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Sample records for common genetic mechanism

  1. Genetic Mechanisms Leading to Sex Differences Across Common Diseases and Anthropometric Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traglia, Michela; Bseiso, Dina; Gusev, Alexander; Adviento, Brigid; Park, Daniel S; Mefford, Joel A; Zaitlen, Noah; Weiss, Lauren A

    2017-02-01

    Common diseases often show sex differences in prevalence, onset, symptomology, treatment, or prognosis. Although studies have been performed to evaluate sex differences at specific SNP associations, this work aims to comprehensively survey a number of complex heritable diseases and anthropometric traits. Potential genetically encoded sex differences we investigated include differential genetic liability thresholds or distributions, gene-sex interaction at autosomal loci, major contribution of the X-chromosome, or gene-environment interactions reflected in genes responsive to androgens or estrogens. Finally, we tested the overlap between sex-differential association with anthropometric traits and disease risk. We utilized complementary approaches of assessing GWAS association enrichment and SNP-based heritability estimation to explore explicit sex differences, as well as enrichment in sex-implicated functional categories. We do not find consistent increased genetic load in the lower-prevalence sex, or a disproportionate role for the X-chromosome in disease risk, despite sex-heterogeneity on the X for several traits. We find that all anthropometric traits show less than complete correlation between the genetic contribution to males and females, and find a convincing example of autosome-wide genome-sex interaction in multiple sclerosis (P = 1 × 10(-9)). We also find some evidence for hormone-responsive gene enrichment, and striking evidence of the contribution of sex-differential anthropometric associations to common disease risk, implying that general mechanisms of sexual dimorphism determining secondary sex characteristics have shared effects on disease risk. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  2. Genetic mechanisms and age-related macular degeneration: common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, and mitochondrial genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Melissa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex and multifaceted disease involving contributions from both genetic and environmental influences. Previous work exploring the genetic contributions of AMD has implicated numerous genomic regions and a variety of candidate genes as modulators of AMD susceptibility. Nevertheless, much of this work has revolved around single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and it is apparent that a significant portion of the heritability of AMD cannot be explained through these mechanisms. In this review, we consider the role of common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, microRNAs, and mitochondrial genetics in AMD. Copy number variations in regulators of complement activation genes (CFHR1 and CFHR3 and glutathione S transferase genes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been associated with AMD, and several additional loci have been identified as regions of potential interest but require further evaluation. MicroRNA dysregulation has been linked to the retinal pigment epithelium degeneration in geographic atrophy, ocular neovascularization, and oxidative stress, all of which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of AMD. Certain mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and SNPs in mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase genes have also been associated with AMD. The role of these additional mechanisms remains only partly understood, but the importance of their further investigation is clear to elucidate more completely the genetic basis of AMD.

  3. Mechanisms of population genetic heterogeneity among molting common mergansers on Kodiak Island, Alaska: implications for assessments of migratory connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John M.; Zwiefelhofer, Denny; Maryanski, Nate

    2009-01-01

    Quantifying population genetic heterogeneity within nonbreeding aggregations can inform our understanding of patterns of site fidelity, migratory connectivity, and gene flow between breeding and nonbreeding areas. However, characterizing mechanisms that contribute to heterogeneity, such as migration and dispersal, is required before site fidelity and migratory connectivity can be assessed accurately. We studied nonbreeding groups of Common Mergansers (Mergus merganser) molting on Kodiak Island, Alaska, from 2005 to 2007, using banding data to assess rates of recapture, mitochondrial (mt) DNA to determine natal area, and nuclear microsatellite genotypes to assess dispersal. Using baseline information from differentiated mtDNA haplogroups across North America, we were able to assign individuals to natal regions and document population genetic heterogeneity within and among molting groups. Band-recovery and DNA data suggest that both migration from and dispersal among natal areas contribute to admixed groups of males molting on Kodiak Island. A lack of differentiation in the Common Merganser's nuclear, bi-parentally inherited DNA, observed across North America, implies that dispersal can mislead genetic assessments of migratory connectivity and assignments of nonbreeding individuals to breeding areas. Thus multiple and independent data types are required to account for such behaviors before accurate assessments of migratory connectivity can be made.

  4. Impact of a Common Genetic Variation Associated With Putamen Volume on Neural Mechanisms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Bing; Jia, Tianye; Macare, Christine; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Bromberg, Uli; Büchel, Christian; Cattrell, Anna; Conrod, Patricia J; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Gowland, Penny; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Paillère Martinot, Marie-Laure; Nees, Frauke; Orfanos, Dimitri Papadopoulos; Paus, Tomáš; Poustka, Luise; Smolka, Michael N; Walter, Henrik; Whelan, Robert; Schumann, Gunter; Desrivières, Sylvane

    2017-05-01

    In a recent genomewide association study of subcortical brain volumes, a common genetic variation at rs945270 was identified as having the strongest effect on putamen volume, a brain measurement linked to familial risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). To determine whether rs945270 might be a genetic determinant of ADHD, its effects on ADHD-related symptoms and neural mechanisms of ADHD, such as response inhibition and reward sensitivity, were explored. A large population sample of 1,834 14-year-old adolescents was used to test the effects of rs945270 on ADHD symptoms assessed through the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire and region-of-interest analyses of putamen activation by functional magnetic resonance imaging using the stop signal and monetary incentive delay tasks, assessing response inhibition and reward sensitivity, respectively. There was a significant link between rs945270 and ADHD symptom scores, with the C allele associated with lower symptom scores, most notably hyperactivity. In addition, there were sex-specific effects of this variant on the brain. In boys, the C allele was associated with lower putamen activity during successful response inhibition, a brain response that was not associated with ADHD symptoms. In girls, putamen activation during reward anticipation increased with the number of C alleles, most significantly in the right putamen. Remarkably, right putamen activation during reward anticipation tended to negatively correlate with ADHD symptoms. These results indicate that rs945270 might contribute to the genetic risk of ADHD partly through its effects on hyperactivity and reward processing in girls. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  5. Commonalities in Biological Pathways, Genetics, and Cellular Mechanism between Alzheimer Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases: An In Silico-Updated Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Khurshid; Baig, Mohammad Hassan; Mushtaq, Gohar; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad; Greig, Nigel H; Choi, Inho

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common and well-studied neurodegenerative disease (ND). Biological pathways, pathophysiology and genetics of AD show commonalities with other NDs viz. Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's disease (HD), Prion disease and Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). Many of the NDs, sharing the common features and molecular mechanisms suggest that pathology may be directly comparable and be implicated in disease prevention and development of highly effective therapies. In this review, a brief description of pathophysiology, clinical symptoms and available treatment of various NDs have been explored with special emphasis on AD. Commonalities in these fatal NDs provide support for therapeutic advancements and enhance the understanding of disease manifestation. The studies concentrating on the commonalities in biological pathways, cellular mechanisms and genetics may provide the scope to researchers to identify few novel common target(s) for disease prevention and development of effective common drugs for multi-neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). METHODS: We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy...... and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different...... genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance...

  7. Genetic divergence of common bean cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, J S; Silva, W; Pinheiro, L R; Dos Santos, J B; Fonseca, N S; Euzebio, M P

    2015-09-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic divergence in the 'Carioca' (beige with brown stripes) common bean cultivar used by different institutions and in 16 other common bean cultivars used in the Rede Cooperativa de Pesquisa de Feijão (Cooperative Network of Common Bean Research), by using simple sequence repeats associated with agronomic traits that are highly distributed in the common bean genome. We evaluated 22 polymorphic loci using bulks containing DNA from 30 plants. There was genetic divergence among the Carioca cultivar provided by the institutions. Nevertheless, there was lower divergence among them than among the other cultivars. The cultivar used by Instituto Agronômico do Paraná was the most divergent in relation to the Carioca samples. The least divergence was observed among the samples used by Universidade Federal de Lavras and by Embrapa Arroz e Feijão. Of all the cultivars, 'CNFP 10104' and 'BRSMG Realce' showed the greatest dissimilarity. The cultivars were separated in two groups of greatest similarity using the Structure software. Genetic variation among cultivars was greater than the variation within or between the groups formed. This fact, together with the high estimate of heterozygosity observed and the genetic divergence of the samples of the Carioca cultivar in relation to the original provided by Instituto Agronômico de Campinas, indicates a mixture of cultivars. The high divergence among cultivars provides potential for the utilization of this genetic variability in plant breeding.

  8. The role of common genetic variants in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Muller, Christian; Svendsen, Jesper H.; Olesen, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the genetic basis of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the role of variants in the susceptibility of developing the disease. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. Studies in the last decade have demonstrated that AF, and in particular....... The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for AF are still far from completely understood, and it is assumed that this arrhythmia represents a complex interplay of genetic predispositions, arrhythmogenic contributors such as electrolytes and inflammatory stimuli as well as contributions from concomitant cardiac...... lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have indicated that common genetic variants, more precisely the so called single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with AF. Presently more than 10 genomic regions have been identified using...

  9. Is there more than one way to skin a newt? Convergent toxin resistance in snakes is not due to a common genetic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, C R; Durso, A M; Hanifin, C T; Pfrender, M E; Ducey, P K; Stokes, A N; Barnett, K E; Brodie, E D; Brodie, E D

    2016-01-01

    Convergent evolution of tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistance, at both the phenotypic and genetic levels, characterizes coevolutionary arms races between amphibians and their snake predators around the world, and reveals remarkable predictability in the process of adaptation. Here we examine the repeatability of the evolution of TTX resistance in an undescribed predator-prey relationship between TTX-bearing Eastern Newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) and Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes (Heterodon platirhinos). We found that that local newts contain levels of TTX dangerous enough to dissuade most predators, and that Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes within newt range are highly resistant to TTX. In fact, these populations of Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes are so resistant to TTX that the potential for current reciprocal selection might be limited. Unlike all other cases of TTX resistance in vertebrates, H. platirhinos lacks the adaptive amino acid substitutions in the skeletal muscle sodium channel that reduce TTX binding, suggesting that physiological resistance in Eastern Hog-nosed Snakes is conferred by an alternate genetic mechanism. Thus, phenotypic convergence in this case is not due to parallel molecular evolution, indicating that there may be more than one way for this adaptation to arise, even among closely related species.

  10. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  11. Genetic Diversity of Croatian Common Bean Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaudija Carović-Stanko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In Croatia, the majority of the common bean production is based on local landraces, grown by small-scale farmers in low input production systems. Landraces are adapted to the specific growing conditions and agro-environments and show a great morphological diversity. These local landraces are in danger of genetic erosion caused by complex socio-economic changes in rural communities. The low profitability of farms and their small size, the advanced age of farmers and the replacement of traditional landraces with modern bean cultivars and/or other more profitable crops have been identified as the major factors affecting genetic erosion. Three hundred accessions belonging to most widely used landraces were evaluated by phaseolin genotyping and microsatellite marker analysis. A total of 183 different multi-locus genotypes in the panel of 300 accessions were revealed using 26 microsatellite markers. Out of 183 accessions, 27.32% were of Mesoamerican origin, 68.31% of Andean, while 4.37% of accessions represented putative hybrids between gene pools. Accessions of Andean origin were further classified into phaseolin type II (“H” or “C” and III (“T”, the latter being more frequent. A model-based cluster analysis based on microsatellite markers revealed the presence of three clusters in congruence with the results of phaseolin type analysis.

  12. Genetic Diversity of Croatian Common Bean Landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carović-Stanko, Klaudija; Liber, Zlatko; Vidak, Monika; Barešić, Ana; Grdiša, Martina; Lazarević, Boris; Šatović, Zlatko

    2017-01-01

    In Croatia, the majority of the common bean production is based on local landraces, grown by small-scale farmers in low input production systems. Landraces are adapted to the specific growing conditions and agro-environments and show a great morphological diversity. These local landraces are in danger of genetic erosion caused by complex socio-economic changes in rural communities. The low profitability of farms and their small size, the advanced age of farmers and the replacement of traditional landraces with modern bean cultivars and/or other more profitable crops have been identified as the major factors affecting genetic erosion. Three hundred accessions belonging to most widely used landraces were evaluated by phaseolin genotyping and microsatellite marker analysis. A total of 183 different multi-locus genotypes in the panel of 300 accessions were revealed using 26 microsatellite markers. Out of 183 accessions, 27.32% were of Mesoamerican origin, 68.31% of Andean, while 4.37% of accessions represented putative hybrids between gene pools. Accessions of Andean origin were further classified into phaseolin type II ("H" or "C") and III ("T"), the latter being more frequent. A model-based cluster analysis based on microsatellite markers revealed the presence of three clusters in congruence with the results of phaseolin type analysis.

  13. Is there a Common Genetic Basis for Autoimmune Diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan-Manuel Anaya

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (ADs represent a diverse collection of diseases in terms of their demographic profile and primary clinical manifestations. The commonality between them however, is the damage to tissues and organs that arises from the response to self-antigens. The presence of shared pathophysiological mechanisms within ADs has stimulated searches for common genetic roots to these diseases. Two approaches have been undertaken to sustain the “common genetic origin” theory of ADs. Firstly, a clinical genetic analysis showed that autoimmunity aggregates within families of probands diagnosed with primary Sjögren's (pSS syndrome or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. A literature review supported the establishment of a familiar cluster of ADs depending upon the proband's disease phenotype. Secondly, in a same and well-defined population, a large genetic association study indicated that a number of polymorphic genes (i.e. HLA-DRB1, TNF and PTPN22 influence the susceptibility for acquiring different ADs. Likewise, association and linkage studies in different populations have revealed that several susceptibility loci overlap in ADs, and clinical studies have shown that frequent clustering of several ADs occurs. Thus, the genetic factors for ADs consist of two types: those which are common to many ADs (acting in epistatic pleitropy and those that are specific to a given disorder. Their identification and functional characterization will allow us to predict their effect as well as to indicate potential new therapeutic interventions. Both autoimmunity family history and the co-occurrence of ADs in affected probands should be considered when performing genetic association and linkage studies.

  14. Phenobarbital induction of CYP2B1, CYP2B2, and CYP3A1 in rat liver: genetic differences in a common regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M C; Jefcoate, C R

    1995-08-20

    The phenobarbital induction of five responsive hepatic cytochrome P450 genes is highly strain selective, particularly in female rats (Fischer > Wistar Furth). We have shown that this strain variation represents a systematic difference in the endocrine-mediated suppression of phenobarbital induction which points to a common signaling process for each of these genes. Immunoblot analysis revealed that the strain-specific differences of phenobarbital responsiveness (10-fold for CYP2B1, CYP2B2, and CYP3A1 in females) are much smaller in male animals and are also greatly diminished by hypophysectomy. Partial depletion of thyroid hormone and growth hormone levels by methimazole treatment was equally as effective as hypophysectomy in elevating phenobarbital-induced levels of CYP2B1, CYP2B2, and CYP3A1 in Wistar Furth rats, while the Fischer strain was unaffected. Ovariectomy suppressed the phenobarbital induction of these genes in the Wistar Furth but not in the Fischer strain, while castration yielded a similar differential suppression in male rats which was reversed by testosterone propionate supplementation. Changes in CYP2B1 protein closely correlated with changes in 7-pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylation activity, a functional marker for this P450. The strain-selective differences, although smaller, were also observed in the very low basal expression of these P450 genes, while the effects of hypophysectomy, ovariectomy, and castration occurred in a similar manner. However, methimazole was essentially ineffective relative to hypophysectomy in elevating basal expression of these genes. The low concentrations of residual growth hormone and thyroid hormone probably provide a more effective suppression in the basal than in the induced state. We conclude that multiple cytochrome P450 genes share a common phenobarbital induction pathway that, in part, alleviates the suppressive effects of thyroid hormone and growth hormone which are far greater in female Wistar Furth rats. This

  15. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  16. Genetic relationships among alfalfa gemplasms resistant to common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-03

    Oct 3, 2011 ... 2The Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and Breeding, Department of Agronomy, Tianjin Agricultural University, Tianjin. 300384 ... Genetic relationships among 26 alfalfa cultivars, of which, 12 were of high resistance to common leaf ..... ultradense genetic recombination map for Brassica napus, consisting.

  17. Population genetic study on common kilka (Clupeonella cultriventris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A

    Accepted 16 October, 2012. This study represents population genetic analysis of the common kilka Clupeonella cultriventris ... of different genetic populations along the Caspian Sea coast (Guilan Province). Key words: Population ..... microsatellite linkage map of the European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L. Genetics ...

  18. Shared genetic variants suggest common pathways in allergy and autoimmune diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreiner, Eskil; Waage, Johannes; Standl, Marie; Brix, Susanne; Pers, Tune H; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Warrington, Nicole M; Tiesler, Carla Mt; Fuertes, Elaine; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N; James, Alan; Simpson, Angela; Tung, Joyce Y; Koppelman, Gerard H; Postma, Dirkje S; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Custovic, Adnan; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Strachan, David P; Henderson, John; Hinds, David; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    Background: The relationship between allergy and autoimmune disorders is complex and poorly understood. Objective: We sought to investigate commonalities in genetic loci and pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases to elucidate shared disease mechanisms. Methods: We meta-analyzed 2

  19. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ethiopian genetic center is considered to be one of the secondary centers of diversity for the common bean. This study was conducted to characterize the distribution of genetic diversity between and within ecological/geographical regions of Ethiopia. A germplasm sample of 116 landrace accessions was developed, ...

  20. agronomic qualities of genetic pyramids of common bean developed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2017-11-07

    Nov 7, 2017 ... (BCMNV); and Pythium ultimum (P.ult) root rots were combined into the same genotype at CIAT, a process referred to as pyramiding. Common bean genetic pyramids could, therefore, offer long-term strategies for managing major common bean diseases. However, in the process of developing pyramids ...

  1. Genetic risk prediction for common diseases : methodology and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Mihaescu (Raluca)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis describes methodological and empirical studies of genetic risk prediction of common diseases. The methodological studies involved the evaluation of traditional and new methods of model performance, the evaluation of rare variants for risk prediction of common diseases, the

  2. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magn...

  3. Genetic Correlation between Body Fat Percentage and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Suggests Common Genetic Etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnurr, Theresia M; Gjesing, Anette P; Sandholt, Camilla H

    2016-01-01

    reflect a common genetic origin. In this study we aimed to 1) examine genetic correlations between body fat% and CRF; 2) determine whether CRF can be attributed to a genetic risk score (GRS) based on known body fat% increasing loci; and 3) examine whether the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) locus...... author and source are credited....

  4. Rare genetic risk factors in common idiopathic epilepsy syndromes

    OpenAIRE

    Lal, Dennis

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures due to increased neuronal hyperexcitability and abnormal synchronization. I have explored the genetic architecture of the most common types of idiopathic epilepsies, the idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs) and the spectrum of idiopathic focal epilepsies related to rolandic epilepsies (REs). Both groups are distinguishable by the leading seizure types, age-dependent onset and electroen...

  5. Genetic control of potassium content of common bean seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Nerison Luís Poersch; Nerinéia Dalfollo Ribeiro; Daniele Piano Rosa; Micheli Thaise Della Flora Possobom

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate possible maternal effects on potassium content of common bean seeds, as well as to estimate the heritability and selection gains in early hybrid generations for this character and to evaluate the efficiency of genetic selection to improve the nutritional quality of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Crosses with four cultivars from the Mesoamerican gene pool yielded the reciprocal F1 and F2 generations and the backcrossed populations (BCP1 and BCP2...

  6. A common genetic factor underlies hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spector Tim D

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain conditions characterised by blood vessel occlusion or vascular spasm have been found to cluster together in epidemiological studies. However the biological causes for these associations remain controversial. This study used a classical twin design to examine whether these conditions are linked through shared environmental exposures or by a common underlying genetic propensity to vasospasm. Methods We investigated the association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease in twins from a national register. Phenotype status was determined using a questionnaire and the genetic and environmental association between phenotypes was estimated through variance components analysis. Results Responses were obtained from 2,204 individuals comprising 525 monozygotic and 577 dizygotic pairs. There was a significant genetic contribution to all four traits with heritabilities ranging from 0.34 to 0.64. Multivariate model-fitting demonstrated that a single common genetic factor underlies the four conditions. Conclusions We have confirmed an association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease, and shown that a single genetic factor underlies them. The demonstration of a shared genetic factor explains the association between them and adds weight to the theory of an inherited predisposition to vasospasm.

  7. Worldwide genetic differentiation in the common fouling barnacle, Amphibalanus amphitrite

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hsi-Nien

    2014-10-21

    © 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Amphibalanus amphitrite is a common fouling barnacle distributed globally in tropical and subtropical waters. In the present study, the genetic (mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I) and morphological differentiation in A. amphitrite from 25 localities around the world were investigated. The results revealed three clades within A. amphitrite with a genetic divergence of ~ 4% among clades, whereas there were no diagnostic morphological differences among clades. Clade 1 is widely distributed in both temperate and tropical waters, whereas Clade 3 is currently restricted to the tropical region. The deep divergence among clades suggests historical isolation within A. amphitrite; thus, the present geographical overlaps are possibly a result of the combined effects of rising sea level and human-mediated dispersals. This study highlights the genetic differentiation that exists in a common, widely distributed fouling organism with great dispersal potential; future antifouling research should take into account the choice of lineages.

  8. New ethical issues for genetic counseling in common mental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Elliot S; Alliey-Rodriguez, Ney

    2013-09-01

    Recent genetic findings of high-impact genetic variants in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) must lead to profound changes in genetic and family counseling. The authors present risk calculations, discuss the ethical implications of these findings, and outline the changes now required in the risk counseling process. The authors use data from recent mega-analyses and reviews of common and rare risk variants in bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and ASD to calculate risks of illness based on genetic marker tests. They then consider new ethical issues in mental disorders presented by these risks, including within-family conflicts over genetic testing; effects of genetic discoveries on stigma, abortion, preimplantation procedures, and population screening for susceptibility; and genetic tests as a factor in marital choice. New structural mutations (de novo copy number variants [CNVs], which are chromosomal microdeletions and micro-duplications) are present in 4%27% of patients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or ASD and can occur almost anywhere in the genome. For a person with a de novo CNV, the absolute risk of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or ASD is 14%, much higher than the population risk. Rare CNVs have also been identified that are generally not new mutations but constitute very high-effect risk factors, ranging up to 82%. A substantial minority of patients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and ASD have high-impact detectable genetic events. This greatly changes psychiatric genetic counseling for these patients and families. A psychotherapeutic approach may be needed as a routine part of risk counseling, particularly for resolution of ethical issues and for within-family stigma and conflicts over genetic test results.

  9. Genetic relationships among alfalfa gemplasms resistant to common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic relationships among 26 alfalfa cultivars, of which, 12 were of high resistance to common leaf spot (CLS), were assessed using sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers. 34 SRAP primer combinations were selected for fingerprinting of these cultivars and a total of 281 bands were observed, among ...

  10. Examination of genetic diversity in common bean ( Phaseolus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To study the pattern of genetic diversity in 45 genotypes of common bean, 19 RAPD primers were used. Of 253 bands produced, 236 bands (94.22%) were polymorphic in which maximum number (20 polymorphic bands) were observed in the profiles of the primer OPB-07. Highest PIC value (0.79) was observed for the ...

  11. Genetic diversity study of common bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phaseolus vulgaris L. (family Leguminosae), is a leguminous crop widely distributed in all parts of the world. In Ethiopia, common bean is cultivated as a source of protein for local consumption and for export. Mostly, it grows in the warm and lowland areas of the country. The aim of this research was to investigate the genetic ...

  12. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fire7-

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... The Ethiopian genetic center is considered to be one of the secondary centers of diversity for the ... accessions was developed, which represented different common bean production ecologies and seed .... The size of the bubbles does not correspond to number of genotypes sampled in each location.

  13. Role of common sarcomeric gene polymorphisms in genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Mutations in sarcomeric genes are common genetic cause of cardiomyopathies. An intronic 25-bp deletion in cardiac myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3) at 3 region is associated with dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies in Southeast Asia. However, the frequency of sarcomeric gene polymorphisms and ...

  14. Common Genetic Components of Obesity Traits and Serum Leptin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Ann L; Benyamin, Beben; Visscher, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    To estimate common and distinct genetic influences on a panel of obesity-related traits and serum leptin level in adults. In a cross-sectional study of 625 Danish, adult, healthy, monozygotic, and same-sex dizygotic twin pairs of both genders, we carried out detailed anthropometry (height, weight......, waist and hip, and skin-fold thickness, body composition assessment by bioimpedance (fat mass and fat-free mass), and measurement of serum leptin level. Bivariate variance component analyses estimated the additive genetic correlations between these measurements. The genetic correlations between....... For leptin vs. the various measures of overall and local fatness the correlations ranged from 0.54 to 0.74 in men and from 0.48 to 0.75 in women. All correlations were significantly genetic...

  15. Evidence of Common Genetic Overlap Between Schizophrenia and Cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Leon; Tansey, Katherine E; Rai, Dheeraj; Jones, Peter; Ripke, Stephan; Chambert, Kimberly D; Moran, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Steven A; Linden, David E J; Owen, Michael J; O'Donovan, Michael C; Walters, James T R; Zammit, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    Cognitive impairment is a core feature of schizophrenia but there is limited understanding of the genetic relationship between cognition in the general population and schizophrenia. We examine how common variants associated with schizophreniaen massecontribute to childhood cognitive ability in a population-based sample, and the extent to which common genetic variants associated with childhood cognition explain variation in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia polygenic risk scores were derived from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (n= 69 516) and tested for association with IQ, attention, processing speed, working memory, problem solving, and social cognition in over 5000 children aged 8 from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children birth cohort. Polygenic scores for these cognitive domains were tested for association with schizophrenia in a large UK schizophrenia sample (n= 11 853). Bivariate genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) estimated the amount of shared genetic factors between schizophrenia and cognitive domains. Schizophrenia polygenic risk score was associated with lower performance IQ (P= .001) and lower full IQ (P= .013). Polygenic score for performance IQ was associated with increased risk for schizophrenia (P= 3.56E-04). Bivariate GCTA revealed moderate genetic correlation between schizophrenia and both performance IQ (rG= -.379,P= 6.62E-05) and full IQ (rG= -.202,P= 5.00E-03), with approximately 14% of the genetic component of schizophrenia shared with that for performance IQ. Our results support the presence of shared common genetic factors between schizophrenia and childhood cognitive ability. We observe a genetic relationship between schizophrenia and performance IQ but not verbal IQ or other cognitive variables, which may have implications for studies utilizing cognitive endophenotypes for psychosis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  17. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  18. Molecular Mechanism for Genetic Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Henry M.

    1972-01-01

    Symmetry considerations of proteinnucleic acid interaction suggest the existence of an alternate branched configuration for DNA induced by binding specific structural proteins to symmetrically arranged polynucleotide base sequences. The concept that such sequences exist at the ends of genes or operons leads to a molecular model for genetic recombination in eukaryotic cells. PMID:4115953

  19. Common Genetic Variants Alter Metabolism and Influence Dietary Choline Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Ariel B; Klatt, Kevin C; Caudill, Marie A

    2017-08-04

    Nutrient needs, including those of the essential nutrient choline, are a population wide distribution. Adequate Intake (AI) recommendations for dietary choline (put forth by the National Academies of Medicine to aid individuals and groups in dietary assessment and planning) are grouped to account for the recognized unique needs associated with age, biological sex, and reproductive status (i.e., pregnancy or lactation). Established and emerging evidence supports the notion that common genetic variants are additional factors that substantially influence nutrient requirements. This review summarizes the genetic factors that influence choline requirements and metabolism in conditions of nutrient deprivation, as well as conditions of nutrient adequacy, across biological sexes and reproductive states. Overall, consistent and strong associative evidence demonstrates that common genetic variants in choline and folate pathway enzymes impact the metabolic handling of choline and the risk of nutrient inadequacy across varied dietary contexts. The studies characterized in this review also highlight the substantial promise of incorporating common genetic variants into choline intake recommendations to more precisely target the unique nutrient needs of these subgroups within the broader population. Additional studies are warranted to facilitate the translation of this evidence to nutrigenetics-based dietary approaches.

  20. Unraveling genetic mechanisms in headache syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weller, Claudia Mandina

    2015-01-01

    Migraine and cluster headache are disabling brain disorders. Current treatment is ineffective in many patients. The research performed in this thesis aimed at elucidating some of the molecular genetic mechanisms in these two headache disorders by means of clinical and genetic studies in complex

  1. Identification of common genetic variation that modulates alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Hull

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by naturally occurring DNA sequence variation and in particular by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this study, we surveyed the splicing patterns of 250 exons in 22 individuals who had been previously genotyped by the International HapMap Project. We identified 70 simple cassette exon alternative splicing events in our experimental system; for six of these, we detected consistent differences in splicing pattern between individuals, with a highly significant association between splice phenotype and neighbouring SNPs. Remarkably, for five out of six of these events, the strongest correlation was found with the SNP closest to the intron-exon boundary, although the distance between these SNPs and the intron-exon boundary ranged from 2 bp to greater than 1,000 bp. Two of these SNPs were further investigated using a minigene splicing system, and in each case the SNPs were found to exert cis-acting effects on exon splicing efficiency in vitro. The functional consequences of these SNPs could not be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms. Our findings suggest that phenotypic variation in splicing patterns is determined by the presence of SNPs within flanking introns or exons. Effects on splicing may represent an important mechanism by which SNPs influence gene function.

  2. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  3. Most genetic risk for autism resides with common variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaugler, Trent; Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J; Bodea, Corneliu A; Goldberg, Arthur P; Lee, Ann B; Mahajan, Milind; Manaa, Dina; Pawitan, Yudi; Reichert, Jennifer; Ripke, Stephan; Sandin, Sven; Sklar, Pamela; Svantesson, Oscar; Reichenberg, Abraham; Hultman, Christina M; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn; Buxbaum, Joseph D

    2014-08-01

    A key component of genetic architecture is the allelic spectrum influencing trait variability. For autism spectrum disorder (herein termed autism), the nature of the allelic spectrum is uncertain. Individual risk-associated genes have been identified from rare variation, especially de novo mutations. From this evidence, one might conclude that rare variation dominates the allelic spectrum in autism, yet recent studies show that common variation, individually of small effect, has substantial impact en masse. At issue is how much of an impact relative to rare variation this common variation has. Using a unique epidemiological sample from Sweden, new methods that distinguish total narrow-sense heritability from that due to common variation and synthesis of results from other studies, we reach several conclusions about autism's genetic architecture: its narrow-sense heritability is ∼52.4%, with most due to common variation, and rare de novo mutations contribute substantially to individual liability, yet their contribution to variance in liability, 2.6%, is modest compared to that for heritable variation.

  4. Genetic Correlation between Body Fat Percentage and Cardiorespiratory Fitness Suggests Common Genetic Etiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnurr, Theresia Maria; Gjesing, Anette Marianne Prior; Sandholt, Camilla Helene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: It has long been discussed whether fitness or fatness is a more important determinant of health status. If the same genetic factors that promote body fat percentage (body fat%) are related to cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), part of the concurrent associations with health outcomes could...... reflect a common genetic origin. In this study we aimed to 1) examine genetic correlations between body fat% and CRF; 2) determine whether CRF can be attributed to a genetic risk score (GRS) based on known body fat% increasing loci; and 3) examine whether the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) locus...... associates with CRF. Methods: Genetic correlations based on pedigree information were examined in a family based cohort (n = 230 from 55 families). For the genetic association analyses, we examined two Danish population-based cohorts (ntotal = 3206). The body fat% GRS was created by summing the alleles...

  5. Genetics of common bean resistance to white mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Fernandes Carneiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to investigate the nature and magnitude of the genetic factors involved in theresistance of the common bean to white mold. The lines G122 (resistant and M20 (susceptible were crossed to yield F1 and F2generations and F2:3 progenies. The experiment was set up using the random block design with two replications, each of which wasevaluated twice with fungal inoculations being performed on 28 and 38 day-old plants using the straw test method. Six to eight daysafter inoculation evaluations were conducted on individual plants and at the level of means of progenies using a diagrammatic scaleranging from 1 to 9. The additive-dominance model adopted was efficient, and the genetic control of resistance was predominantlydue additive effects. Estimates of broad-sense heritability indicated that selection would be more efficient when based on the meansof progenies and when successive inoculations are employed.

  6. Common Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Blood Biomarker Measurements in COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2016-08-01

    differences observed between pQTLs and eQTLs SNPs, we recommend that protein biomarker-disease association studies take into account the potential effect of common local SNPs and that pQTLs be integrated along with eQTLs to uncover disease mechanisms. Large-scale blood biomarker studies would also benefit from close attention to the ABO blood group.

  7. Common Genetic Polymorphisms Influence Blood Biomarker Measurements in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Kechris, Katerina; Jacobson, Sean; Drummond, M Bradley; Hawkins, Gregory A; Yang, Jenny; Chen, Ting-Huei; Quibrera, Pedro Miguel; Anderson, Wayne; Barr, R Graham; Basta, Patricia V; Bleecker, Eugene R; Beaty, Terri; Casaburi, Richard; Castaldi, Peter; Cho, Michael H; Comellas, Alejandro; Crapo, James D; Criner, Gerard; Demeo, Dawn; Christenson, Stephanie A; Couper, David J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Doerschuk, Claire M; Freeman, Christine M; Gouskova, Natalia A; Han, MeiLan K; Hanania, Nicola A; Hansel, Nadia N; Hersh, Craig P; Hoffman, Eric A; Kaner, Robert J; Kanner, Richard E; Kleerup, Eric C; Lutz, Sharon; Martinez, Fernando J; Meyers, Deborah A; Peters, Stephen P; Regan, Elizabeth A; Rennard, Stephen I; Scholand, Mary Beth; Silverman, Edwin K; Woodruff, Prescott G; O'Neal, Wanda K; Bowler, Russell P

    2016-08-01

    differences observed between pQTLs and eQTLs SNPs, we recommend that protein biomarker-disease association studies take into account the potential effect of common local SNPs and that pQTLs be integrated along with eQTLs to uncover disease mechanisms. Large-scale blood biomarker studies would also benefit from close attention to the ABO blood group.

  8. Italian Common Bean Landraces: History, Genetic Diversity and Seed Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Piergiovanni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The long tradition of common bean cultivation in Italy has allowed the evolution of many landraces adapted to restricted areas. Nowadays, in response to market demands, old landraces are gradually being replaced by improved cultivars. However, landraces still survive in marginal areas of several Italian regions. Most of them appear severely endangered with risk of extinction due to the advanced age of the farmers and the socio-cultural context where they are cultivated. The present contribution is an overview of the state of the art about the knowledge of Italian common bean germplasm, describing the most important and recent progresses made in its characterization, including genetic diversity and nutritional aspects.

  9. Genetic sampling for estimating density of common species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ellen; Hodges, Karen E; Sollmann, Rahel; Mills, L Scott

    2017-08-01

    Understanding population dynamics requires reliable estimates of population density, yet this basic information is often surprisingly difficult to obtain. With rare or difficult-to-capture species, genetic surveys from noninvasive collection of hair or scat has proved cost-efficient for estimating densities. Here, we explored whether noninvasive genetic sampling (NGS) also offers promise for sampling a relatively common species, the snowshoe hare (Lepus americanus Erxleben, 1777), in comparison with traditional live trapping. We optimized a protocol for single-session NGS sampling of hares. We compared spatial capture-recapture population estimates from live trapping to estimates derived from NGS, and assessed NGS costs. NGS provided population estimates similar to those derived from live trapping, but a higher density of sampling plots was required for NGS. The optimal NGS protocol for our study entailed deploying 160 sampling plots for 4 days and genotyping one pellet per plot. NGS laboratory costs ranged from approximately $670 to $3000 USD per field site. While live trapping does not incur laboratory costs, its field costs can be considerably higher than for NGS, especially when study sites are difficult to access. We conclude that NGS can work for common species, but that it will require field and laboratory pilot testing to develop cost-effective sampling protocols.

  10. [Molecular mechanism and genetic basis of geoherbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lu-Qi; Guo, Lan-Ping; Hu, Juan; Shao, Ai-Juan

    2008-10-01

    As products of interaction of time and space, geoherbs, which are essential parts of Chinese Materia Medica, were characterized in different morphology, unique habitat, continuous and changeable sites. The main fields in molecular mechanism of geoherbs focus on: biodiversity and molecular identification, genetic different and evolutionary genetics, geo-variation and environmental adaptation, germplasm and aimed genus choosing, expression and control of functional gene, gene transfer and bio-safety evaluation. The main tasks are to discover the genetic variation at molecular level, ascertain the molecular characteristics of geoherbs and the effect of environment on gene expression of geoherbs, confirm the genetic factors attribute to the forming of geoherbs, and find out the genetic basis of geoherbs at individual level and population level, respectively. This paper pointed out that the essential of geoherbs is continuers quantities variation at population level, geoherb's populations are different in gene frequency with the others'; geohersm are quantitative trait loci (QTL) controlled by multi - gene or combination with multiple-gene and major gene at individual level. It is very important to pay more attention to the scale effect of geoherbs, refer the theories and methods of quantities genetic, and concern more about the interaction of environment and gene in geoherbs' molecular mechanism research.

  11. Prospects for genetically modified non-human primate models, including the common marmoset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Erika

    2015-04-01

    Genetically modified mice have contributed much to studies in the life sciences. In some research fields, however, mouse models are insufficient for analyzing the molecular mechanisms of pathology or as disease models. Often, genetically modified non-human primate (NHP) models are desired, as they are more similar to human physiology, morphology, and anatomy. Recent progress in studies of the reproductive biology in NHPs has enabled the introduction of exogenous genes into NHP genomes or the alteration of endogenous NHP genes. This review summarizes recent progress in the production of genetically modified NHPs, including the common marmoset, and future perspectives for realizing genetically modified NHP models for use in life sciences research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic control of potassium content of common bean seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerison Luís Poersch

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to investigate possible maternal effects on potassium content of common bean seeds, as well as to estimate the heritability and selection gains in early hybrid generations for this character and to evaluate the efficiency of genetic selection to improve the nutritional quality of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. Crosses with four cultivars from the Mesoamerican gene pool yielded the reciprocal F1 and F2 generations and the backcrossed populations (BCP1 and BCP2. The potassium content of the progenies was measured via nitric‑perchloric digestion and flame photometry. The potassium content in the tested progenies varied from 6.0 to 14.9 g kg-1 dry matter, and no significant maternal effect was observed. The narrow-sense heritability ranged from low (33.26% to intermediate (43.05%. Partial dominance was observed for low potassium content in the seeds. No increase in potassium content was obtained through selection. Breeding common bean plants for increasing potassium content in seeds may be difficult because the local environment strongly influences the character.

  13. Common genetic components of obesity traits and serum leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselbalch, Ann L; Benyamin, Beben; Visscher, Peter M; Heitmann, Berit L; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2008-12-01

    To estimate common and distinct genetic influences on a panel of obesity-related traits and serum leptin level in adults. In a cross-sectional study of 625 Danish, adult, healthy, monozygotic, and same-sex dizygotic twin pairs of both genders, we carried out detailed anthropometry (height, weight, waist and hip, and skin-fold thickness, body composition assessment by bioimpedance (fat mass and fat-free mass), and measurement of serum leptin level. Bivariate variance component analyses estimated the additive genetic correlations between these measurements. The genetic correlations between the traits for overall fatness (BMI and fat mass index, kg/m(2)) were 0.94 in men and 0.98 in women, and their correlations with the various local fatness measures ranged from 0.49 to 0.83 in men and from 0.70 to 0.87 in women. The correlations between the truncal measures (waist circumference and truncal skin folds) and between the peripheral measures (hip circumference and peripheral skin folds) were 0.57 and 0.47 in men and 0.71 and 0.70 in women, respectively. The correlations between the truncal and peripheral measures ranged between 0.49 and 0.72 in men and between 0.61 and 0.82 in women. For leptin vs. the various measures of overall and local fatness the correlations ranged from 0.54 to 0.74 in men and from 0.48 to 0.75 in women. All correlations were significantly obesity.

  14. Additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eCalero

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Familial Alzheimer's disease (AD, mostly associated with early onset, is caused by mutations in three genes (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2 involved in the production of the amyloid  peptide. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms that trigger the most common late onset sporadic AD remain largely unknown. With the implementation of an increasing number of case-control studies and the upcoming of large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS there is a mounting list of genetic risk factors associated to common genetic variants that have been associated to sporadic AD. Besides APOE, that presents a strong association with the disease (OR~4, the rest of these genes have moderate or low degrees of association, with OR ranging from 0.88 to 1.23. Taking together, these genes may account only for a fraction of the attributable AD risk and therefore, rare variants and epistastic gene interactions should be taken into account in order to get the full picture of the genetic risks associated to AD. Here, we review recent whole-exome studies looking for rare variants, somatic brain mutations with a strong association to the disease, and several studies dealing with epistasis as additional mechanisms conferring genetic susceptibility to AD. Altogether, recent evidence underlines the importance of defining molecular and genetic pathways and networks rather than the contribution of specific genes.

  15. [Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinney, A; Herrfurth, N; Schonnop, L; Volckmar, A-L

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is a relevant medical problem. Around 60 % of German adults are overweight, 20 % are obese. The hereditary contribution to the variance of body weight is high. Nevertheless, molecular genetic studies have as yet explained only a small part of the inter-individual variability in the body mass index (BMI). Monogenic forms of obesity, in which loss of a single gene product leads to extreme obesity, are very infrequent. Variance of body weight is commonly explained by a complex interplay of many genetic variants (polygenic obesity). Each variant contributes only a small amount to the body weight. Currently, the largest published analysis of individuals of European origin identified 32 genetic variations (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) associated with BMI (obesity). Overall, these polygenic obesity variants only explain about 5 % of the variance of the BMI. In addition to the DNA variants epigenetic factors seem to also play a role in body weight regulation. These epigenetic marks can change in the course of life. They might provide an interface between genetic and environmental influences. It is conceivable that in future it will be possible to use epigenetic and genetic markers to detect a predisposition for obesity and to improve prevention and therapy.

  16. Genetic diversity of Pakistani common myna (Acridotheres tristis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... Acridotheres tristis is a widely distributed species of Pakistan but no genetic data of this species is available in the literature. ... protection programs, the genetic structure of species at population level has received ..... the Genetic Polymorphism in Duck: Differences among Breeds. Genetika, 36: 682-687.

  17. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Caspi, S; Dietderich, D R; Gourlay, S A; Gupta, R; McInturff, A; Millos, G; Scanlan, R M

    1999-01-01

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a "conductor-friendly" option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb/sub 3/Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach. (9 refs).

  18. Mechanical design of a high field common coil magnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspi, S.; Chow, K.; Dietderich, D.; Gourlay, S.; Gupta, R.; McInturff, A.; Millos, G.; Scanlan, R.

    1999-03-18

    A common coil design for high field 2-in-1 accelerator magnets has been previously presented as a 'conductor-friendly' option for high field magnets applicable for a Very Large Hadron Collider. This paper presents the mechanical design for a 14 tesla 2-in-1 dipole based on the common coil design approach. The magnet will use a high current density Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor. The design addresses mechanical issues particular to the common coil geometry: horizontal support against coil edges, vertical preload on coil faces, end loading and support, and coil stresses and strains. The magnet is the second in a series of racetrack coil magnets that will provide experimental verification of the common coil design approach.

  19. Shared genetic variants suggest common pathways in allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Waage, Johannes; Standl, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background: The relationship between allergy and autoimmune disorders is complex and poorly understood. Objective: To investigate commonalities in genetic loci and pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases to elucidate shared disease mechanisms. Methods: We meta-analyzed two GWAS on self......-reported allergy and sensitization comprising a total of 62,330 individuals. These results were used to calculate enrichment for SNPs previously associated with autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we probed for enrichment within genetic pathways and of transcription factor binding sites, and characterized...... commonalities in the variant burden on tissue-specific regulatory sites by calculating the enrichment of allergy SNPs falling in gene regulatory regions in various cells using Encode Roadmap DHS data, and compared the allergy data with all known diseases. Conclusion: Among 290 loci previously associated with 16...

  20. Convergence of circuit dysfunction in ASD: a common bridge between diverse genetic and environmental risk factors and common clinical electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Russell G.; Gandal, Michael J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Siegel, Steven J.; Carlson, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Most recent estimates indicate that 1 in 68 children are affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Though decades of research have uncovered much about these disorders, the pathological mechanism remains unknown. Hampering efforts is the seeming inability to integrate findings over the micro to macro scales of study, from changes in molecular, synaptic and cellular function to large-scale brain dysfunction impacting sensory, communicative, motor and cognitive activity. In this review, we describe how studies focusing on neuronal circuit function provide unique context for identifying common neurobiological disease mechanisms of ASD. We discuss how recent EEG and MEG studies in subjects with ASD have repeatedly shown alterations in ensemble population recordings (both in simple evoked related potential latencies and specific frequency subcomponents). Because these disease-associated electrophysiological abnormalities have been recapitulated in rodent models, studying circuit differences in these models may provide access to abnormal circuit function found in ASD. We then identify emerging in vivo and ex vivo techniques, focusing on how these assays can characterize circuit level dysfunction and determine if these abnormalities underlie abnormal clinical electrophysiology. Such circuit level study in animal models may help us understand how diverse genetic and environmental risks can produce a common set of EEG, MEG and anatomical abnormalities found in ASD. PMID:25538564

  1. Kin-Aggregations Explain Chaotic Genetic Patchiness, a Commonly Observed Genetic Pattern, in a Marine Fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Selwyn

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of chaotic genetic patchiness is a pattern commonly seen in marine organisms, particularly those with demersal adults and pelagic larvae. This pattern is usually associated with sweepstakes recruitment and variable reproductive success. Here we investigate the biological underpinnings of this pattern in a species of marine goby Coryphopterus personatus. We find that populations of this species show tell-tale signs of chaotic genetic patchiness including: small, but significant, differences in genetic structure over short distances; a non-equilibrium or "chaotic" pattern of differentiation among locations in space; and within locus, within population deviations from the expectations of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE. We show that despite having a pelagic larval stage, and a wide distribution across Caribbean coral reefs, this species forms groups of highly related individuals at small spatial scales (<10 metres. These spatially clustered family groups cause the observed deviations from HWE and local population differentiation, a finding that is rarely demonstrated, but could be more common than previously thought.

  2. The mechanical transmission of hepatitis B virus by the common ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mechanical transmission of hepatitis B virus by the common bedbug. (Cimex lectularius L.) in South Africa. P. G. JUPP, S. E. McELLlGOTT, G. LECATSAS. Summary. Tests for both hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and hepatitis e antigen (HBeAg) were carried out on wild-caught and laboratory-colonized bedbugs.

  3. Shared genetic variants suggest common pathways in allergy and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, Eskil; Waage, Johannes; Standl, Marie; Brix, Susanne; Pers, Tune H; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Warrington, Nicole M; Tiesler, Carla M T; Fuertes, Elaine; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N; James, Alan; Simpson, Angela; Tung, Joyce Y; Koppelman, Gerard H; Postma, Dirkje S; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Custovic, Adnan; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Strachan, David P; Henderson, John; Hinds, David; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between allergy and autoimmune disorders is complex and poorly understood. We sought to investigate commonalities in genetic loci and pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases to elucidate shared disease mechanisms. We meta-analyzed 2 genome-wide association studies on self-reported allergy and sensitization comprising a total of 62,330 subjects. These results were used to calculate enrichment for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we probed for enrichment within genetic pathways and of transcription factor binding sites and characterized commonalities in variant burden on tissue-specific regulatory sites by calculating the enrichment of allergy SNPs falling in gene regulatory regions in various cells using Encode Roadmap DNase-hypersensitive site data. Finally, we compared the allergy data with those of all known diseases. Among 290 loci previously associated with 16 autoimmune diseases, we found a significant enrichment of loci also associated with allergy (P = 1.4e-17) encompassing 29 loci at a false discovery rate of less than 0.05. Such enrichment seemed to be a general characteristic for autoimmune diseases. Among the common loci, 48% had the same direction of effect for allergy and autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we observed an enrichment of allergy SNPs falling within immune pathways and regions of chromatin accessible in immune cells that was also represented in patients with autoimmune diseases but not those with other diseases. We identified shared susceptibility loci and commonalities in pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases, suggesting shared disease mechanisms. Further studies of these shared genetic mechanisms might help in understanding the complex relationship between these diseases, including the parallel increase in disease prevalence. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  4. Common genetic variants associated with open-angle glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdas, Wishal D; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Lemij, Hans G; Pasutto, Francesca; Cree, Angela J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F; Jacoline, Ten Brink; Amin, Najaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Wolfs, Roger C W; Walters, G Bragi; Jonasson, Fridbert; Weisschuh, Nicole; Mardin, Christian Y; Gibson, Jane; Zegers, Richard H C; Hofman, Albert; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Uitterlinden, André G; Oostra, Ben A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Gramer, Eugen; Welgen-Lüssen, Ulrich C; Kirwan, James F; Bergen, Arthur A B; Reis, André; Stefansson, Kari; Lotery, Andrew J; Vingerling, Johannes R; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2011-06-15

    Open-angle glaucoma (glaucoma) is a major eye disorder characterized by optic disc pathology. Recent genome-wide association studies identified new loci associated with clinically relevant optic disc parameters, such as the optic disc area and vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR). We examined to what extent these loci are involved in glaucoma. The loci studied include ATOH7, CDC7/TGFBR3 and SALL1 for optic disc area, and CDKN2B, SIX1, SCYL1/LTBP3, CHEK2, ATOH7 and DCLK1 for VCDR. We performed a meta-analysis using data from six independent studies including: the Rotterdam Study (n= 5736), Genetic Research in Isolated Populations combined with Erasmus Rucphen Family study (n= 1750), Amsterdam Glaucoma Study (n= 296) and cohorts from Erlangen and Tübingen (n= 1363), Southampton (n= 702) and deCODE (n= 36 151) resulting in a total of 3161 glaucoma cases and 42 837 controls. Of the eight loci, we found significant evidence (P= 1.41 × 10(-8)) for the association of CDKN2B with glaucoma [odds ratio (OR) for those homozygous for the risk allele: 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.70-0.84], for the role of ATOH7 (OR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.12-1.47) and for SIX1 (OR: 1.20; 95% CI: 1.10-1.31) when adjusting for the number of tested loci. Furthermore, there was a borderline significant association of CDC7/TGFBR3 and SALL1 (both P= 0.04) with glaucoma. In conclusion, we found consistent evidence for three common variants (CDKN2B, ATOH7 and SIX1) significantly associated with glaucoma. These findings may shed new light on the pathophysiological protein pathways leading to glaucoma, and point to pathways involved in the growth and development of the optic nerve.

  5. Genetic variation in coding regions between and within commonly used inbred rat strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, B.M.; van Zutphen, B.F.; Plasterk, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2004-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most common genetic variation in mammalian populations. Their significance is illustrated by their potential contribution to common disease but also by their potential for use in genetic association and mapping experiments. We have examined the genetic

  6. Genetic Counsellors and Private Practice: Professional Turbulence and Common Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Sarah; Gaff, Clara; Wake, Samantha; McEwen, Alison

    2017-12-27

    Genetic counsellors face tensions between past and future identities: between established values and goals, and a broadening scope of settings and activities. This study examines the advent of genetic counsellors in private practice in Australia and New Zealand from the perspectives of the small numbers working in this sector and those who have only worked in public practice. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 genetic counsellors who had experience in private practice, and 14 genetic counsellors without private sector experience. Results demonstrated that circumstantial and personal factors can mitigate the challenges experienced and the amount of support desired by those who had established a private practice, and those who were employed by private companies. Notably, most participants with private sector experience perceived themselves to be viewed negatively by other genetic counsellors. Most participants without private sector experience expressed concern that the challenges they believed genetic counsellors face in private practice may impact service quality, but wished to address such concerns by providing appropriate support. Together, our results reinforce that participants in private and public sectors are strong advocates for peer support, multidisciplinary team work, and professional development. These core values, and seeking understanding of different circumstances and support needs, will enable genetic counsellors in different sectors to move forward together. Our results suggest supports that may be acted upon by members of the profession, professional groups, and training programs, in Australia, New Zealand, and overseas.

  7. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment estimated – NIH-funded study. The bulk of risk, or liability, for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was traced to inherited variations ...

  8. Association mapping of genomic microdeletions and common susceptibility variants predisposing to genetic generalized epilepsies

    OpenAIRE

    Trucks, Holger Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 3% of the general population is affected by epilepsy during lifetime, making epilepsy one of the most common neurological diseases. Genetic generalized epilepsies (GGE) are the most common of genetic epilepsies and account for 20-30% of all epilepsies. GGE is subdivided into genetically determined subgroups with gradual transition, including genetic absence epilepsies (GAE), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), and epilepsy with generalized tonic-clonic seizures (EG...

  9. Common mechanisms of synaptic plasticity in vertebrates and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glanzman, David L.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the literature on learning-related synaptic plasticity in invertebrates has been dominated by models assuming plasticity is mediated by presynaptic changes, whereas the vertebrate literature has been dominated by models assuming it is mediated by postsynaptic changes. Here I will argue that this situation does not reflect a biological reality and that, in fact, invertebrate and vertebrate nervous systems share a common set of mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. PMID:20152143

  10. Epidemiological mechanisms of genetic resistance to kuru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Katherine E; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Medlock, Jan; Galvani, Alison P

    2013-08-06

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), such as kuru, are invariably fatal neurodegenerative conditions caused by a malformation of the prion protein. Heterozygosity of codon 129 of the prion protein gene has been associated with increased host resistance to TSEs, although the mechanism by which this resistance is achieved has not been determined. To evaluate the epidemiological mechanism of human resistance to kuru, we developed a model that combines the dynamics of kuru transmission and the population genetics of human resistance. We fitted our model to kuru data from the epidemic that occurred in Papua New Guinea over the last hundred years. To elucidate the epidemiological mechanism of human resistance, we estimated the incubation period and transmission rate of kuru for codon 129 heterozygotes and homozygotes using kuru incidence data and human genotype frequency data from 1957 to 2004. Our results indicate that human resistance arises from a combination of both a longer incubation period and reduced susceptibility to infection. This work provides evidence for balancing selection acting on a human population and the mechanistic basis for the heterozygote resistance to kuru.

  11. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Puetz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goering, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzah, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mahnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Noethen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdes Hernandez, Maria C.; van't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, Rene S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Voelzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Joensson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To

  12. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); J.L. Stein; M.E. Rentería (Miguel); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); N. Jahanshad (Neda); R. Toro (Roberto); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); L. Abramovic (Lucija); M. Andersson (Micael); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); M. Bernard (Manon); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.A. Brown (Andrew); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); A. den Braber (Anouk); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); O. Grimm (Oliver); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); J. Hass (Johanna); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil H.); L.M. Olde Loohuis (Loes M.); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); K. Nho (Kwangsik); M. Papmeyer (Martina); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); E.J. Rose (Emma); A. Salami (Alireza); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); J. Shin (Jean); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); R.K. Walters (Raymond); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); S. Alhusaini (Saud); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); M. Hakobjan (Marina); C.B. Hartberg (Cecilie B.); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); A.J.G.A.M. Heister (Angelien J. G. A. M.); D. Hoehn (David); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); R.R.R. Makkinje (Remco R. R.); M. Matarin (Mar); M.A.M. Naber (Marlies A. M.); D. Reese McKay; M. Needham (Margaret); A.C. Nugent (Allison); B. Pütz (Benno); N.A. Royle (Natalie); L. Shen (Li); R. Sprooten (Roy); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S.S.L. Van Der Marel (Saskia S. L.); K.J.E. Van Hulzen (Kimm J. E.); E. Walton (Esther); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); L. Almasy (Laura); D.J. Ames (David); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; M.E. Bastin (Mark); H. Brodaty (Henry); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); M.A. Carless (Melanie); S. Cichon (Sven); A. Corvin (Aiden); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); A. Dillman (Allissa); A. Duggirala (Aparna); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); S. Erk; I. Fedko (Iryna); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); M. Fukunaga (Masaki); J. Raphael Gibbs; H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); F. Holsboer; G. Homuth (Georg); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M. Ikeda (Masashi); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); R. Kanai (Ryota); M. Keil (Maria); J.W. Kent (Jack W.); P. Kochunov (Peter); J.B. Kwok (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); K.L. Mcmahon (Katie); E. Meisenzahl (Eva); I. Melle (Ingrid); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J.C. Mostert (Jeanette C.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); M.A. Nalls (Michael); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); L.G. Nilsson; M.M. Nöthen (Markus); K. Ohi (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R. Perez-Iglesias (Rocio); G. Bruce Pike; S.G. Potkin (Steven); I. Reinvang (Ivar); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (Marcella); N. Seiferth (Nina); G.D. Rosen (Glenn D.); D. Rujescu (Dan); K. Schnell (Kerry); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Smith (Colin); V.M. Steen (Vidar); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); J. Turner (Jessica); M.C. Valdés Hernández (Maria); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); D.J. Veltman (Dick); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); E. Westman (Eric); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman (Alan B.); D.G. Ashbrook (David G.); R. Hager (Reinmar); L. Lu (Lu); F.J. Mcmahon (Francis J); D.W. Morris (Derek W); R.W. Williams (Robert W.); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan K.); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); T. Espeseth (Thomas); R.L. Gollub (Randy); B.C. Ho (Beng ); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); N. Hosten (Norbert); R. Kahn (René); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); A. Meyer-Lindenberg; B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); M. Nauck (Matthias); L. Nyberg (Lars); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); J.W. Smoller; H. van Bokhoven (Hans); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); H. Völzke (Henry); H.J. Walter (Henrik); M.W. Weiner (Michael); W. Wen (Wei); T.J.H. White (Tonya); I. Agartz (Ingrid); O.A. Andreassen (Ole); J. Blangero (John); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); D.M. Cannon (Dara); M.R. Cookson (Mark); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); G. Fernandez (Guillén); S.E. Fisher (Simon); C. Francks (Clyde); D.C. Glahn (David); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); O. Gruber (Oliver); J. Hardy (John); R. Hashimoto (Ryota); H.E. Hulshoff Pol (Hilleke); E.G. Jönsson (Erik); I. Kloszewska (Iwona); S. Lovestone (Simon); V.S. Mattay (Venkata S.); P. Mecocci (Patrizia); C. McDonald (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); M. Ryten (Mina); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); A. Simmons (Andrew); A. Singleton (Andrew); H. Soininen (H.); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); M.E. Weale (Michael); D.R. Weinberger (Daniel); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S. Seiler (Stephan); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); J.T. Becker (James); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); S.J. van der Lee (Sven); M. Ebling (Maritza); B. Fischl (Bruce); W.T. Longstreth Jr; D. Greve (Douglas); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); P. Nyquist (Paul); L.N. Vinke (Louis N.); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L. Xue (Luting); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); J.C. Bis (Joshua); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Seshadri (Sudha); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M.J. Wright (Margaret); G. Schumann (Gunter); B. Franke (Barbara); P.M. Thompson (Paul); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate

  13. Population genetic study on common kilka ( Clupeonella cultriventris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All sampled regions contained private alleles. The average observed and expected heterozygosity were 0.153 and 0.888, respectively. All loci significantly deviated from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE). Based on AMOVA, RST values was found to be 0.113 (Nm=1.96, P<0.01). The genetic distance between populations ...

  14. Role of common sarcomeric gene polymorphisms in genetic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Genetics,Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGIMS), Lucknow 226 014, India; Department of Cardiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGIMS), Lucknow 226 014, India; Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Sanjay Gandhi ...

  15. Examination of genetic diversity in common bean (Phaseolus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    2015-02-11

    Feb 11, 2015 ... Division of Genetics and Pant Breeding Sher-e-Kashmir University of Agricultural Sciences and Technology of Kashmir. Shalimar campus ..... of commercial beans to develop high yielding cultivars. Conflict of interests. The authors did not declare any conflict of interest. REFERENCES. Alzate-Marin AL ...

  16. Mean Platelet Volume and Arterial Stiffness – Clinical Relationship and Common Genetic Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panova-Noeva, Marina; Arnold, Natalie; Hermanns, M. Iris; Prochaska, Jürgen H.; Schulz, Andreas; Spronk, Henri M.; Binder, Harald; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Beutel, Manfred; Blankenberg, Stefan; Zeller, Tanja; Lotz, Johannes; Münzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl J.; ten Cate, Hugo; Wild, Philipp S.

    2017-01-01

    Vessel wall stiffening is an important clinical parameter, but it is unknown whether platelets, key elements in the pathogenesis of arterial thrombosis, are associated with arterial stiffness. The present studies sought to determine whether mean platelet volume (MPV), a potential marker of platelet activation, is linked to vascular elasticity as assessed by the augmentation index (AIx), in 15,010 individuals from the population-based Gutenberg Health Study. Multivariable analysis showed that MPV in both males (β 0.776; 95thCI [0.250;1.16]; p = 0.0024) and females (β 0.881[0.328;1.43]; p = 0.0018) is strongly associated with AIx. Individuals with MPV and AIx above the sex-specific medians had worse survival. Association analysis between MPV-related genetic variants and arterial stiffness identified four genetic variants in males and one in females related with AIx. Cox regression analysis for mortality identified one of these joint genetic variants close to ring finger protein 145 gene (RNF145, rs10076782) linked with increased mortality (hazard ratio 2.02; 95thCI [1.35;3.02]; p = 0.00061). Thus, these population-based data demonstrate a close relation between platelet volume as a potential marker of platelet activation and arterial stiffness in both sexes. Further research is warranted to further elucidate the mechanisms underlying larger platelets‘ role in arterial stiffening including the role of shared common genetics. PMID:28059166

  17. Perceptual speed and IQ are associated through common genetic factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma, D.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.

