WorldWideScience

Sample records for common factor linking

  1. Variability: The common factor linking low dose-induced genomic instability, adaptation and bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, 1959 NE Pacific, Box 356069, Seattle, WA 98195-6069 (United States)]. E-mail: jschwart@u.washington.edu

    2007-03-01

    The characteristics of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability, adaptive responses, and bystander effects were compared in order to probe possible underlying mechanisms, and develop models for predicting response to in vivo low dose radiation exposures. While there are some features that are common to all three (e.g., absence of a true dose-response, the multiple endpoints affected by each), other characteristics appear to distinguish one from the other (e.g., TP53 involvement, LET response, influence of DNA repair). Each of the responses is also highly variable; not all cell and tissue models show the same response and there is much interindividual variation in response. Most of these studies have employed in vitro cell culture or tissue explant models, and understanding underlying mechanisms and the biological significance of these low dose-responses will require study of tissue-specific in vivo endpoints. The in vitro studies strongly suggest that modeling low dose radiation effects will be a complex process, and will likely require separate study of each of these low dose phenomena. Knowledge of instability responses, for example, may not aid in predicting other low dose effects in the same tissue.

  2. Expanding upon the 'extreme male brain' theory of autism as a common link between other major risk factors: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wendy; Wen, Shi Wu

    2014-05-01

    On average, males have a stronger preference for physical systems and machines over interpersonal interactions; they have lower average levels of cognitive empathy or social cognition than females; and they have higher rates of 'extreme' intelligence when it comes to abstract concepts such as those found in mathematics and sciences. All three traits are also commonly associated with individuals with an autism spectrum disorder or ASD; clearly, it is not coincidental that incidence rates of autism are reportedly four times higher in males than in females. The common link between the majority of risk factors assessed in this review (including technological advancements, advanced parental age, socioeconomic status, and genetic predispositions towards ASDs in families of scientists and engineers) can be traced to a specific hormone, testosterone. It was established that traits which are typically associated with males are also typically associated with ASDs as well as individuals with antisocial personality disorder, or APD. The key distinction between individuals who are considered to be 'autistic' as opposed to those who are considered 'sociopathic' lies in the difference between their empathy deficits: whereas those who are 'autistic' are said to lack cognitive empathy (the ability to identify and understand the thoughts and feelings of others and to respond to these with appropriate emotions), those who are 'sociopathic' are said to lack emotional empathy (which is responsible for inhibiting acts of physical aggression or violence). This would explain why autistic individuals can have elevated testosterone levels without becoming physically aggressive.

  3. Psychotic experiences are linked to cannabis use in adolescents in the community because of common underlying environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; Zavos, Helena M S; McGuire, Philip; Cardno, Alastair G; Freeman, Daniel; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-06-30

    Cannabis users are more likely to have psychotic experiences (PEs). The degree to which these associations are driven by genetic or environmental influences in adolescence is unknown. This study estimated the genetic and environmental contributions to the relationship between cannabis use and PEs. Specific PEs were measured in a community-based twin sample (4830 16-year-old pairs) using self-reports and parent-reports. Adolescents reported on ever using cannabis. Multivariate liability threshold structural equation model-fitting was conducted. Cannabis use was significantly correlated with PEs. Modest heritability (37%), common environmental influences (55%) and unique environment (8%) were found for cannabis use. For PEs, modest heritability (27-54%), unique environmental influences (E=12-50%) and little common environmental influences (11-20%), with the exception of parent-rated Negative Symptoms (42%), were reported. Environmental influences explained all of the covariation between cannabis use and paranoia, cognitive disorganization and parent-rated negative symptoms (bivariate common environment=69-100%, bivariate unique environment=28-31%), whilst the relationship between cannabis use and hallucinations indicated familial influences. Cannabis use explains 2-5% of variance in positive, cognitive, and negative PEs. Cannabis use and psychotic experience co-occur due to environmental factors. Focus on specific environments may reveal why adolescent cannabis use and psychotic experiences tend to 'travel together'. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Psychotic experiences are linked to cannabis use in adolescents in the community because of common underlying environmental risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakoor, Sania; Zavos, Helena M.S.; McGuire, Philip; Cardno, Alastair G.; Freeman, Daniel; Ronald, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    Cannabis users are more likely to have psychotic experiences (PEs). The degree to which these associations are driven by genetic or environmental influences in adolescence is unknown. This study estimated the genetic and environmental contributions to the relationship between cannabis use and PEs. Specific PEs were measured in a community-based twin sample (4830 16-year-old pairs) using self-reports and parent-reports. Adolescents reported on ever using cannabis. Multivariate liability threshold structural equation model-fitting was conducted. Cannabis use was significantly correlated with PEs. Modest heritability (37%), common environmental influences (55%) and unique environment (8%) were found for cannabis use. For PEs, modest heritability (27–54%), unique environmental influences (E=12–50%) and little common environmental influences (11–20%), with the exception of parent-rated Negative Symptoms (42%), were reported. Environmental influences explained all of the covariation between cannabis use and paranoia, cognitive disorganization and parent-rated negative symptoms (bivariate common environment=69–100%, bivariate unique environment=28–31%), whilst the relationship between cannabis use and hallucinations indicated familial influences. Cannabis use explains 2–5% of variance in positive, cognitive, and negative PEs. Cannabis use and psychotic experience co-occur due to environmental factors. Focus on specific environments may reveal why adolescent cannabis use and psychotic experiences tend to ‘travel together’. PMID:25912376

  5. Expected linking error resulting from item parameter drift among the common Items on Rasch calibrated tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G Edward; Gesn, Paul Randall; Rotou, Jourania

    2005-01-01

    In state assessment programs that employ Rasch-based common item linking procedures, the linking constant is usually estimated with only those common items not identified as exhibiting item difficulty parameter drift. Since state assessments typically contain a fixed number of items, an item classified as exhibiting parameter drift during the linking process remains on the exam as a scorable item even if it is removed from the common item set. Under the assumption that item parameter drift has occurred for one or more of the common items, the expected effect of including or excluding the "affected" item(s) in the estimation of the linking constant is derived in this article. If the item parameter drift is due solely to factors not associated with a change in examinee achievement, no linking error will (be expected to) occur given that the linking constant is estimated only with the items not identified as "affected"; linking error will (be expected to) occur if the linking constant is estimated with all common items. However, if the item parameter drift is due solely to change in examinee achievement, the opposite is true: no linking error will (be expected to) occur if the linking constant is estimated with all common items; linking error will (be expected to) occur if the linking constant is estimated only with the items not identified as "affected".

  6. Thoracic skeletal defects and cardiac malformations: a common epigenetic link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Andrea D; Ozolins, Terence R S; Brown, Nigel A

    2006-12-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defects in humans. In addition, cardiac malformations represent the most frequently identified anomaly in teratogenicity experiments with laboratory animals. To explore the mechanisms of these drug-induced defects, we developed a model in which pregnant rats are treated with dimethadione, resulting in a high incidence of heart malformations. Interestingly, these heart defects were accompanied by thoracic skeletal malformations (cleft sternum, fused ribs, extra or missing ribs, and/or wavy ribs), which are characteristic of anterior-posterior (A/P) homeotic transformations and/or disruptions at one or more stages in somite development. A review of other teratogenicity studies suggests that the co-occurrence of these two disparate malformations is not unique to dimethadione, rather it may be a more general phenomenon caused by various structurally unrelated agents. The coexistence of cardiac and thoracic skeletal malformations has also presented clinically, suggesting a mechanistic link between cardiogenesis and skeletal development. Evidence from genetically modified mice reveals that several genes are common to heart development and to formation of the axial skeleton. Some of these genes are important in regulating chromatin architecture, while others are tightly controlled by chromatin-modifying proteins. This review focuses on the role of these epigenetic factors in development of the heart and axial skeleton, and examines the hypothesis that posttranslational modifications of core histones may be altered by some developmental toxicants.

  7. Second Liver 5 Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Method Common Influence Factors Analysis of Test Results%乙肝五项酶联免疫吸附法检测结果常见影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏咸玉

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analysis the hepatitis b five enzyme-linked immunosorbent method to detect the common factors. Methods Randomly selected data in April 2013-April 2014 in our hospital outpatient and five test specimens of 132 cases of hospitalized patients with hepatitis b, adopt enzyme-linked immunosorbent method. Results This group of specimens of time stretching 20 min after positive rate 18.94%, static water bath after 40 min positive rate 9.08%and let stand for water bath after 60 mim positive rate 0.00%;This group of specimens under different condition of serum hepatitis b five test negative, positive performance are also different. Conclusion The effect of five clinical treatment for hepatitis b hepatitis b main judgement index of standardized operation strictly fol ow steps.%目的:分析乙肝五项酶联免疫吸附法检测结果常见影响因素。方法资料随机选取2013年4月~2014年4月本院门诊和住院患者乙肝五项检测标本132例,均采用酶联免疫吸附法检测。结果本组标本静置水浴20 min后阳性率18.94%,静置水浴40 min后阳性率9.08%,静置水浴60 mim后阳性率0.00%;本组标本在不同血清状态下乙肝五项检测阴性、阳性表现也不同。结论乙肝五项作为乙型肝炎临床治疗的效果的主要判定指标,严格遵循操作步骤行规范操作。

  8. Integrating Mechanisms for Insulin Resistance: Common Threads and Missing Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Varman T.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder that defies a single etiological pathway. Accumulation of ectopic lipid metabolites, activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway and innate immune pathways have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. However, these pathways are also closely linked to changes in fatty acid uptake, lipogenesis, and energy expenditure that can impact ectopic lipid deposition. Ultimately, accumulation of specific lipid metabolites (diacylglycerols and/or ceramides) in liver and skeletal muscle, may be a common pathway leading to impaired insulin signaling and insulin resistance. PMID:22385956

  9. The Link Between Lysosomal Storage Disorders and More Common Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beck MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, it has become more and more evident that lysosomal storage disorders and common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases have clinical, neuropathological, and genetic features in common, including lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagy. Patients with Gaucher and even carriers of Gaucher disease have an increased risk to develop Parkinson disease. Likewise, individuals who are heterozygous for a mutation of a gene that causes an adult form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis are more likely to be affected by a form of frontotemporal dementia in their later life. A further example is the gene NAGLU encoding the enzyme α- N -acetylglucosaminidase, which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Mutations of the NAGLU gene have been observed in patients affected by an axonal neuropathy. An interesting unexpected finding was the link between stuttering and genes that are essential for the function of all lysosomal enzymes. This review will present some example of the association of lysosomal storage disorders and neurodegenerative disease and discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms that are common to both conditions. The understanding of the pathophysiology of the endosomal–lysosomal–autophagic system may help to develop drugs, which might provide benefit not only for patients with rare lysosomal storage disorders but also for individuals affected by more common diseases.

  10. The Link Between Lysosomal Storage Disorders and More Common Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Beck MD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, it has become more and more evident that lysosomal storage disorders and common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases have clinical, neuropathological, and genetic features in common, including lysosomal dysfunction and impaired autophagy. Patients with Gaucher and even carriers of Gaucher disease have an increased risk to develop Parkinson disease. Likewise, individuals who are heterozygous for a mutation of a gene that causes an adult form of neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis are more likely to be affected by a form of frontotemporal dementia in their later life. A further example is the gene NAGLU encoding the enzyme α-N-acetylglucosaminidase, which is deficient in patients with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB. Mutations of the NAGLU gene have been observed in patients affected by an axonal neuropathy. An interesting unexpected finding was the link between stuttering and genes that are essential for the function of all lysosomal enzymes. This review will present some example of the association of lysosomal storage disorders and neurodegenerative disease and discuss possible pathogenic mechanisms that are common to both conditions. The understanding of the pathophysiology of the endosomal–lysosomal–autophagic system may help to develop drugs, which might provide benefit not only for patients with rare lysosomal storage disorders but also for individuals affected by more common diseases.

  11. Comorbidities in Neurology: Is Adenosine the Common Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boison, Detlev; Aronica, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Comorbidities in Neurology represent a major conceptual and therapeutic challenge. For example, temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) is a syndrome comprised of epileptic seizures and comorbid symptoms including memory and psychiatric impairment, depression, and sleep dysfunction. Similarly, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) are accompanied by various degrees of memory dysfunction. Patients with AD have an increased likelihood for seizures, whereas all four conditions share certain aspects of psychosis, depression, and sleep dysfunction. This remarkable overlap suggests common pathophysiological mechanisms, which include synaptic dysfunction and synaptotoxicity, as well as glial activation and astrogliosis. Astrogliosis is linked to synapse function via the tripartite synapse, but astrocytes also control the availability of gliotransmitters and adenosine. Here we will specifically focus on the ‘adenosine hypothesis of comorbidities’ implying that astrocyte activation, via overexpression of adenosine kinase (ADK), induces a deficiency in the homeostatic tone of adenosine. We present evidence from patient-derived samples showing astrogliosis and overexpression of ADK as common pathological hallmark of epilepsy, AD, PD, and ALS. We discuss a transgenic ‘comorbidity model’, in which brain-wide overexpression of ADK and resulting adenosine deficiency produces a comorbid spectrum of seizures, altered dopaminergic function, attentional impairment, and deficits in cognitive domains and sleep regulation. We conclude that dysfunction of adenosine signaling is common in neurological conditions, that adenosine dysfunction can explain comorbid phenotypes, and that therapeutic adenosine augmentation might be effective for the treatment of comorbid symptoms in multiple neurological conditions. PMID:25979489

  12. Is there a common factor for vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappe, Céline; Clarke, Aaron; Mohr, Christine; Herzog, Michael H

    2014-07-03

    In cognition, common factors play a crucial role. For example, different types of intelligence are highly correlated, pointing to a common factor, which is often called g. One might expect that a similar common factor would also exist for vision. Surprisingly, no one in the field has addressed this issue. Here, we provide the first evidence that there is no common factor for vision. We tested 40 healthy students’ performance in six basic visual paradigms: visual acuity, vernier discrimination,two visual backward masking paradigms, Gabor detection, and bisection discrimination. One might expect that performance levels on these tasks would be highly correlated because some individuals generally have better vision than others due to superior optics,better retinal or cortical processing, or enriched visual experience. However, only four out of 15 correlations were significant, two of which were nontrivial. These results cannot be explained by high intraobserver variability or ceiling effects because test–retest reliability was high and the variance in our student population is commensurate with that from other studies with well sighted populations. Using a variety of tests (e.g., principal components analysis, Bayes theorem, test–retest reliability), we show the robustness of our null results. We suggest that neuroplasticity operates during everyday experience to generate marked individual differences. Our results apply only to the normally sighted population (i.e., restricted range sampling). For the entire population, including those with degenerate vision, we expect different results.

  13. Humanism as a common factor in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2012-12-01

    There are many forms of psychotherapies, each distinctive in its own way. From the origins of psychotherapy, it has been suggested that psychotherapy is effective through factors that are common to all therapies. In this article, I suggest that the commonalities that are at the core of psychotherapy are related to evolved human characteristics, which include (a) making sense of the world, (b) influencing through social means, and (c) connectedness, expectation, and mastery. In this way, all psychotherapies are humanistic. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  14. Commonness of Amazonian palm (Arecaceae) species: Cross-scale links and potential determinants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Thea; Svenning, J.-C.; Grández, César

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms that cause variation in commonness (abundances and range sizes) of species remain debated in ecology, and a repeatedly observed pattern is the positive relation between local abundances and larger scale range sizes. We used the Amazonian palm species (Arecaceae) to investigate...... commonness in the Amazonian palm flora appear to be scale-dependent, with the unrelated local scale abundance and continental range size probably being controlled by different driving factors. Interestingly, commonness at the intermediate, landscape scale seems linked to both the smaller and the larger scale...

