful selection of indications. the rich experience in manipulating skill and the effective prevention of complications. According to the imaging f'indings on the selective left sided cardiography and echocardiography, the morphology and type of VSD, mainly including the precise size and location of the defect. can be accurately determined. on this account the proper transcatheter device closure can be rationally selected. During the interventional management, the twine and damage of the right atrio-ventricular valve as well as its tendinous cords should be avoided. and the ventricular arrhythmias and new aortic or tricuspid regurgitation should be prevented. After the treatment, the patient should be closely observed, the postoperative complications such as atrioventricular block should be promptly dealt with. In this chapter, the diagnosis of membranous and muscular VSD. the standard interventional procedure of transcatheter device closure implantation and the management of predictable events occurred during and after the procedure will be systemically described. (J Intervent Radiol, 2011 , 20 : 87-92)

  1. Metabolomics, a promising approach to translational research in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Deidda

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we will provide a description of metabolomics in comparison with other, better known “omics” disciplines such as genomics and proteomics. In addition, we will review the current rationale for the implementation of metabolomics in cardiology, its basic methodology and the available data from human studies in this discipline. The topics covered will delineate the importance of being able to use the metabolomic information to understand the mechanisms of diseases from the perspective of systems biology, and as a non-invasive approach to the diagnosis, grading and treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  2. The Paediatric Cardiology Hall of Fame – Donald Nixon Ross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Jane

    2015-10-01

    Donald Nixon Ross, FRCS (4 October 1922 to 7 July 2014) was a South African-born British cardiothoracic surgeon, who developed the pulmonary autograft, known as the Ross procedure, for the treatment of aortic valve disease, and also performed the first heart transplant in the United Kingdom in 1968. This paper, written by Jane Somerville, Professor of Cardiology [Retired], Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom, provides the personal recollections about Donald Ross from Jane Somerville, and thus provides a unique snapshot of cardiac surgical history.

  3. Benefits of an international working exchange in pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, John P; Ramsay, James M; Bullock, Andrew; Chen, Robert P; Warren, Andrew E; Wong, Kenny K

    2011-01-01

    This report describes a 1-year exchange between members of two pediatric cardiology centers: one in Canada and one in Australia. Five cardiologists participated in sequence, fully engaging in the activities of the host department. The motivation of the exchange was broadly educational including clinical experience, shared expertise, teaching, and research collaboration. Structured debriefing confirmed the value of the exchange. In addition to the experience of working in a different medical system, eight research papers were developed, with two research projects ongoing as well as subsequent exchanges of nursing and technical personnel. Interchange between two academic departments can add strength to both and allow development of new skills and research activity.

  4. [Methods of the elaboration of data of the cardiological importance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, C; Taddei, A; Varanini, M

    1987-12-01

    This paper deals with some introductory topics of signal processing and decision making in cardiology. In both instances the matter is referred to general schemes well suited to host different applications. Signal processing is divided in some phases: acquisition, storing, analysis and each of them is described with applications to specific signals. In a similar manner the methods for decision making have been simplified to a scheme including a "knowledge base" and an "inference method". The scheme is used to classify various implementations. Bayes analysis and expert systems have been introduced with some details.

  5. Patient-centred care of patients with ventricular arrhythmias and risk of sudden cardiac death: What do the 2015 European Society of Cardiology guidelines add?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norekvål, Tone M; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fitzsimons, Donna

    2017-03-01

    Nurses and allied professionals are at the forefront of care delivery in patients with arrythmogenic risk and have a responsibility to deliver care that is focused on their individual needs. The 2015 European Society of Cardiology guideline on prevention of ventricular arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death heralds a step-change in patient and family focus and interdisciplinary involvement. This development reflects a recognition within the European Society of Cardiology that chronic care of patients with cardiovascular conditions can be improved by involving all stakeholders, making use of multidisciplinary interventions, and placing the patient at the centre of the care process. In this article, taskforce contributors discuss the latest evidence and highlight some of the most pertinent issues for nurses involved in patient-centred care of patients and families with ventricular arrhythmias and/or risk of sudden death.

  6. Fetal cardiology: changing the definition of critical heart disease in the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Słodki, M; Respondek-Liberska, M; Pruetz, J D; Donofrio, M T

    2016-08-01

    Infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD) may require emergent treatment in the newborn period. These infants are likely to benefit the most from a prenatal diagnosis, which allows for optimal perinatal planning. Several cardiac centers have created guidelines for the management of these high-risk patients with CHD. This paper will review and compare several prenatal CHD classification systems with a particular focus on the most critical forms of CHD in the fetus and newborn. A contemporary definition of critical CHD is one which requires urgent intervention in the first 24 h of life to prevent death. Such cardiac interventions may be not only life saving for the infant but also decrease subsequent morbidity. Critical CHD cases may require delivery at specialized centers that can provide perinatal, obstetric, cardiology and cardiothoracic surgery care. Fetuses diagnosed in mid-gestation require detailed fetal diagnostics and serial monitoring during the prenatal period, in order to assess for ongoing changes and identify progression to a more severe cardiac status. Critical CHD may progress in utero and there is still much to be learned about how to best predict those who will require urgent neonatal interventions. Despite improved therapeutic capabilities, newborns with critical CHD continue to have significant morbidity and mortality due to compromise that begins in the delivery room. Fetal echocardiography is the best way to predict the need for specialized care at birth to improve outcome. Once the diagnosis is made of critical CHD, delivery at the proper time and in appropriate institution with specific care protocols should be initiated. More work needs to be done to better delineate the risk factors for progression of critical CHD and to determine which newborns will require specialized care. The most frequently described forms of critical CHD requiring immediate intervention include hypoplastic left heart syndrome with intact or severely restricted

  7. Management of diabetes by a healthcare team in a cardiology unit: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Maria Antonieta P; Rodrigues, Juliane; Cremonesi, Mariana; Polanczyk, Carisi; Schaan, Beatriz D

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of healthcare team guidance in the implementation of a glycemic control protocol in the non-intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial comparing 9 months of intensive guidance by a healthcare team on a protocol for diabetes care (Intervention Group, n = 95) with 9 months of standard care (Control Group, n = 87). Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01154413. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 61.7±10 years, and the mean glycated hemoglobin level was 71±23 mmol/mol (8.7±2.1%). The mean capillary glycemia during hospitalization was similar between the groups (9.8±2.9 and 9.1±2.4 mmol/l for the Intervention Group and Control Group, respectively, p = 0.078). The number of hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.77), hyperglycemic episodes (47 vs. 50 in the Intervention Group and Control Group, p = 0.35, respectively), and the length of stay in the hospital were similar between the groups (p = 0.64). The amount of regular insulin administered was 0 (0–10) IU in the Intervention Group and 28 (7–56) IU in the Control Group (p<0.001), and the amount of NPH insulin administered was similar between the groups (p = 0.16). CONCLUSIONS: While guidance on a glycemic control protocol given by a healthcare team resulted in a modification of the therapeutic strategy, no changes in glycemic control, frequency of episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, or hospitalization duration were observed. PMID:24270950

  8. Management of diabetes by a healthcare team in a cardiology unit: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Antonieta P. de Moraes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of healthcare team guidance in the implementation of a glycemic control protocol in the non-intensive care unit of a cardiology hospital. METHODS: This was a randomized clinical trial comparing 9 months of intensive guidance by a healthcare team on a protocol for diabetes care (Intervention Group, n = 95 with 9 months of standard care (Control Group, n = 87. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01154413. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 61.7±10 years, and the mean glycated hemoglobin level was 71±23 mmol/mol (8.7±2.1%. The mean capillary glycemia during hospitalization was similar between the groups (9.8±2.9 and 9.1±2.4 mmol/l for the Intervention Group and Control Group, respectively, p = 0.078. The number of hypoglycemic episodes (p = 0.77, hyperglycemic episodes (47 vs. 50 in the Intervention Group and Control Group, p = 0.35, respectively, and the length of stay in the hospital were similar between the groups (p = 0.64. The amount of regular insulin administered was 0 (0-10 IU in the Intervention Group and 28 (7-56 IU in the Control Group (p<0.001, and the amount of NPH insulin administered was similar between the groups (p = 0.16. CONCLUSIONS: While guidance on a glycemic control protocol given by a healthcare team resulted in a modification of the therapeutic strategy, no changes in glycemic control, frequency of episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia, or hospitalization duration were observed.

  9. Dose estimation of interventional cardiologists in different body regions; Estimativa de dose de cardiologistas intervencionistas em diferentes regioes corporais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borba, Iana Q. de; Luz, Renata M. da; Capaverde, Alexandre S.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da; Caramori, Paulo Ricardo Avancini, E-mail: iana.borba@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-12-15

    Interventional radiology is one of the medical specialties that provides the highest doses to professionals, widely used in cardiology, being called interventional cardiology. In order to contribute to the optimization of occupational radiation protection in interventional cardiology procedures, the aim of this study is to evaluate the dose estimation received in different body regions by physicians in interventional cardiology procedures. Two physicians were followed, named as A and B, during one month period, performing a total of 127 procedures (70 for A and 57 for B) of interventional cardiology. During the procedures, dosimeters in different body regions beyond the full-body dosimeter were positioned. The results showed the highest values for the estimated dose received by workers were in the right wrist and left side face regions, for the physician A, and in the left knee and left side face, for the physician B. Results demonstrate the importance of using individual protection equipment by physicians in interventional cardiology, including lead glasses, besides monitoring dosimeters for other body regions, such as wrist, face and knee. (author)

  10. Enabling Precision Cardiology Through Multiscale Biology and Systems Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kipp W. Johnson, BS

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The traditional paradigm of cardiovascular disease research derives insight from large-scale, broadly inclusive clinical studies of well-characterized pathologies. These insights are then put into practice according to standardized clinical guidelines. However, stagnation in the development of new cardiovascular therapies and variability in therapeutic response implies that this paradigm is insufficient for reducing the cardiovascular disease burden. In this state-of-the-art review, we examine 3 interconnected ideas we put forth as key concepts for enabling a transition to precision cardiology: 1 precision characterization of cardiovascular disease with machine learning methods; 2 the application of network models of disease to embrace disease complexity; and 3 using insights from the previous 2 ideas to enable pharmacology and polypharmacology systems for more precise drug-to-patient matching and patient-disease stratification. We conclude by exploring the challenges of applying a precision approach to cardiology, which arise from a deficit of the required resources and infrastructure, and emerging evidence for the clinical effectiveness of this nascent approach.

  11. Emerging role of nuclear cardiology in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotats, A; Carrió, I

    2010-04-01

    The management of patients with heart failure requires the integration of clinical skills and accurate complementary tests for the correct diagnosis, treatment and estimation of individual prognosis. Identification of those patients most at risk of death, and those most likely to benefit from currently available treatment technologies, remains a challenge. Although the basic characterization of patients with heart failure is supported primarily by the assessment of the left ventricular function, there are several nuclear cardiology techniques and tracers, either available or under development, which can provide important noninvasive imaging insights into the pathophysiology, prognosis and management of patients with heart failure. Nuclear techniques for molecular imaging of the myocardium such as those involved in the processes of myocardial perfusion, metabolism and viability, cellular injury, dyssynchrony, intersticial dysregulation and neurohormonal receptor function may facilitate better clinical outcomes for patients with heart failure. This review mainly focuses on cardiac sympathetic imaging, as other modalities of nuclear cardiology in the assessment of patients with HF are reviewed more extensively in other sections of this issue.

  12. Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó, José M; Small, Michael

    2017-06-28

    The application of mathematics, natural sciences and engineering to medicine is gaining momentum as the mutual benefits of this collaboration become increasingly obvious. This theme issue is intended to highlight the trend in the case of mathematics. Specifically, the scope of this theme issue is to give a general view of the current research in the application of mathematical methods to medicine, as well as to show how mathematics can help in such important aspects as understanding, prediction, treatment and data processing. To this end, three representative specialties have been selected: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology. Concerning the topics, the 12 research papers and one review included in this issue cover biofluids, cardiac and virus dynamics, computational neuroscience, functional magnetic resonance imaging data processing, neural networks, optimization of treatment strategies, time-series analysis and tumour growth. In conclusion, this theme issue contains a collection of fine contributions at the intersection of mathematics and medicine, not as an exercise in applied mathematics but as a multidisciplinary research effort that interests both communities and our society in general.This article is part of the themed issue 'Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Training fellows in paediatric cardiology: the Harvard experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David W; Allan, Catherine K; Newburger, Jane W

    2016-12-01

    The Fellowship Program of the Department of Cardiology at Boston Children's Hospital seeks to train academically oriented leaders in clinical care and laboratory and clinical investigation of cardiovascular disease in the young. The core clinical fellowship involves 3 years in training, comprising 24 months of clinical rotations and 12 months of elective and research experience. Trainees have access to a vast array of research opportunities - clinical, basic, and translational. Clinical fellows interested in basic science may reverse the usual sequence and start their training in the laboratory, deferring clinical training for 1 or more years. An increasing number of clinical trainees apply to spend a fourth year as a senior fellow in one of the subspecialty areas of paediatric cardiology. From the founding of the Department to the present, we have maintained a fundamental and unwavering commitment to training and education in clinical care and research in basic science and clinical investigation, as well as to the training of outstanding young clinicians and investigators.

  14. The increasing impact of laboratory medicine on clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerico, Aldo

    2003-07-01

    The practice of cardiology continues to evolve along with a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease and the development of new therapeutic procedures. Consequently, new demands are being made on the in vitro diagnostics industry to improve the performance of existing cardiac markers and to develop novel markers for new cardiac disease indications. Indeed, in the last 20 years there has been a progressive increase in new laboratory tests for markers of cardiac diseases. Several highly sensitive and/or specific assays for the detection of myocardial ischemic damage as well as some immunoassays for cardiac natriuretic hormones, now considered a reliable marker of myocardial function, have become commercially available. In parallel, a growing number of some novel risk factors, which can be assessed and monitored by laboratory methods, have been added to the classical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Finally, the recent explosion of genetic analysis may soon place at the clinical cardiologist's disposal many laboratory tests for defining the diagnosis at the molecular level, assessing new risk factors, and better targeting the pharmaceutical approaches in patients with cardiovascular disease. In the present article, after a brief description of the analytical tests included in these four groups, each group's impact on clinical cardiology is discussed in detail.

  15. Optimization and surgical design for applications in pediatric cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Alison; Bernstein, Adam; Taylor, Charles; Feinstein, Jeffrey

    2007-11-01

    The coupling of shape optimization to cardiovascular blood flow simulations has potential to improve the design of current surgeries and to eventually allow for optimization of surgical designs for individual patients. This is particularly true in pediatric cardiology, where geometries vary dramatically between patients, and unusual geometries can lead to unfavorable hemodynamic conditions. Interfacing shape optimization to three-dimensional, time-dependent fluid mechanics problems is particularly challenging because of the large computational cost and the difficulty in computing objective function gradients. In this work a derivative-free optimization algorithm is coupled to a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver that has been tailored for cardiovascular applications. The optimization code employs mesh adaptive direct search in conjunction with a Kriging surrogate. This framework is successfully demonstrated on several geometries representative of cardiovascular surgical applications. We will discuss issues of cost function choice for surgical applications, including energy loss and wall shear stress distribution. In particular, we will discuss the creation of new designs for the Fontan procedure, a surgery done in pediatric cardiology to treat single ventricle heart defects.

  16. Possible helio-geomagnetic activity influence on cardiological cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsavrias, Christos

    Eruptive solar events as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) occur during solar activ-ity periods. Energetic particles, fast solar wind plasma and electromagnetic radiation pass through interplanetary space, arrive on Earth's ionosphere-magnetosphere and produce various disturbances. It is well known the negative influence of geomagnetic substorms on the human technological applications on geospace. During the last 25 years, many studies concerning the possible influence on the human health are published. Increase of the Acute Coronary Syn-dromes and disorders of the Cardiac Rhythm, increase of accidents as well as neurological and psychological disorders (e.g. increase of suicides) during or near to the geomagnetic storms time interval are reported. In this study, we research the problem in Greece, focusing on patients with Acute Myocardial Infraction, hospitalized in the 2nd Cardiological Department of the General Hospital of Nikaea (Piraeus City), for the time interval 1997-2007 (23rd solar cycle) and also to the arrival of emergency cardiological cases to Emergency Department of two greek hospitals, the General Hospital of Lamia City and the General Hospital of Veria City during the selected months, with or without helio-geomagnetic activity, of the 23rd solar cycle. Increase of cases is recorded during the periods with increase helio-geomagnetic activity. The necessity of continuing the research for a longer period and with a bigger sample is high; so as to exact more secure conclusions.

  17. Business process re-engineering a cardiology department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Syed Murtuza Hussain

    2014-01-01

    The health care sector is the world's third largest industry and is facing several problems such as excessive waiting times for patients, lack of access to information, high costs of delivery and medical errors. Health care managers seek the help of process re-engineering methods to discover the best processes and to re-engineer existing processes to optimize productivity without compromising on quality. Business process re-engineering refers to the fundamental rethinking and radical redesign of business processes to achieve dramatic improvements in critical, contemporary measures of performance, such as cost, quality and speed. The present study is carried out at a tertiary care corporate hospital with 1000-plus-bed facility. A descriptive study and case study method is used with intensive, careful and complete observation of patient flow, delays, short comings in patient movement and workflow. Data is collected through observations, informal interviews and analyzed by matrix analysis. Flowcharts were drawn for the various work activities of the cardiology department including workflow of the admission process, workflow in the ward and ICCU, workflow of the patient for catheterization laboratory procedure, and in the billing and discharge process. The problems of the existing system were studied and necessary suggestions were recommended to cardiology department module with an illustrated flowchart.

  18. Bionic autonomic neuromodulation revolutionizes cardiology in the 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    In this invited session, we would like to address the impact of bionic neuromodulation on cardiovascular diseases. It has been well established that cardiovascular dysregulation plays major roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why most drugs currently used in cardiology have significant pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular regulatory system. Since the ultimate center for cardiovascular regulation is the brainstem, it is conceivable that autonomic neuromodulation would have significant impacts on cardiovascular diseases. On the basis of this framework, we first developed a bionic, neurally regulated artificial pacemaker. We then substituted the brainstem by CPU and developed a bionic artificial baroreflex system. We further developed a bionic brain that achieved better regulatory conditions than the native brainstem in order to improve survival in animal model with heart failure. We recently developed a bionic neuromodulation system to reduce infarction size following acute myocardial infarction. We believe that the bionic neuromodulation will inspire even more intricate applications in cardiology in the 21(st) century.

  19. Linux thin-client conversion in a large cardiology practice: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echt, Martin P; Rosen, Jordan

    2004-01-01

    Capital Cardiology Associates (CCA) is a single-specialty cardiology practice with offices in New York and Massachusetts. In 2003, CCA converted its IT system from a Microsoft-based network to a Linux network employing Linux thin-client technology with overall positive outcomes.

  20. Myocardial scintigraphy. Clinical use and consequence in a non-invasive cardiological department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Elisabeth; Graff, J; Rasmussen, SPL

    2006-01-01

    to analyse the clinical use of MPI in a university hospital without invasive cardiological laboratory. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period 01.01.2002 to 31.12.2003, 259 patients (141 women, 118 men) were referred to MPI from our department of cardiology. RESULTS: Normal MPI was seen in 111 patients (43...

  1. Major achievements in cardiology in the past century : influence on Dutch cardiovascular medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wall, E. E.; de Boer, M-J; Doevendans, P. A.; Wilde, A. A.; Zijlstra, F.

    At the occasion of the 75th anniversary of the Netherlands Society of Cardiology, it is interesting to look back on the major scientific achievements in cardiovascular medicine of the last century, and to pail attention to the impact of these achievements on Dutch Cardiology. It might be a nice

  2. Mental disorders and general well-being in cardiology outpatients--6-year survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birket-Smith, Morten; Hansen, Baiba H; Hanash, Jamal A

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Long-term survival in a sample of cardiology outpatients with and without mental disorders and other psychosocial risk factors. METHODS: In a cardiology outpatient setting, 103 consecutive patients were asked to participate in the study. Of these, 86 were included and screened for mental...

  3. Ceremony for the inaugural issuance of the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The Journal of Geriatric Cardiology ( JGC )started publication in September 2004. To announce the publication of its first issue, a ceremony was held at China Grand Hotel in Beijing on October 18th, 2004during the 15th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology. Many guests were present at the ceremony.

  4. Myocardial scintigraphy. Clinical use and consequence in a non-invasive cardiological department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dümcke, Christine Elisabeth; Graff, J; Rasmussen, SPL

    2006-01-01

    to analyse the clinical use of MPI in a university hospital without invasive cardiological laboratory. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period 01.01.2002 to 31.12.2003, 259 patients (141 women, 118 men) were referred to MPI from our department of cardiology. RESULTS: Normal MPI was seen in 111 patients (43...

  5. Summary of the 5th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伊丽

    2003-01-01

    @@ The 5th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology inSouth China was held from April 3 -7, 2003 inGuangzhou. A seminar-- "The Frontline Problemsand New Viewpoints in Cardiology in Recent Times"was held at the same time.