    2001-01-01

    Individual differences in inspection time explain about 20% of IQ test variance. To determine whether the association between inspection time and IQ is mediated by common genes or by a common environmental factor, inspection time and IQ were assessed in an extended twin design. Data from 688

  18. The genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm is important for the implementation of measures addressed to their utilizations and conservation. The objective of this study was to characterize common bean in Uganda using polymorphic molecular markers for ...

  19. Genetics and Common Disorders: Implications for Primary Care and Public Health Providers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInerney, Joseph D.; Greendale, Karen; Peay, Holly L.

    2005-06-01

    We developed this program for primary care providers (PCPs) and public health professionals (PHPs) who are interested in increasing their understanding of the genetics of common chronic diseases and of the implications of genetics and genomics for their fields. The program differs from virtually all previous educational efforts in genetics for health professionals in that it focuses on the genetics of common chronic disease and on the broad principles that emerge when one views disease from the perspectives of variation and individuality, which are at the heart of thinking genetically. The CD-ROM introduces users to content that will improve their understanding of topics such as: • A framework for genetics and common disease; • Basic information on genetics, genomics, genetic medicine, and public health genetics, all in the context of common chronic disease; • The status of research on genetic contributions to specific common diseases, including a review of research methods; • Genetic/environmental interaction as the new “central dogma” of public health genetics; • The importance of taking and analyzing a family history; • The likely impact of potential gene discovery and genetic testing on genetic counseling and risk assessment and on the practices of PCPs and PHPs; • Stratification of populations into low-, moderate-, and high-risk categories; • The potential role of PCPs and PHPs in identifying high-risk individuals and families, in providing limited genetics services, and in referring to clinical genetics specialists; the potential for standard referral algorithms; • Implications of genetic insights for diagnosis and treatment; • Ethical, legal, and social issues that arise from genetic testing for common chronic diseases; and • Specific prevention strategies based on understanding of genetics and genetic/ environmental interactions. The interactive content – developed by experts in genetics, primary care, and public health – is

  20. Genetic Parameter Estimates for Metabolizing Two Common Pharmaceuticals in Swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy T. Howard

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In livestock, the regulation of drugs used to treat livestock has received increased attention and it is currently unknown how much of the phenotypic variation in drug metabolism is due to the genetics of an animal. Therefore, the objective of the study was to determine the amount of phenotypic variation in fenbendazole and flunixin meglumine drug metabolism due to genetics. The population consisted of crossbred female and castrated male nursery pigs (n = 198 that were sired by boars represented by four breeds. The animals were spread across nine batches. Drugs were administered intravenously and blood collected a minimum of 10 times over a 48 h period. Genetic parameters for the parent drug and metabolite concentration within each drug were estimated based on pharmacokinetics (PK parameters or concentrations across time utilizing a random regression model. The PK parameters were estimated using a non-compartmental analysis. The PK model included fixed effects of sex and breed of sire along with random sire and batch effects. The random regression model utilized Legendre polynomials and included a fixed population concentration curve, sex, and breed of sire effects along with a random sire deviation from the population curve and batch effect. The sire effect included the intercept for all models except for the fenbendazole metabolite (i.e., intercept and slope. The mean heritability across PK parameters for the fenbendazole and flunixin meglumine parent drug (metabolite was 0.15 (0.18 and 0.31 (0.40, respectively. For the parent drug (metabolite, the mean heritability across time was 0.27 (0.60 and 0.14 (0.44 for fenbendazole and flunixin meglumine, respectively. The errors surrounding the heritability estimates for the random regression model were smaller compared to estimates obtained from PK parameters. Across both the PK and plasma drug concentration across model, a moderate heritability was estimated. The model that utilized the plasma drug

  1. Common mechanisms of pain and depression: Are antidepressants also analgesics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza eNekovarova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Neither pain, nor depression exist as independent phenomena per se, they are highly subjective inner states, formed by our brain and built on the bases of our experiences, cognition and emotions. Chronic pain is associated with changes in brain physiology and anatomy. It has been suggested that the neuronal activity underlying subjective perception of chronic pain may be divergent from the activity associated with acute pain. We will discuss the possible common pathophysiological mechanism of chronic pain and depression with respect to the default mode network of the brain, neuroplasticity and the effect of antidepressants on these two pathological conditions. The default mode network of the brain has an important role in the representation of introspective mental activities and therefore can be considered as a nodal point, common for both chronic pain and depression. Neuroplasticity which involves molecular, cellular and synaptic processes modifying connectivity between neurons and neuronal circuits can also be affected by pathological states such as chronic pain or depression. We suppose that pathogenesis of depression and chronic pain shares common negative neuroplastic changes in the central nervous system. The positive impact of antidepressants would result in a reduction of these pathological cellular/molecular processes and in the amelioration of symptoms, but it may also increase survival times and quality of life of patients with chronic cancer pain.

  2. Genetic diversity study of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-09-03

    Sep 3, 2014 ... Phaseolus vulgaris L. (family Leguminosae), is a leguminous crop widely distributed in all parts of the world. In Ethiopia, common bean is cultivated as a source of protein for local consumption and for export. Mostly, it grows in the warm and lowland areas of the country. The aim of this research was to.

  3. Genetic diversity study of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-09-03

    Sep 3, 2014 ... In Ethiopia, common bean is cultivated as a source of protein for local consumption and for export. Mostly, it grows in the ... PCoA, majority individuals of Metekel (L) tended to form separate group. The result of the study ... endospermic and vary greatly in size and color from the small black wild type to the ...

  4. Common mechanism unites membrane poration by amyloid and antimicrobial peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Last, Nicholas B; Miranker, Andrew D

    2013-04-16

    Poration of bacterial membranes by antimicrobial peptides such as magainin 2 is a significant activity performed by innate immune systems. Pore formation by soluble forms of amyloid proteins such as islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) is implicated in cell death in amyloidoses. Similarities in structure and poration activity of these two systems suggest a commonality of mechanism. Here, we investigate and compare the mechanisms by which these peptides induce membrane leakage and bacterial cell death through the measurement of liposome leakage kinetics and bacterial growth inhibition. For both systems, leakage occurs through the nucleation-dependent formation of stable membrane pores. Remarkably, we observe IAPP and magainin 2 to be fully cross-cooperative in the induction of leakage and inhibition of bacterial growth. The effects are dramatic, with mixtures of these peptides showing activities >100-fold greater than simple sums of the activities of individual peptides. Direct protein-protein interactions cannot be the origin of cooperativity, as IAPP and its enantiomer D-IAPP are equally cross-cooperative. We conclude that IAPP and magainin 2 induce membrane leakage and cytotoxicity through a shared, cross-cooperative, tension-induced poration mechanism.

  5. Feline and Canine Coronaviruses: Common Genetic and Pathobiological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Le Poder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new human coronavirus responsible for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS was identified in 2003, which raised concern about coronaviruses as agents of serious infectious disease. Nevertheless, coronaviruses have been known for about 50 years to be major agents of respiratory, enteric, or systemic infections of domestic and companion animals. Feline and canine coronaviruses are widespread among dog and cat populations, sometimes leading to the fatal diseases known as feline infectious peritonitis (FIP and pantropic canine coronavirus infection in cats and dogs, respectively. In this paper, different aspects of the genetics, host cell tropism, and pathogenesis of the feline and canine coronaviruses (FCoV and CCoV will be discussed, with a view to illustrating how study of FCoVs and CCoVs can improve our general understanding of the pathobiology of coronaviruses.

  6. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of epilepsy: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tian; Giri, Mohan; Xia, Zhenyi; Subedi, Yadu Nanda; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common episodic neurological disorder or condition characterized by recurrent epileptic seizures, and genetics seems to play a key role in its etiology. Early linkage studies have localized multiple loci that may harbor susceptibility genes to epilepsy, and mutational analyses have detected a number of mutations involved in both ion channel and nonion channel genes in patients with idiopathic epilepsy. Genome-wide studies of epilepsy have found copy number variants at 2q24.2-q24.3, 7q11.22, 15q11.2-q13.3, and 16p13.11-p13.2, some of which disrupt multiple genes, such as NRXN1, AUTS2, NLGN1, CNTNAP2, GRIN2A, PRRT2, NIPA2, and BMP5, implicated for neurodevelopmental disorders, including intellectual disability and autism. Unfortunately, only a few common genetic variants have been associated with epilepsy. Recent exome-sequencing studies have found some genetic mutations, most of which are located in nonion channel genes such as the LGI1, PRRT2, EFHC1, PRICKLE, RBFOX1, and DEPDC5 and in probands with rare forms of familial epilepsy, and some of these genes are involved with the neurodevelopment. Since epigenetics plays a role in neuronal function from embryogenesis and early brain development to tissue-specific gene expression, epigenetic regulation may contribute to the genetic mechanism of neurodevelopment through which a gene and the environment interacting with each other affect the development of epilepsy. This review focused on the analytic tools used to identify epilepsy and then provided a summary of recent linkage and association findings, indicating the existence of novel genes on several chromosomes for further understanding of the biology of epilepsy. PMID:28761347

  7. Understanding genetic information as a commons: From bioprospecting to personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Lucchi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to discuss how the concept of commons can be enlarged to include genetic resources – both naturally occurring and as essential resources in research laboratories – that are increasingly considered as part of market frameworks. Looking beyond the enclosure of traditional public goods (such as land or water, the paper emphasizes the debate around the progressive commodification of genetic resources and associated genetic information operated by means of intellectual property rights or other forms of management of knowledge. The discourse around commons is used to evaluate alternative tools and strategies to the issue of private appropriation of human genetic resources and natural compounds.

  8. Premature birth and diseases in premature infants: common genetic background?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Mikko

    2012-04-01

    It has been proposed that during human evolution, development of obligate bipedalism, narrow birth canal cross-sectional area and the large brain have forced an adjustment in duration of pregnancy (scaling of gestational age; Plunkett 2011). Children compared to other mammals are born with proportionally small brains (compared to adult brains), suggesting shortening of pregnancy duration during recent evolution. Prevalence of both obstructed delivery and premature birth is still exceptionally high. In near term infants, functional maturity and viability is high, and gene variants predisposing to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) are rare. Advanced antenatal and neonatal treatment practices during the new era of medicine allowed survival of also very preterm infants (gestation premature birth. Specific genes associating with diseases in preterm infants may also contribute to the susceptibility to preterm birth. Understanding and applying the knowledge of genetic interactions in normal and abnormal perinatal-neonatal development requires large, well-structured population cohorts, studies involving the whole genome and international interdisciplinary collaboration.

  9. Population genetics of invasive common carp Cyprinus carpio L. in coastal drainages in eastern Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, G D; Gilligan, D M; Grewe, P; Moran, C; Nicholas, F W

    2010-10-01

    The common carp Cyprinus carpio introduced in two drainages in eastern Australia are largely descended from European common carp, and in a third drainage they descend largely from East Asian common carp. The partial genetic differentiation among the species in those drainages is consistent with their origins. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  10. Development and application of genetically uniform strains of common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, A.B.J.

    1997-01-01

    In this thesis, the development of genetically uniform strains of common carp, Cyprinus carpio L. is described. As in research on mammals, the use of genetically uniform fish could increase the quality (replicability, reproducability and repeatability) of experiments.

  11. Common genetic variation and the control of HIV-1 in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fellay, J.; Ge, D.; Shianna, K.V.

    2009-01-01

    To extend the understanding of host genetic determinants of HIV-1 control, we performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 2,554 infected Caucasian subjects. The study was powered to detect common genetic variants explaining down to 1.3% of the variability in viral load at set point. ...

  12. Genetic Architecture of Atherosclerosis in Mice: A Systems Genetics Analysis of Common Inbred Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Brian J.; Davis, Richard C.; Civelek, Mete; Orozco, Luz; Wu, Judy; Qi, Hannah; Pan, Calvin; Packard, René R. Sevag; Eskin, Eleazar; Yan, Mujing; Kirchgessner, Todd; Wang, Zeneng; Li, Xinmin; Gregory, Jill C.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Gargalovic, Peter S.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    Common forms of atherosclerosis involve multiple genetic and environmental factors. While human genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci contributing to coronary artery disease and its risk factors, these studies are unable to control environmental factors or examine detailed molecular traits in relevant tissues. We now report a study of natural variations contributing to atherosclerosis and related traits in over 100 inbred strains of mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP). The mice were made hyperlipidemic by transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein E-Leiden (APOE-Leiden) and human cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP). The mice were examined for lesion size and morphology as well as plasma lipid, insulin and glucose levels, and blood cell profiles. A subset of mice was studied for plasma levels of metabolites and cytokines. We also measured global transcript levels in aorta and liver. Finally, the uptake of acetylated LDL by macrophages from HMDP mice was quantitatively examined. Loci contributing to the traits were mapped using association analysis, and relationships among traits were examined using correlation and statistical modeling. A number of conclusions emerged. First, relationships among atherosclerosis and the risk factors in mice resemble those found in humans. Second, a number of trait-loci were identified, including some overlapping with previous human and mouse studies. Third, gene expression data enabled enrichment analysis of pathways contributing to atherosclerosis and prioritization of candidate genes at associated loci in both mice and humans. Fourth, the data provided a number of mechanistic inferences; for example, we detected no association between macrophage uptake of acetylated LDL and atherosclerosis. Fifth, broad sense heritability for atherosclerosis was much larger than narrow sense heritability, indicating an important role for gene-by-gene interactions. Sixth, stepwise linear regression

  13. Governing the management and use of pooled microbial genetic resources: Lessons from the global crop commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halewood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights lessons learned over the last thirty years establishing a governance structure for the global crop commons that are of relevance to current champions of the microbial commons. It argues that the political, legal and biophysical situation in which microbial genetic resources (and their users are located today are similar to the situation of plant genetic resources in the mid-1990s, before the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources was negotiated. Consequently, the paper suggests that it may be useful to look to the model of global network of ex situ plant genetic resources collections as a precedent to follow – even if only loosely – in developing an intergovernmentally endorsed legal substructure and governance framework for the microbial commons.

  14. Common TLR1 genetic variation is not associated with death from melioidosis, a common cause of sepsis in rural Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narisara Chantratita

    Full Text Available Melioidosis, infection caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Burkholderia pseudomallei, is a common cause of sepsis in northeast Thailand. In white North Americans, common functional genetic variation in TLR1 is associated with organ failure and death from sepsis. We hypothesized that TLR1 variants would be associated with outcomes in Thais with melioidosis. We collated the global frequencies of three TLR1 variants that are common in white North American populations: rs5743551 (-7202A/G, rs4833095 (742A/G, and rs5743618 (1804G/T. We noted a reversal of the minor allele from white North American subjects to Asian populations that was particularly pronounced for rs5743618. In the Utah residents of European ancestry, the frequency of the rs5743618 T allele was 17% whereas in Vietnamese subjects the frequency was >99%. We conducted a genetic association study in 427 patients with melioidosis to determine the association of TLR1 variation with organ failure or death. We genotyped rs5743551 and rs4833095. The variants were in high linkage disequilibrium but neither variant was associated with organ failure or in-hospital death. In 300 healthy Thai individuals we further tested the association of TLR1 variation with ex vivo blood responses to Pam3CSK4, a TLR1 agonist. Neither variant was robustly associated with blood cytokine responses induced by Pam3CSK4. We identified additional common variation in TLR1 by searching public databases and the published literature and screened three additional TLR1 variants for associations with Pam3CSK4-induced responses but found none. We conclude that the genetic architecture of TLR1 variation differs substantially in southeast Asians compared to other populations and common variation in TLR1 in Thais is not associated with outcome from melioidosis or with altered blood responses to Pam3CSK4. Our findings highlight the need for additional studies of TLR1 and other innate immune genetic modulators of the inflammatory

  15. Intraspecific morphological and genetic variation of common species predicts ranges of threatened ones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Trevon L.; Thomassen, Henri A.; Peralvo, Manuel; Buermann, Wolfgang; Milá, Borja; Kieswetter, Charles M.; Jarrín-V, Pablo; Devitt, Susan E. Cameron; Mason, Eliza; Schweizer, Rena M.; Schlunegger, Jasmin; Chan, Janice; Wang, Ophelia; Schneider, Christopher J.; Pollinger, John P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Graham, Catherine H.; Wayne, Robert K.; Smith, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Predicting where threatened species occur is useful for making informed conservation decisions. However, because they are usually rare, surveying threatened species is often expensive and time intensive. Here, we show how regions where common species exhibit high genetic and morphological divergence among populations can be used to predict the occurrence of species of conservation concern. Intraspecific variation of common species of birds, bats and frogs from Ecuador were found to be a significantly better predictor for the occurrence of threatened species than suites of environmental variables or the occurrence of amphibians and birds. Fully 93 per cent of the threatened species analysed had their range adequately represented by the geographical distribution of the morphological and genetic variation found in seven common species. Both higher numbers of threatened species and greater genetic and morphological variation of common species occurred along elevation gradients. Higher levels of intraspecific divergence may be the result of disruptive selection and/or introgression along gradients. We suggest that collecting data on genetic and morphological variation in common species can be a cost effective tool for conservation planning, and that future biodiversity inventories include surveying genetic and morphological data of common species whenever feasible. PMID:23595273

  16. Common genetic heterogeneity of human interleukin-37 leads to functional variance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingjing; Zhang, Yuling; Cheng, Shimeng; Kang, Bin; Peng, Jinbiao; Zhang, Xiaodan; Yuan, Meichun; Chu, Wenqi; Zhang, Wen; Shen, Jiayin; Zhang, Shuye

    2017-09-01

    Interleukin-37 (IL-37) is an inhibitory member of the IL-1 family of cytokines. We previously found that balanced selection maintains common variations of the human IL37 gene. However, the functional consequences of this selection have yet to be validated. Here, using cells expressing exogenous IL-37 variants, including IL-37 Ref and IL-37 Var1 and Var2, we found that the three variants of IL-37 exhibited different immunoregulatory potencies in response to immune stimulation. The protein level of IL-37 Var2 was found to be significantly less than that of IL-37 Ref or Var1, despite the comparable mRNA levels of all three variants. Further study showed that IL-37 Var2 was rapidly degraded by a proteasome-dependent mechanism mediated by enhanced polyubiquitination, leading to a transient upregulation of IL-37 Var2 after immune stimulation. Finally, when ectopically expressed in cells, human IL-37 Var2 exerted less inhibition on proinflammatory cytokine production than did other IL-37 variants. Conversely, purified extracellular IL-37 variant proteins demonstrated comparable inhibitory abilities in vitro. In conclusion, our study reveals that common genetic variants of IL37 lead to different immune-inhibitory potencies, primarily as a result of differences in IL-37 protein stability, suggesting the possible involvement of these variants in various human diseases.

  17. Amino acid secondary transporters: toward a common transport mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweikhard, Eva S; Ziegler, Christine M

    2012-01-01

    Solute carriers (SLC) that transport amino acids are key players in health and diseases in humans. Their prokaryotic relatives are often involved in essential physiological processes in microorganisms, e.g. in homeostasis and acidic/osmotic stress response. High-resolution X-ray structures of the sequence-unrelated amino acid transporters unraveled a striking structural similarity between carriers, which were formerly assigned to different families. The highly conserved fold is characterized by two inverted structural repeats of five transmembrane helices each and indicates common mechanistic transport concepts if not an evolutionary link among a large number of amino acid transporters. Therefore, these transporters are classified now into the structural amino acid-polyamine-organocation superfamily (APCS). The APCS includes among others the mammalian SLC6 transporters and the heterodimeric SLC7/SLC3 transporters. However, it has to be noted that the APCS is not limited entirely to amino acid transporters but contains also transporters for, e.g. amino acid derivatives and sugars. For instance, the betaine-choline-carnitine transporter family of bacterial activity-regulated Na(+)- and H(+)-coupled symporters for glycine betaine and choline is also part of this second largest structural superfamily. The APCS fold provides different possibilities to transport the same amino acid. Arginine can be transported by an H(+)-coupled symport or by antiport mechanism in exchange against agmatine for example. The convergence of the mechanistic concept of transport under comparable physiological conditions allows speculating if structurally unexplored amino acid transporters, e.g. the members of the SLC36 and SLC38 family, belong to the APCS, too. In the kidney, which is an organ that depends critically on the regulated amino acid transport, these different SLC transporters have to work together to account for proper function. Here, we will summarize the basic concepts of Na

  18. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  19. Ion Channels in Genetic Epilepsy: From Genes and Mechanisms to Disease-Targeted Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyrer, Julia; Maljevic, Snezana; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Reid, Christopher A

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is a common and serious neurologic disease with a strong genetic component. Genetic studies have identified an increasing collection of disease-causing genes. The impact of these genetic discoveries is wide reaching-from precise diagnosis and classification of syndromes to the discovery and validation of new drug targets and the development of disease-targeted therapeutic strategies. About 25% of genes identified in epilepsy encode ion channels. Much of our understanding of disease mechanisms comes from work focused on this class of protein. In this study, we review the genetic, molecular, and physiologic evidence supporting the pathogenic role of a number of different voltage- and ligand-activated ion channels in genetic epilepsy. We also review proposed disease mechanisms for each ion channel and highlight targeted therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  20. Genetics of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome-associated tumors: common genetic pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenman, M.; Westerveld, A.; Mannens, M.

    2000-01-01

    A specific subset of solid childhood tumors-Wilms' tumor, adrenocortical carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, and hepatoblastoma-is characterized by its association with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Genetic abnormalities found in these tumors affect the same chromosome region (11p15), which has been

  1. Common Mechanism Underlies Repeated Evolution of Extreme Pollution Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human alterations to the environment can exert strong evolutionary pressures, yet contemporary adaptation to human-mediated stressors is rarely documented in wild populations. A common-garden experimental design was coupled with comparative transcriptomics to discover evolved me...

  2. The autoregulatory loop: A common mechanism of regulation of key ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-05-06

    May 6, 2016 ... complex diversity of upstream key genes in sex determination mechanisms. Besides, unlike key upstream ... hypothesis that autoregulatory loop mechanisms of sex determination might be a general strategy. We also discuss the ...... Jablonka E and Lamb MJ 1995 Epigenetic inheritance and evolu- tion: the ...

  3. The most common genetic syndromes and associated anomalies in Latvian patients with cleft lip with or without palate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lace, Baiba; Barkane, Biruta; Akota, Ilze

    2006-01-01

    1 over 700 newborns every year is born with cleft lip with/or without palate, in 30% of cases there is a certain genetic mechanism underlying development of disease: chromosomal anomalies, monogenic diseases, exposure to teratogens or in utero disruptive mechanisms. The objective of our study is to describe the most common genetic syndromes and associated anomalies in patients with CL/CP in Latvia. Study material was medical records obtained from Riga Cleft Lip and Palate Centre Registry in a time period of 1980 till 2005. There was analyzed information about patients with identified genetic syndromes and associated anomalies. In a time period from 1980 till 2005, the following genetic syndromes were identified: Van der Woude, Fetal alcohol syndrome, Holzgreve syndrome, Marfan syndrome, Myotonic dystrophy, Klippel-Feil syndrome, Patau syndrome, Potter sequence and Pierre Robin sequence. 16% of CL/CP patients have recognized genetic syndromes or associated anomalies, including profound, severe and moderate mental retardation. Number is lower than expected, but still correlates with date presented in other populations. Long term follow-up of multidisciplinary specialists which includes cardiologists, clinical-geneticists and paediatricians, is needed for CL/CP patients with associated anomalies in order to identify timely side diseases and complications. Grant: Baltic-Taiwan joint research project "Identification of genes involved in craniofacial morphogenesis and susceptibility to orofacial clefting in a human genome scan 2004-2006".

  4. The relationship between the genetic and environmental influences on common externalizing psychopathology and mental wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendler, Kenneth S; Myers, John M; Keyes, Corey L M

    2011-12-01

    To determine the relationship between the genetic and environmental risk factors for externalizing psychopathology and mental wellbeing, we examined detailed measures of emotional, social and psychological wellbeing, and a history of alcohol-related problems and smoking behavior in the last year in 1,386 individual twins from same-sex pairs from the MIDUS national US sample assessed in 1995. Cholesky decomposition analyses were performed withthe Mx program. The best fit model contained one highly heritable common externalizing psychopathology factor for both substance use/abuse measures, and one strongly heritable common factor for the three wellbeing measures. Genetic and environmental risk factors for externalizing psychopathology were both negatively associated with levels of mental wellbeing and accounted for, respectively, 7% and 21% of its genetic and environmental influences. Adding internalizing psychopathology assessed in the last year to the model, genetic risk factors unique for externalizing psychopathology were now positively related to levels of mental wellbeing, although accounting for only 5% of the genetic variance. Environmental risk factors unique to externalizing psychopathology continued to be negatively associated with mental wellbeing, accounting for 26% of the environmental variance. When both internalizing psychopathology and externalizing psychopathology are associated with mental wellbeing, the strongest risk factors for low mental wellbeing are genetic factors that impact on both internalizing psychopathology and externalizing psychopathology, and environmental factors unique to externalizing psychopathology. In this model, genetic risk factors for externalizing psychopathology predict, albeit weakly, higher levels of mental wellbeing.

  5. The effects of common genetic variants in oncogenes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, L.; Gayther, S.A.; Ramus, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    of this study was to evaluate associations between common germline genetic variants in the oncogenes BRAF, ERBB2, KRAS, NMI, and PIK3CA, and survival after a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We evaluated the association between 34 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and survival...... subtype, the rare allele rs10842513 in KRAS, was associated with poor survival (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.10-1.78; P = 0.007). CONCLUSION: Common genetic variants in the BRAF and KRAS oncogenes may be important in the prediction of survival in patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer Udgivelsesdato...

  6. Population genetic structure in Atlantic and Pacific Ocean common murres (Uria aalge): natural replicate tests of post-Pleistocene evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris-Pocock, J A; Taylor, S A; Birt, T P; Damus, M; Piatt, J F; Warheit, K I; Friesen, V L

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the factors that influence population differentiation in temperate taxa can be difficult because the signatures of both historic and contemporary demographics are often reflected in population genetic patterns. Fortunately, analyses based on coalescent theory can help untangle the relative influence of these historic and contemporary factors. Common murres (Uria aalge) are vagile seabirds that breed in the boreal and low arctic waters of the Northern Hemisphere. Previous analyses revealed that Atlantic and Pacific populations are genetically distinct; however, less is known about population genetic structure within ocean basins. We employed the mitochondrial control region, four microsatellite loci and four intron loci to investigate population genetic structure throughout the range of common murres. As in previous studies, we found that Atlantic and Pacific populations diverged during the Pleistocene and do not currently exchange migrants. Therefore, Atlantic and Pacific murre populations can be used as natural replicates to test mechanisms of population differentiation. While we found little population genetic structure within the Pacific, we detected significant east-west structuring among Atlantic colonies. The degree that population genetic structure reflected contemporary population demographics also differed between ocean basins. Specifically, while the low levels of population differentiation in the Pacific are at least partially due to high levels of contemporary gene flow, the east-west structuring of populations within the Atlantic appears to be the result of historic fragmentation of populations rather than restricted contemporary gene flow. The contrasting results in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans highlight the necessity of carefully considering multilocus nonequilibrium population genetic approaches when reconstructing the demographic history of temperate Northern Hemisphere taxa.

  7. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Anthony R; Sweeten, Thayne L; Johnson, Randall C; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C; Davies, Christopher J; Thomas, Aaron J; Croen, Lisa A; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The "common variant-common disease" hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the "common variant-common disease" hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table 2). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in autism over

  8. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  9. Quantum mechanics, common sense and the black hole information paradox

    CERN Document Server

    Danielsson, U H; Danielsson, Ulf H.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse, in the light of information theory and with the arsenal of (elementary) quantum mechanics (EPR correlations, copying machines, teleportation, mixing produced in sub-systems owing to a trace operation, etc.) the scenarios available on the market to resolve the so-called black-hole information paradox. We shall conclude that the only plausible ones are those where either the unitary evolution of quantum mechanics is given up, in which information leaks continuously in the course of black-hole evaporation through non-local processes, or those in which the world is polluted by an infinite number of meta-stable remnants.

  10. The autoregulatory loop: A common mechanism of regulation of key ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... an autoregulatory positive feedback loop. In this review, by taking examples from various insects, we propose the hypothesis that autoregulatory loop mechanisms of sex determination might be a general strategy. We also discuss the possible reasons for the evolution of autoregulatory loops in sex determination cascades ...

  11. Delayed and accelerated aging share common longevity assurance mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schumacher, B.; van der Pluijm, I.; Moorhouse, M.J.; Kosteas, T.; Robinson, A.R.; Suh, Y.; Breit, T.M.; van Steeg, H.; Niedernhofer, L.J.; van IJcken, W.; Bartke, A.; Spindler, S.R.; Hoeijmakers, J.H.J.; van der Horst, G.T.J.; Garinis, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Mutant dwarf and calorie-restricted mice benefit from healthy aging and unusually long lifespan. In contrast, mouse models for DNA repair-deficient progeroid syndromes age and die prematurely. To identify mechanisms that regulate mammalian longevity, we quantified the parallels between the

  12. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klei Lambertus

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context

  13. Associations of Common Genetic Variants With Age-Related Changes in Fasting and Postload Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Anders C.; Barker, Adam; Kumari, Meena; Brunner, Eric J.; Kivimäki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Tabák, Adam G.; Witte, Daniel R.; Langenberg, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE In the general, nondiabetic population, fasting glucose increases only slightly over time, whereas 2-h postload glucose shows a much steeper age-related rise. The reasons underlying these different age trajectories are unknown. We investigated whether common genetic variants associated with fasting and 2-h glucose contribute to age-related changes of these traits. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 5,196 nondiabetic participants of the Whitehall II cohort (aged 40–78 years) attending up to four 5-yearly oral glucose tolerance tests. A genetic score was calculated separately for fasting and 2-h glucose, including 16 and 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms, respectively. Longitudinal modeling with age centered at 55 years was used to study the effects of each genotype and genetic score on fasting and 2-h glucose and their interactions with age, adjusting for sex and time-varying BMI. RESULTS The fasting glucose genetic score was significantly associated with fasting glucose with a 0.029 mmol/L (95% CI 0.023–0.034) difference (P = 2.76 × 10−21) per genetic score point, an association that remained constant over time (age interaction P = 0.17). Two-hour glucose levels differed by 0.076 mmol/L (0.047–0.105) per genetic score point (P = 3.1 × 10−7); notably, this effect became stronger with increasing age by 0.006 mmol/L (0.003–0.009) per genetic score point per year (age interaction P = 3.0 × 10−5), resulting in diverging age trajectories by genetic score. CONCLUSIONS Common genetic variants contribute to the age-related rise of 2-h glucose levels, whereas associations of variants for fasting glucose are constant over time, in line with stable age trajectories of fasting glucose. PMID:21441441

  14. A rapid genetic assay for the identification of the most common Pocillopora damicornis genetic lineages on the Great Barrier Reef.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely Torda

    Full Text Available Pocillopora damicornis (Linnaeus, 1758; Scleractinia, Pocilloporidae has recently been found to comprise at least five distinct genetic lineages in Eastern Australia, some of which likely represent cryptic species. Due to similar and plastic gross morphology of these lineages, field identification is often difficult. Here we present a quick, cost effective genetic assay as well as three novel microsatellite markers that distinguish the two most common lineages found on the Great Barrier Reef. The assay is based on PCR amplification of two regions within the mitochondrial putative control region, which show consistent and easily identifiable fragment size differences for the two genetic lineages after Alu1 restriction enzyme digestion of the amplicons.

  15. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and type 2 diabetes: common pathophysiologic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saponaro, Chiara; Gaggini, Melania; Gastaldelli, Amalia

    2015-06-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an independent risk factor for advanced liver disease, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and cardiovascular diseases. The prevalence of NAFLD in the general population is around 30 %, but it is up to three times higher in those with T2DM. Among people with obesity and T2DM, the NAFLD epidemic also is worsening. Therefore, it is important to identify early metabolic alterations and to prevent these diseases and their progression. In this review, we analyze the pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to NAFLD, particularly, those common to T2DM, such as liver and muscle insulin resistance. However, it is mainly adipose tissue insulin resistance that results in increased hepatic de novo lipogenesis, inflammation, and lipotoxicity. Although genetics predispose to NAFLD, an unhealthy lifestyle, including high-fat/high-sugar diets and low physical activity, increases the risk. In addition, alterations in gut microbiota and environmental chemical agents, acting as endocrine disruptors, may play a role.

  16. Ancient Humans Influenced the Current Spatial Genetic Structure of Common Walnut Populations in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pollegioni

    Full Text Available Common walnut (Juglans regia L is an economically important species cultivated worldwide for its wood and nuts. It is generally accepted that J. regia survived and grew spontaneously in almost completely isolated stands in its Asian native range after the Last Glacial Maximum. Despite its natural geographic isolation, J. regia evolved over many centuries under the influence of human management and exploitation. We evaluated the hypothesis that the current distribution of natural genetic resources of common walnut in Asia is, at least in part, the product of ancient anthropogenic dispersal, human cultural interactions, and afforestation. Genetic analysis combined with ethno-linguistic and historical data indicated that ancient trade routes such as the Persian Royal Road and Silk Road enabled long-distance dispersal of J. regia from Iran and Trans-Caucasus to Central Asia, and from Western to Eastern China. Ancient commerce also disrupted the local spatial genetic structure of autochthonous walnut populations between Tashkent and Samarkand (Central-Eastern Uzbekistan, where the northern and central routes of the Northern Silk Road converged. A significant association between ancient language phyla and the genetic structure of walnut populations is reported even after adjustment for geographic distances that could have affected both walnut gene flow and human commerce over the centuries. Beyond the economic importance of common walnut, our study delineates an alternative approach for understanding how the genetic resources of long-lived perennial tree species may be affected by the interaction of geography and human history.

  17. Integrating Mechanisms for Insulin Resistance: Common Threads and Missing Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Varman T.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder that defies a single etiological pathway. Accumulation of ectopic lipid metabolites, activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and innate immune pathways have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, these pathways are also closely linked to changes in fatty acid uptake, lipogenesis, and energy expenditure that can impact ectopic lipid deposition. Ultimately, accumulation of specific lipid metabolites (diacylglycerols and/or ceramides) in liver and skeletal muscle, may be a common pathway leading to impaired insulin signaling and insulin resistance. PMID:22385956

  18. Are there common genetic and environmental factors behind the endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benyamin, B.; Sørensen, T.I.A.; Schousboe, K.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The cluster of obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension, called the metabolic syndrome, has been suggested as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether there are common genetic...... of endophenotypes. However, moderate correlations between insulin resistance indices and either obesity-related endophenotypes or triacylglycerol levels indicated that some common genetic backgrounds are shared between those components. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We demonstrated that, in a general population...... and environmental factors influencing this cluster in a general population of twin pairs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multivariate genetic analysis was performed on nine endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome from 625 adult twin pairs of the GEMINAKAR study of the Danish Twin Registry. RESULTS: All...

  19. Common Genetic and Environmental Influences on Major Depressive Disorder and Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, Anjali; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Young, Susan E.; Ehringer, Marissa A.; Corley, Robin P.; Hewitt, John K.

    2008-01-01

    The evidence for common genetic and environmental influences on conduct disorder (CD) and major depressive disorder (MDD) in adolescents was examined. A sample of 570 monozygotic twin pairs, 592 dizygotic twin pairs, and 426 non-twin siblings, aged 12-18 years, was recruited from the Colorado Twin Registry. For the past year data, there was a…

  20. Genetic and silvicultural research promoting common walnut (Juglans regia) for timber production in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel E. Hemery

    2004-01-01

    A combination of genetic and silvicultural research is required to improve the viability of common walnut for timber production in the UK. A summary of a research programme, initiated in 1996, is provided. Establishment of walnut plantations using tree shelters indicated positive benefits using 0.75 m shelters but larger shelters (1.20 m) caused early flushing and...

  1. Mouth and fin deformities in common carp: is there a genetic basis?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocour, Martin; Linhart, Otomar; Vandeputte, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 37, 4 (2006), s. 419-422 ISSN 1355-557X R&D Projects: GA MZe(CZ) QF4117 Grant - others:BARRANDE 03218RF; BARRANDE 07508SA Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : common carp Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.051, year: 2006

  2. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  3. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  4. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. M...

  5. Common genetic architecture underlying young children's food fussiness and liking for vegetables and fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fildes, A.; Jaarsveld, C.H.M. van; Cooke, L.; Wardle, J.; Llewellyn, C.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Food fussiness (FF) is common in early childhood and is often associated with the rejection of nutrient-dense foods such as vegetables and fruit. FF and liking for vegetables and fruit are likely all heritable phenotypes; the genetic influence underlying FF may explain the observed

  6. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is

  7. Gestational age at birth and risk of intellectual disability without a common genetic cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuvelman, Hein; Abel, Kathryn; Wicks, Susanne; Gardner, Renee; Johnstone, Edward; Lee, Brian; Magnusson, Cecilia; Dalman, Christina; Rai, Dheeraj

    2017-12-06

    Preterm birth is linked to intellectual disability and there is evidence to suggest post-term birth may also incur risk. However, these associations have not yet been investigated in the absence of common genetic causes of intellectual disability, where risk associated with late delivery may be preventable. We therefore aimed to examine risk of intellectual disability without a common genetic cause across the entire range of gestation, using a matched-sibling design to account for unmeasured confounding by shared familial factors. We conducted a population-based retrospective study using data from the Stockholm Youth Cohort (n = 499,621) and examined associations in a nested cohort of matched outcome-discordant siblings (n = 8034). Risk of intellectual disability was greatest among those born extremely early (adjusted OR24 weeks = 14.54 [95% CI 11.46-18.44]), lessening with advancing gestational age toward term (aOR32 weeks = 3.59 [3.22-4.01]; aOR37weeks = 1.50 [1.38-1.63]); aOR38 weeks = 1.26 [1.16-1.37]; aOR39 weeks = 1.10 [1.04-1.17]) and increasing with advancing gestational age post-term (aOR42 weeks = 1.16 [1.08-1.25]; aOR43 weeks = 1.41 [1.21-1.64]; aOR44 weeks = 1.71 [1.34-2.18]; aOR45 weeks = 2.07 [1.47-2.92]). Associations persisted in a cohort of matched siblings suggesting they were robust against confounding by shared familial traits. Risk of intellectual disability was greatest among children showing evidence of fetal growth restriction, especially when birth occurred before or after term. Birth at non-optimal gestational duration may be linked causally with greater risk of intellectual disability. The mechanisms underlying these associations need to be elucidated as they are relevant to clinical practice concerning elective delivery around term and mitigation of risk in post-term children.

  8. Neanderthal and Denisova genetic affinities with contemporary humans: introgression versus common ancestral polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Robert K; Uribe, Gabriel; Jimenez, Eric B; Weiss, Mark A; Herrera, Kristian J; Regueiro, Maria; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-11-01

    Analyses of the genetic relationships among modern humans, Neanderthals and Denisovans have suggested that 1-4% of the non-Sub-Saharan African gene pool may be Neanderthal derived, while 6-8% of the Melanesian gene pool may be the product of admixture between the Denisovans and the direct ancestors of Melanesians. In the present study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity among a worldwide collection of contemporary human populations with respect to the genetic constitution of these two archaic hominins and Pan troglodytes (chimpanzee). We partitioned SNPs into subsets, including those that are derived in both archaic lineages, those that are ancestral in both archaic lineages and those that are only derived in one archaic lineage. By doing this, we have conducted separate examinations of subsets of mutations with higher probabilities of divergent phylogenetic origins. While previous investigations have excluded SNPs from common ancestors in principal component analyses, we included common ancestral SNPs in our analyses to visualize the relative placement of the Neanderthal and Denisova among human populations. To assess the genetic similarities among the various hominin lineages, we performed genetic structure analyses to provide a comparison of genetic patterns found within contemporary human genomes that may have archaic or common ancestral roots. Our results indicate that 3.6% of the Neanderthal genome is shared with roughly 65.4% of the average European gene pool, which clinally diminishes with distance from Europe. Our results suggest that Neanderthal genetic associations with contemporary non-Sub-Saharan African populations, as well as the genetic affinities observed between Denisovans and Melanesians most likely result from the retention of ancient mutations in these populations. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethical dilemmas associated with genetic testing: which are most commonly seen and how are they managed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Natalie; Delatycki, Martin B; Macciocca, Ivan; Duncan, Rony E

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to document the range and frequency of ethical dilemmas associated with genetic testing encountered by genetic health professionals and to determine the strategies used to manage them. An online survey was used to document how often the 11 key ethical dilemmas have been encountered; whether any additional dilemmas have been encountered; and how these dilemmas have been managed. Members of the Australasian Association of Clinical Geneticists, Australasian Society of Genetic Counsellors, and genetic social workers practicing in Australia and New Zealand were invited to participate. A total of 102 responses were received (31% response rate). Respondents had encountered all of the 11 ethical dilemmas included in the survey, and 18 respondents had encountered 14 additional dilemmas. Respondents encountered an average of 2.2 dilemmas per year of practice. Peer and clinical supervision were the most common strategies used to manage dilemmas, and seeking advice from clinical ethics committees was rare. Occasionally, respondents facilitated practices they deemed unethical as a consequence of client deception. Ethical dilemmas of genetic testing are encountered regularly in clinical genetics practice. Evidence provided by our study can assist in targeting training, support, and guidance to help genetic health professionals navigate such dilemmas in the future.

  10. A Common Mechanism Underlying Food Choice and Social Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajbich, Ian; Hare, Todd; Bartling, Björn; Morishima, Yosuke; Fehr, Ernst

    2015-10-01

    People make numerous decisions every day including perceptual decisions such as walking through a crowd, decisions over primary rewards such as what to eat, and social decisions that require balancing own and others' benefits. The unifying principles behind choices in various domains are, however, still not well understood. Mathematical models that describe choice behavior in specific contexts have provided important insights into the computations that may underlie decision making in the brain. However, a critical and largely unanswered question is whether these models generalize from one choice context to another. Here we show that a model adapted from the perceptual decision-making domain and estimated on choices over food rewards accurately predicts choices and reaction times in four independent sets of subjects making social decisions. The robustness of the model across domains provides behavioral evidence for a common decision-making process in perceptual, primary reward, and social decision making.

  11. A Common Mechanism Underlying Food Choice and Social Decisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Krajbich

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available People make numerous decisions every day including perceptual decisions such as walking through a crowd, decisions over primary rewards such as what to eat, and social decisions that require balancing own and others' benefits. The unifying principles behind choices in various domains are, however, still not well understood. Mathematical models that describe choice behavior in specific contexts have provided important insights into the computations that may underlie decision making in the brain. However, a critical and largely unanswered question is whether these models generalize from one choice context to another. Here we show that a model adapted from the perceptual decision-making domain and estimated on choices over food rewards accurately predicts choices and reaction times in four independent sets of subjects making social decisions. The robustness of the model across domains provides behavioral evidence for a common decision-making process in perceptual, primary reward, and social decision making.

  12. Common Lung Microbiome Identified among Mechanically Ventilated Surgical Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley D Smith

    Full Text Available The examination of the pulmonary microbiome in patients with non-chronic disease states has not been extensively examined. Traditional culture based screening methods are often unable to identify bacteria from bronchoalveolar lavage samples. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies allows for a culture-independent molecular based analysis to determine the microbial composition in the lung of this patient population. For this study, the Ion Torrent PGM system was used to assess the microbial complexity of culture negative bronchoalveolar lavage samples. A group of samples were identified that all displayed high diversity and similar relative abundance of bacteria. This group consisted of Hydrogenophaga, unclassified Bacteroidetes, Pedobacter, Thauera, and Acinetobacter. These bacteria may be representative of a common non-pathogenic pulmonary microbiome associated within this population of patients.

  13. Common Organizing Mechanisms in Ecological and Socio-economic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Saavedra, Serguei; Uzzi, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has shown that species interacting in an ecosystem and actors transacting in an economic context may have notable similarities in behavior. However, the specific mechanism that may underlie similarities in nature and human systems has not been analyzed. Building on stochastic food-web models, we propose a parsimonious bipartite-cooperation model that reproduces the key features of mutualistic networks - degree distribution, nestedness and modularity -- for both ecological networks and socio-economic networks. Our analysis uses two diverse networks. Mutually-beneficial interactions between plants and their pollinators, and cooperative economic exchanges between designers and their contractors. We find that these mutualistic networks share a key hierarchical ordering of their members, along with an exponential constraint in the number and type of partners they can cooperate with. We use our model to show that slight changes in the interaction constraints can produce either extremely nested or rand...

  14. UNIFIED FORMULATION OF J-INTEGRAL FOR COMMON CRACK TYPES USING GENETIC PROGRAMMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim H. Güzelbey

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes Genetic Progran1ming (GP as a new tool for the analysis and formulation of the J-integral for theopening mode offracture mechanics. The proposed GP formulation is based on extensive Finite Element (FE results. AGP based I-integral formulation for the three different geometries w

  15. A common genetic target for environmental and heritable influences on aggressiveness in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liming; Dankert, Heiko; Perona, Pietro; Anderson, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors can modulate aggressiveness, but the biological mechanisms underlying their influence are largely unknown. Social experience with conspecifics suppresses aggressiveness in both vertebrate and invertebrate species, including Drosophila. We searched for genes whose expression levels correlate with the influence of social experience on aggressiveness in Drosophila by performing microarray analysis of head tissue from socially isolated (aggressive) vs. socially e...

  16. [Genetic Structure of Urban Population of the Common Hamster (Cricetus cricetus)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feoktistova, N Yu; Meschersky, I G; Surov, A V; Bogomolov, P L; Tovpinetz, N N; Poplavskaya, N S

    2016-02-01

    Over the past half-century, the common hamster (Cricetus cricetus), along with range-wide decline of natural populations, has actively populated the cities. The study of the genetic structure of urban populations of common hamster may shed light on features of the habitation of this species in urban landscapes. This article is focused on the genetic structure of common hamster populations in Simferopol (Crimea), one of the largest known urban populations of this species. On the basis of the analysis of nucleotide sequences of the cytochrome b gene and mtDNA control region, and the allelic composition of ten microsatellite loci of nDNA, we revealed that, despite the fact that some individuals can move throughout the city at considerable distances, the entire population of the city is represented by separate demes confined to different areas. These demes are characterized by a high degree of the genetic isolation and reduced genetic diversity compared to that found for the city as a whole.

  17. Innovation and problem solving: a review of common mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Andrea S; Guez, David

    2014-11-01

    Behavioural innovations have become central to our thinking about how animals adjust to changing environments. It is now well established that animals vary in their ability to innovate, but understanding why remains a challenge. This is because innovations are rare, so studying innovation requires alternative experimental assays that create opportunities for animals to express their ability to invent new behaviours, or use pre-existing ones in new contexts. Problem solving of extractive foraging tasks has been put forward as a suitable experimental assay. We review the rapidly expanding literature on problem solving of extractive foraging tasks in order to better understand to what extent the processes underpinning problem solving, and the factors influencing problem solving, are in line with those predicted, and found, to underpin and influence innovation in the wild. Our aim is to determine whether problem solving can be used as an experimental proxy of innovation. We find that in most respects, problem solving is determined by the same underpinning mechanisms, and is influenced by the same factors, as those predicted to underpin, and to influence, innovation. We conclude that problem solving is a valid experimental assay for studying innovation, propose a conceptual model of problem solving in which motor diversity plays a more central role than has been considered to date, and provide recommendations for future research using problem solving to investigate innovation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cognition in the wild. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Obesity and psychotic disorders: uncovering common mechanisms through metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Orešič

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Primary obesity and psychotic disorders are similar with respect to the associated changes in energy balance and co-morbidities, including metabolic syndrome. Such similarities do not necessarily demonstrate causal links, but instead suggest that specific causes of and metabolic disturbances associated with obesity play a pathogenic role in the development of co-morbid disorders, potentially even before obesity develops. Metabolomics – the systematic study of metabolites, which are small molecules generated by the process of metabolism – has been important in elucidating the pathways underlying obesity-associated co-morbidities. This review covers how recent metabolomic studies have advanced biomarker discovery and the elucidation of mechanisms underlying obesity and its co-morbidities, with a specific focus on metabolic syndrome and psychotic disorders. The importance of identifying metabolic markers of disease-associated intermediate phenotypes – traits modulated but not encoded by the DNA sequence – is emphasized. Such markers would be applicable as diagnostic tools in a personalized healthcare setting and might also open up novel therapeutic avenues.

  19. Common neural mechanisms underlying reversal learning by reward and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gui; Xue, Feng; Droutman, Vita; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Read, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Impairments in flexible goal-directed decisions, often examined by reversal learning, are associated with behavioral abnormalities characterized by impulsiveness and disinhibition. Although the lateral orbital frontal cortex (OFC) has been consistently implicated in reversal learning, it is still unclear whether this region is involved in negative feedback processing, behavioral control, or both, and whether reward and punishment might have different effects on lateral OFC involvement. Using a relatively large sample (N = 47), and a categorical learning task with either monetary reward or moderate electric shock as feedback, we found overlapping activations in the right lateral OFC (and adjacent insula) for reward and punishment reversal learning when comparing correct reversal trials with correct acquisition trials, whereas we found overlapping activations in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) when negative feedback signaled contingency change. The right lateral OFC and DLPFC also showed greater sensitivity to punishment than did their left homologues, indicating an asymmetry in how punishment is processed. We propose that the right lateral OFC and anterior insula are important for transforming affective feedback to behavioral adjustment, whereas the right DLPFC is involved in higher level attention control. These results provide insight into the neural mechanisms of reversal learning and behavioral flexibility, which can be leveraged to understand risky behaviors among vulnerable populations.

  20. Risk scores of common genetic variants for lipid levels influence atherosclerosis and incident coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Aaron; Willems, Sara M; Bos, Daniel; Dehghan, Abbas; Hofman, Albert; Ikram, M Arfan; Uitterlinden, André G; Oostra, Ben A; Franco, Oscar H; Witteman, Jacqueline C; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2013-09-01

    Circulating levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides are recognized risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We tested the hypothesis that the cumulative effects of common genetic variants for lipids are collectively associated with subclinical atherosclerosis and incident coronary heart disease. Participants were drawn from the Erasmus Rucphen Family Study (n=2269) and the Rotterdam Study (n=8130). Linear regression and Cox proportional hazards models were applied to assess the influence of 4 risk scores derived from common genetic variants for lipids (total cholesterol, LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides) on carotid plaque, intima-media thickness, incident myocardial infarction, and coronary heart disease. Adjusted for age and sex, all 4 risk scores were associated with carotid plaque. This relationship was the strongest for the LDL-C score, which increased plaque score by 0.102 per SD increase in genetic risk score (P=3.2 × 10(-8)). The LDL-C score was also nominally associated with intima-media thickness, which increased 0.006 mm per SD increase in score (P=0.05). Both the total cholesterol and LDL-C scores were associated with incident myocardial infarction and coronary heart disease with hazard ratios between 1.10 and 1.13 per SD increase in score. Inclusion of additional risk factors as covariates minimally affected these results. Common genetic variants with small effects on lipid levels are, in combination, significantly associated with subclinical and clinical cardiovascular outcomes. As knowledge of genetic variation increases, preclinical genetic screening tools might enhance the prediction and prevention of clinical events.

  1. Childhood separation anxiety disorder and adult onset panic attacks share a common genetic diathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson-Nay, Roxann; Eaves, Lindon J; Hettema, John M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Silberg, Judy L

    2012-04-01

    Childhood separation anxiety disorder (SAD) is hypothesized to share etiologic roots with panic disorder. The aim of this study was to estimate the genetic and environmental sources of covariance between childhood SAD and adult onset panic attacks (AOPA), with the primary goal to determine whether these two phenotypes share a common genetic diathesis. Participants included parents and their monozygotic or dizygotic twins (n = 1,437 twin pairs) participating in the Virginia Twin Study of Adolescent Behavioral Development and those twins who later completed the Young Adult Follow-Up (YAFU). The Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment was completed at three waves during childhood/adolescence followed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-III-R at the YAFU. Two separate, bivariate Cholesky models were fit to childhood diagnoses of SAD and overanxious disorder (OAD), respectively, and their relation with AOPA; a trivariate Cholesky model also examined the collective influence of childhood SAD and OAD on AOPA. In the best-fitting bivariate model, the covariation between SAD and AOPA was accounted for by genetic and unique environmental factors only, with the genetic factor associated with childhood SAD explaining significant variance in AOPA. Environmental risk factors were not significantly shared between SAD and AOPA. By contrast, the genetic factor associated with childhood OAD did not contribute significantly to AOPA. Results of the trivariate Cholesky reaffirmed outcomes of bivariate models. These data indicate that childhood SAD and AOPA share a common genetic diathesis that is not observed for childhood OAD, strongly supporting the hypothesis of a specific genetic etiologic link between the two phenotypes. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. More than one genotype: how common is intracolonial genetic variability in scleractinian corals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweinsberg, Maximilian; Weiss, Linda C; Striewski, Sebastian; Tollrian, Ralph; Lampert, Kathrin P

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, a few colonial marine invertebrates have shown intracolonial genetic variability, a previously unreported phenomenon. Intracolonial genetic variability describes the occurrence of more than a single genotype within an individual colony. This variability can be traced back to two underlying processes: chimerism and mosaicism. Chimerism is the fusion of two or more individuals, whereas mosaicism mostly derives from somatic cell mutations. Until now, it remained unclear to what degree the ecologically important group of hermatypic (reef building) corals might be affected. We investigate the occurrence of intracolonial genetic variability in five scleractinian corals: Acropora florida, Acropora hyacinthus, Acropora sarmentosa, Pocillopora species complex and Porites australiensis. The main focus was to test different genera for the phenomenon via microsatellite markers and to distinguish which underlying process caused the genetic heterogeneity. Our results show that intracolonial genetic variability was common (between 46.6% for A. sarmentosa and 23.8% for P. species complex) in all tested corals. The main process was mosaicism (69 cases of 222 tested colonies), but at least one chimera existed in every species. This suggests that intracolonial genetic variability is widespread in scleractinian corals and could challenge the view of a coral colony as an individual and therefore a unit of selection. However, it might also hold potential for colony survival under rapidly changing environmental conditions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Antigenic variation: Molecular and genetic mechanisms of relapsing disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruse, J.M.; Lewis, R.E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 10 chapters. They are: Contemporary Concepts of Antigenic Variation; Antigenic Variation in the Influenza Viruses; Mechanisms of Escape of Visna Lentiviruses from Immunological Control; A Review of Antigenic Variation by the Equine Infectious Anemia Virus; Biologic and Molecular Variations in AIDS Retrovirus Isolates; Rabies Virus Infection: Genetic Mutations and the Impact on Viral Pathogenicity and Immunity; Immunobiology of Relapsing Fever; Antigenic Variation in African Trypanosomes; Antigenic Variation and Antigenic Diversity in Malaria; and Mechanisms of Immune Evasion in Schistosomiasis.

  4. Genetic factors and epigenetic mechanisms of longevity: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Jessica; Mather, Karen A; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Kwok, John B J

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional longevity phenotype, defined as living beyond the age of 95, results from complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as DNA methylation and histone modifications, mediate the interaction of these factors. This review will provide an overview of animal model studies used to examine age-related epigenetic modifications. Key human studies will be used to illustrate the progress made in the identification of the genetic loci associated with exceptional longevity, including APOE and FOXO3 and genes/loci that are also differentially methylated between long-lived individuals and younger controls. Future studies should focus on elucidating whether identified longevity genetic loci directly influence epigenetic mechanisms, especially on differentially methylated regions associated with longevity.

  5. An Overview of Genetic Mechanisms in the Bacterial Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Judith; Baumberg, Simon

    1988-01-01

    Outlines the genetic elements found in the bacterial cell which play a role in recombining DNA sequences. Provides a core structure to which the mechanisms occurring in and between bacterial cells can be related. Discusses the practicalities of recombinant DNA techniques. (Author/CW)

  6. Definition of genetic and pathogenic mechanisms regulating neuroinflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Beyeen, Amennai Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Although complex inflammatory diseases affect 5% of the population we still do not understand fully the underlying disease triggers and mechanisms. This partly explains why current treatments are not curative but only modify disease. These diseases arise from combined genetic, environmental and unknown effects. In this thesis, I have focused on ...

  7. Use of Genetic Models to Study the Urinary Concentrating Mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Kortenoeven, Marleen L.A.; Fenton, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    technology is providing critical new information about urinary concentrating processes and thus mechanisms for maintaining body water homeostasis. In this chapter we provide a brief overview of genetic mouse model generation, and then summarize findings in transgenic and knockout mice pertinent to our...

  8. Genetic variation of common walnut (Juglans regia in Piedmont, Northwestern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrazzini D

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The European or common walnut is a large tree prized as a multipurpose species: it provides valuable timber and produces a high-quality edible nut. The diffusion of the species in Italy has been largely influenced by the human activity, mainly through germplasm movement, selection of genotypes most suited for wood or fruit production and adaptation induced on fruit crop reproductive materials. As a consequence, genetic variability has been reduced, so that programs aimed at its preservation appear of the utmost importance. 104 walnut plants growing in Piedmont, northwestern Italy, were investigated through genetic variation scored at RAPD loci, yielded by PCR amplification of 10 decamer primers. Among the 101 studied loci, only 53 were polymorphic, showing a low level of genetic variation within the studied material. Genetic differentiation was estimated both at individual and geographical area level. Only in few cases trees growing in the same area showed to be genetically similar, while the differentiation between areas accounted for about 10% of the total variation, according to AMOVA. No significant correlation was found between genetic and geographic distances. The results of the study showed that also in Piedmont (such as it was already demonstrated in other parts of Italy the distribution of common walnut is a direct consequence of the human activity. The selection of individual trees, to be used as basic materials for seed supply, should therefore be based mainly on phenotypic traits, rather than ecological features of the location: in species characterized by artificial diffusion, the adoption of Region of Provenance has a scarce significance and prominence should be given to the phenotype selection.

  9. Genetic correlation and path analysis of common bean collected from Caceres Mato Grosso State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo de Lima Gonçalves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The aim of the study was to determine genetic correlations of agronomic traits and to evaluate direct and indirect effects, through path analysis, between variables analyzed with grain yield. Forty accessions of common bean, cultivated at Caceres County were evaluated, by using randomized complete blocks design with three repetitions. Coefficient magnitudes of genotypic correlations were superior to phenotypic and environmental ones for most correlations, suggesting greater influence of genetic factor than environmental factors. In order to determine the importance of direct and indirect effects, path analysis was performed, which provided greater reliability in interpretations of cause and effect between studied traits, indicating that grain yield may be explained by the effects of analyzed traits. Number of seeds per plant (0.801 and grain weight (0.641 showed higher favorable effect over grain yield, allowing its use in direct or indirect selection for grain yield in common bean.