  15. [Hormonal factors in etiology of common acne].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergler-Czop, Beata; Brzezińska-Wcisło, Ligia

    2004-05-01

    Common acne is steatorrhoeic chronic disease, to which specific is, among others, the presence of blackheads, papulopustular eruptions, purulent cysts and cicatrices. Such hormonal factors belong to elements inherent in etiology of the affection. Sebaceous glands have cell receptors on their surface for androgens. In etiopathogenesis of common/simple acne, a decisive role is played by a derivative of testosterone, i.e. 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT). However, some experts are of opinion that there is no correlation between the increased intensity of common acne and other symptoms of hyperandrogenism. Numerous authors assume, however, that common acne-affected patients may be sometimes subjected to intense reactions caused by sebaceous glands against physiological androgens concentrations. Naturally, estrogens can inhibit release of such androgens. Under physiological conditions, natural progesterone does not conduct to intensification of the seborrhea, but the activity of sebum secretion may be triggered off by its synthetic counterparts. Hormonal etiology can be very distinctly visible in the steroid, androgenic, premenstrual, menopausal acne, as well as in juvenile acne and acne neonatorum. In case of females affected by acne, hormonal therapy should be persistently supported and consulted with dermatologists, endocrinologists and gynecologists. Antiandrogenic preparations are applied, such as: cyproterone acetate concurrently administered with estrogens and, as well as not so frequently with chlormadinone acetate (independently or during estrogenic therapy).

  16. Commonness of Amazonian palm (Arecaceae) species: Cross-scale links and potential determinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, Thea; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Grández, César; Salo, Jukka; Balslev, Henrik

    2009-07-01

    The mechanisms that cause variation in commonness (abundances and range sizes) of species remain debated in ecology, and a repeatedly observed pattern is the positive relation between local abundances and larger scale range sizes. We used the Amazonian palm species (Arecaceae) to investigate the dependence between and potential determinants of commonness across three (local, landscape, continental) spatial scales. Commonness at the smaller scales (local abundance, landscape frequency) was estimated using data from 57 transects (5 × 500 m) in primary, non-inundated ( terra firme) rainforest in a western Amazonian landscape, while commonness at the largest scale (continental range size) was estimated from digitized distribution maps. Landscape frequency was positively related to both local abundance and continental range size, which, however, were not related to each other. Landscape frequency was positively related to topographic niche breadth. Stem height correlated with continental range size and was the only species life-history trait related to any commonness measure. Distance from the study area to a species' range centre did not influence any of the commonness measures. The factors determining commonness in the Amazonian palm flora appear to be scale-dependent, with the unrelated local scale abundance and continental range size probably being controlled by different driving factors. Interestingly, commonness at the intermediate, landscape scale seems linked to both the smaller and the larger scale. Our results point towards topographic niche breadth at the smaller scales and stem height, possibly reflecting species' dispersal potential, at the continental scale as important determinants of commonness.

  17. Common Virus May Be Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes in Some Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163761.html Common Virus May Be Linked to Heart Disease, Diabetes in ... THURSDAY, Feb. 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A common virus may make some women more susceptible to both ...

  18. Common developmental pathways link tooth shape to regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Gareth J; Bloomquist, Ryan F; Streelman, J Todd

    2013-05-15

    In many non-mammalian vertebrates, adult dentitions result from cyclical rounds of tooth regeneration wherein simple unicuspid teeth are replaced by more complex forms. Therefore and by contrast to mammalian models, the numerical majority of vertebrate teeth develop shape during the process of replacement. Here, we exploit the dental diversity of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes to ask how vertebrates generally replace their dentition and in turn how this process acts to influence resulting tooth morphologies. First, we used immunohistochemistry to chart organogenesis of continually replacing cichlid teeth and discovered an epithelial down-growth that initiates the replacement cycle via a labial proliferation bias. Next, we identified sets of co-expressed genes from common pathways active during de novo, lifelong tooth replacement and tooth morphogenesis. Of note, we found two distinct epithelial cell populations, expressing markers of dental competence and cell potency, which may be responsible for tooth regeneration. Related gene sets were simultaneously active in putative signaling centers associated with the differentiation of replacement teeth with complex shapes. Finally, we manipulated targeted pathways (BMP, FGF, Hh, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin) in vivo with small molecules and demonstrated dose-dependent effects on both tooth replacement and tooth shape. Our data suggest that the processes of tooth regeneration and tooth shape morphogenesis are integrated via a common set of molecular signals. This linkage has subsequently been lost or decoupled in mammalian dentitions where complex tooth shapes develop in first generation dentitions that lack the capacity for lifelong replacement. Our dissection of the molecular mechanics of vertebrate tooth replacement coupled to complex shape pinpoints aspects of odontogenesis that might be re-evolved in the lab to solve problems in regenerative dentistry.

  19. Common developmental pathways link tooth shape to regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Gareth J.; Bloomquist, Ryan F.; Streelman, J. Todd

    2013-01-01

    In many non-mammalian vertebrates, adult dentitions result from cyclical rounds of tooth regeneration wherein simple unicuspid teeth are replaced by more complex forms. Therefore and by contrast to mammalian models, the numerical majority of vertebrate teeth develop shape during the process of replacement. Here, we exploit the dental diversity of Lake Malawi cichlid fishes to ask how vertebrates generally replace their dentition and in turn how this process acts to influence resulting tooth morphologies. First, we used immunohistochemistry to chart organogenesis of continually replacing cichlid teeth and discovered an epithelial down-growth that initiates the replacement cycle via a labial proliferation bias. Next, we identified sets of co-expressed genes from common pathways active during de novo, lifelong tooth replacement and tooth morphogenesis. Of note, we found two distinct epithelial cell populations, expressing markers of dental competence and cell potency, which may be responsible for tooth regeneration. Related gene sets were simultaneously active in putative signaling centers associated with the differentiation of replacement teeth with complex shapes. Finally, we manipulated targeted pathways (BMP, FGF, Hh, Notch, Wnt/β-catenin) in vivo with small molecules and demonstrated dose-dependent effects on both tooth replacement and tooth shape. Our data suggest that the processes of tooth regeneration and tooth shape morphogenesis are integrated via a common set of molecular signals. This linkage has subsequently been lost or decoupled in mammalian dentitions where complex tooth shapes develop in first generation dentitions that lack the capacity for lifelong replacement. Our dissection of the molecular mechanics of vertebrate tooth replacement coupled to complex shape pinpoints aspects of odontogenesis that might be re-evolved in the lab to solve problems in regenerative dentistry. PMID:23422830

  20. Configurations of Common Childhood Psychosocial Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William; Shanahan, Lilly; Costello, E. Jane; Angold, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Background: Co-occurrence of psychosocial risk factors is commonplace, but little is known about psychiatrically-predictive configurations of psychosocial risk factors. Methods: Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied to 17 putative psychosocial risk factors in a representative population sample of 920 children ages 9 to 17. The resultant class…

  1. ICPD to MDGs: Missing links and common grounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Babar T

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The ICPD agenda of reproductive health was declared as the most comprehensive one, which had actually broadened the spectrum of reproductive health and drove the states to embark upon initiatives to improve reproductive health status of their populations. However, like all other countries, Pakistan also seems to have shifted focus of its policies and programs towards achieving MDGs. As a result, concepts highlighted in the ICPD got dropped eventually. In spite of specific goals on maternal and child mortalities in MDGs and all the investment and policy shift, Pakistan has still one of the highest maternal mortality ratios among developing countries. Lack of synchronized efforts, sector wide approaches, inter-sectoral collaboration, and moreover, the unmet need for family planning, unsafe abortions, low literacy rate and dearth of women empowerment are the main reasons. Being a signatory of both of the international agendas (ICPD and MDGs, Pakistan needed to articulate its policies to keep the balance between the two agendas. There are, however, certainly some common grounds which have been experimented by various countries and we can learn lessons from those best practices. An inter-sectoral cooperation and sector wide approaches would be required to achieve such ambitious goals set out in ICPD-Program of Action while working towards MDGs. There is a need of increasing resource allocation, strengthening primary health care services and emergency obstetric care and motivating the human resource employed in health sector by good governance. These endeavors should lead to formulate evidence based national policies, reproductive health services which are affordable, accessible and culturally acceptable and finally a responsive health system.

  2. A common genetic factor underlies hypertension and other cardiovascular disorders

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    Spector Tim D

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Certain conditions characterised by blood vessel occlusion or vascular spasm have been found to cluster together in epidemiological studies. However the biological causes for these associations remain controversial. This study used a classical twin design to examine whether these conditions are linked through shared environmental exposures or by a common underlying genetic propensity to vasospasm. Methods We investigated the association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease in twins from a national register. Phenotype status was determined using a questionnaire and the genetic and environmental association between phenotypes was estimated through variance components analysis. Results Responses were obtained from 2,204 individuals comprising 525 monozygotic and 577 dizygotic pairs. There was a significant genetic contribution to all four traits with heritabilities ranging from 0.34 to 0.64. Multivariate model-fitting demonstrated that a single common genetic factor underlies the four conditions. Conclusions We have confirmed an association between hypertension, migraine, Raynaud's phenomenon and coronary artery disease, and shown that a single genetic factor underlies them. The demonstration of a shared genetic factor explains the association between them and adds weight to the theory of an inherited predisposition to vasospasm.

  3. Research on common issues for relationship between mechanism degree of freedom, driving link and executive link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG AiLun

    2009-01-01

    During engineering practice and theoretical research, the mechanism degree of freedom is sometimes unequal to the number of the driving link, which is unable to be explained according to the classic theory of the mechanism degree of freedom. To solve this problem, the duality description for operating laws of mechanism is introduced based on the concepts of duality. The Junction-Structure Equation is established for the port descriptions of general ideal mechanism and the functional description for the mechanism degree of freedom is described by utilization of bond graph theory. The force-transfer degree of freedom, i.e. the antithesis concept of movement-transfer degree of freedom, is introduced and defined based on the analysis of energy transfer as well as the analysis of signal causality. By utilization of structural description, functional description and duality description for the equation of degree of freedom, the relationship between the movement-transfer degree of freedom and force-transfer degree of freedom is further explored and analyzed. Thus, the relationship between the mechanism degree of freedom upon the driving link and the executive link is described generally. Finally, some typical relationships between the mechanism degree of freedom, the driving link and the executive link are analyzed.

  4. Link Prediction via Convex Nonnegative Matrix Factorization on Multiscale Blocks

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    Enming Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low rank matrices approximations have been used in link prediction for networks, which are usually global optimal methods and lack of using the local information. The block structure is a significant local feature of matrices: entities in the same block have similar values, which implies that links are more likely to be found within dense blocks. We use this insight to give a probabilistic latent variable model for finding missing links by convex nonnegative matrix factorization with block detection. The experiments show that this method gives better prediction accuracy than original method alone. Different from the original low rank matrices approximations methods for link prediction, the sparseness of solutions is in accord with the sparse property for most real complex networks. Scaling to massive size network, we use the block information mapping matrices onto distributed architectures and give a divide-and-conquer prediction method. The experiments show that it gives better results than common neighbors method when the networks have a large number of missing links.

  5. The Hull Method for Selecting the Number of Common Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo-Seva, Urbano; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Kiers, Henk A. L.

    2011-01-01

    A common problem in exploratory factor analysis is how many factors need to be extracted from a particular data set. We propose a new method for selecting the number of major common factors: the Hull method, which aims to find a model with an optimal balance between model fit and number of parameters. We examine the performance of the method in an…

  6. Inter-relations between osteoarthritis and metabolic syndrome: A common link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Clanche, S; Bonnefont-Rousselot, D; Sari-Ali, E; Rannou, F; Borderie, D

    2016-02-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disorder of the joint, principally occurring during aging, and characterized by a focal degradation of cartilage. It is the most prevalent rheumatic disease in industrialized countries and represents the second cause of disability in France. However, the etiology of OA remains unclear. There is only one cell type found in cartilage, chondrocyte, which is responsible for its repair and the synthesis of the elements of the extra-cellular matrix. A dysfunction of these cells results in an imbalance between repair and degradation in cartilage, leading to its destruction. Recently, a link between OA and metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been suggested, introducing a notion of metabolic OA, and a new vision of the disease. MetS is characterized by a cluster of factors (insulin resistance, hypertension, dyslipidemia, visceral obesity), although there is still no clear definition of it. During the 20th century, MetS dramatically increased with changes in population lifestyle, becoming a major health issue in industrialized countries. MetS concerns 10-30% of the worldwide population, but is prevalent in 59% of OA patients. Patients with both OA and MetS have more severe symptoms, occurring sooner than in the general population. Indeed, OA is generally a disease concerning the population over 65 years old, but with an associated MetS the target population is around 50 years old. In this review, we will focus on common factors in OA and MetS, such as hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, mitochondrial dysfunction and hyperglycemia, linking one disease to the other. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  7. Linking Success Factors to Financial Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivasamy Mothilal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Based on a literature survey, an attempt has been made in this study to develop a framework for identifying the success factors. In addition, a list of key success factors is presented. The emphasis is on success factors dealing with breadth of services, internationalization of operations, industry focus, customer focus, 3PL experience, relationship with 3PLs, investment in quality assets, investment in information systems, availability of skilled professionals and supply chain integration. In developing the factors an effort has been made to align and relate them to financial performance. Conclusion/Recommendations: We found success factors relationship with 3PLs and skilled logistics professionals would substantially improves financial performance metric profit growth. Our findings also contribute to managerial practice by offering a benchmarking tool that can be used by managers in the 3PL service provider industry in India.

  8. Genital tuberculosis is common among females with tubal factor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdulhakim Ali Al eryani

    2015-01-02

    Jan 2, 2015 ... Of a total 151 women who had tubal factor infertility, 61 cases were investigated ... Introduction. Female genital tuberculosis (GTB) is a common health ... had normal hormonal profile, and normal male parameters assessed by ...

  9. Psychological Factors Linked to Risk Perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armaş, I.; Creãu, R. Z.; Stǎnciugelu, I.

    2012-04-01

    Risks are mental models, which allow people to cope with dangerous phenomena (Renn, 2008; Jasanoff, 1998). The term "risk" refers to the likelihood of an adverse effect resulting from an event. The aim of the present study is to identify the psychological factors that are most predictive of risk perception in relation with age, gender, educational level and socio-economical status. Earthquake hazard was considered, because it is an emerging danger for Bucharest. 80% of the laypeople sample are waiting for this event to happen in the next three years. By integrating all the research data, it was attempted to build a risk profile of the investigated population, which could be used by institutions responsible for earthquake risk mitigation situations in Bucharest. This research appealed to the social learning Rotter (1966), auto-effectiveness Bandura (1977; 1983), and anxiety and stress theories. We used psychological variables that measured stress, personal effectiveness and the belief in personal control. The multi-modal risk perception questionnaire was structured on a 49 items sequence. The sample was composed of 1.376 participants recruited on a voluntary basis. The characteristics of risk (like probability and magnitude, time scales) are perceived differently according to psychological factors that play a role also in biases in people's ability to draw inferences from probabilistic information (like cognitive dissonance). Since the 1970's, it has been argued that those who perceive life's events as being beyond their locus of control (external locus of control) are significantly more anxious and less adapted. In this research, strongest associations and significant differences were obtained between sex, age and income categories with Stress vulnerability factor and the External Locus of Control factor. The profile of the low risk perceiver is that of a young, more educated, male individual with a higher self- efficacy level and an internal locus of control.

  10. Common factors and the exchange rate: results from the Brazilian case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Rafael de Oliveira Felício

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the usefulness of factor models in explaining the dynamics of the exchange rate Real / Dollar from January 1999 to August 2011. The paper verifies that the inclusion of factors embedded on the common movements of exchange rates of a set of countries significantly improves the in-sample and out-of-sample predictive power of the models comprising only macroeconomic fundamentals commonly used in the literature to forecast the exchange rate. The paper also links the information contained in the factors to global shocks like the demand for dollars - a "dollar effect", volatility and liquidity of global financial markets.

  11. Mixtures of Common Skew-t Factor Analyzers

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Paula M.; McNicholas, Paul D.; Browne, Ryan P.

    2013-01-01

    A mixture of common skew-t factor analyzers model is introduced for model-based clustering of high-dimensional data. By assuming common component factor loadings, this model allows clustering to be performed in the presence of a large number of mixture components or when the number of dimensions is too large to be well-modelled by the mixtures of factor analyzers model or a variant thereof. Furthermore, assuming that the component densities follow a skew-t distribution allows robust clusterin...

  12. On building a science of common factors in trauma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalenberg, Constance J

    2014-01-01

    Research on therapy outcome routinely finds that common factors (e.g., warmth, genuineness, trustworthiness) account for more variance than does therapy technique. This article makes the case for more attention to training in positive common factor variables within graduate schools and internships and for research on the effectiveness of such training. Recommendations are given for a change in focus in research and training, including more discussion of taboo topics in trauma therapy; attention to therapist behaviors that enhance the experience of warmth or trustworthiness; and research on client characteristics that impede the experience of being in the presence of a warm, genuine, and trustworthy other.