  6. [Management control of cardiology: the experience of a departmental unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccanelli, A; Spandonaro, F

    2000-01-01

    In most Italian hospitals, sanitary reform is being applied, while at the same time a new organization of the National Health System is being planned. The director of the medical hospital (head doctor) is becoming more and more involved in management and this aspect has modified his professional attributes. Cardiology is a branch of medicine that, through its scientific preparatory work consisting in debates, management courses, ethics, and production of managerial software, is closer to applying the reform without risking improper administrative aspects. This, obviously, comes about after thoroughly reviewing past work methods and the need to have an administrative organization, which allocates efficient use of manpower and materials, helping to eliminate any sources of inefficiency. The logical procedure foresees an actual analysis in terms of sanitary needs and availability of resources, and so attempting to better balance and harmonize both aspects of the problem. Certainly, the acquisition of theoretical norms and practices, which today are present because of the upsurge in training courses for doctors, is not enough to guarantee the achievement of optimal results. Furthermore, we find that theoretical models need to be validated and adapted to real work situations in the public hospital sector. This paper proposes, therefore, to explain the managerial experiences achieved in actual work situations at the Cardiology Department Unit of the San Giovanni Addolorata Hospital in Rome. In particular, it shows that in order to reach its clinical and economical objectives, it is essential to make available correct informative support for strategic and operational decisions. We can observe that there is a continuing lack of computer support systems being integrated into the present organization of most cardiology units. The use of software distributed to cardiology units from the Associazione Nazionale Medici Cardiologi Ospedalieri (ANMCO) has enabled us to partially

  7. Common Variants in 40 Genes Assessed for Diabetes Incidence and Response to Metformin and Lifestyle Intervention in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    OpenAIRE

    Jablonski, Kathleen A.; Jarred B McAteer; Franks, Paul W.; Pollin, Toni I.; Hanson, Robert L.; Fowler, Sarah; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Knowler, William C.; de Bakker, Paul I Wen; Saxena, Richa; Altshuler, David Matthew; Florez, Jose Carlos

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genome-wide association studies have begun to elucidate the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes. We examined whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified through targeted complementary approaches affect diabetes incidence in the at-risk population of the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) and whether they influence a response to preventive interventions. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We selected SNPs identified by prior genome-wide association studies for type 2 di...

  8. 常见先天性心脏病介入治疗中国专家共识一、房间隔缺损介入治疗%Interventional treatment of common congenital heart diseases: the common view of Chinese medical experts. Part one: Interventional treatment of atrial septal defect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中国医师协会心血管内科分会先心病工作委员会

    2011-01-01

    房间隔缺损(ASD)约占先天性心脏病的10%,多见于成人女性.绝大多数ASD能够采用介入治疗的方法得到治愈.超声心动图能够明确诊断,准确测量缺损的位置和大小.本文系统介绍ASD介入治疗的适应证、禁忌证、操作方法、封堵器选择与并发症防治.对合并肺动脉高压,多孔型,房间隔膨出瘤型及边缘不好等特殊情况下ASD的处理均进行详细的论述.%Atrial septal defect (ASD) , a congenital heart disease more commonly recognized in female adults. accounts for 10% of all congenital heart diseases. Echocardiographic study can accurately provide the precise information about the size and location of the defect in detail. Most ASDs can be cured by transcatheter device closure. In this chapter, the indications. contraindications, procedures and device sizing for ASDs of interventional management will be systemically described, meanwhile , the complications caused by device occlusion and their preventions will also be discussecl. The treatment for ASD patients accompanied with pulmonary arterial hypertension, multiple-orif'ice defects, aneurysmatic. defects or defects with poor edge will be involved in this chapter. (J Intervent Radiol. 2011, 20: 3-9)

  9. Early readmission in a high complexity public hospital in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Ricci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the early readmission of patients in a high complexity public hospital in cardiology. Methods: this is a descriptive, documental and retrospective study, carried out in a public hospital. Results: in 2012, 729 of the 9,218 hospitalized patients were readmitted, 47.9% of them were readmitted within 30 days after discharge, 61% were men, with a mean age of 57 years old, with the main medical diagnosis of heart disease (heart failure, treatment of acute coronary syndrome, among others on admission (44.7% and readmission (45.8%. Most were readmitted for the same medical reason that led to their first hospitalization. Conclusion: considering the profile of the population admitted and readmitted to the institution, it is believed that the rate of readmission is mainly due to the profile of the patients, considering the high prevalence of non-communicable chronic diseases, and coronary artery disease considered unapproachable for percutaneous or surgical when hospitalized.

  10. Open source cardiology electronic health record development for DIGICARDIAC implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugarte, Nelson; Medina, Rubén.; Huiracocha, Lourdes; Rojas, Rubén.

    2015-12-01

    This article presents the development of a Cardiology Electronic Health Record (CEHR) system. Software consists of a structured algorithm designed under Health Level-7 (HL7) international standards. Novelty of the system is the integration of high resolution ECG (HRECG) signal acquisition and processing tools, patient information management tools and telecardiology tools. Acquisition tools are for management and control of the DIGICARDIAC electrocardiograph functions. Processing tools allow management of HRECG signal analysis searching for indicative patterns of cardiovascular pathologies. Telecardiology tools incorporation allows system communication with other health care centers decreasing access time to the patient information. CEHR system was completely developed using open source software. Preliminary results of process validation showed the system efficiency.

  11. Categories by Heart: Shortcut Reasoning in a Cardiology Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Jacobsson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the practice of doctors and nurses to invoke the categories of age, sex, class, ethnicity, and/or lifestyle factors when discussing individual patients and patient groups. In what situations are such references explicitly made, and what does this practice accomplish? The material consists of field notes from a cardiology clinic in Sweden, and a theory of descriptive practice guided the analysis. When professionals describe patients, discuss decisions, or explain why a patient is ill, age, sex, class, ethnicity, and/or lifestyle serve as contextualization cues, often including widespread results from epidemiological research about groups of patients at higher or lower risk for cardiac disease. These categories work as shortcut reasoning to nudge interpretations in a certain direction, legitimize decisions, and strengthen arguments. In general, studying the descriptions of patients/clients/students provides an entrance to professional methods of reasoning, including their implicit moral assumptions.

  12. PET and PET/CT in clinical cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Kyoung Sook [Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-02-15

    Cardiac PET emerged as a powerful tool that allowed in vivo quantification of physiologic processes including myocardial perfusion and metabolism, as well as neuronal and receptor function for more than 25 years. Now PET imaging has been playing an important role in the clinical evaluation of patients with known or suspected ischemic heart disease. This important clinical role is expected to grow with the availability of PET/CT scanner that allow a true integration of structure and function. The objective of this review is to provide and update on the current and future role of PET in clinical cardiology with a special eye on the great opportunities now offered by PET/CT.

  13. Exploiting expert systems in cardiology: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, George-Peter K; Sourla, Efrosini; Stamatopoulou, Konstantina-Maria; Syrimpeis, Vasileios; Sioutas, Spyros; Tsakalidis, Athanasios; Tzimas, Giannis

    2015-01-01

    An improved Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) in the field of critical cardiovascular diseases is presented. The system stems from an earlier application based only on a Sugeno-type Fuzzy Expert System (FES) with the addition of an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) computational structure. Thus, inherent characteristics of ANNs, along with the human-like knowledge representation of fuzzy systems are integrated. The ANFIS has been utilized into building five different sub-systems, distinctly covering Coronary Disease, Hypertension, Atrial Fibrillation, Heart Failure, and Diabetes, hence aiding doctors of medicine (MDs), guide trainees, and encourage medical experts in their diagnoses centering a wide range of Cardiology. The Fuzzy Rules have been trimmed down and the ANNs have been optimized in order to focus into each particular disease and produce results ready-to-be applied to real-world patients.

  14. On New Spain and Mexican medicinal botany in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli-Serra, Alfredo Alessandro; Izaguirre-Ávila, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    Towards the middle of the XVI century, the empirical physician Martín de la Cruz, in New Spain, compiled a catalogue of the local medicinal herbs and plants, which was translated into Latin by Juan Badiano, professor at the Franciscan college of Tlatelolco. On his side, Dr. Francisco Hernández, the royal physician (protomédico) from 1571 until 1577, performed a systematic study of the flora and fauna in this period. His notes and designs were not published at that time, but two epitomes of Hernández' works appeared, respectively, in 1615 in Mexico and in 1651 in Rome. During the XVIII century, two Spanish scientific expeditions arrived to these lands. They were led, respectively, by the Spanish naturalist Martín Sessé and the Italian seaman, Alessandro Malaspina di Mulazzo, dependent from the Spanish Government. These expeditions collected and carried rich scientific material to Spain. At the end of that century, the Franciscan friar Juan Navarro depicted and described several Mexican medicinal plants in the fifth volume of his botanic work. In the last years of the colonial period, the fundamental works of Humboldt and Bonpland on the geographic distribution of the American plants were published. In the modern age, the first research about the Mexican medicinal botany was performed in the laboratory of the Instituto Médico Nacional [National Medical Institute] under the leadership of Dr. Fernando Altamirano, who started pharmacological studies in this country. Later, trials of cardiovascular pharmacology were performed in the small laboratories of the cardiological unit at the General Hospital of Mexico City, on Dr. Ignacio Chávez' initiative. The Mexican botanical-pharmacological tradition persists alive and vigorous at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología and other scientific institutions of the country.

  15. Understanding surgery choices for breast cancer: how might the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Common Sense Model contribute to decision support interventions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sivell, S.; Edwards, A.; Elwyn, G.; Manstead, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the evidence about factors influencing breast cancer patients' surgery choices and the implications for designing decision support in reference to an extended Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB) and the Common Sense Model of Illness Representations (CSM). BACKGROUND: A wide rang

  16. CARDIOLOGY CLINICAL TRIAL PARTICIPATION IN COMMUNITY-BASED HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS: OBSTACLES AND OPPORTUNITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somkin, Carol P.; Altschuler, Andrea; Ackerson, Lynn; Tolsma, Dennis; Rolnick, Sharon J.; Yood, Robert; Weaver, W. Douglas; Von Worley, Ann; Hornbrook, Mark; Magid, David J.; Go, Alan S.

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective of our study was to examine cardiologists’ and organizational leaders’ interest in clinical trial participation and perceived barriers and facilitators to participation within ten diverse non-profit healthcare delivery systems. Trials play a pivotal role in advancing knowledge about the safety and efficacy of cardiovascular interventions and tests. Although cardiovascular trials successfully enroll patients, recruitment challenges persist. Community-based health systems could be an important source of participants and investigators, but little is known about community cardiologists’ experiences with trials. Methods We interviewed 25 cardiology and administrative leaders and mailed questionnaires to all 280 cardiologists at 10 U.S. healthcare organizations. Results The survey received a 73% response rate. While 60% of respondents had not participated in any trials in the past year, nearly 75% wanted greater participation. Cardiologists reported positive attitudes toward trial participation; more than half agreed that trials were their first choice of therapy for patients, if available. Almost all leaders described their organizations as valuing research but not necessarily trials. Major barriers to participation were lack of physician time and insufficient skilled research nurses. Conclusions Cardiologists have considerable interest in trial participation. Major obstacles to increased participation are lack of time and effective infrastructure to support trials. These results suggest that community-based health systems are a rich source for cardiovascular research but additional funding and infrastructure are needed to leverage this resource. PMID:18397842

  17. Embedding patient simulation in a pediatric cardiology rotation: a unique opportunity for improving resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaun; Follansbee, Christopher; Nwankwo, Ugonna; Hofkosh, Dena; Sherman, Frederick S; Hamilton, Melinda F

    2015-01-01

    High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS) has been used in medical education to bridge gaps in medical knowledge and clinical skills. Few studies have analyzed the impact of HFPS in subspecialty rotations for pediatric residents. We hypothesized that pediatric residents exposed to HFPS with a structured content curriculum would perform better on a case quiz than residents without exposure to HFPS. Prospective randomized controlled Tertiary-care free standing children's hospital During a cardiology rotation, senior pediatric residents completed an online pediatric cardiology curriculum and a cardiology quiz. After randomization into two groups, the study group participated in a fully debriefed HFPS session. The control group had no HFPS. Both groups completed a case quiz. Confidence surveys pre- and postsimulation were completed. From October 2010 through March 2013, 55 residents who rotated through the pediatric cardiology rotation were used in the final analysis (30 control, 25 in the study group). There was no significant difference between groups on the initial cardiology quiz. The study group scored higher on the case quiz compared with the control group (P = .024). Based on pre- and postsimulation questionnaires, residents' confidence in approaching a pediatric cardiology patient improved from an average Likert score of 5.1 to 7.5 (on scale of 0-10) (P cardiology rotation was feasible and well received. Our study suggests that simulation promotes increased confidence and may modestly improve clinical reasoning compared to traditional educational techniques. Targeted simulation sessions may readily be incorporated into pediatric subspecialty rotations. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. [The Health Department of Sicily "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event" decree].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrignani, Maurizio Giuseppe; De Luca, Giovanni; Gabriele, Michele; Tourkmani, Nidal

    2014-06-01

    Mortality and rehospitalizations still remain high after discharge for an acute cardiologic event. In this context, hospital discharge represents a potential pitfall for heart disease patients. In the setting of care transitions, the discharge letter is the main instrument of communication between hospital and primary care. Communication, besides, is an integral part of high-quality, patient-centered interventions aimed at improving the discharge process. Inadequate information at discharge significantly affects the quality of treatment compliance and the adoption of lifestyle modifications for an effective secondary prevention. The Health Department of Sicily, in 2013, established a task force with the aim to elaborate "Regional recommendations for hospital discharge and communication with patients after admission due to a cardiologic event", inviting to participate GICR-IACPR and many other scientific societies of cardiology and primary care, as discharge letter and communication are fundamental junctions of care transitions in cardiology. These recommendations have been published as a specific decree and contain: a structured model of discharge letter, which includes all of the parameters characterizing patients at high clinical risk, high thrombotic risk and low risk according to the Consensus document ANMCO/GICR-IACPR/GISE; is thus possible to identify these patients, choosing consequently the most appropriate follow-up pathways. A particular attention has been given to the "Medication Reconciliation" and to the identification of therapeutic targets; an educational Kit, with different forms on cardiac diseases, risk factors, drugs and lifestyle; a check-list about information given to the patient and caregivers. The "Recommendations" represent, in conclusion, the practical realization of the fruitful cooperation between scientific societies and political-administrative institutions that has been realized in Sicily in the last years.

  19. Position paper on the importance of psychosocial factors in cardiology: Update 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladwig, Karl-Heinz

    2014-05-01

    with implanted cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs a subjective health technology assessment is warranted. In particular, the likelihood of affective comorbidities and the onset of psychological crises should be carefully considered.Conclusions: The present state of the art paper presents an update of current empirical evidence in psychocardiology. The paper provides evidence-based recommendations for the integration of psychosocial factors into cardiological practice and highlights areas of high priority. The evidence for estimating the efficiency for psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacological interventions has increased substantially since the first release of the policy document but is, however, still weak. There remains an urgent need to establish curricula for physician competence in psychodiagnosis, communication and referral to ensure that current psychocardiac knowledge is translated into the daily routine.

  20. Waist circumference as a vital sign in cardiology 20 years after its initial publication in the American Journal of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Després, Jean-Pierre

    2014-07-15

    In 1994, we reported in The American Journal of Cardiology that a simple anthropometric measurement, waist circumference, was related to the amount of abdominal visceral adipose tissue measured by computed tomography. An elevated waist circumference was also found to be associated with several features of the cardiometabolic risk profile such as glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and an atherogenic dyslipidemic profile that included hypertriglyceridemia and reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Although a linear relation was found between waist circumference and these metabolic alterations, we reported that a waist circumference value of about 100 cm was associated with a high probability of finding diabetogenic and atherogenic abnormalities. The present short report provides a brief update of issues that have been raised regarding the measurement of waist circumference and its clinical use over a period of 20 years since the original publication.

  1. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2016, Chicago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro

    2016-05-25

    The 65(th)Annual Scientific Sessions of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at McCormick Place, Chicago, from April 2-4, 2016. The ACC Scientific Sessions are one of the 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the USA and one of the major scientific meetings of cardiology in the world. It had an attendance of 18,769 and over 2,000 oral and poster abstracts, including 8 late-breaking clinical trials. This report presents the key presentations and the highlights from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2016 in Chicago. (Circ J 2016; 80: 1308-1313).

  2. Bioresorbable scaffolds: A new paradigm in percutaneous coronary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Tenekecioglu (Erhan); V. Farooq (Vasim); C.V. Bourantas (Christos); R.C. Silva (Rafael Cavalcante); Y. Onuma (Yoshinobu); M. Yilmaz (Mustafa); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNumerous advances and innovative therapies have been introduced in interventional cardiology over the recent years, since the first introduction of balloon angioplasty, but bioresorbable scaffold is certainly one of the most exciting and attracting one. Despite the fact that the metallic

  3. "When are you seeing my patient?"--an analysis of the cardiology consultation service in a teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cronin, E

    2010-05-01

    The provision of an efficient consultation service is essential to the efficient functioning of any hospital. Surprisingly little is known about this activity. We present the first reported evaluation of a cardiology consultation service in an attempt to determine the characteristics, efficiency and workload implications of such a service. We performed an audit of the in-patient cardiology consultation service over a four week period. During this period, 125 consultations were seen, of which 85 (68%) were requested by medical specialties. Consultations were seen in a timely fashion, with 76 (61%) being seen on the same day that the request was received. The most common problem was chest pain, (49 patients; 38%) which was felt to be of cardiac origin in only a minority (20; 40%) of cases. Consultations had significant resource implications for our department, with 35 (28%) procedures being performed, 25 (20%) patients\\' care being taken over, and a further 27 (21.6%) new out-patient referrals generated. Our results indicate that the consultation service considered was efficiently delivered but contributed significantly to the department\\'s workload. The most frequent consultation request was for chest pain that was often non-cardiac in nature.

  4. Hepatobiliary Intervention in Children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franchi-Abella, Stéphanie [Le Centre Hospitalier Universitaire du Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Cahill, Anne Marie; Barnacle, Alex M. [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom); Pariente, Danièle [Le Centre Hospitalier Universitaire du Kremlin-Bicêtre (France); Roebuck, Derek J., E-mail: derek.roebuck@gosh.nhs.uk [Great Ormond Street Hospital, Department of Radiology (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-02

    Various vascular and nonvascular hepatobiliary interventional radiology techniques are now commonly performed in children’s hospitals. Although the procedures are broadly similar to interventional practice in adults, there are important differences in indications and technical aspects. This review describes the indications, techniques, and results of liver biopsy, hepatic and portal venous interventions and biliary interventions in children.

  5. A dataset to assess providers׳ knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Steinberg, Lynne; Chan, Winston; Akeroyd, Julia M; Jones, Peter H; Nambi, Vijay; Nasir, Khurram; Petersen, Laura; Ballantyne, Christie M; Virani, Salim S

    2016-06-01

    We previously examined provider׳s understanding of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol management guideline (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2015.11.002)(Virani et al., 2013) [1], and also assessed whether a case-based educational intervention could improve providers׳ knowledge gaps and attitudes towards the guideline (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.044) (Pokharel, et al., 2016) [2]. Here we describe the dataset that we used to examine our objectives.

  6. Costs of processing in the interventionist cardiology field in patients of coronary illness in Seguro Social, Valle del Cauca Section, November 2003-December 2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Rodríguez

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Coronary illness affects a high proportion of affiliated with the Seguro Social (ISS Departamento (=State Valle del Cauca. This paper describes the costs in the specialty of interventionist cardiology of the Health Promoter Enterprise (EPS because of this illness among November 2003-December 2004. The costs are larger than the budget of the ISS for this illness. This unbalance inside security social system contemporary in Colombia, that is a contributive regime, affects to the ISS because a high number of affiliated are adults of 45 years. The compensated population of the ISS Valle del Cauca is 423,440 people of which 43% is older 45 years, segment of age that concentrates the risk of coronary illness. Metodology: It is a descriptive study. It analyses the distribution of compensated population by age and sex; besides the payment of ISS Valle del Cauca to the Health Institutions (IPS in the interventionist cardiology specialty. The information was taken of the register made by the IPS to the Social Secure Institute and crossed with the Individual Registers of Procedures in Health (RIPS to identify the patients with coronary illness and to rate them in accordance with the International Illness Codes (CIE 10 likewise the book about activities, Processing and Interventions of the Obligatory Health Program (MAPIPOS. Universe: 1,349 processing. The population was 1,103 affiliated patients with the  Seguro Social with coronary illness diagnoses. Analysis and results: The compensated population of ISS represents 9.3% of Valle del Cauca population (4’532,378 inhabitants in the Departamento and 423,400 compensated. Of them 43% are 45 years old or more and are in risk for suffering coronary illness and need medical intervention. The ISS Valle del Cauca paid out to IPS with interventionist cardiology services the total of $5’320,786.046 more of five thousand millions pesos for 1,349 procedures realized to 1103 patients of coronary

  7. A dataset to assess providers׳ knowledge and attitudes towards the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Cholesterol Management Guideline

    OpenAIRE

    Yashashwi Pokharel; Lynne Steinberg; Winston Chan; Akeroyd, Julia M; Jones, Peter H.; Vijay Nambi; Khurram Nasir; Laura Petersen; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Virani, Salim S.