  10. Genetics of diabetic nephropathy: are there clues to the understanding of common kidney diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, B R; Maxwell, A P

    2009-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease in the Western world. There is evidence for a genetic susceptibility to diabetic kidney disease, but despite intensive research efforts it has proved difficult to identify the causative genes. Improvements in genotyping technologies have made genome-wide association studies (GWAS), employing hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms, affordable. Recently, such scans have advanced understanding of the genetics of common complex diseases, finding more than 100 novel susceptibility variants for diverse disorders including type 1 and 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis. In this review, type 2 diabetes is highlighted to illustrate how genome-wide association studies have been used to study the genetics of complex multifactorial conditions; in addition, diabetic nephropathy will be used to demonstrate how similar scans could be employed to detect genetic factors predisposing to kidney disease. The identification of such variants would permit early identification of atrisk patients, enabling targeting of therapy and a move towards primary prevention. In addition, these powerful research methodologies may identify genes that were not previously known to predispose to nephropathy, thereby enhancing our understanding of the pathophysiology of renal disorders and potentially leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  12. Multicollinearity in spatial genetics: separating the wheat from the chaff using commonality analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunier, J G; Colyn, M; Legendre, X; Nimon, K F; Flamand, M C

    2015-01-01

    Direct gradient analyses in spatial genetics provide unique opportunities to describe the inherent complexity of genetic variation in wildlife species and are the object of many methodological developments. However, multicollinearity among explanatory variables is a systemic issue in multivariate regression analyses and is likely to cause serious difficulties in properly interpreting results of direct gradient analyses, with the risk of erroneous conclusions, misdirected research and inefficient or counterproductive conservation measures. Using simulated data sets along with linear and logistic regressions on distance matrices, we illustrate how commonality analysis (CA), a detailed variance-partitioning procedure that was recently introduced in the field of ecology, can be used to deal with nonindependence among spatial predictors. By decomposing model fit indices into unique and common (or shared) variance components, CA allows identifying the location and magnitude of multicollinearity, revealing spurious correlations and thus thoroughly improving the interpretation of multivariate regressions. Despite a few inherent limitations, especially in the case of resistance model optimization, this review highlights the great potential of CA to account for complex multicollinearity patterns in spatial genetics and identifies future applications and lines of research. We strongly urge spatial geneticists to systematically investigate commonalities when performing direct gradient analyses. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. A HapMap harvest of insights into the genetics of common disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolio, Teri A; Brooks, Lisa D; Collins, Francis S

    2008-05-01

    The International HapMap Project was designed to create a genome-wide database of patterns of human genetic variation, with the expectation that these patterns would be useful for genetic association studies of common diseases. This expectation has been amply fulfilled with just the initial output of genome-wide association studies, identifying nearly 100 loci for nearly 40 common diseases and traits. These associations provided new insights into pathophysiology, suggesting previously unsuspected etiologic pathways for common diseases that will be of use in identifying new therapeutic targets and developing targeted interventions based on genetically defined risk. In addition, HapMap-based discoveries have shed new light on the impact of evolutionary pressures on the human genome, suggesting multiple loci important for adapting to disease-causing pathogens and new environments. In this review we examine the origin, development, and current status of the HapMap; its prospects for continued evolution; and its current and potential future impact on biomedical science.

  14. A dense genetic linkage map for common carp and its integration with a BAC-based physical map.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common carp (Cyprinus carpio is one of the most important aquaculture species with an annual global production of 3.4 million metric tons. It is also an important ornamental species as well as an important model species for aquaculture research. To improve the economically important traits of this fish, a number of genomic resources and genetic tools have been developed, including several genetic maps and a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC-based physical map. However, integrated genetic and physical maps are not available to study quantitative trait loci (QTL and assist with fine mapping, positional cloning and whole genome sequencing and assembly. The objective of this study was to integrate the currently available BAC-based physical and genetic maps. RESULTS: The genetic map was updated with 592 novel markers, including 312 BAC-anchored microsatellites and 130 SNP markers, and contained 1,209 genetic markers on 50 linkage groups, spanning 3,565.9 cM in the common carp genome. An integrated genetic and physical map of the common carp genome was then constructed, which was composed of 463 physical map contigs and 88 single BACs. Combined lengths of the contigs and single BACs covered a physical length of 498.75 Mb, or around 30% of the common carp genome. Comparative analysis between common carp and zebrafish genomes was performed based on the integrated map, providing more insights into the common carp specific whole genome duplication and segmental rearrangements in the genome. CONCLUSION: We integrated a BAC-based physical map to a genetic linkage map of common carp by anchoring BAC-associated genetic markers. The density of the genetic linkage map was significantly increased. The integrated map provides a tool for both genetic and genomic studies of common carp, which will help us to understand the genomic architecture of common carp and facilitate fine mapping and positional cloning of economically important traits for

  15. The role of genetics in fisheries management under the E.U. common fisheries policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, J; Jardim, E; Martinsohn, J Th

    2016-12-01

    Exploitation of fish and shellfish stocks by the European Union fishing fleet is managed under the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), which aims to ensure that fishing and aquaculture are environmentally, economically and socially sustainable and that they provide a source of healthy food for E.U. citizens. A notable feature of the CFP is its legally enshrined requirement for sound scientific advice to underpin its objectives. The CFP was first conceived in 1970 when it formed part of the Common Agricultural Policy. Its formal inception as a stand-alone regulation occurred in 1983 and since that time, the CFP has undergone reforms in 1992, 2002 and 2013, each time bringing additional challenges to the scientific advisory process as the scope of the advice increased in response to changing objectives arising from E.U. regulations and commitments to international agreements. This paper reviews the influence that genetics has had on fish stock assessments and the provision of management advice for European fisheries under successive reforms of the CFP. The developments in genetics since the inception of the CFP have given rise to a diverse and versatile set of genetic techniques that have the potential to provide significant added value to fisheries assessments and the scientific advisory process. While in some cases, notably Pacific salmon Oncorhynchus spp., genetics appear to be very well integrated into existing management schemes, it seems that for marine fishes, discussions on the use of genetics and genomics for fisheries management are often driven by the remarkable technological progress in this field, rather than imminent needs emerging from policy frameworks. An example is the recent suggestion to use environmental (e)DNA for monitoring purposes. While there is no denying that state-of-the-art genetic and genomic approaches can and will be of value to address a number of issues relevant for the management and conservation of marine renewable natural resources, a

  16. Common genetic variants contribute to primary hypertriglyceridemia without differences between familial combined hyperlipidemia and isolated hypertriglyceridemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Castro-Orós, Isabel; Cenarro, Ana; Tejedor, María Teresa; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Pocoví, Miguel; Civeira, Fernando

    2014-12-01

    The majority of hypertriglyceridemias are diagnosed as familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCHL) and primary isolated hypertriglyceridemias. The contribution of common genetic variants in primary hypertriglyceridemias and the genetic difference between FCHL and isolated hypertriglyceridemias have not been thoroughly examined. This study involved 580 patients with hypertriglyceridemias and 403 controls. Of the 37 single nucleotide polymorphisms examined, 12 located in 10 genes showed allelic and genotype frequency differences between hypertriglyceridemias and controls. The minor alleles of APOE, APOA5, GALNTN2, and GCKR variants were positively correlated with plasma triglycerides, whereas minor alleles of ADIPOR2, ANGPTL3, LPL, and TRIB1 polymorphisms were inversely associated. Body mass index, glucose, sex, rs328 and rs7007797 in LPL, rs662799 and rs3135506 in APOA5, and rs1260326 in GCKR explained 36% of the variability in plasma triglycerides, 7.3% of which was attributable to the genetic variables. LPL, GCKR, and APOA5 polymorphisms fit dominant, recessive, and additive inheritance models, respectively. Variants more frequently identified in isolated hypertriglyceridemias were rs7412 in APOE and rs1800795 in IL6; rs2808607 in CYP7A1 and rs3812316 and rs17145738 in MLXIPL were more frequent in FCHL. The other 32 single nucleotide polymorphisms presented similar frequencies between isolated hypertriglyceridemias and FCHL. Common genetic variants found in LPL, APOA5, and GCKR are associated with triglycerides levels in patients with primary hypertriglyceridemias. FCHL and isolated hypertriglyceridemias are probably trace to an accumulation of genetic variants predisposing to familial and sporadic hypertriglyceridemias or to hypertriglyceridemias and hypercholesterolemia in case of FCHL. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Genetic diversity within and among two-spotted spider mite resistant and susceptible common bean genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab YOUSEFI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two-spotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae C. L. Koch, 1836, is one of the most destructive herbivores of common bean. Very little is known about the diversity among resistant sources in this crop. The present study was conducted to characterize 22 resistant and susceptible common bean genotypes by 8 Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs and 8 Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. These SSR and RAPD primers produced 100 % and 81.8 % polymorphic bands. Based on RAPD fingerprints and SSR profiles, pairwise genetic similarity ranged from 0.0 to 0.857 and from 0.125 to 1, respectively. The resistant and susceptible common bean accessions were grouped together in the dendrograms generated from RAPD and SSR clustering analyses. The results indicate that RAPD and SSR analysis could be successfully used for the estimation of genetic diversity among genotypes. SSR markers could group genotypes according to their resistibility and susceptibility to the spotted spider mite but RAPD could not. Therefore, the SSR markers can facilitate the development of resistant common bean cultivars through breeding programs against T. urticae.

  18. A Common Mechanism for Resistance to Oxime Reactivation of Acetylcholinesterase Inhibited by Organophosphorus Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A common mechanism for resistance to oxime reactivation of acetylcholinesterase inhibited 5a...reprint. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Acetylcholinesterase, Oxime , Reactivation, Organophosphorus, Structure-Activity 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...Z39.18 A common mechanism for resistance to oxime reactivation of acetylcholinesterase inhibited by organophosphorus compounds Donald M. Maxwell ⇑, Karen

  19. Genome-wide comparative analysis of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis gives insight into opposing genetic mechanisms.

    OpenAIRE

    IRVINE, ALAN; CORVIN, AIDEN; MORRIS, DEREK

    2015-01-01

    PUBLISHED Export Date: 3 March 2015 Atopic dermatitis and psoriasis are the two most common immune-mediated inflammatory disorders affecting the skin. Genome-wide studies demonstrate a high degree of genetic overlap, but these diseases have mutually exclusive clinical phenotypes and opposing im- mune mechanisms. Despite their prevalence, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis very rarely co-occur within one individual. By utilizing genome-wide association study and ImmunoChip data fro...

  20. Assessing Genetic Structure in Common but Ecologically Distinct Carnivores: The Stone Marten and Red Fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basto, Mafalda P; Santos-Reis, Margarida; Simões, Luciana; Grilo, Clara; Cardoso, Luís; Cortes, Helder; Bruford, Michael W; Fernandes, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The identification of populations and spatial genetic patterns is important for ecological and conservation research, and spatially explicit individual-based methods have been recognised as powerful tools in this context. Mammalian carnivores are intrinsically vulnerable to habitat fragmentation but not much is known about the genetic consequences of fragmentation in common species. Stone martens (Martes foina) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) share a widespread Palearctic distribution and are considered habitat generalists, but in the Iberian Peninsula stone martens tend to occur in higher quality habitats. We compared their genetic structure in Portugal to see if they are consistent with their differences in ecological plasticity, and also to illustrate an approach to explicitly delineate the spatial boundaries of consistently identified genetic units. We analysed microsatellite data using spatial Bayesian clustering methods (implemented in the software BAPS, GENELAND and TESS), a progressive partitioning approach and a multivariate technique (Spatial Principal Components Analysis-sPCA). Three consensus Bayesian clusters were identified for the stone marten. No consensus was achieved for the red fox, but one cluster was the most probable clustering solution. Progressive partitioning and sPCA suggested additional clusters in the stone marten but they were not consistent among methods and were geographically incoherent. The contrasting results between the two species are consistent with the literature reporting stricter ecological requirements of the stone marten in the Iberian Peninsula. The observed genetic structure in the stone marten may have been influenced by landscape features, particularly rivers, and fragmentation. We suggest that an approach based on a consensus clustering solution of multiple different algorithms may provide an objective and effective means to delineate potential boundaries of inferred subpopulations. sPCA and progressive partitioning

  1. Assessing Genetic Structure in Common but Ecologically Distinct Carnivores: The Stone Marten and Red Fox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mafalda P Basto

    Full Text Available The identification of populations and spatial genetic patterns is important for ecological and conservation research, and spatially explicit individual-based methods have been recognised as powerful tools in this context. Mammalian carnivores are intrinsically vulnerable to habitat fragmentation but not much is known about the genetic consequences of fragmentation in common species. Stone martens (Martes foina and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes share a widespread Palearctic distribution and are considered habitat generalists, but in the Iberian Peninsula stone martens tend to occur in higher quality habitats. We compared their genetic structure in Portugal to see if they are consistent with their differences in ecological plasticity, and also to illustrate an approach to explicitly delineate the spatial boundaries of consistently identified genetic units. We analysed microsatellite data using spatial Bayesian clustering methods (implemented in the software BAPS, GENELAND and TESS, a progressive partitioning approach and a multivariate technique (Spatial Principal Components Analysis-sPCA. Three consensus Bayesian clusters were identified for the stone marten. No consensus was achieved for the red fox, but one cluster was the most probable clustering solution. Progressive partitioning and sPCA suggested additional clusters in the stone marten but they were not consistent among methods and were geographically incoherent. The contrasting results between the two species are consistent with the literature reporting stricter ecological requirements of the stone marten in the Iberian Peninsula. The observed genetic structure in the stone marten may have been influenced by landscape features, particularly rivers, and fragmentation. We suggest that an approach based on a consensus clustering solution of multiple different algorithms may provide an objective and effective means to delineate potential boundaries of inferred subpopulations. sPCA and progressive

  2. Comparative transcriptome analysis reveals the genetic basis of skin color variation in common carp.

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    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available The common carp is an important aquaculture species that is widely distributed across the world. During the long history of carp domestication, numerous carp strains with diverse skin colors have been established. Skin color is used as a visual criterion to determine the market value of carp. However, the genetic basis of common carp skin color has not been extensively studied.In this study, we performed Illumina sequencing on two common carp strains: the reddish Xingguo red carp and the brownish-black Yellow River carp. A total of 435,348,868 reads were generated, resulting in 198,781 assembled contigs that were used as reference sequences. Comparisons of skin transcriptome files revealed 2,012 unigenes with significantly different expression in the two common carp strains, including 874 genes that were up-regulated in Xingguo red carp and 1,138 genes that were up-regulated in Yellow River carp. The expression patterns of 20 randomly selected differentially expressed genes were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Gene pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated that melanin biosynthesis, along with the Wnt and MAPK signaling pathways, is highly likely to affect the skin pigmentation process. Several key genes involved in the skin pigmentation process, including TYRP1, SILV, ASIP and xCT, showed significant differences in their expression patterns between the two strains.In this study, we conducted a comparative transcriptome analysis of Xingguo red carp and Yellow River carp skins, and we detected key genes involved in the common carp skin pigmentation process. We propose that common carp skin pigmentation depends upon at least three pathways. Understanding fish skin color genetics will facilitate future molecular selection of the fish skin colors with high market values.

  3. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha Palikhe, Nami; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Nam, Young Hee; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the resp...

  4. A common genetic influence on human intensity ratings of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Zhu, Gu; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J

    2015-08-01

    The perception of sweetness varies among individuals but the sources of this variation are not fully understood. Here, in a sample of 1,901 adolescent and young adults (53.8% female; 243 MZ and 452 DZ twin pairs, 511 unpaired individuals; mean age 16.2±2.8, range 12–26 years), we studied the variation in the perception of sweetness intensity of two monosaccharides and two high-potency sweeteners: glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame. Perceived intensity for all sweeteners decreased with age (2–5% per year) and increased with the history of otitis media (6–9%). Males rated aspartame slightly stronger than females (7%). We found similar heritabilities for sugars (glucose: h2=0.31, fructose: h2=0.34) and high-potency sweeteners (NHDC: h2=0.31, aspartame: h2=0.30); all were in the modest range. Multivariate modeling showed that a common genetic factor accounted for >75% of the genetic variance in the four sweeteners, suggesting that individual differences in perceived sweet intensity, which are partly due to genetic factors, may be attributed to a single set of genes. This study provided evidence of the shared genetic pathways between the perception of sugars and high-potency sweeteners.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Seed Quality of the “Badda” Common Bean from Sicily (Italy

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    Lucia Lioi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic structure of the “Badda” common bean cultivated at Polizzi Generosa, a village of Sicily (Palermo, Italy, was investigated using biochemical and molecular markers. Seed storage protein analysis by using SDS-PAGE, confirmed the attribution to the Andean gene pool. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR (or microsatellite molecular markers provided useful information on genetic variation and relationships between “Badda bianco” and “Badda nero” morphotypes. Based on SSR data, the nine accessions examined were grouped in three sub-clusters. The first sub-cluster included all the accessions belonging to the “Badda bianco”. Conversely, “Badda nero” was constituted by two well-distinguished sub-clusters, one of them forming a well-separated branch. This result suggests that two constitutive nuclei contributed to the genetic background of “Badda nero”. Moreover, technological and nutritional data evidenced a good seed protein content (mean value 240.7 g kg−1 and differences in seed hydration rate among accessions. Knowledge of genetic structure appear to be fundamental in planning safeguard strategies of an appreciate landrace such as the “Badda” bean.

  6. Common genetic variants in Wnt signaling pathway genes as potential prognostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chien Ting

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence has implicated the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We assessed the use of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC/β-catenin (CTNNB1 genes to predict outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. We selected and genotyped 10 tSNP to predict common variants across entire APC and CTNNB1 genes in 282 colorectal cancer patients. The associations of these tSNPs with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 68.3%. Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the APC rs565453, CTNNB1 2293303, and APC rs1816769 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival overall rates were 89.2%, 66.1%, and 58.8% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (log-rank P = 0.001. After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation, stage, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement, the genetic interaction profile remained significant. None of the studied SNPs were individually associated with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profile among Wnt pathway SNPs might potentially increase the prognostic value in outcome prediction for colorectal cancer.

  7. A Powerful Pathway-Based Adaptive Test for Genetic Association with Common or Rare Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wei; Kwak, Il-Youp; Wei, Peng

    2015-07-02

    In spite of the success of genome-wide association studies (GWASs), only a small proportion of heritability for each complex trait has been explained by identified genetic variants, mainly SNPs. Likely reasons include genetic heterogeneity (i.e., multiple causal genetic variants) and small effect sizes of causal variants, for which pathway analysis has been proposed as a promising alternative to the standard single-SNP-based analysis. A pathway contains a set of functionally related genes, each of which includes multiple SNPs. Here we propose a pathway-based test that is adaptive at both the gene and SNP levels, thus maintaining high power across a wide range of situations with varying numbers of the genes and SNPs associated with a trait. The proposed method is applicable to both common variants and rare variants and can incorporate biological knowledge on SNPs and genes to boost statistical power. We use extensively simulated data and a WTCCC GWAS dataset to compare our proposal with several existing pathway-based and SNP-set-based tests, demonstrating its promising performance and its potential use in practice. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detecting genetic association of common human facial morphological variation using high density 3D image registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shouneng; Tan, Jingze; Hu, Sile; Zhou, Hang; Guo, Jing; Jin, Li; Tang, Kun

    2013-01-01

    Human facial morphology is a combination of many complex traits. Little is known about the genetic basis of common facial morphological variation. Existing association studies have largely used simple landmark-distances as surrogates for the complex morphological phenotypes of the face. However, this can result in decreased statistical power and unclear inference of shape changes. In this study, we applied a new image registration approach that automatically identified the salient landmarks and aligned the sample faces using high density pixel points. Based on this high density registration, three different phenotype data schemes were used to test the association between the common facial morphological variation and 10 candidate SNPs, and their performances were compared. The first scheme used traditional landmark-distances; the second relied on the geometric analysis of 15 landmarks and the third used geometric analysis of a dense registration of ∼30,000 3D points. We found that the two geometric approaches were highly consistent in their detection of morphological changes. The geometric method using dense registration further demonstrated superiority in the fine inference of shape changes and 3D face modeling. Several candidate SNPs showed potential associations with different facial features. In particular, one SNP, a known risk factor of non-syndromic cleft lips/palates, rs642961 in the IRF6 gene, was validated to strongly predict normal lip shape variation in female Han Chinese. This study further demonstrated that dense face registration may substantially improve the detection and characterization of genetic association in common facial variation.

  9. Common variation in ISL1 confers genetic susceptibility for human congenital heart disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Stevens

    Full Text Available Congenital heart disease (CHD is the most common birth abnormality and the etiology is unknown in the overwhelming majority of cases. ISLET1 (ISL1 is a transcription factor that marks cardiac progenitor cells and generates diverse multipotent cardiovascular cell lineages. The fundamental role of ISL1 in cardiac morphogenesis makes this an exceptional candidate gene to consider as a cause of complex congenital heart disease. We evaluated whether genetic variation in ISL1 fits the common variant-common disease hypothesis. A 2-stage case-control study examined 27 polymorphisms mapping to the ISL1 locus in 300 patients with complex congenital heart disease and 2,201 healthy pediatric controls. Eight genic and flanking ISL1 SNPs were significantly associated with complex congenital heart disease. A replication study analyzed these candidate SNPs in 1,044 new cases and 3,934 independent controls and confirmed that genetic variation in ISL1 is associated with risk of non-syndromic congenital heart disease. Our results demonstrate that two different ISL1 haplotypes contribute to risk of CHD in white and black/African American populations.

  10. Irinotecan-Induced Gastrointestinal Dysfunction and Pain Are Mediated by Common TLR4-Dependent Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardill, Hannah R; Gibson, Rachel J; Van Sebille, Ysabella Z A; Secombe, Kate R; Coller, Janet K; White, Imogen A; Manavis, Jim; Hutchinson, Mark R; Staikopoulos, Vasiliki; Logan, Richard M; Bowen, Joanne M

    2016-06-01

    Strong epidemiological data indicate that chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain occur in parallel, indicating common underlying mechanisms. We have recently outlined evidence suggesting that TLR4 signaling may contribute to both side effects. We therefore aimed to determine if genetic deletion of TLR4 improves chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity and pain. Forty-two female wild-type (WT) and 42 Tlr4 null (-/-) BALB/c mice weighing between 18 and 25 g (10-13 weeks) received a single 270 mg/kg (i.p.) dose of irinotecan hydrochloride or vehicle control and were killed at 6, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours. Bacterial sequencing was conducted on cecal samples of control animals to determine the gut microbiome profile. Gut toxicity was assessed using validated clinical and histopathologic markers, permeability assays, and inflammatory markers. Chemotherapy-induced pain was assessed using the validated rodent facial grimace criteria, as well as immunologic markers of glial activation in the lumbar spinal cord. TLR4 deletion attenuated irinotecan-induced gut toxicity, with improvements in weight loss (P = 0.0003) and diarrhea (P induced gut toxicity and pain, highlighting the possibility of a targetable gut/CNS axis for improved toxicity outcomes. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1376-86. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Genetic characterization and disease mechanism of retinitis pigmentosa; current scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Umar; Rahman, Muhammad Saif Ur; Cao, Jiang; Yuan, Ping Xi

    2017-08-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa is a group of genetically transmitted disorders affecting 1 in 3000-8000 individual people worldwide ultimately affecting the quality of life. Retinitis pigmentosa is characterized as a heterogeneous genetic disorder which leads by progressive devolution of the retina leading to a progressive visual loss. It can occur in syndromic (with Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome) as well as non-syndromic nature. The mode of inheritance can be X-linked, autosomal dominant or autosomal recessive manner. To date 58 genes have been reported to associate with retinitis pigmentosa most of them are either expressed in photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. This review focuses on the disease mechanisms and genetics of retinitis pigmentosa. As retinitis pigmentosa is tremendously heterogeneous disorder expressing a multiplicity of mutations; different variations in the same gene might induce different disorders. In recent years, latest technologies including whole-exome sequencing contributing effectively to uncover the hidden genesis of retinitis pigmentosa by reporting new genetic mutations. In future, these advancements will help in better understanding the genotype-phenotype correlations of disease and likely to develop new therapies.

  12. Epigenetic and genetic mechanisms in red cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Kyle J; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Johnson, Kirby D; Keles, Sunduz; Bresnick, Emery H

    2014-05-01

    Erythropoiesis, in which hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) generate lineage-committed progenitors that mature into erythrocytes, is regulated by numerous chromatin modifying and remodeling proteins. We will focus on how epigenetic and genetic mechanisms mesh to establish the erythroid transcriptome and how studying erythropoiesis can yield genomic principles. Trans-acting factor binding to small DNA motifs (cis-elements) underlies regulatory complex assembly at specific chromatin sites, and therefore unique transcriptomes. As cis-elements are often very small, thousands or millions of copies of a given element reside in a genome. Chromatin restricts factor access in a context-dependent manner, and cis-element-binding factors recruit chromatin regulators that mediate functional outputs. Technologies to map chromatin attributes of loci in vivo, to edit genomes and to sequence whole genomes have been transformative in discovering critical cis-elements linked to human disease. Cis-elements mediate chromatin-targeting specificity, and chromatin regulators dictate cis-element accessibility/function, illustrating an amalgamation of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Cis-elements often function ectopically when studied outside of their endogenous loci, and complex strategies to identify nonredundant cis-elements require further development. Facile genome-editing technologies provide a new approach to address this problem. Extending genetic analyses beyond exons and promoters will yield a rich pipeline of cis-element alterations with importance for red cell biology and disease.

  13. Effects of common germ-line genetic variation in cell cycle genes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Hogdall, E.; Ramus, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    .05) in these genes. The genotypes of each polymorphism were tested for association with survival by Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: A nominally statistically significant association between genotype and ovarian cancer survival was observed for polymorphisms in CCND2 and CCNE1. The per-allele hazard ratios (95......PURPOSE: Somatic alterations have been shown to correlate with ovarian cancer prognosis and survival, but less is known about the effects on survival of common inherited genetic variation. Of particular interest are genes involved in cell cycle pathways, which regulate cell division and could......) and survival among women with invasive ovarian cancer participating in a multicenter case-control study from United Kingdom, Denmark, and United States. DNAs from up to 1,499 women were genotyped for 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that tagged the known common variants (minor allele frequency > or = 0...

  14. Common genetic variation near MC4R has a sex-specific impact on human brain structure and eating behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Horstmann

    Full Text Available Obesity is associated with genetic and environmental factors but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS identified obesity- and type 2 diabetes-associated genetic variants located within or near genes that modulate brain activity and development. Among the top hits is rs17782313 near MC4R, encoding for the melanocortin-4-receptor, which is expressed in brain regions that regulate eating. Here, we hypothesized rs17782313-associated changes in human brain regions that regulate eating behavior. Therefore, we examined effects of common variants at rs17782313 near MC4R on brain structure and eating behavior. Only in female homozygous carriers of the risk allele we found significant increases of gray matter volume (GMV in the right amygdala, a region known to influence eating behavior, and the right hippocampus, a structure crucial for memory formation and learning. Further, we found bilateral increases in medial orbitofrontal cortex, a multimodal brain structure encoding the subjective value of reinforcers, and bilateral prefrontal cortex, a higher order regulation area. There was no association between rs17782313 and brain structure in men. Moreover, among female subjects only, we observed a significant increase of 'disinhibition', and, more specifically, on 'emotional eating' scores of the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire in carriers of the variant rs17782313's risk allele. These findings suggest that rs17782313's effect on eating behavior is mediated by central mechanisms and that these effects are sex-specific.

  15. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Genetic singularity coefficients of common vetch Vicia sativa L. accessions determined with molecular markers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potokina, E K; Aleksandrova, T G

    2008-11-01

    Organization and practical application of ex situ collections require estimation of genetic differences between numerous accessions of local cultivars and field weed forms collected from the same ecological and geographical region and similar in their morphophysiological characteristics. A mathematical algorithm for estimating the degree of genetic singularity of a specimen in the system of local gene pool determined with the help of molecular markers is described. The utility of this algorithm is demonstrated by the example of classification of 677 common vetch accessions from the collection of the Vavilov Institute of Plant Industry from 11 ecological-geographic regions of Russia analyzed using AFLP. The proposed classification of accessions is the result of processing the AFLP data by weighting the marker traits based on their frequency in particular regions. This allowed each accession to be characterized according to the ratio of rare and frequent alleles as a genetic singularity coefficient. The proposed method is appropriate for any types of molecular markers. A practical result of its application is the classification of accessions using a five-point score scale, which can be added to descriptors of certificate databases and used for optimization of the work with collections.

  17. Can genetic pleiotropy replicate common clinical constellations of cardiovascular disease and risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Gottesman

    Full Text Available The relationship between obesity, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, kidney disease and cardiovascular disease (CVD is established when looked at from a clinical, epidemiological or pathophysiological perspective. Yet, when viewed from a genetic perspective, there is comparatively little data synthesis that these conditions have an underlying relationship. We sought to investigate the overlap of genetic variants independently associated with each of these commonly co-existing conditions from the NHGRI genome-wide association study (GWAS catalog, in an attempt to replicate the established notion of shared pathophysiology and risk. We used pathway-based analyses to detect subsets of pleiotropic genes involved in similar biological processes. We identified 107 eligible GWAS studies related to CVD and its established comorbidities and risk factors and assigned genes that correspond to the associated signals based on their position. We found 44 positional genes shared across at least two CVD-related phenotypes that independently recreated the established relationship between the six phenotypes, but only if studies representing non-European populations were included. Seven genes revealed pleiotropy across three or more phenotypes, mostly related to lipid transport and metabolism. Yet, many genes had no relationship to each other or to genes with established functional connection. Whilst we successfully reproduced established relationships between CVD risk factors using GWAS findings, interpretation of biological pathways involved in the observed pleiotropy was limited. Further studies linking genetic variation to gene expression, as well as describing novel biological pathways will be needed to take full advantage of GWAS results.

  18. Heritability estimates of the Big Five personality traits based on common genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, R A; Pluess, M

    2015-07-14

    According to twin studies, the Big Five personality traits have substantial heritable components explaining 40-60% of the variance, but identification of associated genetic variants has remained elusive. Consequently, knowledge regarding the molecular genetic architecture of personality and to what extent it is shared across the different personality traits is limited. Using genomic-relatedness-matrix residual maximum likelihood analysis (GREML), we here estimated the heritability of the Big Five personality factors (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness for experience) in a sample of 5011 European adults from 527,469 single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. We tested for the heritability of each personality trait, as well as for the genetic overlap between the personality factors. We found significant and substantial heritability estimates for neuroticism (15%, s.e. = 0.08, P = 0.04) and openness (21%, s.e. = 0.08, P Big Five personality traits using the GREML approach. Findings should be considered exploratory and suggest that detectable heritability estimates based on common variants is shared between neuroticism and openness to experiences.

  19. Large scale meta-analysis characterizes genetic architecture for common psoriasis associated variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoi, Lam C; Stuart, Philip E; Tian, Chao; Gudjonsson, Johann E; Das, Sayantan; Zawistowski, Matthew; Ellinghaus, Eva; Barker, Jonathan N; Chandran, Vinod; Dand, Nick; Duffin, Kristina Callis; Enerbäck, Charlotta; Esko, Tõnu; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D; Hoffmann, Per; Kingo, Külli; Kõks, Sulev; Krueger, Gerald G; Lim, Henry W; Metspalu, Andres; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Mucha, Sören; Rahman, Proton; Reis, Andre; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Trembath, Richard; Voorhees, John J; Weidinger, Stephan; Weichenthal, Michael; Wen, Xiaoquan; Eriksson, Nicholas; Kang, Hyun M; Hinds, David A; Nair, Rajan P; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Elder, James T

    2017-05-24

    Psoriasis is a complex disease of skin with a prevalence of about 2%. We conducted the largest meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for psoriasis to date, including data from eight different Caucasian cohorts, with a combined effective sample size >39,000 individuals. We identified 16 additional psoriasis susceptibility loci achieving genome-wide significance, increasing the number of identified loci to 63 for European-origin individuals. Functional analysis highlighted the roles of interferon signalling and the NFκB cascade, and we showed that the psoriasis signals are enriched in regulatory elements from different T cells (CD8+ T-cells and CD4+ T-cells including TH0, TH1 and TH17). The identified loci explain ∼28% of the genetic heritability and generate a discriminatory genetic risk score (AUC=0.76 in our sample) that is significantly correlated with age at onset (p=2 × 10-89). This study provides a comprehensive layout for the genetic architecture of common variants for psoriasis.

  20. Maintenance of genetic variation in human personality: Testing evolutionary models by estimating heritability due to common causal variants and investigating the effect of distant inbreeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Karin J.H.; Yang, Jian; Lahti, Jari; Veijola, Juha; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Heinonen, Kati; Pouta, Anneli; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Widen, Elisabeth; Taanila, Anja; Isohanni, Matti; Miettunen, Jouko; Palotie, Aarno; Penke, Lars; Service, Susan K.; Heath, Andrew C.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Räikkönen, Katri; Eriksson, Johan G; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Lehtimäki, Terho; Martin, Nicholas G.; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Visscher, Peter M.; Keller, Matthew C.; Zietsch, Brendan P.

    2012-01-01

    Personality traits are basic dimensions of behavioural variation, and twin, family, and adoption studies show that around 30% of the between-individual variation is due to genetic variation. There is rapidly-growing interest in understanding the evolutionary basis of this genetic variation. Several evolutionary mechanisms could explain how genetic variation is maintained in traits, and each of these makes predictions in terms of the relative contribution of rare and common genetic variants to personality variation, the magnitude of nonadditive genetic influences, and whether personality is affected by inbreeding. Using genome-wide SNP data from >8,000 individuals, we estimated that little variation in the Cloninger personality dimensions (7.2% on average) is due to the combined effect of common, additive genetic variants across the genome, suggesting that most heritable variation in personality is due to rare variant effects and/or a combination of dominance and epistasis. Furthermore, higher levels of inbreeding were associated with less socially-desirable personality trait levels in three of the four personality dimensions. These findings are consistent with genetic variation in personality traits having been maintained by mutation-selection balance. PMID:23025612

  1. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  2. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-06-08

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  3. Genetic assessment of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions by peroxidase gene-based markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemli, Seda; Kaya, Hilal Betul; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2014-06-01

    Peroxidase, a plant-specific oxidoreductase, is a heme-containing glycoprotein encoded by a large multigenic family in plants. Plant peroxidases (POXs, EC 1.11.1.7) play important roles in many self-defense interactions in plants. Here, 67 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes were studied using a POX gene-based marker method. Comparison of POX genes could resolve evolutionary relationships in common bean. Eighty fragments were obtained with 20 primer pairs that amplified one (POX8c) to eight (ATP29) bands, with a mean of four bands per primer pair. The average (polymorphic information content) PIC value for the POX products was 0.40. The maximum variation (93%) was found between Turkey (#33) and India (#52) and between Antalya (#33) and India (#53). The minimum variation (0%) was found among four pairs: Bozdag (#2) and Karadeniz (#38), Kirklareli (#11) and Turkey (#15, 16, 43), Bandirma (#13) and Turkey (#15, 16, 43), and Kirklareli (#10) and Bandirma (#22). UPGMA was used to discriminate the common bean genotypes into five clusters, while STRUCTURE software was used to investigate the genetic population structure. The results showed that POX gene family markers can be used to study genotypic diversity and provide new information for breeding programs and common bean improvement practices. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Genetic potential of common bean progenies selected for crude fiber content obtained through different breeding methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, V A P; Melo, P G S; Pereira, H S; Bassinello, P Z; Melo, L C

    2015-05-29

    Gastrointestinal health is of great importance due to the increasing consumption of functional foods, especially those concern-ing diets rich in fiber content. The common bean has been valorized as a nutritious food due to its appreciable fiber content and the fact that it is consumed in many countries. The current study aimed to evaluate and compare the genetic potential of common bean progenies of the carioca group, developed through different breeding methods, for crude fiber content. The progenies originated through hybridization of two advanced strains, CNFC 7812 and CNFC 7829, up to the F7 generation using three breeding methods: bulk-population, bulk within F2 families, and single seed descent. Fifteen F8 progenies were evaluated in each method, as well as two check cultivars and both parents, us-ing a 7 x 7 simple lattice design, with experimental plots comprised of two 4-m long rows. Field trials were conducted in eleven environments encompassing four Brazilian states and three different sowing times during 2009 and 2010. Estimates of genetic parameters indicate differences among the breeding methods, which seem to be related to the different processes for sampling the advanced progenies inherent to each method, given that the trait in question is not subject to natural selection. Variability amongst progenies occurred within the three breeding methods and there was also a significant effect of environment on the progeny for all methods. Progenies developed by bulk-population attained the highest estimates of genetic parameters, had less interaction with the environment, and greater variability.

  5. Common and distinct genetic properties of ESCRT-II components in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Martin Herz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic studies in yeast have identified class E vps genes that form the ESCRT complexes required for protein sorting at the early endosome. In Drosophila, mutations of the ESCRT-II component vps25 cause endosomal defects leading to accumulation of Notch protein and increased Notch pathway activity. These endosomal and signaling defects are thought to account for several phenotypes. Depending on the developmental context, two different types of overgrowth can be detected. Tissue predominantly mutant for vps25 displays neoplastic tumor characteristics. In contrast, vps25 mutant clones in a wild-type background trigger hyperplastic overgrowth in a non-autonomous manner. In addition, vps25 mutant clones also promote apoptotic resistance in a non-autonomous manner. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we genetically characterize the remaining ESCRT-II components vps22 and vps36. Like vps25, mutants of vps22 and vps36 display endosomal defects, accumulate Notch protein and--when the tissue is predominantly mutant--show neoplastic tumor characteristics. However, despite these common phenotypes, they have distinct non-autonomous phenotypes. While vps22 mutations cause strong non-autonomous overgrowth, they do not affect apoptotic resistance. In contrast, vps36 mutations increase apoptotic resistance, but have little effect on non-autonomous proliferation. Further characterization reveals that although all ESCRT-II mutants accumulate Notch protein, only vps22 and vps25 mutations trigger Notch activity. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The ESCRT-II components vps22, vps25 and vps36 display common and distinct genetic properties. Our data redefine the role of Notch for hyperplastic and neoplastic overgrowth in these mutants. While Notch is required for hyperplastic growth, it appears to be dispensable for neoplastic transformation.

  6. Heterogeneity in the development of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood: Common and specific genetic - environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquin, Stéphane; Lacourse, Eric; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Dionne, Ginette; Tremblay, Richard Ernest; Boivin, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Few studies are grounded in a developmental framework to study proactive and reactive aggression. Furthermore, although distinctive correlates, predictors and outcomes have been highlighted, proactive and reactive aggression are substantially correlated. To our knowledge, no empirical study has examined the communality of genetic and environmental underpinning of the development of both subtypes of aggression. The current study investigated the communality and specificity of genetic-environmental factors related to heterogeneity in proactive and reactive aggression's development throughout childhood. Participants were 223 monozygotic and 332 dizygotic pairs. Teacher reports of aggression were obtained at 6, 7, 9, 10 and 12 years of age. Joint development of both phenotypes were analyzed through a multivariate latent growth curve model. Set point, differentiation, and genetic maturation/environmental modulation hypotheses were tested using a biometric decomposition of intercepts and slopes. Common genetic factors accounted for 64% of the total variation of proactive and reactive aggression's intercepts. Two other sets of uncorrelated genetic factors accounted for reactive aggression's intercept (17%) on the one hand, and for proactive (43%) and reactive (13%) aggression's slopes on the other. Common shared environmental factors were associated with proactive aggression's intercept (21%) and slope (26%) and uncorrelated shared environmental factors were also associated with reactive aggression's slope (14%). Common nonshared environmental factors explained most of the remaining variability of proactive and reactive aggression slopes. A genetic differentiation hypothesis common to both phenotypes was supported by common genetic factors associated with the developmental heterogeneity of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood. A genetic maturation hypothesis common to both phenotypes, albeit stronger for proactive aggression, was supported by common genetic

  7. Heterogeneity in the development of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood: Common and specific genetic - environmental factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Paquin

    Full Text Available Few studies are grounded in a developmental framework to study proactive and reactive aggression. Furthermore, although distinctive correlates, predictors and outcomes have been highlighted, proactive and reactive aggression are substantially correlated. To our knowledge, no empirical study has examined the communality of genetic and environmental underpinning of the development of both subtypes of aggression. The current study investigated the communality and specificity of genetic-environmental factors related to heterogeneity in proactive and reactive aggression's development throughout childhood.Participants were 223 monozygotic and 332 dizygotic pairs. Teacher reports of aggression were obtained at 6, 7, 9, 10 and 12 years of age. Joint development of both phenotypes were analyzed through a multivariate latent growth curve model. Set point, differentiation, and genetic maturation/environmental modulation hypotheses were tested using a biometric decomposition of intercepts and slopes.Common genetic factors accounted for 64% of the total variation of proactive and reactive aggression's intercepts. Two other sets of uncorrelated genetic factors accounted for reactive aggression's intercept (17% on the one hand, and for proactive (43% and reactive (13% aggression's slopes on the other. Common shared environmental factors were associated with proactive aggression's intercept (21% and slope (26% and uncorrelated shared environmental factors were also associated with reactive aggression's slope (14%. Common nonshared environmental factors explained most of the remaining variability of proactive and reactive aggression slopes.A genetic differentiation hypothesis common to both phenotypes was supported by common genetic factors associated with the developmental heterogeneity of proactive and reactive aggression in childhood. A genetic maturation hypothesis common to both phenotypes, albeit stronger for proactive aggression, was supported by common

  8. [Molecular mechanisms of genetic damages of the myocardium in cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasanov, A G; Bershova, T V; Basargina, E N; Bakanov, M I

    2010-01-01

    The review highlighted problems of reorganization of myocardical contractile and cytoskeletal proteins in cardiomyopathy (CM). The role of the genetic factors coding contractile proteins, proteins of thin and thick filaments, and also extracellular matrix proteins in processes of formation and development of hypertrophic (HCM) and dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathy are analyzed. The mechanisms responsible for the changes in cardiac proteins on regulation involved into force generation, its transfer, recycling ATP, impairments in transmembranal signals, that finally lead to cardiac cell dysfunction determining various manifestations of CM are considered.

  9. The Molecular Genetics of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Genomic Mechanisms, Neuroimmunopathology, and Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Guerra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have become increasingly common in recent years. The discovery of single-nucleotide polymorphisms and accompanying copy number variations within the genome has increased our understanding of the architecture of the disease. These genetic and genomic alterations coupled with epigenetic phenomena have pointed to a neuroimmunopathological mechanism for ASD. Model animal studies, developmental biology, and affective neuroscience laid a foundation for dissecting the neural pathways impacted by these disease-generating mechanisms. The goal of current autism research is directed toward a systems biological approach to find the most basic genetic and environmental causes to this severe developmental disease. It is hoped that future genomic and neuroimmunological research will be directed toward finding the road toward prevention, treatment, and cure of ASD.

  10. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on common genetic variants in women of East Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wanqing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Guo, Xingyi; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Brennan, Paul; Chen, Shou-Tung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Ito, Hidemi; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Teo, Soo H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wu, Anna H; Yip, Cheng Har; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Kang, Daehee; Xiang, Yongbing; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-08

    Approximately 100 common breast cancer susceptibility alleles have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The utility of these variants in breast cancer risk prediction models has not been evaluated adequately in women of Asian ancestry. We evaluated 88 breast cancer risk variants that were identified previously by GWAS in 11,760 cases and 11,612 controls of Asian ancestry. SNPs confirmed to be associated with breast cancer risk in Asian women were used to construct a polygenic risk score (PRS). The relative and absolute risks of breast cancer by the PRS percentiles were estimated based on the PRS distribution, and were used to stratify women into different levels of breast cancer risk. We confirmed significant associations with breast cancer risk for SNPs in 44 of the 78 previously reported loci at P women in the middle quintile of the PRS, women in the top 1% group had a 2.70-fold elevated risk of breast cancer (95% CI: 2.15-3.40). The risk prediction model with the PRS had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.606. The lifetime risk of breast cancer for Shanghai Chinese women in the lowest and highest 1% of the PRS was 1.35% and 10.06%, respectively. Approximately one-half of GWAS-identified breast cancer risk variants can be directly replicated in East Asian women. Collectively, common genetic variants are important predictors for breast cancer risk. Using common genetic variants for breast cancer could help identify women at high risk of breast cancer.

  11. Detecting genetic association of common human facial morphological variation using high density 3D image registration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouneng Peng

    Full Text Available Human facial morphology is a combination of many complex traits. Little is known about the genetic basis of common facial morphological variation. Existing association studies have largely used simple landmark-distances as surrogates for the complex morphological phenotypes of the face. However, this can result in decreased statistical power and unclear inference of shape changes. In this study, we applied a new image registration approach that automatically identified the salient landmarks and aligned the sample faces using high density pixel points. Based on this high density registration, three different phenotype data schemes were used to test the association between the common facial morphological variation and 10 candidate SNPs, and their performances were compared. The first scheme used traditional landmark-distances; the second relied on the geometric analysis of 15 landmarks and the third used geometric analysis of a dense registration of ∼30,000 3D points. We found that the two geometric approaches were highly consistent in their detection of morphological changes. The geometric method using dense registration further demonstrated superiority in the fine inference of shape changes and 3D face modeling. Several candidate SNPs showed potential associations with different facial features. In particular, one SNP, a known risk factor of non-syndromic cleft lips/palates, rs642961 in the IRF6 gene, was validated to strongly predict normal lip shape variation in female Han Chinese. This study further demonstrated that dense face registration may substantially improve the detection and characterization of genetic association in common facial variation.

  12. Genetic spatial structure of European common hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) - a result of repeated range expansion and demographic bottlenecks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, K.; Michaux, R.; Maak, S.; Jansman, H.A.H.; Kayser, A.; Mundt, G.; Gattermann, R.

    2005-01-01

    The spatial genetic structure of common hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) was investigated using three partial mitochondrial (mt) genes and 11 nuclear microsatellite loci. All marker systems revealed significant population differentiation across Europe. Hamsters in central and western Europe belong

  13. Teaching the Common Aspects in Mechanical, Electromagnetic and Quantum Waves at Interfaces and Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, R.; Robles, P.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss common features in mechanical, electromagnetic and quantum systems, supporting identical results for the transmission and reflection coefficients of waves arriving perpendicularly at a plane interface. Also, we briefly discuss the origin of special notions such as refractive index in quantum mechanics, massive photons in wave guides and…

  14. Genetic diversity and selection of common bean lines based on technological quality and biofortification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckling, S de M; Ribeiro, N D; Arns, F D; Mezzomo, H C; Possobom, M T D F

    2017-03-22

    The development of common bean cultivars with high technological quality that are biofortified with minerals, is required to meet the demand for food with health benefits. The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether common bean genotypes differ in terms of technological and mineral biofortification traits, to study the correlations between these characters, to analyze the genetic dissimilarity of common bean genotypes, and to select superior lines for these traits. For this, 14 common bean genotypes were evaluated in experiments conducted in three growing seasons in the Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil. A significant genotype x environment interaction was observed for technological quality (mass of 100 grains and cooking time) and biofortification traits (concentration of potassium, phosphorus, calcium, iron, zinc, and copper). Positive correlation estimates were obtained between phosphorus and potassium (r = 0.575), iron and zinc (r = 0.641), copper and iron (r = 0.729), and copper and phosphorus (r = 0.533). In the main component cluster analysis, four groups of genotypes were formed. The following lines are recommended for selection: LP 11-363 for fast-cooking, CNFC 11 948 for high iron concentration, and LEC 03-14 for high potassium, phosphorus, and calcium concentrations in grains. Common bean lines with high phosphorus and iron concentrations in grains can be indirectly selected based on higher potassium, copper, and zinc concentrations. Controlled crossings between LP 11-363 x CNFC 11 948 and LP 11-363 x LEC 03-14 are recommended to obtain segregating lines that are fast-cooking and biofortified with minerals.

  15. Common Genetic Variants in FOXP2 Are Not Associated with Individual Differences in Language Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Kathryn L; Murray, Jeffrey C; Michaelson, Jacob J; Christiansen, Morten H; Reilly, Sheena; Tomblin, J Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Much of our current knowledge regarding the association of FOXP2 with speech and language development comes from singleton and small family studies where a small number of rare variants have been identified. However, neither genome-wide nor gene-specific studies have provided evidence that common polymorphisms in the gene contribute to individual differences in language development in the general population. One explanation for this inconsistency is that previous studies have been limited to relatively small samples of individuals with low language abilities, using low density gene coverage. The current study examined the association between common variants in FOXP2 and a quantitative measure of language ability in a population-based cohort of European decent (n = 812). No significant associations were found for a panel of 13 SNPs that covered the coding region of FOXP2 and extended into the promoter region. Power analyses indicated we should have been able to detect a QTL variance of 0.02 for an associated allele with MAF of 0.2 or greater with 80% power. This suggests that, if a common variant associated with language ability in this gene does exist, it is likely of small effect. Our findings lead us to conclude that while genetic variants in FOXP2 may be significant for rare forms of language impairment, they do not contribute appreciably to individual variation in the normal range as found in the general population.

  16. Disentangling genetic vs. environmental causes of sex determination in the common frog, Rana temporaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merilä Juha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding of sex ratio dynamics in a given species requires understanding its sex determination system, as well as access for reliable tools for sex identification at different life stages. As in the case of many other amphibians, the common frogs (Rana temporaria do not have well differentiated sex chromosomes, and an identification of individuals' genetic sex may be complicated by sex reversals. Here, we report results of studies shedding light on the sex determination system and sex ratio variation in this species. Results A microsatellite locus RtSB03 was found to be sex-linked in four geographically disparate populations, suggesting male heterogamy in common frogs. However, in three other populations examined, no or little evidence for sex-linkage was detected suggesting either ongoing/recent recombination events, and/or frequent sex-reversals. Comparison of inheritance patterns of alleles in RtSB03 and phenotypic sex within sibships revealed a mixed evidence for sex-linkage: all individuals with male phenotype carried a male specific allele in one population, whereas results were more mixed in another population. Conclusion These results make sense only if we assume that the RtSB03 locus is linked to male sex determination factor in some, but not in all common frog populations, and if phenotypic sex-reversals – for which there is earlier evidence from this species – are frequently occurring.

  17. Common genetic variants associated with sudden cardiac death: the FinSCDgen study.

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    Annukka M Lahtinen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac death (SCD accounts for up to half of cardiac mortality. The risk of SCD is heritable but the underlying genetic variants are largely unknown. We investigated whether common genetic variants predisposing to arrhythmia or related electrocardiographic phenotypes, including QT-interval prolongation, are associated with increased risk of SCD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied the association between 28 candidate SNPs and SCD in a meta-analysis of four population cohorts (FINRISK 1992, 1997, 2002 and Health 2000, n = 27,629 and two forensic autopsy series (The Helsinki Sudden Death Study and The Tampere Autopsy Study, n = 694. We also studied the association between established cardiovascular risk factors and SCD. Causes of death were reviewed using registry-based health and autopsy data. Cox regression and logistic regression models were adjusted for age, sex, and geographic region. The total number of SCDs was 716. Two novel SNPs were associated with SCD: SCN5A rs41312391 (relative risk [RR] 1.27 per minor T allele, 95% CI 1.11-1.45, P = 3.4×10(-4 and rs2200733 in 4q25 (RR 1.28 per minor T allele, 95% CI 1.11-1.48, P = 7.9×10(-4. We also replicated the associations for 9p21 (rs2383207, RR 1.13 per G allele, 95% CI 1.01-1.26, P = 0.036, as well as for male sex, systolic blood pressure, diabetes, cigarette smoking, low physical activity, coronary heart disease, and digoxin use (P<0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Two novel genetic variants, one in the cardiac sodium channel gene SCN5A and another at 4q25 previously associated with atrial fibrillation, are associated with SCD.

  18. Genome sequence and genetic diversity of the common carp, Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xumin; Li, Jiongtang; Liu, Guiming; Kuang, Youyi; Xu, Jian; Zheng, Xianhu; Ren, Lufeng; Wang, Guoliang; Zhang, Yan; Huo, Linhe; Zhao, Zixia; Cao, Dingchen; Lu, Cuiyun; Li, Chao; Zhou, Yi; Liu, Zhanjiang; Fan, Zhonghua; Shan, Guangle; Li, Xingang; Wu, Shuangxiu; Song, Lipu; Hou, Guangyuan; Jiang, Yanliang; Jeney, Zsigmond; Yu, Dan; Wang, Li; Shao, Changjun; Song, Lai; Sun, Jing; Ji, Peifeng; Wang, Jian; Li, Qiang; Xu, Liming; Sun, Fanyue; Feng, Jianxin; Wang, Chenghui; Wang, Shaolin; Wang, Baosen; Li, Yan; Zhu, Yaping; Xue, Wei; Zhao, Lan; Wang, Jintu; Gu, Ying; Lv, Weihua; Wu, Kejing; Xiao, Jingfa; Wu, Jiayan; Zhang, Zhang; Yu, Jun; Sun, Xiaowen

    2014-11-01

    The common carp, Cyprinus carpio, is one of the most important cyprinid species and globally accounts for 10% of freshwater aquaculture production. Here we present a draft genome of domesticated C. carpio (strain Songpu), whose current assembly contains 52,610 protein-coding genes and approximately 92.3% coverage of its paleotetraploidized genome (2n = 100). The latest round of whole-genome duplication has been estimated to have occurred approximately 8.2 million years ago. Genome resequencing of 33 representative individuals from worldwide populations demonstrates a single origin for C. carpio in 2 subspecies (C. carpio Haematopterus and C. carpio carpio). Integrative genomic and transcriptomic analyses were used to identify loci potentially associated with traits including scaling patterns and skin color. In combination with the high-resolution genetic map, the draft genome paves the way for better molecular studies and improved genome-assisted breeding of C. carpio and other closely related species.

  19. A covering method for detecting genetic associations between rare variants and common phenotypes.

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    Gaurav Bhatia

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association (GWA studies, which test for association between common genetic markers and a disease phenotype, have shown varying degrees of success. While many factors could potentially confound GWA studies, we focus on the possibility that multiple, rare variants (RVs may act in concert to influence disease etiology. Here, we describe an algorithm for RV analysis, RareCover. The algorithm combines a disparate collection of RVs with low effect and modest penetrance. Further, it does not require the rare variants be adjacent in location. Extensive simulations over a range of assumed penetrance and population attributable risk (PAR values illustrate the power of our approach over other published methods, including the collapsing and weighted-collapsing strategies. To showcase the method, we apply RareCover to re-sequencing data from a cohort of 289 individuals at the extremes of Body Mass Index distribution (NCT00263042. Individual samples were re-sequenced at two genes, FAAH and MGLL, known to be involved in endocannabinoid metabolism (187Kbp for 148 obese and 150 controls. The RareCover analysis identifies exactly one significantly associated region in each gene, each about 5 Kbp in the upstream regulatory regions. The data suggests that the RVs help disrupt the expression of the two genes, leading to lowered metabolism of the corresponding cannabinoids. Overall, our results point to the power of including RVs in measuring genetic associations.

  20. Common genetic variation drives molecular heterogeneity in human iPSCs.

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    Kilpinen, Helena; Goncalves, Angela; Leha, Andreas; Afzal, Vackar; Alasoo, Kaur; Ashford, Sofie; Bala, Sendu; Bensaddek, Dalila; Casale, Francesco Paolo; Culley, Oliver J; Danecek, Petr; Faulconbridge, Adam; Harrison, Peter W; Kathuria, Annie; McCarthy, Davis; McCarthy, Shane A; Meleckyte, Ruta; Memari, Yasin; Moens, Nathalie; Soares, Filipa; Mann, Alice; Streeter, Ian; Agu, Chukwuma A; Alderton, Alex; Nelson, Rachel; Harper, Sarah; Patel, Minal; White, Alistair; Patel, Sharad R; Clarke, Laura; Halai, Reena; Kirton, Christopher M; Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Beales, Philip; Birney, Ewan; Danovi, Davide; Lamond, Angus I; Ouwehand, Willem H; Vallier, Ludovic; Watt, Fiona M; Durbin, Richard; Stegle, Oliver; Gaffney, Daniel J

    2017-06-15

    Technology utilizing human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) has enormous potential to provide improved cellular models of human disease. However, variable genetic and phenotypic characterization of many existing iPS cell lines limits their potential use for research and therapy. Here we describe the systematic generation, genotyping and phenotyping of 711 iPS cell lines derived from 301 healthy individuals by the Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells Initiative. Our study outlines the major sources of genetic and phenotypic variation in iPS cells and establishes their suitability as models of complex human traits and cancer. Through genome-wide profiling we find that 5-46% of the variation in different iPS cell phenotypes, including differentiation capacity and cellular morphology, arises from differences between individuals. Additionally, we assess the phenotypic consequences of genomic copy-number alterations that are repeatedly observed in iPS cells. In addition, we present a comprehensive map of common regulatory variants affecting the transcriptome of human pluripotent cells.

  1. Carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial cancer: involvement of genetics and epigenetics.

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    Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Iida, Miho; Masuda, Kenta; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-08-01

    Endometrial cancer is increasing worldwide and the number of patients with this disease is likely to continue to grow, including younger patients. Many endometrial cancers show estrogen-dependent proliferation, but the carcinogenic mechanisms are unknown or not completely explained beyond mutations of single oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Possible carcinogenic mechanisms include imbalance between endometrial proliferation by unopposed estrogen and the mismatch repair (MMR) system; hypermethylation of the MMR gene hMLH1; mutation of PTEN, β-catenin and K-ras genes in type I endometrial cancer and of HER-2/neu and p53 genes in type II endometrial cancer; hypermethylation of SPRY2, RASSF1A, RSK4, CHFR and CDH1; and methylation of tumor suppressor microRNAs, including miR-124, miR-126, miR-137, miR-491, miR-129-2 and miR-152. Thus, it is likely that the carcinogenic mechanisms of endometrial cancer involve both genetic and epigenetic changes. Mutations and methylation of MMR genes induce various oncogenic changes that cause carcinogenesis, and both MMR mutation in germ cells and methylation patterns may be inherited over generations and cause familial tumorigenesis. Determination of the detailed carcinogenic mechanisms will be useful for prevention and diagnosis of endometrial cancer, risk assessment, and development of new treatment strategies targeting MMR genes. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Efficiency of Indigenous Common Bean Rhizobia in Croatia

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    Ines Pohajda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodule bacteria (rhizobia in symbiotic associations with legumes enable considerable entries of biologically fixed nitrogen into soil. Efforts are therefore made to intensify the natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume inoculation. Studies of field populationsof rhizobia open up the possibility to preserve and probably exploit some indigenous strains with hidden symbiotic or ecological potentials. The main aim of the present study is to determine genetic diversity of common bean rhizobia isolated from different field sites in central Croatia and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency and compatibility with host plants. The isolation procedure revealed that most soil samples contained no indigenous common bean rhizobia. The results indicate that the cropping history had a significant impact on the presence of indigenous strains. Although all isolates were found to belong to species Rhizobium leguminosarum, significant genetic diversity at the strain level was determined. Application of both random amplifi cation of polymorphic DNA (RAPD and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus–polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR methods resulted in similar grouping of strains. Symbiotic efficiency of indigenous rhizobia as well as their compatibility with two commonly grown bean varieties were tested in field experiments. Application of indigenous rhizobial strains as inoculants resulted in significantly different values of nodulation, seed yield as well as plant nitrogen and seed protein contents. The most abundant nodulation and the highest plant nitrogen and protein contents were determined in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum strains S17/2 and S21/6. Although, in general, the inoculation had a positive impact on seed yield, differences depending on the applied strain were not determined. The overall results show the high degree of symbiotic efficiency of the specific indigenous strain S21/6. These results indicate different

  3. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

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    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  4. Genetic mapping of two genes conferring resistance to powdery mildew in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

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    Pérez-Vega, Elena; Trabanco, Noemí; Campa, Ana; Ferreira, Juan José

    2013-06-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a serious disease in many legume species, including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This study investigated the genetic control behind resistance reaction to PM in the bean genotype, Cornell 49242. The results revealed evidence supporting a qualitative mode of inheritance for resistance and the involvement of two independent genes in the resistance reaction. The location of these resistance genes was investigated in a linkage genetic map developed for the XC RIL population. Contingency tests revealed significant associations for 28 loci out of a total of 329 mapped loci. Fifteen were isolated or formed groups with less than two loci. The thirteen remaining loci were located at three regions in linkage groups Pv04, Pv09, and Pv11. The involvement of Pv09 was discarded due to the observed segregation in the subpopulation obtained from the Xana genotype for the loci located in this region. In contrast, the two subpopulations obtained from the Xana genotype for the BM161 locus, linked to the Co-3/9 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv04), and from the Xana genotype for the SCAReoli locus, linked to the Co-2 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv11), exhibited monogenic segregations, suggesting that both regions were involved in the genetic control of resistance. A genetic dissection was carried out to verify the involvement of both regions in the reaction to PM. Two resistant recombinant lines were selected, according to their genotypes, for the block of loci included in the Co-2 and Co-3/9 regions, and they were crossed with the susceptible parent, Xana. Linkage analysis in the respective F2 populations supported the hypothesis that a dominant gene (Pm1) was located in the linkage group Pv11 and another gene (Pm2) was located in the linkage group Pv04. This is the first report showing the localization of resistance genes against powdery mildew in Phaseolus vulgaris and the results offer the opportunity to increase the efficiency of breeding

  5. Report of National Cancer Institute symposium: comparison of mechanisms of carcinogenesis by radiation and chemical agents. I. Common molecular mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borg, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some aspects of molecular mechanisms common to radiation and chemical carcinogenesis are discussed, particularly the DNA damage done by these agents. Emphasis is placed on epidemiological considerations and on dose-response models used in risk assessment to extrapolate from experimental data obtained at high doses to the effects from long-term, low-level exposures. 3 references, 6 figures. (ACR)

  6. Genetic Diversity of Fusarium oxysporum Strains from Common Bean Fields in Spain

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    Alves-Santos, Fernando M.; Benito, Ernesto P.; Eslava, Arturo P.; Díaz-Mínguez, José María

    1999-01-01

    Fusarium wilt is an endemic disease in El Barco de Avila (Castilla y León, west-central Spain), where high-quality common bean cultivars have been cultured for the last century. We used intergenic spacer (IGS) region polymorphism of ribosomal DNA, electrophoretic karyotype patterns, and vegetative compatibility and pathogenicity analyses to assess the genetic diversity within Fusarium oxysporum isolates recovered from common bean plants growing in fields around El Barco de Avila. Ninety-six vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) were found among 128 isolates analyzed; most of these VCGs contained only a single isolate. The strains belonging to pathogenic VCGs and the most abundant nonpathogenic VCGs were further examined for polymorphisms in the IGS region and electrophoretic karyotype patterns. Isolates belonging to the same VCG exhibited the same IGS haplotype and very similar electrophoretic karyotype patterns. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that VCGs represent clonal lineages that rarely, if ever, reproduce sexually. The F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli strains recovered had the same IGS haplotype and similar electrophoretic karyotype patterns, different from those found for F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli from the Americas, and were assigned to three new VCGs (VCGs 0166, 0167, and 0168). Based on our results, we do not consider the strains belonging to F. oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli to be a monophyletic group within F. oxysporum, as there is no correlation between pathogenicity and VCG, IGS restriction fragment length polymorphism, or electrophoretic karyotype. PMID:10427016

  7. Genetic diversity of indigenous common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. rhizobia from the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Adalgisa Ribeiro Torres

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We characterized indigenous common bean rhizobia from five districts of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The isolates were trapped by two common bean varieties, the Mineiro Precoce (Andean origin and Ouro Negro (Mesoamerican origin. Analysis by BOX-PCR of selected isolates detected a high level of genetic diversity.