  13. Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha: A Link between Neuroinflammation and Excitotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Olmos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α is a proinflammatory cytokine that exerts both homeostatic and pathophysiological roles in the central nervous system. In pathological conditions, microglia release large amounts of TNF-α; this de novo production of TNF-α is an important component of the so-called neuroinflammatory response that is associated with several neurological disorders. In addition, TNF-α can potentiate glutamate-mediated cytotoxicity by two complementary mechanisms: indirectly, by inhibiting glutamate transport on astrocytes, and directly, by rapidly triggering the surface expression of Ca+2 permeable-AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors, while decreasing inhibitory GABAA receptors on neurons. Thus, the net effect of TNF-α is to alter the balance of excitation and inhibition resulting in a higher synaptic excitatory/inhibitory ratio. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which TNF-α links the neuroinflammatory and excitotoxic processes that occur in several neurodegenerative diseases, but with a special emphasis on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. As microglial activation and upregulation of TNF-α expression is a common feature of several CNS diseases, as well as chronic opioid exposure and neuropathic pain, modulating TNF-α signaling may represent a valuable target for intervention.

  14. Common neighbours and the local-community-paradigm for topological link prediction in bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daminelli, Simone; Thomas, Josephine Maria; Durán, Claudio; Vittorio Cannistraci, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    Bipartite networks are powerful descriptions of complex systems characterized by two different classes of nodes and connections allowed only across but not within the two classes. Unveiling physical principles, building theories and suggesting physical models to predict bipartite links such as product-consumer connections in recommendation systems or drug-target interactions in molecular networks can provide priceless information to improve e-commerce or to accelerate pharmaceutical research. The prediction of nonobserved connections starting from those already present in the topology of a network is known as the link-prediction problem. It represents an important subject both in many-body interaction theory in physics and in new algorithms for applied tools in computer science. The rationale is that the existing connectivity structure of a network can suggest where new connections can appear with higher likelihood in an evolving network, or where nonobserved connections are missing in a partially known network. Surprisingly, current complex network theory presents a theoretical bottle-neck: a general framework for local-based link prediction directly in the bipartite domain is missing. Here, we overcome this theoretical obstacle and present a formal definition of common neighbour index and local-community-paradigm (LCP) for bipartite networks. As a consequence, we are able to introduce the first node-neighbourhood-based and LCP-based models for topological link prediction that utilize the bipartite domain. We performed link prediction evaluations in several networks of different size and of disparate origin, including technological, social and biological systems. Our models significantly improve topological prediction in many bipartite networks because they exploit local physical driving-forces that participate in the formation and organization of many real-world bipartite networks. Furthermore, we present a local-based formalism that allows to intuitively

  15. Monogenic mouse models of autism spectrum disorders: Common mechanisms and missing links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulbert, S W; Jiang, Y-H

    2016-05-03

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) present unique challenges in the fields of genetics and neurobiology because of the clinical and molecular heterogeneity underlying these disorders. Genetic mutations found in ASD patients provide opportunities to dissect the molecular and circuit mechanisms underlying autistic behaviors using animal models. Ongoing studies of genetically modified models have offered critical insight into possible common mechanisms arising from different mutations, but links between molecular abnormalities and behavioral phenotypes remain elusive. The challenges encountered in modeling autism in mice demand a new analytic paradigm that integrates behavioral assessment with circuit-level analysis in genetically modified models with strong construct validity.

  16. Cystatin a, a potential common link for mutant myocilin causative glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K David Kennedy

    Full Text Available Myocilin (MYOC is a 504 aa secreted glycoprotein induced by stress factors in the trabecular meshwork tissue of the eye, where it was discovered. Mutations in MYOC are linked to glaucoma. The glaucoma phenotype of each of the different MYOC mutation varies, but all of them cause elevated intraocular pressure (IOP. In cells, forty percent of wild-type MYOC is cleaved by calpain II, a cysteine protease. This proteolytic process is inhibited by MYOC mutants. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms by which MYOC mutants cause glaucoma. We constructed adenoviral vectors with variants Q368X, R342K, D380N, K423E, and overexpressed them in human trabecular meshwork cells. We analyzed expression profiles with Affymetrix U133Plus2 GeneChips using wild-type and null viruses as controls. Analysis of trabecular meshwork relevant mechanisms showed that the unfolded protein response (UPR was the most affected. Search for individual candidate genes revealed that genes that have been historically connected to trabecular meshwork physiology and pathology were altered by the MYOC mutants. Some of those had known MYOC associations (MMP1, PDIA4, CALR, SFPR1 while others did not (EDN1, MGP, IGF1, TAC1. Some, were top-changed in only one mutant (LOXL1, CYP1B1, FBN1, others followed a mutant group pattern. Some of the genes were new (RAB39B, STC1, CXCL12, CSTA. In particular, one selected gene, the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin A (CSTA, was commonly induced by all mutants and not by the wild-type. Subsequent functional analysis of the selected gene showed that CSTA was able to reduce wild-type MYOC cleavage in primary trabecular meshwork cells while an inactive mutated CSTA was not. These findings provide a new molecular understanding of the mechanisms of MYOC-causative glaucoma and reveal CSTA, a serum biomarker for cancer, as a potential biomarker and drug for the treatment of MYOC-induced glaucoma.

  17. The Dodo Bird and Common Factors in Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Trancas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Since its inception, the theoretical exploration of psychotherapy has originated diverse ideas on the mechanisms underlying its effectiveness. The authors focus on one of the founding moments of the theory of common factors in psychotherapy and subsequently explore its theoretical grounds and conceptual evolution. Criticism to the construct and exposure of its fragilities are also approached. Some consequences of this knowledge relating to the practice and training of psychotherapy are put forward.

  18. On the Selection of Common Factors for Macroeconomic Forecasting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giovannelli, Alessandro; Proietti, Tommaso

    We address the problem of selecting the common factors that are relevant for forecasting macroeconomic variables. In economic forecasting using diffusion indexes the factors are ordered, according to their importance, in terms of relative variability, and are the same for each variable to predict...... on the ordering of the components, based on weighting the p-values according to the eigenvalues associated to the components. We compare the empirical performance of these methods with the classical diffusion index (DI) approach proposed by Stock and Watson, conducting a pseudo-real time forecasting exercise...... factors. However, variable selection, leading to exclude some of the low order principal components, can lead to a sizable improvement in forecasting in specific cases. Only in one instance, real personal income, we were able to detect a significant contribution from high order components....

  19. [Common and inductors factors of inflammation in asthma and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Huerta-Gutiérrez de Velasco, Rodrigo; Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of asthma and obesity is increasing, therefore they have been classified as public health problems; epidemiology suggests a link between these diseases. It has been detected a relationship between the body mass index and lung function, moreover some works show a direct correlation between the aforementioned index and severity of asthma. By a search for articles in indexed journals from medical databases with the key words asthma and obesity: pathogenesis, inflammation, adipokines, hypoxia, nutrition, pregnancy, this paper deeps in the knowledge about basic elements that offer an asthma and obesity link. It was found that the association between body mass index and asthma is more frequent in women. Asthma and obesity might be influenced by genetic elements and fetal programming; at the same time obesity could influence asthma by several mechanisms such as inflammation, hormones and mechanical respiratory dysfunction. The existing coincidence between several inducers and factors which exacerbate these diseases as well as in some molecular routes shows a potential relation between both pathological entities.

  20. Population decline is linked to migration route in the Common Cuckoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Chris M; Thorup, Kasper; Pearce-Higgins, James W; Atkinson, Philip W

    2016-07-19

    Migratory species are in rapid decline globally. Although most mortality in long-distance migrant birds is thought to occur during migration, evidence of conditions on migration affecting breeding population sizes has been completely lacking. We addressed this by tracking 42 male Common Cuckoos from the rapidly declining UK population during 56 autumn migrations in 2011-14. Uniquely, the birds use two distinct routes to reach the same wintering grounds, allowing assessment of survival during migration independently of origin and destination. Mortality up to completion of the Sahara crossing (the major ecological barrier encountered in both routes) is higher for birds using the shorter route. The proportion of birds using this route strongly correlates with population decline across nine local breeding populations. Knowledge of variability in migratory behaviour and performance linked to robust population change data may therefore be necessary to understand population declines of migratory species and efficiently target conservation resources.

  1. Cytokines and growth factors cross-link heparan sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Elisa; Thakar, Dhruv; Kühnle, Jens; Sadir, Rabia; Dyer, Douglas P.; Li, Yong; Sun, Changye; Volkman, Brian F.; Handel, Tracy M.; Coche-Guerente, Liliane; Fernig, David G.; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Richter, Ralf P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS), present at the surface of most cells and ubiquitous in extracellular matrix, binds many soluble extracellular signalling molecules such as chemokines and growth factors, and regulates their transport and effector functions. It is, however, unknown whether upon binding HS these proteins can affect the long-range structure of HS. To test this idea, we interrogated a supramolecular model system, in which HS chains grafted to streptavidin-functionalized oligoethylene glycol monolayers or supported lipid bilayers mimic the HS-rich pericellular or extracellular matrix, with the biophysical techniques quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). We were able to control and characterize the supramolecular presentation of HS chains—their local density, orientation, conformation and lateral mobility—and their interaction with proteins. The chemokine CXCL12α (or SDF-1α) rigidified the HS film, and this effect was due to protein-mediated cross-linking of HS chains. Complementary measurements with CXCL12α mutants and the CXCL12γ isoform provided insight into the molecular mechanism underlying cross-linking. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which has three HS binding sites, was also found to cross-link HS, but FGF-9, which has just one binding site, did not. Based on these data, we propose that the ability to cross-link HS is a generic feature of many cytokines and growth factors, which depends on the architecture of their HS binding sites. The ability to change matrix organization and physico-chemical properties (e.g. permeability and rigidification) implies that the functions of cytokines and growth factors may not simply be confined to the activation of cognate cellular receptors. PMID:26269427

  2. A common brain network links development, aging, and vulnerability to disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Groves, Adrian R; Tamnes, Christian K; Westlye, Lars Tjelta; Duff, Eugene P; Engvig, Andreas; Walhovd, Kristine B; James, Anthony; Gass, Achim; Monsch, Andreas U; Matthews, Paul M; Fjell, Anders M; Smith, Stephen M; Johansen-Berg, Heidi

    2014-12-09

    Several theories link processes of development and aging in humans. In neuroscience, one model posits for instance that healthy age-related brain degeneration mirrors development, with the areas of the brain thought to develop later also degenerating earlier. However, intrinsic evidence for such a link between healthy aging and development in brain structure remains elusive. Here, we show that a data-driven analysis of brain structural variation across 484 healthy participants (8-85 y) reveals a largely--but not only--transmodal network whose lifespan pattern of age-related change intrinsically supports this model of mirroring development and aging. We further demonstrate that this network of brain regions, which develops relatively late during adolescence and shows accelerated degeneration in old age compared with the rest of the brain, characterizes areas of heightened vulnerability to unhealthy developmental and aging processes, as exemplified by schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. Specifically, this network, while derived solely from healthy subjects, spatially recapitulates the pattern of brain abnormalities observed in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. This network is further associated in our large-scale healthy population with intellectual ability and episodic memory, whose impairment contributes to key symptoms of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. Taken together, our results suggest that the common spatial pattern of abnormalities observed in these two disorders, which emerge at opposite ends of the life spectrum, might be influenced by the timing of their separate and distinct pathological processes in disrupting healthy cerebral development and aging, respectively.

  3. Common links between metabolic syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease: Current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Arkadiusz; Mosińska, Paula; Fichna, Jakub

    2016-08-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) features a constellation of central obesity, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose metabolism and often hypertension joined by insulin resistance and chronic inflammation. All these elements greatly raise patient's risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, resulting in an increased mortality. Metabolic syndrome affects approximately 20-25% of the world's adult population and thus it is essential to study its pathophysiology and seek new pharmacological targets. There is a thoroughly studied link between MS and inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal (GI) system, i.e. steatohepatitis. However, recent findings also indicate similarities in pathophysiological features between MS and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including adipose tissue dysregulation, inadequate immune response, and inflammation. In this review we aim to outline the pathophysiology of MS and emphasize the aspects revealed recently, such as mineralocorticoid activity, involvement of sex hormones and an accompanying increase in prolactin secretion. More importantly, we focus on the common links between MS and IBD. Finally, we describe new strategies and drug targets that may be utilized in MS therapy, namely adiponectin mimetics, GLP-1-based multi agonists, ABCA1 agonists and possible role of miRNA. We also discuss the possible utility of selected agents as adjuvants in IBD therapy.

  4. A perturbation-based framework for link prediction via non-negative matrix factorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjun; Cai, Fei; Jiao, Pengfei; Pan, Lin

    2016-12-01

    Many link prediction methods have been developed to infer unobserved links or predict latent links based on the observed network structure. However, due to network noises and irregular links in real network, the performances of existed methods are usually limited. Considering random noises and irregular links, we propose a perturbation-based framework based on Non-negative Matrix Factorization to predict missing links. We first automatically determine the suitable number of latent features, which is inner rank in NMF, by Colibri method. Then, we perturb training set of a network by perturbation sets many times and get a series of perturbed networks. Finally, the common basis matrix and coefficients matrix of these perturbed networks are obtained via NMF and form similarity matrix of the network for link prediction. Experimental results on fifteen real networks show that the proposed framework has competitive performances compared with state-of-the-art link prediction methods. Correlations between the performances of different methods and the statistics of networks show that those methods with good precisions have similar consistence.

  5. Research on common issues for relationship between mechanism degree of freedom,driving link and executive link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    During engineering practice and theoretical research, the mechanism degree of freedom is sometimes unequal to the number of the driving link, which is unable to be explained according to the classic theory of the mechanism degree of freedom. To solve this problem, the duality description for operating laws of mechanism is introduced based on the concepts of duality. The Junction-Structure Equation is established for the port descriptions of general ideal mechanism and the functional description for the mechanism degree of freedom is described by utilization of bond graph theory. The force-transfer de- gree of freedom, i.e. the antithesis concept of movement-transfer degree of freedom, is introduced and defined based on the analysis of energy transfer as well as the analysis of signal causality. By utiliza- tion of structural description, functional description and duality description for the equation of degree of freedom, the relationship between the movement-transfer degree of freedom and force-transfer de- gree of freedom is further explored and analyzed. Thus, the relationship between the mechanism de- gree of freedom upon the driving link and the executive link is described generally. Finally, some typical relationships between the mechanism degree of freedom, the driving link and the executive link are analyzed.

  6. Diameter of common bile duct: what are the predicting factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atoosa Adibi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available

    BACKGROUND: This was a study to determine the correlation between the common bile duct (CBD diameter and demographic data, fasting, and the history of opium addiction.
    METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study on 375 patients (>16 years old including 219 females and 156 males. They had no evident hepatobiliary or pancreatic disease and underwent abdominopelvic ultrasonography for measurement of their CBD diameter. Ultrasound (US was performed to measure CBD diameter at the porta hepatis (proximal part and behind the head of the pancreas (distal part. Correlation coefficients for the association between CBD diameter and predictive factors were calculated. t-test was applied to compare the means between the groups.
    RESULTS: The mean CBD diameter (1 standard deviation, in proximal and distal parts were 3.64 mm (±1.2 and 3.72 mm (±1.2, respectively. The CBD diameters (proximal and distal were significantly (P<0.05 correlated with age (r = 0.55 and 0.54, respectively, BMI (r = 0.25 and 0.27, respectively and portal vein diameter (r = 0.24 and 0.22, respectively. Distal diameter of CBD was significantly larger in opium addicts (5.66 ± 2.65 in comparison with non addicts (3.68 ± 1.17, P = 0.04.
    CONCLUSIONS: CBD diameter associates with age, BMI, portal vein diameter and opium addiction. CBD dilatation, if it can not be explained by age, opium usage or large BMI, should be evaluated further to rule out obstruction.
    KEY WORDS: Common bile duct, predicting factors, ultrasonography.