    2016-01-01

    We previously examined provider׳s understanding of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cholesterol management guideline (DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jacl.2015.11.002)(Virani et al., 2013) [1], and also assessed whether a case-based educational intervention could improve providers׳ knowledge gaps and attitudes towards the guideline (DOI: 10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.12.044) (Pokharel, et al., 2016) [2]. Here we describe the dataset that we used t...

  8. Hypertension management in an outpatient clinic at the Institute of Cardiology of Abidjan (Ivory Coast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramoh, Euloge K; N'goran, Yves N K; Aké-Traboulsi, Evelyne; Anzouan-Kacou, Jean-Baptiste; Konin, Christophe K; Coulibaly, Iklo; Traoré, Fatoumata; Agbechi, Yao M; Guikahue, Maurice K

    2011-11-01

    Elevated blood pressure is one of the most important modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. To evaluate blood pressure management in Côte d'Ivoire. A retrospective study was conducted among 2575 hypertensive patients from the Institute of Cardiology of Abidjan, who were followed for at least 10 years, between January 2000 and December 2009. The patients' mean age ± standard deviation was 59.1 ± 12.5 years; 54.3% were women. At first presentation, hypertension was stage 1 in 21.7%, stage 2 in 32.3% and stage 3 in 46.0% of patients. According to the European guidelines' stratification of the cardiovascular risk-excess attributable to high blood pressure, 46.7% had a very high added risk, 37.8% had a high added risk and 14.9% had a low-to-moderate added risk. Pharmacological therapy was prescribed in 97.8% of patients; more than 66% were receiving at least two antihypertensive drugs, including fixed-dose combination drugs. The most common agents used were diuretics (59.7%) followed by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (59.6%). The most common agents for monotherapy were calcium antagonists. When two or more drugs were used, diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers were most commonly used. Blood pressure control was achieved in 43.7% of cases. In our series, severe hypertension with high added risk or very high added risk was very common. Treatment--mostly diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers--required at least two antihypertensive drugs to meet the recommended blood pressure target. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [The GIPSY-RECPAM model: a versatile approach for integrated evaluation in cardiologic care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carinci, F

    2009-01-01

    Tree-structured methodology applied for the GISSI-PSICOLOGIA project, although performed in the framework of earliest GISSI studies, represents a powerful tool to analyze different aspects of cardiologic care. The GISSI-PSICOLOGIA project has delivered a novel methodology based on the joint application of psychometric tools and sophisticated statistical techniques. Its prospective use could allow building effective epidemiological models relevant to the prognosis of the cardiologic patient. The various features of the RECPAM method allow a versatile use in the framework of modern e-health projects. The study used the Cognitive Behavioral Assessment H Form (CBA-H) psychometrics scales. The potential for its future application in the framework of Italian cardiology is relevant and particularly indicated to assist planning of systems for integrated care and routine evaluation of the cardiologic patient.

  10. NEWS FROM THE ANNUAL CONGRESS OF EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY (BARCELONA 2014: REALIZED AND UNREALIZED EXPECTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available News from Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (Barcelona, 2014 is highlighted. Results of recent controlled clinical trials, new clinical recommendations and registers data that were presented at the Congress are discussed.

  11. NEWS FROM THE ANNUAL CONGRESS OF EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY (BARCELONA 2014: REALIZED AND UNREALIZED EXPECTATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available News from Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (Barcelona, 2014 is highlighted. Results of recent controlled clinical trials, new clinical recommendations and registers data that were presented at the Congress are discussed.

  12. Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Common warts By Mayo Clinic Staff Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny ...

  13. Assessing the need for nuclear cardiology and other advanced cardiac imaging modalities in the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitola, João V; Shaw, Leslee J; Allam, Adel H; Orellana, Pilar; Peix, Amalia; Ellmann, Annare; Allman, Kevin C; Lee, B N; Siritara, Chanika; Keng, Felix Y J; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Kiess, Marla C; Giubbini, Raffaele; Bouyoucef, Salaheddine E; He, Zuo-Xiang; Thomas, Gregory S; Mut, Fernando; Dondi, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, 80% of cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths occurred in low- to middle-income countries (i.e., developing nations). Cardiovascular imaging, such as myocardial perfusion SPECT, is one method that may be applied to detect and foster improved detection of at-risk patients. This document will review the availability and utilization for nuclear cardiology procedures worldwide and propose strategies to devise regional centers of excellence to achieve quality imaging around the world. As a means to establish the current state of nuclear cardiology, International Atomic Energy Agency member and non-member states were queried as to annual utilization of nuclear cardiology procedures. Other sources for imaging statistics included data from medical societies (American Society of Nuclear Cardiology, European Society of Cardiology, and the European Association of Nuclear Medicine) and nuclear cardiology working groups within several nations. Utilization was calculated by dividing annual procedural volume by 2007 population statistics (/100,000) and categorized as high (>1,000/100,000), moderate-high (250-999/100,000), moderate (100-249/100,000), low-moderate (50-99/100,000) and low (Algeria and Egypt); perhaps the result of accessible high-quality training programs. Worldwide utilization patterns for nuclear cardiology vary substantially and may be influenced by physician access to training and education programs. Development of regional training centers of excellence can guide utilization of nuclear cardiology through the application of guideline- and appropriateness-driven testing, training, continuing education, and quality assurance programs aiding developing nations to confront the epidemics of CVD.

  14. OntoDiagram: Automatic Diagram Generation for Congenital Heart Defects in Pediatric Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Vishwanath, Kartik; Viswanath, Venkatesh; Drake, William; Lee, Yugyung

    2005-01-01

    In pediatric cardiology as well as many other medical specialties, the accurate portrayal of a large volume of patient information is crucial to providing good patient care. Our research aims at utilizing clinical and spatial ontologies representing the human heart, to automatically generate a Mullins-like diagram [6] based on a patient's information in the cardiology databases. Our ontology allows an intuitive way of modeling congenital defects with the structure of the hum...

  15. Impact of post myocardial infarction depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemanta Dutta

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Depressive symptoms are very usual in patients experiencing a history of myocardial infarction (MI. An individual who has developed depression after an episode of MI becomes non compliant with the treatment of cardiology. Aim: To test the impact of post MI depression on drug adherence of cardiological medicines. Settings and design: The study was conducted on patients of acute MI (n=50 attending cardiology outpatient department (OPD of Assam Medical College and Hospital, Dibrugarh at eight weeks after the index event. Methods: Screening was performed by the Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders (PRIME-MD and diagnoses of major depressive disorder were established according to the text revision of the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR criteria. The eight-item Morisky Medication Adherence Questionnaire was applied to the patients to assess drug adherence after eight weeks from the MI episode. Results: Statistically significant strong association and correlation were found between post MI depression and drug adherence of cardiological medicines (Wald 9.84, Odd’s ratio 2.054, p=0.002, rho=0.714. Conclusion: The result of analysis has revealed that post MI depression has an unfavourable impact on drug adherence, ultimately contributing to increased risk of cardiological morbidity and death rate. Therefore, routine screening of depressive symptoms should be mandatory in cardiology.

  16. CardioSmart365: Artificial Intelligence in the Service of Cardiologic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efrosini Sourla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial intelligence has significantly contributed in the evolution of medical informatics and biomedicine, providing a variety of tools available to be exploited, from rule-based expert systems and fuzzy logic to neural networks and genetic algorithms. Moreover, familiarizing people with smartphones and the constantly growing use of medical-related mobile applications enables complete and systematic monitoring of a series of chronic diseases both by health professionals and patients. In this work, we propose an integrated system for monitoring and early notification for patients suffering from heart diseases. CardioSmart365 consists of web applications, smartphone native applications, decision support systems, and web services that allow interaction and communication among end users: cardiologists, patients, and general doctors. The key features of the proposed solution are (a recording and management of patients' measurements of vital signs performed at home on regular basis (blood pressure, blood glucose, oxygen saturation, weight, and height, (b management of patients' EMRs, (c cardiologic patient modules for the most common heart diseases, (d decision support systems based on fuzzy logic, (e integrated message management module for optimal communication between end users and instant notifications, and (f interconnection to Microsoft HealthVault platform. CardioSmart365 contributes to the effort for optimal patient monitoring at home and early response in cases of emergency.

  17. Three- and four-dimensional visualization of magnetic resonance imaging data sets in pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, G W

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of medical imaging technology in pediatric cardiology is to provide clear representations of the underlying anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system--representations that are easily understood and that facilitate clinical decision making. However, standard projective and tomographic imaging methods often yield results that are intelligible only to imaging specialists. Three- and four-dimensional reconstructions from projective and tomographic data sets are an alternative form of image display. Often, these reconstructions are more readily comprehensible as representations of the reality apparent in the operating room or the pathology laboratory than are the original data sets. Furthermore, viewing of these reconstructions is much more time efficient than viewing hundreds of separate tomographic images. Magnetic resonance imaging inherently provides three-, four-, and even higher dimensional data, and magnetic resonance data sets are commonly used to generate volumetric reconstructions. This review will focus on the practical application of magnetic resonance imaging to yield three- and four-dimensional reconstructions of pediatric cardiovascular disorders.

  18. Tracing and cataloguing knowledge in an e-health cardiology environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gortzis, L G; Nikiforidis, G

    2008-04-01

    In an e-health cardiology environment, the current knowledge engineering systems can support two knowledge processes; the knowledge tracing, and the knowledge cataloguing. We have developed an n-tier system capable of supporting these processes by enabling human collaboration in each phase along with, a prototype scalable knowledge engineering tactic. A knowledge graph is used as a dynamic information structure. Biosignal data (values of HR, QRS, and ST variables) from 86 patients were used; two general practitioners defined and updated the patients' clinical management protocols; and feedback was inserted retrospectively. Several calibration tests were also performed. The system succeeded in formulating three knowledge catalogues per patient, namely, the "patient in life", the "patient in time", and the "patient in action". For each patient the clinically accepted normal limits of each variable were predicted with an accuracy of approximately 95%. The patients' risk-levels were identified accurately, and in turn, the errors were reduced. The data and the expert-oriented feedback were also time-stamped correctly and synchronized under a common time-framework. Knowledge processes optimization necessitates human collaboration and scalable knowledge engineering tactics. Experts should be responsible for resenting or rejecting a process if it downgrades the provided healthcare quality.

  19. The potential role of MRI in veterinary clinical cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Stephen H; McConnell, Fraser J; Holden, Arun V; Sivananthan, Mohan U; Dukes-McEwan, Joanna

    2010-02-01

    Over the last decade, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become established as a useful referral diagnostic method in veterinary medicine that is widely used in small animal brain and spinal diseases, aural, nasal and orbital disorders, planning soft tissue surgery, oncology and small animal and equine orthopaedics. The use of MRI in these disciplines has grown due to its unparalleled capability to image soft tissue structures. This has been exploited in human cardiology where, despite the inherent difficulties in imaging a moving, contractile structure, cardiac MRI (CMRI) has become the optimal technique for the morphological assessment and quantification of ventricular function. Both CMRI hardware and software systems have developed rapidly in the last 10 years but although several preliminary veterinary CMRI studies have been reported, the technique's growth has been limited and is currently used primarily in clinical research. A review of published studies is presented with a description of CMRI technology and the potential of CMRI is discussed along with some of the reasons for its limited usage.

  20. [Cardiology was born with the modern medical science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Modern medical science was born in the post-Renaissance age and began to consolidate towards the middle of the XVII century thanks to physicists, physiologists and biologists, most of whom were direct or indirect pupils of Galileo. The discovery of blood circulation by Harvey is now considered the only progress in physiology at the beginning of the XVII century, comparable to the current advances seen in physical sciences. The history of this exploit could be written from view point of the progressive advance in knowledge. In his experiments, Harvey referred to the authentic not imaginary experiments, and put forward irrefutable quantitative arguments. We can therefore claim that his discovery of blood circulation was the first proper explanation of an organic process and the starting point leading to experimental physiology. So it seems justified to assert that modern medical science did not all rise suddenly, but was gradually structured starting from the middle of the XVII century following the path traced by William Harvey in light of Galileo's thought. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. Milestones in pediatric cardiology: making possible the impossible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormile, Raffaella; Quadrini, Ilaria; Squarcia, Umberto

    2013-02-01

    Pediatric Cardiology as a discipline has been proposed to have been born on August 26, 1938, when Robert Gross at the age of 33 years, successfully ligated a patent ductus arteriosus of a 7 years girl at the Children's Hospital in Boston. In November 1944, Helen Taussig convinced Alfred Blalock to anastomose the left subclavian artery to the left pulmonary artery after Robert Gross had declined to cooperate with her. About the 1950s, at the University of Minneapolis, Clarence Walton Lillehei worked on a controlled "crossed circulation" in which the cardiopulmonary bypass machine was another human, generally one of the patient's parents. In 1966 Williams Rashkind introduced ballon septostomy as a palliative approach to complete transposition of the Great Arteries, followed later by Jean Kan's balloon valvuloplasty to open the pulmonary valve. During the 1960s Giancarlo Rastelli developed a new classification of the Atrio Ventricular Canal defect which allowed to have a strikingly better surgical results. Today, even the hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), at one time a fatal condition, is operable. The completion of the Human Genome Project has been an enormous help in the understanding the genetic causes of cardiac anomalies. However, there are very few approved application for stem cells, and stem cells will not likely replace organ transplantation any time soon. Recently, the protein survivin has been described as a novel player in cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. The science needs to be made with love to warrant the humanity of Research.

  2. Update in cardiology: vascular risk and cardiac rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve, Enrique; Alegría, Eduardo; Cordero, Alberto; Fácila, Lorenzo; Fernández de Bobadilla, Jaime; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Mazón, Pilar; de Pablo Zarzosa, Carmen; González-Juanatey, José Ramón

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular disease develops in a slow and subclinical manner over decades, only to manifest suddenly and unexpectedly. The role of prevention is crucial, both before and after clinical appearance, and there is ample evidence of the effectiveness and usefulness of the early detection of at-risk individuals and lifestyle modifications or pharmacological approaches. However, these approaches require time, perseverance, and continuous development. The present article reviews the developments in 2013 in epidemiological aspects related to prevention, includes relevant contributions in areas such as diet, weight control methods (obesity is now considered a disease), and physical activity recommendations (with warnings about the risk of strenuous exercise), deals with habit-related psychosocial factors such as smoking, provides an update on emerging issues such as genetics, addresses the links between cardiovascular disease and other pathologies such as kidney disease, summarizes the contributions of new, updated guidelines (3 of which have recently been released on topics of considerable clinical importance: hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease), analyzes the pharmacological advances (largely mediocre except for promising lipid-related results), and finishes by outlining developments in the oft-neglected field of cardiac rehabilitation. This article provides a briefing on controversial issues, presents interesting and somewhat surprising developments, updates established knowledge with undoubted application in clinical practice, and sheds light on potential future contributions. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Sample size considerations for clinical research studies in nuclear cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuzan, Cody; West, Erin A; Duong, Jimmy; Cheung, Ken Y K; Einstein, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Sample size calculation is an important element of research design that investigators need to consider in the planning stage of the study. Funding agencies and research review panels request a power analysis, for example, to determine the minimum number of subjects needed for an experiment to be informative. Calculating the right sample size is crucial to gaining accurate information and ensures that research resources are used efficiently and ethically. The simple question "How many subjects do I need?" does not always have a simple answer. Before calculating the sample size requirements, a researcher must address several aspects, such as purpose of the research (descriptive or comparative), type of samples (one or more groups), and data being collected (continuous or categorical). In this article, we describe some of the most frequent methods for calculating the sample size with examples from nuclear cardiology research, including for t tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA), non-parametric tests, correlation, Chi-squared tests, and survival analysis. For the ease of implementation, several examples are also illustrated via user-friendly free statistical software.

  4. Motivation and frustration in cardiology trial participation: the patient perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silmara Meneguin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The participation of humans in clinical cardiology trials remains essential, but little is known regarding participant perceptions of such studies. We examined the factors that motivated participation in such studies, as well as those that led to participant frustration. METHODS: Patients who had participated in hypertension and coronary arterial disease (phases II, III, and IV clinical trials were invited to answer a questionnaire. They were divided into two groups: Group I, which included participants in placebo-controlled clinical trials after randomization, and Group II, which included participants in clinical trials in which the tested treatment was compared to another drug after randomization and in which a placebo was used in the washout period. RESULTS: Eighty patients (47 patients in Group I and 33 patients in Group II with different socio-demographic characteristics were interviewed. Approximately 60% of the patients were motivated to participate in the trial with the expectation of personal benefit. Nine participants (11.2% expressed the desire to withdraw, which was due to their perception of risk during the testing in the clinical trial (Group I and to the necessity of repeated returns to the institution (Group II. However, the patients did not withdraw due to fear of termination of hospital treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Although this study had a small patient sample, the possibility of receiving a benefit from the new tested treatment was consistently reported as a motivation to participate in the trials.

  5. [About the origin, evolution and irradiation of Mexican cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Micheli, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The Mexican cardioangiology started in the nineteen century thanks to first endeavors of surgeons and physicians related to local academies and to School of Medicine, established in 1833 by Dr. Valentin Gómez Farías. Dr. Manuel Carpio, the future first head of department of physiology in this school, translated to Spanish language and published, in 1823, the article On pectoriloquo of the French physician Marat and later performed some experiments on the heart' motion. During the Secont Empire (1864-1867), the physician Samuel von Basch performed studies to define the arterial hypertension, called by him "latent atherosclerosis", i.e. the "essential hypertension". Once he had returned to his country, he invented in 1880, a sphygmomanometer of mercury column, that was the model for the instrument constructed by the Italian physician Scipione Riva-Rocci and presented in 1896. In our time, Dr. Demetrio Sodi Pallares systematized a metabolic therapy called "polarizing therapy", i.e. capable of repolarizing the heart's cells partly depolarized due to hypoxia or direct aggressions. These were the first steps in Mexico on the way to a promising medicine starting and the great adventure of Mexican cardiology.

  6. Management of hypertension in the elderly patient at abidjan cardiology institute (ivory coast).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramoh, K E; Aké-Traboulsi, E; Konin, C; N'goran, Y; Coulibaly, I; Adoubi, A; Koffi, J; Anzouan-Kacou, J B; Guikahue, M

    2012-01-01

    Background. Since the treatment of hypertension is beneficial for the elderly, we have undertaken this study that aims to evaluate the management of hypertension in elderly patient in Côte d'Ivoire. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted among 854 hypertensive elderly patients of Abidjan Cardiology Institute who were followed for a minimum of one year, between January 2000 and December 2009. Results. The patients mean age was 73.1 ± 5.3 years, and 59% were women. At the first presentation, it was mostly systolic-diastolic hypertension (51.8%) and isolated systolic hypertension (38.5%). Mean blood pressure was 169.4 ± 28.4 mmHg for systolic, 95.3 ± 15.7 mmHg for diastolic, and 74.1 ± 22.8 mmHg for pulse pressure. Pulse pressure was ≥60 mmHg in 80.4%. According to the European Guidelines stratification of the cardiovascular risk-excess attributable to high blood pressure, 82.1% of the sample had a very high added risk. The pharmacological therapy was prescribed in 93.5%. More than 66% of patients were receiving ≥2 antihypertensive drugs including fixed-dose combination drugs. The most common agents used were diuretics (63.5%) followed by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in 61.3%. The most common agents used for monotherapy were calcium antagonists. When ≥2 drugs were used, diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers were the most common. Blood pressure control was achieved in 42.6%. Conclusion. The control of elderly hypertension can be effective in Sub-Saharan Africa. He required at least two antihypertensive drugs to meet the recommended blood pressure target.

  7. Management of Hypertension in the Elderly Patient at Abidjan Cardiology Institute (Ivory Coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Kramoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Since the treatment of hypertension is beneficial for the elderly, we have undertaken this study that aims to evaluate the management of hypertension in elderly patient in Côte d'Ivoire. Methods. A retrospective study was conducted among 854 hypertensive elderly patients of Abidjan Cardiology Institute who were followed for a minimum of one year, between January 2000 and December 2009. Results. The patients mean age was 73.1±5.3 years, and 59% were women. At the first presentation, it was mostly systolic-diastolic hypertension (51.8% and isolated systolic hypertension (38.5%. Mean blood pressure was 169.4±28.4 mmHg for systolic, 95.3±15.7 mmHg for diastolic, and 74.1±22.8 mmHg for pulse pressure. Pulse pressure was ≥60 mmHg in 80.4%. According to the European Guidelines stratification of the cardiovascular risk-excess attributable to high blood pressure, 82.1% of the sample had a very high added risk. The pharmacological therapy was prescribed in 93.5%. More than 66% of patients were receiving ≥2 antihypertensive drugs including fixed-dose combination drugs. The most common agents used were diuretics (63.5% followed by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers in 61.3%. The most common agents used for monotherapy were calcium antagonists. When ≥2 drugs were used, diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers were the most common. Blood pressure control was achieved in 42.6%. Conclusion. The control of elderly hypertension can be effective in Sub-Saharan Africa. He required at least two antihypertensive drugs to meet the recommended blood pressure target.