  8. SNP marker development for linkage map construction, anchoring of the common bean whole genome sequence and genetic research

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    Our objectives were to identify SNP DNA markers based on a diverse set of common bean cultivars via next generation sequencing technologies; to develop Illumina Infinium BeadChip assays containing SNPs with high polymorphism within and between common bean market classes, to create high density genet...

  9. Common genetic polymorphisms of adenosine A2A receptor do not influence response to regadenoson.

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    Berlacher, Mark; Mastouri, Ronald; Philips, Santosh; Skaar, Todd C; Kreutz, Rolf P

    2017-04-01

    Hemodynamic response to regadenoson varies greatly, and underlying mechanisms for variability are poorly understood. We hypothesized that five common variants of adenosine A2A receptor (ADORA2A) are associated with altered response to regadenoson. Consecutive subjects (n = 357) undergoing resting regadenoson nuclear stress imaging were enrolled. Genotyping was performed using Taqman-based assays for rs5751862, rs2298383, rs3761422, rs2267076 and rs5751876. There was no significant difference in heart rate or blood pressure between different genotypes following regadenoson administration. There was also no significant difference in myocardial ischemia detected by nuclear perfusion imaging as defined by summed difference score, or in self-reported side effects among the genotypes tested. The common A2A variants studied are not associated with variability in hemodynamic response to regadenoson or variability in detection of ischemia with nuclear perfusion stress imaging.

  10. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

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    Nami Shrestha Palikhe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the response to medication. Potential genetic biomarkers contributing to the AERD phenotype include HLA-DPB1, LTC4S, ALOX5, CYSLT, PGE2, TBXA2R, TBX21, MS4A2, IL10, ACE, IL13, KIF3A, SLC22A2, CEP68, PTGER, and CRTH2 and a four-locus SNP set composed of B2ADR, CCR3, CysLTR1, and FCER1B. Future areas of investigation need to focus on comprehensive approaches to identifying biomarkers for early diagnosis.

  11. Autoimmune thyroid disease: mechanism, genetics and current knowledge.

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    Dong, Y H; Fu, D G

    2014-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies recognized a steady increase in the incidence of different autoimmune endocrine disorders, including autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). The etiology of AITD is multifactorial and involves genetic and environmental factors and apparently with a strong preponderance in females. There are mainly two types of AITD, Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease and both of these show strong association in age groups above 45-50 years. Among environmental factors smoking and alcohol have significant effects, both protective as well as for aggravating the disease, even though the precise nature of these effects are not clearly known. There are elevated levels of circulating antibodies against the thyroid proteins, mainly thyroid oxidase, thyroglobulin and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor, in patients with Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. Linkage and association studies in AITD identified several major genes that are relevant for the onset of AITD, including the thyroid-specific genes, thyroglobulin and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor and also many immune-regulatory genes. In this review we addressed many aspects of AITD including disease mechanisms, involved thyroid antigens, environmental factors and genetic factors.

  12. Epigenetics and genetics in endometrial cancer: new carcinogenic mechanisms and relationship with clinical practice.

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    Banno, Kouji; Kisu, Iori; Yanokura, Megumi; Masuda, Kenta; Ueki, Arisa; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Daisuke

    2012-04-01

    Endometrial cancer is the seventh most common cancer worldwide among females. An increased incidence and a younger age of patients are also predicted to occur, and therefore elucidation of the pathological mechanisms is important. However, several aspects of the mechanism of carcinogenesis in the endometrium remain unclear. Associations with genetic mutations of cancer-related genes have been shown, but these do not provide a complete explanation. Therefore, epigenetic mechanisms have been examined. Silencing of genes by DNA hypermethylation, hereditary epimutation of DNA mismatch repair genes and regulation of gene expression by miRNAs may underlie carcinogenesis in endometrial cancer. New therapies include targeting epigenetic changes using histone deacetylase inhibitors. Some cases of endometrial cancer may also be hereditary. Thus, patients with Lynch syndrome which is a hereditary disease, have a higher risk for developing endometrial cancer than the general population. Identification of such disease-related genes may contribute to early detection and prevention of endometrial cancer.

  13. Genetic association study of common mitochondrial variants on body fat mass.

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    Tie-Lin Yang

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a central role in ATP production and energy metabolism. Previous studies suggest that common variants in mtDNA are associated with several common complex diseases, including obesity. To test the hypothesis that common mtDNA variants influence obesity-related phenotypes, including BMI and body fat mass, we genotyped a total of 445 mtSNPs across the whole mitochondrial genome in a large sample of 2,286 unrelated Caucasian subjects. 72 of these 445 mtSNPs passed quality control criteria, and were used for subsequent analyses. We also classified all subjects into nine common European haplogroups. Association analyses were conducted for both BMI and body fat mass with single mtSNPs and mtDNA haplogroups. Two mtSNPs, mt4823 and mt8873 were detected to be significantly associated with body fat mass, with adjusted P values of 4.94 × 10⁻³ and 4.58 × 10⁻², respectively. The minor alleles mt4823 C and mt8873 A were associated with reduced fat mass values and the effect size (β was estimated to be 3.52 and 3.18, respectively. These two mtSNPs also achieved nominally significant levels for association with BMI. For haplogroup analyses, we found that haplogroup X was strongly associated with both BMI (adjusted P = 8.31 × 10⁻³ and body fat mass (adjusted P = 5.67×10⁻⁴ Subjects classified as haplogroup X had lower BMI and fat mass values, with the β estimated to be 2.86 and 6.03, respectively. Our findings suggest that common variants in mitochondria might play a role in variations of body fat mass. Further molecular and functional studies will be needed to clarify the potential mechanism.

  14. Different tradeoffs result from alternate genetic adaptations to a common environment.

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    Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; Carrillo-Cisneros, David; González-González, Andrea; Gaut, Brandon S; Bennett, Albert F

    2014-08-19

    Fitness tradeoffs are often assumed by evolutionary theory, yet little is known about the frequency of fitness tradeoffs during stress adaptation. Even less is known about the genetic factors that confer these tradeoffs and whether alternative adaptive mutations yield contrasting tradeoff dynamics. We addressed these issues using 114 clones of Escherichia coli that were evolved independently for 2,000 generations under thermal stress (42.2 °C). For each clone, we measured their fitness relative to the ancestral clone at 37 °C and 20 °C. Tradeoffs were common at 37 °C but more prevalent at 20 °C, where 56% of clones were outperformed by the ancestor. We also characterized the upper and lower thermal boundaries of each clone. All clones shifted their upper boundary to at least 45 °C; roughly half increased their lower niche boundary concomitantly, representing a shift of thermal niche. The remaining clones expanded their thermal niche by increasing their upper limit without a commensurate increase of lower limit. We associated these niche dynamics with genotypes and confirmed associations by engineering single mutations in the rpoB gene, which encodes the beta subunit of RNA polymerase, and the rho gene, which encodes a termination factor. Single mutations in the rpoB gene exhibit antagonistic pleiotropy, with fitness tradeoffs at 18 °C and fitness benefits at 42.2 °C. In contrast, a mutation within the rho transcriptional terminator, which defines an alternative adaptive pathway from that of rpoB, had no demonstrable effect on fitness at 18 °C. This study suggests that two different genetic pathways toward high-temperature adaptation have contrasting effects with respect to thermal tradeoffs.

  15. The mechanisms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses for the treatment of cancer.

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    Jefferson, Artrish; Cadet, Valerie E; Hielscher, Abigail

    2015-09-01

    The use of oncolytic viruses for the treatment of cancer is an emerging field of cancer research and therapy. Oncolytic viruses are designed to induce tumor specific immunity while replicating selectively within cancer cells to cause lysis of the tumor cells. While there are several forms of oncolytic viruses, the use of vaccinia viruses for oncolysis may be more beneficial than other forms of oncolytic viruses. For example, vaccinia viruses have been shown to exert their anti-tumor effects through genetic engineering strategies which enhance their therapeutic efficacy. This paper will address some of the most common forms of genetically modified vaccinia viruses and will explore the mechanisms whereby they selectively target, enter and destroy cancer cells. Furthermore, this review will highlight how vaccinia viruses activate host immune responses against cancer cells and will address clinical trials evaluating the tumor-directed and killing efficacy of these viruses against solid tumors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Common genetic polymorphisms of microRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival

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    Sung Hyuna

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the role of microRNA’s (miRNA’s biogenesis pathway genes in cancer development and progression has been well established, the association between genetic variants of this pathway genes and breast cancer survival is still unknown. Methods We used genotype data available from a previously conducted case–control study to investigate association between common genetic variations in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes and breast cancer survival. We investigated the possible associations between 41 germ-line single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and both disease free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS among 488 breast cancer patients. During the median follow-up of 6.24 years, 90 cases developed disease progression and 48 cases died. Results Seven SNPs were significantly associated with breast cancer survival. Two SNPs in AGO2 (rs11786030 and rs2292779 and DICER1 rs1057035 were associated with both DFS and OS. Two SNPs in HIWI (rs4759659 and rs11060845 and DGCR8 rs9606250 were associated with DFS, while DROSHA rs874332 and GEMIN4 rs4968104 were associated with only OS. The most significant association was observed in variant allele of AGO2 rs11786030 with 2.62-fold increased risk of disease progression (95% confidence interval (CI, 1.41-4.88 and in minor allele homozygote of AGO2 rs2292779 with 2.94-fold increased risk of death (95% CI, 1.52-5.69. We also found cumulative effects of SNPs on DFS and OS. Compared to the subjects carrying 0 to 2 high-risk genotypes, those carrying 3 or 4–6 high-risk genotypes had an increased risk of disease progression with a hazard ratio of 2.16 (95% CI, 1.18- 3.93 and 4.47 (95% CI, 2.45- 8.14, respectively (P for trend, 6.11E-07. Conclusions Our results suggest that genetic variants in miRNA biogenesis pathway genes may be associated with breast cancer survival. Further studies in larger sample size and functional characterizations are warranted to validate these results.

  17. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

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    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  18. metabolicMine: an integrated genomics, genetics and proteomics data warehouse for common metabolic disease research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyne, Mike; Smith, Richard N; Lyne, Rachel; Aleksic, Jelena; Hu, Fengyuan; Kalderimis, Alex; Stepan, Radek; Micklem, Gos

    2013-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine diseases such as diabetes affect millions of people worldwide and have a major health impact, frequently leading to complications and mortality. In a search for better prevention and treatment, there is ongoing research into the underlying molecular and genetic bases of these complex human diseases, as well as into the links with risk factors such as obesity. Although an increasing number of relevant genomic and proteomic data sets have become available, the quantity and diversity of the data make their efficient exploitation challenging. Here, we present metabolicMine, a data warehouse with a specific focus on the genomics, genetics and proteomics of common metabolic diseases. Developed in collaboration with leading UK metabolic disease groups, metabolicMine integrates data sets from a range of experiments and model organisms alongside tools for exploring them. The current version brings together information covering genes, proteins, orthologues, interactions, gene expression, pathways, ontologies, diseases, genome-wide association studies and single nucleotide polymorphisms. Although the emphasis is on human data, key data sets from mouse and rat are included. These are complemented by interoperation with the RatMine rat genomics database, with a corresponding mouse version under development by the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) group. The web interface contains a number of features including keyword search, a library of Search Forms, the QueryBuilder and list analysis tools. This provides researchers with many different ways to analyse, view and flexibly export data. Programming interfaces and automatic code generation in several languages are supported, and many of the features of the web interface are available through web services. The combination of diverse data sets integrated with analysis tools and a powerful query system makes metabolicMine a valuable research resource. The web interface makes it accessible to first

  19. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  20. A Systems Biology Approach Reveals Converging Molecular Mechanisms that Link Different POPs to Common Metabolic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Patricia; Perlina, Ally; Mumtaz, Moiz; Fowler, Bruce A

    2016-07-01

    A number of epidemiological studies have identified statistical associations between persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and metabolic diseases, but testable hypotheses regarding underlying molecular mechanisms to explain these linkages have not been published. We assessed the underlying mechanisms of POPs that have been associated with metabolic diseases; three well-known POPs [2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD), 2,2´,4,4´,5,5´-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 153), and 4,4´-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p´-DDE)] were studied. We used advanced database search tools to delineate testable hypotheses and to guide laboratory-based research studies into underlying mechanisms by which this POP mixture could produce or exacerbate metabolic diseases. For our searches, we used proprietary systems biology software (MetaCore™/MetaDrug™) to conduct advanced search queries for the underlying interactions database, followed by directional network construction to identify common mechanisms for these POPs within two or fewer interaction steps downstream of their primary targets. These common downstream pathways belong to various cytokine and chemokine families with experimentally well-documented causal associations with type 2 diabetes. Our systems biology approach allowed identification of converging pathways leading to activation of common downstream targets. To our knowledge, this is the first study to propose an integrated global set of step-by-step molecular mechanisms for a combination of three common POPs using a systems biology approach, which may link POP exposure to diseases. Experimental evaluation of the proposed pathways may lead to development of predictive biomarkers of the effects of POPs, which could translate into disease prevention and effective clinical treatment strategies. Ruiz P, Perlina A, Mumtaz M, Fowler BA. 2016. A systems biology approach reveals converging molecular mechanisms that link different POPs to common metabolic diseases. Environ

  1. Direct detection of common and rare inversion mutations in the genetic diagnosis of severe hemophilia A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windsor, A.S.; Lillicrap, D.P.; Taylor, S.A.M. [Queen`s Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    Approximately 50% of the cases of severe hemophilia A (factor VIII:C < 0.01 units/ml) may be due to gross rearrangements of the factor VIII gene. The mutation involves homologous sequences upstream of the factor VIII locus and within intron 22 in an intrachromosomal recombination, inversion, event. The rearrangements can readily be detected on a Southern blot using a probe that is complementary to sequences from within intron 22. We describe here the analysis of this mutation in 71 severe hemophilia A patients. Thirty two of the patients (45%) showed evidence of a rearrangement. Five different patterns of rearrangements were seen, two of which have previously been described and account for the majority of cases (pattern 1, 70% and pattern 2, 16%). Three other abnormal patterns were observed. The inversion mechanism does not usually result in the loss or gain of any genetic material, but in one patient, in whom a unique rearrangement pattern was observed (pattern 3), we have previously documented a gross deletion which removes exons 1-22 of the factor VII gene as well as sequences 5{prime} to the gene. In another individual a fourth pattern in which an extra 19.0 kb band is present was detected. In this case it is unclear as to whether the rearrangement is responsible for the disease or is simply coincident normal variation. A fifth pattern, in which an extra 16.0 kb band was detected, was observed in a family with a new mutation causing hemophilia A. The affected individual and his mother inherited a de novo rearrangement of the factor VIII gene from his unaffected grandfather, implicating it as the cause of the disease. In conclusion, testing for the factor VIII inversion mutation was positive in approximately 45% of severe hemophiliacs, 72% of whom were isolated cases, and as such should constitute the initial stage in the genetic testing protocol for these patients` families.

  2. Genetic Mechanisms of Antibiotic Resistance and the Role of Antibiotic Adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontes, Daniela Santos; de Araujo, Rodrigo Santos Aquino; Dantas, Natalina; Scotti, Luciana; Scotti, Marcus Tullius; de Moura, Ricardo Olimpio; Mendonca-Junior, Francisco Jaime Bezerra

    2018-02-05

    The ever increasing number of multidrug-resistant microorganism pathogens has become a great and global public health threat. Antibiotic mechanisms of action and the opposing mechanisms of resistance are intimately associated, but comprehension of the biochemical and molecular functions of such drugs is not a simple exercise. Both the environment, and genetic settings contribute to alterations in phenotypic resistance (natural bacterial evolution), and make it difficult to control the emergence and impacts of antibiotic resistance. Under such circumstances, comprehension of how bacteria develop and/or acquire antibiotic resistance genes (ARG) has a critical role in developing propositions to fight against these superbugs, and to search for new drugs. In this review, we present and discuss both general information and examples of common genetic and molecular mechanisms related to antibiotic resistance, as well as how the expression and interactions of ARGs is important to drug resistance. At the same time, we focus on recent achievements in the search for antibiotic adjuvants, which help combat antibiotic resistance through deactivation of bacterial mechanisms of action such as ?-lactamases. Recent advances involving the use of anti-resistance drugs such as: efflux pump inhibitors; anti-virulence drugs; drugs against quorum sensing; and against type II/III secretion systems are revealed. Such antibiotic adjuvants (as explored herein) collaborate against the problematic of antibiotic resistance, and may restore or prolong the therapeutic activity of known antibiotics. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Genetic variation, phenotypic stability, and repeatability of drought response in European larch throughout 50 years in a common garden experiment

    OpenAIRE

    George, Jan-Peter; Grabner, Michael; Karanitsch-Ackerl, Sandra; Mayer, Konrad; Wei?enbacher, Lambert; Schueler, Silvio

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Assessing intra-specific variation in drought stress response is required to mitigate the consequences of climate change on forest ecosystems. Previous studies suggest that European larch (Larix decidua Mill.), an important European conifer in mountainous and alpine forests, is highly vulnerable to drought. In light of this, we estimated the genetic variation in drought sensitivity and its degree of genetic determination in a 50-year-old common garden experiment in the drought-prone ...

  4. Evaluating the performance of commercial whole-genome marker sets for capturing common genetic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Reedik; Pfeufer, Arne; Nelis, Mari; Montpetit, Alexandre; Metspalu, Andres; Remm, Maido

    2007-01-01

    Background New technologies have enabled genome-wide association studies to be conducted with hundreds of thousands of genotyped SNPs. Several different first-generation genome-wide panels of SNPs have been commercialized. The total amount of common genetic variation is still unknown; however, the coverage of commercial panels can be evaluated against reference population samples genotyped by the International HapMap project. Less information is available about coverage in samples from other populations. Results In this study we compare four commercial panels: the HumanHap 300 and HumanHap 550 Array Sets from the Illumina Infinium series and the Mapping 100 K and Mapping 500 K Array Sets from the Affymetrix GeneChip series. Tagging performance is compared among HapMap CEPH (CEU), Asian (JPT, CHB) and Yoruba (YRI) population samples. It is also evaluated in an Estonian population sample with more than 1000 individuals genotyped in two 500-kbp ENCODE regions of chromosome 2: ENr112 on 2p16.3 and ENr131 on 2p37.1. Conclusion We found that in a non-reference Caucasian population, commercial SNP panels provide levels of coverage similar to those in the HapMap CEPH population sample. We present the proportions of universal and population-specific SNPs in all the commercial platforms studied. PMID:17562002

  5. Genetic control of the number of days to flowering in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Pedroso Mendes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic control of early flowering in common bean. Crosses weremade between the parents Pérola and BRS Radiante and between ESAL 506 and Preto 60 dias. The segregating generations,F3, F2BC11 and F2BC12 of each cross were evaluated in experiments with two replications. F3 plants of both crosses wererandomly taken, and F3:4 progenies evaluated for the trait number of days to flowering. There was good adjustment to theadditive-dominant model of both crosses. The dominance effect was lower than the additive effect in the trait control and, whenpresent, it reduced the number of days to flowering. The value of realized heritability (h2R was similar in both crosses andlower than the h2 estimated for selection among F3:4 progenies. There were indications that aside from the environmental effecton the trait expression, the genotype-environment interaction was also significant.

  6. Common variants of OPA1 conferring genetic susceptibility to leprosy in Han Chinese from Southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yang-Lin; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Wang, Dong; Li, Yu-Ye; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2015-11-01

    Leprosy is an ancient chronic infection caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Onset of leprosy was highly affected by host nutritional condition and energy production, (partially) due to genomic loss and parasitic life style of M. leprae. The optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) gene plays an essential role in mitochondria, which function in cellular energy supply and innate immunity. To investigate the potential involvement of OPA1 in leprosy. We analyzed 7 common genetic variants of OPA1 in 1110 Han Chinese subjects with and without leprosy, followed by mRNA expression profiling and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analysis. We observed positive associations between OPA1 variants rs9838374 (Pgenotypic=0.003) and rs414237 (Pgenotypic=0.002) with lepromatous leprosy. expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis showed that the leprosy-related risk allele C of rs414237 is correlated with lower OPA1 mRNA expression level. Indeed, we identified a decrease of OPA1 mRNA expression in both with patients and cellular model of leprosy. In addition, the PPI analysis showed that OPA1 protein was actively involved in the interaction network of M. leprae induced differentially expressed genes. Our results indicated that OPA1 variants confer risk of leprosy and may affect OPA1 expression, mitochondrial function and antimicrobial pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingli; Wu, Jing; Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines.

  8. Constraints on Biological Mechanism from Disease Comorbidity Using Electronic Medical Records and Database of Genetic Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven C Bagley

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of disease co-occurrence that deviate from statistical independence may represent important constraints on biological mechanism, which sometimes can be explained by shared genetics. In this work we study the relationship between disease co-occurrence and commonly shared genetic architecture of disease. Records of pairs of diseases were combined from two different electronic medical systems (Columbia, Stanford, and compared to a large database of published disease-associated genetic variants (VARIMED; data on 35 disorders were available across all three sources, which include medical records for over 1.2 million patients and variants from over 17,000 publications. Based on the sources in which they appeared, disease pairs were categorized as having predominant clinical, genetic, or both kinds of manifestations. Confounding effects of age on disease incidence were controlled for by only comparing diseases when they fall in the same cluster of similarly shaped incidence patterns. We find that disease pairs that are overrepresented in both electronic medical record systems and in VARIMED come from two main disease classes, autoimmune and neuropsychiatric. We furthermore identify specific genes that are shared within these disease groups.

  9. Biological pathways and genetic mechanisms involved in social functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordoñana, Juan R.; Bartels, Meike; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Cella, David; Mosing, Miriam; Oliveira, Joao R.; Patrick, Donald L.; Veenhoven, Ruut; Wagner, Gert G.; Sprangers, Mirjam A. G.; Abernethy, Amy P.; Baas, Frank; Barsevick, Andrea M.; Bottomley, Andrew; Brundage, Michael; Chauhan, Cynthia; Cleeland, Charles S.; Coens, Corneel; Dueck, Amylou C.; Frost, Marlene H.; Hall, Per; Halyard, Michele Y.; Klepstad, Pål; Martin, Nicholas G.; Miaskowski, Christine; Movsas, Benjamin; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Oliveira, Joao Ricardo; Ordoñana, Juan; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Raat, Hein; Reeve, Bryce; Ropka, Mary E.; Shi, Quiling; Shinozaki, Gen; Singh, Jasvinder A.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Swaab, Dick; Talwalker, Jayant; Yang, Ping; Zwinderman, Ailko H.

    2013-01-01

    To describe the major findings in the literature regarding associations between biological and genetic factors and social functioning, paying special attention to: (1) heritability studies on social functioning and related concepts; (2) hypothesized biological pathways and genetic variants that

  10. Biological pathways and genetic mechanisms involved in social functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ordonana, J.R.; Bartels, M.; Boomsma, D.I.; Cella, D.; Mosing, M.; Oliveira, J.R.; Patrick, D.L.; Veenhoven, R.; Wagner, G.G.; Sprangers, M.A.G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the major findings in the literature regarding associations between biological and genetic factors and social functioning, paying special attention to: (1) heritability studies on social functioning and related concepts; (2) hypothesized biological pathways and genetic variants

  11. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and non-genetic risk factors in Hispanic women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C.; John, Esther M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M.; Wolff, Roger K.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. Methods We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. Results We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele odds ratio (OR): 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.74–1.20), 1.20 (0.94–1.53) and 1.49 (1.28–1.75) for current, former and never hormone therapy users, respectively, P-interaction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72–1.42), 1.19 (0.98–1.45) and 1.69 (1.26–2.26) for never, 12 months breastfeeding, respectively, P-interaction 0.014]. Conclusions The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. Impact These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and non-genetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. PMID:26364163

  12. Modification of Occupational Exposures on Bladder Cancer Risk by Common Genetic Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Jonine D; Koutros, Stella; Colt, Joanne S; Kogevinas, Manolis; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Real, Francisco X; Friesen, Melissa C; Baris, Dalsu; Stewart, Patricia; Schwenn, Molly; Johnson, Alison; Karagas, Margaret R; Armenti, Karla R; Moore, Lee E; Schned, Alan; Lenz, Petra; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Banday, A Rouf; Paquin, Ashley; Ylaya, Kris; Chung, Joon-Yong; Hewitt, Stephen M; Nickerson, Michael L; Tardón, Adonina; Serra, Consol; Carrato, Alfredo; García-Closas, Reina; Lloreta, Josep; Malats, Núria; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Chanock, Stephen J; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Rothman, Nathaniel; Silverman, Debra T

    2015-11-01

    Few studies have demonstrated gene/environment interactions in cancer research. Using data on high-risk occupations for 2258 case patients and 2410 control patients from two bladder cancer studies, we observed that three of 16 known or candidate bladder cancer susceptibility variants displayed statistically significant and consistent evidence of additive interactions; specifically, the GSTM1 deletion polymorphism (P interaction ≤ .001), rs11892031 (UGT1A, P interaction = .01), and rs798766 (TMEM129-TACC3-FGFR3, P interaction = .03). There was limited evidence for multiplicative interactions. When we examined detailed data on a prevalent occupational exposure associated with increased bladder cancer risk, straight metalworking fluids, we also observed statistically significant additive interaction for rs798766 (TMEM129-TACC3-FGFR3, P interaction = .02), with the interaction more apparent in patients with tumors positive for FGFR3 expression. All statistical tests were two-sided. The interaction we observed for rs798766 (TMEM129-TACC3-FGFR3) with specific exposure to straight metalworking fluids illustrates the value of integrating germline genetic variation, environmental exposures, and tumor marker data to provide insight into the mechanisms of bladder carcinogenesis. Published by Oxford University Press 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  13. Meningococcal genetic variation mechanisms viewed through comparative analysis of serogroup C strain FAM18.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen D Bentley

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Neisseria meningitidis is commonly found harmlessly colonising the mucosal surfaces of the human nasopharynx. Occasionally strains can invade host tissues causing septicaemia and meningitis, making the bacterium a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both the developed and developing world. The species is known to be diverse in many ways, as a product of its natural transformability and of a range of recombination and mutation-based systems. Previous work on pathogenic Neisseria has identified several mechanisms for the generation of diversity of surface structures, including phase variation based on slippage-like mechanisms and sequence conversion of expressed genes using information from silent loci. Comparison of the genome sequences of two N. meningitidis strains, serogroup B MC58 and serogroup A Z2491, suggested further mechanisms of variation, including C-terminal exchange in specific genes and enhanced localised recombination and variation related to repeat arrays. We have sequenced the genome of N. meningitidis strain FAM18, a representative of the ST-11/ET-37 complex, providing the first genome sequence for the disease-causing serogroup C meningococci; it has 1,976 predicted genes, of which 60 do not have orthologues in the previously sequenced serogroup A or B strains. Through genome comparison with Z2491 and MC58 we have further characterised specific mechanisms of genetic variation in N. meningitidis, describing specialised loci for generation of cell surface protein variants and measuring the association between noncoding repeat arrays and sequence variation in flanking genes. Here we provide a detailed view of novel genetic diversification mechanisms in N. meningitidis. Our analysis provides evidence for the hypothesis that the noncoding repeat arrays in neisserial genomes (neisserial intergenic mosaic elements provide a crucial mechanism for the generation of surface antigen variants. Such variation will have an

  14. Prediction of genotypic values and estimation of genetic parameters in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Fernando Chiorato

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. genotypes were evaluated in 25 environments of the state of São Paulo in 2001 and 2002. The estimation of genetic parameters by the Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML and the prediction of genotypic values via Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP were obtained by software Selegen-REML/BLUP. The estimate of the broad-sense heritability was low for the grain yield (0.03, since it took individual plots into consideration and was free of the effects of interaction with years, cultivation periods and site. Nevertheless, the heritability at the level of line means across the various environments was high (0.75, allowing a high accuracy (0.87 in the selection of lines for planting in the environment mean. Among the 18 genotypes, the predicted genotypic values of nine were higher than the general mean. The genetic gain predicted with the selection of the best line, in this case line Gen 96A31 of the IAC, was 16.25%.Dezoito genótipos de feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L. foram avaliados em 25 ambientes do estado de São Paulo durante os anos de 2001 e 2002. As estimativas de parâmetros genéticos por REML e a predição de valores genotípicos via BLUP foram obtidas por meio do aplicativo computacional Selegen REML/BLUP, seguindo o modelo misto para linhagens. A estimativa da herdabilidade no sentido amplo para produção de grãos foi baixa (0,03, por ser em nível de parcelas individuais e livre dos efeitos da interação com anos, épocas e locais. No entanto, a herdabilidade ao nível de médias de linhagens ao longo dos vários ambientes foi alta (0,75, permitindo alta acurácia (0,87 na seleção de linhagens para plantio no ambiente médio. Dentre os 18 genótipos, nove apresentaram valores genotípicos preditos superiores à média geral. O ganho genético predito com a seleção da melhor linhagem, no caso, a linhagem Gen 96A31 do IAC, foi de 16,25%.

  15. Structure of genetic diversity in the two major gene pools of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Myounghai; Gepts, Paul

    2009-03-01

    Domesticated materials with well-known wild relatives provide an experimental system to reveal how human selection during cultivation affects genetic composition and adaptation to novel environments. In this paper, our goal was to elucidate how two geographically distinct domestication events modified the structure and level of genetic diversity in common bean. Specifically, we analyzed the genome-wide genetic composition at 26, mostly unlinked microsatellite loci in 349 accessions of wild and domesticated common bean from the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools. Using a model-based approach, implemented in the software STRUCTURE, we identified nine wild or domesticated populations in common bean, including four of Andean and four of Mesoamerican origins. The ninth population was the putative wild ancestor of the species, which was classified as a Mesoamerican population. A neighbor-joining analysis and a principal coordinate analysis confirmed genetic relationships among accessions and populations observed with the STRUCTURE analysis. Geographic and genetic distances in wild populations were congruent with the exception of a few putative hybrids identified in this study, suggesting a predominant effect of isolation by distance. Domesticated common bean populations possessed lower genetic diversity, higher F(ST), and generally higher linkage disequilibrium (LD) than wild populations in both gene pools; their geographic distributions were less correlated with genetic distance, probably reflecting seed-based gene flow after domestication. The LD was reduced when analyzed in separate Andean and Mesoamerican germplasm samples. The Andean domesticated race Nueva Granada had the highest F(ST) value and widest geographic distribution compared to other domesticated races, suggesting a very recent origin or a selection event, presumably associated with a determinate growth habit, which predominates in this race.

  16. MECHANISM TRANSFER PRICING AND THE NEED INTRODUCTION COMMON CONSOLIDATED CORPORATE INCOME TAX TRANSNATIONAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Grigorescu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transfer pricing mechanism is a tool commonly used to transfer the tax base in countries with high tax countries with lower taxation. In the European Union the financial operations generate tax revenue losses. In an attempt to limit manipulation by corporate tax systems, many public authorities have introduced transfer pricing rules, but these rules has shown limited efficacy, however, contribute to the increasing complexity of tax laws and the emergence of additional costs for companies. This paper deals with the concrete examples, the solution to solving the problem of transfer pricing in the European Union by the introduction of common consolidated corporate income tax.

  17. A Montero auction mechanism for regulating unobserved use of the commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Gårn

    , these taxes are vulnerable to collusion and strategic behavior and they generate inefficient entry-exit incentives. To address these disadvantages, I suggest using a Montero (2008)-type auction mechanism to allocate licenses for unobserved use of common resources and to induce compliance with these licenses......Regulating externalities from the use of common resources is often hampered by the regulator’s inability to accurately observe individual firms’ resource use. Allocating resource use through taxes on aggregate use, which often can be observed, has been suggested (Segerson, 1988); however...... through an enforcement tax on the differences between aggregated licenses issued and observed aggregated resource use....

  18. Origin and evolution of antibiotic resistance: the common mechanisms of emergence and spread in water bodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnese eLupo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The environment, and especially fresh water, constitutes a reactor where the evolution and the rise of new resistances occur. In rivers or streams, bacteria from different sources such as urban, industrial and agricultural waste, probably selected by intensive antibiotic usage, are collected and mixed with environmental species. This may cause two effects on the development of antibiotic resistances: First, the contamination of water by antibiotics or other pollutants lead to the rise of resistance due to selection processes. For instance, of strains over-expressing broad range defensive mechanisms, such as efflux pumps. Second, since environmental species are provided with intrinsic antibiotic resistance mechanisms, the mixture with allochthonous species is likely to cause genetic exchange. In this context, the role of phages and integrons for the spread of resistance mechanisms appears significant. Allochthonous species could acquire new resistances from environmental donors and introduce the newly acquired resistance mechanisms into the clinics. This is illustrated by clinically relevant resistance mechanisms, such as the fluoroquinolones resistance genes qnr. Freshwater appears to play an important role in the emergence and in the spread of antibiotic resistances, highlighting the necessity for strategies of water quality improvement. Moreover, further knowledge is needed to better understand the role of the environment as reservoir of antibiotic resistances and to assess the risk of spread of antibiotic resistances via water bodies.

  19. Mechanisms of arterial remodeling: lessons from genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard eVan Varik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Vascular disease is still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world, and the primary cause of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemia. The biology of vascular disease is complex and still poorly understood in terms of causes and consequences. Vascular function is determined by structural and functional properties of the arterial vascular wall. Arterial stiffness, that is a pathological alteration of the vascular wall, ultimately results in target-organ damage and increased mortality. Arterial remodeling is accelerated under conditions that adversely affect the balance between arterial function and structure such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, inflammatory disease, lifestyle aspects (smoking, drugs (vitamin K antagonists and genetic abnormalities (e.g. pseudoxanthoma elasticum, Marfan’s disease. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the complex mechanisms and different factors that underlie arterial remodeling, learning from single gene defect diseases like PXE, and PXE-like, Marfan’s disease and Keutel syndrome in vascular remodeling.

  20. Common Genetic Variants and Modification of Penetrance of BRCA2-Associated Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiducci, Candace; Segrè, Ayellet V.; McGee, Kate; McGuffog, Lesley; Kartsonaki, Christiana; Morrison, Jonathan; Healey, Sue; Sinilnikova, Olga M.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Gauthier-Villars, Marion; Sobol, Hagay; Longy, Michel; Frenay, Marc; GEMO Study Collaborators; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Rookus, Matti A.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Roozendaal, Kees E. P.; Piedmonte, Marion; Rubinstein, Wendy; Nerenstone, Stacy; Van Le, Linda; Blank, Stephanie V.; Caldés, Trinidad; de la Hoya, Miguel; Nevanlinna, Heli; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Lazaro, Conxi; Blanco, Ignacio; Arason, Adalgeir; Johannsson, Oskar T.; Barkardottir, Rosa B.; Devilee, Peter; Olopade, Olofunmilayo I.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Wang, Xianshu; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Viel, Alessandra; Radice, Paolo; Phelan, Catherine M.; Narod, Steven; Rennert, Gad; Lejbkowicz, Flavio; Flugelman, Anath; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Ozcelik, Hilmi; Toland, Amanda E.; Montagna, Marco; D'Andrea, Emma; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Borg, Ake; Beattie, Mary; Ramus, Susan J.; Domchek, Susan M.; Nathanson, Katherine L.; Rebbeck, Tim; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; John, Esther M.; Hopper, John L.; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary B.; Southey, Melissa C.; Terry, Mary Beth; Tung, Nadine; Overeem Hansen, Thomas V.; Nielsen, Finn C.; Greene, Mark I.; Mai, Phuong L.; Osorio, Ana; Durán, Mercedes; Andres, Raquel; Benítez, Javier; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Garber, Judy; Hamann, Ute; Peock, Susan; Cook, Margaret; Oliver, Clare; Frost, Debra; Platte, Radka; Evans, D. Gareth; Lalloo, Fiona; Eeles, Ros; Izatt, Louise; Walker, Lisa; Eason, Jacqueline; Barwell, Julian; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Wappenschmidt, Barbara; Engert, Stefanie; Arnold, Norbert; Gadzicki, Dorothea; Dean, Michael; Gold, Bert; Klein, Robert J.; Couch, Fergus J.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Easton, Douglas F.; Daly, Mark J.; Antoniou, Antonis C.; Altshuler, David M.; Offit, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years) affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ) was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10−5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10−4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499) and chromosome 10 (rs16917302). The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66–0.86, ) and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61–0.85, ). FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18–1.39, ). These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer. PMID:21060860

  1. [Sickle cell anemia causes varied symptoms and high morbidity. Serious prognosis in the most common genetic disease in the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellander, Christian; Sennström, Maria K B; Stiller, Viveka; Ågren, Anna

    2015-03-03

    Sickle cell anemia is a life-threatening disease, and the most common genetic disease in the world. The prevalence of sickle cell anemia in Sweden is unknown. Sickle cell anemia is an important disease, because of its variable complications, in many medical and surgical specialties. The overview highlights common medical problems encountered in sickle cell anemia presented through a case report of a pregnant woman.

  2. Characterization of acoustic and mechanical properties of common tropical woods used in classical guitars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproßmann, Robert; Zauer, Mario; Wagenführ, André

    There is a need of substitution woods for the use in musical instruments because of the limited availability of some commonly used tropical tonewoods. Before substitutions can be found, it is necessary to know about the required properties. Hence, in this paper acoustical, mechanical and physical properties of four common tropical hardwoods (Indian rosewood, ziricote, African blackwood and ebony) were determined because there are less literature values for some properties available, e.g. internal friction, hardness or swelling behaviour. The acoustic properties were determined by means of experimental modal analysis, the mechanical properties by means of static bending tests and tests of the Brinell hardness. For the swelling behaviour the volume swelling and also the differential swelling coefficients were determined. With the results it is possible to look for new 'tonewoods' or to specifically modified woods, e.g. thermally treated wood, to substitute tropical wood species.

  3. Common Genetic and Nonshared Environmental Factors Contribute to the Association between Socioemotional Dispositions and the Externalizing Factor in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeanette; Allan, Nicholas; Mikolajewski, Amy J.; Hart, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Childhood behavioral disorders including conduct disorder (CD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often co-occur. Prior twin research shows that common sets of genetic and environmental factors are associated with these various disorders and they form a latent factor called…

  4. Narcolepsy: genetic predisposition and neuropharmacological mechanisms. REVIEW ARTICLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Seiji; Okura, Mutsumi; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2000-02-01

    Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime somnolence (EDS), cataplexy and REM sleep-related abnormalities. It is a frequently-occurring but under-diagnosed condition that affects 0.02 to 0.18% of the general population in various countries. Although most cases occur sporadically, familial clustering may be observed; the risk of a first-degree relative of a narcoleptic developing narcolepsy is 10-40 times higher than in the general population. The disorder is tightly associated with the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele, DQB1*0602 [most often in combination with HLA-DR2 (DRB1*15)]. Genetic transmission is, however, likely to be polygenic in most cases, and genetic factors other than HLA-DQ are also likely to be implicated. In addition, environmental factors are involved in disease predisposition; most monozygotic twins pairs reported in the literature are discordant for narcolepsy. Narcolepsy was reported to exist in canines in the early 1970s. Both sporadic and familial cases are also observed in this animal species. A highly-penetrant single autosomal recessive gene, canarc-1, is involved in the transmission of narcolepsy in Doberman pinschers and Labrador retrievers. Positional cloning of this gene is in progress, and a human homologue of this gene, or a gene with a functional relationship to canarc-1, might be involved in some human cases. Human narcolepsy is currently treated with central nervous system (CNS) stimulants for EDS and antidepressants for cataplexy and abnormal REM sleep. These treatments are purely symptomatic and induce numerous side effects. These compounds disturb nocturnal sleep in many patients, and tolerance may develop as a result of continuous treatment. The canine model is an invaluable resource for studying the pharmacological and physiological control of EDS and cataplexy. Experiments using canine narcolepsy have demonstrated that increased cholinergic and decreased monoaminergic

  5. Cytokine Imbalance as a Common Mechanism in Both Psoriasis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis (PS and rheumatoid arthritis (RA are immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. Previous studies showed that these two diseases had a common pathogenesis, but the precise molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, RNA sequencing of peripheral blood mononuclear cells was employed to explore both the differentially expressed genes (DEGs of 10 PS and 10 RA patients compared with those of 10 healthy volunteers and the shared DEGs between these two diseases. Bioinformatics network analysis was used to reveal the connections among the shared DEGs and the corresponding molecular mechanism. In total, 120 and 212 DEGs were identified in PS and RA, respectively, and 31 shared DEGs were identified. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that the cytokine imbalance relevant to key molecules (such as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK, tumor necrosis factor (TNF, colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF3, interleukin- (IL- 6, and interferon gene (IFNG and canonical signaling pathways (such as the complement system, antigen presentation, macropinocytosis signaling, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling, and IL-17 signaling was responsible for the common comprehensive mechanism of PS and RA. Our findings provide a better understanding of the pathogenesis of PS and RA, suggesting potential strategies for treating and preventing both diseases. This study may also provide a new paradigm for illuminating the common pathogenesis of different diseases.

  6. Epidemiology and genetics of common mental disorders in the general population: the PEGASUS-Murcia project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Tormo, Mj; Vilagut, G; Alonso, J; Ruíz-Merino, G; Escámez, T; Salmerón, D; Júdez, J; Martínez, S; Navarro, C

    2013-12-03

    Multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, epidemiologists, neurogeneticists and statisticians on research projects has been encouraged to improve our knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying the aetiology and burden of mental disorders. The PEGASUS-Murcia (Psychiatric Enquiry to General Population in Southeast Spain-Murcia) project was designed to assess the prevalence of common mental disorders and to identify the risk and protective factors, and it also included the collection of biological samples to study the gene-environmental interactions in the context of the World Mental Health Survey Initiative. The PEGASUS-Murcia project is a new cross-sectional face-to-face interview survey based on a representative sample of non-institutionalised adults in the Region of Murcia (Mediterranean Southeast, Spain). Trained lay interviewers used the latest version of the computer-assisted personal interview of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) for use in Spain, specifically adapted for the project. Two biological samples of buccal mucosal epithelium will be collected from each interviewed participant, one for DNA extraction for genomic and epigenomic analyses and the other to obtain mRNA for gene expression quantification. Several quality control procedures will be implemented to assure the highest reliability and validity of the data. This article describes the rationale, sampling methods and questionnaire content as well as the laboratory methodology. Informed consent will be obtained from all participants and a Regional Ethics Research Committee has approved the protocol. Results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at the national and the international conferences. Cross-sectional studies, which combine detailed personal information with biological data, offer new and exciting opportunities to study the gene-environmental interactions in the aetiology of common mental disorders in representative

  7. Impact of family structure and common environment on heritability estimation for neuroimaging genetics studies using Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koran, Mary Ellen; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Jahanshad, Neda; Glahn, David C; Thompson, Paul M; Blangero, John; Nichols, Thomas E; Kochunov, Peter; Landman, Bennett A

    2014-06-27

    Imaging genetics is an emerging methodological field that combines genetic information with medical imaging-derived metrics to understand how genetic factors impact observable phenotypes. In order for a trait to be a reasonable phenotype in an imaging genetics study, it must be heritable: at least some proportion of its variance must be due to genetic influences. The Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines (SOLAR) imaging genetics software can estimate the heritability of a trait in complex pedigrees. We investigate the ability of SOLAR to accurately estimate heritability and common environmental effects on simulated imaging phenotypes in various family structures. We found that heritability is reliably estimated with small family-based studies of 40 to 80 individuals, though subtle differences remain between the family structures. In an imaging application analysis, we found that with 80 subjects in any of the family structures, estimated heritability of white matter fractional anisotropy was biased by <10% for every region of interest. Results from these studies can be used when investigators are evaluating power in planning genetic analyzes.

  8. Phylogeography and conservation genetics of the common wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on islands at its northern range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sozos Michaelides

    Full Text Available Populations at range limits are often characterized by lower genetic diversity, increased genetic isolation and differentiation relative to populations at the core of geographical ranges. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that populations situated at range limits might be the result of human introductions rather than natural dispersal. It is therefore important to document the origin and genetic diversity of marginal populations to establish conservation priorities. In this study, we investigate the phylogeography and genetic structure of peripheral populations of the common European wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on Jersey (Channel Islands, UK and in the Chausey archipelago. We sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in 200 individuals of P. muralis to infer the phylogeography of the island populations using Bayesian approaches. We also genotyped 484 individuals from 21 populations at 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci to evaluate the genetic structure and diversity of island and mainland (Western France populations. We detected four unique haplotypes in the island populations that formed a sub-clade within the Western France clade. There was a significant reduction in genetic diversity (HO, HE and AR of the island populations in relation to the mainland. The small fragmented island populations at the northern range margin of the common wall lizard distribution are most likely native, with genetic differentiation reflecting isolation following sea level increase approximately 7000 BP. Genetic diversity is lower on islands than in marginal populations on the mainland, potentially as a result of early founder effects or long-term isolation. The combination of restriction to specific localities and an inability to expand their range into adjacent suitable locations might make the island populations more vulnerable to extinction.

  9. Genetic Diversity and Pathogenic Variation of Common Blight Bacteria (Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans) Suggests Pathogen Coevolution with the Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkandawire, Alexander B C; Mabagala, Robert B; Guzmán, Pablo; Gepts, Paul; Gilbertson, Robert L

    2004-06-01

    ABSTRACT Common bacterial blight (CBB), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans, is one of the most important diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Africa and other bean-growing regions. Xanthomonad-like bacteria associated with CBB in Malawi and Tanzania, East Africa, and in Wisconsin, U.S., were characterized based on brown pigment production, pathogenicity on common bean, detection with an X. campestris pv. phaseoli- or X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans-specific PCR primer pair, and repetitive element polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analyses. The common bean gene pool (Andean or Middle American) from which each strain was isolated also was determined. In Malawi, X. campestris pv. phaseoli and X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans were isolated predominantly from Andean or Middle American beans, respectively. In Tanzania, X. campestris pv. phaseoli var. fuscans was most commonly isolated, irrespective of gene pool; whereas, in Wisconsin, only X. campestris pv. phaseoli was isolated from Andean red kidney beans. Three rep-PCR fingerprints were obtained for X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains; two were unique to East African strains, whereas the other was associated with strains collected from all other (mostly New World) locations. RFLP analyses with repetitive DNA probes revealed the same genetic diversity among X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains as did rep-PCR. These probes hybridized with only one or two fragments in the East African strains, but with multiple fragments in the other X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains. East African X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains were highly pathogenic on Andean beans, but were significantly less pathogenic on Middle American beans. In contrast, X. campestris pv. phaseoli strains from New World locations were highly pathogenic on beans of both gene pools. Together, these results indicate the

  10. Mechanical stress as the common denominator between chronic inflammation, cancer and Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel eLevy Nogueira

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of common diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD and cancer are currently poorly understood. Inflammation is a common risk factor for cancer and AD. Recent data, provided by our group and from others, demonstrate that increased pressure and inflammation are synonymous. There is a continuous increase in pressure from inflammation to fibrosis and then cancer. This in line with the numerous papers reporting high interstitial pressure in cancer. But most authors focus on the role of pressure in the lack of delivery of chemotherapy in the center of the tumor. Pressure may also be a key factor in carcinogenesis. Increased pressure is responsible for oncogene activation and cytokine secretion. Accumulation of mechanical stress plays a key role in the development of diseases of old age such as cardiomyopathy, atherosclerosis and osteoarthritis. Growing evidence suggest also a possible link between mechanical stress in the pathogenesis of AD. The aim of this review is to describe environmental and endogenous mechanical factors possibly playing a pivotal role in the mechanism of chronic inflammation, AD and cancer.

  11. Failed Lactation and Perinatal Depression: Common Problems with Shared Neuroendocrine Mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewen, Karen; Pedersen, Cort A.; Propper, Cathi; Meltzer-Brody, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the early postpartum period, mother and infant navigate a critical neuroendocrine transition from pregnancy to lactation. Two major clinical problems that occur during this transition are failed lactation and perinatal mood disorders. These disorders often overlap in clinical settings. Failed lactation is common. Although all major medical organizations recommend 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding, only 13% of women in the United States achieve this recommendation. Perinatal mood disorders affect 10% of mothers, with substantial morbidity for mother and child. We hypothesize that shared neuroendocrine mechanisms contribute to both failed lactation and perinatal mood disorders. In this hypothesis article, we discuss data from both animal models and clinical studies that suggest neuroendocrine mechanisms that may underlie these two disorders. Research to elucidate the role of these underlying mechanisms may identify treatment strategies both to relieve perinatal depression and to enable women to achieve their infant feeding goals. PMID:22204416

  12. Crossing the Vascular Wall: Common and Unique Mechanisms Exploited by Different Leukocyte Subsets during Extravasation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schnoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leukocyte extravasation is one of the essential and first steps during the initiation of inflammation. Therefore, a better understanding of the key molecules that regulate this process may help to develop novel therapeutics for treatment of inflammation-based diseases such as atherosclerosis or rheumatoid arthritis. The endothelial adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 are known as the central mediators of leukocyte adhesion to and transmigration across the endothelium. Engagement of these molecules by their leukocyte integrin receptors initiates the activation of several signaling pathways within both leukocytes and endothelium. Several of such events have been described to occur during transendothelial migration of all leukocyte subsets, whereas other mechanisms are known only for a single leukocyte subset. Here, we summarize current knowledge on regulatory mechanisms of leukocyte extravasation from a leukocyte and endothelial point of view, respectively. Specifically, we will focus on highlighting common and unique mechanisms that specific leukocyte subsets exploit to succeed in crossing endothelial monolayers.

  13. First genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii infection in common quails (Coturnix coturnix) intended for human consumption in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Wei; Ju, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Meng, Qing-Feng; Ma, Jian-Gang; Qian, Ai-Dong; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2017-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is widely distributed in humans and other animals including birds throughout the world. However, little is known of the molecular epidemiology and genotypes of T. gondii infecting quails in China. Therefore, the present study was conducted to characterize T. gondii genotypes in common quails in China. During December 2014 to October 2015, a total of 390 muscle tissue samples of common quails were collected and the T. gondii B1 gene was amplified using a nested PCR, and the positive samples were genotyped at 11 genetic markers (SAG1, 5'-and 3'-SAG2, alternative SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, L358, PK1, c22-8, c29-2, and Apico) using multilocus polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) technology. Twenty-five of the 390 common quails (6.41%) were tested positive by nested PCR. Three DNA samples from the 25 positive samples were typed completely and were identified as ToxoDB Genotype #9 (http://toxodb.org/toxo/). The results of the present study indicated that T. gondii infection in common quails was common in China, which provided the information of T. gondii genetic diversity in this host species. This is the first genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates from quails in China, which is useful for monitoring and controlling the T. gondii infection in quails, other animals and humans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Cisplatin Resistance: A Cellular Self-Defense Mechanism Resulting from Multiple Epigenetic and Genetic Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ding-Wu; Pouliot, Lynn M.; Hall, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most effective broad-spectrum anticancer drugs. Its effectiveness seems to be due to the unique properties of cisplatin, which enters cells via multiple pathways and forms multiple different DNA-platinum adducts while initiating a cellular self-defense system by activating or silencing a variety of different genes, resulting in dramatic epigenetic and/or genetic alternations. As a result, the development of cisplatin resistance in human cancer cells in vivo and in vitro by necessity stems from bewilderingly complex genetic and epigenetic changes in gene expression and alterations in protein localization. Extensive published evidence has demonstrated that pleiotropic alterations are frequently detected during development of resistance to this toxic metal compound. Changes occur in almost every mechanism supporting cell survival, including cell growth-promoting pathways, apoptosis, developmental pathways, DNA damage repair, and endocytosis. In general, dozens of genes are affected in cisplatin-resistant cells, including pathways involved in copper metabolism as well as transcription pathways that alter the cytoskeleton, change cell surface presentation of proteins, and regulate epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. Decreased accumulation is one of the most common features resulting in cisplatin resistance. This seems to be a consequence of numerous epigenetic and genetic changes leading to the loss of cell-surface binding sites and/or transporters for cisplatin, and decreased fluid phase endocytosis. PMID:22659329

  15. Genetic variability in common wheat germplasm based on coefficients of parentage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bered

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The characterization of genetic variability and an estimate of the genetic relationship among varieties are essential to any breeding program, because artificial crosses among less similar parents allow a larger segregation and the combination of different favorable alleles. Genetic variability can be evaluated in different ways, including the Coefficient of Parentage (COP, which estimates the probability of two alleles in two different individuals being identical by descent. In this study, we evaluated the degree of genetic relationship among 53 wheat genotypes, and identified the ancestor genotypes which contributed the most to the current wheat germplasm, as a prediction of the width of the genetic base of this cereal. The results revealed a mean COP of 0.07 and the formation of 22 similarity groups. The ancestor genotypes Ciano 67 and Mentana were those which contributed the most to the current wheat germplasm. According to the COP analyses, the genetic base of wheat rests on a small number of ancestral genotypes.

  16. Variation in predictive ability of common genetic variants by established strata: the example of breast cancer and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschard, Hugues; Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of breast cancer and common genetic markers have failed to identify pervasive gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Theoretical considerations also suggest that the contribution of modest interactions to risk discrimination in the general population is likely small. However, the clinical utility of common breast cancer risk markers may nonetheless differ across strata defined by known risk factors, such as age. We examined the age-specific per-allele odds ratios of 15 common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found to be associated with breast cancer in 1142 breast cancer cases and 1145 controls from the Nurses' Health Study. We calculated the age-specific discriminatory ability of risk models incorporating these SNPs. We then conducted simulation studies to explore how hypothetical underlying genetic models may fit the observed results. Although all individual SNP-by-age interactions were modest, we found a negative interaction effect between age and a genetic risk score defined by the sum of risk alleles (P = 0.04). We also observed a decrease in discriminatory ability, as measured by the area under the curve (AUC), of the SNPs with age (P = 0.04). Simulation studies revealed models where the AUC can differ by strata defined by a risk factor without the presence of interactions; however, our study suggests that the observed differences in AUC are explained by the age-specific effect of the SNPs. The identification of risk factors that alter the effect of multiple genetic variants can help to explain the genetic architecture of multifactorial diseases and identify subgroups of persons who may benefit from genetic screening.

  17. Epidemiology and genetics of common mental disorders in the general population: the PEGASUS-Murcia project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Mateu, Fernando; Tormo, MJ; Vilagut, G; Alonso, J; Ruíz-Merino, G; Escámez, T; Salmerón, D; Júdez, J; Martínez, S; Navarro, C

    2013-01-01

    Background Multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, epidemiologists, neurogeneticists and statisticians on research projects has been encouraged to improve our knowledge of the complex mechanisms underlying the aetiology and burden of mental disorders. The PEGASUS-Murcia (Psychiatric Enquiry to General Population in Southeast Spain-Murcia) project was designed to assess the prevalence of common mental disorders and to identify the risk and protective factors, and it also included the collection of biological samples to study the gene–environmental interactions in the context of the World Mental Health Survey Initiative. Methods and analysis The PEGASUS-Murcia project is a new cross-sectional face-to-face interview survey based on a representative sample of non-institutionalised adults in the Region of Murcia (Mediterranean Southeast, Spain). Trained lay interviewers used the latest version of the computer-assisted personal interview of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) for use in Spain, specifically adapted for the project. Two biological samples of buccal mucosal epithelium will be collected from each interviewed participant, one for DNA extraction for genomic and epigenomic analyses and the other to obtain mRNA for gene expression quantification. Several quality control procedures will be implemented to assure the highest reliability and validity of the data. This article describes the rationale, sampling methods and questionnaire content as well as the laboratory methodology. Ethics and dissemination Informed consent will be obtained from all participants and a Regional Ethics Research Committee has approved the protocol. Results will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at the national and the international conferences. Discussion Cross-sectional studies, which combine detailed personal information with biological data, offer new and exciting opportunities to study the gene

  18. High genetic diversity of common toad (Bufo bufo) populations under strong natural fragmentation on a Northern archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Steffen; Jehle, Robert

    2016-03-01

    The last decades have shown a surge in studies focusing on the interplay between fragmented habitats, genetic variation, and conservation. In the present study, we consider the case of a temperate pond-breeding anuran (the common toad Bufo bufo) inhabiting a naturally strongly fragmented habitat at the Northern fringe of the species' range: islands offshore the Norwegian coast. A total of 475 individuals from 19 populations (three mainland populations and 16 populations on seven adjacent islands) were genetically characterized using nine microsatellite markers. As expected for a highly fragmented habitat, genetic distances between populations were high (pairwise F st values ranging between 0.06 and 0.33), with however little differences between populations separated by ocean and populations separated by terrestrial habitat (mainland and on islands). Despite a distinct cline in genetic variation from mainland populations to peripheral islands, the study populations were characterized by overall high genetic variation, in line with effective population sizes derived from single-sample estimators which were on average about 20 individuals. Taken together, our results reinforce the notion that spatial and temporal scales of fragmentation need to be considered when studying the interplay between landscape fragmentation and genetic erosion.

  19. Common mechanism in endothelin-3 and PAF receptor function for anti-inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Akira; Ebina, Keiichi

    2013-10-15

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent lipid mediator that is implicated in numerous inflammatory diseases. Under inflammatory conditions, PAF is biosynthesized through the remodelling pathway and elicits many inflammatory responses through binding to its specific PAF receptor. Endogenous bioactive endothelins (ETs: ET-1, -2, and -3) are also considered potent inflammatory mediators that play a critical role in many inflammatory diseases. In this perspective, we provide a brief overview of possible common mechanisms in ETs and PAF receptor function for inflammatory responses. Accumulating evidence strongly suggests that ET-3, but not ET-1 and ET-2, can attenuate PAF-induced inflammation through direct binding of the Tyr-Lys-Asp (YKD) region in the peptide to PAF and its metabolite/precursor lyso-PAF, followed by inhibition of binding between PAF and its receptor. Additionally, YKD sequence-containing peptides may be useful as a novel type of anti-inflammatory drugs targeting this mechanism. These findings should lead to new treatment strategies for numerous inflammatory diseases by targeting the common mechanism in ET and PAF receptor function. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Interplay between genetic and epigenetic mechanisms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Klein, Kerstin; Gay, Steffen

    2017-04-01

    Genetic and environmental factors contribute to the risk for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), with epigenetics serving as a possible interface through which risk factors contribute to RA. High-throughput technologies for interrogating genome and epigenome, and the availability of genetic and epigenetic datasets across a diversity of cell types, enable the identification of candidate causal genetic variants for RA to study their function in core RA processes. To date, RA risk variants were studied in the immune cells but not joint resident cells, for example, synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fibroblasts from different joints are distinct, anatomically specialized cells, defined by joint-specific transcriptomes, epigenomes and phenotypes. Cell type-specific analysis of epigenetic changes, together with genetic fine mapping and interrogation of chromatin 3D interactions may identify new disease relevant pathways, potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers for RA progression or therapy response.