  7. The Impact of Test Dimensionality, Common-Item Set Format, and Scale Linking Methods on Mixed-Format Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk-Gübes, Nese; Kelecioglu, Hülya

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of dimensionality, common-item set format, and different scale linking methods on preserving equity property with mixed-format test equating. Item response theory (IRT) true-score equating (TSE) and IRT observed-score equating (OSE) methods were used under common-item nonequivalent groups design.…

  8. Colored sl(N) link homology via matrix factorizations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao

    2011-01-01

    The Reshetikhin-Turaev sl(N) polynomial of links colored by wedge powers of the defining representation has been categorified via several different approaches. Here, we give a concise introduction to the categorification using matrix factorizations, which is a direct generalization of the Khovanov-Rozansky homology. Full details of the construction are given in [arXiv:0907.0695]. We also briefly review deformations and applications of this categorification given in [arXiv:1002.2662, arXiv:1011.2254, arXiv:1102.0586].

  9. The Allelic Landscape of Human Blood Cell Trait Variation and Links to Common Complex Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, William J; Elding, Heather; Jiang, Tao; Allen, Dave; Ruklisa, Dace; Mann, Alice L; Mead, Daniel; Bouman, Heleen; Riveros-Mckay, Fernando; Kostadima, Myrto A; Lambourne, John J; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Downes, Kate; Kundu, Kousik; Bomba, Lorenzo; Berentsen, Kim; Bradley, John R; Daugherty, Louise C; Delaneau, Olivier; Freson, Kathleen; Garner, Stephen F; Grassi, Luigi; Guerrero, Jose; Haimel, Matthias; Janssen-Megens, Eva M; Kaan, Anita; Kamat, Mihir; Kim, Bowon; Mandoli, Amit; Marchini, Jonathan; Martens, Joost H A; Meacham, Stuart; Megy, Karyn; O'Connell, Jared; Petersen, Romina; Sharifi, Nilofar; Sheard, Simon M; Staley, James R; Tuna, Salih; van der Ent, Martijn; Walter, Klaudia; Wang, Shuang-Yin; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wilder, Steven P; Iotchkova, Valentina; Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Kaptoge, Stephen; Kuijpers, Taco W; Carrillo-de-Santa-Pau, Enrique; Juan, David; Rico, Daniel; Valencia, Alfonso; Chen, Lu; Ge, Bing; Vasquez, Louella; Kwan, Tony; Garrido-Martín, Diego; Watt, Stephen; Yang, Ying; Guigo, Roderic; Beck, Stephan; Paul, Dirk S; Pastinen, Tomi; Bujold, David; Bourque, Guillaume; Frontini, Mattia; Danesh, John; Roberts, David J; Ouwehand, Willem H; Butterworth, Adam S; Soranzo, Nicole

    2016-11-17

    Many common variants have been associated with hematological traits, but identification of causal genes and pathways has proven challenging. We performed a genome-wide association analysis in the UK Biobank and INTERVAL studies, testing 29.5 million genetic variants for association with 36 red cell, white cell, and platelet properties in 173,480 European-ancestry participants. This effort yielded hundreds of low frequency (<5%) and rare (<1%) variants with a strong impact on blood cell phenotypes. Our data highlight general properties of the allelic architecture of complex traits, including the proportion of the heritable component of each blood trait explained by the polygenic signal across different genome regulatory domains. Finally, through Mendelian randomization, we provide evidence of shared genetic pathways linking blood cell indices with complex pathologies, including autoimmune diseases, schizophrenia, and coronary heart disease and evidence suggesting previously reported population associations between blood cell indices and cardiovascular disease may be non-causal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbes bind complement inhibitor factor H via a common site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Meri

    Full Text Available To cause infections microbes need to evade host defense systems, one of these being the evolutionarily old and important arm of innate immunity, the alternative pathway of complement. It can attack all kinds of targets and is tightly controlled in plasma and on host cells by plasma complement regulator factor H (FH. FH binds simultaneously to host cell surface structures such as heparin or glycosaminoglycans via domain 20 and to the main complement opsonin C3b via domain 19. Many pathogenic microbes protect themselves from complement by recruiting host FH. We analyzed how and why different microbes bind FH via domains 19-20 (FH19-20. We used a selection of FH19-20 point mutants to reveal the binding sites of several microbial proteins and whole microbes (Haemophilus influenzae, Bordetella pertussis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia, Candida albicans, Borrelia burgdorferi, and Borrelia hermsii. We show that all studied microbes use the same binding region located on one side of domain 20. Binding of FH to the microbial proteins was inhibited with heparin showing that the common microbial binding site overlaps with the heparin site needed for efficient binding of FH to host cells. Surprisingly, the microbial proteins enhanced binding of FH19-20 to C3b and down-regulation of complement activation. We show that this is caused by formation of a tripartite complex between the microbial protein, FH, and C3b. In this study we reveal that seven microbes representing different phyla utilize a common binding site on the domain 20 of FH for complement evasion. Binding via this site not only mimics the glycosaminoglycans of the host cells, but also enhances function of FH on the microbial surfaces via the novel mechanism of tripartite complex formation. This is a unique example of convergent evolution resulting in enhanced immune evasion of important pathogens via utilization of a "superevasion site."

  11. Linking human factors to corporate strategy with cognitive mapping techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Village, Judy; Greig, Michael; Salustri, Filippo A; Neumann, W Patrick

    2012-01-01

    For human factors (HF) to avoid being considered of "side-car" status, it needs to be positioned within the organization in such a way that it affects business strategies and their implementation. Tools are needed to support this effort. This paper explores the feasibility of applying a technique from operational research called cognitive mapping to link HF to corporate strategy. Using a single case study, a cognitive map is drawn to reveal the complex relationships between human factors and achieving an organization's strategic goals. Analysis of the map for central concepts and reinforcing loops enhances understanding that can lead to discrete initiatives to facilitate integration of HF. It is recommended that this technique be used with senior managers to understand the organizations` strategic goals and enhance understanding of the potential for HF to contribute to the strategic goals.

  12. COPD and squamous cell lung cancer: aberrant inflammation and immunity is the common link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozinovski, Steven; Vlahos, Ross; Anthony, Desiree; McQualter, Jonathan; Anderson, Gary; Irving, Louis; Steinfort, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Cigarette smoking has reached epidemic proportions within many regions of the world and remains the highest risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. Squamous cell lung cancer is commonly detected in heavy smokers, where the risk of developing lung cancer is not solely defined by tobacco consumption. Although therapies that target common driver mutations in adenocarcinomas are showing some promise, they are proving ineffective in smoking-related squamous cell lung cancer. Since COPD is characterized by an excessive inflammatory and oxidative stress response, this review details how aberrant innate, adaptive and systemic inflammatory processes can contribute to lung cancer susceptibility in COPD. Activated leukocytes release increasing levels of proteases and free radicals as COPD progresses and tertiary lymphoid aggregates accumulate with increasing severity. Reactive oxygen species promote formation of reactive carbonyls that are not only tumourigenic through initiating DNA damage, but can directly alter the function of regulatory proteins involved in host immunity and tumour suppressor functions. Systemic inflammation is also markedly increased during infective exacerbations in COPD and the interplay between tumour-promoting serum amyloid A (SAA) and IL-17A is discussed. SAA is also an endogenous allosteric modifier of FPR2 expressed on immune and epithelial cells, and the therapeutic potential of targeting this receptor is proposed as a novel strategy for COPD-lung cancer overlap.

  13. Insulin Resistance as Common Molecular Denominator Linking Obesity to Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Domenico; Picone, Pasquale; Baldassano, Sara; Caruana, Luca; Messina, Elisa; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Cappello, Francesco; Mulè, Flavia; Di Carlo, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an aging-related multi-factorial disorder to which metabolic factors contribute at what has canonically been considered a centrally mediated process. Although the exact underlying mechanisms are still unknown, obesity is recognized as a risk factor for AD and the condition of insulin resistance seems to be the link between the two pathologies. Using mice with high fat diet (HFD) obesity we dissected the molecular mechanisms shared by the two disorders. Brains of HFD fed mice showed elevated levels of APP and Aβ40/Aβ42 together with BACE, GSK3β and Tau proteins involved in APP processing and Aβ accumulation. Immunofluorescence, Thioflavin T staining experiments, confirmed increased Aβ generation, deposition in insoluble fraction and plaques formation in both the hippocampus and the cerebral cortex of HFD mice. Presence of Aβ40/Aβ42 in the insoluble fraction was also shown by ELISA assay. Brain insulin resistance was demonstrated by reduced presence of insulin receptor (IRs) and defects in Akt-Foxo3a insulin signaling. We found reduced levels of phospho-Akt and increased levels of Foxo3a in the nuclei of neurons where proapototic genes were activated. Dysregulation of different genes related to insulin resistance, especially those involved in inflammation and adipocytokines synthesis were analyzed by Profiler PCR array. Further, HFD induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and dynamics as demonstrated by expression of biomarkers involved in these processes. Here, we provide evidence that obesity and AD markers besides insulin resistance are associated with inflammation, adipokine dyshomeostasis, oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, all mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration.

  14. Neuroinflammation as a Common Mechanism Associated with the Modifiable Risk Factors for Alzheimer's and Parkinson`s Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Jordan Alexander; Spielman, Lindsay J; Pointer, Caitlin B; Lowry, Jessica R; Bajwa, Ekta; Lee, Carolyn W; Klegeris, Andis

    2017-03-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are among the most common causes of dementia, which increasingly contribute to morbidity and mortality worldwide. A common hallmark in the pathogenesis of these two diseases is neuroinflammation, which is initially triggered by the presence of pathological structures associated with these disorders. Chronic neuroinflammation is sustained by persistent and aberrant microglial activation in the brain, which results in damage and death of neighboring cells, including neurons and glial cells. Two types of risk factors contribute to the development of AD and PD: non-modifiable risk factors and modifiable risk factors. Non-modifiable risk factors include genetic susceptibility that increases an individual's risk of developing the disease, whereas modifiable risk factors include a wide variety of health- and lifestyle-related factors that may be altered by changing individual behaviors. Exposure to environmental toxins could be viewed as a partially modifiable risk factor. This review focuses on four modifiable risk factors including physical inactivity, vascular disease-related conditions, obesity and type two diabetes mellitus, all of which have been identified as risk factors for the development of AD and PD. We highlight that control of the modifiable risk factors is a valid approach for managing the increased incidence of AD and PD. We describe neuroinflammatory mechanisms, which are common to AD and PD, that may link both these neurodegenerative diseases with the four common modifiable risk factors. Understanding these mechanisms could help identify novel therapeutic targets for combating these neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Epilepsy, hippocampal sclerosis and febrile seizures linked by common genetic variation around SCN1A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperavičiūtė, Dalia; Catarino, Claudia B.; Matarin, Mar; Leu, Costin; Novy, Jan; Tostevin, Anna; Leal, Bárbara; Hessel, Ellen V. S.; Hallmann, Kerstin; Hildebrand, Michael S.; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M.; Ryten, Mina; Trabzuni, Daniah; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Alhusaini, Saud; Doherty, Colin P.; Dorn, Thomas; Hansen, Jörg; Krämer, Günter; Steinhoff, Bernhard J.; Zumsteg, Dominik; Duncan, Susan; Kälviäinen, Reetta K.; Eriksson, Kai J.; Kantanen, Anne-Mari; Pandolfo, Massimo; Gruber-Sedlmayr, Ursula; Schlachter, Kurt; Reinthaler, Eva M.; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Zimprich, Fritz; Théâtre, Emilie; Smith, Colin; O’Brien, Terence J.; Meng Tan, K.; Petrovski, Slave; Robbiano, Angela; Paravidino, Roberta; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Sperling, Michael R.; Buono, Russell J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Chaves, João; Costa, Paulo P.; Silva, Berta M.; da Silva, António M.; de Graan, Pierre N. E.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Becker, Albert; Schoch, Susanne; von Lehe, Marec; Reif, Philipp S.; Rosenow, Felix; Becker, Felicitas; Weber, Yvonne; Lerche, Holger; Rössler, Karl; Buchfelder, Michael; Hamer, Hajo M.; Kobow, Katja; Coras, Roland; Blumcke, Ingmar; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Weale, Michael E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Kunz, Wolfram S.

    2013-01-01

    Epilepsy comprises several syndromes, amongst the most common being mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis. Seizures in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis are typically drug-resistant, and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is frequently associated with important co-morbidities, mandating the search for better understanding and treatment. The cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis is unknown, but there is an association with childhood febrile seizures. Several rarer epilepsies featuring febrile seizures are caused by mutations in SCN1A, which encodes a brain-expressed sodium channel subunit targeted by many anti-epileptic drugs. We undertook a genome-wide association study in 1018 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 7552 control subjects, with validation in an independent sample set comprising 959 people with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis and 3591 control subjects. To dissect out variants related to a history of febrile seizures, we tested cases with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with (overall n = 757) and without (overall n = 803) a history of febrile seizures. Meta-analysis revealed a genome-wide significant association for mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures at the sodium channel gene cluster on chromosome 2q24.3 [rs7587026, within an intron of the SCN1A gene, P = 3.36 × 10−9, odds ratio (A) = 1.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.26–1.59]. In a cohort of 172 individuals with febrile seizures, who did not develop epilepsy during prospective follow-up to age 13 years, and 6456 controls, no association was found for rs7587026 and febrile seizures. These findings suggest SCN1A involvement in a common epilepsy syndrome, give new direction to biological understanding of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis with febrile seizures

  16. Chemical deamidation: a common pitfall in large-scale N-linked glycoproteomic mass spectrometry-based analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palmisano, Giuseppe; Melo-Braga, Marcella Nunes; Engholm-Keller, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    . We have evaluated this common large-scale N-linked glycoproteomic strategy and proved potential pitfalls using Escherichia coli as a model organism, since it lacks the N-glycosylation machinery found in mammalian systems and some pathogenic microbes. After isolation and proteolytic digestion of E...... indentified deamidated peptides with incorporation of 18O, showing the pitfalls of glycosylation site assignment based on deamidation of asparagine induced by PNGase F in 18O-water in large-scale analyses. These data experimentally prove the need for more caution in assigning glycosylation sites and "new" N......-linked consensus sites based on common N-linked glycoproteomics strategies without proper control experiments. Beside showing the spontaneous deamidation we provide alternative methods for validation that should be used in such experiments....

  17. Common Ground: Exploring Compatibilities between the Linked Data Models of the Library of Congress and OCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godby, Carol Jean; Denenberg, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Jointly released by OCLC and the Library of Congress, this white paper compares and contrasts the compatible linked data initiatives at both institutions. It is an executive summary of a more detailed technical analysis that will be released later this year. The white paper summarizes the recent activity of the Bibliographic Framework Initiative…

  18. Dynamics of competitive systems with a single common limiting factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kon, Ryusuke

    2015-02-01

    The concept of limiting factors (or regulating factors) succeeded in formulating the well-known principle of competitive exclusion. This paper shows that the concept of limiting factors is helpful not only to formulate the competitive exclusion principle, but also to obtain other ecological insights. To this end, by focusing on a specific community structure, we study the dynamics of Kolmogorov equations and show that it is possible to derive an ecologically insightful result only from the information about interactions between species and limiting factors. Furthermore, we find that the derived result is a generalization of the preceding work by Shigesada, Kawasaki, and Teramoto (1984), who examined a certain Lotka-Volterra equation in a different context.

  19. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  20. SCAR, RAPD and RFLP markers linked to a dominant gene (Are) conferring resistance to anthracnose in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam-Blondon, A F; Sévignac, M; Bannerot, H; Dron, M

    1994-08-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungusColletotrichum lindemuthianum, is a severe disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) controlled, in Europe, by a single dominant gene,Are. Four pairs of near-isogenic lines (NILs) were constructed, in which theAre gene was introgressed into different genetic backgrounds. These pairs of NILs were used to search for DNA markers linked to the resistance gene. Nine molecular markers, five RAPDs and four RFLPs, were found to discriminate between the resistant and the susceptible members of these NILs. A backcross progeny of 120 individuals was analysed to map these markers in relation to theAre locus. Five out of the nine markers were shown to be linked to theAre gene within a distance of 12.0 cM. The most tightly linked, a RAPD marker, was used to generate a pair of primers that specifically amplify this RAPD (sequence characterized amplified region, SCAR).