  8. Problem-solving therapy for depression and common mental disorders in Zimbabwe: piloting a task-shifting primary mental health care intervention in a population with a high prevalence of people living with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cowan Frances

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is limited evidence that interventions for depression and other common mental disorders (CMD can be integrated sustainably into primary health care in Africa. We aimed to pilot a low-cost multi-component 'Friendship Bench Intervention' for CMD, locally adapted from problem-solving therapy and delivered by trained and supervised female lay workers to learn if was feasible and possibly effective as well as how best to implement it on a larger scale. Method We trained lay workers for 8 days in screening and monitoring CMD and in delivering the intervention. Ten lay workers screened consecutive adult attenders who either were referred or self-referred to the Friendship Bench between July and December 2007. Those scoring above the validated cut-point of the Shona Symptom Questionnaire (SSQ for CMD were potentially eligible. Exclusions were suicide risk or very severe depression. All others were offered 6 sessions of problem-solving therapy (PST enhanced with a component of activity scheduling. Weekly nurse-led group supervision and monthly supervision from a mental health specialist were provided. Data on SSQ scores at 6 weeks after entering the study were collected by an independent research nurse. Lay workers completed a brief evaluation on their experiences of delivering the intervention. Results Of 395 potentially eligible, 33 (8% were excluded due to high risk. Of the 362 left, 2% (7 declined and 10% (35 were lost to follow-up leaving an 88% response rate (n = 320. Over half (n = 166, 52% had presented with an HIV-related problem. Mean SSQ score fell from 11.3 (sd 1.4 before treatment to 6.5 (sd 2.4 after 3-6 sessions. The drop in SSQ scores was proportional to the number of sessions attended. Nine of the ten lay workers rated themselves as very able to deliver the PST intervention. Conclusion We have found preliminary evidence of a clinically meaningful improvement in CMD associated with locally adapted problem

  9. Analysis of common complications associated with interventional therapy of congenital heart disease%先天性心脏病介入治疗的常见并发症分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文泉; 王咏梅; 李贵双

    2011-01-01

    多年来外科手术一直是先天性心脏病(先心病)治疗的金标准.随着介入器材及技术的不断发展,先心病的介入治疗被广泛接受并成为很多患者的首选治疗方法.虽然大多情况下介入治疗能顺利完成,但并发症时有发生,介入手术仍存在相当大的风险.先心病介入治疗常见并发症有心脏、大血管穿孔、心包压塞、心律失常、封堵器脱落、瓣膜关闭不全、残余分流与溶血、血管并发症和拔管综合征等.该文分析了介入治疗常见并发症的发生原因、诊断、处理和预防.%Surgery has been considered to be the gold standard for the treatment of congenital heart disease.With the development of interventional equipment and technology, interventional therapy for congenital heart disease has been widely accepted and recognized as the preferred treatment option for a wide number of congenital cardiac conditions.Although most interventional therapy procedures are accomplished, complications, such as cardiac perforation, large vessels perforation, pericardial tamponade, arrhythmia, occluder off, valvular inadequacy, residual shunt with hemolysis and extubation syndrome, may occur.This review summarized the causes, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of common complications associated with interventional therapy of congenital heart disease.

  10. Radiation doses to adult patients in interventional procedure: the first data for the Biobio region; Dosis de radiacion a pacientes adultos en procedimientos de intervencionismo: los primeiros datos para la region del Biobio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, C.A.; Nocetti, D.A., E-mail: carlos.ubeda.uta@gmail.com [Universidade de Tarapaca (Chile). Centro de Estudos en Ciencias Radiologicas (CECRad). Dept. de Tecnologic Medica. Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud (FACSAL); Robles, I.L., E-mail: isabel.robles.p@gmail.com [Hospital Clinico Guilhermo Grant Benavente, Concepcion (Chile). Servico de Imagenologia

    2013-11-01

    The main objective of this study was to estimate the levels of radiation to the patient in interventional cardiology procedures and neurological (diagnostic and therapeutic) in the main public hospital in Chile, in the region of Biobio.

  11. Antithrombotic therapy in anticoagulated patients with atrial fibrillation presenting with acute coronary syndromes and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention/stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin J. Wrigley

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of antithrombotic therapy in atrial fibrillation patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary inter vention/stenting cannot be done according to a regimented common protocol, and stroke and bleeding risk stratification schema should be employed to individualize treatment options. A delicate balance is needed between the prevention of thromboembolism, against recurrent cardiac ischemia or stent thrombosis, and bleeding risk. New guidance from a consensus document of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, endorsed by the European Heart Rhythm Association and the European Association ofPercutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions on the management of Antithrombotic Therapy in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Presenting with Acute Coronary Syndrome and/or Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention/Stenting has sought to clarify some of the major issues and problems surrounding this practice, and will allow clinicians to make much more informed decisions when faced with treating such patients.

  12. In-hospital mortality and treatment patterns in acute myocardial infarction patients admitted during national cardiology meeting dates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Seiko; Kunisawa, Susumu; Sasaki, Noriko; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Imanaka, Yuichi

    2016-10-01

    Many hospitals experience a reduction in the number of available physicians on days when national scientific meetings are conducted. This study investigates the relationship between in-hospital mortality in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients and admission during national cardiology meeting dates. Using an administrative database, we analyzed patients with AMI admitted to acute care hospitals in Japan from 2011 to 2013. There were 3 major national cardiology meetings held each year. A hierarchical logistic regression model was used to compare in-hospital mortality and treatment patterns between patients admitted on meeting dates and those admitted on identical days during the week before and after the meeting dates. We identified 6,332 eligible patients, with 1,985 patients admitted during 26 meeting days and 4,347 patients admitted during 52 non-meeting days. No significant differences between meeting and non-meeting dates were observed for in-hospital mortality (7.4% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p=0.151, unadjusted odds ratio: 0.861, 95% confidence interval: 0.704-1.054) and the proportion of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) performed on the day of admission (75.9% vs. 76.2%, respectively; p=0.824). We also found that some low-staffed hospitals did not treat AMI patients during meeting dates. Little or no "national meeting effect" was observed on in-hospital mortality in AMI patients, and PCI rates were similar for both meeting and non-meeting dates. Our findings also indicated that during meeting dates, AMI patients may have been consolidated to high-performance and sufficiently staffed hospitals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary Fat Intake Modifies the Effect of a Common Variant in the LIPC Gene on Changes in Serum Lipid Concentrations during a Long-Term Weight-Loss Intervention Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Ng, San San; Bray, George A; Ryan, Donna H; Sacks, Frank M; Ning, Guang; Qi, Lu

    2015-06-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) plays a pivotal role in the metabolism of HDL and LDL. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified common variants in the HL gene (LIPC) associated with HDL cholesterol. We tested the effect of a common variant in LIPC on changes in blood lipids in response to weight-loss diets in the Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies Trial. We genotyped LIPC rs2070895 in 743 overweight or obese adults aged 30-70 y (61% women) who were assigned to high-fat (40% energy) or low-fat (20% energy) diets for 2 y. We measured serum concentrations of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol at baseline and 2 y of intervention. At 2 y of intervention, dietary fat modified effects of the variant on changes in serum TC, LDL cholesterol, and HDL cholesterol (P-interaction: 0.0008, 0.004, and 0.03, respectively). In the low-fat group, as compared to the G allele, the A allele tended to be related to the decrease in TC and LDL cholesterol concentrations [TC (β ± SE): -5.5 ± 3.0, P = 0.07; LDL cholesterol: -4.8 ± 2.5, P = 0.06] and a lower increase in HDL cholesterol concentrations (β ± SE: -1.37 ± 0.69, P = 0.048), whereas an opposite effect in the high-fat diet group was evident [TC (β ± SE): 7.3 ± 2.7, P = 0.008; LDL cholesterol: 4.1 ± 2.3, P = 0.07], and there was no genetic effect on changes in HDL cholesterol concentrations (P = 0.54). Dietary fat intake modifies the effect of a common variant in LIPC on changes in serum lipids during a long-term weight-loss intervention in overweight or obese adults. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00072995. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  14. [First definition of minimal care model: the role of nurses, physiotherapists, dietitians and psychologists in preventive and rehabilitative cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinardi, Ornella; da Vico, Letizia; Pierobon, Antonia; Iannucci, Manuela; Maffezzoni, Barbara; Borghi, Silvana; Ferrari, Marina; Brazzo, Silvia; Mazza, Antonio; Sommaruga, Marinella; Angelino, Elisabetta; Biffi, Barbara; Agostini, Susanna; Masini, Maria Luisa; Ambrosetti, Marco; Faggiano, Pompilio; Griffo, Raffaele

    2014-09-01

    Rehabilitative and preventive cardiology (CRP) is configured as intervention prevention to "gain health" through a process of multifactorial care that reduces disability and the risk of subsequent cardiovascular events. It makes use of an interdisciplinary team in which every professional needs to have multiple intervention paths because of the different levels of clinical and functional complexity of cardiac patients who currently have access to the rehabilitation. The document refers to the use of interventions by nurses, physiotherapists, dietitians and psychologists that are part of the rehabilitation team of CRP. Interventions of which have been documented, on scientific bases and clinical practice, empirical effectiveness and organizational efficiency. The methodological approach of this paper is a first attempt to define, through the model of consensus, the minimum standards for a CRP evidence based characterized by clearly defined criteria that can be used by operators of CRP. The document describes the activities to be carried out in each of the phases included in the pathways of care by nurses, physiotherapists, dietitians and psychologists. The routes identified were divided, according to the type of patients who have access to the CRP and to the phases of care, including the initial assessment, intervention, evaluation and final reporting, in high medium and low complexity. Examples of models of reporting, used by the operators of the team according to the principles of good clinical practice, are provided. This is made to allow traceability of operations, encourage communication inside the working group and within the patient and the caregiver. Also to give any possible indication for the post-rehabilitation.

  15. Nuclear cardiology practice and associated radiation doses in Europe: results of the IAEA Nuclear Cardiology Protocols Study (INCAPS) for the 27 European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Oliver; Pascual, Thomas N B; Mercuri, Mathew; Acampa, Wanda; Burchert, Wolfgang; Flotats, Albert; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Kitsiou, Anastasia; Knuuti, Juhani; Underwood, S Richard; Vitola, João V; Mahmarian, John J; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Better, Nathan; Rehani, Madan M; Kashyap, Ravi; Dondi, Maurizio; Paez, Diana; Einstein, Andrew J

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear cardiology is widely used to diagnose coronary artery disease and to guide patient management, but data on current practices, radiation dose-related best practices, and radiation doses are scarce. To address these issues, the IAEA conducted a worldwide study of nuclear cardiology practice. We present the European subanalysis. In March 2013, the IAEA invited laboratories across the world to document all SPECT and PET studies performed in one week. The data included age, gender, weight, radiopharmaceuticals, injected activities, camera type, positioning, hardware and software. Radiation effective dose was calculated for each patient. A quality score was defined for each laboratory as the number followed of eight predefined best practices with a bearing on radiation exposure (range of quality score 0 - 8). The participating European countries were assigned to regions (North, East, South, and West). Comparisons were performed between the four European regions and between Europe and the rest-of-the-world (RoW). Data on 2,381 European patients undergoing nuclear cardiology procedures in 102 laboratories in 27 countries were collected. A cardiac SPECT study was performed in 97.9 % of the patients, and a PET study in 2.1 %. The average effective dose of SPECT was 8.0 ± 3.4 mSv (RoW 11.4 ± 4.3 mSv; P cardiology is lower and the average quality score is higher than in the RoW. There is regional variation in effective dose in relation to the best practice quality score. A possible reason for the differences between Europe and the RoW could be the safety culture fostered by actions under the Euratom directives and the implementation of diagnostic reference levels. Stress-only imaging and weight-adjusted activity might be targets for optimization of European nuclear cardiology practice.

  16. The Use of Continuous Electrocardiographic Holter Monitoring in Pediatric Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begic, Zijo; Begic, Edin; Mesihovic-Dinarevic, Senka; Masic, Izet; Pesto, Senad; Halimic, Mirza; Kadic, Almira; Dobraca, Amra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To show the place and role of continuous electrocardiographic twenty-four-hour ECG monitoring in daily clinical practice of pediatric cardiologists. Methods: According to protocol, 2753 patients underwent dynamic continuous ECG Holter monitoring (data collected from the “Register of ECG Holter monitoring” of Pediatric Clinic, UCC Sarajevo in period April 2003- April 2015). Results: There were 50,5% boys and 49,5% girls, aged from birth to 19 years (1,63% - neonates and infants, 2,6% - toddlers, 9,95% - preschool children, 35,5% - gradeschoolers and 50,3% children in puberty and adolescence). In 68,1% of patients Holter was performed for the first time. Indications for conducting Holter were: arrhythmias in 42,2% cases, precordial pain in 23,5%, suspicion of pre-excitation and/or pre-excitation in 10%, crisis of consciousness in 8%, uncorrected congenital/acquired heart defects in 4,2%, operated heart defects in 3,7%, hypertension in 3,1% cases, control of the pacemaker in 1,63% and other causes in 3,5% cases. Discharge diagnosis after ECG Holter monitoring were: insignificant arrhythmias in 47,1% cases, wandering pacemaker in 21,3%, pre-excitation in 16,2%, benign ventricular premature beats in 6,3%, atrioventricular block in 3%, sinus pause in 2.2% cases and other arrhythmias in 3,5%. In mentioned period 57 cases of Wolf Parkinson White syndrome were registered, in 4,5% of patients antiarrhythmic therapy was administered. Radiofrequent ablation was performed in 23 cases. Conclusion: The development of pediatric cardiac surgery has initiated development of pediatric arrhythmology as imperative segment of pediatric cardiology. Continuous ECG Holter monitoring has become irreplaceable method in everyday diagnostics and therapy of arrhythmias in children. PMID:27708487

  17. [New pharmaceuticals in cardiology. Heart failure, anticoagulation, dyslipidemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czepluch, F S; Hasenfuß, G; Jacobshagen, C

    2014-04-01

    Three innovative pharmaceuticals which might play an important role in the field of cardiology in the near future were recently tested in large clinical studies. Serelaxin, a vasoactive hormone peptide that is produced during pregnancy, reduces vessel resistance, increases cardiac output, and improves renal function. Lately, it was demonstrated that serelaxin significantly reduces congestion symptoms in patients with acute heart failure. As a secondary endpoint the mortality at day 180 was reduced. Therefore, serelaxin seems to be a promising new drug for the treatment of acute heart failure which might have a prognostic impact. Edoxaban is a selective factor Xa inhibitor, which inhibits thrombin production and thrombus formation. Two recently published studies reported that edoxaban is at least as effective as the vitamin K antagonist warfarin in prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and in the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism due to nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Compared to warfarin, edoxaban significantly exhibited less frequent severe bleeding complications. Edoxaban will probably soon be the fourth new oral anticoagulant available for patients. The serine protease proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) reduces the ability of the liver to bind low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and to remove it from the circulation. Recently, a monoclonal antibody for PCSK9 was developed which induces a LDL-C plasma level reduction up to 73 % and also decreases lipoprotein(a) and apolipoprotein B. PCSK9 inhibition is a promising new mechanism for LDL-C reduction and the corresponding drug will be presumably approved soon by the regulatory authorities.

  18. The Use of Continuous Electrocardiographic Holter Monitoring in Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begic, Zijo; Begic, Edin; Mesihovic-Dinarevic, Senka; Masic, Izet; Pesto, Senad; Halimic, Mirza; Kadic, Almira; Dobraca, Amra

    2016-07-16

    To show the place and role of continuous electrocardiographic twenty-four-hour ECG monitoring in daily clinical practice of pediatric cardiologists. According to protocol, 2753 patients underwent dynamic continuous ECG Holter monitoring (data collected from the "Register of ECG Holter monitoring" of Pediatric Clinic, UCC Sarajevo in period April 2003- April 2015). There were 50,5% boys and 49,5% girls, aged from birth to 19 years (1,63% - neonates and infants, 2,6% - toddlers, 9,95% - preschool children, 35,5% - gradeschoolers and 50,3% children in puberty and adolescence). In 68,1% of patients Holter was performed for the first time. Indications for conducting Holter were: arrhythmias in 42,2% cases, precordial pain in 23,5%, suspicion of pre-excitation and/or pre-excitation in 10%, crisis of consciousness in 8%, uncorrected congenital/acquired heart defects in 4,2%, operated heart defects in 3,7%, hypertension in 3,1% cases, control of the pacemaker in 1,63% and other causes in 3,5% cases. Discharge diagnosis after ECG Holter monitoring were: insignificant arrhythmias in 47,1% cases, wandering pacemaker in 21,3%, pre-excitation in 16,2%, benign ventricular premature beats in 6,3%, atrioventricular block in 3%, sinus pause in 2.2% cases and other arrhythmias in 3,5%. In mentioned period 57 cases of Wolf Parkinson White syndrome were registered, in 4,5% of patients antiarrhythmic therapy was administered. Radiofrequent ablation was performed in 23 cases. The development of pediatric cardiac surgery has initiated development of pediatric arrhythmology as imperative segment of pediatric cardiology. Continuous ECG Holter monitoring has become irreplaceable method in everyday diagnostics and therapy of arrhythmias in children.

  19. The present role of nuclear cardiology in clinical practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.N.; Beller, G.A. [Virginia University, Charlottesville (United States). Cardiovascular Division Department of Medicine

    2005-03-01

    Many advances have been made in the field of nuclear cardiology in the past decade for enhancing the diagnostic and prognostic value of stress myocardial variability using SPECT technology. Gated SPECT for determining regional and global function have provided incremental diagnostic and prognostic information in the evaluation of patients with suspected or known coronary artery disease. Left ventricular ejection fraction and regional myocardial wall thickening can now be simultaneously evaluated with regional perfusion particularly with the use of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled perfusion agents such as sestamibi and tetrofosmin. Many studies have shown that the extent and severity of stress-induced perfusion defects have incremental prognostic value over exercise electrocardiographic stress test variables alone. Patients with normal perfusions scans have <1% combined cardiac death and myocardial infarction rates per year and thus have an excellent prognosis. Diabetics are particularly benefited from stress perfusion imaging for detection of coronary artery disease and risk assessment. Diabetics have a worse prognostic than non diabetics for the same amount of hypoperfusion on stress SPECT studies. Quantitative rest perfusion imaging with {sup 201}Tl or with one of the {sup 99m}Tc-labeled imaging agents, or PET imaging with {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose can accurately distinguish viable from irreversibility injured myocardium providing useful information for identifying which patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy benefit most from coronary revascularization with a subsequent improvement in left ventricular function and enhanced survival. Finally, serial stress perfusion imaging can be employed to monitor the efficacy of medical therapy that improves endothelial function and myocardial blood flow reserve.

  20. Common Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen Common Terms Below is a list of diabetes-related ... a skin condition characterized by darkened skin patches; common in people whose body is not responding correctly ...

  1. Improving diabetes medication adherence: successful, scalable interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zullig LL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leah L Zullig,1,2 Walid F Gellad,3,4 Jivan Moaddeb,2,5 Matthew J Crowley,1,2 William Shrank,6 Bradi B Granger,7 Christopher B Granger,8 Troy Trygstad,9 Larry Z Liu,10 Hayden B Bosworth1,2,7,11 1Center for Health Services Research in Primary Care, Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 3Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion, Pittsburgh Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 4Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 5Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 6CVS Caremark Corporation; 7School of Nursing, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA; 8Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA; 9North Carolina Community Care Networks, Raleigh, NC, USA; 10Pfizer, Inc., and Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY, USA; 11Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Effective medications are a cornerstone of prevention and disease treatment, yet only about half of patients take their medications as prescribed, resulting in a common and costly public health challenge for the US healthcare system. Since poor medication adherence is a complex problem with many contributing causes, there is no one universal solution. This paper describes interventions that were not only effective in improving medication adherence among patients with diabetes, but were also potentially scalable (ie, easy to implement to a large population. We identify key characteristics that make these interventions effective and scalable. This information is intended to inform healthcare systems seeking proven, low resource, cost-effective solutions to improve medication adherence. Keywords: medication adherence, diabetes mellitus, chronic disease, dissemination research

  2. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In the course of a year, people ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest ...

  3. The role of multislice spiral CT in clinical cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberl, R.; Boehme, E.; Richartz, B.; Czernik, A.; Buck, J.; Steinbigler, P. [Medical Hospital I and Department of Radiology, Klinik Muenchen-Pasing, Munich (Germany)

    2004-05-01

    Multislice spiral CT provides diagnostic-quality images of native coronary arteries and bypasses. Indications include prognosis in asymptomatic individuals, detection of significant coronary stenosis, and follow-up after interventions or surgery.

  4. The effects of preoperative cardiology consultation prior to elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair on patient morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniakowski, Anna E; Davis, Frank M; Phillips, Amanda R; Robinson, Adina B; Coleman, Dawn M; Henke, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Objectives The relationship between preoperative medical consultations and postoperative complications has not been extensively studied. Thus, we investigated the impact of preoperative consultation on postoperative morbidity following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Methods A retrospective review was conducted on 469 patients (mean age 72 years, 20% female) who underwent elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair from June 2007 to July 2014. Data elements included detailed medical history, preoperative cardiology consultation, and postoperative complications. Primary outcomes included 30-day morbidity, consult-specific morbidity, and mortality. A bivariate probit regression model accounting for the endogeneity of binary preoperative medical consult and patient variability was estimated with a maximum likelihood function. Results Eighty patients had preoperative medical consults (85% cardiology); thus, our analysis focuses on the effect of cardiac-related preoperative consults. Hyperlipidemia, increased aneurysm size, and increased revised cardiac risk index increased likelihood of referral to cardiology preoperatively. Surgery type (endovascular versus open repair) was not significant in development of postoperative complications when controlling for revised cardiac risk index ( p = 0.295). After controlling for patient comorbidities, there was no difference in postoperative cardiac-related complications between patients who did and did not undergo cardiology consultation preoperatively ( p = 0.386). Conclusions When controlling for patient disease severity using revised cardiac risk index risk stratification, preoperative cardiology consultation is not associated with postoperative cardiac morbidity.