  1. Phenotypic differentiation of the Solidago virgaurea complex along an elevational gradient: Insights from a common garden experiment and population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Masaaki; Sakaguchi, Shota; Takahashi, Koichi

    2017-09-01

    Plant species distributed along wide elevational or latitudinal gradients show phenotypic variation due to their heterogeneous habitats. This study investigated whether phenotypic variation in populations of the Solidago virgaurea complex along an elevational gradient is caused by genetic differentiation. A common garden experiment was based on seeds collected from nine populations of the S. virgaurea complex growing at elevations from 1,597 m to 2,779 m a.s.l. on Mt. Norikura in central Japan. Population genetic analyses with microsatellite markers were used to infer the genetic structure and levels of gene flow between populations. Leaf mass per area was lower, while leaf nitrogen and chlorophyll concentrations were greater for higher elevations at which seeds were originally collected. For reproductive traits, plants derived from higher elevations had larger flower heads on shorter stems and flowering started earlier. These elevational changes in morphology were consistent with the clines in the field, indicating that phenotypic variation along the elevational gradient would have been caused by genetic differentiation. However, population genetic analysis using 16 microsatellite loci suggested an extremely low level of genetic differentiation of neutral genes among the nine populations. Analysis of molecular variance also indicated that most genetic variation was partitioned into individuals within a population, and the genetic differentiation among the populations was not significant. This study suggests that genome regions responsible for adaptive traits may differ among the populations despite the existence of gene flow and that phenotypic variation of the S. virgaurea complex along the elevational gradient is maintained by strong selection pressure.

  2. Common genetic variants on 6q24 associated with exceptional episodic memory performance in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Christensen, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: There are genetic influences on memory ability as we age, but no specific genes have been identified. OBJECTIVE: To use a cognitive endophenotype, exceptional episodic memory (EEM) performance, derived from nondemented offspring from the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) to identify genetic...... or more offspring that exhibited exceptional memory performance were used for genome-wide linkage analysis. Adjusted multivariate linear analyses in the 40-megabase region encompassing the linkage peak were conducted using 4 independent replication data sets that included 4006 nondemented elderly...... individuals. Results of the individual replication cohorts were combined by meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Episodic memory scores computed as the mean of the 2 standardized measures of Logical Memory IA and IIA. RESULTS: Heritability estimates indicated a significant genetic component for EEM (h2 = 0...

  3. Adjustment and Coping Mechanisms for Individuals with Genetic Aortic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Emily; Jeremy, Richmond W; Fisher, Alana; Sharpe, Louise; Juraskova, Ilona

    2015-12-01

    Advances in diagnosis and management of Genetic Aortic (GA) Disorders have improved prognosis for affected individuals, yet many do not adhere to key management recommendations, and some may experience clinically significant levels of psychological distress. These issues are often not communicated to treating clinicians. Poor adjustment and coping may adversely impact on prognosis, but little is known about the processes contributing to negative outcomes. This study investigated adjustment to GA disorders to determine which processes facilitated or hindered good adherence and psychological outcomes. Semi-structured interviews involving 21 individuals (12M, 9 F; age 19-62 years) with a GA Disorder and psychosocial measures of depression/stress/anxiety (DASS), coping (COPE) and involvement in treatment (CPS) were used. Qualitative data were analysed using grounded theory and a model of adjustment was developed. Although most participants adhered to physician management recommendations and experienced minimal emotional distress, a subset reported poor adherence and/or sub/clinical levels of depression/anxiety/stress (29%). Dysfunctional coping mechanisms were infrequent, however 22% participants reported 'little or no' acceptance and 43% avoided life planning in response to a diagnosis of GA disorder. Interviews revealed an overarching theme: Negotiating perception of self and GA disorder, supported by five sub-themes: Restrictions upon Lifestyle, Destabilisation, Future, Support, and Unmet Needs. Accepting restrictions and having support were conducive to better adherence, whilst destabilisation and loss of control had a negative impact. A model of adjustment is proposed to explain how patients reached one of four outcomes relating to psychological distress and adherence to physician recommendations. The central tenet of the model is founded on how realistically patients appraise their vulnerability to GA threat and whether they are able to integrate their

  4. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and nongenetic risk factors in Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M; Wolff, Roger K; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Giuliano, Anna R; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Slattery, Martha L

    2015-11-01

    Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified SNPs among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele OR: 0.94 (95% confidence intervals, 0.74-1.20), 1.20 (0.94-1.53), and 1.49 (1.28-1.75) for current, former, and never hormone therapy users, respectively, Pinteraction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72-1.42), 1.19 (0.98-1.45), and 1.69 (1.26-2.26) for never, 12 months breastfeeding, respectively, Pinteraction 0.014]. The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and nongenetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Prions and transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE) chemotherapeutics: A common mechanism for anti-TSE compounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caughey, B; Caughey, W S; Kocisko, D A; Lee, K S; Silveira, J R; Morrey, J D

    2006-09-01

    No validated treatments exist for transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs or prion diseases) in humans or livestock. The search for TSE therapeutics is complicated by persistent uncertainties about the nature of mammalian prions and their pathogenic mechanisms. In pursuit of anti-TSE drugs, we and others have focused primarily on blocking conversion of normal prion protein, PrP(C), to the TSE-associated isoform, PrP(Sc). Recently developed high-throughput screens have hastened the identification of new inhibitors with strong in vivo anti-TSE activities such as porphyrins, phthalocyanines, and phosphorthioated oligonucleotides. New routes of administration have enhanced beneficial effects against established brain infections. Several different classes of TSE inhibitors share structural similarities, compete for the same site(s) on PrP(C), and induce the clustering and internalization of PrP(C) from the cell surface. These activities may represent a common mechanism of action for these anti-TSE compounds.

  6. Atrial Fibrillation Genetic Risk and Ischemic Stroke Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubitz, Steven A; Parsons, Owen E; Anderson, Christopher D; Benjamin, Emelia J; Malik, Rainer; Weng, Lu-Chen; Dichgans, Martin; Sudlow, Cathie L; Rothwell, Peter M; Rosand, Jonathan; Ellinor, Patrick T; Markus, Hugh S; Traylor, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a leading cause of cardioembolic stroke, but the relationship between AF and noncardioembolic stroke subtypes are unclear. Because AF may be unrecognized, and because AF has a substantial genetic basis, we assessed for predisposition to AF across ischemic stroke subtypes. We examined associations between AF genetic risk and Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment stroke subtypes in 2374 ambulatory individuals with ischemic stroke and 5175 without from the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2 using logistic regression. We calculated AF genetic risk scores using single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with AF in a previous independent analysis across a range of preselected significance thresholds. There were 460 (19.4%) individuals with cardioembolic stroke, 498 (21.0%) with large vessel, 474 (20.0%) with small vessel, and 814 (32.3%) individuals with strokes of undetermined cause. Most AF genetic risk scores were associated with stroke, with the strongest association ( P =6×10 - 4 ) attributed to scores of 944 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (each associated with AF at P stroke were enriched in the cardioembolic stroke subset (strongest P =1.2×10 - 9 , 944 single-nucleotide polymorphism score). In contrast, AF genetic risk was not significantly associated with noncardioembolic stroke subtypes. Comprehensive AF genetic risk scores were specific for cardioembolic stroke. Incomplete workups and subtype misclassification may have limited the power to detect associations with strokes of undetermined pathogenesis. Future studies are warranted to determine whether AF genetic risk is a useful biomarker to enhance clinical discrimination of stroke pathogeneses. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Impairment of leaf photosynthesis after insect herbivory or mechanical injury on common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, K J; Haile, F J; Peterson, R K D; Higley, L G

    2008-10-01

    Insect herbivory has variable consequences on plant physiology, growth, and reproduction. In some plants, herbivory reduces photosynthetic rate (Pn) activity on remaining tissue of injured leaves. We sought to better understand the influence of leaf injury on Pn of common milkweed, Asclepias syriaca (Asclepiadaceae), leaves. Initially, we tested whether Pn reductions occurred after insect herbivory or mechanical injury. We also (1) examined the duration of photosynthetic recovery, (2) compared mechanical injury with insect herbivory, (3) studied the relationship between leaf Pn with leaf injury intensity, and (4) considered uninjured leaf compensatory Pn responses neighboring an injured leaf. Leaf Pn was significantly reduced on mechanically injured or insect-fed leaves in all reported experiments except one, so some factor(s) (cardiac glycoside induction, reproductive investment, and water stress) likely interacts with leaf injury to influence whether Pn impairment occurs. Milkweed tussock moth larval herbivory, Euchaetes egle L. (Arctiidae), impaired leaf Pn more severely than mechanical injury in one experiment. Duration of Pn impairment lasted > 5 d to indicate high leaf Pn sensitivity to injury, but Pn recovery occurred within 13 d in one experiment. The degree of Pn reduction was more severe from E. egle herbivory than similar levels of mechanical tissue removal. Negative linear relationships characterized leaf Pn with percentage tissue loss from single E. egle-fed leaves and mechanically injured leaves and suggested that the signal to trigger leaf Pn impairment on remaining tissue of an injured leaf was amplified by additional tissue loss. Finally, neighboring uninjured leaves to an E. egle-fed leaf had a small (approximately 10%) degree of compensatory Pn to partly offset tissue loss and injured leaf Pn impairment.

  8. Long-distance dispersal and high genetic diversity are implicated in the invasive spread of the common reed, Phragmites australis (Poaceae), in northeastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Heather; Paul, Jennifer; Straka, Jason; Freeland, Joanna R

    2011-07-01

    The Eurasian subspecies of the common reed (Phragmites australis subsp. australis, hereafter abbreviated as P. a. australis) was introduced to North America in the late 18(th) century and rapidly expanded its range, posing an ecological threat to wetlands. In this study, we aimed to determine whether admixture among multiple lineages, dispersal mechanisms, and high genetic diversity have contributed to the invasion of P. a. australis in the northeastern part of its range. Understanding mechanisms of the P. a. australis invasion will 1) contribute to a broader understanding of the factors that facilitate plant invasion, and 2) help us to develop effective management strategies for wetlands threatened by P. a. australis invasion. We used a population genetics approach incorporating nine microsatellite loci to study genetic diversity and population structure in relation to biogeography of introduced North American Phragmites a. australis stands in the northeastern continental region. Phragmites a. australis is genetically diverse in the region studied here. Significant population structure exists, and population structure is likely influenced by both long-distance dispersal via major waterways, and short-distance dispersal overland. Different lineages sometimes colonize geographically proximate locations leading to opportunities for admixture. Clonal reproduction likely exaggerates geographical structure among some stands, although high genetic and clonal diversity within some stands implies that sexual reproduction occurs frequently in P. a. australis. A variety of factors, including admixture among multiple lineages, multiple modes of dispersal, and plasticity in reproductive strategy promote the invasion success of Phragmites a. australis. Wetland managers in the St. Lawrence River/Great Lakes region should focus monitoring efforts on the shores of conservation lands to prevent the establishment of propagules from novel lineages.

  9. Heritability of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis burden and its genetic correlation with development time in a population of Common toad (Bufo spinosus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomar, Gemma; Bosch, Jaime; Cano, José Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Despite the important threat that emerging pathogens pose for the conservation of biodiversity as well as human health, very little is known about the adaptive potential of host species to withstand infections. We studied the quantitative genetic architecture responsible for the burden of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in a population of common toads in conjunction with other life-history traits (i.e., body size and development rate) that may be affected by common selective pressures. We found a significant heritable component that is associated with fungal burden, which may allow for local adaptation to this pathogen to proceed. In addition, the high genetic correlation found between fungal burden and development time suggests that both traits have to be taken into account in order to assess the adaptive response of host populations to this emerging pathogen. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Are there common genetic and environmental factors behind the endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benyamin, B; Sørensen, T I A; Schousboe, K

    2007-01-01

    and environmental factors influencing this cluster in a general population of twin pairs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multivariate genetic analysis was performed on nine endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome from 625 adult twin pairs of the GEMINAKAR study of the Danish Twin Registry. RESULTS: All...

  11. Reproductive aging-associated common genetic variants and the risk of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. He (Chunyan); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); H. Dreyfus (Hélène); S.J. Hwang; R. Ruiter (Rikje); S. Sanna (Serena); J.E. Buring (Julie); L. Fernández-Rhodes (Lindsay); N. Franceschini (Nora); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); A. Hofman (Albert); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); D. Palmieri (Dario); E. Porcu (Eleonora); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); L.M. Rose (Lynda); G.L. Splansky (Greta); L. Stolk (Lisette); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Crisponi (Laura); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); J. Murabito (Joanne); P.M. Ridker (Paul); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); D. Hunter (David)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: A younger age at menarche and an older age at menopause are well established risk factors for breast cancer. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified several novel genetic loci associated with these two traits. However, the association between these loci and

  12. Common and Specific Genetic Influences on Aggressive and Nonaggressive Conduct Disorder Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelhorn, Heather; Stallings, Michael; Young, Susan; Corley, Robin; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Hopfer, Christian; Hewitt, John

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the genetic and environmental influences on DSM-IV conduct disorder (CD) aggressive and nonaggressive subscales, taking into account age and sex differences. Method: A community sample of 1,100 twin pairs (ages 11-18) was interviewed using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. Bivariate analyses, using variable…

  13. Common genetic loci influencing plasma homocysteine concentrations and their effect on risk of coronary artery disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    The strong observational association between total homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) and the null associations in the homocysteine-lowering trials have prompted the need to identify genetic variants associated with homocysteine concentrations and risk of CA...

  14. A genetic linkage map of the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion; Asteraceae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, Kitty; van der Hulst, R.G.M.; Lindhout, P.; Van Dijk, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we mapped the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale, by using amplified fragment length polymorphism technology (AFLP) in 73 plants from a segregating population. Taraxacum serves as a model system to investigate the genetics, ecology, and evolution of apomixis. The

  15. A genetic linkage map of the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale (common dandelion; Asteracaea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, K.; Hulst, van der R.G.M.; Lindhout, W.H.; Dijk, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we mapped the diplosporous chromosomal region in Taraxacum officinale, by using amplified fragment length polymorphism technology (AFLP) in 73 plants from a segregating population. Taraxacum serves as a model system to investigate the genetics, ecology, and evolution of apomixis. The

  16. Common Genetic Variation in Circadian Rhythm Genes and Risk of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer (EOC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jim, Heather S L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Tyrer, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Disruption in circadian gene expression, whether due to genetic variation or environmental factors (e.g., light at night, shiftwork), is associated with increased incidence of breast, prostate, gastrointestinal and hematologic cancers and gliomas. Circadian genes are highly expressed in the ovari...

  17. No evidence that common genetic risk variation is shared between schizophrenia and autism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; Anney, Richard J. L.; Derks, Eske M.; Gallagher, Louise; Gill, Michael; de Jonge, Maretha V.; van Engeland, Herman; Kahn, René S.; Ophoff, Roel A.

    2013-01-01

    The similarity between aspects of the clinical presentation of schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggests that elements of the biological etiology may also be shared between these two disorders. Recently, an increasing number of rare, mostly structural genetic variants are reported

  18. [Analysis of genetic diversity of Russian regional populations based on common STR markers used in DNA identification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesik, V Yu; Fedunin, A A; Agdzhoyan, A T; Utevska, O M; Chukhraeva, M I; Evseeva, I V; Churnosov, M I; Lependina, I N; Bogunov, Yu V; Bogunova, A A; Ignashkin, M A; Yankovsky, N K; Balanovska, E V; Orekhov, V A; Balanovsky, O P

    2014-06-01

    We conducted the first genetic analysis of a wide a range of rural Russian populations in European Russia with a panel of common DNA markers commonly used in criminalistics genetic identification. We examined a total of 647 samples from indigenous ethnic Russian populations in Arkhangelsk, Belgorod, Voronezh, Kursk, Rostov, Ryazan, and Orel regions. We employed a multiplex genotyping kit, COrDIS Plus, to genotype Short Tandem Repeat (STR) loci, which included the genetic marker panel officially recommended for DNA identification in the Russian Federation, the United States, and the European Union. In the course of our study, we created a database of allelic frequencies, examined the distribution of alleles and genotypes in seven rural Russian populations, and defined the genetic relationships between these populations. We found that, although multidimensional analysis indicated a difference between the Northern gene pool and the rest of the Russian European populations, a pairwise comparison using 19 STR markers among all populations did not reveal significant differences. This is in concordance with previous studies, which examined up to 12 STR markers of urban Russian populations. Therefore, the database of allelic frequencies created in this study can be applied for forensic examinations and DNA identification among the ethnic Russian population over European Russia. We also noted a decrease in the levels of heterozygosity in the northern Russian population compared to ethnic populations in southern and central Russia, which is consistent with trends identified previously using classical gene markers and analysis of mitochondrial DNA.

  19. Mathematical modeling of atopic dermatitis reveals "double-switch" mechanisms underlying 4 common disease phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Hüttinger, Elisa; Christodoulides, Panayiotis; Miyauchi, Kosuke; Irvine, Alan D; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kubo, Masato; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2017-06-01

    The skin barrier acts as the first line of defense against constant exposure to biological, microbial, physical, and chemical environmental stressors. Dynamic interplay between defects in the skin barrier, dysfunctional immune responses, and environmental stressors are major factors in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD). A systems biology modeling approach can yield significant insights into these complex and dynamic processes through integration of prior biological data. We sought to develop a multiscale mathematical model of AD pathogenesis that describes the dynamic interplay between the skin barrier, environmental stress, and immune dysregulation and use it to achieve a coherent mechanistic understanding of the onset, progression, and prevention of AD. We mathematically investigated synergistic effects of known genetic and environmental risk factors on the dynamic onset and progression of the AD phenotype, from a mostly asymptomatic mild phenotype to a severe treatment-resistant form. Our model analysis identified a "double switch," with 2 concatenated bistable switches, as a key network motif that dictates AD pathogenesis: the first switch is responsible for the reversible onset of inflammation, and the second switch is triggered by long-lasting or frequent activation of the first switch, causing irreversible onset of systemic T H 2 sensitization and worsening of AD symptoms. Our mathematical analysis of the bistable switch predicts that genetic risk factors decrease the threshold of environmental stressors to trigger systemic T H 2 sensitization. This analysis predicts and explains 4 common clinical AD phenotypes from a mild and reversible phenotype through to severe and recalcitrant disease and provides a mechanistic explanation for clinically demonstrated preventive effects of emollient treatments against development of AD. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium gallicum Nodulate Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in a Traditionally Managed Milpa Plot in Mexico: Population Genetics and Biogeographic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Claudia; Vinuesa, Pablo; Eguiarte, Luis E.; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Souza, Valeria

    2003-01-01

    The stability of the genetic structure of rhizobial populations nodulating Phaseolus vulgaris cultivated in a traditionally managed milpa plot in Mexico was studied over three consecutive years. The set of molecular markers analyzed (including partial rrs, glnII, nifH, and nodB sequences), along with host range experiments, placed the isolates examined in Rhizobium etli bv. phaseoli and Rhizobium gallicum bv. gallicum. Cluster analysis of multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and plasmid profile data separated the two species and identified numerically dominant clones within each of them. Population genetic analyses showed that there was high genetic differentiation between the two species and that there was low intrapopulation differentiation of the species over the 3 years. The results of linkage disequilibrium analyses are consistent with an epidemic genetic structure for both species, with frequent genetic exchange taking place within conspecific populations but not between the R. etli and R. gallicum populations. A subsample of isolates was selected and used for 16S ribosomal DNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, nifH copy number determination, and host range experiments. Plasmid profiles and nifH hybridization patterns also revealed the occurrence of lateral plasmid transfer among distinct multilocus genotypes within species but not between species. Both species were recovered from nodules of the same plants, indicating that mechanisms other than host, spatial, or temporal isolation may account for the genetic barrier between the species. The biogeographic implications of finding an R. gallicum bv. gallicum population nodulating common bean in America are discussed. PMID:12571008

  1. A Fully Distributed Resource Allocation Mechanism for CRNs without Using a Common Control Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adil Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variations in the available spectrum for cognitive devices add additional complexity in designing a medium access strategy for cognitive radio (CR networks. To ease this complication, a common control channel (CCC is often used as a common platform to exchange control messages, so the CR users can make decisions concerning resource allocation. Much of the literature in this area opts for forming groups and negotiating a CCC from the available channels rather than considering a dedicated common control channel. However, if a primary user appears on the CCC, all the CR users have to vacate that channel and negotiate another CCC, and thus overhead continues to grow with an agile primary network. We propose a medium access control protocol that can work in the absence of a CCC and reduce the possible overhead to a greater extent. In our proposed protocol, CR users take advantage of similar spectrum availability in their neighborhood for resource utilization. We also propose a contention-based spectrum allocation mechanism that works in a distributed manner over different available channels. Simulation results show that this approach can reduce broadcast overhead significantly while maintaining connectivity success similar to its counterparts.

  2. Common Factor Mechanisms in Clinical Practice and Their Relationship with Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan-Sierra, Carolina; Hyland, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates three common factor mechanisms that could affect outcome in clinical practice: response expectancy, the affective expectation model and motivational concordance. Clients attending a gestalt therapy clinic (30 clients), a sophrology (therapeutic technique) clinic (33 clients) and a homeopathy clinic (31 clients) completed measures of expectancy and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) before their first session. After 1 month, they completed PANAS and measures of intrinsic motivation, perceived effort and empowerment. Expectancy was not associated with better outcome and was no different between treatments. Although some of the 54 clients who endorsed highest expectations showed substantial improvement, others did not: 19 had no change or deteriorated in positive affect, and 18 had the same result for negative affect. Intrinsic motivation independently predicted changes in negative affect (β = -0.23). Intrinsic motivation (β = 0.24), effort (β = 0.23) and empowerment (β = 0.20) independently predicted positive affect change. Expectancy (β = -0.17) negatively affected changes in positive affect. Clients found gestalt and sophrology to be more intrinsically motivating, empowering and effortful compared with homeopathy. Greater improvement in mood was found for sophrology and gestalt than for homeopathy clients. These findings are inconsistent with response expectancy as a common factor mechanism in clinical practice. The results support motivational concordance (outcome influenced by the intrinsic enjoyment of the therapy) and the affective expectation model (high expectations can lead for some clients to worse outcome). When expectancy correlates with outcome in some other studies, this may be due to confound between expectancy and intrinsic enjoyment. Common factors play an important role in outcome. Intrinsic enjoyment of a therapeutic treatment is associated with better outcome. Active engagement with a

  3. Analysis of common and specific mechanisms of liver function affected by nitrotoluene compounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youping Deng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nitrotoluenes are widely used chemical manufacturing and munitions applications. This group of chemicals has been shown to cause a range of effects from anemia and hypercholesterolemia to testicular atrophy. We have examined the molecular and functional effects of five different, but structurally related, nitrotoluenes on using an integrative systems biology approach to gain insight into common and disparate mechanisms underlying effects caused by these chemicals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sprague-Dawley female rats were exposed via gavage to one of five concentrations of one of five nitrotoluenes [2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene (2ADNT 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoulene (4ADNT, 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4DNT and 2,6-dinitrotoluene (2,6DNT] with necropsy and tissue collection at 24 or 48 h. Gene expression profile results correlated well with clinical data and liver histopathology that lead to the concept that hematotoxicity was followed by hepatotoxicity. Overall, 2,4DNT, 2,6DNT and TNT had stronger effects than 2ADNT and 4ADNT. Common functional terms, gene expression patterns, pathways and networks were regulated across all nitrotoluenes. These pathways included NRF2-mediated oxidative stress response, aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling, LPS/IL-1 mediated inhibition of RXR function, xenobiotic metabolism signaling and metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450. One biological process common to all compounds, lipid metabolism, was found to be impacted both at the transcriptional and lipid production level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A systems biology strategy was used to identify biochemical pathways affected by five nitroaromatic compounds and to integrate data that tie biochemical alterations to pathological changes. An integrative graphical network model was constructed by combining genomic, gene pathway, lipidomic, and physiological endpoint results to better understand mechanisms of liver toxicity and

  4. Genetic determinants of common epilepsies: a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The epilepsies are a clinically heterogeneous group of neurological disorders. Despite strong evidence for heritability, genome-wide association studies have had little success in identification of risk loci associated with epilepsy, probably because of relatively small sample sizes and insufficient power. We aimed to identify risk loci through meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for all epilepsy and the two largest clinical subtypes (genetic generalised epilepsy and focal epilepsy). Methods We combined genome-wide association data from 12 cohorts of individuals with epilepsy and controls from population-based datasets. Controls were ethnically matched with cases. We phenotyped individuals with epilepsy into categories of genetic generalised epilepsy, focal epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy. After standardised filtering for quality control and imputation to account for different genotyping platforms across sites, investigators at each site conducted a linear mixed-model association analysis for each dataset. Combining summary statistics, we conducted fixed-effects meta-analyses of all epilepsy, focal epilepsy, and genetic generalised epilepsy. We set the genome-wide significance threshold at panalysis. Meta-analysis of the all-epilepsy cohort identified loci at 2q24.3 (p=8·71 × 10−10), implicating SCN1A, and at 4p15.1 (p=5·44 × 10−9), harbouring PCDH7, which encodes a protocadherin molecule not previously implicated in epilepsy. For the cohort of genetic generalised epilepsy, we noted a single signal at 2p16.1 (p=9·99 × 10−9), implicating VRK2 or FANCL. No single nucleotide polymorphism achieved genome-wide significance for focal epilepsy. Interpretation This meta-analysis describes a new locus not previously implicated in epilepsy and provides further evidence about the genetic architecture of these disorders, with the ultimate aim of assisting in disease classification and prognosis. The data suggest that

  5. Metal uptake and acute toxicity in zebrafish: common mechanisms across multiple metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsop, Derek; Wood, Chris M

    2011-10-01

    Zebrafish larvae (Danio rerio) were used to examine the mechanisms of action and acute toxicities of metals. Larvae had similar physiological responses and sensitivities to waterborne metals as adults. While cadmium and zinc have previously been shown to reduce Ca(2+) uptake, copper and nickel also decreased Ca(2+) uptake, suggesting that the epithelial transport of all these metals is through Ca(2+) pathways. However, exposure to cadmium, copper or nickel for up to 48 h had little or no effect on total whole body Ca(2+) levels, indicating that the reduction of Ca(2+) uptake is not the acute toxic mechanism of these metals. Instead, mortalities were effectively related to whole body Na(+), which decreased up to 39% after 48 h exposures to different metals around their respective 96 h LC50s. Decreases in whole body K(+) were also observed, although they were not as pronounced or frequent as Na(+) losses. None of the metals tested inhibited Na(+) uptake in zebrafish (Na(+) uptake was in fact increased with exposure) and the observed losses of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) were proportional to the ionic gradients between the plasma and water, indicating diffusive ion loss with metal exposure. This study has shown that there is a common pathway for metal uptake and a common mechanism of acute toxicity across groups of metals in zebrafish. The disruption of ion uptake accompanying metal exposure does not appear to be responsible for the acute toxicity of metals, as has been previously suggested, but rather the toxicity is instead due to total ion loss (predominantly Na(+)). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Peasant rice agriculture: Its character and mechanisms of genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The factors implicated in the genetic erosion of peasant rice germplasm are; mode of harvesting, inherent population dynamics like choking up of late emergents, loss of lodging and shattering genotypes, loss of late-maturing genotypes, seed dormancy. Wholesale loss due to adoption of improved varieties and complete ...

  7. Cryptic genetic variation can make "irreducible complexity" a common mode of adaptation in sexual populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Meredith V; Weissman, Daniel B; Peterson, Grant I; Peck, Kayla M; Masel, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    The existence of complex (multiple-step) genetic adaptations that are "irreducible" (i.e., all partial combinations are less fit than the original genotype) is one of the longest standing problems in evolutionary biology. In standard genetics parlance, these adaptations require the crossing of a wide adaptive valley of deleterious intermediate stages. Here, we demonstrate, using a simple model, that evolution can cross wide valleys to produce "irreducibly complex" adaptations by making use of previously cryptic mutations. When revealed by an evolutionary capacitor, previously cryptic mutants have higher initial frequencies than do new mutations, bringing them closer to a valley-crossing saddle in allele frequency space. Moreover, simple combinatorics implies an enormous number of candidate combinations exist within available cryptic genetic variation. We model the dynamics of crossing of a wide adaptive valley after a capacitance event using both numerical simulations and analytical approximations. Although individual valley crossing events become less likely as valleys widen, by taking the combinatorics of genotype space into account, we see that revealing cryptic variation can cause the frequent evolution of complex adaptations. © 2014 The Author(s). Evolution © 2014 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. Conservation and genetic characterisation of common bean landraces from Cilento region (southern Italy): high differentiation in spite of low genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Daniele; Cennamo, Paola; Del Guacchio, Emanuele; Di Novella, Riccardo; Caputo, Paolo

    2018-02-01

    Since its introduction from Central-South America to Italy almost 500 years ago, the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was largely cultivated across the peninsula in hundreds of different landraces. However, globalisation and technological modernisation of agricultural practices in the last decades promoted the cultivation of few varieties at the expense of traditional and local agro-ecotypes, which have been confined to local markets or have completely disappeared. The aim of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and differentiation in 12 common bean landraces once largely cultivated in the Cilento region (Campania region, southern Italy), and now the object of a recovery program to save them from extinction. The analysis conducted using 13 nuclear microsatellite loci in 140 individuals revealed a high degree of homozygosity within each landrace and a strong genetic differentiation that was reflected in the success in assigning individuals to the source landrace. On the contrary, internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, analysed in one individual per landrace, were highly similar among common bean landraces but allowed the identification of a cowpea variety (Vigna unguiculata Walp.), a crop largely cultivated in the Old World before the arrival of common bean from Americas. In conclusion, our study highlighted that conservation of landraces is important not only for the cultural and socio-economic value that they have for local communities, but also because the time and conditions in which they have been selected have led to that genetic distinctiveness that is at the basis of many potential agronomical applications and dietary benefits.

  9. Pharmacology and toxicology of cholinesterase inhibitors: uses and misuses of a common mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Carey; Karanth, Subramanya; Liu, Jing

    2005-05-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors have been used in the treatment of human diseases, the control of insect pests, and more notoriously as chemical warfare agents and weapons of terrorism. Most uses of cholinesterase inhibitors are based on a common mechanism of action initiated by inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Extensive inhibition of this enzyme leads to accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and enhanced stimulation of postsynaptic cholinergic receptors. This action is beneficial in cases where a reduction in cholinergic transmission contributes to clinical symptoms, e.g., low muscle tone in the autoimmune disorder myasthenia gravis due to loss of nicotinic receptors. Under normal conditions, however, extensive inhibition of AChE leads to excess synaptic acetylcholine levels, over-stimulation of cholinergic receptors, alteration of postsynaptic cell function and consequent signs of cholinergic toxicity. This biochemical cascade forms the basis for the use of anticholinesterase insecticides in pest control as well as for nerve agents in chemical warfare. Paradoxically, the short-acting cholinesterase inhibitor pyridostigmine, an important therapeutic agent in the treatment of myasthenia gravis, was used during the Persian Gulf War to prevent the long-term clinical consequences of possible organophosphate nerve agent exposure. As shown in the attacks in Matsumoto and Tokyo, these same nerve agents can be effectively used to inflict urban terror. Cholinesterase inhibitors thus share a common mechanism of pharmacological or toxicological action, ultimately modifying cholinergic signaling through disruption of acetylcholine degradation. While the use of cholinesterase inhibitors relies on their interaction with AChE, a variety of reports indicate that a number of cholinesterase inhibitors have additional sites of action that may have pharmacologic or toxicologic relevance. A variety of esterase and non-esterase enzymes, neurotransmitter receptors and

  10. Is There Any Evidence for Rapid, Genetically-Based, Climatic Niche Expansion in the Invasive Common Ragweed?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Gallien

    Full Text Available Climatic niche shifts have been documented in a number of invasive species by comparing the native and adventive climatic ranges in which they occur. However, these shifts likely represent changes in the realized climatic niches of invasive species, and may not necessarily be driven by genetic changes in climatic affinities. Until now the role of rapid niche evolution in the spread of invasive species remains a challenging issue with conflicting results. Here, we document a likely genetically-based climatic niche expansion of an annual plant invader, the common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., a highly allergenic invasive species causing substantial public health issues. To do so, we looked for recent evolutionary change at the upward migration front of its adventive range in the French Alps. Based on species climatic niche models estimated at both global and regional scales we stratified our sampling design to adequately capture the species niche, and localized populations suspected of niche expansion. Using a combination of species niche modeling, landscape genetics models and common garden measurements, we then related the species genetic structure and its phenotypic architecture across the climatic niche. Our results strongly suggest that the common ragweed is rapidly adapting to local climatic conditions at its invasion front and that it currently expands its niche toward colder and formerly unsuitable climates in the French Alps (i.e. in sites where niche models would not predict its occurrence. Such results, showing that species climatic niches can evolve on very short time scales, have important implications for predictive models of biological invasions that do not account for evolutionary processes.

  11. Is There Any Evidence for Rapid, Genetically-Based, Climatic Niche Expansion in the Invasive Common Ragweed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallien, Laure; Thuiller, Wilfried; Fort, Noémie; Boleda, Marti; Alberto, Florian J; Rioux, Delphine; Lainé, Juliette; Lavergne, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Climatic niche shifts have been documented in a number of invasive species by comparing the native and adventive climatic ranges in which they occur. However, these shifts likely represent changes in the realized climatic niches of invasive species, and may not necessarily be driven by genetic changes in climatic affinities. Until now the role of rapid niche evolution in the spread of invasive species remains a challenging issue with conflicting results. Here, we document a likely genetically-based climatic niche expansion of an annual plant invader, the common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.), a highly allergenic invasive species causing substantial public health issues. To do so, we looked for recent evolutionary change at the upward migration front of its adventive range in the French Alps. Based on species climatic niche models estimated at both global and regional scales we stratified our sampling design to adequately capture the species niche, and localized populations suspected of niche expansion. Using a combination of species niche modeling, landscape genetics models and common garden measurements, we then related the species genetic structure and its phenotypic architecture across the climatic niche. Our results strongly suggest that the common ragweed is rapidly adapting to local climatic conditions at its invasion front and that it currently expands its niche toward colder and formerly unsuitable climates in the French Alps (i.e. in sites where niche models would not predict its occurrence). Such results, showing that species climatic niches can evolve on very short time scales, have important implications for predictive models of biological invasions that do not account for evolutionary processes.

  12. Leaf mechanical resistance in plant trait databases: comparing the results of two common measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrico, Lucas; Díaz, Sandra; Westoby, Mark; Rice, Barbara L

    2016-01-01

    The influence of leaf mechanical properties on local ecosystem processes, such as trophic transfer, decomposition and nutrient cycling, has resulted in a growing interest in including leaf mechanical resistance in large-scale databases of plant functional traits. 'Specific work to shear' and 'force to tear' are two properties commonly used to describe mechanical resistance (toughness or strength) of leaves. Two methodologies have been widely used to measure them across large datasets. This study aimed to assess correlations and standardization between the two methods, as measured by two widely used apparatuses, in order to inter-convert existing data in those global datasets. Specific work to shear (W(SS)) and force to tear (FT) were measured in leaves of 72 species from south-eastern Australia. The measurements were made including and excluding midribs. Relationships between the variables were tested by Spearman correlations and ordinary least square regressions. A positive and significant correlation was found between the methods, but coefficients varied according to the inclusion or exclusion of the midrib in the measurements. Equations for prediction varied according to leaf venation pattern. A positive and significant (r = 0·90, P leaf mechanical resistance data obtained with both methodologies could be pooled together into a single coarser variable, using the equations provided in this paper. However, more detailed datasets of FT cannot be safely filled in with estimations based on W(SS), or vice versa. In addition, W(SS) values of green leaves can be predicted with good accuracy from W(SS) of rehydrated leaves of the same species. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Amphibian population genetics in agricultural landscapes: does viniculture drive the population structuring of the European common frog (Rana temporaria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P. Lenhardt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Amphibian populations have been declining globally over the past decades. The intensification of agriculture, habitat loss, fragmentation of populations and toxic substances in the environment are considered as driving factors for this decline. Today, about 50% of the area of Germany is used for agriculture and is inhabited by a diverse variety of 20 amphibian species. Of these, 19 are exhibiting declining populations. Due to the protection status of native amphibian species, it is important to evaluate the effect of land use and associated stressors (such as road mortality and pesticide toxicity on the genetic population structure of amphibians in agricultural landscapes. We investigated the effects of viniculture on the genetic differentiation of European common frog (Rana temporaria populations in Southern Palatinate (Germany. We analyzed microsatellite data of ten loci from ten breeding pond populations located within viniculture landscape and in the adjacent forest block and compared these results with a previously developed landscape permeability model. We tested for significant correlation of genetic population differentiation and landscape elements, including land use as well as roads and their associated traffic intensity, to explain the genetic structure in the study area. Genetic differentiation among forest populations was significantly lower (median pairwise FST = 0.0041 at 5.39 km to 0.0159 at 9.40 km distance than between viniculture populations (median pairwise FST = 0.0215 at 2.34 km to 0.0987 at 2.39 km distance. Our analyses rejected isolation by distance based on roads and associated traffic intensity as the sole explanation of the genetic differentiation and suggest that the viniculture landscape has to be considered as a limiting barrier for R. temporaria migration, partially confirming the isolation of breeding ponds predicted by the landscape permeability model. Therefore, arable land may act as a sink habitat

  14. Amphibian population genetics in agricultural landscapes: does viniculture drive the population structuring of the European common frog (Rana temporaria)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhardt, Patrick P; Brühl, Carsten A; Leeb, Christoph; Theissinger, Kathrin

    2017-01-01

    Amphibian populations have been declining globally over the past decades. The intensification of agriculture, habitat loss, fragmentation of populations and toxic substances in the environment are considered as driving factors for this decline. Today, about 50% of the area of Germany is used for agriculture and is inhabited by a diverse variety of 20 amphibian species. Of these, 19 are exhibiting declining populations. Due to the protection status of native amphibian species, it is important to evaluate the effect of land use and associated stressors (such as road mortality and pesticide toxicity) on the genetic population structure of amphibians in agricultural landscapes. We investigated the effects of viniculture on the genetic differentiation of European common frog (Rana temporaria) populations in Southern Palatinate (Germany). We analyzed microsatellite data of ten loci from ten breeding pond populations located within viniculture landscape and in the adjacent forest block and compared these results with a previously developed landscape permeability model. We tested for significant correlation of genetic population differentiation and landscape elements, including land use as well as roads and their associated traffic intensity, to explain the genetic structure in the study area. Genetic differentiation among forest populations was significantly lower (median pairwise FST = 0.0041 at 5.39 km to 0.0159 at 9.40 km distance) than between viniculture populations (median pairwise FST = 0.0215 at 2.34 km to 0.0987 at 2.39 km distance). Our analyses rejected isolation by distance based on roads and associated traffic intensity as the sole explanation of the genetic differentiation and suggest that the viniculture landscape has to be considered as a limiting barrier for R. temporaria migration, partially confirming the isolation of breeding ponds predicted by the landscape permeability model. Therefore, arable land may act as a sink habitat, inhibiting genetic

  15. Sheltering behavior and locomotor activity in 11 genetically diverse common inbred mouse strains using home-cage monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Loos

    Full Text Available Functional genetic analyses in mice rely on efficient and in-depth characterization of the behavioral spectrum. Automated home-cage observation can provide a systematic and efficient screening method to detect unexplored, novel behavioral phenotypes. Here, we analyzed high-throughput automated home-cage data using existing and novel concepts, to detect a plethora of genetic differences in spontaneous behavior in a panel of commonly used inbred strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, BALB/cJ, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ, FVB/NJ, WSB/EiJ, PWK/PhJ and CAST/EiJ. Continuous video-tracking observations of sheltering behavior and locomotor activity were segmented into distinguishable behavioral elements, and studied at different time scales, yielding a set of 115 behavioral parameters of which 105 showed highly significant strain differences. This set of 115 parameters was highly dimensional; principal component analysis identified 26 orthogonal components with eigenvalues above one. Especially novel parameters of sheltering behavior and parameters describing aspects of motion of the mouse in the home-cage showed high genetic effect sizes. Multi-day habituation curves and patterns of behavior surrounding dark/light phase transitions showed striking strain differences, albeit with lower genetic effect sizes. This spontaneous home-cage behavior study demonstrates high dimensionality, with a strong genetic contribution to specific sets of behavioral measures. Importantly, spontaneous home-cage behavior analysis detects genetic effects that cannot be studied in conventional behavioral tests, showing that the inclusion of a few days of undisturbed, labor extensive home-cage assessment may greatly aid gene function analyses and drug target discovery.

  16. ASD and schizophrenia show distinct developmental profiles in common genetic overlap with population-based social communication difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pourcain, B; Robinson, E B; Anttila, V; Sullivan, B B; Maller, J; Golding, J; Skuse, D; Ring, S; Evans, D M; Zammit, S; Fisher, S E; Neale, B M; Anney, R J L; Ripke, S; Hollegaard, M V; Werge, T; Ronald, A; Grove, J; Hougaard, D M; Børglum, A D; Mortensen, P B; Daly, M J; Davey Smith, G

    2017-01-03

    Difficulties in social communication are part of the phenotypic overlap between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. Both conditions follow, however, distinct developmental patterns. Symptoms of ASD typically occur during early childhood, whereas most symptoms characteristic of schizophrenia do not appear before early adulthood. We investigated whether overlap in common genetic influences between these clinical conditions and impairments in social communication depends on the developmental stage of the assessed trait. Social communication difficulties were measured in typically-developing youth (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, N⩽5553, longitudinal assessments at 8, 11, 14 and 17 years) using the Social Communication Disorder Checklist. Data on clinical ASD (PGC-ASD: 5305 cases, 5305 pseudo-controls; iPSYCH-ASD: 7783 cases, 11 359 controls) and schizophrenia (PGC-SCZ2: 34 241 cases, 45 604 controls, 1235 trios) were either obtained through the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) or the Danish iPSYCH project. Overlap in genetic influences between ASD and social communication difficulties during development decreased with age, both in the PGC-ASD and the iPSYCH-ASD sample. Genetic overlap between schizophrenia and social communication difficulties, by contrast, persisted across age, as observed within two independent PGC-SCZ2 subsamples, and showed an increase in magnitude for traits assessed during later adolescence. ASD- and schizophrenia-related polygenic effects were unrelated to each other and changes in trait-disorder links reflect the heterogeneity of genetic factors influencing social communication difficulties during childhood versus later adolescence. Thus, both clinical ASD and schizophrenia share some genetic influences with impairments in social communication, but reveal distinct developmental profiles in their genetic links, consistent with the onset of clinical symptoms.Molecular Psychiatry advance online

  17. Genetic screening for a single common LRRK2 mutation in familial Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, William C; Pankratz, Nathan; Hernandez, Dena; Paisán-Ruíz, Coro; Jain, Shushant; Halter, Cheryl A; Michaels, Veronika E; Reed, Terry; Rudolph, Alice; Shults, Clifford W; Singleton, Andrew; Foroud, Tatiana

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause some forms of autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease. We measured the frequency of a novel mutation (Gly2019 ser) in familial Parkinson's disease by screening genomic DNA of patients and controls. Of 767 affected individuals from 358 multiplex families, 35 (5%) individuals were either heterozygous (34) or homozygous (one) for the mutation, and had typical clinical findings of idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Thus, our results suggest that a single LRRK2 mutation causes Parkinson's disease in 5% of individuals with familial disease. Screening for this mutation should be a component of genetic testing for Parkinson's disease.

  18. Sparse multitask regression for identifying common mechanism of response to therapeutic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Gray, Joe W.; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Molecular association of phenotypic responses is an important step in hypothesis generation and for initiating design of new experiments. Current practices for associating gene expression data with multidimensional phenotypic data are typically (i) performed one-to-one, i.e. each gene is examined independently with a phenotypic index and (ii) tested with one stress condition at a time, i.e. different perturbations are analyzed separately. As a result, the complex coordination among the genes responsible for a phenotypic profile is potentially lost. More importantly, univariate analysis can potentially hide new insights into common mechanism of response. Results: In this article, we propose a sparse, multitask regression model together with co-clustering analysis to explore the intrinsic grouping in associating the gene expression with phenotypic signatures. The global structure of association is captured by learning an intrinsic template that is shared among experimental conditions, with local perturbations introduced to integrate effects of therapeutic agents. We demonstrate the performance of our approach on both synthetic and experimental data. Synthetic data reveal that the multi-task regression has a superior reduction in the regression error when compared with traditional L1-and L2-regularized regression. On the other hand, experiments with cell cycle inhibitors over a panel of 14 breast cancer cell lines demonstrate the relevance of the computed molecular predictors with the cell cycle machinery, as well as the identification of hidden variables that are not captured by the baseline regression analysis. Accordingly, the system has identified CLCA2 as a hidden transcript and as a common mechanism of response for two therapeutic agents of CI-1040 and Iressa, which are currently in clinical use. Contact: b_parvin@lbl.gov PMID:20529943

  19. Cumulative impact of common genetic variants and other risk factors on colorectal cancer risk in 42,103 individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Ballereau, Stephane; Brewster, David H.; Pharoah, Paul DP.; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Völzke, Henry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; von Holst, Susanna; Picelli, Simone; Lindblom, Annika; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Casey, Graham; Duggan, David; Newcomb, Polly; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Niittymäki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri; Zanke, Brent W.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Gallinger, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Walther, Axel; Kerr, David; Lubbe, Steven; Broderick, Peter; Chandler, Ian; Pittman, Alan; Penegar, Steven; Campbell, Harry; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a substantial heritable component. Common genetic variation has been shown to contribute to CRC risk. In a large, multi-population study, we set out to assess the feasibility of CRC risk prediction using common genetic variant data, combined with other risk factors. We built a risk prediction model and applied it to the Scottish population using available data. Design Nine populations of European descent were studied to develop and validate colorectal cancer risk prediction models. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the combined effect of age, gender, family history (FH) and genotypes at 10 susceptibility loci that individually only modestly influence colorectal cancer risk. Risk models were generated from case-control data incorporating genotypes alone (n=39,266), and in combination with gender, age and family history (n=11,324). Model discriminatory performance was assessed using 10-fold internal cross-validation and externally using 4,187 independent samples. 10-year absolute risk was estimated by modelling genotype and FH with age- and gender-specific population risks. Results Median number of risk alleles was greater in cases than controls (10 vs 9, p5% predicted 10-year absolute risk. Conclusion We show that genotype data provides additional information that complements age, gender and FH as risk factors. However, individualized genetic risk prediction is not currently feasible. Nonetheless, the modelling exercise suggests public health potential, since it is possible to stratify the population into CRC risk categories, thereby informing targeted prevention and surveillance. PMID:22490517

  20. High genetic variability in endophytic fungi from the genus Diaporthe isolated from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, T T; de Souza Leite, T; de Queiroz, C B; de Araújo, E F; Pereira, O L; de Queiroz, M V

    2016-02-01

    The goals of the present study were to identify, to analyse the phylogenetic relations and to evaluate the genetic variability in Diaporthe endophytic isolates from common bean. Diaporthe sp., D. infecunda and D. phaseolorum strains were identified using multilocus phylogeny (rDNA ITS region; EF1-α, β-tubulin, and calmodulin genes). IRAP (Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism) and REMAP (Retrotransposon-Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism) molecular markers reveal the existence of high genetic variability, especially among D. infecunda isolates. It was concluded that the multilocus phylogenetic approach was more effective than individual analysis of ITS sequences, in identifying the isolates to species level, and that IRAP and REMAP markers can be used for studying the genetic variability in the genus Diaporthe particularly at the intraspecific level. The combined use of molecular tools such as multilocus phylogenetic approach and molecular markers, as performed in this study, is the best way to distinguish endophytic strains of Diaporthe isolated from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Cumulative impact of common genetic variants and other risk factors on colorectal cancer risk in 42,103 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M; Ballereau, Stephane; Brewster, David H; Koessler, Thibaud; Pharoah, Paul; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Völzke, Henry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; von Holst, Susanna; Picelli, Simone; Lindblom, Annika; Jenkins, Mark A; Hopper, John L; Casey, Graham; Duggan, David; Newcomb, Polly A; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Niittymäki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri; Zanke, Brent; Hudson, Tom; Gallinger, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Walther, Axel; Kerr, David; Lubbe, Steven; Broderick, Peter; Chandler, Ian; Pittman, Alan; Penegar, Steven; Campbell, Harry; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard S

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a substantial heritable component. Common genetic variation has been shown to contribute to CRC risk. A study was conducted in a large multi-population study to assess the feasibility of CRC risk prediction using common genetic variant data combined with other risk factors. A risk prediction model was built and applied to the Scottish population using available data. Nine populations of European descent were studied to develop and validate CRC risk prediction models. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the combined effect of age, gender, family history (FH) and genotypes at 10 susceptibility loci that individually only modestly influence CRC risk. Risk models were generated from case-control data incorporating genotypes alone (n=39,266) and in combination with gender, age and FH (n=11,324). Model discriminatory performance was assessed using 10-fold internal cross-validation and externally using 4187 independent samples. The 10-year absolute risk was estimated by modelling genotype and FH with age- and gender-specific population risks. The median number of risk alleles was greater in cases than controls (10 vs 9, p5% predicted 10-year absolute risk. Genotype data provide additional information that complements age, gender and FH as risk factors, but individualised genetic risk prediction is not currently feasible. Nonetheless, the modelling exercise suggests public health potential since it is possible to stratify the population into CRC risk categories, thereby informing targeted prevention and surveillance.

  2. Analysis of the common genetic component of large-vessel vasculitides through a meta-Immunochip strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, F David; Coit, Patrick; Saruhan-Direskeneli, Güher; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, María C; Solans, Roser; Castañeda, Santos; Vaglio, Augusto; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A; Boiardi, Luigi; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A; Martín, Javier; Sawalha, Amr H

    2017-03-09

    Giant cell arteritis (GCA) and Takayasu's arteritis (TAK) are major forms of large-vessel vasculitis (LVV) that share clinical features. To evaluate their genetic similarities, we analysed Immunochip genotyping data from 1,434 LVV patients and 3,814 unaffected controls. Genetic pleiotropy was also estimated. The HLA region harboured the main disease-specific associations. GCA was mostly associated with class II genes (HLA-DRB1/HLA-DQA1) whereas TAK was mostly associated with class I genes (HLA-B/MICA). Both the statistical significance and effect size of the HLA signals were considerably reduced in the cross-disease meta-analysis in comparison with the analysis of GCA and TAK separately. Consequently, no significant genetic correlation between these two diseases was observed when HLA variants were tested. Outside the HLA region, only one polymorphism located nearby the IL12B gene surpassed the study-wide significance threshold in the meta-analysis of the discovery datasets (rs755374, P = 7.54E-07; ORGCA = 1.19, ORTAK = 1.50). This marker was confirmed as novel GCA risk factor using four additional cohorts (PGCA = 5.52E-04, ORGCA = 1.16). Taken together, our results provide evidence of strong genetic differences between GCA and TAK in the HLA. Outside this region, common susceptibility factors were suggested, especially within the IL12B locus.

  3. Common genetic variants on 1p13.2 associate with risk of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, K; Guo, H; Hu, Z; Xun, G; Zuo, L; Peng, Y; Wang, K; He, Y; Xiong, Z; Sun, L; Pan, Q; Long, Z; Zou, X; Li, X; Li, W; Xu, X; Lu, L; Liu, Y; Hu, Y; Tian, D; Long, L; Ou, J; Liu, Y; Li, X; Zhang, L; Pan, Y; Chen, J; Peng, H; Liu, Q; Luo, X; Su, W; Wu, L; Liang, D; Dai, H; Yan, X; Feng, Y; Tang, B; Li, J; Miedzybrodzka, Z; Xia, J; Zhang, Z; Luo, X; Zhang, X; St Clair, D; Zhao, J; Zhang, F

    2014-11-01

    Autism is a highly heritable neurodevelopmental disorder, and known genetic variants, mostly rare, account only for a small proportion of cases. Here we report a genome-wide association study on autism using two Chinese cohorts as gene discovery (n=2150) and three data sets of European ancestry populations for replication analysis of top association signals. Meta-analysis identified three single-nucleotide polymorphisms, rs936938 (P=4.49 × 10(-8)), non-synonymous rs6537835 (P=3.26 × 10(-8)) and rs1877455 (P=8.70 × 10(-8)), and related haplotypes, AMPD1-NRAS-CSDE1, TRIM33 and TRIM33-BCAS2, associated with autism; all were mapped to a previously reported linkage region (1p13.2) with autism. These genetic associations were further supported by a cis-acting regulatory effect on the gene expressions of CSDE1, NRAS and TRIM33 and by differential expression of CSDE1 and TRIM33 in the human prefrontal cortex of post-mortem brains between subjects with and those without autism. Our study suggests TRIM33 and NRAS-CSDE1 as candidate genes for autism, and may provide a novel insight into the etiology of autism.

  4. Cryptic distant relatives are common in both isolated and cosmopolitan genetic samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenna M Henn

    Full Text Available Although a few hundred single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs suffice to infer close familial relationships, high density genome-wide SNP data make possible the inference of more distant relationships such as 2(nd to 9(th cousinships. In order to characterize the relationship between genetic similarity and degree of kinship given a timeframe of 100-300 years, we analyzed the sharing of DNA inferred to be identical by descent (IBD in a subset of individuals from the 23andMe customer database (n = 22,757 and from the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP-CEPH, n = 952. With data from 121 populations, we show that the average amount of DNA shared IBD in most ethnolinguistically-defined populations, for example Native American groups, Finns and Ashkenazi Jews, differs from continentally-defined populations by several orders of magnitude. Via extensive pedigree-based simulations, we determined bounds for predicted degrees of relationship given the amount of genomic IBD sharing in both endogamous and 'unrelated' population samples. Using these bounds as a guide, we detected tens of thousands of 2(nd to 9(th degree cousin pairs within a heterogenous set of 5,000 Europeans. The ubiquity of distant relatives, detected via IBD segments, in both ethnolinguistic populations and in large 'unrelated' populations samples has important implications for genetic genealogy, forensics and genotype/phenotype mapping studies.

  5. Cryptic distant relatives are common in both isolated and cosmopolitan genetic samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, Brenna M; Hon, Lawrence; Macpherson, J Michael; Eriksson, Nick; Saxonov, Serge; Pe'er, Itsik; Mountain, Joanna L

    2012-01-01

    Although a few hundred single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) suffice to infer close familial relationships, high density genome-wide SNP data make possible the inference of more distant relationships such as 2(nd) to 9(th) cousinships. In order to characterize the relationship between genetic similarity and degree of kinship given a timeframe of 100-300 years, we analyzed the sharing of DNA inferred to be identical by descent (IBD) in a subset of individuals from the 23andMe customer database (n = 22,757) and from the Human Genome Diversity Panel (HGDP-CEPH, n = 952). With data from 121 populations, we show that the average amount of DNA shared IBD in most ethnolinguistically-defined populations, for example Native American groups, Finns and Ashkenazi Jews, differs from continentally-defined populations by several orders of magnitude. Via extensive pedigree-based simulations, we determined bounds for predicted degrees of relationship given the amount of genomic IBD sharing in both endogamous and 'unrelated' population samples. Using these bounds as a guide, we detected tens of thousands of 2(nd) to 9(th) degree cousin pairs within a heterogenous set of 5,000 Europeans. The ubiquity of distant relatives, detected via IBD segments, in both ethnolinguistic populations and in large 'unrelated' populations samples has important implications for genetic genealogy, forensics and genotype/phenotype mapping studies.

  6. Genetic divergence in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the Cerrado-Pantanal ecotone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, F A; Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Lopes, K V; Corrêa, C C G

    2017-03-30

    Evaluating genetic diversity among genotypes is important for providing parameters for the identification of superior genotypes, because the choice of parents that form segregating populations is crucial. Our objectives were to i) evaluate agronomic performance; ii) compare clustering methods; iii) ascertain the relative contributions of the variables evaluated; and iv) identify the most promising hybrids to produce superior segregating populations. The trial was conducted in 2015 at the State University of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We used a randomized block design with three replications, and recorded the days to emergence, days to flowering, days to maturity, plant height, number of branches, number of pods, number of seeds per pod, weight of 100 grains, and productivity. The genetic diversity of the genotypes was determined by cluster analysis using two dissimilarity measures: the Euclidean distance and the standardized mean Mahalanobis distance using the Ward hierarchical method. The genotypes 'CNFC 10762', 'IAC Dawn', and 'BRS Style' had the highest grain yields, and clusters that were based on the Euclidean distance differed from those based on the Mahalanobis distance, the second being more precise. The yield grain character has greater relevance to the dispute. Hybrids with a high heterotic effect can be obtained by crossing 'IAC Alvorada' with 'CNFC 10762', 'IAC Alvorada' with 'CNFC 10764', and 'BRS Style' with 'IAC Alvorada'.

  7. Do Quiescence and Wasp Venom-Induced Lethargy Share Common Neuronal Mechanisms in Cockroaches?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stav Emanuel

    Full Text Available The escape behavior of a cockroach may not occur when it is either in a quiescent state or after being stung by the jewel wasp (Ampulex compressa. In the present paper, we show that quiescence is an innate lethargic state during which the cockroach is less responsive to external stimuli. The neuronal mechanism of such a state is poorly understood. In contrast to quiescence, the venom-induced lethargic state is not an innate state in cockroaches. The Jewel Wasp disables the escape behavior of cockroaches by injecting its venom directly in the head ganglia, inside a neuropile called the central complex a 'higher center' known to regulate motor behaviors. In this paper we show that the coxal slow motoneuron ongoing activity, known to be involved in posture, is reduced in quiescent animals, as compared to awake animals, and it is further reduced in stung animals. Moreover, the regular tonic firing of the slow motoneuron present in both awake and quiescent cockroaches is lost in stung cockroaches. Injection of procaine to prevent neuronal activity into the central complex to mimic the wasp venom injection produces a similar effect on the activity of the slow motoneuron. In conclusion, we speculate that the neuronal modulation during the quiescence and venom-induced lethargic states may occur in the central complex and that both states could share a common neuronal mechanism.

  8. Genetics and mapping of a new anthracnose resistance Locus in Andean common bean Paloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean cultivar Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican and Andean races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the fungal pathogen that causes the destructive anthracnose disease of common bean. Remarkably, Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican races 2047 and 3481, which are among the most virulent races ...

  9. Variation in behaviour and growth of common sole : genetic and environmental influences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mas Muñoz, J.

    2013-01-01

    Common sole (Solea solea) has a high potential for commercial aquaculture because of its consumer popularity and high market values in Europe. However, a major economic constraint for the culture of sole is its slow and variable growth. The aim of this thesis was to investigate: 1) the importance of

  10. Ancient humans influenced the current spatial genetic structure of common walnut populations in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paola Pollegioni; Keith E. Woeste; Francesca Chiocchini; Stefano Del Lungo; Irene Olimpieri; Virginia Tortolano; Jo Clark; Gabriel E. Hemery; Sergio Mapelli; Maria Emilia Malvolti; Gyaneshwer. Chaubey

    2015-01-01

    Common walnut (Juglans regia L) is an economically important species cultivated worldwide for its wood and nuts. It is generally accepted that J. regia survived and grew spontaneously in almost completely isolated stands in its Asian native range after the Last Glacial Maximum. Despite its natural geographic isolation, J....

  11. What causes myopia? : Complex genetics and epidemiology of a common condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Myopia (nearsightedness) is a highly common eye condition that is predominantly caused by an axial elongation of the eye. Myopia can usually be corrected with negative glasses, contact lenses, and/or laser refractive surgery. Unfortunately, however, high myopia (-6

  12. More than one way to evolve a weed: parallel evolution of US weedy rice through independent genetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xinshuai; Liu, Yan; Vigueira, Cynthia C; Young, Nelson D; Caicedo, Ana L; Jia, Yulin; Gealy, David R; Olsen, Kenneth M

    2015-07-01

    Many different crop species were selected for a common suite of 'domestication traits', which facilitates their use for studies of parallel evolution. Within domesticated rice (Oryza sativa), there has also been independent evolution of weedy strains from different cultivated varieties. This makes it possible to examine the genetic basis of parallel weed evolution and the extent to which this process occurs through shared genetic mechanisms. We performed comparative QTL mapping of weediness traits using two recombinant inbred line populations derived from crosses between an indica crop variety and representatives of each of the two independently evolved weed strains found in US rice fields, strawhull (S) and blackhull awned (B). Genotyping-by-sequencing provided dense marker coverage for linkage map construction (average marker interval <0.25 cM), with 6016 and 13 730 SNPs mapped in F5 lines of the S and B populations, respectively. For some weediness traits (awn length, hull pigmentation and pericarp pigmentation), QTL mapping and sequencing of underlying candidate genes confirmed that trait variation was largely attributable to individual loci. However, for more complex quantitative traits (including heading date, panicle length and seed shattering), we found multiple QTL, with little evidence of shared genetic bases between the S and B populations or across previous studies of weedy rice. Candidate gene sequencing revealed causal genetic bases for 8 of 27 total mapped QTL. Together these findings suggest that despite the genetic bottleneck that occurred during rice domestication, there is ample genetic variation in this crop to allow agricultural weed evolution through multiple genetic mechanisms. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Genetic consequences of population expansions and contractions in the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) since the Late Pleistocene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoffel, Céline; Dufresnes, Christophe; Okello, John B A

    2015-01-01

    of semi-aquatic animals, which faced tremendous challenges imposed by unpredictable availability of water resources. In this study, we investigate the Late Pleistocene history of the common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius), using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence variation and range......-wide sampling. We documented a global demographic and spatial expansion approximately 0.1-0.3 My ago, most likely associated with an episode of massive drainage overflow. These events presumably enabled a historical continent-wide gene flow among hippopotamus populations, and hence no clear continental......-scale genetic structuring remains. Nevertheless, present-day hippopotamus populations are genetically disconnected, probably as a result of the mid-Holocene aridification and contemporary anthropogenic pressures. This unique pattern contrasts with the biogeographic paradigms established for savannah...