  1. What links schizophrenia and dreaming? Common phenomenological and neurobiological features of schizophrenia and REM sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skrzypińska, Dagna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this theoretical study is to present common phenomenological and neurobiological features of schizophrenia and REM sleep.Results. A review of professional literature was conducted in order to synthesize current findings about associations between schizophrenia and REM sleep. Many researches reveal that both states share some common phenomenological and neurobiological features. Autism, lack of insight and a loss of autonomy in relation to mental content are just some of the characteristics that occur on a phenomenological level in both dreams during REM sleep (lucid dreaming excluded and schizophrenia. Data from experimental conditions revealed that the waking mentation of patients suffering from schizophrenia has a similar degree of formal cognitive bizarreness as dream narratives obtained from both non-clinical and clinical populations. On the other hand, some common neurobiological features of the REM sleep stage and schizophrenia are: lack of central inhibitory processes, intracerebral disconnections, dysfunction of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex or nucleus accumbens and disturbed responsiveness. Moreover, there is similaractivation of dopamine, acetylcholine, noradrenaline, serotonin and glutamate in both states.Conclusions. Common phenomenological and neurobiological characteristics of these two states suggest that data about REM sleep could help introduce a useful experimental model of schizophrenia.

  2. In Search of Common Threads: Linking Multicultural, Feminist, and Social Justice Counseling Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crethar, Hugh C.; Rivera, Edil Torres; Nash, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Multicultural, feminist, and social justice counseling theories are often viewed as disparate helping models. This article examines the complementary nature of these models and discusses the need to promote a clearer understanding of the ways in which these common threads can be used in counseling practice.

  3. In Search of Common Threads: Linking Multicultural, Feminist, and Social Justice Counseling Paradigms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crethar, Hugh C.; Rivera, Edil Torres; Nash, Sara

    2008-01-01

    Multicultural, feminist, and social justice counseling theories are often viewed as disparate helping models. This article examines the complementary nature of these models and discusses the need to promote a clearer understanding of the ways in which these common threads can be used in counseling practice.

  4. Technical note: The Linked Paleo Data framework - a common tongue for paleoclimatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Nicholas P.; Emile-Geay, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Paleoclimatology is a highly collaborative scientific endeavor, increasingly reliant on online databases for data sharing. Yet there is currently no universal way to describe, store and share paleoclimate data: in other words, no standard. Data standards are often regarded by scientists as mere technicalities, though they underlie much scientific and technological innovation, as well as facilitating collaborations between research groups. In this article, we propose a preliminary data standard for paleoclimate data, general enough to accommodate all the archive and measurement types encountered in a large international collaboration (PAGES 2k). We also introduce a vehicle for such structured data (Linked Paleo Data, or LiPD), leveraging recent advances in knowledge representation (Linked Open Data).The LiPD framework enables quick querying and extraction, and we expect that it will facilitate the writing of open-source community codes to access, analyze, model and visualize paleoclimate observations. We welcome community feedback on this standard, and encourage paleoclimatologists to experiment with the format for their own purposes.

  5. Common familial risk factors for schizophrenia and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Debra L; Mackinnon, Andrew; Morgan, Vera A; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Waterreus, Anna; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-05-01

    The co-occurrence of type 2 diabetes and psychosis is an important form of medical comorbidity within individuals, but no large-scale study has evaluated comorbidity within families. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence for familial comorbidity between type 2 diabetes and psychosis. Data were analysed from an observational study of a nationally representative sample of 1642 people with psychosis who were in contact with psychiatric services at the time of survey (The 2010 Australian National Survey of Psychosis). Participants were aged 18-64 years and met World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision diagnostic criteria for a psychotic disorder (857 with schizophrenia, 319 with bipolar disorder with psychotic features, 293 with schizoaffective disorder, 81 with depressive psychosis and 92 with delusional disorder or other non-organic psychoses). Logistic regression was used to estimate the association between a family history of diabetes and a family history of schizophrenia. A positive family history of diabetes was associated with a positive family history of schizophrenia in those with a psychotic disorder (odds ratio = 1.35, p = 0.01, adjusted for age and gender). The association was different in those with an affective versus non-affective psychosis (odds ratio = 0.613, p = 0.019, adjusted for age and gender) and was significant only in those with a non-affective psychosis, specifically schizophrenia (odds ratio = 1.58, p = 0.005, adjusted for age and sex). Adjustment for demographic factors in those with schizophrenia slightly strengthened the association (odds ratio = 1.74, p = 0.001, adjusted for age, gender, diagnosis, ethnicity, education, employment, income and marital status). Elevated risk for type 2 diabetes in people with schizophrenia is not simply a consequence of antipsychotic medication; type 2 diabetes and schizophrenia share familial risk factors. © The Royal Australian and New

  6. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and its links with cardiovascular risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalache, A; Fitting, J W; Nicod, L P

    2015-11-18

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often also present with one or more cardiovascular risk factors, resulting not only in an increased mortality rate but also in a major impact on the health care system. Aside from common predisposing and environmental factors, the hypothesis of a chronic systemic inflammation linking COPD and cardiovascular co-morbidities is supported by an increasing body of evidence in recent literature. This could in turn pave the way for new developments, both diagnostic and therapeutic, in the future. In this context, the studies CoLaus and PneumoLaus aim to further investigate characteristics of the Lausanne general population, in particular those relating to cardiovascular and respiratory disease.

  7. Development and mapping of SSR markers linked to resistance-gene homologue clusters in common bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luz; Nayibe; Garzon; Matthew; Wohlgemuth; Blair

    2014-01-01

    Common bean is an important but often a disease-susceptible legume crop of temperate,subtropical and tropical regions worldwide. The crop is affected by bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The strategy of resistance-gene homologue(RGH) cloning has proven to be an efficient tool for identifying markers and R(resistance) genes associated with resistances to diseases. Microsatellite or SSR markers can be identified by physical association with RGH clones on large-insert DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosomes(BACs). Our objectives in this work were to identify RGH-SSR in a BAC library from the Andean genotype G19833 and to test and map any polymorphic markers to identify associations with known positions of disease resistance genes. We developed a set of specific probes designed for clades of common bean RGH genes and then identified positive BAC clones and developed microsatellites from BACs having SSR loci in their end sequences. A total of 629 new RGH-SSRs were identified and named BMr(bean microsatellite RGH-associated markers). A subset of these markers was screened for detecting polymorphism in the genetic mapping population DOR364 × G19833. A genetic map was constructed with a total of 264 markers,among which were 80 RGH loci anchored to single-copy RFLP and SSR markers. Clusters of RGH-SSRs were observed on most of the linkage groups of common bean and in positions associated with R-genes and QTL. The use of these new markers to select for disease resistance is discussed.

  8. Rapid change in host use of the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus linked to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A P; Saino, N; Adamík, P; Ambrosini, R; Antonov, A; Campobello, D; Stokke, B G; Fossøy, F; Lehikoinen, E; Martin-Vivaldi, M; Moksnes, A; Moskat, C; Røskaft, E; Rubolini, D; Schulze-Hagen, K; Soler, M; Shykoff, J A

    2011-03-07

    Parasites require synchrony with their hosts so if host timing changes with climate change, some parasites may decline and eventually go extinct. Residents and short-distance migrant hosts of the brood parasitic common cuckoo, Cuculus canorus, have advanced their phenology in response to climate change more than long-distance migrants, including the cuckoo itself. Because different parts of Europe show different degrees of climate change, we predicted that use of residents or short-distance migrants as hosts should have declined in areas with greater increase in spring temperature. Comparing relative frequency of parasitism of the two host categories in 23 European countries before and after 1990, when spring temperatures in many areas had started to increase, we found that relative parasitism of residents and short-distance migrants decreased. This change in host use was positively related to increase in spring temperature, consistent with the prediction that relative change in phenology for different migrant classes drives host-use patterns. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that climate change affects the relative abundance of different host races of the common cuckoo.

  9. Observational Confirmation of a Link Between Common Envelope Binary Interaction and Planetary Nebula Shaping

    CERN Document Server

    Hillwig, Todd; De Marco, Orsola; Bond, Howard; Margheim, Steve; Frew, David

    2016-01-01

    A current issue in the study of planetary nebulae with close binary central stars is the extent to which the binaries affect the shaping of the nebulae. Recent studies have begun to show a high coincidence rate between nebulae with large-scale axial or point symmetries and close binary stars. In addition, combined binary-star and spatio-kinematic modeling of the nebulae have demonstrated that all of the systems studied to date appear to have their central binary axis aligned with the primary axis of the nebula. Here we add two more systems to the list, the central stars and nebulae of NGC 6337 and Sp 1. We show both systems to be low inclination, with their binary axis nearly aligned with our line-of-sight. Their inclinations match published values for the inclinations of their surrounding nebulae. Including these two systems with the existing sample statistically demonstrates a direct link between the central binary and the nebular morphology. In addition to the systems' inclinations we give ranges for other...

  10. On the capacity of multiple cognitive links through common relay under spectrum-sharing constraints

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuli

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we consider an underlay cognitive relaying network consisting of multiple secondary users and introduce a cooperative transmission protocol using a common relay to help with the communications between all secondary source-destination pairs for higher throughput and lower realization complexity. A whole relay-assisted transmission procedure is composed of multiple access phase and broadcast phase, where the relay is equipped with multiple antennas, and the secondary sources and destinations are single-antenna nodes. Considering the spectrum-sharing constraints on the secondary sources and the relay, we analyze the capacity behaviors of the underlay cognitive relaying network under study. The corresponding numerical results provide a convenient tool for the presented network design and substantiate a distinguishing feature of introduced design in that multiple secondary users\\' communications do not rely on multiple relays, hence allowing for a more efficient use of the radio resources. © 2011 IEEE.

  11. Geostatistics: a common link between medical geography, mathematical geology, and medical geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goovaerts, P

    2014-08-01

    Since its development in the mining industry, geostatistics has emerged as the primary tool for spatial data analysis in various fields, ranging from earth and atmospheric sciences to agriculture, soil science, remote sensing, and more recently environmental exposure assessment. In the last few years, these tools have been tailored to the field of medical geography or spatial epidemiology, which is concerned with the study of spatial patterns of disease incidence and mortality and the identification of potential 'causes' of disease, such as environmental exposure, diet and unhealthy behaviours, economic or socio-demographic factors. On the other hand, medical geology is an emerging interdisciplinary scientific field studying the relationship between natural geological factors and their effects on human and animal health. This paper provides an introduction to the field of medical geology with an overview of geostatistical methods available for the analysis of geological and health data. Key concepts are illustrated using the mapping of groundwater arsenic concentration across eleven Michigan counties and the exploration of its relationship to the incidence of prostate cancer at the township level.

  12. Cue-based and algorithmic learning in common carp: A possible link to stress coping style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Flavia Oliveira; Borcato, Fabio Luiz; Huntingford, Felicity Ann

    2015-06-01

    Common carp that had been screened for stress coping style using a standard behavioural test (response to a novel environment) were given a learning task in which food was concealed in one of two compartments, its location randomised between trials and its presence in a given compartment signalled by either a red or a yellow light. All the fish learned to find food quickly, but did so in different ways. Fifty five percent learned to use the light cue to locate food; the remainder achieved the same result by developing a fixed movement routine. To explore this variation, we related learning strategy to stress coping style. Time to find food fell identically with successive trials in carp classified as reactive or proactive, but reactive fish tended to follow the light cue and proactive fish to adopt a fixed routine. Among fish that learned to follow the light, reactive individuals took fewer trials to reach the learning criterion than did proactive fish. These results add to the growing body of information on within-species variation in learning strategies and suggest a possible influence of stress coping style on the use of associative learning as opposed to algorithmic searching during foraging. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Factor V-Leiden Mutation: A Common Risk Factor for Venous Thrombosis among Lebanese Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghid Kreidy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Lebanon exhibits one of the highest prevalences of factor V-Leiden (FVL in the world (14.4%. The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of FVL mutation among Lebanese patients with lower extremity venous thrombosis. Material and Methods. From January 2003 to January 2011, 283 consecutive Lebanese patients, diagnosed with deep venous thrombosis (DVT by duplex scan, were retrospectively reviewed. FVL mutation was tested among patients with conditions highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states (65 patients. Results. FVL mutation was detected among 56.9% of patients, 68.6% of patients younger than 50 years, and 43.4% of patients older than 50 years (=0.041. FVL mutation was commonly reported in young adults, in patients with pregnancy, estrogen drugs, recurrent DVT, and resistance to anticoagulation. Conclusion. The high rate of FVL mutation observed among Lebanese patients with venous thrombosis is related to the high prevalence of this mutation in the Lebanese population. Thrombophilia screening should be tailored to accommodate a population's risk factor. In countries with high prevalence of FVL, this mutation should be screened among patients younger than 50 years and patients with situations highly suggestive of hypercoagulation states.

  14. Impaired endothelial nitric oxide bioavailability: a common link between aging, hypertension, and atherogenesis?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Walsh, Thomas

    2012-01-31

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is responsible for maintaining continuous vasodilator tone and for regulating local perfusion and systemic blood pressure. It also has significant antiproliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle and platelet anti-aggregatory effects. Impaired endothelial-dependent (NO mediated) vasorelaxation is observed in most animal and human models of healthy aging. It also occurs in age-associated conditions such as atherosclerosis and hypertension. Such "endotheliopathy" increases vascular risk in older adults. Studies have indicated that pharmacotherapeutic intervention with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme-A reductase inhibitors may improve NO-mediated vasomotor function. This review, evaluates the association between impaired endothelial NO bioavailability, accelerated vascular aging, and the age-associated conditions hypertension and atherogenesis. This is important, because pharmacotherapy aimed at improving endothelial NO bioavailability could modify age-related vascular disease and transform age into a potentially modifiable vascular risk factor, at least in a subpopulation of older adults.

  15. Identification of a RAPD marker linked to the Co-6 anthracnose resistant gene in common bean cultivar AB 136

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzate-Marin Ana Lilia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic variability of the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum represents an obstacle for the creation of resistant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. varieties. Gene pyramiding is an alternative strategy for the development of varieties with durable resistance. RAPD markers have been proposed as a means to facilitate pyramiding of resistance genes without the need for multiple inoculations of the pathogens. The main aims of this work were to define the inheritance pattern of resistance present in common bean cultivar AB 136 in segregating populations derived from crosses with cultivar Rudá (susceptible to most C. lindemuthianum races and to identify RAPD markers linked to anthracnose resistance. The two progenitors, populations F1 and F2, F2:3 families and backcross-derived plants were inoculated with race 89 of C. lindemuthianum under environmentally controlled greenhouse conditions. The results indicate that a single dominant gene, Co-6, controls common bean resistance to this race, giving a segregation ratio between resistant and susceptible plants of 3:1 in the F2, 1:0 in the backcrosses to AB 136 and 1:1 in the backcross to Rudá. The segregation ratio of F2:3 families derived from F2 resistant plants was 1:2 (homozygous to heterozygous resistant. Molecular marker analyses in the F2 population identified a DNA band of approximately 940 base pairs (OPAZ20(940, linked in coupling phase at 7.1 cM of the Co-6 gene. This marker is being used in our backcross breeding program to develop Rudá-derived common bean cultivars resistant to anthracnose and adapted to central Brazil.

  16. Common Factors in Speech-Language Treatment: An Exploratory Study of Effective Clinicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Kerry Danahy; Kohnert, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Research in related fields that employ behavioral interventions indicates that factors common to treatment programs may be more important to successful outcomes than specific components of a treatment. Applying this concept to speech-language pathology, we investigated one hypothesized "common factor," namely, the clinician who implements…

  17. Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Atrial Fibrillation: What is the Link?

    OpenAIRE

    Yaariv Khaykin

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation is a common cardiac arrhythmia. It is well known to occur in older patients with comorbid conditions such congestive heart failure and ischemic heart disease.1-3 In these otherwise sick individuals it is associated with higher long term morbidity and mortality.