  5. A review on the Avicenna's contribution to the field of cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarshenas, Mohammad M; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-03-01

    The cardiology and field of cardiovascular approaches are often mentioned as of the earliest concerns throughout the history of mankind civilization. During the golden ages of Islamic era, 9th to 12th centuries A.D., medical knowledge from various fields including cardiology was flourished by prominent Persian physicians and scholars. Among those outstanding physicians and scientists of the Islamic golden era, Avicenna is known as a famous and pioneer character. To outline the cardiovascular knowledge and contribution of Avicenna, current review compiled all his evidence-based concepts of cardiovascular findings from current medical literatures as well as those mentioned in his important medical encyclopedia, the Canon of Medicine. In this review, Avicenna's findings on cardiovascular anatomy such as his description of Willis circle, capillary circulation and arterial and ventricular contractions in the cardiovascular system have been mentioned. Also, his books and manuscripts on cardiology as well as findings and theories on cardiovascular and allied diseases were discussed. These findings are included in his descriptions on cardiac tamponade, stroke, palpitation, atherosclerosis, hypertension, association of the cardiovascular complications with erection and ejaculation, interaction between the heart and emotions as well as some of his mentioned drugs for cardiological disorders and the early concepts of drug targeting. These results can show Avicenna's great contribution to improve the sciences of cardiology in early medieval era.

  6. Capturing a Luxurious Commons through State Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Moscovici

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Seaview Resort is nestled on 270 hectares of New Jersey USA coast. Seaview is adjacent to the Pinelands National Reserve (an almost 500,000 hectare protected area and is a historical landmark for the region. Founded in 1914 by Clarence H. Geist as a retreat for the wealthy, it brought some famous and powerful people to the Pinelands and the NJ Shore during its private ownership. Notables include Bing Crosby, Ben Hogan, Grace Kelly, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and Presidents Eisenhower, Harding, Nixon, and Hoover.

  7. Effects of an Internet physical activity intervention in adults with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosak, Kelly A; Yates, Bernice; Pozehl, Bunny

    2010-02-01

    The Internet is a relatively new method of delivering strategies for health behavior change. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of delivering a physical activity intervention by the Internet to improve outcomes in adults with the metabolic syndrome. Twenty-two participants (16 males; 6 females) were recruited from a cardiology clinic database, age range 32-66 years. Participants were randomly assigned to the Internet intervention (n = 12) or the usual care ( n = 10) group. The mean total dose, in terms of the time the intervention Web site was accessed was 2 hours over 6 weeks, which was greater than the time spent delivering usual care. Overall, participants' evaluations of the Internet intervention were positive. The costs of development and delivery of the Internet intervention were less than that of a consultation and follow-up in the cardiology clinic for this sample. The Internet intervention appears feasible for testing in a larger study.

  8. [National and international impact factor of Revista Española de Cardiología].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre Benavent, Rafael; Valderrama Zurián, Juan C; Castellano Gómez, Miguel; Miguel-Dasit, Alberto; Simó Meléndez, Raquel; Navarro Molina, Carolina

    2004-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the bibliometric indicators for Revista Española de Cardiologíathat were obtained from the "Potential impact factor of Spanish medical journals in 2001" study financed by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion, Cultura y Deporte. Citations to Revista Española de Cardiología, its national and international impact factor, and its immediacy index were calculated with methods similar to those used by the Institute for Scientific Information. National indicators were based only on citations from 87 Spanish journals considered source journals, whereas international indicators were calculated on the basis of citations from both national journals and foreign source journals in the Science Citation Index. Revista Española de Cardiologíaobtained a national impact factor of 0.719 and an international impact factor of 0.837, placing it at the head of the ranking of Spanish medical journals.

  9. Highlights of the 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitsiou, Anastasia; Dorbala, Sharmila; Scholte, Arthur J H A

    2015-09-01

    The 12th International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT was held from 3 to 5 May 2015 in Madrid, Spain. In this article, the three Congress Program Committee Chairs summarize selected highlights of the presented abstracts. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com. This article is being published concurrently in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology (10.1007/s12350-015-0260-y) and European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging (10.1093/ehjci/jev179). The articles are identical except for minor stylistic and spelling differences in keeping with each journal’s style. Either citation can be used when citing this article.

  10. Regional Implementation of a Pediatric Cardiology Syncope Algorithm Using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPS) Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Yvonne; Toro-Salazar, Olga H; Gauthier, Naomi S; Rotondo, Kathleen M; Arnold, Lucy; Hamershock, Rose; Saudek, David E; Fulton, David R; Renaud, Ashley; Alexander, Mark E

    2016-02-19

    Pediatric syncope is common. Cardiac causes are rarely found. We describe and assess a pragmatic approach to these patients first seen by a pediatric cardiologist in the New England region, using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs). Ambulatory patients aged 7 to 21 years initially seen for syncope at participating New England Congenital Cardiology Association practices over a 2.5-year period were evaluated using a SCAMP. Findings were iteratively analyzed and the care pathway was revised. The vast majority (85%) of the 1254 patients had typical syncope. A minority had exercise-related or more problematic symptoms. Guideline-defined testing identified one patient with cardiac syncope. Syncope Severity Scores correlated well between physician and patient perceived symptoms. Orthostatic vital signs were of limited use. Largely incidental findings were seen in 10% of ECGs and 11% of echocardiograms. The 10% returning for follow-up, by design, reported more significant symptoms, but did not have newly recognized cardiac disease. Iterative analysis helped refine the approach. SCAMP methodology confirmed that the vast majority of children referred to the outpatient pediatric cardiology setting had typical low-severity neurally mediated syncope that could be effectively evaluated in a single visit using minimal resources. A simple scoring system can help triage patients into treatment categories. Prespecified criteria permitted the effective diagnosis of the single patient with a clear cardiac etiology. Patients with higher syncope scores still have a very low risk of cardiac disease, but may warrant attention. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  11. 9th Annual William J. Rashkind Memorial Lecture in paediatric cardiology: "the reimbursement tsunami: preserving the passion".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Robert

    2010-12-01

    In the early 1980s cardiology was dominated by "triple threat individuals" - doctors who were the very best clinicians, very best researchers, and very best teachers. This type of individual usually became the director of the division. Now, however, the amount of knowledge and specialisation in each of these three areas of expertise has exploded. It is not certain that triple threat individuals can or do exist today. Instead, we need to be aiming higher, for a "quintuple threat profession". Not only do we need expertise in clinical care, teaching, and research, but also we now require business leadership and alignment. No single person can be expert in all five of these areas. In paediatric cardiology we need to invest in the right people. Our new "quintuple threat profession" needs to match the expertise and passion of the right people with our current and future needs. Going forward, we should focus on leadership, teams, and alignment. We need to identify, develop, and empower leaders at all levels within our profession, including physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators. Ultimately, we need a profession that remains clinically led, but professionally managed. The second step of the formula is the development of successful teams, and teamwork. Successful "team behaviour" is not a part of traditional medical education. The third step is alignment. Alignment can be defined as representing the degree to which physicians and organisations, such as hospitals, acting out of enlightened self-interest, operate inside a common vision, mutual goals, and the acceptance of a shared destiny. Imagine the benefits to our profession and our kids if we can provide a new level of leadership, teamwork, and alignment going forward.

  12. Interventional techniques in medicine and radioprotection; Les techniques interventionnelles en medecine et radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Guen, B.; Bar, O.; Benderitter, M.; Bourguignon, M.; Chevillard, S.; Gauron, Ch.; Lallemand, J.; Lombard, J.; Maccia, C.; Sapoval, M.; Bernier, M.O.; Pirard, Ph.; Jacob, S.; Donadille, L.; Aubert, B.; Clairand, I.; Mozziconacci, J.G.; Brot, A.M.; Jarrige, V.; Huet, Ch.; Marchal, C.; Martin, M.; Bar, O.; Degrange, J.P.; Livarek, B.; Menechal, Ph.; Sapoval, M.; Pellerin, O.

    2009-07-01

    This document gathers the slides of the available presentations given during this conference day. Nineteen presentations are assembled in the document and deal with: 1 - Interventional radiology: why is it developing? (M. Sapoval); 2 - exposure particularities in interventional radiology (O. Bar); 3 - doses received by organs in interventional cardiology (C. Maccia); 4 - Patients exposure: description of cumulated exposure of patients treated in interventional cardiology (M.O. Bernier); 5 - 2004 inquiry to dermatologists about post-interventional radiology radio-dermatitis (P. Pirard); 6 - exposure and risks to operators (S. Jacob); 7 - dosimetric evaluation techniques and results about interventional imaging operators' extremities (L. Donadille and F. Merat); 8 - bibliographic study of doses received by operators with non-protected organs (B. Aubert); 9 - ORAMED European project: optimization of operational dosimeter uses in interventional radiology (I. Clairand); 10 - reference levels and dosimetric evaluation of patients (C. Maccia); 11 - optimization in coronary angioplasty (J.G. Mozziconacci, A.M. Brot and V. Jarrige); 12 - dosimetry in medical over-exposure situation (C. Huet); 13 - significant radioprotection events in interventional radiology declared to the Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) - status and experience feedback (C. Marchal); 14 - interventional radiology and unwanted effects (M. Benderitter); 15 - global analyses and new exposure indicators in human epidermis cells (M. Martin); 16 - radioprotection regulations and training (O. Bar); 17 - zoning and workplace analysis in interventional cardiology (J.P. Degrange); 18 - guide of good clinical practices: example of interventional cardiology (B. Livarek); 19 - how to encourage the radioprotection optimization in interventional radiology: the ASN's point of view (P. Menechal). (J.S.)

  13. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology: (I) algebra, functions and graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-02-01

    This is the first in a series of four articles developed for the readers of. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease, abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to cardiovascular medicine and

  14. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology: (II). Calculus and differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-04-01

    This is the second in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  15. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology IV: statistics and model fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-06-01

    This is the fourth in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas. This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  16. The conceptual basis of mathematics in cardiology III: linear systems theory and integral transforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Jason H T; Sobel, Burton E

    2003-05-01

    This is the third in a series of four articles developed for the readers of Coronary Artery Disease. Without language ideas cannot be articulated. What may not be so immediately obvious is that they cannot be formulated either. One of the essential languages of cardiology is mathematics. Unfortunately, medical education does not emphasize, and in fact, often neglects empowering physicians to think mathematically. Reference to statistics, conditional probability, multicompartmental modeling, algebra, calculus and transforms is common but often without provision of genuine conceptual understanding. At the University of Vermont College of Medicine, Professor Bates developed a course designed to address these deficiencies. The course covered mathematical principles pertinent to clinical cardiovascular and pulmonary medicine and research. It focused on fundamental concepts to facilitate formulation and grasp of ideas.This series of four articles was developed to make the material available for a wider audience. The articles will be published sequentially in Coronary Artery Disease. Beginning with fundamental axioms and basic algebraic manipulations they address algebra, function and graph theory, real and complex numbers, calculus and differential equations, mathematical modeling, linear system theory and integral transforms and statistical theory. The principles and concepts they address provide the foundation needed for in-depth study of any of these topics. Perhaps of even more importance, they should empower cardiologists and cardiovascular researchers to utilize the language of mathematics in assessing the phenomena of immediate pertinence to diagnosis, pathophysiology and therapeutics. The presentations are interposed with queries (by Coronary Artery Disease abbreviated as CAD) simulating the nature of interactions that occurred during the course itself. Each article concludes with one or more examples illustrating application of the concepts covered to

  17. Student Commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  18. Cardiology in the young : where we have been. Where we are. Where we are going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey P

    2014-12-01

    Cardiology in the Young is devoted to cardiovascular issues affecting the young, and older patients with congenital heart disease, or with other cardiac diseases acquired during childhood. The journal serves the interests of all professionals concerned with these topics. By design, the journal is international and multidisciplinary in its approach, and members of the editorial board take an active role in its mission, helping to make it an indispensable reference for paediatric and congenital cardiac care. All aspects of paediatric and congenital cardiac care are covered within the journal. The content includes original articles, brief reports, editorials, reviews, and papers devoted to continuing professional development. High-quality colour figures are published on a regular basis, and without charge to the authors. Regular supplements are published containing the abstracts of the annual meetings of the Association for European Paediatric and Congenital Cardiology, along with other occasional supplements. These supplements are supplied free to subscribers. The vision of Cardiology in the Young is to use print and electronic media to improve paediatric and congenital cardiac care. The mission of Cardiology in the Young is to be a premier global journal for paediatric and congenital cardiac care - an essential journal that spans the domains of patient care, research, education, and advocacy, and also spans geographical, temporal, and subspeciality boundaries. Cardiology in the Young was officially launched in December, 1990. The late Lucio Parenzan was Editor-in-Chief from 1990 through Volume 4, Number 1, January 1994. Professor Robert Anderson and Giancarlo Crupi then shared the Editor-in-Chief position until the end of 1995. Then, from 1995 through 2007, Professor Robert Anderson served as the sole Editor-in-Chief of Cardiology in the Young . Edward Baker, MD, FRCP, FRCPCH, served as Editor-in-Chief of Cardiology in the Young from 2007 to 2013. In January, 2014

  19. Report of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) Scientific Sessions 2015, San Diego.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murohara, Toyoaki

    2015-01-01

    The 64th Annual Scientific Sessions and Exposition of the American College of Cardiology (ACC) were held at the San Diego Convention Center from March 14-16, 2015. The ACC Scientific Sessions are 1 of 2 major scientific cardiology meetings in the United States, with nearly 20,000 attendees, including 15,000 cardiovascular professionals. There were over 2,100 oral and poster abstracts, and more than 15 late-breaking clinical trials (LBCTs) abstructs. This report presents the highlights and several key presentations, especially the LBCTs, from the ACC Scientific Sessions 2015. I hope this review will help cardiologists update to the latest information.

  20. Computational cardiology and risk stratification for sudden cardiac death: one of the grand challenges for cardiology in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Matthew D.; Abi‐Gerges, Najah; Couderc, Jean‐Philippe; Fermini, Bernard; Hancox, Jules C.; Knollmann, Bjorn C.; Mirams, Gary R.; Skinner, Jon; Zareba, Wojciech; Vandenberg, Jamie I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Risk stratification in the context of sudden cardiac death has been acknowledged as one of the major challenges facing cardiology for the past four decades. In recent years, the advent of high performance computing has facilitated organ‐level simulation of the heart, meaning we can now examine the causes, mechanisms and impact of cardiac dysfunction in silico. As a result, computational cardiology, largely driven by the Physiome project, now stands at the threshold of clinical utility in regards to risk stratification and treatment of patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. In this white paper, we outline a roadmap of what needs to be done to make this translational step, using the relatively well‐developed case of acquired or drug‐induced long QT syndrome as an exemplar case. PMID:27060987

  1. [The clinical management guidelines of the Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Nuclear cardiology: the technical bases and clinical applications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candell Riera, J; Castell Conesa, J; Jurado López, J A; López de Sá, E; Nuño de la Rosa, J A; Ortigosa Aso, F J; Valle Tudela, V

    1999-11-01

    Although the role of nuclear cardiology is currently well consolidated, the addition of new radiotracers and modern techniques prompt us to permanently update the requirements, equipment and clinical applications of these isotopic tests. Radioisotopic drugs, instrumentation and characteristics of radionuclide tests that are presently used are explained in the first part of this text. In the second part, diagnostic and prognostic indications of these tests are presented in detail.

  2. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  3. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  4. QCI Common

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    There are many common software patterns and utilities for the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute that can and should be shared across projects. Otherwise we find duplication of code which adds unwanted complexity. This is a software product seeks to alleviate this by providing common utilities such as object factories, graph data structures, parameter input mechanisms, etc., for other software products within the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute. This work enables pure basic research, has no export controlled utilities, and has no real commercial value.

  5. Aspirin and clopidogrel: a sweeping combination in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolis, Antonis S; Tzeis, Stylianos; Andrikopoulos, George; Koulouris, Spyros; Melita, Helen

    2005-07-01

    important large-scale clinical trials currently ongoing. Newer data are being accumulated from studies where indications for the use of clopidogrel and aspirin continue to expand into other patient groups, rendering this dual antiplatelet drug therapy a sweeping combination in Cardiology. However, important issues remain to be further and more thoroughly explored about the benefit of this antiplatelet drug combination in these other patient groups, such as in patients with heart failure, where preliminary data indicate a favorable effect on thrombotic vascular events, in patients with atrial fibrillation, where there is hope that this combination may replace or be an alternative treatment modality to coumadin in certain subpopulations, in patients undergoing demanding catheter ablation procedures, where data point to a protective effect from thromboembolic events. Another pertaining issue to be further investigated is the occurrence of drug-resistance observed in some patients for both these antithrombotic agents. This article is a comprehensive review of all these data and the landmark trials on the two antiplatelet agents, the issues involved and the current recommendations for their use in patients with atherosclerotic heart disease and other cardiovascular disorders and procedures.

  6. Instituting Commoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . STEALTH.unlimited

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the origins of the notion of management, this paper explores how commons governance is constituted by the earlier influential research of Elinor Ostrom, and pursues this with reference to scholars such as Saki Bailey, who emphasises that the choice of regulatory frame is ultimately a political one. We then argue that commons have to be ‘instituted’ in an open manner in order to remain accessible. This demands a set of scripts, rules or agreements that keep the process of commoning in place, and, simultaneously, keep commoning in a constant process of reproduction. We examine this tension and look at the shift in understanding about what ‘institutions of the commons’ have entailed in practice over the course of the last century and a half. Finally, we return to the political dimension to touch upon the question of whether, with the disappearance of the welfare state, a coherent concept of society can emerge from the current upsurge of commons initiatives.

  7. Increasing face validity of a vascular interventional training system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winder, John; Zheng, Huiru; Hughes, Simon; Kelly, Barry; Wilson, Carol; Gallagher, Anthony

    2004-01-01

    Many aspects of medical training take place on real patients in a live environment thus incurring risk. Apart from the obvious risks to patients there is the issue of X-ray exposure to both staff and trainees. Image quality used during interventional procedures is low to ensure minimum X-ray radiation dose. A virtual interventional system may be used to simulate the interventional cardiology training environment therefore reducing overall risk. The purpose of this project was to determine the appropriate image quality settings on a virtual training system to accurately simulate interventional cardiology and increase the face validity of the overall system. Real image data was obtained from patients undergoing diagnostic interventional cardiology examinations in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast. The images were obtained during catheter placement and contrast enhancement around the region of the heart. The diagnostic views were left anterior oblique, right anterior oblique, left lateral, caudal and the spider view. These five views were simulated on a virtual interventional training system (VIST, Mentice Medical Simulation AB, Sweden) by adjusting x-ray tube and table position at 20 different image quality settings. Signal to noise ratio and image contrast were measured for each of these views using soft tissue and vertebra. The results from the real image data and the VIST image data were compared. Calibration curves were compiled to determine the appropriate VIST image quality setting for each procedure. Average SNR ranged from 2.94 to 74.0 and IC ranged from 0.009 to 0.61 on the real image data. This indicates the very wide range of image quality encountered in interventional cardiology. Calibration curves for each view with the corresponding range of real patient image quality were produced. These calibration curves enabled the appropriate VIST image quality setting to be determined and therefore simulate the real examination image quality as closely as

  8. Inpatient Department of Cardiology and Nursing Psychological Research Analysis%心内科住院患者心理问题分析与护理对策研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文静; 杨静; 金雁; 宋淑平; 郭晓霞; 李明波

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Department of Cardiology understand the psychological problems of hospitalized patients to identify Department of Cardiology common psychological problems of hospitalized patients and the psychological cause of the problem of improving the psychological problems of hospitalized patients Department of Cardiology effective care measures. Methods: Our hospital in January 2011 -2011 Department of Cardiology in April to 802 hospitalized patients and in-depth survey conducted interviews with a combination of investigation. Results:Target of 802 patients with data analysis, Department of Cardiology common psychological problems of patients were: anxiety and depression, paranoia, fear, tension, despair and sorrow; psychological barrier because the patient's own illness, economic status, environment and so on. Conclusion: Asked the Department of Cardiology the more serious mental hospital patients, nursing care through the introduction of targeted measures, effective treatment of psychological problems in patients with heart medicine to reduce the psychological stress of patients, and promote the health of patients and protect patient safety.%目的:了解心内科住院患者的心理问题,找出心内科住院患者常见的心理问题以及产生心理问题的原因,探讨改善心内科住院患者心理问题的有效护理措施.方法:对我院2011年1月-2011年4月心内科802例住院患者采取问卷调查及深入访谈相结合的方式进行调查.结果:对802例目标患者进行数据分析,心内科患者常见的心理问题为:焦虑与抑郁、多疑、恐惧紧张、绝望与悲哀;产生心理障碍的原因在于患者自身疾病、经济状况、环境等.结论:心内科住院患者心理问较为严重,通过实行有针对性的护理措施,有效治疗心内科患者的心理问题,减轻患者心理压力,促进患者的健康,保护患者安全.