  14. [Examination of processed vegetable foods for the presence of common DNA sequences of genetically modified tomatoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Mamiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Ubukata, Shoji; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of processed vegetable foods with genetically modified tomatoes was investigated by the use of qualitative PCR methods to detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) and the kanamycin resistance gene (NPTII). DNA fragments of P35S and NPTII were detected in vegetable juice samples, possibly due to contamination with the genomes of cauliflower mosaic virus infecting juice ingredients of Brassica species and soil bacteria, respectively. Therefore, to detect the transformation construct sequences of GM tomatoes, primer pairs were designed for qualitative PCR to specifically detect the border region between P35S and NPTII, and the border region between nopaline synthase gene promoter and NPTII. No amplification of the targeted sequences was observed using genomic DNA purified from the juice ingredients. The developed qualitative PCR method is considered to be a reliable tool to check contamination of products with GM tomatoes.

  15. Frequency of rare mutations and common genetic variations in severe hypertriglyceridemia in the general population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamiquiz-Moneo, Itziar; Blanco-Torrecilla, Cristian; Bea, Ana M; Mateo-Gallego, Rocío; Pérez-Calahorra, Sofía; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Cenarro, Ana; Civeira, Fernando; de Castro-Orós, Isabel

    2016-04-23

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a common complex metabolic trait that results of the accumulation of relatively common genetic variants in combination with other modifier genes and environmental factors resulting in increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels. The majority of severe primary hypertriglyceridemias is diagnosed in adulthood and their molecular bases have not been fully defined yet. The prevalence of HTG is highly variable among populations, possibly caused by differences in environmental factors and genetic background. However, the prevalence of very high TG and the frequency of rare mutations causing HTG in a whole non-selected population have not been previously studied. The total of 23,310 subjects over 18 years from a primary care-district in a middle-class area of Zaragoza (Spain) with TG >500 mg/dL were selected to establish HTG prevalence. Those affected of primary HTG were considered for further genetic analysis. The promoters, coding regions and exon-intron boundaries of LPL, LMF1, APOC2, APOA5, APOE and GPIHBP1 genes were sequenced. The frequency of rare variants identified was studied in 90 controls. One hundred ninety-four subjects (1.04%) had HTG and 90 subjects (46.4%) met the inclusion criteria for primary HTG. In this subgroup, nine patients (12.3%) were carriers of 7 rare variants in LPL, LMF1, APOA5, GPIHBP1 or APOE genes. Three of these mutations are described for the first time in this work. The presence of a rare pathogenic mutation did not confer a differential phenotype or a higher family history of HTG. The prevalence of rare mutations in candidate genes in subjects with primary HTG is low. The low frequency of rare mutations, the absence of a more severe phenotype or the dominant transmission of the HTG would not suggest the use of genetic analysis in the clinical practice in this population.

  16. Common genetic variants and subclinical atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Jose D; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Post, Wendy S; Polak, Joseph F; Budoff, Matthew J; Bluemke, David A

    2016-02-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis (sCVD), measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) of sCVD and CVD have focused primarily on Caucasian populations. We hypothesized that these associations may differ in populations from distinct genetic backgrounds. The associations between sCVD and 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from published GWAS of sCVD and CVD were tested in 8224 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and MESA Family participants [2329 Caucasians (EUA), 691 Chinese (CHN), 2482 African Americans (AFA), and 2012 Hispanic (HIS)] using an additive model adjusting for CVD risk factors, with SNP significance defined by a Bonferroni-corrected p < 7.6 × 10(-4) (0.05/66). In EUA there were significant associations for CAC with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P = 2 × 10(-9); rs4977574, P = 4 × 10(-9)), COL4A1 (rs9515203, P = 9 × 10(-6)), and PHACTR1 (rs9349379, P = 4 × 10(-4)). In HIS, CAC was associated with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P = 8 × 10(-5); rs4977574, P = 5 × 10(-5)), APOA5 (rs964184, P = 2 × 10(-4)), and ADAMTS7 (rs7173743, P = 4 × 10(-4)). There were no associations between CAC and 9p21 SNPs for AFA and CHN. Fine mapping of the 9p21 region revealed SNPs with robust associations with CAC in EUA and HIS but no significant associations in AFA and CHN. Our results suggest some shared genetic architecture for sCVD across ethnic groups, while also underscoring the possibility of novel variants and/or pathways in risk of CVD in ethnically diverse populations. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Phylogeography of the common ivy (Hedera sp.) in Europe: genetic differentiation through space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grivet, D; Petit, R J

    2002-08-01

    We studied the phylogeography of ivy (Hedera sp.), a liana widespread in Europe, throughout its natural range. The populations sampled belong to four closely related species differing by ploidy levels and morphological characters. Chloroplast (cp) markers were used and 13 haplotypes were detected, usually shared across species, contrary to ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) variants. We demonstrated the existence of a strong overall cpDNA phylogeographical structure. Several methods of data analysis were conducted to describe how this structure and the genetic diversity change through space and time. Southern populations, especially those from Spain, are the most divergent. Pairwise estimates of differentiation point to isolation by distance, and the existence of a latitudinal gradient of divergence was demonstrated using a regression procedure. Similarly, latitudinal differences in haplotype richness and diversity exist, as shown by population permutations ('differentiation through space'). Finally, we measured differentiation by taking into account successive levels of divergence between haplotypes ('differentiation through time'). Genetic differentiation turns out to be much greater when differences between closely related haplotypes are not considered. Further, these results indicate that the phylogeographical structure is essentially due to the relative distribution of the most similar haplotypes. Diversity decreases from south to north, whereas haplotype frequencies change longitudinally. It appears that Hedera survived in Spanish and Balkan refugia during the last ice age. A third refugium must have been present in the Alps or in Italy. During the northward expansion, the decrease in overall diversity was attenuated by some mixing of lineages at intermediate latitudes, resulting in comparatively higher levels of differentiation in the south.

  18. Genetic differentiation in life-history traits of introduced and native common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgins, K A; Rieseberg, L

    2011-12-01

    Introduced species represent opportunities to observe evolution over contemporary time scales, and as exotics encounter new environments, adaptive responses can occur, potentially contributing to invasion. Here, we compare 22 native North American populations and 12 introduced European populations of common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) in five common gardens (control, herbivory, light stress, nutrient stress and drought). We found evidence for improved growth and reproduction of the introduced populations in most environments, particularly in the light stress. However, under drought conditions, the introduced plants experienced more rapid wilting and mortality than their native counterparts, evidence consistent with a life-history trade-off between rapid growth and drought tolerance. Moreover, we found parallel latitudinal clines in flowering time and correlations between fitness components and the local climate of the source populations in both ranges. Together these data provide evidence for adaptation to local environmental conditions in the native and introduced range of common ragweed. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2011 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  19. Pathway analysis reveals common pro-survival mechanisms of metyrapone and carbenoxolone after traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Hellmich

    Full Text Available Developing new pharmacotherapies for traumatic brain injury (TBI requires elucidation of the neuroprotective mechanisms of many structurally and functionally diverse compounds. To test our hypothesis that diverse neuroprotective drugs similarly affect common gene targets after TBI, we compared the effects of two drugs, metyrapone (MT and carbenoxolone (CB, which, though used clinically for noncognitive conditions, improved learning and memory in rats and humans. Although structurally different, both MT and CB inhibit a common molecular target, 11β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, which converts inactive cortisone to cortisol, thereby effectively reducing glucocorticoid levels. We examined injury-induced signaling pathways to determine how the effects of these two compounds correlate with pro-survival effects in surviving neurons of the injured rat hippocampus. We found that treatment of TBI rats with MT or CB acutely induced in hippocampal neurons transcriptional profiles that were remarkably similar (i.e., a coordinated attenuation of gene expression across multiple injury-induced cell signaling networks. We also found, to a lesser extent, a coordinated increase in cell survival signals. Analysis of injury-induced gene expression altered by MT and CB provided additional insight into the protective effects of each. Both drugs attenuated expression of genes in the apoptosis, death receptor and stress signaling pathways, as well as multiple genes in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway such as subunits of NADH dehydrogenase (Complex1, cytochrome c oxidase (Complex IV and ATP synthase (Complex V. This suggests an overall inhibition of mitochondrial function. Complex 1 is the primary source of reactive oxygen species in the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation pathway, thus linking the protective effects of these drugs to a reduction in oxidative stress. The net effect of the drug-induced transcriptional changes observed here indicates that

  20. Cofactor of BRCA1: A new genetic marker for common malignant liver cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Editorial Office

    2016-01-01

    A new study has identified a vital gene in the pathogenesis and progression of liver cancer hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), according to a team of biotechnology researchers at The American University in Cairo, Egypt, in a scientific paper published recently by AMOR. The study on human gene ‘Cofactor of BRCA1’ (dubbed COBRA1) and its potential role as a reliable cancer predictor for HCC is especially important due to the disease’s grim outlook. HCC is “ranked as the second most common cause of...

  1. Common Genetic Influences on Negative Emotionality and a General Psychopathology Factor in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Jennifer L.; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Hulle, Carol Van; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F.; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a “bifactor”; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher-order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, Van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tests a prediction derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially—at both phenotypic and genetic levels—with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9–17) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors. PMID:24364617

  2. Microtwinning as a common mechanism for the martensitic and pearlitic transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraposhin, V., E-mail: kraposhin@gmail.com [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 5, 2nd Baumanskaya Street, 105005 Moscow (Russian Federation); Jakovleva, I.; Karkina, L. [Institute of Metal Physics of Russian Academy of Science, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Nuzhny, G. [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 5, 2nd Baumanskaya Street, 105005 Moscow (Russian Federation); Zubkova, T. [Institute of Metal Physics of Russian Academy of Science, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Talis, A. [A.N. Nesmeyanov Institute of Organoelement Compounds, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: ► Diagonal flipping in the coordination polyhedra was proposed as the main mechanism of polymorph transformation. ► Microtwinning of crystal lattice can be effected by diagonal flipping in polyhedra. ► Martensite and perlite transformation can be fulfilled by the similar microtwinning. ► Twinning of austenite during perlite transformation has been observed by electron microscopy, thus confirming the proposed model. ► Orientation relationships predicted by model are in accordance with the experiment. -- Abstract: Common model for austenite transformations to pearlite and martensite has been proposed. The model uses a topological operation which is a local flipping of interatomic bonds resulting in formation of the structural unit of the coherent twin boundary. Main structural unit of a coherent twin boundary along {1 1 3} in the FCC lattice is a trigonal prism which is also the main building unit for the cementite structure. The atomic structure of such multiple {1 1 3} twins coincides with the structure of multiple twins along {1 1 2} of the BCC lattice, so the FCC–BCC transformation route is the FCC twinning along {1 1 3} and detwinning of {1 1 2} BCC twins into BCC structure. Carbon atoms serve as stabilizers to the prismatic iron configurations thus forming the cementite structure during pearlite transformation. High density of microtwins in the rest austenite after pearlite transformation in 1.2C–4Mn steel and new orientation relationships between pearlite constituents and austenite have been observed by transmission electron microscopy in full consistency with the proposed model. The twinning–detwinning mechanism prescribes also parallelism between {1 1 3} FCC and {1 1 2} BCC for martensite transformation in full accordance with published data.

  3. Genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of epilepsy: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Chen T; Giri M; Xia ZY; Subedi YN; Li Y

    2017-01-01

    Tian Chen,1,* Mohan Giri,2,* Zhenyi Xia,3 Yadu Nanda Subedi,2 Yan Li1 1Department of Health Management Center, Chongqing Three Gorges Central Hospital, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China; 2National Center for Rheumatic Diseases, Ratopul, Gaushala, Kathmandu, Nepal; 3Department of Thoracic Surgery, Chongqing Three Gorges Central Hospital, Chongqing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Epilepsy is a common episo...

  4. Angelman Syndrome: Genetic Mechanisms and Relationship to Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Arabella

    1994-01-01

    Research points to two distinct regions within the Prader-Willi chromosome region: one for Prader Willi syndrome and one for Angelman syndrome. Genetic mechanisms in Angelman syndrome are complex, and at present, three mechanisms are recognized: maternal deletion, paternal uniparental disomy, and a nondeleted nondisomic form. (Author/JDD)

  5. DNA barcoding common non-native freshwater fish species in Turkey: low genetic diversity but high population structuring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Emre; Ağdamar, Sevan; Tarkan, Ali Serhan

    2013-06-01

    Negative impacts of introduced non-native freshwater species on native species have been increasingly recognized in the world as well as in Turkey. However, there has been relatively little attention on genetic characterization of alien freshwater fishes in their non-native distribution range and virtually no study has been conducted in Turkey despite its crucial importance in invasion biology. The purpose of this study was to elucidate genetic diversity of common non-native freshwater fish species (Carassius auratus, Carassius gibelio, Gambusia holbrooki, Lepomis gibbosus, and Pseudorasbora parva) using mitochondrial Cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences; known as DNA barcodes. Through the whole dataset, seventeen haplotypes (haplotype diversity = 0.8908) were found containing 145 COI sequences. Mean Kimura two-parameter genetic distances were calculated as 0.209 for interspecific distance and 0.009 for intraspecific variation. COI barcode diversity among populations of the same species was found to be low, especially for C. gibelio, G. holbrooki, and L. gibbosus populations which were 0.5%, 0.6%, and 0.3%, respectively. Our results clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of the DNA barcoding approach both for identifications at species level and revealing intraspecific variation among populations, which could be used for effective management measures for invasive species and conservation strategies for indigenous and endemic species.

  6. Modelling decisions to undergo genetic testing for susceptibility to common health conditions: an ancillary study of the Multiplex Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Christopher H; Shiloh, Shoshana; Woolford, Samuel W; Roberts, J Scott; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Marteau, Theresa M; Biesecker, Barbara B

    2012-01-01

    New genetic tests reveal risks for multiple conditions simultaneously, although little is understood about the psychological factors that affect testing uptake. We assessed a conceptual model called the multiplex genetic testing model (MGTM) using structural equation modelling. The MGTM delineates worry, perceived severity, perceived risk, response efficacy and attitudes towards testing as predictors of intentions and behaviour. Participants were 270 healthy insured adults aged 25-40 from the Multiplex Initiative conducted within a health care system in Detroit, MI, USA. Participants were offered a genetic test that assessed risk for eight common health conditions. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that worry, perceived risk and severity clustered into two disease domains: cancer or metabolic conditions. Only perceived severity of metabolic conditions was correlated with general response efficacy (β = 0.13, ptesting (β = 0.24, ptesting were the strongest predictors of intentions to undergo testing (β = 0.49, ptesting uptake (OR 17.7, β = 0.97, ptesting for multiple health conditions.

  7. Genetic variation coincides with geographic structure in the common bush-tanager (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus) complex from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moreno, Jaime; Navarro-Sigüenza, Adolfo G; Peterson, A Townsend; Sánchez-González, Luis A

    2004-10-01

    Cloud forests are distributed in the Neotropics, from northern Mexico to Argentina, under very specific ecological conditions, namely slopes with high humidity input from clouds and mist. Its distribution in Mesoamerica is highly fragmented, similar to an archipelago, and taxa are thus frequently represented as sets of isolated populations, each restricted to particular mountain ranges and often showing a high degree of divergence, both morphologically and genetically. The common bush-tanager (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus, Aves: Thraupidae) inhabits cloud forests from eastern and southern Mexico south to northwestern Argentina. Here we use 676bp of mtDNA (around the ATPase 8 gene) to explore the genetic variation and phylogeographic structure of the Mexican populations of C. ophthalmicus. Phylogenetic analyses of mtDNA sequences indicate deep genetic structure. Five major clades, which segregate according to geographic breaks, are identified (starting from the deepest one in the phylogeny): (1) Southern Chiapas and Northern Central America, (2) Tuxtlas massif, (3) Sierra Madre del Sur, (4) Eastern Oaxaca and Northern Chiapas, and (5) Sierra Madre Oriental. The long history of isolation undergone by each clade, as suggested by the phylogeny, implies that the species status of each of them should be revised.

  8. Common genetic variations in Patched1 (PTCH1) gene and risk of hirschsprung disease in the Han Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Jun; Pan, Weihua; Zhou, Ying; Xiao, Yongtao; Zhou, Kejun; Wen, Jie; Yu, Tingxi; Cai, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is the most frequent genetic cause of congenital intestinal obstruction with an incidence of 1:5000 live births. In a pathway-based epistasis analysis of data generated by genome-wide association study on HSCR, specific genotype of Patched 1 (PTCH1) has been linked to an increased risk for HSCR. The aim of the present study is to examine the contribution of genetic variants in PTCH1 to the susceptibility to HSCR in Han Chinese. Accordingly, we assessed 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within PTCH1 gene in 104 subjects with sporadic HSCR and 151 normal controls of Han Chinese origin by the Sequenom MassArray technology (iPLEX GOLD). Two of the eight genetic markers were found to be significantly associated with Hirschsprung disease (rs357565, allele P = 0.005; rs2236405, allele P = 0.002, genotype P = 0.003). Both the C allele of rs357565 and the A allele of rs2236405 served as risk factors for HSCR. During haplotype analysis, one seven-SNP-based haplotype was the most significant, giving a global P = 0.0036. Our results firstly suggest common variations of PTCH1 may be involved in the altered risk for HSCR in the Han Chinese population, providing potential molecular markers for early diagnosis of Hirschsprung disease.

  9. Common genetic variations in Patched1 (PTCH1 gene and risk of hirschsprung disease in the Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is the most frequent genetic cause of congenital intestinal obstruction with an incidence of 1:5000 live births. In a pathway-based epistasis analysis of data generated by genome-wide association study on HSCR, specific genotype of Patched 1 (PTCH1 has been linked to an increased risk for HSCR. The aim of the present study is to examine the contribution of genetic variants in PTCH1 to the susceptibility to HSCR in Han Chinese. Accordingly, we assessed 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within PTCH1 gene in 104 subjects with sporadic HSCR and 151 normal controls of Han Chinese origin by the Sequenom MassArray technology (iPLEX GOLD. Two of the eight genetic markers were found to be significantly associated with Hirschsprung disease (rs357565, allele P = 0.005; rs2236405, allele P = 0.002, genotype P = 0.003. Both the C allele of rs357565 and the A allele of rs2236405 served as risk factors for HSCR. During haplotype analysis, one seven-SNP-based haplotype was the most significant, giving a global P = 0.0036. Our results firstly suggest common variations of PTCH1 may be involved in the altered risk for HSCR in the Han Chinese population, providing potential molecular markers for early diagnosis of Hirschsprung disease.

  10. Systems-level quantification of division timing reveals a common genetic architecture controlling asynchrony and fate asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Vincy Wing Sze; Wong, Ming-Kin; An, Xiaomeng; Guan, Daogang; Shao, Jiaofang; Ng, Hon Chun Kaoru; Ren, Xiaoliang; He, Kan; Liao, Jinyue; Ang, Yingjin; Chen, Long; Huang, Xiaotai; Yan, Bin; Xia, Yiji; Chan, Leanne Lai Hang; Chow, King Lau; Yan, Hong; Zhao, Zhongying

    2015-01-01

    Coordination of cell division timing is crucial for proper cell fate specification and tissue growth. However, the differential regulation of cell division timing across or within cell types during metazoan development remains poorly understood. To elucidate the systems-level genetic architecture coordinating division timing, we performed a high-content screening for genes whose depletion produced a significant reduction in the asynchrony of division between sister cells (ADS) compared to that of wild-type during Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. We quantified division timing using 3D time-lapse imaging followed by computer-aided lineage analysis. A total of 822 genes were selected for perturbation based on their conservation and known roles in development. Surprisingly, we find that cell fate determinants are not only essential for establishing fate asymmetry, but also are imperative for setting the ADS regardless of cellular context, indicating a common genetic architecture used by both cellular processes. The fate determinants demonstrate either coupled or separate regulation between the two processes. The temporal coordination appears to facilitate cell migration during fate specification or tissue growth. Our quantitative dataset with cellular resolution provides a resource for future analyses of the genetic control of spatial and temporal coordination during metazoan development. PMID:26063786

  11. Defective folding and rapid degradation of mutant proteins is a common disease mechanism in genetic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N; Bross, P; Jørgensen, M M

    2000-01-01

    Many disease-causing point mutations do not seriously compromise synthesis of the affected polypeptide but rather exert their effects by impairing subsequent protein folding or stability of the folded protein. This often results in rapid degradation of the affected protein. The concepts...

  12. Defective folding and rapid degradation of mutant proteins is a common disease mechanism in genetic disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Bross, Peter; Jørgensen, Malene Munk

    2000-01-01

    Many disease-causing point mutations do not seriously compromise synthesis of the affected polypeptides but rather exert their effects by impairing subsequent protein folding or stability of the folded protein. This often results in rapid degradation of the affected protein. The concepts...

  13. Eight common genetic variants associated with serum dheas levels suggest a key role in ageing mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Zhai (Guangju); A. Teumer (Alexander); L. Stolk (Lisette); J.R.B. Perry (John); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); A. Koster (Annemarie); J.T. Bell (Jordana); S. Bhasin (Shalender); J. Eriksson (Joel); F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); D. Glass (Daniel); E. Grundberg (Elin); R. Haring (Robin); A.K. HedmanÅ; A. Hofman (Albert); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); Y. Liu (Yongmei); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); M. Maggio (Marcello); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); M. Mangino (Massimo); D. Melzer (David); I. Miljkovic (Iva); A. Nica (Alexandra); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); R.S. Vasan (Ramachandran Srini); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); K.S. Small (Kerrin); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); H. Völzke (Henry); S.G. Wilson (Scott); L. Xi (Li); W.V. Zhuang; F.H. de Jong (Frank); T.B. Harris (Tamara); J. Murabito (Joanne); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A. Murray (Anna); T.D. Spector (Timothy); H. Wallaschofski (Henri)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) is the most abundant circulating steroid secreted by adrenal glands-yet its function is unknown. Its serum concentration declines significantly with increasing age, which has led to speculation that a relative DHEAS deficiency may contribute to the

  14. Andrographolide: antibacterial activity against common bacteria of human health concern and possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Malabika; Parai, Debaprasad; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Mukherjee, Samir Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Increasing bacterial resistance to common drugs is a major public health concern for the treatment of infectious diseases. Certain naturally occurring compounds of plant sources have long been reported to possess potential antimicrobial activity. This study was aimed to investigate the antibacterial activity and possible mechanism of action of andrographolide (Andro), a diterpenoid lactone from a traditional medicinal herb Andrographis paniculata. Extent of antibacterial action was assessed by minimal bactericidal concentration method. Radiolabeled N-acetyl glucosamine, leucine, thymidine, and uridine were used to determine the effect of Andro on the biosyntheses of cell wall, protein, DNA, and RNA, respectively. In addition, anti-biofilm potential of this compound was also tested. Andro showed potential antibacterial activity against most of the tested Gram-positive bacteria. Among those, Staphylococcus aureus was found to be most sensitive with a minimal inhibitory concentration value of 100 μg/mL. It was found to be bacteriostatic. Specific inhibition of intracellular DNA biosynthesis was observed in a dose-dependent manner in S. aureus. Andro mediated inhibition of biofilm formation by S. aureus was also found. Considering its antimicrobial potency, Andro might be accounted as a promising lead for new antibacterial drug development.

  15. Common therapeutic mechanisms of pallidal deep brain stimulation for hypo- and hyperkinetic movement disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriki, Atsushi; Isoda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Abnormalities in cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) networks can cause a variety of movement disorders ranging from hypokinetic disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), to hyperkinetic conditions, such as Tourette syndrome (TS). Each condition is characterized by distinct patterns of abnormal neural discharge (dysrhythmia) at both the local single-neuron level and the global network level. Despite divergent etiologies, behavioral phenotypes, and neurophysiological profiles, high-frequency deep brain stimulation (HF-DBS) in the basal ganglia has been shown to be effective for both hypo- and hyperkinetic disorders. The aim of this review is to compare and contrast the electrophysiological hallmarks of PD and TS phenotypes in nonhuman primates and discuss why the same treatment (HF-DBS targeted to the globus pallidus internus, GPi-DBS) is capable of ameliorating both symptom profiles. Recent studies have shown that therapeutic GPi-DBS entrains the spiking of neurons located in the vicinity of the stimulating electrode, resulting in strong stimulus-locked modulations in firing probability with minimal changes in the population-scale firing rate. This stimulus effect normalizes/suppresses the pathological firing patterns and dysrhythmia that underlie specific phenotypes in both the PD and TS models. We propose that the elimination of pathological states via stimulus-driven entrainment and suppression, while maintaining thalamocortical network excitability within a normal physiological range, provides a common therapeutic mechanism through which HF-DBS permits information transfer for purposive motor behavior through the CBG while ameliorating conditions with widely different symptom profiles. PMID:26180116

  16. A dominant-negative mutant inhibits multiple prion variants through a common mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fen Pei

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Prions adopt alternative, self-replicating protein conformations and thereby determine novel phenotypes that are often irreversible. Nevertheless, dominant-negative prion mutants can revert phenotypes associated with some conformations. These observations suggest that, while intervention is possible, distinct inhibitors must be developed to overcome the conformational plasticity of prions. To understand the basis of this specificity, we determined the impact of the G58D mutant of the Sup35 prion on three of its conformational variants, which form amyloids in S. cerevisiae. G58D had been previously proposed to have unique effects on these variants, but our studies suggest a common mechanism. All variants, including those reported to be resistant, are inhibited by G58D but at distinct doses. G58D lowers the kinetic stability of the associated amyloid, enhancing its fragmentation by molecular chaperones, promoting Sup35 resolubilization, and leading to amyloid clearance particularly in daughter cells. Reducing the availability or activity of the chaperone Hsp104, even transiently, reverses curing. Thus, the specificity of inhibition is determined by the sensitivity of variants to the mutant dosage rather than mode of action, challenging the view that a unique inhibitor must be developed to combat each variant.

  17. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... function. When a residue identified as mutated in an individual suspected of Lynch syndrome is listed as critical in such a reverse diagnosis catalog, there is a high probability that the corresponding human VUS is pathogenic. To investigate the applicability of this approach, we have generated....... Nearly half of these critical residues match with VUS previously identified in individuals suspected of Lynch syndrome. This aids in the assignment of pathogenicity to these human VUS and validates the approach described here as a diagnostic tool. In a wider perspective, this work provides a model...

  18. [Genetic mechanism and evolutionary significance of the origin of parthenogenetic insects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Ye

    2011-12-01

    There is a high proportion of parthenogenesis in insecta, and the parthenogenetic potential of insects is an important but often ignored threaten factor for the agricultural and forestry production. The maintenance of parthenogenetic species is a puzzling issue in evolutionary biology. In recent years, although the cellular mechanisms during parthenogenesis in some species have been well studied, the underlying genetic mechanisms that cause the switch from sexual reproduction to parthenogenesis have not been defined. While, understanding the genetic mechanism and evolutionary significance of the origin of parthenogenetic insects is crucial for preventing the pests in agricultural and forestry production. Here we summarized recent studies aimed at identifying the underlying genetic mechanism of parthenogenesis in insects, and briefly discussed its potential application in this filed.

  19. Measures and mechanisms of common ground: backchannels, conversational repair, and interactive alignmentin free and task-oriented social interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian; Madsen, Katrine Garly

    A crucial aspect of everyday conversational interactions is our ability to establish and maintain common ground. Understanding the relevant mechanisms involved in such social coordination remains an important challenge for cognitive science. While common ground is often discussed in very general ...

  20. Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov., an indigenous N2-fixing symbiont of the Ecuadorian common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genetic pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Martins, Talita Busulini; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Marçon Delamuta, Jakeline Renata; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-09-01

    There are two major centres of genetic diversification of common bean (Phaseolus vilgaris L.), the Mesoamerican and the Andean, and the legume is capable of establishing nitrogen-fixing symbioses with several rhizobia; Rhizobium etli seems to be the dominant species in both centres. Another genetic pool of common bean, in Peru and Ecuador, is receiving increasing attention, and studies of microsymbionts from the region can help to increase our knowledge about coevolution of this symbiosis. We have previously reported several putative new lineages from this region and here present data indicating that strains belonging to one of them, PEL4, represent a novel species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, PEL4 strains are positioned in the Rhizobium phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade, but show unique properties in several morphological, physiological and biochemical analyses, as well as in BOX-PCR profiles ( Rhizobium fabae. DNA-DNA hybridization ( Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov. The type strain is CNPSo 671(T) ( = UMR 1450(T) = PIMAMPIRS I 5(T) = LMG 27578(T)).

  1. Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms in Bacteria: Biochemical and Genetic Aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Džidić, Senka; Šušković, Jagoda; Kos, Blaženka

    2008-01-01

    Since the discovery and subsequent widespread use of antibiotics, a variety of bacterial species of human and animal origin have developed numerous mechanisms that render bacteria resistant to some, and in certain cases to nearly all antibiotics. There are many important pathogens that are resistant to multiple antibiotic classes, and infections caused by multidrug resistant (MDR) organisms are limiting treatment options and compromising effective therapy. So the emergence of antibiotic-resis...

  2. Physiological, Molecular and Genetic Mechanisms of Long-Term Habituation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calin-Jageman, Robert J

    2009-09-12

    Work funded on this grant has explored the mechanisms of long-term habituation, a ubiquitous form of learning that plays a key role in basic cognitive functioning. Specifically, behavioral, physiological, and molecular mechanisms of habituation have been explored using a simple model system, the tail-elicited siphon-withdrawal reflex (T-SWR) in the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Substantial progress has been made on the first and third aims, providing some fundamental insights into the mechanisms by which memories are stored. We have characterized the physiological correlates of short- and long-term habituation. We found that short-term habituation is accompanied by a robust sensory adaptation, whereas long-term habituation is accompanied by alterations in sensory and interneuron synaptic efficacy. Thus, our data indicates memories can be shifted between different sites in a neural network as they are consolidated from short to long term. At the molecular level, we have accomplished microarray analysis comparing gene expression in both habituated and control ganglia. We have identified a network of putatively regulated transcripts that seems particularly targeted towards synaptic changes (e.g. SNAP25, calmodulin) . We are now beginning additional work to confirm regulation of these transcripts and build a more detailed understanding of the cascade of molecular events leading to the permanent storage of long-term memories. On the third aim, we have fostered a nascent neuroscience program via a variety of successful initiatives. We have funded over 11 undergraduate neuroscience scholars, several of whom have been recognized at national and regional levels for their research. We have also conducted a pioneering summer research program for community college students which is helping enhance access of underrepresented groups to life science careers. Despite minimal progress on the second aim, this project has provided a) novel insight into the network mechanisms by

  3. Genetic diversity of common bean accessions from former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia as revealed by molecular and morphological markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maras Marko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of common bean has a long tradition in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM and is still nowadays important part of the human diet. In a study reported here 71 accessions from the FYROM were assessed for genetic diversity with the aim to provide information on genetic structure of Macedonian common bean germplasm and to depict its peculiarities. A total of 71 accessions were assessed using 13 microsatellite and 16 morphological markers. The average number of alleles per microsatellite was 5.8, and ranged from three to 16 alleles. High capacity of selected markers for distinguishing genotypes was identified by the calculation of a very low value of probability of identity. The relationship among 71 studied accessions was assessed by hierarchical cluster analysis. A very clear separation of accessions into two groups was observed in the UPGMA dendrogram. The larger represented Andean gene pool and contained 40 accessions (56% of total, while the other 31 accessions (44% of total composed Mesoamerican gene pool. The two groups were successfully discriminated by eight morphological traits. Within the larger Andean cluster in the UPGMA dendrogram a sub-group of 16 climbing accessions was separated from 24 bush accessions. The absence of the string in the pods of the climbers suggests that this sub-group comprises snap beans grown primarily for their fresh pods. There were eight morphological traits in total that distinguished the two Andean sub-groups. Assessment of genetic relationship among accessions, their classification into respective gene pool and identification of morphological peculiarities provided valuable information for the management of plant gene bank and Macedonian bean breeding program.

  4. Additional evidence supports association of common genetic variants in VTI1A and ETFA with increased risk of glioma susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Deng, Zhong; Wang, Maode; Li, Ruichun; Xu, Gaofeng; Bao, Gang

    2017-04-15

    VTI1A and ETFA were identified recently as susceptibility genes for non-glioblastoma (GBM) of glioma risk in European populations, but the genetic etiology and pathogenesis of glioma have not been fully elucidated. Here, we aimed to investigate whether common genetic variants in VTI1A and ETFA predispose Han Chinese individuals to glioma. The association of thirteen common tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in VTI1A and ETFA genes with glioma were assessed in a hospital-based case-control study including 473 non-GBM of glioma patients and 1046 cancer-free controls. Two SNPs (rs11196067 in VTI1A and rs1801591 in ETFA) were found to be significantly associated with non-GBM of glioma risk (rs11196067, adjusted P=0.00018, adjusted odds ratio (OR)=1.37, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.16-1.61; rs1801591, adjusted P=0.000022, adjusted OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.34-2.20). In further stratified analysis, they were both more pronounced in the adult subgroup. In haplotype-based analysis, two haplotypes were identified to be significant association with glioma. The haplotype "TGA" (P=0.002) in VTI1A and the haplotype "ACA" (Pglioma risk respectively, compared with corresponding non-carriers. In summary, our results indicate that genetic variants in VTI1A and ETFA may modify individual susceptibility to non-GBM of glioma in the Han Chinese population and support the role of the VTI1A and ETFA genes in the occurrence of glioma. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of Common Genetic Variants With Contralateral Breast Cancer Risk in the WECARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, Mark E; Reiner, Anne S; Brooks, Jennifer D; Concannon, Patrick J; John, Esther M; Mellemkjaer, Lene; Bernstein, Leslie; Malone, Kathleen E; Knight, Julia A; Lynch, Charles F; Woods, Meghan; Liang, Xiaolin; Haile, Robert W; Duggan, David J; Shore, Roy E; Smith, Susan A; Thomas, Duncan C; Stram, Daniel O; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2017-10-01

    Women with unilateral breast cancer (UBC) are at risk of developing a subsequent contralateral breast cancer (CBC). Common variants are associated with breast cancer risk. Whether these influence CBC risk is unknown. Participants were breast cancer cases from the population-based Women's Environmental Cancer and Radiation Epidemiology (WECARE) Study. Sixty-seven established breast cancer risk loci were genotyped directly or by imputation in 1459 case subjects with CBC and 2126 UBC control subjects. An unweighted polygenic risk score (PRS) was created by summing the number of risk alleles for each directly genotyped single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), or for imputed loci, the imputed dosage. A weighted PRS was calculated similarly, but where each SNP's contribution was weighted by the published per-allele log odds ratio. Unweighted and weighted polygenic risk scores and CBC risk were modeled using conditional logistic regression. Cumulative CBC risk was estimated and benchmarked using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results population incidence rates. Both unweighted and weighted PRS were statistically significantly associated with CBC risk. The adjusted risk ratio of CBC in women in the upper quartile of unweighted PRS compared with the lowest quartile was 1.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.33 to 2.00). The estimated 10-year cumulative risk for women in the upper quartile of the unweighted PRS was 7.4% (95% CI = 6.0% to 9.1%). For women in the upper quartile of the weighted PRS, the risk ratio for CBC was 1.75 (95% CI = 1.41 to 2.18) compared with women in the lowest quartile. There was no statistically significant heterogeneity by age, treatment (radiation therapy dose, tamoxifen, chemotherapy), estrogen receptor status of the first primary, histology of the first primary, length of at-risk period for CBC, or breast cancer family history. Common genomic variants associated with the development of first primary breast cancer are also associated

  6. Knowledge Sharing among University Students Facilitated with a Creative Commons Licensing Mechanism: A Case Study in a Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Lin, Chia-Ching; Chang, Chun-Yi; Chao, Po-Yao

    2014-01-01

    Creative Commons (CC) mechanism has been suggested as a potential means to foster a reliable environment for online knowledge sharing activity. This study investigates the role of the CC mechanism in supporting knowledge sharing among a group of university students studying programming from the perspectives of social cognitive and social capital…

  7. [Genetics of congenital color vision defects. I. Common types of color blindness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyński, M R

    1995-01-01

    Normal human colour vision is based on the presence of 3 kinds of cones containing 3 different visual pigments, sensitive to short (blue), middle (green) and long (red) wavelengths. Congenital defects of colour vision are based on handicap or total loss of these pigments' function, usually a result of changes in their coding genes. The common types of colour blindness, referred to red-green axis, are present in about 8% of males and 0.44% of females. 3/4 of them are deuteranopes or deuteranomalous trichromats and 1/4 of them are protanopes or protanomalous trichromats. All of them are inherited in X-linked recessive way. The genes have been already mapped and sequenced. The cause of the great majority of their changes is nonhomologous recombination, which produces a gene deletion or creates the red-green or green-red hybrid genes. The result of that is the production of visual pigment with partly or totally changed spectral sensitivity.

  8. Seven common mistakes in population genetics and how to avoid them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirmans, Patrick G

    2015-07-01

    As the data resulting from modern genotyping tools are astoundingly complex, genotyping studies require great care in the sampling design, genotyping, data analysis and interpretation. Such care is necessary because, with data sets containing thousands of loci, small biases can easily become strongly significant patterns. Such biases may already be present in routine tasks that are present in almost every genotyping study. Here, I discuss seven common mistakes that can be frequently encountered in the genotyping literature: (i) giving more attention to genotyping than to sampling, (ii) failing to perform or report experimental randomization in the laboratory, (iii) equating geopolitical borders with biological borders, (iv) testing significance of clustering output, (v) misinterpreting Mantel's r statistic, (vi) only interpreting a single value of k and (vii) forgetting that only a small portion of the genome will be associated with climate. For every of those issues, I give some suggestions how to avoid the mistake. Overall, I argue that genotyping studies would benefit from establishing a more rigorous experimental design, involving proper sampling design, randomization and better distinction of a priori hypotheses and exploratory analyses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Integrating molecular mechanisms into quantitative genetics to understand consistent individual differences in behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Alison M; Dochtermann, Ned A

    2015-12-01

    It is now well appreciated that individual animals behave differently from one another and that individual differences in behaviors-personality differences-are maintained through time and across situations. Quantitative genetics has emerged as a conceptual basis for understanding the key ingredients of personality: (co)variation and plasticity. However, the results from quantitative genetic analyses are often divorced from underlying molecular or other proximate mechanisms. This disconnect has the potential to impede an integrated understanding of behavior and is a disconnect present throughout evolutionary ecology. Here we discuss some of the main conceptual connections between personality and quantitative genetics, the relationship of both with genomic tools, and areas that require integration. With its consideration of both trait variation and plasticity, the study of animal personality offers new opportunities to incorporate molecular mechanisms into both the trait partitioning and reaction norm frameworks provided by quantitative genetics.

  10. A dual physiological character for cerebral mechanisms of sexuality and cognition: common somatic peripheral afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motofei, Ion G

    2011-11-01

    The dual theory of sexuality is a work in progress that tries to put together all the significant physiological aspects described on this subject, the most recent published article discussing about the hormonal and pheromonal neuromodulation of somatic peripheral afferents. But sexuality and cognition shares common somatic peripheral afferents, so that a good understanding of sexual mechanisms supposes also a good knowledge of the essential psychological mechanisms/neuromodulators. Current psychological approaches could be limited to two general tendencies. Some authors consider that cerebral neuronal connexions generate a unitary network substrate that - increasing in its complexity - becomes compatible with our complex mental function. Others suggest that such a complex cerebral function correspond actually to a system based on subsystems, represented by distinct neuronal units (not necessarily complexes) that interact each other. Starting from basic somatic/sexual neurophysiological elements and general accepted psychological aspects, the discussion gave sense to the last point of view, namely that genesis of a new function is the result of cooperation between distinct structural and functional units. Contrary to the classical concepts, this paper sows the fact that mental perception corresponds actually (in term of touch/tangibility) to the internal representation of an external object while sensations realize an internal representation of the external characteristics of environmental object. As a conclusion, sexuality and cognition are two distinct autonomic/dual functions, interrelated at both cerebral and peripheral level. Peripheral interference implies intervention of some specific (mental and sexual) neuromodulators, making external information act as internal mental or internal sexual stimuli. Central cerebral interferences are also clinically and pharmacologically documented, specific neuromodulators being taken into account. Supplementary studies would

  11. Common cancers share familial susceptibility: implications for cancer genetics and counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongyao; Frank, Christoph; Sundquist, Jan; Hemminki, Akseli; Hemminki, Kari

    2017-04-01

    It has been proposed that cancer is more common in some families than in others, but the hypothesis lacks population level support. We use a novel approach by studying any cancers in large three-generation families and thus are able to find risks even though penetrance is low. Individuals in the nation-wide Swedish Family-Cancer Database were organised in three generations and the relative risk (RR) of cancer was calculated to the persons in the third generation by the numbers of patients with cancer in generations 1, 2 and 3. The RRs for any cancer in generation 3 increased by the numbers of affected relatives, reaching 1.61 when at least seven relatives were diagnosed. The median patient had two affected relatives, and 7.0% had five or more affected relatives with an RR of 1.46, which translated to an absolute risk of 21.5% compared with 14.7% in population by age 65 years. For prostate cancer, the RR was 2.85 with four or more affected family members with any cancer, and it increased to 14.42 with four or more concordant cancers in family members. RRs for prostate cancer were approximately equal (2.70 vs 2.85) if a man had one relative with prostate cancer or four or more relatives diagnosed with any cancer. A strong family history of cancer, regardless of tumour type, increases cancer risk of family members and calls for mechanistic explanations. Our data provide tools for counselling of patients with cancer with both low and high familiar risks. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Quantitative assessment of common genetic variants on FOXE1 and differentiated thyroid cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongling Zhu

    Full Text Available Forkhead box E1 encodes the transcription factor FOXE1 (or TTF-2, which together with Homeobox protein NKX2-1, PAX8 and HHEX, are pivotal proteins required for thyroid gland formation, differentiation and function. Recently, genome-wide association studies have identified FOXE1 as a thyroid cancer (TC susceptibility gene in populations of European descent. After that, a number of studies reported that the rs965513, rs1867277, and rs71369530 polymorphism in FOXE1 has been implicated in TC risk. However, the causal variants remain unknown. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis of 9,828 TC cases and 109,995 controls from 14 case-control studies was performed. Overall, significant results were observed for rs965513 (OR=1.71, 95% CI: 1.59-1.85, P<10(-5, rs1867277 (OR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.51-1.78, P<10(-5 and rs71369530 (OR=2.01, 95% CI: 1.66-2.44, P<10(-5 polymorphism. In the subgroup analysis by ethnicity, we found that rs965513 polymorphism confer high risk for Caucasians with per-allele OR of 1.80 (95% CI: 1.69-1.92, P<10(-5 compared to East Asians of 1.35 (95% CI: 1.09-1.67, P=0.006. There was strong evidence of heterogeneity, which largely disappeared after stratification by ethnicity. In the subgroup analysis by sample size, and study design, significantly increased risks were found for the polymorphism. In conclusion, this meta-analysis demonstrated that common variations of FOXE1 are a risk factor associated with increased TC susceptibility.

  13. Integrating molecular mechanisms into quantitative genetics to understand consistent individual differences in behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Alison M.; Dochtermann, Ned A.

    2015-01-01

    It is now well appreciated that individual animals behave differently from one another and that individual differences in behaviors—personality differences—are maintained through time and across situations. Quantitative genetics has emerged as a conceptual basis for understanding the key ingredients of personality: (co)variation and plasticity. However, the results from quantitative genetic analyses are often divorced from underlying molecular or other proximate mechanisms. This disconnect ha...

  14. Mycobacterial F420H2-Dependent Reductases Promiscuously Reduce Diverse Compounds through a Common Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Greening

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An unusual aspect of actinobacterial metabolism is the use of the redox cofactor F420. Studies have shown that actinobacterial F420H2-dependent reductases promiscuously hydrogenate diverse organic compounds in biodegradative and biosynthetic processes. These enzymes therefore represent promising candidates for next-generation industrial biocatalysts. In this work, we undertook the first broad survey of these enzymes as potential industrial biocatalysts by exploring the extent, as well as mechanistic and structural bases, of their substrate promiscuity. We expressed and purified 11 enzymes from seven subgroups of the flavin/deazaflavin oxidoreductase (FDOR superfamily (A1, A2, A3, B1, B2, B3, B4 from the model soil actinobacterium Mycobacterium smegmatis. These enzymes reduced compounds from six chemical classes, including fundamental monocycles such as a cyclohexenone, a dihydropyran, and pyrones, as well as more complex quinone, coumarin, and arylmethane compounds. Substrate range and reduction rates varied between the enzymes, with the A1, A3, and B1 groups exhibiting greatest promiscuity. Molecular docking studies suggested that structurally diverse compounds are accommodated in the large substrate-binding pocket of the most promiscuous FDOR through hydrophobic interactions with conserved aromatic residues and the isoalloxazine headgroup of F420H2. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS analysis of derivatized reaction products showed reduction occurred through a common mechanism involving hydride transfer from F420H- to the electron-deficient alkene groups of substrates. Reduction occurs when the hydride donor (C5 of F420H- is proximal to the acceptor (electrophilic alkene of the substrate. These findings suggest that engineered actinobacterial F420H2-dependent reductases are promising novel biocatalysts for the facile transformation of a wide range of α,β-unsaturated compounds.

  15. A common cortical circuit mechanism for perceptual categorical discrimination and veridical judgment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2008-12-01

    Perception involves two types of decisions about the sensory world: identification of stimulus features as analog quantities, or discrimination of the same stimulus features among a set of discrete alternatives. Veridical judgment and categorical discrimination have traditionally been conceptualized as two distinct computational problems. Here, we found that these two types of decision making can be subserved by a shared cortical circuit mechanism. We used a continuous recurrent network model to simulate two monkey experiments in which subjects were required to make either a two-alternative forced choice or a veridical judgment about the direction of random-dot motion. The model network is endowed with a continuum of bell-shaped population activity patterns, each representing a possible motion direction. Slow recurrent excitation underlies accumulation of sensory evidence, and its interplay with strong recurrent inhibition leads to decision behaviors. The model reproduced the monkey's performance as well as single-neuron activity in the categorical discrimination task. Furthermore, we examined how direction identification is determined by a combination of sensory stimulation and microstimulation. Using a population-vector measure, we found that direction judgments instantiate winner-take-all (with the population vector coinciding with either the coherent motion direction or the electrically elicited motion direction) when two stimuli are far apart, or vector averaging (with the population vector falling between the two directions) when two stimuli are close to each other. Interestingly, for a broad range of intermediate angular distances between the two stimuli, the network displays a mixed strategy in the sense that direction estimates are stochastically produced by winner-take-all on some trials and by vector averaging on the other trials, a model prediction that is experimentally testable. This work thus lends support to a common neurodynamic framework for both

  16. Genetic and environmental modification of the mechanical properties of wood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sederoff, R.; Allona, I.; Whetten, R.

    1996-02-01

    Wood is one of the nation's leading raw materials and is used for a wide variety of products, either directly as wood, or as derived materials in pulp and paper. Wood is a biological material and evolved to provide mechanical support and water transport to the early plants that conquered the land. Wood is a tissue that results from the differentiation and programmed cell death of cells that derive from a tissue known as the vascular cambium. The vascular cambium is a thin cylinder of undifferentiated tissue in plant stems and roots that gives rise to several different cell types. Cells that differentiate on the internal side of the cambium form xylem, a tissue composed in major part, of long thin cells that die leaving a network of interconnected cell walls that serve to transport water and to provide mechanical support for the woody plant. The shape and chemical composition of the cells in xylem are well suited for these functions. The structure of cells in xylem determines the mechanical properties of the wood because of the strength derived from the reinforced matrix of the wall. The hydrophobic phenolic surface of the inside of the cell walls is essential to maintain surface tension upon which water transport is based and to resist decay caused by microorganisms. The properties of wood derived from the function of xylem also determine its structural and chemical properties as wood and paper products. Therefore, the physical and chemical properties of wood and paper products also depend on the morphology and composition of the cells from which they are derived. Wood (xylem cell walls) is an anisotropic material, a composite of lignocellulose. It is a matrix of cellulose microfibrils, complexed with hemicelluloses, (carbohydrate polymers which contain sugars other than glucose, both pentoses and hexoses), embedded together in a phenolic matrix of lignin. The high tensile strength of wood in the longitudinal direction, is due to the structure of cellulose and the

  17. Mammalian life histories: their evolution and molecular-genetic mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacher, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Survival curves for various species of mammals are discussed and a table is presented to show recorded maximum life spans of about 30 species of mammals. The range of longevities is from one year for shrews and moles up to more than 80 years for the fin whale. The constitutional correlates of longevity are discussed with regard to body size, brain weight,metabolic rates, and body temperature. It is concluded that longevity evolved as a positive trait, associated with the evolution of large body size and brain size. Life table data for man, the thorough-bred horse, beagle dogs, and the laboratory rodents, Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus are discussed. The data show a pattern of exponential increase of death rate with age. A laboratory model using Mus musculus and Peromyscus leucopus for the study of the longevity-assurance mechanisms is described. (HLW)

  18. [The genetic toxicity and toxicology mechanism of metal nano materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liping; Wang, Zhidong; Zhou, Pingkun

    2015-09-01

    Although metal nano materials have been widely used in various fields, the potential risks of it still could not be neglected. In this paper, the effects and mechanisms of genotoxicity caused by different nano materials were discussed. Human body can be exposed to metal nano materials through multiple pathways, metals nano follow the blood stream in circulatory system and distribute to organs. Metal nano particles are mainly uptaken into cells by endocytosis, and direct or indirect damages to genes can be induced by these particles after metabolism in cells. These damages would affect the course of cell cycle and the stability of the genome, resulting in gene mutation or chromosome aberration, and even leading to the death or malignant transformation of cells.

  19. Systems genetics: a paradigm to improve discovery of candidate genes and mechanisms underlying complex traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltus, F Alex

    2014-06-01

    Understanding the control of any trait optimally requires the detection of causal genes, gene interaction, and mechanism of action to discover and model the biochemical pathways underlying the expressed phenotype. Functional genomics techniques, including RNA expression profiling via microarray and high-throughput DNA sequencing, allow for the precise genome localization of biological information. Powerful genetic approaches, including quantitative trait locus (QTL) and genome-wide association study mapping, link phenotype with genome positions, yet genetics is less precise in localizing the relevant mechanistic information encoded in DNA. The coupling of salient functional genomic signals with genetically mapped positions is an appealing approach to discover meaningful gene-phenotype relationships. Techniques used to define this genetic-genomic convergence comprise the field of systems genetics. This short review will address an application of systems genetics where RNA profiles are associated with genetically mapped genome positions of individual genes (eQTL mapping) or as gene sets (co-expression network modules). Both approaches can be applied for knowledge independent selection of candidate genes (and possible control mechanisms) underlying complex traits where multiple, likely unlinked, genomic regions might control specific complex traits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic and systems level analysis of Drosophila sticky/citron kinase and dFmr1 mutants reveals common regulation of genetic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarnescu Daniela C

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Drosophila, the genes sticky and dFmr1 have both been shown to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics and chromatin structure. These genes also genetically interact with Argonaute family microRNA regulators. Furthermore, in mammalian systems, both genes have been implicated in neuronal development. Given these genetic and functional similarities, we tested Drosophila sticky and dFmr1 for a genetic interaction and measured whole genome expression in both mutants to assess similarities in gene regulation. Results We found that sticky mutations can dominantly suppress a dFmr1 gain-of-function phenotype in the developing eye, while phenotypes produced by RNAi knock-down of sticky were enhanced by dFmr1 RNAi and a dFmr1 loss-of-function mutation. We also identified a large number of transcripts that were misexpressed in both mutants suggesting that sticky and dFmr1 gene products similarly regulate gene expression. By integrating gene expression data with a protein-protein interaction network, we found that mutations in sticky and dFmr1 resulted in misexpression of common gene networks, and consequently predicted additional specific phenotypes previously not known to be associated with either gene. Further phenotypic analyses validated these predictions. Conclusion These findings establish a functional link between two previously unrelated genes. Microarray analysis indicates that sticky and dFmr1 are both required for regulation of many developmental genes in a variety of cell types. The diversity of transcripts regulated by these two genes suggests a clear cause of the pleiotropy that sticky and dFmr1 mutants display and provides many novel, testable hypotheses about the functions of these genes. As both of these genes are implicated in the development and function of the mammalian brain, these results have relevance to human health as well as to understanding more general biological processes.

  1. [Genetic and biochemical mechanisms of involvement of antioxidant defense enzymes in the development of bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonikov, A V; Ivanov, V P; Bogomazov, A D; Solodilova, M A

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we have analyzed and summarized recent literature data on genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for involvement of antioxidant defense enzymes in the etiology and pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. It has been shown that the mechanisms of asthma development are linked with genetically determined abnormalities in the functioning of antioxidant defense enzymes. These alterations are accompanied by a systemic imbalance between oxidative and anti-oxidative reactions with the shift of the redox state toward increased free radical production and oxidative stress, a key element in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma.

  2. Impaired Pavlovian fear extinction is a common phenotype across genetic lineages of the 129 inbred mouse strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, M; Norcross, M; Whittle, N; Feyder, M; D'Hanis, W; Yilmazer-Hanke, D; Singewald, N; Holmes, A

    2009-11-01

    Fear extinction is impaired in psychiatric disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder and schizophrenia, which have a major genetic component. However, the genetic factors underlying individual variability in fear extinction remain to be determined. By comparing a panel of inbred mouse strains, we recently identified a strain, 129S1/SvImJ (129S1), that exhibits a profound and selective deficit in Pavlovian fear extinction, and associated abnormalities in functional activation of a key prefrontal-amygdala circuit, as compared with C57BL/6J. The first aim of the present study was to assess fear extinction across multiple 129 substrains representing the strain's four different genetic lineages (parental, steel, teratoma and contaminated). Results showed that 129P1/ReJ, 129P3/J, 129T2/SvEmsJ and 129X1/SvJ exhibited poor fear extinction, relative to C57BL/6J, while 129S1 showed evidence of fear incubation. On the basis of these results, the second aim was to further characterize the nature and specificity of the extinction phenotype in 129S1, as an exemplar of the 129 substrains. Results showed that the extinction deficit in 129S1 was neither the result of a failure to habituate to a sensitized fear response nor an artifact of a fear response to (unconditioned) tone per se. A stronger conditioning protocol (i.e. five x higher intensity shocks) produced an increase in fear expression in 129S1, relative to C57BL/6J, due to rapid rise in freezing during tone presentation. Taken together, these data show that impaired fear extinction is a phenotypic feature common across 129 substrains, and provide preliminary evidence that impaired fear extinction in 129S1 may reflect a pro-fear incubation-like process.

  3. Nuclear internal transcribed spacer-1 as a sensitive genetic marker for environmental DNA studies in common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minamoto, Toshifumi; Uchii, Kimiko; Takahara, Teruhiko; Kitayoshi, Takumi; Tsuji, Satsuki; Yamanaka, Hiroki; Doi, Hideyuki

    2017-03-01

    The recently developed environmental DNA (eDNA) analysis has been used to estimate the distribution of aquatic vertebrates by using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a genetic marker. However, mtDNA markers have certain drawbacks such as variable copy number and maternal inheritance. In this study, we investigated the potential of using nuclear DNA (ncDNA) as a more reliable genetic marker for eDNA analysis by using common carp (Cyprinus carpio). We measured the copy numbers of cytochrome b (CytB) gene region of mtDNA and internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) region of ribosomal DNA of ncDNA in various carp tissues and then compared the detectability of these markers in eDNA samples. In the DNA extracted from the brain and gill tissues and intestinal contents, CytB was detected at 95.1 ± 10.7 (mean ± 1 standard error), 29.7 ± 1.59 and 24.0 ± 4.33 copies per cell, respectively, and ITS1 was detected at 1760 ± 343, 2880 ± 503 and 1910 ± 352 copies per cell, respectively. In the eDNA samples from mesocosm, pond and lake water, the copy numbers of ITS1 were about 160, 300 and 150 times higher than those of CytB, respectively. The minimum volume of pond water required for quantification was 33 and 100 mL for ITS1 and CytB, respectively. These results suggested that ITS1 is a more sensitive genetic marker for eDNA studies of C. carpio. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Population variation in total genetic risk of Hirschsprung disease from common RET, SEMA3 and NRG1 susceptibility polymorphisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Ashish; Jiang, Qian; Chatterjee, Sumantra; Chakraborty, Prakash; Sosa, Maria X.; Berrios, Courtney; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2015-01-01

    The risk of Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is ∼15/100 000 live births per newborn but has been reported to show significant inter-individual variation from the effects of seven common susceptibility alleles at the RET, SEMA3 and NRG1 loci. We show, by analyses of these variants in 997 samples from 376 HSCR families of European ancestry, that significant genetic risk can only be detected at RET (rs2435357 and rs2506030) and at SEMA3 (rs11766001), but not at NRG1. RET rs2435357 also showed significant frequency differences by gender, segment length of aganglionosis and familiality. Further, in combination, disease risk varied >30-fold between individuals with none and up to 6 susceptibility alleles. Thus, these polymorphisms can be used to stratify the newborn population into distinct phenotypic classes with defined risks to understand HSCR etiology. PMID:25666438

  5. Comarison between Three Common Remedial Exercises in Pain Severity of Patients with Mechanical CLBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Okhovatian

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of three common remedial exercises and then compare them in severity of pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain. Materials & Methods: 25 patients with same as level of physical activity and history of mechanical low back pain during 6-12 months ago invited to participate to this clinical trial. After routine physical exam, severity of pain and disability due to low back pain was evaluated with visual analog scale (VAS and Oswestry Questionnaire (OSWQ respectively. Patients distribute to three subgroups (stabilization exercise=10pateints, Williams exercise=8patients, McKenzie exercise=7patients. Means difference of pain score and OSWQ (disability index in all groups wasn't significant. Patients had done exercises according to name of their group during 12 weeks. At first all groups performed a complete set of exercises every day in 6 weeks. Then second 6 weeks exercises had done every other day (3 days per week. After testing the repeat ability of the parameters, reassessment of parameters was performed at the end of every 3 weeks. Data analysis was done with SPSS software. Friedman and Willcoxon tests were used for determination and analysis of data in three groups and then Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney was done for determination of differences between three groups. Results: Data showed that all exercise regimens can decrease pain and disability index (P<0.000l. Though decrease of pain and OSWQ in stabilization group was faster than the other groups (P<0.05. Conclusion: All exercise regimens due to their strengthening properties and special affects on muscles and joints of lumbopelvic region can decrease severity of pain even acute pain. But according to the effect of pain chronocity to surrounding tissues and receptors of lumbopelvic region and also central effect of pain (reorganization of motor cortex, which exercise can more effect than the other to this

  6. Genetic diversity, seed size associations and population structure of a core collection of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; Díaz, Lucy M; Buendía, Hector F; Duque, Myriam C

    2009-10-01

    Cultivated common bean germplasm is especially diverse due to the parallel domestication of two genepools in the Mesoamerican and Andean centers of diversity and introgression between these gene pools. Classification into morphological races has helped to provide a framework for utilization of this cultivated germplasm. Meanwhile, core collections along with molecular markers are useful tools for organizing and analyzing representative sets of these genotypes. In this study, we evaluated 604 accessions from the CIAT core germplasm collection representing wide genetic variability from both primary and secondary centers of diversity with a newly developed, fluorescent microsatellite marker set of 36 genomic and gene-based SSRs to determine molecular diversity and with seed protein analysis to determine phaseolin alleles. The entire collection could be divided into two genepools and five predominant races with the division between the Mesoamerica race and the Durango-Jalisco group showing strong support within the Mesoamerican genepool and the Nueva Granada and Peru races showing less diversity overall and some between-group admixture within the Andean genepool. The Chile race could not be distinguished within the Andean genepool but there was support for the Guatemala race within the Mesoamerican genepool and this race was unique in its high level of diversity and distance from other Mesoamerican races. Based on this population structure, significant associations were found between SSR loci and seed size characteristics, some on the same linkage group as the phaseolin locus, which previously had been associated with seed size, or in other regions of the genome. In conclusion, this study has shown that common bean has very significant population structure that can help guide the construction of genetic crosses that maximize diversity as well as serving as a basis for additional association studies.

  7. Association study of common genetic variants and HIV-1 acquisition in 6,300 infected cases and 7,200 controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaren, Paul J; Coulonges, Cédric; Ripke, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    that this association was due to the frailty bias in studies of lethal diseases. Further analyses including testing recessive genetic models, testing for bulk effects of non-genome-wide significant variants, stratifying by sexual or parenteral transmission risk and testing previously reported associations showed......Multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed in HIV-1 infected individuals, identifying common genetic influences on viral control and disease course. Similarly, common genetic correlates of acquisition of HIV-1 after exposure have been interrogated using GWAS, although...