  18. Identification of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Markers Linked to the Co-4 Resistance Gene to Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arruda, M C; Alzate-Marin, A L; Chagas, J M; Moreira, M A; de Barros, E G

    2000-07-01

    ABSTRACT New cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) with durable resistance to anthracnose can be developed by pyramiding major resistance genes using marker-assisted selection. To this end, it is necessary to identify sources of resistance and molecular markers tightly linked to the resistance genes. The objectives of this work were to study the inheritance of resistance to anthracnose in the cultivar TO (carrying the Co-4 gene), to identify random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers linked to Co-4, and to introgress this gene in the cultivar Rudá. Populations F(1), F(2), F(2:3), BC(1)s, and BC(1)r from the cross Rudá x TO were inoculated with race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, causal agent of bean anthracnose. The phenotypic ratios (resistant/susceptible) were 3:1 in the F(2) population, 1:1 in the BC(1)s, and 1:0 in the BC(1)r, confirming that resistance to anthracnose in the cultivar TO was monogenic and dominant. Six RAPD markers linked to the Co-4 gene were identified, four in the coupling phase: OPY20(830C) (0.0 centimorgan [cM]), OPC08(900C) (9.7 cM), OPI16(850C) (14.3 cM), and OPJ01(1,380C) (18.1 cM); and two in the repulsion phase: OPB03(1,800T) (3.7 cM) and OPA18(830T) (17.4 cM). OPY20(830C) and OPB03(1,800T), used in association as a codominant pair, allowed the identification of the three genotypic classes with a high degree of confidence. Marker OPY20(830C), which is tightly linked to Co-4, is being used to assist in breeding for resistance to anthracnose.

  19. Homeodomain Protein Transforming Growth Factor Beta-Induced Factor 2 Like, X-Linked Function in Colon Adenocarcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Abolfazl; Agah, Shahram; Heidari, Mansour; Mobini, Gholam Reza; Faghihloo, Ebrahim; Sarveazad, Arash; Mirzaei, Alireza

    2017-08-27

    Background: TGIF2LX (transforming growth factor beta-induced factor 2 like, X-linked) is a homeodomain (HD) protein that has been implicated in the negative regulation of cell signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible functions of TGIF2LX in colon adenocarcinoma cells. Methods: The human SW48 cell line was transfected with cDNA for the wild-type TGIF2LX gene and gene/protein over-expression was confirmed by microscopic analysis, real time RT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. In vitro cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT and BrdU assays. After developing a colon tumor model in nude mice, immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of tumor tissue was carried out for Ki-67 (proliferation) and CD34 (angiogenesis) markers. To predict potential protein partners of TGIF2LX, in-silico analysis was also conducted. Results: Obtained results showed over-expression of TGIF2LX as a potential transcription factor could inhibit either proliferation or angiogenesis (P<0.05) in colon tumors. In-silico results predicted interaction of TGIF2LX with other proteins considered important for cellular development. Conclusions: Our findings provided evidence of molecular mechanisms by which TGIF2LX could act as a tumor suppressor in colon adenocarcinoma cells. Thus, this gene may potentially be a promising option for colon cancer gene-based therapeutic strategies. Creative Commons Attribution License

  20. Links between accidents and lifestyle factors among Lithuanian schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkuviene, Skirmante; Zaborskis, Apolinaras

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate associations of some lifestyle factors with injuries among schoolchildren. Analysis was performed using data from the survey conducted in 2002 according to the methods of World Health Organization Cross-National Study on Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC). Using stratified random sampling, the representative sample of 5645 schoolchildren aged 11, 13, and 15 years from 104 schools of Lithuania was drawn and surveyed. Associations between potential risk factors and injuries among schoolchildren were evaluated calculating odds ratio and its 95% confidence intervals. For the evaluation of the impact of explanatory variables on analyzed event, logistic regression analysis was performed. Behavioral, psychological, and social integration factors were associated with the risk to sustain injuries among school-aged children. The impact of these factors varied within subgroups of schoolchildren by grade and sex. The most significant factors were: risk-taking behavior (smoking, alcohol and drug consumption, premature sexual activity), frequent participation in sport activities, involvement in physical fight, longer time spent away from home with friends, experienced bullying, poor self-assessed health and academic achievement, unhappiness, feeling unsafe at school, and high suicidal risk. Analysis failed to identify an expected association between lower socio-economic status and risk for injury. Integrated approach to injury etiology is essential in planning injury prevention and safety promotion activities among schoolchildren, paying particular attention to lifestyle factors, which can have the potential influence on risk to sustain injuries.

  1. [Systematization and hygienic standardization of environmental factors on the basis of common graphic models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galkin, A A

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of graphic models of the human response to environmental factors, two main types of complex quantitative influence as well as interrelation between determined effects at the level of an individual, and stochastic effects on population were revealed. Two main kinds of factors have been suggested to be distinguished. They are essential factors and accidental factors. The essential factors are common for environment. The accidental factors are foreign for environment. The above two kinds are different in approaches of hygienic standardization Accidental factors need a dot-like approach, whereas a two-level range approach is suitable for the essential factors.

  2. Most common genotypes and risk factors for HCV in Gaza strip: a cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Jadallah Salah Y

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present work aims at determining HCV genotypes in patients with chronic HCV infection, in Gaza strip, Palestine. The most common risk factors for HCV transmission were also evaluated in conjunction with the genotyping data. Results The study shows that there are only two major genotypes of HCV in Gaza Strip: Genotype 1 (subtypes 1a and 1b collectively contribute to 28.3% of the cases, and genotype 4 (subtypes 4a and 4c/d collectively contribute to 64.1% of the cases. Mixed infection with the two genotypes was also present among 7.6% of the cases. In this study a statistically significant relationship was established between the distribution of these genotypes and the patients' living place, traveling history, history of blood transfusion and history of surgical operations. Conclusion The present study is the first to link HCV genotyping in Gaza strip with its possible roots of transmission. Traveling to endemic countries, especially Egypt; blood transfusion and surgical operations are major roots of HCV infection in Gaza strip. The results indicate that iatrogenic and nosocomial procedures may be responsible for the majority of HCV infections in Gaza strip.

  3. Estimation of daily Linke turbidity factor by using global irradiance measurements at solar noon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo, J.; Zarzalejo, L.F.; Martin, L.; Navarro, A.A. [Renewable Energy Division (Energy Department), CIEMAT Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Marchante, R. [Investigaciones y Recursos Solares Avanzados, IrSOLaV Santiago Grisolia, 2, 28760 Tres Cantos, Madrid (Spain)

    2009-08-15

    This work presents a methodology for estimating daily Linke turbidity factor for clear sky days from global horizontal irradiance information at solar noon and monthly mean values of the Linke turbidity factor. The analysis of the method proposed here have been made using the ESRA clear sky model to recalculate the direct normal irradiance using as input the new Linke turbidities. Ground data of three BSRN and six AEMet radiometric meteorological stations have been used for assessing the method. Linke turbidity factor estimated here exhibits higher fluctuations than the monthly means and the comparison of the solar irradiance recalculated with the ground data have shown a noticeable reduction of the root mean square deviation. On the other hand the new Linke turbidity estimations have been compared to those values obtained from normal beam irradiance measures. The discrepancies found point out the high dependence of the reliability of this method with the quality of the ground measurements used. (author)

  4. Common links in the structure and cellular localization of Rhizobium chitolipooligosaccharides and general Rhizobium membrane phospholipid and glycolipid components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedergren, R A; Lee, J; Ross, K L; Hollingsworth, R I

    1995-04-04

    Several common links between the structural chemistry of the chitolipooligosaccharides of Rhizobium and the general rhizobial membrane lipid and lipopolysaccharide chemistry of these bacteria have been uncovered. Aspects of common chemistry include sulfation, methylation, and the position and extent of fatty acyl chain unsaturation. We find that bacteria which are known to synthesize sulfated chitolipooligosaccharides (such as Rhizobium meliloti strains and the broad-host-range Rhizobium species strain NGR234) also have sulfated lipopolysaccharides. Their common origins of sulfation have been demonstrated by using mutants which are known to be impaired in sulfating their chitolipooligosaccharides. In such cases, there is a corresponding diminution or complete lack of sulfation of the lipopolysaccharides. The structural diversity of the fatty acids observed in the chitolipooligosaccharides is also observed in the other membrane lipids. For instance, the doubly unsaturated fatty acids which are known to be predominant components of R. meliloti chitolipooligosaccharides were also found in the usual phospholipids and glycolipids. Also, the known functionalization of the chitolipooligosaccharides of R. sp. NGR234 by O- and N-methylation was also reflected in the lipopolysaccharide of this organism. The common structural features of chitolipooligosaccharides and membrane components are consistent with a substantial degree of biosynthetic overlap and a large degree of cellular, spatial overlap between these molecules. The latter aspect is clearly demonstrated here since we show that the chitolipooligosaccharides are, in fact, normal membrane components of Rhizobium. This increases the importance of understanding the role of the bacterial cell surface chemistry in the Rhizobium/legume symbiosis and developing a comprehensive understanding of the highly integrated membrane lipid and glycolipid chemistry of Rhizobium.

  5. Nuclei of Taxus baccata: Flavanols Linked to Chromatin Remodeling Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Feucht

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic studies of young needles and shoot tips from Taxus baccata showed that flavanols are localized in the nuclei. This observation is based on the histochemical staining of flavanols with the DMACA reagent. The colour that is obtained with this reagent varies from pale to deep blue, depending on the amount of flavanols. This study is focused on nondifferentiated cell lineages and on differentiating cells. The key point to note is that all nuclei of a cell lineage showed a uniform DMACA staining pattern based on the amount and structural appearence of nuclear flavanols. This points to transcriptional and epigenetic programming. However, comparing various cell lineages from different shoot tips and needles revealed a lineage-specific expression of nuclear flavanols. This result implied that both positional and developmental signals from neighbouring cells were involved in the nuclear flavanol binding of lineages. The cells of a developmentally advanced lineage loose their intimate contact and, then, they separate from each other to undergo an autonomous, individual sequence of differentiation. This in turn was accompanied by differences in the nuclear flavanol patterns of the single cells. Investigating different mitotic stages revealed a wide spectrum in flavanol staining intensities of the chromosomes. These observations should be linked to UV-VIS spectroscopical kinetic results indicating that nuclear flavanols bound to histones are involved in epigenetically regulated modification of chromatin. The kinetic studies show that catechin is relatively rapidly degraded by oxygen in the presence of Mg2+-ions. However, this degradation reaction is strongly inhibited when histone proteins were added. This behaviour is a clear indication that coregulatory interactions exist between catechin and histones.

  6. Web Link Counts Correlate with ISI Impact Factors: Evidence from Two Disciplines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Liwen; Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Reports on a study that compared counts of links to the Web home pages of academic journals with the citation based Journal Impact Factor (JIF) for two disciplines: library and information science, and law. Highlights include compiling the lists of journals (which are appended); locating Web pages; and correlations between JIF and link counts.…

  7. Generalized Identities Involving Common Factors of Generalized Fibonacci, Jacobsthal and Jacobsthal-Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant K. Panwar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present generalized identities involving common factors of generalized Fibonacci, Jacobsthal and jacobsthal-Lucas numbers. Binet’s formula will employ to obtain the identities.

  8. Risk Factors for Surgical-Site Infection Following Common Femoral Artery Endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Wouter J. M.; Verhoeven, Bart A. N.; van de Mortel, Rob H. W.; Moll, Frans L.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a major complication following endarterectomy of the common femoral artery. The aim of this single-center study was to determine risk factors for surgical-site infection after endarterectomy of the common femoral artery and especially the possible association between patch

  9. 不同铆测验设计下多维IRT等值方法的比较%Comparison of MIRT Linking Methods for Different Common Item Designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玥; 刘红云

    2013-01-01

    two kinds of common item choosing strategies in various situations. The study was a mixed measure design of simulation conditions (between-factors) and linking methods (within-factor). There were six between-factors: (1) 2 test lengths (40 items and 80 items); (2) 2 levels of the proportion of the number of items in one dimension to another (1:1 and 1:3); (3) 3 anchor lengths (1/20, 1/5 to 1/3 of total test); (4) 2 strategies of choosing common items (averagely choosing the items in all dimensions or choosing according to the proportions of items in every dimension); (5) 3 correlations between two ability dimensions (r=0, 0.5, 0.9); (6) 2 levels of equivalent/non-equivalent ability levels between two populations. The five MIRT linking methods we investigated were: Mean/Mean (MM) method, Mean/Sigma (MS) method, Stoking-Lord's (SL) method, Haebara's (HB) method and Least Square (LS) method. Under each condition, the number of examinees was fixed as / =2000, and 30 replications were generated. BMIRT (Yao, 2003) was applied to estimate item and ability parameters using an MCMC method. Based on the previous studies about equating (Kim & Cohen, 1998; Kim & Cohen, 2002), a two-step of linking was applied. The first step was to transform the scale of parameters in the new test onto the base test, and the second step was to transform the scale of all the simulated items onto the generating scale. In each step, the transformation matrices were produced by LinkMIRT (Yao, 2004) and the R package called "Plink" (Weeks, 2010). Finally, the recovery of parameters was evaluated by four criteria: bias, mean absolute error, root mean square error, correlation between the parameters after equating and true values. To compare the five MIRT equating methods, the results showed that: the RMSE for parameters under SL, HB and LS methods were smaller and more stable in different situations; however, the RMSE for parameters in MM and MS methods were significantly large, especially in non

  10. Common Genetic and Nonshared Environmental Factors Contribute to the Association between Socioemotional Dispositions and the Externalizing Factor in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jeanette; Allan, Nicholas; Mikolajewski, Amy J.; Hart, Sara A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Childhood behavioral disorders including conduct disorder (CD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often co-occur. Prior twin research shows that common sets of genetic and environmental factors are associated with these various disorders and they form a latent factor called…

  11. Research on the Relationships between Chinese Journal Impact Factors and External Web Link Counts and Web Impact Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Lu; Qiu, Junping

    2004-01-01

    Journal impact factors (JIFs) as determined by the Institute for Scientific and Technological Information of China (ISTIC) of forty-two Chinese engineering journals were compared with external Web link counts, obtained from Lycos, and Web Impact Factors (WIFs) of corresponding journal Web sites to determine if any significant correlation existed…

  12. A Common Factors Approach to Supporting University Students Experiencing Psychological Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surette, Tanya E.; Shier, Micheal L.

    2017-01-01

    This study empirically assessed the applicability of the common factors model to students accessing university-based counseling (n = 102). Participants rated symptoms of depression, anxiety, and somatization at intake and discharge. Therapists kept detailed session notes on client factors and therapy process variables. Data were analyzed utilizing…

  13. Excessive Cold-tongue and Weak ENSO Asymmetry: Are These Two Common Biases in Climate Models Linked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, D. Z.

    2014-12-01

    Among the biases in the tropical Pacific that are common in the climate models, two stand out. One is the excessive cold-tongue in the mean state---the pool of the cold water that is normally in the eastern tropical Pacific extends too far to the west. The other is the underestimate of the asymmetry of El Nino-Southern Oscillation—the fact that El Nino and La Nina are more or less a mirror image of each other in the models while they are not so in the observations. Results from an analysis from CMIP5 models, forced ocean GCM experiments, as well as an analytical model are presented to suggest that these two common biases in our state-of-the-art models are linked. Specifically, an excessive cold-tongue in the mean climatological state makes the ENSO system more stable and thus leads to a more symmetric ENSO, while a more symmetric ENSO in turn results in less nonlinear heating from the ENSO events to the cental equatorial Pacific which in turn contributes to the development of an excessive cold-tongue. The finding underscores that errors in the mean state and ENSO tend to reinforce each other and thus explains why it has been difficult to simulate the tropical Pacific climate. Further comparison with observations suggests that these two biases are the symptoms of a single structural inadequacy in the models: a weak dynamical coupling between the atmosphere and ocean which puts the ENSO system in the models to a different dynamic regime than the obsereved. Measures that may help push the models closer to the observations are suggested.