  9. Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidbuchel, H.; Papadakis, M.; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N.M.; Carre, F.; Dugmore, D.; Mellwig, K.P.; Rasmusen, H.K.; Solberg, E.E.; Borjesson, M.; Corrado, D.; Pelliccia, A.; Sharma, S.

    2013-01-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum

  10. European Society of Cardiology Heart Failure Association Standards for delivering heart failure care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McDonagh, Theresa A.; Blue, Lynda; Clark, Andrew L.; Dahlstroem, Ulf; Ekman, Inger; Lainscak, Mitja; McDonald, Kenneth; Ryder, Mary; Stroemberg, Anna; Jaarsma, Tiny

    2011-01-01

    The management of heart failure (HF) is complex. As a consequence, most cardiology society guidelines now state that HF care should be delivered in a multiprofessional manner. The evidence base for this approach now means that the establishment of HF management programmes is a priority. This documen

  11. Clinical and scientific progress related to the interface between cardiology and psychology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdman, R A M; Pedersen, Susanne S.

    2011-01-01

    In November 1975, as the first in the Netherlands, a full-time psychologist was employed at the Department of Cardiology of the Thoraxcenter of the Erasmus Medical Center. This innovative decision was consistent with a view to treat the patient as a whole rather than the heart as a single body part...

  12. 2013 update on congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, heart failure, and heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subirana, M Teresa; Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; Oliver, José M; Ripoll, Tomás; Lambert, Jose Luis; Zunzunegui, José L; Bover, Ramon; García-Pinilla, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    This article presents the most relevant developments in 2013 in 3 key areas of cardiology: congenital heart disease, clinical cardiology, and heart failure and transplant. Within the area of congenital heart disease, we reviewed contributions related to sudden death in adult congenital heart disease, the importance of specific echocardiographic parameters in assessing the systemic right ventricle, problems in patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot and indication for pulmonary valve replacement, and confirmation of the role of specific factors in the selection of candidates for Fontan surgery. The most recent publications in clinical cardiology include a study by a European working group on correct diagnostic work-up in cardiomyopathies, studies on the cost-effectiveness of percutaneous aortic valve implantation, a consensus document on the management of type B aortic dissection, and guidelines on aortic valve and ascending aortic disease. The most noteworthy developments in heart failure and transplantation include new American guidelines on heart failure, therapeutic advances in acute heart failure (serelaxin), the management of comorbidities such as iron deficiency, risk assessment using new biomarkers, and advances in ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Position paper: proposal for a core curriculum for a European Sports Cardiology qualification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidbuchel, H.; Papadakis, M.; Panhuyzen-Goedkoop, N.M.; Carre, F.; Dugmore, D.; Mellwig, K.P.; Rasmusen, H.K.; Solberg, E.E.; Borjesson, M.; Corrado, D.; Pelliccia, A.; Sharma, S.

    2013-01-01

    Sports cardiology is a new and rapidly evolving subspecialty. It aims to elucidate the cardiovascular effects of regular exercise and delineate its benefits and risks, so that safe guidance can be provided to all individuals engaging in sports and/or physical activity in order to attain the maximum

  14. Test of a Cardiology Patient Simulator with Students in Fourth-Year Electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewy, Gordon A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Students at five medical schools participated in an evaluation of a cardiology patient simulator (CPS), a life-size mannequin capable of simulating a wide variety of cardiovascular conditions. The CPS enhances learning both the knowledge and the skills necessary to perform a bedside cardiovascular evaluation. (Author/MLW)

  15. Evaluation of a hand carried cardiac ultrasound device in an outpatient cardiology clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Vourvouri (Eleni); D. Poldermans (Don); G.E. Parharidis; J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos); J.W. Deckers (Jaap)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE: To determine the diagnostic potential of a hand carried cardiac ultrasound (HCU) device (OptiGo, Philips Medical Systems) in a cardiology outpatient clinic and to compare the HCU diagnosis with the clinical diagnosis and diagnosis with a full featured standar

  16. [Analysis of the safety culture in a Cardiology Unit managed by processes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raso-Raso, Rafael; Uris-Selles, Joaquín; Nolasco-Bonmatí, Andreu; Grau-Jornet, Guillermo; Revert-Gandia, Rosa; Jiménez-Carreño, Rebeca; Sánchez-Soriano, Ruth M; Chamorro-Fernández, Carlos I; Marco-Francés, Elvira; Albero-Martínez, José V

    2017-04-03

    The safety culture is one of the requirements to prevent the occurrence of adverse effects, however has not been studied in the field of cardiology. The objective is to evaluate the safety culture in a cardiology unit has implemented and certified an integrated quality and risk management for patient safety system. A transversal observational study was made in 2 consecutive years using the survey "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" of the "Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality" in its Spanish version (42 items grouped into 12 dimensions) in all staff. The percentage of positive responses in each dimension in 2014 and 2015 were compared, as well as national data and United States data, following the established rules. The overall assessment of a possible 5, was 4.5 in 2014 and 4.7 in 2015. We identified seven dimensions as a fortress. The worst rated were: staffing, management support and teamwork between units. The comparison showed superiority in all dimensions respect to national data, and 8 respect to American data. The safety culture in a Cardiology Unit with an integrated quality and risk management and patient safety system is high, higher than the national in all its dimensions and in most of them respect to the United States. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Key issues in setting up and running a nurse-led cardiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchett, Richard

    This article discusses the key issues involved in setting up and running an effective nurse-led cardiology clinic. These include: developing clear aims and objectives for the service, techniques to reduce resistance from colleagues who are affected by the change in service provision, professional development, audit and evaluation.

  18. Test of a Cardiology Patient Simulator with Students in Fourth-Year Electives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewy, Gordon A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Students at five medical schools participated in an evaluation of a cardiology patient simulator (CPS), a life-size mannequin capable of simulating a wide variety of cardiovascular conditions. The CPS enhances learning both the knowledge and the skills necessary to perform a bedside cardiovascular evaluation. (Author/MLW)

  19. State of the Art of Imaging Equipment and Tools for Nuclear Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Il [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear cardiology in Korea is less active, compared to nuclear oncology, but it has been specialized and ramified. Lately, sophisticated nuclear cardiac imaging methods provide more convenience for patients. It is necessary to accurately estimate the recent progress in the imaging devices for nuclear cardiology. Myocardial perfusion imaging is a well established study to evaluate heart function. Myocardial perfusion SPECT and PET have been used for assessment of coronary artery disease with various radiopharmaceuticals. And of late, the development of advanced imaging devices - multi-pinhole technique and high definition imaging technique - and software made the scanning time shorter and expanded the application field. Therefore, it is required to review the nuclear cardiology hardware/software for the clinical practice and research. In this review, the characteristics about recently-developed SPECT/PET and software for nuclear cardiology are described. It is hoped that this information would contribute to improving the activity of nuclear cardiac research in Korea where the research for the fusion imaging combining CT and nuclear imaging is drawing more attention.

  20. Cardiological evaluation of patients with a cerebral ischemic event: the relation between heart and brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A.M. Pop (Gheorghe)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractIn this study several aspects of the cardiological evaluation of patients with cerebral ischemia are described; its usefulness for diagnosis and treatment is discussed. The aim of this thesis is to approach the clinical and epidemiological aspects of patients with cerebral ischemic event

  1. Appreciative inquiry enhances cardiology nurses’ clinical decision making when using a clinical guideline on delirium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsegaard, Helle; Schrader, Anne-Marie; Rom, Gitte

    2016-01-01

    and axial coding drawing on the principles of grounded theory. The study shows that appreciative inquiry was meaningful to cardiology nurses in providing them with knowledge of using a guideline on delirium in clinical decision making, the main reasons being a) data on a current patient were included, b...

  2. Lifestyle referral assessment in an acute cardiology setting: study protocol for a randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kate M; Walwyn, Rebecca E A; Camidge, Diana C; Meads, David M; Murray, Jenni Y; Reynolds, Greg; Farrin, Amanda J; House, Allan O

    2013-07-11

    Lifestyle and behaviour change are important factors in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and reduction of premature mortality. Public health initiatives have focused on opportunities for healthcare staff to deliver lifestyle advice routinely in primary and secondary care but there is no consistent approach to onward referrals and the rate of uptake of advice remains low. We do not know if advice is more effective in supporting behaviour change when a systematic approach is taken that includes identification of barriers to change, directing patients toward services, referral to services, and feedback on outcome. This is a single-centre, randomized, unblinded feasibility trial in an acute hospital setting which aims to assess the feasibility of a definitive trial and provide proof of concept for the systematic delivery of individualized lifestyle advice in patients managed through an acute cardiology in-patient service.Patients will be recruited before discharge and randomized to two groups. A control group will receive the usual lifestyle assessment and referral, while an intervention group will receive the usual assessment plus the new individualized lifestyle assessment and referral. The new assessment will inform assignment of each patient to one of three categories based on personal barriers to change. Patients may be referred to a formal lifestyle-change programme, through the 'Leeds Let's Change' website, or they may be guided in self-management, using goal setting, or they may be assigned to a 'deferment' category, for reassessment at follow-up. These latter patients will be given a contact card for the 'Leeds Let's Change' service. Lifestyle change is an important mechanism for improving health and wellbeing across the population but there are widely acknowledged difficulties in addressing lifestyle factors with patients and supporting behaviour change. A systematic approach to assessment would facilitate audit and provide an indicator of the quality

  3. The World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery: "The Olympics of our profession".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugo-Hamman, Christopher; Jacobs, Jeffery Phillip

    2012-12-01

    The first World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in London, United Kingdom, in 1980, organised by Dr. Jane Somerville and Prof. Fergus Macartney. The idea was that of Jane Somerville, who worked with enormous energy and enthusiasm to bring together paediatric cardiologists and surgeons from around the world. The 2nd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology took place in New York in 1985, organised by Bill Rashkind, Mary Ellen Engle, and Eugene Doyle. The 3rd World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology was held in Bangkok, Thailand, in 1989, organised by Chompol Vongraprateep. Although cardiac surgeons were heavily involved in these early meetings, a separate World Congress of Paediatric Cardiac Surgery was held in Bergamo, Italy, in 1988, organised by Lucio Parenzan. Thereafter, it was recognised that surgeons and cardiologists working on the same problems and driven by a desire to help children should really rather meet together. A momentous decision was taken to initiate a Joint World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery. A steering committee was established with membership comprising the main organisers of the four separate previous Congresses, and additional members were recruited in an effort to achieve numerical equality of cardiologists and surgeons and a broad geographical representation. The historic 1st "World Congress of Paediatric Cardiology and Cardiac Surgery" took place in Paris in June, 1993, organised by Jean Kachaner. The next was to be held in Japan, but the catastrophic Kobe earthquake in 1995 forced relocation to Hawaii in 1997. Then followed Toronto, Canada (2001, organised by Bill Williams and Lee Benson), Buenos Aires, Argentina (2005, organised by Horatio Capelli and Guillermo Kreutzer), and most recently Cairns, Australia (2009, organised by Jim Wilkinson). Having visited Europe (1993), Asia-Pacific (1997), North America (2001), South America (2005), and Australia (2009), and reflecting the "African Renaissance", the

  4. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  5. Science commons

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    SCP: Creative Commons licensing for open access publishing, Open Access Law journal-author agreements for converting journals to open access, and the Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine for retaining rights to self-archive in meaningful formats and locations for future re-use. More than 250 science and technology journals already publish under Creative Commons licensing while 35 law journals utilize the Open Access Law agreements. The Addendum Engine is a new tool created in partnership with SPARC and U.S. universities. View John Wilbanks's biography

  6. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  7. Prognostic value of serum total bilirubin in patients with acute coronary syndrome after percutaneous coronary intervention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙同文

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the predictive value of serum total bilirubin (STB) level in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) .Methods A total of 1273 consecutive patients treated with PCI in cardiology department,First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University from June

  8. What do the recent American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Foundation Clinical Practice Guidelines tell us about the evolving management of coronary heart disease in older adults?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Forman; Nanette K Wenger

    2013-01-01

    Biological aging predisposes older adults to increased cardiovascular disease (CHD) and greater disease complexity. Given the high age-related prevalence of CHD and age-related compounding factors, the recently updated American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology Foundation CHD-related guidelines increased their focus on older patients. These guidelines are predominately evidence-based (using data from quality randomized clinical trials) and are organized to delineate medications and procedures that best treat particular cardiovascular diseases. While such rationale and thought work well in young and middle aged adults, they become problematic in patients who are very old. Data pertaining to adults aged ≥ 80 are virtually absent from most randomized clinical trials, and even in the instances when very old patients were included, eligibility criteria typically excluded candidates with co-morbidities and complexities of customary CHD patients. While medications and interventions yielding benefit in clinical trials should theoretically produce the greatest benefits for patients with high intrinsic risk, age-related cardiovascular complexities also increase iatrogenic risks. Navigating between the potential for high benefit and high risk in "evidence-based" cardiovascular management remains a key Geriatric Cardiology challenge. In this review we consider the expanded Geriatric Cardiology content of current guidelines, acknowledging both the progress that has been made, as well as the work that still needs to be accomplished to truly address the patient-centered priorities of older CHD patients.

  9. [Possibilities of minimal invasive cardiac catheter interventions in the dog].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaus, T M; Unterer, S; Tomsa, K; Baumgartner, C; Geissbühler, U; Gardelle, O; Reusch, C

    2003-09-01

    The therapeutic possibilities in veterinary cardiology have developed rapidly in the past few years. Whereas until recently cardiac intervention in dogs could only be performed by thoracotomy, new minimally invasive techniques are adopted. Procedures like balloondilatation of pulmonic stenosis, coil embolisation of patent ductus arteriosus, pacemaker implantation in symptomatic bradyarrhyhtmia, and palliative balloon pericardiotomy are becoming more and more established. These alternative interventional methods are attractive, because no postsurgical pain and no complications potentially associated with thoracotomy ensue. The knowledge of such new treatment modalities and particularly the indications for an intervention are prerequisites to apply them optimally and broadly.

  10. Subsequent full publication of abstracts presented in the annual meetings of the Spanish Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Vidal-Infer, Antonio; Anguita-Sánchez, Manuel; Chorro-Gascó, Francisco J; Bolaños-Pizarro, Máxima; Castelló-Cogollos, Lourdes; Navarro-Molina, Carolina; Valderrama-Zurián, Juan C

    2014-01-01

    The Spanish Society of Cardiology holds an annual national meeting with a large number of presentations but the number of full-text publications resulting from these presentations and the journals accepting these manuscripts is unknown. This study aimed to identify the full-text publication rate of accepted abstracts and to analyze the bibliometric features of subsequent publications. We randomly selected a sample of 300 oral presentations at the meetings of the Spanish Society of Cardiology in 2002, 2005 and 2008. Subsequent publications were identified through the Science Citation Index-Expanded, Scopus, Índice Médico Español, and Índice Bibliográfico Español en Ciencias de la Salud. Of 300 abstracts, 115 resulted in 147 full publications, representing a publication rate of 38.33%. The meeting with the highest publication rate (43%) was held in 2005. The subject category with the highest number of publications was Pediatric Cardiology/Congenital Heart Disease (58.8%). Time to full publication was usually 2 years (30.61%). Articles were published in 57 journals. The journals publishing the highest number of articles were Revista Española de Cardiología (n=55; 37.41%) and the European Heart Journal (n=8; 5.44%). The high percentage of articles published in the upper half of journals listed in Journal Citation Reports under the category of cardiac and cardiovascular system (83%) can be taken as an objective quality indicator of the results presented at these meetings. However, more than 60% of the abstracts did not result in full publications, thus depriving the scientific community of potentially interesting results. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison between Cystatin C- and Creatinine-Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Cardiology Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerblom, Axel; Helmersson-Karlqvist, Johanna; Flodin, Mats; Larsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimation of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is essential for identification, evaluation and risk prediction in patients with kidney disease. Estimated GFR (eGFR) is also needed for the correct dosing of drugs eliminated by the kidneys and to identify high-risk individuals in whom coronary angiography or other procedures may lead to kidney failure. Both cystatin C and creatinine are used for the determination of GFR, and we aimed to investigate if eGFR by the two methods differ in cardiology patients. Methods We compared cystatin C and creatinine (CKD-EPI) eGFR calculated from the same request from a cardiology outpatient unit (n = 2,716), a cardiology ward (n = 980), a coronary care unit (n = 1,464), and an advanced coronary care unit (n = 518) in an observational, cross-sectional study. Results The median creatinine eGFR results are approximately 10 ml/min/1.73 m2 higher than the median cystatin C eGFR that is up to 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, irrespective of the level of care. Creatinine eGFR resulted in a less advanced eGFR category in the majority of patients with a cystatin C eGFR <60 ml/min/1.73 m2. Conclusions Our study demonstrates a difference between creatinine and cystatin C eGFR in cardiology patients. It is important to be aware of which marker is used for the reported eGFR to minimize erroneous interpretations of the test results, as this could lead to under- or overmedication. Further studies are needed to determine the best method of estimating the GFR in cardiology units. PMID:26648945

  12. The 2017 International Joint Working Group recommendations of the Indian College of Cardiology, the Academic College of Emergency Experts, and INDUSEM on the management of low-risk chest pain in emergency departments across India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Vivek; Shah, Pavitra Kotini; Galwankar, Sagar; Sammon, Maura; Hosad, Prabhakar; Beeresha; Erickson, Timothy B; Gaieski, David F; Grover, Joydeep; Hegde, Anupama V; Hoek, Terry Vanden; Jarwani, Bhavesh; Kataria, Himanshu; LaBresh, Kenneth A; Manjunath, Cholenahally Nanjappa; Nagamani, A C; Patel, Anjali; Patel, Ketan; Ramesh, D; Rangaraj, R; Shamanur, Narendra; Sridhar, L; Srinivasa, K H; Tyagi, Shweta

    2017-01-01

    There have been no published recommendations for the management of low-risk chest pain in emergency departments (EDs) across India. This is despite the fact that chest pain continues to be one of the most common presenting complaints in EDs. Risk stratification of patients utilizing an accelerated diagnostic protocol has been shown to decrease hospitalizations by approximately 40% with a low 30-day risk of major adverse cardiac events. The experts group of academic leaders from the Indian College of Cardiology and Academic College of Emergency Experts in India partnered with academic experts in emergency medicine and cardiology from leading institutions in the UK and USA collaborated to study the scientific evidence and make recommendations to guide emergency physicians working in EDs across India.

  13. [Diagnostics and therapy of chronic stable coronary artery disease : new guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiadis, A; Sechtem, U

    2014-12-01

    The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines on the management of stable coronary artery disease published in 2013 give practical recommendations for diagnostics and therapy. The approach depends on the clinical picture and symptoms of the patient, the severity and extent of ischemia, the degree and location of coronary stenoses, additional cardiac findings and finally on non-cardiac comorbidities. The selection of suitable diagnostic tools is based on the tabulated pretest probability for the presence of coronary artery disease which plays an important and central role in the diagnostic algorithm. An invasive approach is recommended only in patients with severe angina, i.e. a Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) angina grading scale of ≥ CCS3 or in patients who are at high risk for death or myocardial infarction based on the results of the test used for detection of ischemia. Detailed therapeutic recommendations are given for medicinal and interventional or surgical therapy. Medicinal therapy includes drugs both for relief of symptoms and prevention of cardiovascular events. Recommendations are also given for the use of new antianginal drugs. A PCI is only indicated in vessels causing ischemia which can be verified by using fractional flow reserve measurements. The indications for PCI now also include patients with a low SYNTAX score and multivessel disease or left main stenosis; however, the optimal strategy should be individually determined in heart team discussions.