  8. Genetic Polymorphism in Wine Yeasts: Mechanisms and Methods for Its Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Guillamón

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The processes of yeast selection for using as wine fermentation starters have revealed a great phenotypic diversity both at interspecific and intraspecific level, which is explained by a corresponding genetic variation among different yeast isolates. Thus, the mechanisms involved in promoting these genetic changes are the main engine generating yeast biodiversity. Currently, an important task to understand biodiversity, population structure and evolutionary history of wine yeasts is the study of the molecular mechanisms involved in yeast adaptation to wine fermentation, and on remodeling the genomic features of wine yeast, unconsciously selected since the advent of winemaking. Moreover, the availability of rapid and simple molecular techniques that show genetic polymorphisms at species and strain levels have enabled the study of yeast diversity during wine fermentation. This review will summarize the mechanisms involved in generating genetic polymorphisms in yeasts, the molecular methods used to unveil genetic variation, and the utility of these polymorphisms to differentiate strains, populations, and species in order to infer the evolutionary history and the adaptive evolution of wine yeasts, and to identify their influence on their biotechnological and sensorial properties.

  9. Genetic Polymorphism in Wine Yeasts: Mechanisms and Methods for Its Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillamón, José M.; Barrio, Eladio

    2017-01-01

    The processes of yeast selection for using as wine fermentation starters have revealed a great phenotypic diversity both at interspecific and intraspecific level, which is explained by a corresponding genetic variation among different yeast isolates. Thus, the mechanisms involved in promoting these genetic changes are the main engine generating yeast biodiversity. Currently, an important task to understand biodiversity, population structure and evolutionary history of wine yeasts is the study of the molecular mechanisms involved in yeast adaptation to wine fermentation, and on remodeling the genomic features of wine yeast, unconsciously selected since the advent of winemaking. Moreover, the availability of rapid and simple molecular techniques that show genetic polymorphisms at species and strain levels have enabled the study of yeast diversity during wine fermentation. This review will summarize the mechanisms involved in generating genetic polymorphisms in yeasts, the molecular methods used to unveil genetic variation, and the utility of these polymorphisms to differentiate strains, populations, and species in order to infer the evolutionary history and the adaptive evolution of wine yeasts, and to identify their influence on their biotechnological and sensorial properties. PMID:28522998

  10. Molecular mechanisms of the genetic risk factors in pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanatsu, Kunihiko; Tomita, Taisuke

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the extensive deposition of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Until recently, only the APOE gene had been known as a genetic risk factor for late-onset AD (LOAD), which accounts for more than 95% of all AD cases. However, in addition to this well-established genetic risk factor, genome-wide association studies have identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms as genetic risk factors of LOAD, such as PICALM and BIN1 . In addition, whole genome sequencing and exome sequencing have identified rare variants associated with LOAD, including TREM2 . We review the recent findings related to the molecular mechanisms by which these genetic risk factors contribute to AD, and our perspectives regarding the etiology of AD for the development of therapeutic agents.

  11. Genetic diversity in the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis: molecular mechanisms and biological consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, Gena D; Kerr, Jennifer E; Wang, Bing-Yan

    2013-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobic bacterium that colonizes the human oral cavity. It is implicated in the development of periodontitis, a chronic periodontal disease affecting half of the adult population in the USA. To survive in the oral cavity, these bacteria must colonize dental plaque biofilms in competition with other bacterial species. Long-term survival requires P. gingivalis to evade host immune responses, while simultaneously adapting to the changing physiology of the host and to alterations in the plaque biofilm. In reflection of this highly variable niche, P. gingivalis is a genetically diverse species and in this review the authors summarize genetic diversity as it relates to pathogenicity in P. gingivalis. Recent studies revealing a variety of mechanisms by which adaptive changes in genetic content can occur are also reviewed. Understanding the genetic plasticity of P. gingivalis will provide a better framework for understanding the host–microbe interactions associated with periodontal disease. PMID:23642116

  12. Mechanisms of common ground in case-based web discussions in teacher education

    OpenAIRE

    Mäkitalo, Kati; Häkkinen, Päivi; Leinonen, Piritta; Järvelä, Sanna

    2002-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that before the participants in Web-based conferencing can reach deeper level interaction and learning, they have to gain an adequate level of common ground in terms of shared mutual understanding, knowledge, beliefs, assumptions, and pre-suppositions (Clark & Schaefer, 1989; Dillenbourg, 1999). In this paper, the main purpose is to explore how participants establish and maintain common ground in order to reach deeper level interaction in case-based Web-discussions. T...

  13. The common ecotoxicology laboratory strain of Hyalella azteca is genetically distinct from most wild strains sampled in eastern North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Kaley; Soucek, David J; Giordano, Rosanna; Wetzel, Mark J; Soto-Adames, Felipe

    2013-11-01

    The amphipod Hyalella azteca is commonly used as a model for determining safe concentrations of contaminants in freshwaters. The authors sequenced the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene for representatives of 38 populations of this species complex from US and Canadian toxicology research laboratories and eastern North American field sites to determine their genetic relationships. With 1 exception, all US and Canadian laboratory cultures sampled were identified as conspecific. In 22 wild populations spanning 5 US states and 1 Canadian province, the commonly occurring laboratory species was found only in northern Florida, USA. Therefore, the diversity of the H. azteca species complex detected in the wild is not accurately represented in North American laboratories, questioning the reliability of H. azteca cultures currently in use to accurately predict the responses of wild populations in ecotoxicological assays. The authors also examined the utility of different COI nucleotide fragments presently in use to determine phylogenetic relationships in this group and concluded that saturation in DNA sequences leads to inconsistent relationships between clades. Amino acid sequences for COI were not saturated and may allow a more accurate phylogeny estimate. Hyalella azteca is crucial for developing water-quality regulations; therefore, laboratories should know and standardize the strain(s) they use to confidently compare toxicity tests across laboratories and determine whether they are an appropriate surrogate for their regions. © 2013 SETAC.

  14. Spatial heterogeneity as a genetic mixing mechanism in highly philopatric colonial seabirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofari, Robin; Trucchi, Emiliano; Whittington, Jason D; Vigetta, Stéphanie; Gachot-Neveu, Hélène; Stenseth, Nils Christian; Le Maho, Yvon; Le Bohec, Céline

    2015-01-01

    How genetic diversity is maintained in philopatric colonial systems remains unclear, and understanding the dynamic balance of philopatry and dispersal at all spatial scales is essential to the study of the evolution of coloniality. In the King penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, return rates of post-fledging chicks to their natal sub-colony are remarkably high. Empirical studies have shown that adults return year after year to their previous breeding territories within a radius of a few meters. Yet, little reliable data are available on intra- and inter-colonial dispersal in this species. Here, we present the first fine-scale study of the genetic structure in a king penguin colony in the Crozet Archipelago. Samples were collected from individual chicks and analysed at 8 microsatellite loci. Precise geolocation data of hatching sites and selective pressures associated with habitat features were recorded for all sampling locations. We found that despite strong natal and breeding site fidelity, king penguins retain a high degree of panmixia and genetic diversity. Yet, genetic structure appears markedly heterogeneous across the colony, with higher-than-expected inbreeding levels, and local inbreeding and relatedness hotspots that overlap predicted higher-quality nesting locations. This points towards heterogeneous population structure at the sub-colony level, in which fine-scale environmental features drive local philopatric behaviour, while lower-quality patches may act as genetic mixing mechanisms at the colony level. These findings show how a lack of global genetic structuring can emerge from small-scale heterogeneity in ecological parameters, as opposed to the classical model of homogeneous dispersal. Our results also emphasize the importance of sampling design for estimation of population parameters in colonial seabirds, as at high spatial resolution, basic genetic features are shown to be location-dependent. Finally, this study stresses the importance of

  15. Spatial heterogeneity as a genetic mixing mechanism in highly philopatric colonial seabirds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Cristofari

    Full Text Available How genetic diversity is maintained in philopatric colonial systems remains unclear, and understanding the dynamic balance of philopatry and dispersal at all spatial scales is essential to the study of the evolution of coloniality. In the King penguin, Aptenodytes patagonicus, return rates of post-fledging chicks to their natal sub-colony are remarkably high. Empirical studies have shown that adults return year after year to their previous breeding territories within a radius of a few meters. Yet, little reliable data are available on intra- and inter-colonial dispersal in this species. Here, we present the first fine-scale study of the genetic structure in a king penguin colony in the Crozet Archipelago. Samples were collected from individual chicks and analysed at 8 microsatellite loci. Precise geolocation data of hatching sites and selective pressures associated with habitat features were recorded for all sampling locations. We found that despite strong natal and breeding site fidelity, king penguins retain a high degree of panmixia and genetic diversity. Yet, genetic structure appears markedly heterogeneous across the colony, with higher-than-expected inbreeding levels, and local inbreeding and relatedness hotspots that overlap predicted higher-quality nesting locations. This points towards heterogeneous population structure at the sub-colony level, in which fine-scale environmental features drive local philopatric behaviour, while lower-quality patches may act as genetic mixing mechanisms at the colony level. These findings show how a lack of global genetic structuring can emerge from small-scale heterogeneity in ecological parameters, as opposed to the classical model of homogeneous dispersal. Our results also emphasize the importance of sampling design for estimation of population parameters in colonial seabirds, as at high spatial resolution, basic genetic features are shown to be location-dependent. Finally, this study stresses the

  16. Inhibition of HIV-1 gene expression by Sam68ΔC: multiple targets but a common mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cochrane Alan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two recent publications have explored the mechanisms by which a mutant of the host protein Sam68 blocks HIV-1 structural protein synthesis and expands its activity to encompass Nef. Although the two studies propose different mechanisms for the responses observed, it is possible that a common activity is responsible. Understanding how this Sam68 mutant discriminates among the multiple viral mRNAs promises to reveal unique properties of HIV-1 RNA metabolism.

  17. In-depth Investigation of Genetic Region Identifies Mechanism that Contributes to Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Investigators in the Laboratory of Translational Genomics have identified a genetic variant in a multi-cancer risk locus at chromosome 5p15.33 that explains, at least in part, the molecular mechanism through which this variant influences cancer risk.

  18. Genetic architecture and pathogenic mechanisms of ALS : Repeats, animal models and interactomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppers, M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons, ultimately leading to death due to respiratory failure 3-5 years after disease onset. In this doctoral thesis, the genetic etiology and pathogenic mechanisms of ALS have been studied. To gain more insight

  19. A combined genetic-morphometric analysis unravels the complex biogeographical history of Polyommatus icarus and Polyommatus celina common blue butterflies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincă, Vlad; Dapporto, Leonardo; Vila, Roger

    2011-09-01

    Widespread species have the potential to reveal large-scale biogeographical patterns, as well as responses to environmental changes possibly unique to habitat generalists. This study presents a continental-scale phylogeographical analysis of Polyommatus icarus, one of the most common Palaearctic butterflies, and the morphologically and ecologically similar Polyommatus celina, a recently discovered cryptic species. By combining data from mitochondrial [cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] and nuclear [internal transcribed spacer (ITS2)] molecular markers with geometric morphometrics, we document a complex phylogeographical history for the two species. Despite morphological similarities, the genetic divergence between these two species is high (more than 5% at COI) and they are not sister species. For the first time, we show that P. celina occurs not only in North Africa but also in Europe, where it inhabits several west Mediterranean islands, as well as large parts of Iberia, where it occurs in parapatry with P. icarus. The two species appear to completely exclude each other on islands, but we provide morphological and molecular evidence that introgression occurred in the Iberian Peninsula. We discovered strongly diverged lineages that seem to represent relict populations produced by past range expansions and contractions: Crete and Iberian isolates for P. icarus, Balearics-Sardinia and Sicily-Lipari for P. celina. This study shows that a combined genetic-morphometric approach can shed light on cryptic diversity while providing the necessary resolution to reconstruct a fine-scale phylogeographical history of species at both spatial and temporal levels. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Regions of common inter-individual DNA methylation differences in human monocytes: genetic basis and potential function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christopher; Leitão, Elsa; Wallner, Stefan; Schmitz, Gerd; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Sinha, Anupam; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Heilmann-Heimbach, Stefanie; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Steffens, Michael; Ebert, Peter; Rahmann, Sven; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2017-07-26

    There is increasing evidence for inter-individual methylation differences at CpG dinucleotides in the human genome, but the regional extent and function of these differences have not yet been studied in detail. For identifying regions of common methylation differences, we used whole genome bisulfite sequencing data of monocytes from five donors and a novel bioinformatic strategy. We identified 157 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) with four or more CpGs, almost none of which has been described before. The DMRs fall into different chromatin states, where methylation is inversely correlated with active, but not repressive histone marks. However, methylation is not correlated with the expression of associated genes. High-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping of the five donors revealed evidence for a role of cis-acting genetic variation in establishing methylation patterns. To validate this finding in a larger cohort, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using SNP genotypes and 450k array methylation data from blood samples of 1128 individuals. Only 30/157 (19%) DMRs include at least one 450k CpG, which shows that these arrays miss a large proportion of DNA methylation variation. In most cases, the GWAS peak overlapped the CpG position, and these regions are enriched for CREB group, NF-1, Sp100 and CTCF binding motifs. In two cases, there was tentative evidence for a trans-effect by KRAB zinc finger proteins. Allele-specific DNA methylation occurs in discrete chromosomal regions and is driven by genetic variation in cis and trans, but in general has little effect on gene expression.

  1. Post-ejection nest-desertion of common cuckoo hosts : a second defense mechanism or avoiding reduced reproductive success?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moskat, Csaba; Rosendaal, Erik C.; Boers, Myra; Zoelei, Aniko; Ban, Miklos; Komdeur, Jan; Soler, M.

    Hosts of the common cuckoo (Cuculus canorus), an avian brood parasite, develop antiparasite defense mechanisms to increase their reproductive success. Ejection of the parasite egg and desertion of the parasitized nest are the most typical adaptations in response to brood parasitism, but nest

  2. Structures of parasitic CDPK domains point to a common mechanism of activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K.; Amani, Merhnaz; Qiu, Wei; Pizarro, Juan C.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Lin, Yu-Hui; Lew, Jocelyn; Hutchinson, Ashley; Hui, Raymond (Toronto)

    2011-11-23

    We recently determined the first structures of inactivated and calcium-activated calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) from Apicomplexa. Calcium binding triggered a large conformational change that constituted a new mechanism in calcium signaling and a novel EF-hand fold (CAD, for CDPK activation domain). Thus we set out to determine if this mechanism was universal to all CDPKs. We solved additional CDPK structures, including one from the species Plasmodium. We highlight the similarities in sequence and structure across apicomplexan and plant CDPKs, and strengthen our observations that this novel mechanism could be universal to canonical CDPKs. Our new structures demonstrate more detailed steps in the mechanism of calcium activation and possible key players in regulation. Residues involved in making the largest conformational change are the most conserved across Apicomplexa, leading us to propose that the mechanism is indeed conserved. CpCDPK3{_}CAD and PfCDPK{_}CAD were captured at a possible intermediate conformation, lending insight into the order of activation steps. PfCDPK3{_}CAD adopts an activated fold, despite having an inactive EF-hand sequence in the N-terminal lobe. We propose that for most apicomplexan CDPKs, the mode of activation will be similar to that seen in our structures, while specific regulation of the inactive and active forms will require further investigation.

  3. Genetic analysis of the response to eleven Colletotrichum lindemuthianum races in a RIL population of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Ana; Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Giraldez, Ramón; Ferreira, Juan José

    2014-04-30

    Bean anthracnose is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magnus) Lams.- Scrib. Resistance to C. lindemuthianum in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) generally follows a qualitative mode of inheritance. The pathogen shows extensive pathogenic variation and up to 20 anthracnose resistance loci (named Co-), conferring resistance to specific races, have been described. Anthracnose resistance has generally been investigated by analyzing a limited number of isolates or races in segregating populations. In this work, we analyzed the response against eleven C. lindemuthianum races in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) common bean population derived from the cross Xana × Cornell 49242 in which a saturated linkage map was previously developed. A systematic genetic analysis was carried out to dissect the complex resistance segregations observed, which included contingency analyses, subpopulations and genetic mapping. Twenty two resistance genes were identified, some with a complementary mode of action. The Cornell 49242 genotype carries a complex cluster of resistance genes at the end of linkage group (LG) Pv11 corresponding to the previously described anthracnose resistance cluster Co-2. In this position, specific resistance genes to races 3, 6, 7, 19, 38, 39, 65, 357, 449 and 453 were identified, with one of them showing a complementary mode of action. In addition, Cornell 49242 had an independent gene on LG Pv09 showing a complementary mode of action for resistance to race 453. Resistance genes in genotype Xana were located on three regions involving LGs Pv01, Pv02 and Pv04. All resistance genes identified in Xana showed a complementary mode of action, except for two controlling resistance to races 65 and 73 located on LG Pv01, in the position of the previously described anthracnose resistance cluster Co-1. Results shown herein reveal a complex and specific interaction between bean and fungus genotypes leading to anthracnose resistance. Organization

  4. Unique and Common Mechanisms of Change across Cognitive and Dynamic Psychotherapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Barber, Jacques P.; Stirman, Shannon Wiltsey; Gallop, Robert; Goldstein, Lizabeth A.; Temes, Christina M.; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this article was to examine theoretically important mechanisms of change in psychotherapy outcome across different types of treatment. Specifically, the role of gains in self-understanding, acquisition of compensatory skills, and improvements in views of the self were examined. A pooled study database collected at the University of…

  5. Chromothripsis is a common mechanism driving genomic rearrangements in primary and metastatic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, W.P.; Hoogstraat, M.; Paling, O.; Tavakoli-Yaraki, M.; Renkens, I.; Vermaat, J.S.; Roosmalen, van M.J.; Lieshout, van S.; Nijman, I.J.; Roessingh, W.; Slot, van 't R.; Belt, van de J.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Structural rearrangements form a major class of somatic variation in cancer genomes. Local chromosome shattering, termed chromothripsis, is a mechanism proposed to be the cause of clustered chromosomal rearrangements and was recently described to occur in a small percentage of tumors.

  6. Common and rare genetic markers of lipid variation in subjects with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skylar W. Marvel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alterations in circulating lipid levels, total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and triglycerides (TG are heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Here we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS of common and rare variants to investigate associations with baseline lipid levels in 7,844 individuals with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial. Methods DNA extracted from stored blood samples from ACCORD participants were genotyped using the Affymetrix Axiom Biobank 1 Genotyping Array. After quality control and genotype imputation, association of common genetic variants (CV, defined as minor allele frequency (MAF ≥ 3%, with baseline levels of TC, LDL, HDL, and TG was tested using a linear model. Rare variant (RV associations (MAF < 3% were conducted using a suite of methods that collapse multiple RV within individual genes. Results Many statistically significant CV (p < 1 × 10−8 replicate findings in large meta-analyses in non-diabetic subjects. RV analyses also confirmed findings in other studies, whereas significant RV associations with CNOT2, HPN-AS1, and SIRPD appear to be novel (q < 0.1. Discussion Here we present findings for the largest GWAS of lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes to date. We identified 17 statistically significant (p < 1 × 10−8 associations of CV with lipid levels in 11 genes or chromosomal regions, all of which were previously identified in meta-analyses of mostly non-diabetic cohorts. We also identified 13 associations in 11 genes based on RV, several of which represent novel findings.

  7. Common and rare genetic markers of lipid variation in subjects with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Skylar W; Rotroff, Daniel M; Wagner, Michael J; Buse, John B; Havener, Tammy M; McLeod, Howard L; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Alterations in circulating lipid levels, total cholesterol (TC), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides (TG) are heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Here we conduct a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of common and rare variants to investigate associations with baseline lipid levels in 7,844 individuals with type 2 diabetes from the ACCORD clinical trial. DNA extracted from stored blood samples from ACCORD participants were genotyped using the Affymetrix Axiom Biobank 1 Genotyping Array. After quality control and genotype imputation, association of common genetic variants (CV), defined as minor allele frequency (MAF) ≥ 3%, with baseline levels of TC, LDL, HDL, and TG was tested using a linear model. Rare variant (RV) associations (MAF < 3%) were conducted using a suite of methods that collapse multiple RV within individual genes. Many statistically significant CV (p < 1 × 10-8) replicate findings in large meta-analyses in non-diabetic subjects. RV analyses also confirmed findings in other studies, whereas significant RV associations with CNOT2, HPN-AS1, and SIRPD appear to be novel (q < 0.1). Here we present findings for the largest GWAS of lipid levels in people with type 2 diabetes to date. We identified 17 statistically significant (p < 1 × 10-8) associations of CV with lipid levels in 11 genes or chromosomal regions, all of which were previously identified in meta-analyses of mostly non-diabetic cohorts. We also identified 13 associations in 11 genes based on RV, several of which represent novel findings.

  8. The Common Marmoset Monkey: Avenues for Exploring the Prenatal, Placental and Postnatal Mechanisms in Developmental Programming of Pediatric Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riesche, Laren; Tardif, Suzette D; Ross, Corinna N; deMartelly, Victoria A; Ziegler, Toni; Rutherford, Julienne N

    2018-02-07

    Animal models have been critical in building evidence that the prenatal experience and intrauterine environment are capable of exerting profound and permanent effects on metabolic health through developmental programming of obesity. The common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World Monkey that has been used as a biomedical model for well over 50 years. The spontaneous, multifactorial, and early life development of obesity in the common marmoset make it a valuable research model for advancing our knowledge about the role of prenatal and placental mechanisms involved in developmental programming of obesity. This paper provides a brief overview of obesity in the common marmoset, followed by a discussion of marmoset reproduction and placental characteristics. We then discuss the occurrence and utility of variable intrauterine environments in developmental programming in marmosets. Evidence of developmental programming of obesity will be given, and finally we put forward future directions and innovations for including the placenta in developmental programming of obesity in the common marmoset.

  9. Genetic dissection of ICP-detected nutrient accumulation in the whole seed of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Blair

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient transport to grain legume seeds is not well studied and can benefit from modern methods of elemental analysis including spectroscopic techniques. Some cations such as potassium (K and magnesium (Mg are needed for plant physiological purposes. Meanwhile, some minerals such as copper (Cu, iron (Fe, molybdenum (Mo and zinc (Zn are important micronutrients. Phosphorus (P is rich in legumes, while sulfur (S concentration is related to essential amino acids. In this research, the goal was to analyze a genetic mapping population of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. with inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectrophotometry to determine concentrations of and to discover quantitative trait loci (QTL for 15 elements in ground flour of whole seeds. The population was grown in randomized complete block design experiments that had been used before to analyze Fe and Zn. A total of 21 QTL were identified for 9 additional elements, of which four QTL were found for Cu followed by three each for Mg, Mn and P. Fewer QTL were found for K, Na and S. Boron (B and calcium (Ca had only one QTL each. The utility of the QTL for breeding adaptation to element deficient soils and association with previously discovered nutritional loci are discussed.

  10. An Underlying Common Factor, Influenced by Genetics and Unique Environment, Explains the Covariation Between Major Depressive Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Burnout: A Swedish Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Lisa; Blom, Victoria; Bergström, Gunnar; Svedberg, Pia

    2016-12-01

    Depression and anxiety are highly comorbid due to shared genetic risk factors, but less is known about whether burnout shares these risk factors. We aimed to examine whether the covariation between major depressive disorder (MDD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and burnout is explained by common genetic and/or environmental factors. This cross-sectional study included 25,378 Swedish twins responding to a survey in 2005-2006. Structural equation models were used to analyze whether the trait variances and covariances were due to additive genetics, non-additive genetics, shared environment, and unique environment. Univariate analyses tested sex limitation models and multivariate analysis tested Cholesky, independent pathway, and common pathway models. The phenotypic correlations were 0.71 (0.69-0.74) between MDD and GAD, 0.58 (0.56-0.60) between MDD and burnout, and 0.53 (0.50-0.56) between GAD and burnout. Heritabilities were 45% for MDD, 49% for GAD, and 38% for burnout; no statistically significant sex differences were found. A common pathway model was chosen as the final model. The common factor was influenced by genetics (58%) and unique environment (42%), and explained 77% of the variation in MDD, 69% in GAD, and 44% in burnout. GAD and burnout had additive genetic factors unique to the phenotypes (11% each), while MDD did not. Unique environment explained 23% of the variability in MDD, 20% in GAD, and 45% in burnout. In conclusion, the covariation was explained by an underlying common factor, largely influenced by genetics. Burnout was to a large degree influenced by unique environmental factors not shared with MDD and GAD.

  11. A Common Catalytic Mechanism for Proteins of the HutI Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi,R.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Burley, S.; Raushel, F.; Swaminathan, S.

    2008-01-01

    Imidazolonepropionase (HutI) (imidazolone-5-propanote hydrolase, EC 3.5.2.7) is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily and catalyzes the conversion of imidazolone-5-propanoate to N-formimino-l-glutamate in the histidine degradation pathway. We have determined the three-dimensional crystal structures of HutI from Agrobacterium tumefaciens (At-HutI) and an environmental sample from the Sargasso Sea Ocean Going Survey (Es-HutI) bound to the product [N-formimino-l-glutamate (NIG)] and an inhibitor [3-(2, 5-dioxoimidazolidin-4-yl)propionic acid (DIP)], respectively. In both structures, the active site is contained within each monomer, and its organization displays the landmark feature of the amidohydrolase superfamily, showing a metal ligand (iron), four histidines, and one aspartic acid. A catalytic mechanism involving His265 is proposed on the basis of the inhibitor-bound structure. This mechanism is applicable to all HutI forms.

  12. Systems biology elucidates common pathogenic mechanisms between nonalcoholic and alcoholic-fatty liver disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Sookoian

    Full Text Available The abnormal accumulation of fat in the liver is often related either to metabolic risk factors associated with metabolic syndrome in the absence of alcohol consumption (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, NAFLD or to chronic alcohol consumption (alcoholic fatty liver disease, AFLD. Clinical and histological studies suggest that NAFLD and AFLD share pathogenic mechanisms. Nevertheless, current data are still inconclusive as to whether the underlying biological process and disease pathways of NAFLD and AFLD are alike. Our primary aim was to integrate omics and physiological data to answer the question of whether NAFLD and AFLD share molecular processes that lead to disease development. We also explored the extent to which insulin resistance (IR is a distinctive feature of NAFLD. To answer these questions, we used systems biology approaches, such as gene enrichment analysis, protein-protein interaction networks, and gene prioritization, based on multi-level data extracted by computational data mining. We observed that the leading disease pathways associated with NAFLD did not significantly differ from those of AFLD. However, systems biology revealed the importance of each molecular process behind each of the two diseases, and dissected distinctive molecular NAFLD and AFLD-signatures. Comparative co-analysis of NAFLD and AFLD clarified the participation of NAFLD, but not AFLD, in cardiovascular disease, and showed that insulin signaling is impaired in fatty liver regardless of the noxa, but the putative regulatory mechanisms associated with NAFLD seem to encompass a complex network of genes and proteins, plausible of epigenetic modifications. Gene prioritization showed a cancer-related functional map that suggests that the fatty transformation of the liver tissue is regardless of the cause, an emerging mechanism of ubiquitous oncogenic activation. In conclusion, similar underlying disease mechanisms lead to NAFLD and AFLD, but specific ones depict a

  13. Colombian forensic genetics as a form of public science: The role of race, nation and common sense in the stabilization of DNA populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz-Marín, Ernesto; Wade, Peter; Cruz-Santiago, Arely; Cárdenas, Roosbelinda

    2015-12-01

    Abstract This article examines the role that vernacular notions of racialized-regional difference play in the constitution and stabilization of DNA populations in Colombian forensic science, in what we frame as a process of public science. In public science, the imaginations of the scientific world and common-sense public knowledge are integral to the production and circulation of science itself. We explore the origins and circulation of a scientific object--'La Tabla', published in Paredes et al. and used in genetic forensic identification procedures--among genetic research institutes, forensic genetics laboratories and courtrooms in Bogotá. We unveil the double life of this central object of forensic genetics. On the one hand, La Tabla enjoys an indisputable public place in the processing of forensic genetic evidence in Colombia (paternity cases, identification of bodies, etc.). On the other hand, the relations it establishes between 'race', geography and genetics are questioned among population geneticists in Colombia. Although forensic technicians are aware of the disputes among population geneticists, they use and endorse the relations established between genetics, 'race' and geography because these fit with common-sense notions of visible bodily difference and the regionalization of race in the Colombian nation.

  14. Humidity sensation, cockroaches, worms, and humans: are common sensory mechanisms for hygrosensation shared across species?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filingeri, Davide

    2015-08-01

    Although the ability to detect humidity (i.e., hygrosensation) represents an important sensory attribute in many animal species (including humans), the neurophysiological and molecular bases of such sensory ability remain largely unknown in many animals. Recently, Russell and colleagues (Russell J, Vidal-Gadea AG, Makay A, Lanam C, Pierce-Shimomura JT. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 111: 8269-8274, 2014) provided for the first time neuromolecular evidence for the sensory integration of thermal and mechanical sensory cues which underpin the hygrosensation strategy of an animal (i.e., the free-living roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans) that lacks specific sensory organs for humidity detection (i.e., hygroreceptors). Due to the remarkable similarities in the hygrosensation transduction mechanisms used by hygroreceptor-provided (e.g., insects) and hygroreceptor-lacking species (e.g., roundworms and humans), the findings of Russell et al. highlight potentially universal mechanisms for humidity detection that could be shared across a wide range of species, including humans. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Expanding Diversity and Common Goal of Regulatory T and B Cells. I: Origin, Phenotype, Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocian, Katarzyna; Kiernozek, Ewelina; Domagała-Kulawik, Joanna; Korczak-Kowalska, Grażyna; Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Drela, Nadzieja

    2017-12-01

    Immunosuppressive activity of regulatory T and B cells is critical to limit autoimmunity, excessive inflammation, and pathological immune response to conventional antigens or allergens. Both types of regulatory cells are intensively investigated, however, their development and mechanisms of action are still not completely understood. Both T and B regulatory cells represent highly differentiated populations in terms of phenotypes and origin, however, they use similar mechanisms of action. The most investigated CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells are characterized by the expression of Foxp3+ transcription factor, which is not sufficient to maintain their lineage stability and suppressive function. Currently, it is considered that specific epigenetic changes are critical for defining regulatory T cell stability in the context of their suppressive function. It is not yet known if similar epigenetic regulation determines development, lineage stability, and function of regulatory B cells. Phenotype diversity, confirmed or hypothetical developmental pathways, multiple mechanisms of action, and role of epigenetic changes in these processes are the subject of this review.

  16. The cGMP/PKG pathway as a common mediator of cardioprotection: translatability and mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inserte, Javier; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2015-04-01

    Cardiomyocyte cell death occurring during myocardial reperfusion (reperfusion injury) contributes to final infarct size after transient coronary occlusion. Different interrelated mechanisms of reperfusion injury have been identified, including alterations in cytosolic Ca(2+) handling, sarcoplasmic reticulum-mediated Ca(2+) oscillations and hypercontracture, proteolysis secondary to calpain activation and mitochondrial permeability transition. All these mechanisms occur during the initial minutes of reperfusion and are inhibited by intracellular acidosis. The cGMP/PKG pathway modulates the rate of recovery of intracellular pH, but has also direct effect on Ca(2+) oscillations and mitochondrial permeability transition. The cGMP/PKG pathway is depressed in cardiomyocytes by ischaemia/reperfusion and preserved by ischaemic postconditioning, which importantly contributes to postconditioning protection. The present article reviews the mechanisms and consequences of the effect of ischaemic postconditioning on the cGMP/PKG pathway, the different pharmacological strategies aimed to stimulate it during myocardial reperfusion and the evidence, limitations and promise of translation of these strategies to the clinical practice. Overall, the preclinical and clinical evidence suggests that modulation of the cGMP/PKG pathway may be a therapeutic target in the context of myocardial infarction. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  17. [Modern evolutional developmental biology: mechanical and molecular genetic or phenotypic approaches?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'eva, É I

    2010-01-01

    Heightened interest in the evolutionary problems of developmental biology in the 1980s was due to the success of molecular genetics and disappointment in the synthetic theory of evolution, where the chapters of embryology and developmental biology seem to have been left out. Modern evo-devo, which turned out to be antipodean to the methodology of the synthetic theory of evolution, propagandized in the development of evolutionary problems only the mechanical and molecular genetic approach to the evolution of ontogenesis, based on cellular and intercellular interactions. The phonotypical approach to the evaluation of evolutionary occurrences in ontogenesis, which aids in the joining of the genetic and epigenetic levels of research, the theory of natural selection, the nomogenetic conception, and the problem of the wholeness of the organism in onto- and phylogenesis may be against this. The phenotypic approach to ontogenesis is methodologically the most perspective for evolutionary developmental biology.

  18. Common genetic variation and risk of gallbladder cancer in India: a case-control genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhatre, Sharayu; Wang, Zhaoming; Nagrani, Rajini; Badwe, Rajendra; Chiplunkar, Shubhada; Mittal, Balraj; Yadav, Saurabh; Zhang, Haoyu; Chung, Charles C; Patil, Prachi; Chanock, Stephen; Dikshit, Rajesh; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Rajaraman, Preetha

    2017-04-01

    Gallbladder cancer is highly lethal, with notable differences in incidence by geography and ethnic background. The aim of this study was to identify common genetic susceptibility alleles for gallbladder cancer. In this case-control genome-wide association study (GWAS), we did a genome-wide scan of gallbladder cancer cases and hospital visitor controls, both of Indian descent, followed by imputation across the genome. Cases were patients aged 20-80 years with microscopically confirmed primary gallbladder cancer diagnosed or treated at Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India, and enrolled in the study between Sept 12, 2010, and June 8, 2015. We only included patients who had been diagnosed less than 1 year before the date of enrolment and excluded patients with any other malignancies. We recruited visitor controls aged 20-80 years with no history of cancer visiting all departments or units of Tata Memorial Hospital during the same time period and frequency matched them to cases on the basis of age, sex, and current region of residence. We estimated association using logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, and five eigenvectors. We recruited samples for a replication cohort from patients visiting Tata Memorial Hospital between Aug 4, 2015, and May 17, 2016, and patients visiting the Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, India, between July, 2010, and May, 2015. We used the same inclusion and exclusion criteria for the replication set. We examined three of the most significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the replication cohort and did a meta-analysis of the GWAS discovery and replication sets to get combined estimates of association. The discovery cohort comprised 1042 gallbladder cancer cases and 1709 controls and the replication cohort contained 428 gallbladder cancer cases and 420 controls. We observed genome-wide significant associations for several markers in the chromosomal region 7q21.12 harbouring both the ABCB1 and

  19. Common Genetic Variation Near Melatonin Receptor 1A Gene Linked to Job-Related Exhaustion in Shift Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkava, Sonja; Ollila, Hanna M; Alasaari, Jukka; Puttonen, Sampsa; Härmä, Mikko; Viitasalo, Katriina; Lahtinen, Alexandra; Lindström, Jaana; Toivola, Auli; Sulkava, Raimo; Kivimäki, Mika; Vahtera, Jussi; Partonen, Timo; Silander, Kaisa; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Paunio, Tiina

    2017-01-01

    Tolerance to shift work varies; only some shift workers suffer from disturbed sleep, fatigue, and job-related exhaustion. Our aim was to explore molecular genetic risk factors for intolerance to shift work. We assessed intolerance to shift work with job-related exhaustion symptoms in shift workers using the emotional exhaustion subscale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey, and carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Illumina's Human610-Quad BeadChip (n = 176). The most significant findings were further studied in three groups of Finnish shift workers (n = 577). We assessed methylation in blood cells with the Illumina HumanMethylation450K BeadChip, and examined gene expression levels in the publicly available eGWAS Mayo data. The second strongest signal identified in the GWAS (p = 2.3 × 10E-6) was replicated in two of the replication studies with p exhaustion in shift workers with rs12506228, located downstream of the melatonin receptor 1A gene (MTNR1A). The risk allele was also associated with reduced in silico gene expression levels of MTNR1A in brain tissue and suggestively associated with changes in DNA methylation in the 5' regulatory region of MTNR1A. These findings suggest that a variant near MTNR1A may be associated with job-related exhaustion in shift workers. The risk variant may exert its effect via epigenetic mechanisms, potentially leading to reduced melatonin signaling in the brain. These results could indicate a link between melatonin signaling, a key circadian regulatory mechanism, and tolerance to shift work.

  20. Genetic architecture of context processing in late middle age: more than one underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremen, William S; Panizzon, Matthew S; Xian, Hong; Barch, Deanna M; Franz, Carol E; Grant, Michael D; Toomey, Rosemary; Lyons, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    Studies comparing young and older adults suggest a deficit in processing context information as a key mechanism underlying cognitive aging. However, the genetic architecture of context processing has not been examined. Consistent with previous results, we found evidence of functionally dissociable components of context processing accuracy in 1127 late middle-aged twins ages 51-60. One component emphasizes use of context cues to prepare responses (proactive cognitive control), and the other emphasizes adjustment of responses after probes are presented (reactive control). Approximately one-quarter of the variance in each component was accounted for by genes. Multivariate twin analysis indicated that genetic factors underlying two important components of context processing were independent of one another, thus implicating more than one underlying mechanism. Slower reaction time (RT) on noncontext processing trials was positively correlated with errors on the strongly proactive control component on which young adults outperform older adults, but RT was negatively correlated with errors on the strongly reactive control component on which older adults perform better. Although this RT measure was uncorrelated with chronological age in our age-homogeneous sample, slower RT was associated with performance patterns that were more like older adults. However, this did not generalize to other processing speed measures. Genetic correlations, which reflect shared genetic variance, paralleled the phenotypic correlations. There was also a positive genetic correlation between general cognitive ability and accuracy on the proactive control component, but there were still mostly distinct genetic influences underlying these measures. In contrast, the reactive control component was unrelated to general cognitive ability.

  1. Selected biometric and mechanical properties of the common reed Phragmites australis and the reed sweet grass Glyceria maxima rhizomes

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    Kowalik Weronika

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The results on the selected biometric and mechanical properties of common reed Phragmites australis and reed sweet grass Glyceria maxima were presented. The experiments were conducted with the help of the universal testing machine Instron 5966. The underground biomasses, diameters, tensile forces, displacements and tensile strengths for summer and winter rhizomes of both species were assessed and compared. The final results indicate that rhizomes of common reed had higher values of the studied parameters of biometric and stretching than sweet reed grass rhizomes. Therefore, there are more opportunities to use them to protect the coastline.

  2. Common Genetic Pathways Regulate Organ-Specific Infection-Related Development in the Rice Blast Fungus[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sara L.; Besi, Maria I.; Galhano, Rita; Franceschetti, Marina; Goetz, Stephan; Lenhert, Steven; Osbourn, Anne; Sesma, Ane

    2010-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the most important fungal pathogen of rice (Oryza sativa). Under laboratory conditions, it is able to colonize both aerial and underground plant organs using different mechanisms. Here, we characterize an infection-related development in M. oryzae produced on hydrophilic polystyrene (PHIL-PS) and on roots. We show that fungal spores develop preinvasive hyphae (pre-IH) from hyphopodia (root penetration structures) or germ tubes and that pre-IH also enter root cells. Changes in fungal cell wall structure accompanying pre-IH are seen on both artificial and root surfaces. Using characterized mutants, we show that the PMK1 (for pathogenicity mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) pathway is required for pre-IH development. Twenty mutants with altered pre-IH differentiation on PHIL-PS identified from an insertional library of 2885 M. oryzae T-DNA transformants were found to be defective in pathogenicity. The phenotypic analysis of these mutants revealed that appressorium, hyphopodium, and pre-IH formation are genetically linked fungal developmental processes. We further characterized one of these mutants, M1373, which lacked the M. oryzae ortholog of exportin-5/Msn5p (EXP5). Mutants lacking EXP5 were much less virulent on roots, suggesting an important involvement of proteins and/or RNAs transported by EXP5 during M. oryzae root infection. PMID:20348434

  3. Innate recognition of pheromone and food odors in moths: a common mechanism in the antennal lobe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P Martin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The survival of an animal often depends on an innate response to a particular sensory stimulus. For an adult male moth, two categories of odors are innately attractive: pheromone released by conspecific females, and the floral scents of certain, often co-evolved, plants. These odors consist of multiple volatiles in characteristic mixtures. Here, we review evidence that both categories of odors are processed as sensory objects, and we suggest a mechanism in the primary olfactory center, the antennal lobe (AL, that encodes the configuration of these mixtures and may underlie recognition of innately attractive odors. In the pheromone system, mixtures of two or three volatiles elicit upwind flight. Peripheral changes are associated with behavioral changes in speciation, and suggest the existence of a pattern recognition mechanism for pheromone mixtures in the AL. Moths are similarly innately attracted to certain floral scents. Though floral scents consist of multiple volatiles that activate a broad array of receptor neurons, only a smaller subset, numerically comparable to pheromone mixtures, is necessary and sufficient to elicit behavior. Both pheromone and floral scent mixtures that produce attraction to the odor source elicit synchronous action potentials in particular populations of output (projection neurons (PNs in the AL. We propose a model in which the synchronous output of a population of PNs encodes the configuration of an innately attractive mixture, and thus comprises an innate mechanism for releasing odor-tracking behavior. The particular example of olfaction in moths may inform the general question of how sensory objects trigger innate responses.

  4. Molecular genetic analysis in mild hyperhomocysteinemia: A common mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene is a genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kluijtmans, L.A.J.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Stevens, E.M.B. [Univ. Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1996-01-01

    Mild hyperhomocysteinemia is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Genetic aberrations in the cystathionine P-synthase (CBS) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) genes may account for reduced enzyme activities and elevated plasma homocysteine levels. In 15 unrelated Dutch patients with homozygous CBS deficiency, we observed the 833T{yields}C (1278T) mutation in 50% of the alleles. Very recently, we identified a common mutation (677C{yields}T; A{yields}V) in the MTHFR gene, which, in homozygous state, is responsible for the thermolabile phenotype and which is associated with decreased specific MTHFR activity and elevated homocysteine levels. We screened 60 cardiovascular patients and 111 controls for these two mutations, to determine whether these mutations are risk factors for premature cardiovascular disease. Heterozygosity for the 833T{yields}C mutation in the CBS gene was observed in one individual of the control group but was absent in patients with premature cardiovascular disease. Homozygosity for the 677C-{yields}T mutation in the MTHFR gene was found in 9 (15%) of 60 cardiovascular patients and in only 6 ({approximately}5%) of 111 control individuals (odds ratio 3.1 [95% confidence interval 1.0-9.21]). Because of both the high prevalence of the 833T-{yields}C mutation among homozygotes for CBS deficiency and its absence in 60 cardiovascular patients, we may conclude that heterozygosity for CBS deficiency does not appear to be involved in premature cardiovascular disease. However, a frequent homozygous mutation in the MTHFR gene is associated with a threefold increase in risk for premature cardiovascular disease. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Genomic imprinting: genetic mechanisms and phenotypic consequences in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

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    Fridman Cintia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal 15q11-q13 region is of great interest in Human Genetics because many structural rearrangements have been described for it (deletions, duplications and translocations leading to phenotypes resulting in conditions such as the Prader-Willi (PWS and Angelman (AS syndromes which were the first human diseases found to be related to the differential expression of parental alleles (genomic imprinting. Contrary to Mendelian laws where the parental inheritance of genetic information does not influence gene expression, genomic imprinting is characterized by DNA modifications that produce different phenotypes depending on the parental origin of the mutation. Clinical manifestation of PWS appears when the loss of paternally expressed genes occurs and AS results from the loss of a maternally expressed gene. Different genetic mechanisms can lead to PWS or AS, such as deletions, uniparental disomy or imprinting mutation. In AS patients an additional class occurs with mutations on the UBE3A gene. Studies of PWS and AS patients can help us to understand the imprinting process, so that other genomic regions with similar characteristics can be located, and different syndromes can have their genetic mechanisms elucidated.

  6. Vitamin K-dependent proteins GAS6 and Protein S and TAM receptors in patients of systemic lupus erythematosus: correlation with common genetic variants and disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recarte-Pelz, Pedro; Tàssies, Dolors; Espinosa, Gerard; Hurtado, Begoña; Sala, Núria; Cervera, Ricard; Reverter, Joan Carles; de Frutos, Pablo García

    2013-03-12

    Growth arrest-specific gene 6 protein (GAS6) and protein S (ProS) are vitamin K-dependent proteins present in plasma with important regulatory functions in systems of response and repair to damage. They interact with receptor tyrosine kinases of the Tyro3, Axl and MerTK receptor tyrosine kinase (TAM) family, involved in apoptotic cell clearance (efferocytosis) and regulation of the innate immunity. TAM-deficient mice show spontaneous lupus-like symptoms. Here we tested the genetic profile and plasma levels of components of the system in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and compare them with a control healthy population. Fifty SLE patients and 50 healthy controls with matched age, gender and from the same geographic area were compared. Genetic analysis was performed in GAS6 and the TAM receptor genes on SNPs previously identified. The concentrations of GAS6, total and free ProS, and the soluble forms of the three TAM receptors (sAxl, sMerTK and sTyro3) were measured in plasma from these samples. Plasma concentrations of GAS6 were higher and, total and free ProS were lower in the SLE patients compared to controls, even when patients on oral anticoagulant treatment were discarded. Those parameters correlated with SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) score, GAS6 being higher in the most severe cases, while free and total ProS were lower. All 3 soluble receptors increased its concentration in plasma of lupus patients. The present study highlights that the GAS6/ProS-TAM system correlates in several ways with disease activity in SLE. We show here that this correlation is affected by common polymorphisms in the genes of the system. These findings underscore the importance of mechanism of regulatory control of innate immunity in the pathology of SLE.

  7. Site-Specific Mobilization of Vinyl Chloride Respiration Islands by a Mechanism Common in Dehalococcoides

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    Edwards Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vinyl chloride is a widespread groundwater pollutant and Group 1 carcinogen. A previous comparative genomic analysis revealed that the vinyl chloride reductase operon, vcrABC, of Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS is embedded in a horizontally-acquired genomic island that integrated at the single-copy tmRNA gene, ssrA. Results We targeted conserved positions in available genomic islands to amplify and sequence four additional vcrABC -containing genomic islands from previously-unsequenced vinyl chloride respiring Dehalococcoides enrichments. We identified a total of 31 ssrA-specific genomic islands from Dehalococcoides genomic data, accounting for 47 reductive dehalogenase homologous genes and many other non-core genes. Sixteen of these genomic islands contain a syntenic module of integration-associated genes located adjacent to the predicted site of integration, and among these islands, eight contain vcrABC as genetic 'cargo'. These eight vcrABC -containing genomic islands are syntenic across their ~12 kbp length, but have two phylogenetically discordant segments that unambiguously differentiate the integration module from the vcrABC cargo. Using available Dehalococcoides phylogenomic data we estimate that these ssrA-specific genomic islands are at least as old as the Dehalococcoides group itself, which in turn is much older than human civilization. Conclusions The vcrABC -containing genomic islands are a recently-acquired subset of a diverse collection of ssrA-specific mobile elements that are a major contributor to strain-level diversity in Dehalococcoides, and may have been throughout its evolution. The high similarity between vcrABC sequences is quantitatively consistent with recent horizontal acquisition driven by ~100 years of industrial pollution with chlorinated ethenes.

  8. What kind of goods are plant genetic resources for food and agriculture? Towards the identification and development of a new global commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halewood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant genetic resources for food and agriculture (PGRFA were once widely considered to be global public goods. Recently, however, access to subsets of PGRFA has been subject to various forms of exclusive technological and legal restrictions. In reaction, numerous voluntary pooling initiatives – from local to global scales – are being experimented with, in an attempt to re-strike a balance more supportive of agricultural research and development.  The first part of the paper argues that different subsets of PGRFA can now be accurately described as public goods, private goods, club goods and common pool resources, but that these categories do not fully interrogate important ‘exogenous variables’ concerning PGRFA.  As the products of complex interactions between crops breeding systems and natural and human selection, PGRFA occupy a middle ground between natural resources and human-make cultural resources. The paper identifies which subsets of PGRFA are (or could be included in an evolving global plant genetic resources commons. The paper uses Elinor Ostrom’s eight design principles for long enduring commons to analyze the extent to which the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for Food and Agriculture (ITPGRFA supports this evolving global commons. The paper concludes by identifying options for policy reforms to provide better tailored institutional support for the plant genetic resources commons.

  9. Monocyte and haematopoietic progenitor reprogramming as common mechanism underlying chronic inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogeveen, Renate M; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Riksen, Niels P; Netea, Mihai G; de Winther, Menno P J; Lutgens, Esther; Nordestgaard, Boerge; Neidhart, Michel; Stroes, Erik S G; Catapano, Alberico L; Bekkering, Siroon

    2017-10-24

    A large number of cardiovascular events are not prevented by current therapeutic regimens. In search for additional, innovative strategies, immune cells have been recognized as key players contributing to atherosclerotic plaque progression and destabilization. Particularly the role of innate immune cells is of major interest, following the recent paradigm shift that innate immunity, long considered to be incapable of learning, does exhibit immunological memory mediated via epigenetic reprogramming. Compelling evidence shows that atherosclerotic risk factors promote immune cell migration by pre-activation of circulating innate immune cells. Innate immune cell activation via metabolic and epigenetic reprogramming perpetuates a systemic low-grade inflammatory state in cardiovascular disease (CVD) that is also common in other chronic inflammatory disorders. This opens a new therapeutic area in which metabolic or epigenetic modulation of innate immune cells may result in decreased systemic chronic inflammation, alleviating CVD, and its co-morbidities. © The Author 2017. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  10. Study on structure, mechanical property and cell cytocompatibility of electrospun collagen nanofibers crosslinked by common agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xueshi; Guo, Zhenzhao; He, Ping; Chen, Tian; Li, Lihua; Ding, Shan; Li, Hong

    2018-01-29

    Collagen electrospun scaffolds properly reproduce the framework of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues that are natural with the fibrous morphology of the protein by coupling large biomimetism of the biological material. However, traditional solvents employed for collagen electrospinning lead to poor mechanical attributes and bad hydro-stability. In this work, by N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride with N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (EDC-NHS), glutaraldehyde (GTA) and genipin (GP) respectively, electrospun collagen fibers cross-linked, effectively stabilized the fiber morphology over 2 months and improved the mechanical properties in both dry and wet state, especially EDC-NHS with large ultimate tensile stress and ε b . The secondary structure of collagen structure still remained and had no obvious difference among various crosslinked samples according to FTIR. On the cell assessment, electrospun collagen fibers crosslinked by EDC-NHS, GTA and GP, were found to support cell adhesion, spreading and proliferation of MC3T3-E1. By contrast, GTA was more effective in preserving explicit fibrous morphology with a relatively lower cell viability both in FBS and BSA soaked mats. Interestingly, GP also had the similar cytocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 as EDC-NHS did. The study proved the feasibility of chemical crosslinker to electrospun collagen for biomedical application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Does Parkinson's disease and type-2 diabetes mellitus present common pathophysiological mechanisms and treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Marcelo M S; Targa, Adriano D S; Noseda, Ana C D; Rodrigues, Lais S; Delattre, Ana Marcia; dos Santos, Fabiola V; Fortes, Mariana H; Maturana, Maira J; Ferraz, Anete C

    2014-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease afflicting about 1% of people over 65 years old and 4-5% of people over 85 years. It is proposed that a cascade of deleterious factors is set in motion within that neuron made not of one, but rather of multiple factors such as free radicals, excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, and apoptosis to cite only some of the most salient. In this scenario, chronic systemic inflammation, as well as impaired mitochondrial metabolism, have also been suspected of playing a role in the development of type-2 diabetes, and the possibility of a shared pathophysiology of PD and type-2 diabetes has been proposed. The discussion about the interactions between PD and type-2 diabetes mellitus began in the 1960's and there is still controversy. Insulin and dopamine may exert reciprocal regulation hence; hypoinsulinemia induced by streptozotocin decreased the amounts of dopamine transporter and tyrosine hydroxylase transcripts in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Accordingly, dopamine depletion in the striatum is able to decreases insulin signaling in basal ganglia, indicating that, perhaps, PD may be considered as a risk factor for the development of type-2 diabetes mellitus. In this sense, it is described that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, ATP-sensitive K(+) channels, AMP-activated protein kinase, glucagon-like peptide-1 and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 are important therapeutic targets for PD and reinforces the association with diabetes. Therefore, the objective of the present review is to contextualize the mutual pathophysiological interactions between PD and type-2 diabetes mellitus, as well as the potential common treatments.

  12. Action and perception are temporally coupled by a common mechanism that leads to a timing misperception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretegiani, Elena; Astefanoaei, Corina; Daye, Pierre M; FitzGibbon, Edmond J; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia; Rufa, Alessandra; Optican, Lance M

    2015-01-28

    We move our eyes to explore the world, but visual areas determining where to look next (action) are different from those determining what we are seeing (perception). Whether, or how, action and perception are temporally coordinated is not known. The preparation time course of an action (e.g., a saccade) has been widely studied with the gap/overlap paradigm with temporal asynchronies (TA) between peripheral target onset and fixation point offset (gap, synchronous, or overlap). However, whether the subjects perceive the gap or overlap, and when they perceive it, has not been studied. We adapted the gap/overlap paradigm to study the temporal coupling of action and perception. Human subjects made saccades to targets with different TAs with respect to fixation point offset and reported whether they perceived the stimuli as separated by a gap or overlapped in time. Both saccadic and perceptual report reaction times changed in the same way as a function of TA. The TA dependencies of the time change for action and perception were very similar, suggesting a common neural substrate. Unexpectedly, in the perceptual task, subjects misperceived lights overlapping by less than ∼100 ms as separated in time (overlap seen as gap). We present an attention-perception model with a map of prominence in the superior colliculus that modulates the stimulus signal's effectiveness in the action and perception pathways. This common source of modulation determines how competition between stimuli is resolved, causes the TA dependence of action and perception to be the same, and causes the misperception. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351493-12$15.00/0.

  13. Action and Perception Are Temporally Coupled by a Common Mechanism That Leads to a Timing Misperception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astefanoaei, Corina; Daye, Pierre M.; FitzGibbon, Edmond J.; Creanga, Dorina-Emilia; Rufa, Alessandra; Optican, Lance M.

    2015-01-01

    We move our eyes to explore the world, but visual areas determining where to look next (action) are different from those determining what we are seeing (perception). Whether, or how, action and perception are temporally coordinated is not known. The preparation time course of an action (e.g., a saccade) has been widely studied with the gap/overlap paradigm with temporal asynchronies (TA) between peripheral target onset and fixation point offset (gap, synchronous, or overlap). However, whether the subjects perceive the gap or overlap, and when they perceive it, has not been studied. We adapted the gap/overlap paradigm to study the temporal coupling of action and perception. Human subjects made saccades to targets with different TAs with respect to fixation point offset and reported whether they perceived the stimuli as separated by a gap or overlapped in time. Both saccadic and perceptual report reaction times changed in the same way as a function of TA. The TA dependencies of the time change for action and perception were very similar, suggesting a common neural substrate. Unexpectedly, in the perceptual task, subjects misperceived lights overlapping by less than ∼100 ms as separated in time (overlap seen as gap). We present an attention-perception model with a map of prominence in the superior colliculus that modulates the stimulus signal's effectiveness in the action and perception pathways. This common source of modulation determines how competition between stimuli is resolved, causes the TA dependence of action and perception to be the same, and causes the misperception. PMID:25632126

  14. Common Genetic Variant Risk Score Is Associated With Drug-Induced QT Prolongation and Torsade de Pointes Risk: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, David G; Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Blinova, Ksenia; Mason, Jay W; Weeke, Peter; Behr, Elijah R; Roden, Dan M; Woosley, Ray; Kosova, Gulum; Rosenberg, Michael A; Newton-Cheh, Christopher

    2017-04-04

    Drug-induced QT interval prolongation, a risk factor for life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, is a potential side effect of many marketed and withdrawn medications. The contribution of common genetic variants previously associated with baseline QT interval to drug-induced QT prolongation and arrhythmias is not known. We tested the hypothesis that a weighted combination of common genetic variants contributing to QT interval at baseline, identified through genome-wide association studies, can predict individual response to multiple QT-prolonging drugs. Genetic analysis of 22 subjects was performed in a secondary analysis of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of 3 QT-prolonging drugs with 15 time-matched QT and plasma drug concentration measurements. Subjects received single doses of dofetilide, quinidine, ranolazine, and placebo. The outcome was the correlation between a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants and the slope of an individual subject's drug-induced increase in heart rate-corrected QT (QTc) versus drug concentration. The genetic QT score was correlated with drug-induced QTc prolongation. Among white subjects, genetic QT score explained 30% of the variability in response to dofetilide (r=0.55; 95% confidence interval, 0.09-0.81; P=0.02), 23% in response to quinidine (r=0.48; 95% confidence interval, -0.03 to 0.79; P=0.06), and 27% in response to ranolazine (r=0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.80; P=0.03). Furthermore, the genetic QT score was a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes in an independent sample of 216 cases compared with 771 controls (r2=12%, P=1×10-7). We demonstrate that a genetic QT score comprising 61 common genetic variants explains a significant proportion of the variability in drug-induced QT prolongation and is a significant predictor of drug-induced torsade de pointes. These findings highlight an opportunity for recent genetic discoveries to improve

  15. Malicious Botnet Survivability Mechanism Evolution Forecasting by Means of a Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaj Goranin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Botnets are considered to be among the most dangerous modern malware types and the biggest current threats to global IT infrastructure. Botnets are rapidly evolving, and therefore forecasting their survivability strategies is important for the development of countermeasure techniques. The article propose the botnet-oriented genetic algorithm based model framework, which aimed at forecasting botnet survivability mechanisms. The model may be used as a framework for forecasting the evolution of other characteristics. The efficiency of different survivability mechanisms is evaluated by applying the proposed fitness function. The model application area also covers scientific botnet research and modelling tasks.

  16. Perspective: Identification of genetic variants associated with dopaminergic compensatory mechanisms in early Parkinson's disease

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    Lior eGreenbaum

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is slowly progressive, and heterogeneity of its severity among individuals may be due to endogenous mechanisms that counterbalance the striatal dopamine loss. In this perspective paper, we introduce a neuroimaging-genetic approach to identify genetic variants, which may contribute to this compensation. First, we briefly review current known potential compensatory mechanisms for premotor and early disease PD, located in the striatum and other brain regions. Then, we claim that a mismatch between mild symptomatic disease, manifested by low motor score on the Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS and extensive Nigro-Striatal degeneration, manifested by reduced uptake of [123I]FP-CIT is indicative of compensatory processes. If genetic variants are associated with the severity of motor symptoms, while the level of striatal terminals degeneration measured by ligand uptake is taken into account and controlled in the analysis, then these variants may be involved in functional compensatory mechanisms for striatal dopamine deficit. To demonstrate feasibility of this approach, we performed a small "proof of concept" study (candidate gene design in a sample of 28 Jewish PD patients, and preliminary results are presented.

  17. Gender Identity Disorder and Schizophrenia: Neurodevelopmental Disorders with Common Causal Mechanisms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Philip Rajkumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gender identity disorder (GID, recently renamed gender dysphoria (GD, is a rare condition characterized by an incongruity between gender identity and biological sex. Clinical evidence suggests that schizophrenia occurs in patients with GID at rates higher than in the general population and that patients with GID may have schizophrenia-like personality traits. Conversely, patients with schizophrenia may experience alterations in gender identity and gender role perception. Neurobiological research, including brain imaging and studies of finger length ratio and handedness, suggests that both these disorders are associated with altered cerebral sexual dimorphism and changes in cerebral lateralization. Various mechanisms, such as Toxoplasma infection, reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, early childhood adversity, and links with autism spectrum disorders, may account for some of this overlap. The implications of this association for further research are discussed.

  18. Gender Identity Disorder and Schizophrenia: Neurodevelopmental Disorders with Common Causal Mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID), recently renamed gender dysphoria (GD), is a rare condition characterized by an incongruity between gender identity and biological sex. Clinical evidence suggests that schizophrenia occurs in patients with GID at rates higher than in the general population and that patients with GID may have schizophrenia-like personality traits. Conversely, patients with schizophrenia may experience alterations in gender identity and gender role perception. Neurobiological research, including brain imaging and studies of finger length ratio and handedness, suggests that both these disorders are associated with altered cerebral sexual dimorphism and changes in cerebral lateralization. Various mechanisms, such as Toxoplasma infection, reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), early childhood adversity, and links with autism spectrum disorders, may account for some of this overlap. The implications of this association for further research are discussed. PMID:25548672

  19. Gender identity disorder and schizophrenia: neurodevelopmental disorders with common causal mechanisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Ravi Philip

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity disorder (GID), recently renamed gender dysphoria (GD), is a rare condition characterized by an incongruity between gender identity and biological sex. Clinical evidence suggests that schizophrenia occurs in patients with GID at rates higher than in the general population and that patients with GID may have schizophrenia-like personality traits. Conversely, patients with schizophrenia may experience alterations in gender identity and gender role perception. Neurobiological research, including brain imaging and studies of finger length ratio and handedness, suggests that both these disorders are associated with altered cerebral sexual dimorphism and changes in cerebral lateralization. Various mechanisms, such as Toxoplasma infection, reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), early childhood adversity, and links with autism spectrum disorders, may account for some of this overlap. The implications of this association for further research are discussed.