  14. Linking Professional, School, Demographic, and Motivational Factors to Desire for Principalship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Allan; Kwan, Paula

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This study attempts to link four groups of contextual factors to vice principals' desire for principalship using regression analysis. Relevant items representing context are grouped under professional, school, demographic, and motivational factors. The findings aim to provide greater understanding of the desire, or lack thereof, of vice…

  15. The Association of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia with Chiari Malformation Type I: A Coincidence or a Common Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A 19-month-old boy was referred for progressive weight gain. His past medical history included congenital hypothyroidism and developmental delay. Physical examination revealed characteristics of Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy, macrocephaly, and calcinosis cutis. He had hypocalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, and elevated Parathyroid Hormone levels. Genetic testing revealed a known mutation of GNAS gene, confirming the diagnosis of Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type Ia (PHP-Ia) (c.34C>T (p.G1n12X)). He had a normal brain MRI at three months, but developmental delay prompted a repeat MRI that revealed Chiari Malformation Type I (CM-I) with hydrocephalus requiring neurosurgical intervention. This was followed by improvement in attaining developmental milestones. Recently, he was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency. This case suggests the potential association of CM-I with PHP-Ia. Larger studies are needed to assess whether CM-I with hydrocephalus are common associations with PHP-Ia and to define potential genetic links between these conditions. We propose a low threshold in performing brain MRI on PHP-1a patients, especially those with persistent developmental delay to rule out CM-I. Early intervention may improve neurodevelopmental outcomes and prevent neurosurgical emergencies. PMID:27703483

  16. Application of in silico bulked segregant analysis for rapid development of markers linked to Bean common mosaic virus resistance in common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean was one of the first crops that benefited from the development and utilization of molecular markers in tagging major disease resistance genes for marker-assisted selection (MAS). Efficiency of MAS breeding in common bean is still hampered; however, due to the dominance, linkage phase, an...

  17. Systematic identification of core transcription factors mediating dysregulated links bridging inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Xiao

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows a tight link between inflammation and cancer. However, comprehensive identification of pivotal transcription factors (i.e., core TFs mediating the dysregulated links remains challenging, mainly due to a lack of samples that can effectively reflect the connections between inflammation and tumorigenesis. Here, we constructed a series of TF-mediated regulatory networks from a large compendium of expression profiling of normal colonic tissues, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs and colorectal cancer (CRC, which contains 1201 samples in total, and then proposed a network-based approach to characterize potential links bridging inflammation and cancer. For this purpose, we computed significantly dysregulated relationships between inflammation and their linked cancer networks, and then 24 core TFs with their dysregulated genes were identified. Collectively, our approach provides us with quite important insight into inflammation-associated tumorigenesis in colorectal cancer, which could also be applied to identify functionally dysregulated relationships mediating the links between other different disease phenotypes.

  18. Strengthening the systemic ties that bind: integrating common factors into marriage and family therapy curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karam, Eli A; Blow, Adrian J; Sprenkle, Douglas H; Davis, Sean D

    2015-04-01

    Specific models guide the training of marriage and family therapists (MFTs) as they offer both structure and organization for both therapists and clients. Learning models may also benefit therapists-in-training by instilling confidence and preventing atheoretical eclecticism. The moderate common factors perspective argues that models are essential, but should not be taught as "the absolute truth," given there is no evidence for relative efficacy of one empirically validated model versus another, and no single model works in all instances. The following article provides a blueprint for infusing a common factors perspective into MFT programmes by reviewing innovations in course design, outlining specific teaching strategies, and highlighting potential implementation challenges.

  19. Are there common genetic and environmental factors behind the endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benyamin, B.; Sørensen, T.I.A.; Schousboe, K.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The cluster of obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension, called the metabolic syndrome, has been suggested as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether there are common genetic...... and environmental factors influencing this cluster in a general population of twin pairs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multivariate genetic analysis was performed on nine endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome from 625 adult twin pairs of the GEMINAKAR study of the Danish Twin Registry. RESULTS: All......, the endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome apparently do not share a substantial common genetic or familial environmental background....

  20. Common variable immune deficiency associated Hodgkin’s lymphoma complicated with EBV-linked hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkan, Umit Yavuz; Gunes, Gursel; Aslan, Tuncay; Etgul, Sezgin; Aydin, Seda; Buyukasik, Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is described by an increase in macrophages accountable for extensive phagocytosis of hematopoietic cells. Secondary HPS arises commonly in the presence of infections, neoplasia, autoimmune disorders and immune disorders. Here, we reported a patient with common variable immune deficiency (CVID) and Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) who later developed EBV linked hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis. 42 year old men underwent check-up because of back pain in July 2012. He had known CVID disease. In physical examination he had no lymphadenopathies however his spleen was palpable 3 cm under arcus costa. He had hypogammaglobulinemia with IgG levels around 500 mg/dl. In abdominal computed tomography (CT) multiple lymphadenopathies reaching maximum 26×17 cm size were seen so, PET-CT was performed. Involvement in thorax, abdomen, and bone was detected with maximum SUV max 11.5. He had undergone tru-cut biopsy from lymph node in November 2012 which revealed HL. Bone marrow investigation favored with mix cell type. His cytogenetic analysis was reported as 46 XY. He was considered as stage 4 disease and ABVD (Adriamycin, bleomycin, vincristine and dexamethasone). He was given six cycles of chemotherapy in May 2013 and complete remission was observed in control CT screening in July 2013. However pancytopenia evolved in August 2013. Bone marrow investigation revealed suspicious lymphohistiocytic infiltration. Treatment was planned to apply autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) after salvage chemotherapy. Control bone marrow investigation again revealed the lymphohistiocytic aggregates with hemophagocytosis. Our patient showed 5 criteria of hemophagocytic syndrome. He had ferritin elevation (>5000 μg/dl), splenomegaly (13 cm) cytopenia, triglyceride elevation and hemophagocytosis. He had unrelated SCT transplantation however he died from transplant related toxicity. The primary and secondary immune deficiency caused by chemotherapy are the major causes

  1. Greatest Common Divisor and Least Common Multiple Matrices on Factor Closed Sets in a Principal Ideal Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. El-Kassar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Let T be a set of n distinct positive integers, x1, x2, ..., xn. The n×n matrix [T] having (xi, xj, the greatest common divisor of xi and xj, as its (i,j-entry is called the greatest common divisor (GCD matrix on T. The matrix [[T

  2. 美军通用数据链发展趋势分析%Study on Development Trend of U.S. Common Data Link

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光辉

    2016-01-01

    Common Data Link is the main means of the real-time communication for the high capacity of U.S. ISR (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance). In this paper, with the development of the Navy CDL equipments, the development trend of U.S. Common Data Link (CDL) is discussed and analyzed based on the transmission system of Common Data Link.%通用数据链是美军大容量情报监视侦察信息实时共享的主要手段,本文在介绍通用数据链传输体制的基础上,结合海军通用数据链装备的发展,对美军通用数据链发展趋势进行了探讨分析。

  3. O-Linked Glycosylation Determines the Nephritogenic Potential of IgA Rheumatoid Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Masao; Ito, Kiyoaki; Nakata, Junichiro; Otani, Masako; Tran, Ngoc Lan; Morito, Naoki; Takahashi, Satoru; Wada, Yoshinao

    2014-01-01

    Deficient glycosylation of O-linked glycans in the IgA1 hinge region is associated with IgA nephropathy in humans, but the pathogenic contribution of the underlying structural aberrations remains incompletely understood. We previously showed that mice implanted with cells secreting the class-switch variant 6-19 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, but not 46-42 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, develop glomerular lesions resembling IgA nephropathy. Because the levels of O-linked glycosylation in the hinge region and the structures of N-linked glycans in the CH1 domain differ in 6-19 IgA and 46-42 IgA, we determined the respective contributions of O- and N-linked glycans to the nephritogenic potential of the 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor in mice. Wild-type 6-19 IgA secreted by implanted cells induced significant formation of glomerular lesions, whereas poorly O-glycosylated 6-19 IgA glycovariants or a 6-19 IgA hinge mutant lacking O-linked glycans did not. However, we observed no apparent heterogeneity in the structure of N-linked glycans attached to three different sites of the Fc regions of nephritogenic and non-nephritogenic 6-19 IgAs. Collectively, our data suggest a critical role of O-linked glycans attached to the hinge region in the development of IgA nephropathy–like GN induced by 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor in mice. PMID:24511137

  4. Conduction Losses and Common Mode EMI Analysis on Bridgeless Power Factor Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingnan; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.; Thomsen, Ole Cornelius

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a review of Bridgeless Boost power factor correction (PFC) converters is presented at first. Performance comparison on conduction losses and common mode electromagnetic interference (EMI) are analyzed between conventional Boost PFC converter and members of Bridgeless PFC family....... Experiment results are given to validate the efficiency analysis and EMI model building....

  5. Factors that Affect the Physical Science Career Interest of Female Students: Testing Five Common Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Lock, Robynne M.; Lung, Florin; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using multivariate matching methods on national data drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering (PRiSE) project ("n" = 7505), we test the following five commonly held beliefs regarding what…

  6. Factors associated with psychological distress or common mental disorders in migrant populations across the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, Dolores; Alarcón, Renato D; Martínez-Ortega, José M; Mendieta-Marichal, Yaiza; Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis; Gurpegui, Manuel

    We systematically review factors associated with the presence of psychological distress or common mental disorders in migrant populations. Articles published between January 2000 and December 2014 were reviewed and 85 applying multivariate statistical analysis were selected. Common mental disorders were significantly associated with socio-demographic and psychological characteristics, as observed in large epidemiological studies on general populations. The probability of common mental disorders occurrence differs significantly among migrant groups according to their region of origin. Moreover, traumatic events prior to migration, forced, unplanned, poorly planned or illegal migration, low level of acculturation, living alone or separated from family in the host country, lack of social support, perceived discrimination, and the length of migrants' residence in the host country all increase the likelihood of CMD. In contrast, language proficiency, family reunification, and perceived social support reduce such probability. Factors related with the risk of psychiatric morbidity among migrants should be taken into account to design preventive strategies.

  7. Identification of Discriminant Factors after Exposure of Maize and Common Bean Plantlets to Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro HERNÁNDEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adverse environmental conditions limit crop yield and better understanding of plant response to stress will assist the development of more tolerant cultivars. Maize and common bean plantlets were evaluated under salinity, high temperature, drought and waterlogged conditions to identify biochemical markers which could be useful for rapid identification of putative stress tolerant plants. The levels of phenolics (free, cell wall-linked, total, aldehydes including malondialdehyde and chlorophylls (a, b, total were measured on stressed plantlets.  Only two indicators were statistically non-significant:  chlorophyll b in maize plantlets stressed with sodium chloride and malondialdehyde content in drought stressed maize. The most remarkable effects of abiotic stresses can be summarized as follows: (i salinity increased levels of free phenolics in maize plantlets and chlorophylls (a, b, total in common bean; (ii high temperature (40 °C elevated levels of chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize but decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total and free phenolics in common bean; (iii drought increased phenolics and decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize and increased chlorophyll pigments (a, b, total in common bean; (iv waterlogging increased free phenolics and decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize and increased chlorophyll (a, total in common bean. Free phenolics and chlorophylls, especially a, were the most responsive indicators to stress and can, therefore, be considered putative biochemical markers for abiotic stress tolerance in maize and common bean. The use of Fisher’s linear discriminant analysis to differentiate non-stressed and stressed plants in breeding programs is also a novel aspect of this report. Fisher’s linear discriminant functions classified correctly 100% of non-stressed or stressed originally grouped plants.

  8. Data-Mining Techniques in Detecting Factors Linked to Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Abad, Fernando; Chaparro Caso López, Alicia A.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the emergence of statistical analysis techniques based on data mining in education sciences, and the potential they offer to detect non-trivial information in large databases, this paper presents a procedure used to detect factors linked to academic achievement in large-scale assessments. The study is based on a non-experimental,…

  9. Data-Mining Techniques in Detecting Factors Linked to Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Abad, Fernando; Chaparro Caso López, Alicia A.

    2017-01-01

    In light of the emergence of statistical analysis techniques based on data mining in education sciences, and the potential they offer to detect non-trivial information in large databases, this paper presents a procedure used to detect factors linked to academic achievement in large-scale assessments. The study is based on a non-experimental,…

  10. Factors Affecting the Link between Physical Discipline and Child Externalizing Problems in Black and White Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna S.; Litrownik, Alan J.; Newton, Rae R.; Black, Maureen M.; Everson, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    We examined contextual factors that may affect the impact of physical discipline on later child behavior problems among high-risk Black and White families. We examined race, parental warmth, and early child problems as potential moderators of the discipline-behavior problem link. The sample included 442 White and Black children and their…

  11. Jacquelines of all trades or masters of some? Negative implications of focusing on common factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas C

    2012-07-01

    The emphasis on common factors initially grew out of increasingly frustrating findings from randomized clinical trials that head-to-head comparison of different treatments rarely found one to be superior (Luborsky et al., 2002; Luborsky, Singer, & Luborsky, 1975). In this regard, Cameron and Keenan (2010) have done well calling attention to a fundamental problem we deal with in researching, practicing, and teaching. As an instructor, it is difficult to teach practice- minded MSW students about empirically supported treatments when, with few exceptions, most theoretically distinct treatments that have been contrasted are not so different in terms of outcomes. This beckons us to teach students to think critically and understand the limits of current research on empirically supported treatments. However, I have argued here that there are benefits to teaching students about specific ESTs. It is plausible that providing extensive training in specific ESTs could be a platform for teaching about common factors, rather than focusing on developing generalist skills and later learning specific techniques that are needed in certain practice areas. Doing so gives students some useful techniques, which are associated with clinical improvement and can be adapted to other practice settings. It is unclear if the same can be said for teaching a common factors approach, which is already the dominant training model in social work. Of course, empirical research is needed to determine whether varying degrees of training emphasis on common factors or specific ESTs affect clinical skill development or adoption of ESTs. With regard to the issue of common factors in clinical research, health services researchers are already being encouraged to propose novel techniques for how we might affect common factors. Although it is clear that such mechanisms are not always unique to particular treatments, such research is typically being done incrementally by studying in-session processes operating

  12. Common and unique associated factors for medically unexplained chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, J; Tomenson, B; Chew-Graham, C A; Macfarlane, G J; Jackson, J; Littlewood, A; Creed, F H

    2015-12-01

    Chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue share common associated factors but these associations may be explained by the presence of concurrent depression and anxiety. We mailed questionnaires to a randomly selected sample of people in the UK to identify participants with chronic widespread pain (ACR 1990 definition) and those with chronic fatigue. The questionnaire assessed sociodemographic factors, health status, healthcare use, childhood factors, adult attachment, and psychological stress including anxiety and depression. To identify persons with unexplained chronic widespread pain or unexplained chronic fatigue; we examined participant's medical records to exclude medical illness that might cause these symptoms. Of 1443 participants (58.0% response rate) medical records of 990 were examined. 9.4% (N=93) had unexplained chronic widespread pain and 12.6% (N=125) had unexplained chronic fatigue. Marital status, childhood psychological abuse, recent threatening experiences and other somatic symptoms were commonly associated with both widespread pain and fatigue. No common effect was found for few years of education and current medical illnesses (more strongly associated with chronic widespread pain) or recent illness in a close relative, neuroticism, depression and anxiety scores (more strongly associated with chronic fatigue). Putative associated factors with a common effect were associated with unexplained chronic widespread pain or unexplained chronic fatigue only when there was concurrent anxiety and/or depression. This study suggests that the associated factors for chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue need to be studied in conjunction with concurrent depression/anxiety. Clinicians should be aware of the importance of concurrent anxiety or depression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Common and unique associated factors for medically unexplained chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, J.; Tomenson, B.; Chew-Graham, C.A.; Macfarlane, G.J.; Jackson, J.; Littlewood, A.; Creed, F.H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue share common associated factors but these associations may be explained by the presence of concurrent depression and anxiety. Methods We mailed questionnaires to a randomly selected sample of people in the UK to identify participants with chronic widespread pain (ACR 1990 definition) and those with chronic fatigue. The questionnaire assessed sociodemographic factors, health status, healthcare use, childhood factors, adult attachment, and psychological stress including anxiety and depression. To identify persons with unexplained chronic widespread pain or unexplained chronic fatigue; we examined participant's medical records to exclude medical illness that might cause these symptoms. Results Of 1443 participants (58.0% response rate) medical records of 990 were examined. 9.4% (N = 93) had unexplained chronic widespread pain and 12.6% (N = 125) had unexplained chronic fatigue. Marital status, childhood psychological abuse, recent threatening experiences and other somatic symptoms were commonly associated with both widespread pain and fatigue. No common effect was found for few years of education and current medical illnesses (more strongly associated with chronic widespread pain) or recent illness in a close relative, neuroticism, depression and anxiety scores (more strongly associated with chronic fatigue). Putative associated factors with a common effect were associated with unexplained chronic widespread pain or unexplained chronic fatigue only when there was concurrent anxiety and/or depression. Discussion This study suggests that the associated factors for chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue need to be studied in conjunction with concurrent depression/anxiety. Clinicians should be aware of the importance of concurrent anxiety or depression. PMID:26652592