  14. Analysis of complications during and post to interventional therapy of common congenital heart disease in children%儿童常见先天性心脏病介入治疗的并发症分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞程程; 张智伟; 钱明阳; 李渝芬

    2014-01-01

    目的:总结儿童先天性心脏病(CHD)介入治疗并发症的发生率,并分析其发生原因。方法回顾性分析2011年1月至2013年12月间2356例诊断为室间隔缺损(VSD)、房间隔缺损(ASD)、动脉导管未闭(PDA)、肺动脉瓣狭窄(PS),并行介入治疗的0~18岁CHD患儿,在介入治疗中及治疗后发生并发症的情况。结果 2356例CHD患儿中159例发生并发症,发生率为6.75%;其中VSD组为11.40%(82/719),ASD组为7.50%(51/680),PDA组为3.09%(22/712),PS组为1.63%(4/245)。心律失常发生率为4.41%(102/2356)。严重并发症发生率为2.71%(64/2356),VSD组为3.62%(26/719), ASD组为2.21%(15/680),PDA组为2.53%(18/712),PS组为1.63%(4/245);术中严重并发症为0.51%(12/2356),术后早发严重并发症为1.99%(47/2356),迟发严重并发症为0.21%(5/2356)。严重并发症经介入手术治疗0.13%(3/2356),经外科手术治疗0.64%(15/2356),经内科保守治疗1.95%(46/2356);2例死亡,死亡率0.08%。结论 CHD介入治疗的并发症及死亡率低,但仍不容忽视。术前严格掌握适应证,术中按常规操作,术后进行规范的长期随访至关重要。%Objective To analyze the incidence of complications during and after interventional therapy for common con-genital heart disease (CHD) in children. Methods From January 2011 to December 2013, interventional therapy of common congenital heart disease which include ventricular septal defect (VSD), atrial septal defect (ASD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) and pulmonary valve stenosis (PS) were performed in 2356 patients. Among them, 159 patients who developed complications during and post to interventional therapy were retrospectively analyzed. Results The overall complication rate was 6.75%(159/2356) (11.40% post VSD occlusion, 7.50% post ASD occlusion, 3.09% post PDA occlusion, 1.63% post percutaneous balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty (PBPV) ).The rate of arrhythmia was 4.41%(102/2356). The severe

  15. Distribution of kerma rate in the air inside of hemodynamic room for typical projections of interventionist cardiology procedures; Distribuicao da taxa de kerma no ar em uma sala de hemodinamica para projecoes tipicas de procedimentos de cardiologia intervencionista

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Mirtha Elizabet Gamarra

    2008-07-01

    The evaluation of dose to physicians involved in Interventional Cardiology (IC) is an extreme important matter due to the high and non-uniform distribution of dose values. The radiation control during each procedure is complex and the reasons for the high exposures have many different causes. Many international recommendations have already been written aiming the radiation protection optimization in IC. In Brazil, there is not any special orientation for the protection of those occupational persons, nor a specific legislation. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the air kerma rate at critical anatomic regions of the occupationally exposed staff that carry out IC procedures, in representative incidences in order to give subsidies for individual monitoring procedures implementation and to give more information about their radiation protection. The air kerma rate has been measured in the often used condition in the two more common IC procedures namely angiography and coronary angioplasty, using an adult patient simulator irradiated under RAO, LAO and AP projections for fluoro and digital acquisition modes. The measurements have been made in 45 points around the examination table at 5 different representatives heights of: eyes lens, thorax, hands, gonads and knees. AP projection shows the smaller scattered radiation contributions and a more homogeneous exposure distribution. The digital acquisition mode gives air kerma rates about 4 times higher than fluoro mode for LAO projection in the position occupied by the interventionist doctor, the anesthetist and the nursing staff. The most critical anatomic regions are: knees and gonads (without protection). On the physician hands position, values as high as 5 mGy/h have been measured, which can overpass, depending on the number of procedures done, the individual occupational annual limit. Therefore, in IC it is necessary to implement additional protection tools, elaborate safety guides (based on international experiences

  16. Current status and perspective of percutaneous coronary intervention in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The first percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) in China was performed in 1984. Since then the progresses in this field have been achieved gradually. The development process can be divided into 3 phases roughly. According to a national survey organized by Chinese Society of Cardiology,1-3 from 1984 to 1996, as the first phase, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) can only be performed in a few centers by a few cardiologists.

  17. Bioresorbable scaffolds: A new paradigm in percutaneous coronary intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Tenekecioglu, Erhan; Farooq, Vasim; Bourantas, Christos; Silva, Rafael Cavalcante; Onuma, Yoshinobu; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Serruys, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    textabstractNumerous advances and innovative therapies have been introduced in interventional cardiology over the recent years, since the first introduction of balloon angioplasty, but bioresorbable scaffold is certainly one of the most exciting and attracting one. Despite the fact that the metallic drug-eluting stents have significantly diminished the re-stenosis ratio, they have considerable limitations including the hypersensitivity reaction to the polymer that can cause local inflammation...

  18. Common Nosocomial Infections and Intervention Strategies for Inpatients in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology%妇产科住院患者常见院内感染及干预对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马峭屹

    2014-01-01

    目的分析基层医院妇产科住院患者常见院内感染,制订有效的干预对策,提高护理质量。方法针对妇产科住院患者的特殊性和我科存在的薄弱环节,结合实际工作,在患者住院全过程实施流程管理,制定并全面落实各项干预对策。结果有效地防范了呼吸道感染、泌尿道感染、手术切口感染等院内感染发生。结论医护人员思想上要重视院内感染,把各项规章制度落到实处,加强健康宣教和病房管理,做好手部卫生和消毒隔离工作,从严执行无菌操作,合理使用抗菌素,并采用针对性的预防措施对易感因素进行控制和预防,就可以降低院内感染率。%Objective Analyze common nosocomial infections in department of obstetrics and gynecology in grass-roots hospitals and formulate effective intervention strategies to improve nursing quality. Methods On the basis of the particularity of inpatients in department of obstetrics and gynecology, implemented overall process management on inpatients by combining practical work, formulated and implemented all intervention strategies. Results Nosocomial infections like respiratory tract infection, urinary tract infection and surgical incision infection were effectively prevented. Conclusion Medical workers should pay attention to nosocomial infections and implement all rules and regulations, including strenghtening health education and ward management, keeping hand hygiene and disinfection and isolation, well conducting sterile operation, fair use of antibiotics and take corresponding preventive measures on predisposing factors so as to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections.

  19. Current status of nuclear cardiology in Japan: Ongoing efforts to improve clinical standards and to establish evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Keiichiro; Tamaki, Nagara

    2015-08-01

    Nuclear cardiology imaging tests are widely performed in Japan as clinical practice. The Japanese nuclear cardiology community has developed new diagnostic imaging tests using (123)I-beta-methyl-p-iodophenyl-pentadecanoic acid, (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine, and (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose PET for detecting cardiac involvement in sarcoidosis. These tests have become popular worldwide. The Japanese Circulation Society and the Japanese Society of Nuclear Cardiology have published clinical imaging guidelines showing indications and standards for the new imaging tests. JSNC is currently striving to improve the standard of clinical practice and is promoting research activities.

  20. [The QuIK-Registry of the German Society of Cardiologists in private practice: countrywide and benchmarking quality assurance in invasive cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, A; Levenson, B; Göhring, S; Haerer, W; Reifart, N; Ringwald, G; Troger, B

    2009-10-01

    QuIK is the German acronym for QUality Assurance in Invasive Cardiology. It describes the continuous project of an electronic data collection in Cardiac catheterization laboratories all over Germany. Mainly members of the German Society of Cardiologists in Private Practice (BNK) participate in this computer based project. Since 1996 data of diagnostic and interventional procedures are collected and send to a registry-center where a regular benchmarking analysis of the results is performed. Part of the project is a yearly auditing process including an on-site visit to the cath lab to guarantee for the reliability of information collected. Since 1996 about one million procedures have been documented. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart , New York.

  1. Friedreich's Ataxia: a review from a cardiology perspective.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bourke, T

    2011-12-01

    Neuromuscular disorders are not among the common causes of cardiomyopathy in the general population; however, cardiomyopathy is known to occur in several neuromuscular disorders including Friedreich\\'s Ataxia (FA). In patients with neuromuscular disorders, concomitant cardiac involvement contributes significantly to morbidity and mortality and often leads to premature death.

  2. Common mental disorder underwent colostomy and the research progress of nursing intervention%结肠造口常见心理障碍及护理干预的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钮丽美; 滕卓艳; 王红艳

    2015-01-01

    Underwent colostomy is one of the common for the treatment of abdominal surgery. Is the necessary way for treatment of low rectal cancer underwent colostomy, the existence of underwent colostomy and colostomy surgery caused by physiological and pathological changes led to the patient's physical function, physical function, mental status changes, which affects the patient's quality of life. The underwent colostomy complications and bowel way, changes in body shape has a great influence to the patient's physical and psychological. Knot patients underwent colostomy should not only face the challenges of the cancer, and to undertake artificial anus bring physical and psychological pressure, which can produce fear, pessimism, low self-esteem and a series of psychological problems. In this paper, the psychological problems of patients underwent colostomy common and nursing intervention were reviewed, aimed at improving the quality of life of patients underwent colostomy.%结肠造口,是腹部外科常见的治疗措施之一。结肠造口是治疗低位直肠癌的必要手段,结肠造口的存在及造口手术引起的生理、病理变化导致了病人的躯体功能、生理功能、精神状态的改变,从而影响病人的生活质量。结肠造口的并发症及排便方式、身体外形的改变对患者的生理和心理有很大的影响。结结肠造口患者既要面对癌症的挑战,又要承担人工肛门带来的生理和心理上的巨大压力,由此可产生恐惧、悲观、自卑等一系列心理问题。本文就结肠造口患者常见的心理障碍问题及护理干预等进行综述,旨在提高结肠造口患者的生活质量。

  3. Vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales en un hospital de cardiología Nosocomial infections surveillance in a cardiology and thoracic diseases hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Julio D. Molina-Gamboa; Héctor Garza-Moreno

    1999-01-01

    OBJETIVO. Describir los resultados de la vigilancia de las infecciones nosocomiales en un hospital de cardiología y neumología del norte de México en sus primeros meses de actividad. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Informe retrospectivo de los hallazgos de la vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales realizado por el equipo de control, con búsqueda directa de la información mediante la revisión de pacientes, expedientes y notas médicas y de enfermería, reportes de bacteriología y reportes del personal encar...

  4. The history of the German Cardiac Society and the American College of Cardiology and their two founders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüderitz, Berndt; Holmes, David R; Harold, John

    2013-02-26

    The German Cardiac Society is the oldest national cardiac society in Europe, founded on June 3, 1927, in Bad Nauheim by Dr. Bruno Kisch and Professor Arthur Weber. They were actively supported by Dr. Franz Groedel, who together with Kisch became co-founders of the American College of Cardiology in 1949. Both Groedel and Kisch would be proud to see the fulfillment of their visions and dreams, which was commemorated at the joint session of the two societies held during the 78th annual meeting of the German Cardiac Society in Mannheim, Germany. "It is ironic that their dreadful years in Germany and their loss to German Cardiology helped to contribute to advances in American and international Cardiology," said Dr. Simon Dack, American College of Cardiology president in 1956 and 1957. The legacy of Groedel might be reflected by his own words: "We will meet the future not merely by dreams but by concerned action and inextinguishable enthusiasm".

  5. Intima media thickness measurement in children: A statement from the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology (AEPC) Working Group on Cardiovascular Prevention endorsed by the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Pozza, Robert; Ehringer-Schetitska, Doris; Fritsch, Peter; Jokinen, Eero; Petropoulos, Andreas; Oberhoffer, Renate

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis causing cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death in the developed world. Early precursors of vascular changes - subclinical atherosclerosis - warrant special attention as this process can be stabilized or even reversed if treated in time. Sonographic Intima Media Thickness measurement of the carotid artery (cIMT: carotid Intima-Media-Thickness) is considered a valid surrogate marker for cardiovascular risk allowing assessment of atherosclerotic changes at a very early stage. It is easy to apply due to its non-invasive character. Moreover, cIMT has been proven to provide reliable and reproducible results both in adult and adolescent patients. For the paediatric age group, several characteristics deserve special consideration. The heterogeneity of techniques of scanning, measurement and interpretation impede the comparison and interpretation of IMT values so far. Also, age- and sex-dependent normative data have to be considered for interpretation. Thus, the Association for European Paediatric Cardiology (AEPC) Working Group on Cardiovascular Prevention concludes to refer a statement on cIMT scanning, measurement and interpretation with special focus on paediatric patients. This statement includes an overview on normative data available as well as a practical guideline for the setting, scanning, measurement and interpretation of IMT values. Synchronizing different measurement methods will allow for comparing the results of several research centers. By that, in a large patient number, sufficient information may be given to assess the long-term endpoints of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  6. Radionuclide investigations in clinical cardiology - 10 years of cooperation in Frankfurt/FRG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klepzig, H. Jr.; Kaltenbach, M.

    1989-02-01

    Radionuclide investigations today are an important tool in cardiology. They close the diagnostic gap in cases where non-invasive procedures of cardiological diagnosis such as ecg, exercise-ecg, echocardiography and chest-x-ray remains unrevealing. Further, they are helpful when an exact quantitation of the disease or a precise follow-up is required. Radionuclide techniques are very useful to detect myocardial ischemia in patients with coronary heart disease and to judge myocardial function in patients with aortic or mitral regurgitation. Follow-up investigations after therapy (aortocoronary bypass, PTCA, valve replacement) permit conclusions regarding the benefit of these measures. Results of radionuclide investigations should consider the Bayes' theorem in order to keep false-negative and false-positive reports as low as possible.

  7. Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance in Cardiology Practice: A Concise Guide to Image Acquisition and Clinical Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena-López, Silvia; Hinojar, Rocío; Puntmann, Valentina O

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance plays an increasingly important role in routine cardiology clinical practice. It is a versatile imaging modality that allows highly accurate, broad and in-depth assessment of cardiac function and structure and provides information on pertinent clinical questions in diseases such as ischemic heart disease, nonischemic cardiomyopathies, and heart failure, as well as allowing unique indications, such as the assessment and quantification of myocardial iron overload or infiltration. Increasing evidence for the role of cardiovascular magnetic resonance, together with the spread of knowledge and skill outside expert centers, has afforded greater access for patients and wider clinical experience. This review provides a snapshot of cardiovascular magnetic resonance in modern clinical practice by linking image acquisition and postprocessing with effective delivery of the clinical meaning. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Concepts of neuroendocrine cardiology and neuroendocrine immunology, chemistry and biology of signal molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galoyan, Armen

    2010-12-01

    Discovery of neurosecretion of cardioactive neurohormones produced by hypothalamic nuclei (NSO and NPV), as well as the biosynthesis of several immunomodulators (signal molecules of the neuroendocrine immune system of brain), deciphering of their chemical structure and study of their biological properties led to the foundation of two important trends of neurobiology: neuroendocrine immunology and cardiology. Hormone formation by atrium ganglionary nerve cells and auriculum establishment of neurohumoral interactions between hypothalamic and atrium neurosecretion indicated the existence of the system neuroendocrine hypothalamus--endocrine heart. Study of their biological properties promoted creation of powerful neurohormonal preparations for the treatment of immune, cardio-vascular, neurodegenerative, infectious and tumor diseases. Concepts suggested by us on neuroendocrine cardiology and immunology, create large perspectives for development of the theory and its implementation in medicine.

  9. [Digital signature: new prospects for the information of the cardiologic clinical card].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervesato, E; Antonini-Canterin, F; Nicolosi, G L

    2001-02-01

    In the last few years, remarkable improvements have been made in computerized database systems used in cardiology. However, they will not easily lead to further relevant improvements unless the weaknesses and the gaps deriving from the obligation of forming and storing case sheets, according to law, are faced and resolved in an original way. This article covers the topic of the digital signature and how it could form the basis for a new powerful impulse to the process of informatization of cardiology records. The proposal of elaborating a totally computerized case sheet involves the need of rationalizing the flow of clinical information and of implementing a management system integrated with the hospital information system. The elimination of paper support will probably lead to an advantageous cycle that will involve the entire hospital, both clinically as well as administratively.

  10. Cardiovascular diseases and aging Highlights on World Congress of Cardiology 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The World Congress of Cardiology (WCC) 2006 was a joint meeting of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)and the World Heart Federation (WHF) held in Barcelona Spain on September 2-5, 2006. The highlight scientific theme of this year's congress is cardiovascular diseases and aging.With the increase of aging population, the prevalence of many cardiovascular diseases increases exponentially, and the spectrum of our patients has changed to the elderly. It is a fact that management of older patients differs from that of younger patients and does not follow international recommendations. The WCC 2006 is the perfect opportunity to review in depth the grounds for this situation and examine solutions to improve it.

  11. Application of receptive music therapy in internal medicine and cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyntia Marconato

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of receptive music therapy in clinical practice. METHODS: Receptive music therapy was individually applied via musical auditions, including five stages: musical stimulation, sensation, situation, reflection, and behavioral alteration. Following anamnesis and obtainment of consent, patients answered a first questionnaire on health risk evaluation (Q1, and after participating in 16 weekly music therapy sessions, answered a second one (Q2. RESULTS: Two men and 8 women, aged above 18 years, referred to us due to symptoms of stress, emotional suffering, and the need to change lifestyles (health risk behavior were studied between August 1998 and December 1999. Comparison between answers to Q1 and Q2, showed a trend (P=0.059 for reduction of ingestion of cholesterol-rich foods and for increased prospects in life with a tendency towards improvement, and also of increased intake of fiber-rich food (55.6%, increased levels of personal satisfaction (44.5%, and decreased levels of stress (66.7%. CONCLUSION: The study demonstrated decreased stress levels and increased personal satisfaction, higher consumption of fiber-rich food, lower cholesterol intake, and a better perspective on life, suggesting that receptive music therapy may be applied in clinical practice as an auxiliary therapeutic intervention for the treatment of behavioral health risks.

  12. Preliminary Study of Pet Owner Adherence in Behaviour, Cardiology, Urology, and Oncology Fields

    OpenAIRE

    Zita Talamonti; Chiara Cassis; Brambilla, Paola G.; Paola Scarpa; Damiano Stefanello; Simona Cannas; Michela Minero; Clara Palestrini

    2015-01-01

    Successful veterinary treatment of animals requires owner adherence with a prescribed treatment plan. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the level of adherence of the owners of patients presented for behavioural, cardiological, urological, and oncological problems. At the end of the first examination, each owner completed a questionnaire. Then, the owners were called four times to fill out another questionnaire over the phone. With regard to the first questionnaire, statisticall...

  13. Paediatric cardiology fellowship training: effect of work-hour regulations on scholarly activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronai, Christina; Lang, Peter

    2017-01-01

    In 2003, work-hour regulations were implemented by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Much has been published regarding resident rest and quality of life as well as patient safety. There has been no examination on the effect of work-hour restrictions on academic productivity of fellows in training. Paediatric subspecialty fellows have a scholarly requirement mandated by the American Board of Pediatrics. We have examined the impact of work-hour restrictions on the scholarly productivity of paediatric cardiology fellows during their fellowship. We conducted a literature search for all paediatric cardiology fellows between 1998 and 2007 at a single academic institution as first or senior authors on papers published during their 3-year fellowship and 3 years after completion of their categorical fellowship (n=63, 30 fellows before 2003 and 33 fellows after 2003). The numbers of first- or senior-author fellow publications before and after 2003 were compared. We also collected data on final paediatric cardiology subspecialty career choice. There was no difference in the number of fellow first-author publications before and after 2003. Before work-hour restrictions, the mean number of publications per fellow was 2.1 (±2.2), and after work-hour restrictions it was 2.0 (±1.8), (p=0.89). By subspecialty career choice, fellows who select electrophysiology, preventative cardiology, and heart failure always published within the 6-year time period. Since the implementation of work-hour regulations, total number of fellow first-authored publications has not changed. The role of subspecialty choice may play a role in academic productivity of fellows in training.

  14. A study of role expansion: a new GP role in cardiology care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The National Health Service is reconfiguring health care services in order to meet the increasing challenge of providing care for people with long-term conditions and to reduce the demand on specialised outpatient hospital services by enhancing primary care. A review of cardiology referrals to specialised care and the literature on referral management inspired the development of a new GP role in Cardiology. This new extended role was developed to enable GPs to diagnose and manage patients with mild to moderate heart failure or atrial fibrillation and to use a range of diagnostics effectively in primary care. This entailed GPs participating in a four-session short course with on-going clinical supervision. The new role was piloted in a small number of GP practices in one county in England for four months. This study explores the impact of piloting the Extended Cardiology role on the GP’s role, patients’ experience, service delivery and quality. Methods A mixed methods approach was employed including semi-structured interviews with GPs, a patient experience survey, a quality review of case notes, and analysis on activity and referral data. Results The participating GPs perceived the extended GP role as a professional development opportunity that had the potential to reduce healthcare utilisation and costs, through a reduction in referrals, whilst meeting the patient’s wishes for the provision of care closer to home. Patient experience of the new GP service was positive. The standard of clinical practice was judged acceptable. There was a fall in referrals during the study period. Conclusion This new role in cardiology was broadly welcomed as a model of care by the participating GPs and by patients, because of the potential to improve the quality of care for patients in primary care and reduce costs. As this was a pilot study further development and continuing evaluation of the model is recommended. PMID:24885826

  15. Competency Testing for Pediatric Cardiology Fellows Learning Transthoracic Echocardiography: Implementation, Fellow Experience, and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Jami C; Geva, Tal; Brown, David W

    2015-12-01

    There is currently great interest in measuring trainee competency at all levels of medical education. In 2007, we implemented a system for assessing cardiology fellows' progress in attaining imaging skills. This paradigm could be adapted for use by other cardiology programs. Evaluation consisted of a two-part exercise performed after years 1 and 2 of pediatric cardiology training. Part 1: a directly observed evaluation of technical skills as fellows imaged a normal subject (year 1) and a patient with complex heart disease (year 2). Part 2: fellows interpreted and wrote reports for two echocardiograms illustrating congenital heart disease. These were graded for accuracy and facility with communicating pertinent data. After 5 years of testing, fellows were surveyed about their experience. In 5 years, 40 fellows were tested at least once. Testing identified four fellows who underperformed on the technical portion and four on the interpretive portion. Surveys were completed by 33 fellows (83 %). Most (67 %) felt that intermittent observation by faculty was inadequate for assessing skills and that procedural volume was a poor surrogate for competency (58 %). Posttest feedback was constructive and valuable for 90, and 70 % felt the process helped them set goals for skill improvement. Overall, fellows felt this testing was fair and should continue. Fellow performance and responses identified programmatic issues that were creating barriers to learning. We describe a practical test to assess competency for cardiology fellows learning echocardiography. This paradigm is feasible, has excellent acceptance among trainees, and identifies trainees who need support. Materials developed could be easily adapted to help track upcoming ACGME-mandated metrics.