  20. Water deprivation and the double- depletion hypothesis: common neural mechanisms underlie thirst and salt appetite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Jr De Luca

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Water deprivation-induced thirst is explained by the double-depletion hypothesis, which predicts that dehydration of the two major body fluid compartments, the extracellular and intracellular compartments, activates signals that combine centrally to induce water intake. However, sodium appetite is also elicited by water deprivation. In this brief review, we stress the importance of the water-depletion and partial extracellular fluid-repletion protocol which permits the distinction between sodium appetite and thirst. Consistent enhancement or a de novo production of sodium intake induced by deactivation of inhibitory nuclei (e.g., lateral parabrachial nucleus or hormones (oxytocin, atrial natriuretic peptide, in water-deprived, extracellular-dehydrated or, contrary to tradition, intracellular-dehydrated rats, suggests that sodium appetite and thirst share more mechanisms than previously thought. Water deprivation has physiological and health effects in humans that might be related to the salt craving shown by our species.

  1. Structure and Mechanism of Receptor Sharing by the IL-10R2 Common Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-il; Jones, Brandi C.; Logsdon, Naomi J.; Harris, Bethany D.; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Radaeva, Svetlana; Halloran, Brian A.; Gao, Bin; Walter, Mark R. (NIH); (UAB)

    2010-07-19

    IL-10R2 is a shared cell surface receptor required for the activation of five class 2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-22, IL-26, IL-28, and IL-29) that play critical roles in host defense. To define the molecular mechanisms that regulate its promiscuous binding, we have determined the crystal structure of the IL-10R2 ectodomain at 2.14 {angstrom} resolution. IL-10R2 residues required for binding were identified by alanine scanning and used to derive computational models of IL-10/IL-10R1/IL-10R2 and IL-22/IL-22R1/IL-10R2 ternary complexes. The models reveal a conserved binding epitope that is surrounded by two clefts that accommodate the structural and chemical diversity of the cytokines. These results provide a structural framework for interpreting IL-10R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with human disease.

  2. Structure and Mechanism of Receptoe Sharing by the IL-10R2 Common Chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sung-il; Jones, Brandi C.; Logsdon, Naomi J.; Harris, Bethany D.; Deshpande, Ashlesha; Radaeva, Svetlana; Halloran, Brian A.; Gao, Bin; Walter, Mark R. (NIH); (UAB)

    2010-06-14

    IL-10R2 is a shared cell surface receptor required for the activation of five class 2 cytokines (IL-10, IL-22, IL-26, IL-28, and IL-29) that play critical roles in host defense. To define the molecular mechanisms that regulate its promiscuous binding, we have determined the crystal structure of the IL-10R2 ectodomain at 2.14 {angstrom} resolution. IL-10R2 residues required for binding were identified by alanine scanning and used to derive computational models of IL-10/IL-10R1/IL-10R2 and IL-22/IL-22R1/IL-10R2 ternary complexes. The models reveal a conserved binding epitope that is surrounded by two clefts that accommodate the structural and chemical diversity of the cytokines. These results provide a structural framework for interpreting IL-10R2 single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with human disease.

  3. Genetic instability in budding and fission yeast—sources and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoneczna, Adrianna; Kaniak, Aneta; Skoneczny, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Cells are constantly confronted with endogenous and exogenous factors that affect their genomes. Eons of evolution have allowed the cellular mechanisms responsible for preserving the genome to adjust for achieving contradictory objectives: to maintain the genome unchanged and to acquire mutations that allow adaptation to environmental changes. One evolutionary mechanism that has been refined for survival is genetic variation. In this review, we describe the mechanisms responsible for two biological processes: genome maintenance and mutation tolerance involved in generations of genetic variations in mitotic cells of both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. These processes encompass mechanisms that ensure the fidelity of replication, DNA lesion sensing and DNA damage response pathways, as well as mechanisms that ensure precision in chromosome segregation during cell division. We discuss various factors that may influence genome stability, such as cellular ploidy, the phase of the cell cycle, transcriptional activity of a particular region of DNA, the proficiency of DNA quality control systems, the metabolic stage of the cell and its respiratory potential, and finally potential exposure to endogenous or environmental stress. PMID:26109598

  4. A comprehensive genetic algorithm for design optimization of Z-bar loader working mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Junli Shen [Fine Mechanics and Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun (China); Wang, Guoqiang; Bi, Qiushi; Qu, Junna [Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2013-11-15

    The operation mechanism is generally considered as a key component of a wheel loader. Its working performance has great influence on the service life, stability, efficiency and economy of the loader. This paper establishes a mathematical model of Z-bar loader mechanism in polar coordinate with four-bar linkage and six-bar Watt linkage synthesis, investigates the working performance, such as mechanism transmission ratio, carry stability, parallelism, dumping in any position, bucket flat setting, maximum dig depth, extreme transmission angle and so on. Then we explore new design methods of joint-position of Z-bar loader linkage between tilt cylinder and loader frame to perfect some of the performance. A new method, comprehensive genetic algorithm, is presented to optimize non-linear equation with multi-constraints, and the results improve the multidisciplinary performance. Furthermore, a virtual prototype of the working mechanism is modeled to simulate and verify the optimization results.

  5. Common genetic variants of surfactant protein-D (SP-D are associated with type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Pueyo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Surfactant protein-D (SP-D is a primordial component of the innate immune system intrinsically linked to metabolic pathways. We aimed to study the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affecting SP-D with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We evaluated a common genetic variant located in the SP-D coding region (rs721917, Met(31Thr in a sample of T2D patients and non-diabetic controls (n = 2,711. In a subset of subjects (n = 1,062, this SNP was analyzed in association with circulating SP-D concentrations, insulin resistance, and T2D. This SNP and others were also screened in the publicly available Genome Wide Association (GWA database of the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC. RESULTS: We found the significant association of rs721917 with circulating SP-D, parameters of insulin resistance and T2D. Indeed, G carriers showed decreased circulating SP-D (p = 0.004, decreased fasting glucose (p = 0.0002, glycated hemoglobin (p = 0.0005, and 33% (p = 0.002 lower prevalence of T2D, estimated under a dominant model, especially among women. Interestingly, these differences remained significant after controlling for origin, age, gender, and circulating SP-D. Moreover, this SNP and others within the SP-D genomic region (i.e. rs10887344 were significantly associated with quantitative measures of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and T2D, according to GWAS datasets from MAGIC. CONCLUSIONS: SP-D gene polymorphisms are associated with insulin resistance and T2D. These associations are independent of circulating SP-D concentrations.

  6. Maternal steroids and contaminants in common tern eggs: A mechanism of endocrine disruption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, J.B.; Nisbet, I.C.T.; Schwabl, H.

    2001-01-01

    We looked for evidence for the hypothesis that exposure of female birds to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) results in alteration of blood steroid hormone concentrations and alters subsequent hormone transfer of steroids to eggs. Eggs of three-egg clutches were collected from a PCB-exposed common tern (Sterna hirundo) colony (Ram Island, Buzzards Bay, MA, USA) and from a relatively clean colony (Bodkin Island, Chesapeake Bay, MD, USA), and were analyzed for concentrations of organochlorine contaminants and steroid hormones (17β-estradiol, 5α-dihydrotestosterone, testosterone and androstenedione). There was no relationship between total PCBs and steroid concentrations considering all eggs together, considering eggs of different laying order or considering differences between sequentially laid eggs in a clutch. Similarly, concentrations of di- and tri-chlorinated biphenyls and steroids in eggs were not related. The concentrations of PCBs, mercury and selenium were below estimated thresholds for toxicity to embryos. Maternal steroids, except estradiol, were present in yolk of all eggs, with increasing concentrations in the second and third eggs laid. Our data provided no evidence for a maternal toxicological event that might alter the amount of maternal steroid hormone transferred to eggs.

  7. Evolutionary mechanisms shaping the genetic population structure of marine fishes; lessons from the European flounder ( Platichthys flesus L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Hemmer; Eg Nielsen, Einar; Grønkjær, P.

    2007-01-01

    A number of evolutionary mechanisms have been suggested for generating low but significant genetic structuring among marine fish populations. We used nine microsatellite loci and recently developed methods in landscape genetics and coalescence-based estimation of historical gene flow and effectiv...... interplay with other evolutionary mechanisms, highlighting the importance of investigating species with wide geographical and ecological distributions to increase our understanding of evolution in the marine environment.......A number of evolutionary mechanisms have been suggested for generating low but significant genetic structuring among marine fish populations. We used nine microsatellite loci and recently developed methods in landscape genetics and coalescence-based estimation of historical gene flow and effective...... and western Baltic Sea samples. Alternative factors, such as dispersal potential and/or environmental gradients, could be important for generating genetic divergence in this region. The results show that the magnitude and scale of structuring generated by a specific mechanism depend critically on its...

  8. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Multiple Pseudomonas Strains Infecting Corylus avellana Trees Reveal the Occurrence of Two Genetic Clusters with Both Common and Distinctive Virulence and Fitness Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Marcelletti

    Full Text Available The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana is threatened in Europe by several pseudomonads which cause symptoms ranging from twig dieback to tree death. A comparison of the draft genomes of nine Pseudomonas strains isolated from symptomatic C. avellana trees was performed to identify common and distinctive genomic traits. The thorough assessment of genetic relationships among the strains revealed two clearly distinct clusters: P. avellanae and P. syringae. The latter including the pathovars avellanae, coryli and syringae. Between these two clusters, no recombination event was found. A genomic island of approximately 20 kb, containing the hrp/hrc type III secretion system gene cluster, was found to be present without any genomic difference in all nine pseudomonads. The type III secretion system effector repertoires were remarkably different in the two groups, with P. avellanae showing a higher number of effectors. Homologue genes of the antimetabolite mangotoxin and ice nucleation activity clusters were found solely in all P. syringae pathovar strains, whereas the siderophore yersiniabactin was only present in P. avellanae. All nine strains have genes coding for pectic enzymes and sucrose metabolism. By contrast, they do not have genes coding for indolacetic acid and anti-insect toxin. Collectively, this study reveals that genomically different Pseudomonas can converge on the same host plant by suppressing the host defence mechanisms with the use of different virulence weapons. The integration into their genomes of a horizontally acquired genomic island could play a fundamental role in their evolution, perhaps giving them the ability to exploit new ecological niches.

  9. Mechanisms for the symmetric and antisymmetric switching of a magnetic vortex core: Differences and common aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noske, Matthias; Stoll, Hermann; Fähnle, Manfred; Hertel, Riccardo; Schütz, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional micromagnetic simulations of the switching of a magnetic vortex core in a cylindrical nanodisk are performed, for excitations with out-of-plane fields (symmetric switching) or with various types of time-dependent in-plane fields (asymmetric switching). Although the switching mechanisms are different in detail, all switching events must involve the movement of a Bloch point through the disk, because the switching leads to a change of the Skyrmion number which is a topological invariant as long as there is no action of a Bloch point. The momentary magnetization configurations are different in different layers of the disk. Because of the three-dimensionality it is often difficult to decide whether the asymmetric switching is caused by the splitting of the dip close to the vortex core into a vortex-antivortex pair, and the annihilation of the original vortex with the antivortex (whereby a Bloch point moves). It is suggested that there are situations for which such a switching occurs by the formation of a Bloch point in a configuration which is already similar to a vortex-antivortex configuration, but by a movement of this Bloch point before the formation of a complete pair and without the annihilation of the original vortex with an antivortex.

  10. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J.; van Rooij, Eva|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/273357115; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on “omics.” Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  11. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  12. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Cui, Jinrui; Mengesha, Emebet; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Azziz, Ricardo; Goodarzi, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS. PMID:26305227

  13. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R Jones

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS.

  14. A common genetic variant at 15q25 modifies the associations of maternal smoking during pregnancy with fetal growth: The generation r study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.T.M. Leermakers (Lisan); H.R. Taal (Rob); R. Bakker (Rachel); E.A.P. Steegers (Eric); A. Hofman (Albert); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with fetal growth retardation. We examined whether a common genetic variant at chromosome 15q25 (rs1051730), which is known to be involved in nicotine metabolism, modifies the associations of maternal smoking with fetal growth

  15. New insights into the genetic mechanism of IQ in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Zhaokun Wang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASD is a complex condition with a number of underlying subtypes with different symptoms and presumably different genetic causes. One important difference between these sub-phenotypes is cognition. Some forms of ASD such as Asperger’s keep cognitive development intact while the majority does not. In this study we explored genetic factors that might account for this difference. Using a case-control study based on IQ status in 1657 ASD probands, we analyzed both common and rare variants provided by the Autism Genome Project consortium via dbGAP, identified a set of genes, among them SYT1L and KIAA0319L, that are strongly associated with IQ within a population of ASD patients.

  16. Genetic control and regulatory mechanisms of succinoglycan and curdlan biosynthesis in genus Agrobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Li, Ang; Ma, Fang; Yang, Jixian; Xie, Yutong

    2016-07-01

    Agrobacterium is a genus of gram-negative bacteria that can produce several typical exopolysaccharides with commercial uses in the food and pharmaceutical fields. In particular, succinoglycan and curdlan, due to their good quality in high yield, have been employed on an industrial scale comparatively early. Exopolysaccharide biosynthesis is a multiple-step process controlled by different functional genes, and various environmental factors cause changes in exopolysaccharide biosynthesis through regulatory mechanisms. In this mini-review, we focus on the genetic control and regulatory mechanisms of succinoglycan and curdlan produced by Agrobacterium. Some key functional genes and regulatory mechanisms for exopolysaccharide biosynthesis are described, possessing a high potential for application in metabolic engineering to modify exopolysaccharide production and physicochemical properties. This review may contribute to the understanding of exopolysaccharide biosynthesis and exopolysaccharide modification by metabolic engineering methods in Agrobacterium.

  17. Optimal Design of a Cam Mechanism with Translating Flat-Face Follower using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Tsiafis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The optimum design of a cam mechanism is a time consuming task, due to the numerous alternatives considerations. In the present work, the problem of design parameters optimization of a cam mechanism with translating flat - face follower is investigated from a multi - objective point of view. The design parameters, just like the cam base circle radius, the follower face width and the follower offset can be determined considering as the optimization criteria minimization of the cam size, of the input torque and of the contact stress. During the optimization procedure, a number of constraints regarding the pressure angle, the contact stress, etcare taken into account. The optimization approach, based on genetic algorithm, is applied to find the optimal solutions with respect to the a fore - mentioned objective function and to Ensure the kinematic requirements. Finally, the dynamic behavior of the designed cam mechanism is investigated considering the frictional forces.

  18. Common genetic variants explain the majority of the correlation between height and intelligence: the generation Scotland study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Batty, G David; Hayward, Caroline; Kerr, Shona M; Campbell, Archie; Hocking, Lynne J; Porteous, David J; Visscher, Peter M; Deary, Ian J

    2014-03-01

    Greater height and higher intelligence test scores are predictors of better health outcomes. Here, we used molecular (single-nucleotide polymorphism) data to estimate the genetic correlation between height and general intelligence (g) in 6,815 unrelated subjects (median age 57, IQR 49-63) from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study cohort. The phenotypic correlation between height and g was 0.16 (SE 0.01). The genetic correlation between height and g was 0.28 (SE 0.09) with a bivariate heritability estimate of 0.71. Understanding the molecular basis of the correlation between height and intelligence may help explain any shared role in determining health outcomes. This study identified a modest genetic correlation between height and intelligence with the majority of the phenotypic correlation being explained by shared genetic influences.

  19. Common genetic risk variants of TLR2 are not associated with periodontitis in large European case-control populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richter, G.M.; Graetz, C.; Pohler, P.; Nothnagel, M.; Dommisch, H.; Laine, M.L.; Folwaczny, M.; Noack, B.; Eickholz, P.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Jepsen, S.; Loos, B.G.; Schreiber, S.; Schaefer, A.S.

    2012-01-01

    Aim Involvement of TLR2 in the pathophysiology of periodontitis has widely been discussed, but hitherto, no validated genetic associations were reported. Previous association studies lacked sufficient statistical power and adequate haplotype information to draw unambiguous conclusions. The aim of

  20. Modeling Decisions to Undergo Genetic Testing for Susceptibility to Common Health Conditions: An Ancillary Study of the Multiplex Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Wade, Christopher H.; Shiloh, Shoshana; Woolford, Samuel W.; Roberts, J. Scott; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Marteau, Theresa M.; Biesecker, Barbara B.

    2011-01-01

    New genetic tests reveal risks for multiple conditions simultaneously, although little is understood about the psychological factors that affect testing uptake. We assessed a conceptual model called the Multiplex Genetic Testing Model (MGTM) using structural equation modeling (SEM). The MGTM delineates worry, perceived severity, perceived risk, response efficacy and attitudes toward testing as predictors of intentions and behavior. Participants were 270 healthy insured adults age 25–40 from t...

  1. Is There Any Evidence for Rapid, Genetically-Based, Climatic Niche Expansion in the Invasive Common Ragweed?

    OpenAIRE

    Gallien, Laure; Thuiller, Wilfried; Fort, No?mie; Boleda, Marti; Alberto, Florian J.; Rioux, Delphine; Lain?, Juliette; Lavergne, S?bastien

    2016-01-01

    Climatic niche shifts have been documented in a number of invasive species by comparing the native and adventive climatic ranges in which they occur. However, these shifts likely represent changes in the realized climatic niches of invasive species, and may not necessarily be driven by genetic changes in climatic affinities. Until now the role of rapid niche evolution in the spread of invasive species remains a challenging issue with conflicting results. Here, we document a likely genetically...

  2. Conservation genetics of the yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata) and the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) in the Italian Alps

    OpenAIRE

    Cornetti, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Global change is heavily affecting Alpine ecosystems in term of both climate warming and anthropization and its effects have been already demonstrated for many different taxa. However, understanding the genetic consequences on wild species caused by environmental modifications is complicated. In this thesis, I analyzed the genetic variation pattern in two vertebrate species whose distribution and persistence across the Italian Alps could be, or already have been, affected by changing climatic...

  3. Impaired Pavlovian fear extinction is a common phenotype across genetic lineages of the 129 inbred mouse strain

    OpenAIRE

    Camp, Marguerite; Norcross, Maxine; Whittle, Nigel; Feyder, Michael; D’Hanis, Wolfgang; Yilmazer-Hanke, Deniz; Singewald, Nicolas; Holmes, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Fear extinction is impaired in psychiatric disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder and schizophrenia, which have a major genetic component. However, the genetic factors underlying individual variability in fear extinction remain to be determined. By comparing a panel of inbred mouse strains, we recently identified a strain, 129S1/SvImJ (129S1), that exhibits a profound and selective deficit in Pavlovian fear extinction, and associated abnormalities in functional activation of a key pr...

  4. The relationship between genetic and environmental influences on resilience and on common internalizing and externalizing psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstadter, Ananda B; Maes, Hermine H; Sheerin, Christina M; Myers, John M; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-05-01

    Resilience to stressful life events (SLEs), which increase risk of psychopathology, is influenced by genetic factors. The purpose of this paper was to map the overlap of etiologic risk factors for resilience onto the broad psychopathological map. Resilience was defined as the difference between the twins' total score on a broad measure of internalizing symptoms and their predicted score based on their cumulative exposure to SLEs. Cholesky decompositions were performed with OpenMx to quantify the overlap in genetic and environmental risk factors between resilience and four phenotypes [major depression (MD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), alcohol abuse or dependence (AAD), and antisocial personality disorder (ASPD)]. The genetic factors that influence resilience account for 42 and 61 % of the heritability of MD and GAD, respectively, and 20 and 18 % for AAD and ASPD, respectively. The latent genetic contribution to MD was shared 47 % with resilience, and for AAD, this estimate was lower (23 %). The shared environmental covariance was nominal. Genetic influences on resilience contribute to internalizing phenotypes to a higher degree than to externalizing phenotypes. Environmental influences can also have an enduring effect on resilience. However, virtually all of the covariance between resilience and the phenotypes was genetic.

  5. Mechanism of Inflammation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: An Up-to-Date on Genetic Landmarks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Parmeggiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment among people over 50 years of age, accounting for up to 50% of all cases of legal blindness in Western countries. Although the aging represents the main determinant of AMD, it must be considered a multifaceted disease caused by interactions among environmental risk factors and genetic backgrounds. Mounting evidence and/or arguments document the crucial role of inflammation and immune-mediated processes in the pathogenesis of AMD. Proinflammatory effects secondary to chronic inflammation (e.g., alternative complement activation and heterogeneous types of oxidative stress (e.g., impaired cholesterol homeostasis can result in degenerative damages at the level of crucial macular structures, that is photoreceptors, retinal pigment epithelium, and Bruch’s membrane. In the most recent years, the association of AMD with genes, directly or indirectly, involved in immunoinflammatory pathways is increasingly becoming an essential core for AMD knowledge. Starting from the key basic-research notions detectable at the root of AMD pathogenesis, the present up-to-date paper reviews the best-known and/or the most attractive genetic findings linked to the mechanisms of inflammation of this complex disease.

  6. Blind to morphology: Genetics identifies several widespread ecologically common species and few endemics among Indo-Pacific cauliflower corals (Pocillopora, Scleractinia)

    KAUST Repository

    Pinzón, Jorge H C

    2013-04-05

    Aim: Using high-resolution genetic markers on samples gathered from across their wide distributional range, we endeavoured to delimit species diversity in reef-building Pocillopora corals. They are common, ecologically important, and widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific, but their phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental conditions and their nearly featureless microskeletal structures confound taxonomic assignments and limit an understanding of their ecology and evolution. Location: Indo-Pacific, Red Sea, Arabian/Persian Gulf. Methods: Sequence analysis of nuclear ribosomal (internal transcribed spacer 2, ITS2) and mitochondrial (open reading frame) loci were combined with population genetic data (seven microsatellite loci) for Pocillopora samples collected throughout the Indo-Pacific, Red Sea and Arabian Gulf, in order to assess the evolutionary divergence, reproductive isolation, frequency of hybridization and geographical distributions of the genus. Results: Between five and eight genetically distinct lineages comparable to species were identified with minimal or no hybridization between them. Colony morphology was generally incongruent with genetics across the full range of sampling, and the total number of species is apparently consistent with lower estimates from competing morphologically based hypotheses (about seven or eight taxa). The most commonly occurring genetic lineages were widely distributed and exhibited high dispersal and gene flow, factors that have probably minimized allopatric speciation. Uniquely among scleractinian genera, this genus contains a monophyletic group of broadcast spawners that evolved recently from an ancestral brooder. Main conclusions: The delineation of species diversity guided by genetics fundamentally advances our understanding of Pocillopora geographical distributions, ecology and evolution. Because traditional diagnostic features of colony and branch morphology are proving to be of limited utility, the

  7. Toward elucidation of genetic and functional genetic mechanisms in corn host resistance to Aspergillus flavus infection and aflatoxin contamination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan eShan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxins are carcinogenic mycotoxins produced by some species in the Aspergillus genus, such as A. flavus and A. parasiticus. Contamination of aflatoxins in corn profusely happens at pre-harvest stage when heat and drought field conditions favor A. flavus colonization. Commercial corn hybrids are generally susceptible to A. flavus infection. An ideal strategy for preventing aflatoxin contamination is through the enhancement of corn host resistance to Aspergillus infection and aflatoxin production. Constant efforts have been made by corn breeders to develop resistant corn genotypes. Significantly low levels of aflatoxin accumulation have been determined in certain resistant corn inbred lines. A number of reports of quantitative trait loci (QTLs have provided compelling evidence supporting the quantitative trait genetic basis of corn host resistance to aflatoxin accumulation. Important findings have also been obtained from the investigation on candidate resistance genes through transcriptomics approach. Elucidation of molecular mechanisms will provide in-depth understanding of the host-pathogen interactions and hence facilitate the breeding of corn with resistance to A. falvus infection and aflatoxin accumulation.

  8. Teaching assistants’ performance at identifying common introductory student difficulties in mechanics revealed by the Force Concept Inventory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Maries

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Force Concept Inventory (FCI has been widely used to assess student understanding of introductory mechanics concepts by a variety of educators and physics education researchers. One reason for this extensive use is that many of the items on the FCI have strong distractor choices which correspond to students’ alternate conceptions in mechanics. Instruction is unlikely to be effective if instructors do not know the common alternate conceptions of introductory physics students and explicitly take into account students’ initial knowledge states in their instructional design. Here, we discuss research involving the FCI to evaluate one aspect of the pedagogical content knowledge of teaching assistants (TAs: knowledge of introductory student alternate conceptions in mechanics as revealed by the FCI. For each item on the FCI, the TAs were asked to identify the most common incorrect answer choice of introductory physics students. This exercise was followed by a class discussion with the TAs related to this task, including the importance of knowing student difficulties in teaching and learning. Then, we used FCI pretest and post-test data from a large population (∼900 of introductory physics students to assess the extent to which TAs were able to identify alternate conceptions of introductory students related to force and motion. In addition, we carried out think-aloud interviews with graduate students who had more than two semesters of teaching experience in recitations to examine how they reason about the task. We find that while the TAs, on average, performed better than random guessing at identifying introductory students’ difficulties with FCI content, they did not identify many common difficulties that introductory physics students have after traditional instruction. We discuss specific alternate conceptions, the extent to which TAs are able to identify them, and results from the think-aloud interviews that provided valuable information

  9. Teaching assistants' performance at identifying common introductory student difficulties in mechanics revealed by the Force Concept Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maries, Alexandru; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-06-01

    The Force Concept Inventory (FCI) has been widely used to assess student understanding of introductory mechanics concepts by a variety of educators and physics education researchers. One reason for this extensive use is that many of the items on the FCI have strong distractor choices which correspond to students' alternate conceptions in mechanics. Instruction is unlikely to be effective if instructors do not know the common alternate conceptions of introductory physics students and explicitly take into account students' initial knowledge states in their instructional design. Here, we discuss research involving the FCI to evaluate one aspect of the pedagogical content knowledge of teaching assistants (TAs): knowledge of introductory student alternate conceptions in mechanics as revealed by the FCI. For each item on the FCI, the TAs were asked to identify the most common incorrect answer choice of introductory physics students. This exercise was followed by a class discussion with the TAs related to this task, including the importance of knowing student difficulties in teaching and learning. Then, we used FCI pretest and post-test data from a large population (˜900 ) of introductory physics students to assess the extent to which TAs were able to identify alternate conceptions of introductory students related to force and motion. In addition, we carried out think-aloud interviews with graduate students who had more than two semesters of teaching experience in recitations to examine how they reason about the task. We find that while the TAs, on average, performed better than random guessing at identifying introductory students' difficulties with FCI content, they did not identify many common difficulties that introductory physics students have after traditional instruction. We discuss specific alternate conceptions, the extent to which TAs are able to identify them, and results from the think-aloud interviews that provided valuable information about why TAs sometimes

  10. Aluminium tolerance in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.): physiological mechanisms, genetics and screening methods*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-ping; Raman, Harsh; Zhang, Guo-ping; Mendham, Neville; Zhou, Mei-xue

    2006-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity is one of the major limiting factors for barley production on acid soils. It inhibits root cell division and elongation, thus reducing water and nutrient uptake, consequently resulting in poor plant growth and yield. Plants tolerate Al either through external resistance mechanisms, by which Al is excluded from plant tissues or internal tolerance mechanisms, conferring the ability of plants to tolerate Al ion in the plant symplasm where Al that has permeated the plasmalemma is sequestered or converted into an innocuous form. Barley is considered to be most sensitive to Al toxicity among cereal species. Al tolerance in barley has been assessed by several methods, such as nutrient solution culture, soil bioassay and field screening. Genetic and molecular mapping research has shown that Al tolerance in barley is controlled by a single locus which is located on chromosome 4H. Molecular markers linked with Al tolerance loci have been identified and validated in a range of diverse populations. This paper reviews the (1) screening methods for evaluating Al tolerance, (2) genetics and (3) mechanisms underlying Al tolerance in barley. PMID:16972319

  11. Genetic mechanism for building evolution reflecting stress histories of residents and environmental factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Saya; Mita, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Conventional architectural design has a lot to do with the intuition and experience of designers. And residences are not always suit to its residents and surrounding environment. If we can extract residents' preferences and demands about comfort of each resident from histories of past life and reflect these information in next design, it's possible to make living space more comfortable. This thesis proposes genetic and evolutional system for architectural design information, which is applied evolutionary adaption. Specifically, I applied genetic mechanism which base sequence of DNA plays a role, epigenetic mechanism which chemical modification plays a role and evolutionary mechanism with natural selection. Proposed system firstly accumulates discomfort of residents, shortcoming of living space and usage of equipment as "comfort stress", "safety stress" and "energy saving stress", and modifies performance value of related performance items of building depending on the stress accumulation. Then this system processes selection according to the characteristics of the site for candidates of next generation of architectural design information which are generated via crossing and mutation. The data-set selected in this way is regarded as the performance value of next architectural design, and system suggests architectural specification to the residents.

  12. Is there a common control mechanism for anti-saccades and reading eye movements? Evidence from distributional analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Gary

    2012-03-15

    In the saccadic literature, the voluntary control of eye movement involves inhibiting automatic saccadic plans. In contrast, the dominant view in reading is that linguistic processes trigger saccade planning. The present study explores the possibility of a common control mechanism, in which cognitively driven responses compete to inhibit automatic, perceptually driven saccade plans. A probabilistic model is developed to account for empirical distributions of saccadic response time in anti-saccade tasks (Studies 1 and 2) and fixation duration in reading and reading-like tasks (Studies 3 and 4). In all cases the distributions can be decomposed into a perceptually based component and a component sensitive to cognitive demands. Parametric similarities among the models strongly suggest a shared cognitive control mechanism between reading and other voluntary saccadic tasks. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. A mechanism to activate branch migration between homologous DNA molecules in genetic recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, H M

    1975-01-01

    A mechanism to activate branch migration between homologous DNA molecules is described that leads to synapsis in genetic recombination. The model involves a restriction-like endonucleolytic enzyme that first nicks DNA (to produce single-strand breaks) on strands of opposite polarity at symmetrically arranged nucleotide sequences (located at ends of genes or operons). This is followed by local denaturation of the region, promoted by a single-strand-specific DNA binding protein (i.e., an unwinding protein). Hydrogen-bounding between homologous DNA molecules can then be initiated and this allows for subsequent propagation of hybrid DNA in the pathway to formation of the synapton structure. PMID:1054504

  14. [Aspect of brain MRI in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency. A diagnostic algorithm of the most common mitochondrial genetic mutations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaux-Bricout, M; Grévent, D; Lebre, A-S; Rio, M; Desguerre, I; De Lonlay, P; Valayannopoulos, V; Brunelle, F; Rötig, A; Munnich, A; Boddaert, N

    2014-05-01

    Mitochondrial diseases are due to deficiency of the respiratory chain and are characterized by a broad clinical and genetic heterogeneity that makes diagnosis difficult. Some clinical presentations are highly suggestive of given gene mutations, allowing rapid genetic diagnosis. However, owing to the wide pattern of symptoms in mitochondrial disorders and the constantly growing number of disease genes, their genetic diagnosis is frequently difficult and genotype/phenotype correlations remain elusive. For this reason, brain MRI appears as a useful tool for genotype/phenotype correlations. Here, we report the most frequent neuroradiological signs in mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency and we propose a diagnostic algorithm based on neuroimaging features, so as to direct molecular genetic tests in patients at risk of mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiency. This algorithm is based on the careful analysis of five areas on brain MRI: (1) basal ganglia (hyperintensities on T2 or calcifications); (2) cerebellum (hyperintensities on T2 or atrophy); (3) brainstem (hyperintensities on T2 or atrophy); (4) white matter (leukoencephalopathy); (5) cortex (sub-tentorial atrophy); (6) stroke-like episodes. We believe that the combination of brain MRI features is of value to support respiratory chain deficiency and direct molecular genetic tests. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Is Increased Intracellular Calcium in Red Blood Cells a Common Component in the Molecular Mechanism Causing Anemia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hertz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available For many hereditary disorders, although the underlying genetic mutation may be known, the molecular mechanism leading to hemolytic anemia is still unclear and needs further investigation. Previous studies revealed an increased intracellular Ca2+ in red blood cells (RBCs from patients with sickle cell disease, thalassemia, or Gardos channelopathy. Therefore we analyzed RBCs' Ca2+ content from 35 patients with different types of anemia (16 patients with hereditary spherocytosis, 11 patients with hereditary xerocytosis, 5 patients with enzymopathies, and 3 patients with hemolytic anemia of unknown cause. Intracellular Ca2+ in RBCs was measured by fluorescence microscopy using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4 and subsequent single cell analysis. We found that in RBCs from patients with hereditary spherocytosis and hereditary xerocytosis the intracellular Ca2+ levels were significantly increased compared to healthy control samples. For enzymopathies and hemolytic anemia of unknown cause the intracellular Ca2+ levels in RBCs were not significantly different. These results lead us to the hypothesis that increased Ca2+ levels in RBCs are a shared component in the mechanism causing an accelerated clearance of RBCs from the blood stream in channelopathies such as hereditary xerocytosis and in diseases involving defects of cytoskeletal components like hereditary spherocytosis. Future drug developments should benefit from targeting Ca2+ entry mediating molecular players leading to better therapies for patients.

  16. Genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... mother and medications). These include: Asthma Cancer Coronary heart disease Diabetes Hypertension Stroke MITOCHONDRIAL DNA-LINKED DISORDERS Mitochondria ...

  17. Common Genetic Variants Explain the Majority of the Correlation Between Height and Intelligence: The Generation Scotland Study

    OpenAIRE

    Marioni, Riccardo E; Batty, G. David; Hayward, Caroline; Kerr, Shona M.; Campbell, Archie; Hocking, Lynne J.; Scotland, Generation; Porteous, David J.; Visscher, Peter M; Deary, Ian J

    2014-01-01

    Greater height and higher intelligence test scores are predictors of better health outcomes. Here, we used molecular (single-nucleotide polymorphism) data to estimate the genetic correlation between height and general intelligence (g) in 6,815 unrelated subjects (median age 57, IQR 49–63) from the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study cohort. The phenotypic correlation between height and g was 0.16 (SE 0.01). The genetic correlation between height and g was 0.28 (SE 0.09) with a b...

  18. Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Quantitative Trait Loci Controlling Maize Inflorescence Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manfei; Zhong, Wanshun; Yang, Fang; Zhang, Zuxin

    2018-02-06

    The establishment of inflorescence architecture is critical for the reproduction of flowering plant species. The maize plant generates two types of inflorescences, the tassel and the ear, and their architectures have a large effect on grain yield and yield-related traits that are genetically controlled by quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Since ear and tassel architecture are deeply affected by the activity of inflorescence meristems, key QTLs and genes regulating meristematic activity have important impacts on inflorescence development and show great potential for optimizing grain yield. Isolation of yield trait-related QTLs is challenging but these QTLs have direct application in maize breeding. Additionally, characterization and functional dissection of QTLs can provide genetic and molecular knowledge of quantitative variation in inflorescence architecture. In this review, we summarize currently identified QTLs responsible for the establishment of ear and tassel architecture and discuss the potential genetic control of four ear-related and four tassel-related traits. In recent years, several inflorescence architecture-related QTLs have been characterized at the gene level. We review the mechanisms of these characterized QTLs. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Associations with Common Genetic Variants in FGFR2 according to the Intrinsic Subtypes in Southern Han Chinese Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiying Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GWAS have identified variation in the FGFR2 locus as risk factors for breast cancer. Validation studies, however, have shown inconsistent results by ethnics and pathological characteristics. To further explore this inconsistency and investigate the associations of FGFR2 variants with breast cancer according to intrinsic subtype (Luminal-A, Luminal-B, ER−&PR−&HER2+, and triple negative among Southern Han Chinese women, we genotyped rs1078806, rs1219648, rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 polymorphisms in 609 patients and 882 controls. Significant associations with breast cancer risk were observed for rs2420946, rs2981579, and rs2981582 with OR (95% CI per risk allele of 1.19 (1.03–1.39, 1.24 (1.07–1.43, and 1.17 (1.01–1.36, respectively. In subtype specific analysis, above three SNPs were significantly associated with increased Luminal-A risk in a dose-dependent manner Ptrend<0.01; however, only rs2981579 was associated with Luminal-B, and none were linked to ER−&PR− subtypes (ER−&PR−&HER2+ and triple negative. Haplotype analyses also identified common haplotypes significantly associated with luminal-like subtypes (Luminal-A and Luminal-B, but not with ER−&PR− subtypes. Our results suggest that associations of FGFR2 SNPs with breast cancer were heterogeneous according to intrinsic subtype. Future studies stratifying patients by their intrinsic subtypes will provide new insights into the complex genetic mechanisms underlying breast cancer.

  20. Association study of common genetic variants and HIV-1 acquisition in 6,300 infected cases and 7,200 controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J McLaren

    Full Text Available Multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been performed in HIV-1 infected individuals, identifying common genetic influences on viral control and disease course. Similarly, common genetic correlates of acquisition of HIV-1 after exposure have been interrogated using GWAS, although in generally small samples. Under the auspices of the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV, we have combined the genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data collected by 25 cohorts, studies, or institutions on HIV-1 infected individuals and compared them to carefully matched population-level data sets (a list of all collaborators appears in Note S1 in Text S1. After imputation using the 1,000 Genomes Project reference panel, we tested approximately 8 million common DNA variants (SNPs and indels for association with HIV-1 acquisition in 6,334 infected patients and 7,247 population samples of European ancestry. Initial association testing identified the SNP rs4418214, the C allele of which is known to tag the HLA-B*57:01 and B*27:05 alleles, as genome-wide significant (p = 3.6 × 10⁻¹¹. However, restricting analysis to individuals with a known date of seroconversion suggested that this association was due to the frailty bias in studies of lethal diseases. Further analyses including testing recessive genetic models, testing for bulk effects of non-genome-wide significant variants, stratifying by sexual or parenteral transmission risk and testing previously reported associations showed no evidence for genetic influence on HIV-1 acquisition (with the exception of CCR5Δ32 homozygosity. Thus, these data suggest that genetic influences on HIV acquisition are either rare or have smaller effects than can be detected by this sample size.

  1. New developments on the neurobiological and pharmaco-genetic mechanisms underlying internet and videogame addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aviv; Lejoyeux, Michel

    2015-03-01

    There is emerging evidence that the psychobiological mechanisms underlying behavioral addictions such as internet and videogame addiction resemble those of addiction for substances of abuse. Review of brain imaging, treatment and genetic studies on videogame and internet addiction. Literature search of published articles between 2009 and 2013 in Pubmed using "internet addiction" and "videogame addiction" as the search word. Twenty-nine studies have been selected and evaluated under the criteria of brain imaging, treatment, and genetics. Brain imaging studies of the resting state have shown that long-term internet game playing affected brain regions responsible for reward, impulse control and sensory-motor coordination. Brain activation studies have shown that videogame playing involved changes in reward and loss of control and that gaming pictures have activated regions similarly to those activated by cue-exposure to drugs. Structural studies have shown alterations in the volume of the ventral striatum possible as result of changes in reward. Furthermore, videogame playing was associated with dopamine release similar in magnitude to those of drugs of abuse and that there were faulty inhibitory control and reward mechanisms videogame addicted individuals. Finally, treatment studies using fMRI have shown reduction in craving for videogames and reduced associated brain activity. Videogame playing may be supported by similar neural mechanisms underlying drug abuse. Similar to drug and alcohol abuse, internet addiction results in sub-sensitivity of dopamine reward mechanisms. Given the fact that this research is in its early stage it is premature to conclude that internet addiction is equivalent to substance addictions. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  2. PHENOTYPIC PLASTICITY IN CHRYSOPERLA: GENETIC VARIATION IN THE SENSORY MECHANISM AND IN CORRELATED REPRODUCTIVE TRAITS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Catherine A; Tauber, Maurice J

    1992-12-01

    A genetically variable sensory mechanism provides phenotypic plasticity in the seasonal cycle of the Chrysoperla carnea species-complex of green lacewings. The mechanism functions as a switch during the pupal and early imaginal stages to determine aestival reproduction versus aestival dormancy, and it has two major components: (1) response to photoperiod and (2) response to a stimulus(i) associated with the prey of the larvae. Ultimately, the switch is based on the response to photoperiod-an all-or-nothing trait whose variation (long-day reproduction versus a short-day/long-day requirement for reproduction) is determined by alleles at two unlinked autosomal loci. In eastern North America, variation in this component of the switch differentiates two reproductively isolated "species" that are sympatric throughout the region: Chrysoperla carnea, in which both loci are homozygous for the dominant alleles that determine long-day, spring and summer reproduction and thus multivoltinism, and C. downesi, which has a very high incidence of the recessive alleles for the short-day/long-day requirement, and thus univoltine spring breeding. In contrast, geographical populations in western North America harbor variable amounts of within-and among-family genetic variation for the photoperiodic responses and also for the switch's second component-adult responsiveness to the prey of the larvae. The geographic pattern of genetic variation in the two components of the switch indicates that it is a highly integrated adaptation to environmental heterogeneity. Expression of among-family variation in the prey component of the switch is highly dependent on photoperiodic conditions and genotype (it requires a constant long daylength and the recessive short-day/long-day genotype). Thus, we infer that responsiveness to prey evolved as a modifier of the photoperiodic trait. The switch has a significant negative effect on a major determinant of fitness; it lengthens the preoviposition period in

  3. Evaluating two-dimensional electrophoresis profiles of the protein phaseolin as markers of genetic differentiation and seed protein quality in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pedrouso, María; Bernal, Javier; Franco, Daniel; Zapata, Carlos

    2014-07-23

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) profiles of the protein phaseolin, the major seed storage protein of common bean, display great number of spots with differentially glycosylated and phosphorylated α- and β-type polypeptides. This work aims to test whether these complex profiles can be useful markers of genetic differentiation and seed protein quality in bean populations. The 2-DE phaseolin profile and the amino acid composition were examined in bean seeds from 18 domesticated and wild accessions belonging to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools. We found that proteomic distances based on 2-DE profiles were successful in identifying the accessions belonging to each gene pool and outliers distantly related. In addition, accessions identified as outliers from proteomic distances showed the highest levels of methionine content, an essential amino acid deficient in bean seeds. These findings suggest that 2-DE phaseolin profiles provide valuable information with potential of being used in common bean genetic improvement.

  4. Multivariate analysis and determination of the best indirect selection criteria to genetic improvement the biological nitrogen fixation ability in common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golparvar Reza Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the best indirect selection criteria for genetic improvement of biological nitrogen fixation, sixty four common bean genotypes were cultivated in two randomized complete block design. Genotypes were inoculated with bacteria Rhizobium legominosarum biovar Phaseoli isolate L-109 only in one of the experiments. The second experiment was considered as check for the first. Correlation analysis showed positive and highly significant correlation of majority of the traits with percent of nitrogen fixation. Step-wise regression designated that traits percent of total nitrogen of shoot, number of nodule per plant and biological yield accounted for 92.3 percent of variation exist in percent of nitrogen fixation. Path analysis indicated that these traits have direct and positive effect on percent of nitrogen fixation. Hence, these traits are promising indirect selection criteria for genetic improvement of nitrogen fixation capability in common bean genotypes especially in early generations.

  5. Phenotypic and genetic differentiation in young-of-the-year common sole (Solea solea) at differentially contaminated nursery grounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinand, Bruno; Durieux, Eric D H; Dupuy, Célie; Cerqueira, Frédérique; Bégout, Marie-Laure

    2011-04-01

    Growth-related characters, condition factor, and genetic differentiation were investigated for a single cohort of young-of-the-year (YOY) sole within and among nurseries with differing levels of heavy metals (Cd, Cu and Zn) contamination in the two Charentais Straits, Bay of Biscay, France. Analyses were performed when individuals recruited (May), then after a full summer spent in each nursery (October). Levels of phenotypic and genetic diversity were compared, together with genetic differentiation at a candidate metallothionein (MT) locus and three putatively neutral microsatellite loci. No phenotypic or genetic differentiation was detected among nurseries in May, but significant variation at each phenotypic trait and at the multilocus level in October (P nurseries, whether corrected for null alleles or not (θ=0.0401 and θ(corr.FreeNA)=0.0326, respectively; P nurseries present a molecular correlate acting at identical spatio-temporal scales among nurseries, potentially reflecting differential selective pressure among nurseries in response to contamination. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic and molecular mechanisms in multiple myeloma: a route to better understand disease pathogenesis and heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Christine Kyrtsonis

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Marie-Christine Kyrtsonis1,2, Vassiliki Bartzis1,2, Xenophon Papanikolaou1, Efstathios Koulieris1,2, George Georgiou2, Maria Dimou2, Tatiana Tzenou1,2, Panayiotis Panayiotidis21First Department of Propedeutic Internal Medicine, 2Department of Hematology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Laikon Hospital, GreeceAbstract: Multiple myeloma (MM is a heterogeneous plasma cell neoplasm presenting with a wide range of clinical manifestations. In spite of the availability of very performing treatment modalities, survival is highly varying, ranging from a few months to several years. Underlying genetic and microenvironmental mechanisms are thought to be responsible for clinical heterogeneity. Disease etiology is unknown but progresses in the understanding of its pathogenesis have shown that MM precursor cell transformation into a malignant one occurs in a multistep process. Possibly during class switch recombination a primary genetic event takes place. With the occurrence of additional events and the support of bone marrow microenvironmental cells, neoplastic plasma cells actively proliferate and disease behavior may change. Recurrent translocations involving the IgH locus (11q13, 4p16, 16q23, 21q12, and 6p21, deletions of chromosome 13, trisomies of chromosomes 3, 5, 9, 11, 15, 19, and 21, and dysregulated expression of cyclin D genes, are considered initiating or primary events. Alterations related to further disease transformation and adverse prognosis are deletion of 17p13, c-myc translocations, and gains of chromosome 1q21. In relation to the underlying genetic defects, disease subgroups are recognized. Accordingly treatment effectiveness may differ among groups. Intense research is ongoing in this field.Keywords: myeloma, pathogenesis, genetic abnormalities, heterogeneity, prognosis

  7. Replication intermediates of the linear mitochondrial DNA of Candida parapsilosis suggest a common recombination based mechanism for yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, Joachim M; Sedman, Tiina; Visacka, Katarina; Slezakova, Judita; Tomaska, Lubomir; Nosek, Jozef; Sedman, Juhan

    2014-08-15

    Variation in the topology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in eukaryotes evokes the question if differently structured DNAs are replicated by a common mechanism. RNA-primed DNA synthesis has been established as a mechanism for replicating the circular animal/mammalian mtDNA. In yeasts, circular mtDNA molecules were assumed to be templates for rolling circle DNA-replication. We recently showed that in Candida albicans, which has circular mapping mtDNA, recombination driven replication is a major mechanism for replicating a complex branched mtDNA network. Careful analyses of C. albicans-mtDNA did not reveal detectable amounts of circular DNA molecules. In the present study we addressed the question of how the unit sized linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis terminating at both ends with arrays of tandem repeats (mitochondrial telomeres) is replicated. Originally, we expected to find replication intermediates diagnostic of canonical bi-directional replication initiation at the centrally located bi-directional promoter region. However, we found that the linear mtDNA of Candida parapsilosis also employs recombination for replication initiation. The most striking findings were that the mitochondrial telomeres appear to be hot spots for recombination driven replication, and that stable RNA:DNA hybrids, with a potential role in mtDNA replication, are also present in the mtDNA preparations. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. A specific endogenous reference for genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) DNA quantification by real-time PCR targeting lectin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Rossi, Gabriela B; Zimmermann, Naíra F; Oliveira, Jaison P; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-11-01

    The Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified (GM) common bean was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Methods for the quantification of this new genetically modified organism (GMO) are necessary. The development of a suitable endogenous reference is essential for GMO quantification by real-time PCR. Based on this, a new taxon-specific endogenous reference quantification assay was developed for Phaseolus vulgaris L. Three genes encoding common bean proteins (phaseolin, arcelin, and lectin) were selected as candidates for endogenous reference. Primers targeting these candidate genes were designed and the detection was evaluated using the SYBR Green chemistry. The assay targeting lectin gene showed higher specificity than the remaining assays, and a hydrolysis probe was then designed. This assay showed high specificity for 50 common bean samples from two gene pools, Andean and Mesoamerican. For GM common bean varieties, the results were similar to those obtained for non-GM isogenic varieties with PCR efficiency values ranging from 92 to 101 %. Moreover, this assay presented a limit of detection of ten haploid genome copies. The primers and probe developed in this work are suitable to detect and quantify either GM or non-GM common bean.

  9. The common genetic influence over processing speed and white matter microstructure: Evidence from the Old Order Amish and Human Connectome Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochunov, Peter; Thompson, Paul M; Winkler, Anderson; Morrissey, Mary; Fu, Mao; Coyle, Thomas R; Du, Xiaoming; Muellerklein, Florian; Savransky, Anya; Gaudiot, Christopher; Sampath, Hemalatha; Eskandar, George; Jahanshad, Neda; Patel, Binish; Rowland, Laura; Nichols, Thomas E; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Shuldiner, Alan R; Mitchell, Braxton D; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-01-15

    Speed with which brain performs information processing influences overall cognition and is dependent on the white matter fibers. To understand genetic influences on processing speed and white matter FA, we assessed processing speed and diffusion imaging fractional anisotropy (FA) in related individuals from two populations. Discovery analyses were performed in 146 individuals from large Old Order Amish (OOA) families and findings were replicated in 485 twins and siblings of the Human Connectome Project (HCP). The heritability of processing speed was h(2)=43% and 49% (both p<0.005), while the heritability of whole brain FA was h(2)=87% and 88% (both p<0.001), in the OOA and HCP, respectively. Whole brain FA was significantly correlated with processing speed in the two cohorts. Quantitative genetic analysis demonstrated a significant degree to which common genes influenced joint variation in FA and brain processing speed. These estimates suggested common sets of genes influencing variation in both phenotypes, consistent with the idea that common genetic variations contributing to white matter may also support their associated cognitive behavior. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel use of a balloon dilatation catheter to enable mechanical lithotripsy of difficult common bile duct stones after initial failed attempt: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Wei-Liang; Tung, Joshua Yi Min; Tan, Trevor Hwee Yong; Tan, Li Ting; Tan, Shaun; Ngoi, Sing Shang

    2018-01-24

    Difficult and large common bile duct stones can be crushed and removed using a mechanical lithotripter. Very often the lack of working space within the common bile duct causing the failure of mechanical lithotripsy would inevitably mean repeat or further invasive procedures. A patient with large and multiple common bile duct stones underwent ERCP, and initial deployment of a mechanical lithotripter failed due to the lack of working space within the common bile duct. A through-the-scope (TTS) dilator was utilized to increase the working space before successful deployment of the mechanical lithotripter, and subsequent clearance of all stones within the same setting. We herein describe a novel and ingenious technique of utilizing a through-the-scope (TTS) dilator in helping to expand the space within the common bile duct to allow for full deployment of a mechanical lithotripter and successful clearance of common bile duct stones. This method can be easily applied by advanced endoscopists and is expected to lead to increased success rates of difficult common bile duct stones clearance in a single setting. Use of TTS dilators to increase working space within the common bile duct can be useful in increasing the success rates of mechanical lithotripsy in the setting of large and multiple common bile duct stones. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Common genetic variants in ARNTL and NPAS2 and at chromosome 12p13 are associated with objectively measured sleep traits in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Daniel S; Parimi, Neeta; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Blackwell, Terri; Redline, Susan; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Orwoll, Eric S; Cummings, Steven R; Stone, Katie L; Tranah, Gregory J

    2013-03-01

    To determine the association between common genetic variation in the clock gene pathway and objectively measured acti-graphic sleep and activity rhythm traits. Genetic association study in two population-based cohorts of elderly participants: the Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) and the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study. Population-based. SOF participants (n = 1,407, 100% female, mean age 84 years) and MrOS participants (n = 2,527, 100% male, mean age 77 years) with actigraphy and genotype data. N/A. Common genetic variation in 30 candidate genes was captured using 529 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Sleep and activity rhythm traits were objectively measured using wrist actigraphy. In a region of high linkage disequilibrium on chromosome 12p13 containing the candidate gene GNB3, the rs1047776 A allele and the rs2238114 C allele were significantly associated with higher wake after sleep onset (meta-analysis: rs1047776 PADD = 2 × 10(-5), rs2238114 PADD = 5 × 10(-5)) and lower LRRC23 gene expression (rs1047776: ρ = -0.22, P = 0.02; rs2238114: ρ = -0.50, P = 5 × 10(-8)). In MrOS participants, SNPs in ARNTL and NPAS2, genes coding for binding partners, were associated with later sleep and wake onset time (sleep onset time: ARNTL rs3816358 P2DF = 1 × 10(-4), NPAS2 rs3768984 P2DF = 5 × 10(-5); wake onset time: rs3816358 P2DF = 3 × 10(-3), rs3768984 P2DF = 2 × 10(-4)) and the SNP interaction was significant (sleep onset time PINT = 0.003, wake onset time PINT = 0.001). A SNP association in the CLOCK gene replicated in the MrOS cohort, and rs3768984 was associated with sleep duration in a previously reported study. Cluster analysis identified four clusters of genetic associations. These findings support a role for common genetic variation in clock genes in the regulation of inter-related sleep traits in the elderly. Evans DS; Parimi N; Nievergelt CM; Blackwell T; Redline S; Ancoli-Israel S; Orwoll ES; Cummings SR; Stone KL; Tranah GJ. Common

  12. ASD and schizophrenia show distinct developmental profiles in common genetic overlap with population-based social communication difficulties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    St Pourcain, B; Robinson, E B; Anttila, V

    2017-01-01

    Difficulties in social communication are part of the phenotypic overlap between autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and schizophrenia. Both conditions follow, however, distinct developmental patterns. Symptoms of ASD typically occur during early childhood, whereas most symptoms characteristic......-developing youth (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, N⩽5553, longitudinal assessments at 8, 11, 14 and 17 years) using the Social Communication Disorder Checklist. Data on clinical ASD (PGC-ASD: 5305 cases, 5305 pseudo-controls; iPSYCH-ASD: 7783 cases, 11 359 controls) and schizophrenia (PGC-SCZ2: 34...... effects were unrelated to each other and changes in trait-disorder links reflect the heterogeneity of genetic factors influencing social communication difficulties during childhood versus later adolescence. Thus, both clinical ASD and schizophrenia share some genetic influences with impairments in social...

  13. Is there a common mechanism underlying genomic instability, bystander effects and other nontargeted effects of exposure to ionizing radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A number of nontargeted and delayed effects associated with radiation exposure have now been described. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects. It is unlikely that these nontargeted effects are directly induced by cellular irradiation. Instead, it is proposed that some as yet to be identified secreted factor can be produced by irradiated cells that can stimulate effects in nonirradiated cells (death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors) and perpetuate genomic instability in the clonally expanded progeny of an irradiated cell. The proposed factor must be soluble and capable of being transported between cells by cell-to-cell gap junction communication channels. Furthermore, it must have the potential to stimulate cellular cytokines and/or reactive oxygen species. While it is difficult to imagine a role for such a secreted factor in contributing to transgenerational effects, the other nontargeted effects of radiation may all share a common mechanism.

  14. pRb inactivation in mammary cells reveals common mechanisms for tumor initiation and progression in divergent epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Simin

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma 1 (pRb and the related pocket proteins, retinoblastoma-like 1 (p107 and retinoblastoma-like 2 (p130 (pRb(f, collectively, play a pivotal role in regulating eukaryotic cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and terminal differentiation. While aberrations in the pRb-signaling pathway are common in human cancers, the consequence of pRb(f loss in the mammary gland has not been directly assayed in vivo. We reported previously that inactivating these critical cell cycle regulators in divergent cell types, either brain epithelium or astrocytes, abrogates the cell cycle restriction point, leading to increased cell proliferation and apoptosis, and predisposing to cancer. Here we report that mouse mammary epithelium is similar in its requirements for pRb(f function; Rb(f inactivation by T(121, a fragment of SV40 T antigen that binds to and inactivates pRb(f proteins, increases proliferation and apoptosis. Mammary adenocarcinomas form within 16 mo. Most apoptosis is regulated by p53, which has no impact on proliferation, and heterozygosity for a p53 null allele significantly shortens tumor latency. Most tumors in p53 heterozygous mice undergo loss of the wild-type p53 allele. We show that the mechanism of p53 loss of heterozygosity is not simply the consequence of Chromosome 11 aneuploidy and further that chromosomal instability subsequent to p53 loss is minimal. The mechanisms for pRb and p53 tumor suppression in the epithelia of two distinct tissues, mammary gland and brain, are indistinguishable. Further, this study has produced a highly penetrant breast cancer model based on aberrations commonly observed in the human disease.

  15. Multilocus phylogeography of the common midwife toad, Alytes obstetricans (Anura, Alytidae): Contrasting patterns of lineage diversification and genetic structure in the Iberian refugium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, H; Maia-Carvalho, B; Sousa-Neves, T; García-París, M; Sequeira, F; Ferrand, N; Martínez-Solano, I

    2015-12-01

    Recent investigations on the evolutionary history of the common midwife toad (Alytes obstetricans) revealed high levels of geographically structured genetic diversity but also a situation where delineation of major historical lineages and resolution of their relationships are much more complex than previously thought. We studied sequence variation in one mitochondrial and four nuclear genes throughout the entire distribution range of all recognized A. obstetricans subspecies to infer the evolutionary processes that shaped current patterns of genetic diversity and population subdivision. We found six divergent, geographically structured mtDNA haplogroups diagnosing population lineages, and varying levels of admixture in nuclear markers. Given the timeframe inferred for the splits between major lineages, the climatic and environmental changes that occurred during the Pleistocene seem to have shaped the diversification history of A. obstetricans. Survival of populations in allopatric refugia through the Ice Ages supports the generality of the "refugia-within-refugia" scenario for the Iberian Peninsula. However, lineages corresponding to subspecies A. o. almogavarii, A. o. pertinax, A. o. obstetricans, and A. o. boscai responded differently to Pleistocene climatic oscillations after diverging from a common ancestor. Alytes o. obstetricans expanded northward from a northern Iberian refugium through the western Pyrenees, leaving a signal of contrasting patterns of genetic diversity, with a single mtDNA haplotype north of the Pyrenees from SW France to Germany. Both A. o. pertinax and A. o. boscai are widespread and genetically diverse in Iberia, the latter comprising two divergent lineages with a long independent history. Finally, A. o. almogavarii is mostly restricted to the north-eastern corner of Iberia north of the Ebro river, with additional populations in a small region in south-eastern France. This taxon exhibits unparalleled levels of genetic diversity and little

  16. Common genetic factors among sexual orientation, gender nonconformity, and number of sex partners in female twins: implications for the evolution of homosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burri, Andrea; Spector, Tim; Rahman, Qazi

    2015-04-01

    Homosexuality is a stable population-level trait in humans that lowers direct fitness and yet is substantially heritable, resulting in a so-called Darwinian "paradox." Evolutionary models have proposed that polymorphic genes influencing homosexuality confer a reproductive benefit to heterosexual carriers, thus offsetting the fitness costs associated with persistent homosexuality. This benefit may consist of a "sex typicality" intermediate phenotype. However, there are few empirical tests of this hypothesis using genetically informative data in humans. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that common genetic factors can explain the association between measures of sex typicality, mating success, and homosexuality in a Western (British) sample of female twins. Here, we used data from 996 female twins (498 twin pairs) comprising 242 full dizygotic pairs and 256 full monozygotic pairs (mean age 56.8) and 1,555 individuals whose co-twin did not participate. Measures of sexual orientation, sex typicality (recalled childhood gender nonconformity), and mating success (number of lifetime sexual partners) were completed. Variables were subject to multivariate variance component analysis. We found that masculine women are more likely to be nonheterosexual, report more sexual partners, and, when heterosexual, also report more sexual partners. Multivariate twin modeling showed that common genetic factors explained the relationship between sexual orientation, sex typicality, and mating success through a shared latent factor. Our findings suggest that genetic factors responsible for nonheterosexuality are shared with genetic factors responsible for the number of lifetime sexual partners via a latent sex typicality phenotype in human females. These results may have implications for evolutionary models of homosexuality but are limited by potential mediating variables (such as personality traits) and measurement issues. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  17. Range extension for the common dolphin (Delphinus sp. to the Colombian Caribbean, with taxonomic implications from genetic barcoding and phylogenetic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)