  16. NORMAN HOLTER AND HIS METHOD OF REMOTE CARDIOLOGIC MONITORING. CASE HISTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Rassadina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This publication is devoted to the personality and creative designs of uncommon American scientist, the engineer and the inventor – Norman Jefferis «Jeff» Holter. Norman Jefferis Holter introduced the terminology of «nuclear medicine» for the name of the new at that time area which associated with employment of the achievements of the nuclear physics in the medical goals. Also he is the author of ambulatory cardiological monitoring.

  17. Unexpected deaths in cardiology outpatients – what can we learn from case review?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitz, Thomas Michael; Burnand, Nikki; Ortner, Astrid; Rudd, Ian G; Sampson, Rod; Rushworth, Gordon F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A proportion of cardiac patients managed at a cardiology outpatient clinic will die between clinic visits. This study aimed to identify the cause of death, to determine if case review occurred and if a formal review of such cases might be useful. Design Single-centre retrospective cohort study. Setting A remote regional centre in the North of Scotland. Participants All patients who had been removed from the cardiology outpatient clinic due to death in the community. Main outcome measures Cause of death, comorbidities and treatments were collected from hospital records and the national register of deaths. Chi-squared test and Student’s t-test were used with significance taken at the 5% level. Results Of 10,606 patients who attended the cardiology outpatient clinic, 75 (0.7%) patients died in the community. The majority (57.0%) died from a non-cardiac cause. Eleven patients (14.9%) died due to an unexpected cardiac death. A detailed case note review was undertaken. In only two (18.2%) cases was any note made as to the cause of death in the hospital records and in only one was there details of post mortem discussion between primary and secondary care. Conclusions A small proportion of patients attending a cardiology outpatient clinic died in the community. Documentation of the death in the hospital notes was very poor and evidence of post mortem communication between primary and secondary care was absent in all but one case. Better documentation and communication between primary and secondary care would seem desirable. PMID:27928509

  18. Greek language: analysis of the cardiologic anatomical etymology: past and present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezas, Georges; Werneck, Alexandre Lins

    2012-01-01

    The Greek language, the root of most Latin anatomical terms, is deeply present in the Anatomical Terminology. Many studies seek to analyze etymologically the terms stemming from the Greek words. In most of these studies, the terms appear defined according to the etymological understanding of the respective authors at the time of its creation. Therefore, it is possible that the terms currently used are not consistent with its origin in ancient Greek words. We selected cardiologic anatomical terms derived from Greek words, which are included in the International Anatomical Terminology. We performed an etymological analysis using the Greek roots present in the earliest terms. We compared the cardiologic anatomical terms currently used in Greece and Brazil to the Greek roots originating from the ancient Greek language. We used morphological decomposition of Greek roots, prefixes, and suffixes. We also verified their use on the same lexicons and texts from the ancient Greek language. We provided a list comprising 30 cardiologic anatomical terms that have their origins in ancient Greek as well as their component parts in the International Anatomical Terminology. We included the terms in the way they were standardized in Portuguese, English, and Modern Greek as well as the roots of the ancient Greek words that originated them. Many works deal with the true origin of words (etymology) but most of them neither returns to the earliest roots nor relate them to their use in texts of ancient Greek language. By comparing the world's greatest studies on the etymology of Greek words, this paper tries to clarify the differences between the true origin of the Greek anatomical terms as well as the origins of the cardiologic anatomical terms more accepted today in Brazil by health professionals.

  19. Summary of the 4th Annual Scientific Session of Cardiology in South China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘伊丽

    2002-01-01

    @@ The 4th Annual Scientific Session of South China was held from April 5 ~ 8, 2002 in Guangzhou. More than one thousand cardiologists came from Guangzhou,Guangxi, Hunan and Hainan Province participated in the meeting and 143 abstracts were presented. A distinguished faculty from the United States, Canada,Germany, Britain, Honkong, Beijing and Shanghai were invited to join this conference and gave a series of special lectures about the newest advances in cardiology.

  20. Journal of Geriatric Cardiology comes to press with a new look

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shiwen WANG

    2004-01-01

    @@ On behalf of all the editors and editorial board members, I would like to announce that the inaugural issue of the Journal of Geriatric Cardiology ( JGC ) was published after over two years of preparation, and the JGC will be continuously published. The JGC was born in accordance with the tough challenge of higher prevalence of cardiac diseases and/or complicated with other organ diseases in the elderly accompanied by the rapid growing number of the aged.

  1. Actualización en cardiología geriátrica

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Castro, Óscar; Datino, Tomás; López Palop, Ramón; Martínez Sellés Oliveria Soares, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Este artículo revisa las principales novedades publicadas durante 2010 en cuanto a la cardiología geriátrica y se centra en los trabajos que analizan las peculiaridades de los ancianos con insuficiencia cardiaca, cardiopatía isquémica, valvulopatías y arritmias. 2.530 JCR (2011) Q2, 48/117 Cardiac & cardiovascular systems

  2. Actualización en cardiología geriátrica

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz-Castro, Óscar; Datino, Tomás; López Palop, Ramón; Martínez Sellés Oliveria Soares, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Este artículo revisa las principales novedades publicadas durante 2010 en cuanto a la cardiología geriátrica y se centra en los trabajos que analizan las peculiaridades de los ancianos con insuficiencia cardiaca, cardiopatía isquémica, valvulopatías y arritmias. 2.157 JCR (2010) Q2, 52/114 Cardiac & cardiovascular systems

  3. [Specific dilated myocardiopathy. Chronic chagasic cardiopathy at the National Institute of Cardiology Ignacio Chávez].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteón-Padilla, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Vallejo-Allende, Maité; Reyes, Pedro A

    2002-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are a heterogenous group of heart ailments. Some of them are primary myocardial diseases and are classified as dilated, hypertrophic, restrictive and arryhithmogenic. Dilated cardiomyopathies (DCs) are the most common. Sometimes it is possible to identify an etiologic agent, in that case we talk about a specific dilated cardiomyopathy. Here in, we review one of these specific DCs, the so called Chronic Chagasic Cardiopathy (CCC) from the point of view of our personal experience at the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología "Ignacio Chávez". Chagas' disease is present in Mexico, therefore CCC is also present. We estimate that 5,000 people, suffer CCC with severe symptoms. In Mexico, Chagas' disease occurs below the Tropic of Cancer and between 2,000-2,500 m above sea level, in this area there is a real risk for vectorial infection, mainly in rural villages. Clinical diagnosis should be supported by epidemiological and seroepidemiological confirmatory data. There is not appropriate therapy yet for this condition.

  4. [Aberrant right subclavian artery in children examined at the National Institute of Cardiology Ignacio Chavez (1992-2012)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijangos-Vázquez, Roberto; Patiño-Bahena, Emilia; Martínez-García, Alfonso; Herrera, Juan; Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Buendía-Hernández, Alfonso; Soto-López, María Elena

    2014-01-01

    Congenital vascular malformations of the major arteries in the chest have been classified into 5 groups: 1) double aortic arch; 2) right aortic arch with left ligament or persistent ductus arteriosus; 3) aberrant subclavian artery; 4) aberrant left pulmonary artery, and 5) anomalous innominate artery. We reviewed the patients with aberrant right subclavian artery and their treatment. We studied retrospectively the records of 29 patients with aberrant right subclavian artery in childhood, from January 1992 to December 2012, analyzing the following variables: age at onset, clinical manifestations, associated cardiovascular defects, diagnosis and surgical approach method. We found that most patients have an asymptomatic course, only 31% of them course with symptoms during the first year of life, with an incidental diagnosis of 35% during catheterization or other imaging studies. Patent ductus arteriosus was the most frequently associated congenital malformation, with 13%. Down's syndrome was found in 21%. The most common treatment was surgical section of the aberrant subclavian artery to release the esophagus. This vascular abnormality must be suspected in those patients with dysphagia, dyspnea, chest pain during feeding or breathing difficulties. A significant number of patients are not diagnosed in time, some reach adulthood without a diagnosis. This malformation is often found in imaging studies when evaluating the aorta or in a gastroesophageal reflux study, in which the barium bolus reveals the extrinsic compression of the esophagus. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Noninvasive Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of the Asymptomatic Diabetic Patient: The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budoff, Matthew J; Raggi, Paolo; Beller, George A; Berman, Daniel S; Druz, Regina S; Malik, Shaista; Rigolin, Vera H; Weigold, Wm Guy; Soman, Prem

    2016-02-01

    Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes is well established; diabetes is associated with at least a 2-fold increased risk of coronary heart disease. Approximately two-thirds of deaths among persons with diabetes are related to cardiovascular disease. Previously, diabetes was regarded as a "coronary risk equivalent," implying a high 10-year cardiovascular risk for every diabetes patient. Following the original study by Haffner et al., multiple studies from different cohorts provided varying conclusions on the validity of the concept of coronary risk equivalency in patients with diabetes. New guidelines have started to acknowledge the heterogeneity in risk and include different treatment recommendations for diabetic patients without other risk factors who are considered to be at lower risk. Furthermore, guidelines have suggested that further risk stratification in patients with diabetes is warranted before universal treatment. The Imaging Council of the American College of Cardiology systematically reviewed all modalities commonly used for risk stratification in persons with diabetes mellitus and summarized the data and recommendations. This document reviews the evidence regarding the use of noninvasive testing to stratify asymptomatic patients with diabetes with regard to coronary heart disease risk and develops an algorithm for screening based on available data.

  6. Spanish pacemaker registry. 10th official report of the Spanish Society of Cardiology Working Group on Cardiac Pacing (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coma Samartín, Raúl; Ruiz Mateas, Francisco; Fidalgo Andrés, María Luisa; Leal del Ojo González, Juan; Pérez Álvarez, Luisa

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to analyze the pacemaker implantations and replacements reported to the Spanish Pacemaker Registry in 2012 with special reference to the selection of pacing modes. The analysis was based on information provided by the European Pacemaker Patient Identification Card. Data were received from 115 hospitals, with a total of 12 856 cards. An estimated 745.8 pacemaker generators and 53.1 resynchronization devices were implanted per million population. Active fixation leads were implanted in more than 70% of the patients; of these leads, more than 20% were safe for use with magnetic resonance. The most common electrocardiographic indication for pacemaker implantation was atrioventricular block (56%). In all, 28% of the patients with sick sinus syndrome were paced in VVIR mode. The use of conventional pacemakers remained stable, whereas the implantation of resynchronization devices increased. Active fixation leads are now employed in most patients. The findings of this study confirm the higher incidence of implantation in men and at an earlier age due to the higher rate of conduction disorders. Age is a factor that influences the choice of the appropriate pacing mode. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence and profile of congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension in Down syndrome in a pediatric cardiology service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Alves Mourato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To determine the frequence and profile of congenital heart defects in Down syndrome patients referred to a pediatric cardiologic center, considering the age of referral, gender, type of heart disease diagnosed by transthoracic echocardiography and its association with pulmonary hypertension at the initial diagnosis.METHODS:Cross-sectional study with retrospective data collection of 138 patients with Down syndrome from a total of 17,873 records. Descriptive analysis of the data was performed, using Epi-Info version 7.RESULTS: Among the 138 patients with Down syndrome, females prevailed (56.1% and 112 (81.2% were diagnosed with congenital heart disease. The most common lesion was ostium secundum atrial septal defect, present in 51.8%, followed by atrioventricular septal defect, in 46.4%. Ventricular septal defects were present in 27.7%, while tetralogy of Fallot represented 6.3% of the cases. Other cardiac malformations corresponded to 12.5%. Pulmonary hypertension was associated with 37.5% of the heart diseases. Only 35.5% of the patients were referred before six months of age.CONCLUSIONS: The low percentage of referral until six months of age highlights the need for a better tracking of patients with Down syndrome in the context of congenital heart disease, due to the high frequency and progression of pulmonary hypertension.

  8. Preliminary Study of Pet Owner Adherence in Behaviour, Cardiology, Urology, and Oncology Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamonti, Zita; Cassis, Chiara; Brambilla, Paola G; Scarpa, Paola; Stefanello, Damiano; Cannas, Simona; Minero, Michela; Palestrini, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Successful veterinary treatment of animals requires owner adherence with a prescribed treatment plan. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the level of adherence of the owners of patients presented for behavioural, cardiological, urological, and oncological problems. At the end of the first examination, each owner completed a questionnaire. Then, the owners were called four times to fill out another questionnaire over the phone. With regard to the first questionnaire, statistically significant data concern behavioral medicine and cardiology. In the first area the owner's worry decreases during the follow-up and the number of owners who would give away the animal increases. In cardiology, owners who think that the pathology harms their animal's quality of life decreased significantly over time. With regard to the 9 additional follow-up questions, in behavioural medicine and urology the owner's discomfort resulting from the animal's pathology significantly decreases over time. Assessment of adherence appears to be an optimal instrument in identifying the positive factors and the difficulties encountered by owners during the application of a treatment protocol.

  9. Preliminary Study of Pet Owner Adherence in Behaviour, Cardiology, Urology, and Oncology Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zita Talamonti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful veterinary treatment of animals requires owner adherence with a prescribed treatment plan. The aim of our study was to evaluate and compare the level of adherence of the owners of patients presented for behavioural, cardiological, urological, and oncological problems. At the end of the first examination, each owner completed a questionnaire. Then, the owners were called four times to fill out another questionnaire over the phone. With regard to the first questionnaire, statistically significant data concern behavioral medicine and cardiology. In the first area the owner’s worry decreases during the follow-up and the number of owners who would give away the animal increases. In cardiology, owners who think that the pathology harms their animal’s quality of life decreased significantly over time. With regard to the 9 additional follow-up questions, in behavioural medicine and urology the owner’s discomfort resulting from the animal’s pathology significantly decreases over time. Assessment of adherence appears to be an optimal instrument in identifying the positive factors and the difficulties encountered by owners during the application of a treatment protocol.

  10. Improved compliance with reporting standards: A retrospective analysis of Intersocietal Accreditation Commission Nuclear Cardiology Laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, P Tim; Farrell, Mary Beth; Ewing, Joseph A; Tilkemeier, Peter L

    2016-11-09

    In 2011, Tilkemeier et al reported significant nuclear cardiology laboratory noncompliance with reporting standards. The aim of this study was to identify and examine noncompliant reporting elements with the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission Nuclear/PET (IAC) Reporting Standards and to compare compliance between 2008 and 2014. This was a retrospective study of compliance with 18 reporting elements utilizing accreditation findings from all laboratories applying for accreditation in 2008 and 2014. 1816 labs applying for initial or subsequent accreditation were analyzed for compliance. The mean reporting noncompliance per lab decreased from 2008 to 2014 (2.48 ± 2.67 to 1.24 ± 1.79, P types, labs with Certification Board of Nuclear Cardiology physicians on staff, and by geographic region (P < .001). Overall severity of reporting issues decreased. Facilities with compliant reports increased from 35.0% in 2008 to 57.1% in 2014 (P < .001). Continuing medical education, accreditation, and other instructional activities aimed at improving nuclear cardiology reporting appear to have made a positive impact over time with the number and severity of noncompliance decreased. More labs are now compliant with the IAC Standards and, thus, reporting guidelines. However, the need for continued educational efforts remains.

  11. Genomic translational research: Paving the way to individualized cardiac functional analyses and personalized cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2017-03-01

    For most of Medicine's past, the best that physicians could do to cope with disease prevention and treatment was based on the expected response of an average patient. Currently, however, a more personalized/precise approach to cardiology and medicine in general is becoming possible, as the cost of sequencing a human genome has declined substantially. As a result, we are witnessing an era of precipitous advances in biomedicine and bourgeoning understanding of the genetic basis of cardiovascular and other diseases, reminiscent of the resurgence of innovations in physico-mathematical sciences and biology-anatomy-cardiology in the Renaissance, a parallel time of radical change and reformation of medical knowledge, education and practice. Now on the horizon is an individualized, diverse patient-centered, approach to medical practice that encompasses the development of new, gene-based diagnostics and preventive medicine tactics, and offers the broadest range of personalized therapies based on pharmacogenetics. Over time, translation of genomic and high-tech approaches unquestionably will transform clinical practice in cardiology and medicine as a whole, with the adoption of new personalized medicine approaches and procedures. Clearly, future prospects far outweigh present accomplishments, which are best viewed as a promising start. It is now essential for pluridisciplinary health care providers to examine the drivers and barriers to the clinical adoption of this emerging revolutionary paradigm, in order to expedite the realization of its potential. So, we are not there yet, but we are definitely on our way.

  12. Bibliometric indexes, databases and impact factors in cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Igor R C; Oliveira, Rogério Carvalho de; Andrade, Pedro Beraldo de; Caramori, Carlos Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bibliometry is a quantitative statistical technique to measure levels of production and dissemination of knowledge, as well as a useful tool to track the development of an scientific area. The valuation of production required for recognition of researchers and magazines is accomplished through tools called bibliometric indexes, divided into quality indicators and scientific impact. Initially developed for monographs of statistical measures especially in libraries, today bibliometrics is mainly used to evaluate productivity of authors and citation repercussion. However, these tools have limitations and sometimes provoke controversies about indiscriminate application, leading to the development of newer indexes. It is important to know the most common search indexes and use it properly even acknowledging its limitations as it has a direct impact in their daily practice, reputation and funds achievement.

  13. The fractal heart — embracing mathematics in the cardiology clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Captur, Gabriella; Karperien, Audrey L.; Hughes, Alun D.; Francis, Darrel P.; Moon, James C.

    2017-01-01

    For clinicians grappling with quantifying the complex spatial and temporal patterns of cardiac structure and function (such as myocardial trabeculae, coronary microvascular anatomy, tissue perfusion, myocyte histology, electrical conduction, heart rate, and blood-pressure variability), fractal analysis is a powerful, but still underused, mathematical tool. In this Perspectives article, we explain some fundamental principles of fractal geometry and place it in a familiar medical setting. We summarize studies in the cardiovascular sciences in which fractal methods have successfully been used to investigate disease mechanisms, and suggest potential future clinical roles in cardiac imaging and time series measurements. We believe that clinical researchers can deploy innovative fractal solutions to common cardiac problems that might ultimately translate into advancements for patient care. PMID:27708281

  14. Bibliometric indexes, databases and impact factors in cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Igor R C; de Oliveira, Rogério Carvalho; de Andrade, Pedro Beraldo; Caramori, Carlos Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bibliometry is a quantitative statistical technique to measure levels of production and dissemination of knowledge, as well as a useful tool to track the development of an scientific area. The valuation of production required for recognition of researchers and magazines is accomplished through tools called bibliometricindexes, divided into quality indicators and scientific impact. Initially developed for monographs of statistical measures especially in libraries, today bibliometrics is mainly used to evaluate productivity of authors and citation repercussion. However, these tools have limitations and sometimes provoke controversies about indiscriminate application, leading to the development of newer indexes. It is important to know the most common search indexes and use it properly even acknowledging its limitations as it has a direct impact in their daily practice, reputation and funds achievement. PMID:26107458

  15. Bibliometric indexes, databases and impact factors in cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor R C Bienert

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBibliometry is a quantitative statistical technique to measure levels of production and dissemination of knowledge, as well as a useful tool to track the development of an scientific area. The valuation of production required for recognition of researchers and magazines is accomplished through tools called bibliometricindexes, divided into quality indicators and scientific impact. Initially developed for monographs of statistical measures especially in libraries, today bibliometrics is mainly used to evaluate productivity of authors and citation repercussion. However, these tools have limitations and sometimes provoke controversies about indiscriminate application, leading to the development of newer indexes. It is important to know the most common search indexes and use it properly even acknowledging its limitations as it has a direct impact in their daily practice, reputation and funds achievement.

  16. The Effect of Clinical Care Location on Clinical Outcomes After Peripheral Vascular Intervention in Medicare Beneficiaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Ryan S; Mi, Xiaojuan; Qualls, Laura G; Vemulapalli, Sreekanth; Peterson, Eric D; Patel, Manesh R; Curtis, Lesley H; Jones, W Schuyler

    2017-06-12

    Modifications in reimbursement rates by Medicare in 2008 have led to peripheral vascular interventions (PVI) being performed more commonly in outpatient and office-based clinics. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of this shift in clinical care setting on clinical outcomes after PVI. Modifications in reimbursement have led to peripheral vascular intervention (PVI) being more commonly performed in outpatient hospital settings and office-based clinics. Using a 100% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries from 2010 to 2012, we examined 30-day and 1-year rates of all-cause mortality, major lower extremity amputation, repeat revascularization, and all-cause hospitalization by clinical care location of index PVI. A total of 218,858 Medicare beneficiaries underwent an index PVI between 2010 and 2012. Index PVIs performed in inpatient settings were associated with higher 1-year rates of all-cause mortality (23.6% vs. 10.4% and 11.7%; p PVI performe