  14. Common polymorphisms and cardiovascular factors in patients with myocardial infarction of Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizbeth Salazar-Sánchez

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Eight common polymorphisms of known myocardial infarction (MIrisk factors (factor V Leiden (FVL, factor V HR2 (FVHR2,factor II 20210G>A (FII,factor VII IVS7 (FVII IVS7,factor VII Arg353Gln (FVII, factor XIII Val34Leu (FXIII,Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR, Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACEand environmental risk factors were analyzed in a MI patients of Costa Rica.This case-control study included 186 MI subjects,95 of them Se estudiaron ocho polimorfismos comunes asociados como factores de riesgo para el infarto al miocardio (IM:factor V Leiden (FVL,factor VHR2 (FVHR2, factor II 20210G>A (FII,factor VII IVS7 (FVII IVS7, factor VIIArg353Gln (FVII,factor XIIIVal34Leu (FXIII, metilentetrahidrofolato reductase C677T (MTHFR, enzima convertidora de la angiotensina (ACE y factores ambientales de riesgo,en pacientes costarricenses.Este es un estudio de casos y controles,donde participan 186 pacientes,95 de ellos con edades <45 años y 201 sujetos controles.Se utilizó la técnica de reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCRy por medio de entrevistas personales se recolectó información epidemiológica adicional.Se encontró que la hipercolesterolemia y el fumado estan asociados como factores de riesgo en los pacientes jóvenes.Niveles elevados del fibrinógeno fueron detectados como un factor de riesgo importante y se observo interacción entre fumado y estos valores aumentados de fibrinógeno. El genotipo 34LeuLeu del FXIII presentó un efecto protector significante mientras que los otros polimorfimos estudiados no mostraron diferencia estadísticamente significativa entre los casos y controles. Los polimorfismos del FVII y FXIII demostraron interación con el fibrinógeno,según el análisis estadístico aplicado. Se evidencia, la interación entre factores de riesgo común y ciertos polimorfismos (FVII;FXIIIen la patogénesis del IM.Este es uno de los primeros informes sobre estos marcadores moleculares y su asociación con IM en

  15. Improved Selection with Newly Identified RAPD Markers Linked to Resistance Gene to Four Pathotypes of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzate-Marin, A L; Menarim, H; de Carvalho, G A; de Paula, T J; de Barros, E G; Moreira, M A

    1999-04-01

    ABSTRACT Three F(2) populations derived from crosses between the resistant cultivar AB 136 and the susceptible cultivar Michelite (MiA), and one F(2) population derived from a cross between AB 136 and Mexico 222 (MeA), were used to identify markers linked to anthracnose resistance genes present in cultivar AB 136. Primer OPZ04 produced a DNA band (OPZ04(560)) linked in coupling phase to the resistance gene for pathotype 89 (8.5 +/- 0.025 cM) in one population derived from the cross MiA. In the same population, primer OPZ09 produced one band (OPZ09(950)) linked in repulsion phase (20.4 +/- 0.014 cM) to the same resistance gene. The simultaneous use of markers in coupling and in repulsion phases allowed the identification of the three genotypic classes. In the other two populations from cross MiA, OPZ04(560) was linked in coupling phase to resistance genes for pathotypes 73 (2.9 +/- 0.012 cM) and 81 (2.8 +/- 0.017 cM). In population MeA, OPZ04(560) was linked in coupling phase (7.5 +/- 0.033 cM) to resistance to pathotype 64. These data suggest that a single gene or complex locus of linked resistance genes present in cultivar AB 136 confers resistance to all four pathotypes of C. lindemuthianum.

  16. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh, E-mail: sthalla@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  17. Common Virulence Factors and Tissue Targets of Entomopathogenic Bacteria for Biological Control of Lepidopteran Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Castagnola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on common insecticidal virulence factors from entomopathogenic bacteria with special emphasis on two insect pathogenic bacteria Photorhabdus (Proteobacteria: Enterobacteriaceae and Bacillus (Firmicutes: Bacillaceae. Insect pathogenic bacteria of diverse taxonomic groups and phylogenetic origin have been shown to have striking similarities in the virulence factors they produce. It has been suggested that the detection of phage elements surrounding toxin genes, horizontal and lateral gene transfer events, and plasmid shuffling occurrences may be some of the reasons that virulence factor genes have so many analogs throughout the bacterial kingdom. Comparison of virulence factors of Photorhabdus, and Bacillus, two bacteria with dissimilar life styles opens the possibility of re-examining newly discovered toxins for novel tissue targets. For example, nematodes residing in the hemolymph may release bacteria with virulence factors targeting neurons or neuromuscular junctions. The first section of this review focuses on toxins and their context in agriculture. The second describes the mode of action of toxins from common entomopathogens and the third draws comparisons between Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The fourth section reviews the implications of the nervous system in biocontrol.

  18. Are there common genetic and environmental factors behind the endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benyamin, B; Sørensen, T I A; Schousboe, K

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The cluster of obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and hypertension, called the metabolic syndrome, has been suggested as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether there are common genetic...... and environmental factors influencing this cluster in a general population of twin pairs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multivariate genetic analysis was performed on nine endophenotypes associated with the metabolic syndrome from 625 adult twin pairs of the GEMINAKAR study of the Danish Twin Registry. RESULTS: All...

  19. The Most Common Detected Risk and Etiologic Factors of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    OpenAIRE

    Cukic, Vesna; Baljic, Rusmir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is the most serious manifestation of thromboembolic disease. Objective: To determine the most common risk and etiologic factors of pulmonary tromboembolism in patients treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year- period from 2008. to 2010. Material and methods: We retrospectively analysed patients with PTE treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in ...

  20. Role of adiponectin and some other factors linking type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chandra; Kanti; Chakraborti

    2015-01-01

    Because of the intimate association of obesity with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM), during the last two decades, extensive research work is being conducted to find out whether the coexistence of the two is a simple association or there is a positive correlating link between the two. In this article, an attempt has been made to collect and analyse the recent developments in this field and to arrive at a conclusion on the subject. The possible role of several important factors(obtained from adipocytes/not of adipocyte origin) in linking the two has been discussed in detail. Some of the agents, specifically adiponectin, are beneficial(i.e., reduce the incidence of both), while others are harmful(i.e., increase their incidence). From the analysis, it appears that obesity and T2 DM are intimately linked.

  1. Institutions and Self-Governing Social Systems: Linking Reflexivity and Institutional Theories for Cybersecurity and Other Commons Governance Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Kenneth Norman

    2012-01-01

    A "commons" is the conventional term that describes a widely accessible and shared resource, such as an ocean, open rangeland, a public park, or public portions of the Internet, which is difficult to exclude or limit use once naturally provided or humanly produced. Ruin of a commons can result when individuals use the resource recklessly…

  2. Practices in Less Commonly Taught Languages: Factors that Shape Teachers’ Beliefs and Guide Their Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farid Saydee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this qualitative study, the researcher investigated teachers’ perceptions about effective teaching and learning methodologies and discovered the factors that shape teachers’ beliefs and lead them to prefer certain methodologies. Data was collected through interviews of Arabic, Chinese, Dari, Pashto, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, and Persian teachers (N=25 and their adult students, ten per teacher (N=241 at institutions of higher education in Southern California. In general, the teachers had similar views about effective teaching strategies and similar factors influenced their views- all the teachers emphasized the languages they teach differ from commonly taught languages; and, therefore, teaching and learning strategies should also be different. Knowing the factors that shape teachers’ beliefs significantly contributes to the field of teacher education. In particular, educators will become more cognizant of content to include in their teacher training program curriculum to better influence teachers and alter their instructional methodologies.

  3. Suicidal Behavior in Relatives or Associates Moderates the Strength of Common Risk Factors for Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Yongsheng; Phillips, Michael R; Duberstein, Paul; Zhan, Weihai

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence and odds ratios of different suicide risk factors were compared in three pairs of decedents: 80 suicides and 25 injury decedents with blood relatives with suicidal behavior history (biologically exposed); 259 suicides and 126 injury decedents with unrelated acquaintances with suicidal behavior history (socially exposed); and 471 suicides and 523 injury decedents with neither relatives nor acquaintances with suicidal behavior history (unexposed). Negative life events and high psychological stress were more common in socially exposed suicides than in other suicides. The adjusted odds ratios of most established suicide risk factors were higher in unexposed decedents than in biologically or socially exposed decedents, suggesting that the predictive value of established risk factors wanes in individuals who have been exposed to suicidal behavior in family or friends.

  4. Convergence of circuit dysfunction in ASD: a common bridge between diverse genetic and environmental risk factors and common clinical electrophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Russell G.; Gandal, Michael J.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Siegel, Steven J.; Carlson, Gregory C.

    2014-01-01

    Most recent estimates indicate that 1 in 68 children are affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Though decades of research have uncovered much about these disorders, the pathological mechanism remains unknown. Hampering efforts is the seeming inability to integrate findings over the micro to macro scales of study, from changes in molecular, synaptic and cellular function to large-scale brain dysfunction impacting sensory, communicative, motor and cognitive activity. In this review, we describe how studies focusing on neuronal circuit function provide unique context for identifying common neurobiological disease mechanisms of ASD. We discuss how recent EEG and MEG studies in subjects with ASD have repeatedly shown alterations in ensemble population recordings (both in simple evoked related potential latencies and specific frequency subcomponents). Because these disease-associated electrophysiological abnormalities have been recapitulated in rodent models, studying circuit differences in these models may provide access to abnormal circuit function found in ASD. We then identify emerging in vivo and ex vivo techniques, focusing on how these assays can characterize circuit level dysfunction and determine if these abnormalities underlie abnormal clinical electrophysiology. Such circuit level study in animal models may help us understand how diverse genetic and environmental risks can produce a common set of EEG, MEG and anatomical abnormalities found in ASD. PMID:25538564

  5. Convergence of circuit dysfunction in ASD: a common bridge between diverse genetic and environmental risk factors and common clinical electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Port, Russell G; Gandal, Michael J; Roberts, Timothy P L; Siegel, Steven J; Carlson, Gregory C

    2014-01-01

    Most recent estimates indicate that 1 in 68 children are affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Though decades of research have uncovered much about these disorders, the pathological mechanism remains unknown. Hampering efforts is the seeming inability to integrate findings over the micro to macro scales of study, from changes in molecular, synaptic and cellular function to large-scale brain dysfunction impacting sensory, communicative, motor and cognitive activity. In this review, we describe how studies focusing on neuronal circuit function provide unique context for identifying common neurobiological disease mechanisms of ASD. We discuss how recent EEG and MEG studies in subjects with ASD have repeatedly shown alterations in ensemble population recordings (both in simple evoked related potential latencies and specific frequency subcomponents). Because these disease-associated electrophysiological abnormalities have been recapitulated in rodent models, studying circuit differences in these models may provide access to abnormal circuit function found in ASD. We then identify emerging in vivo and ex vivo techniques, focusing on how these assays can characterize circuit level dysfunction and determine if these abnormalities underlie abnormal clinical electrophysiology. Such circuit level study in animal models may help us understand how diverse genetic and environmental risks can produce a common set of EEG, MEG and anatomical abnormalities found in ASD.

  6. Convergence of Circuit Dysfunction in ASD: A common bridge between diverse genetic and environmental risk factors and common clinical neurophysiology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell G Port

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Most recent estimates indicate that 1 in 68 children are affected by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD. Though decades of research have uncovered much about these disorders, the pathological mechanism remains unknown. Hampering efforts is the seeming inability to integrate findings over the micro to macro scales of study, from changes in molecular, synaptic and cellular function to large-scale brain dysfunction impacting sensory, communicative, motor and cognitive activity. In this review, we describe how studies focusing on neuronal circuit function provide unique context for identifying common neurobiological disease mechanisms of ASD. We discuss how recent EEG and MEG studies in subjects with ASD have repeatedly shown alterations in ensemble population recordings (both in simple evoked related potential latencies and specific frequency subcomponents. Because these disease-associated electrophysiological abnormalities have been recapitulated in rodent models, studying circuit differences in these models may provide access to abnormal circuit function found in ASD. We then identify emerging in-vivo and ex-vivo techniques, focusing on how these assays can characterize circuit level dysfunction and determine if these abnormalities underlie abnormal clinical electrophysiology. Such circuit level study in animal models may help us understand how diverse genetic and environmental risks can produce a common set of EEG, MEG and anatomical abnormalities found in ASD.

  7. Interacting inflammatory and growth factor signals underlie the obesity-cancer link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashinger, Laura M; Ford, Nikki A; Hursting, Stephen D

    2014-02-01

    The prevalence of obesity, an established risk factor for many chronic diseases (including diabetes, cardiovascular disease, stroke, and several types of cancer), has risen steadily for the past several decades in the United States and many parts of the world. Today, ∼70% of U.S. adults and 30% of children are at an unhealthy weight. The evidence on key biologic mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer link, with an emphasis on local and systemic inflammatory processes and their crosstalk with energy-sensing growth factor signaling pathways, will be discussed. Understanding the influence and underlying mechanisms of obesity on chronic inflammation and cancer will identify promising mechanistic targets and strategies for disrupting the obesity-cancer link and provide important lessons regarding the associations between obesity, inflammation, and other chronic diseases.

  8. Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor and Epilepsy—A Missing Link?

    OpenAIRE

    SCHARFMAN, HELEN E.

    2005-01-01

    It has been known for some time that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical to normal development of the CNS, and more recently, studies also have documented the ability of BDNF to modify adult CNS structure and function. Therefore, it is no surprise that BDNF has been linked to diseases, such as epilepsy, which may involve abnormal cortical development or altered brain structure and function after maturity. This review evaluates the evidence, particularly from recent studies, t...

  9. Factor analysis demonstrates a common schizoidal phenotype within autistic and schizotypal tendency: Implications for neuroscientific studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talitha Caitlyn Ford

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Behavioural and cognitive dysfunction, particularly social and communication impairments are shared between autism and schizophrenia spectrum disorders, while evidence for a diametric autism-positive schizophrenia symptom profile is inconsistent. We investigated the shared phenotype at a personality trait level, particularly its resemblance to schizoid personality disorder, as well as differential aspects of the autism-schizophrenia model.Items of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ and Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire (SPQ were pseudo-randomly combined, and were completed by 449 (162 male, 287 female non-clinical participants aged 18-40. A Factor Analysis revealed three factors; the first represented a shared social disorganization phenotype, the second reflected perceptual oddities specific to schizotypy while the third reflected social rigidity specific to autism. The AQ and SPQ were strongly correlated with Factor 1 (AQ: r=.75, p<.001; SPQ: r=.96, p<.001, SPQ score was correlated with Factor 2 (r=.51, p<.001, particularly in Cognitive-Perceptual features (r=.66, p<.001, and AQ score was strongly correlated with Factor 3 (r=.76, p<.001. Furthermore, there was no relationship between Factor 1 and Factor 2.Thus, there is robust evidence for a shared social disorganization phenotype in autistic and schizotypal tendency, which reflects the schizoid phenotype. Discriminating and independent dimensions of schizotypal and autistic tendency exist in Factors 2 and 3 respectively. Current diagnostic protocols could result in different diagnoses depending on the instrument used, suggesting the need for neuromarkers that objectively differentiate autistic and schizotypal traits and resolve the question of commonality versus comorbidity.

  10. Common prognostic factors of work disability among employees with a chronic somatic disease: a systematic review of cohort studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarah I Detaille; Yvonne F Heerkens; Josephine A Engels; Joost WJ van der Gulden; Frank JH van Dijk

    2009-01-01

    Objective Based on prospective and retrospective disease cohort studies, the aim of this review was to determine common prognostic factors for work disability among employees with rheumatoid arthritis...

  11. Factor analysis of the clustering of common somatic symptoms: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Chung-Huang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of outpatient department patients indicate that somatic discomforts such as headache, neck pain, chest pain, low back pain, and gastrointestinal discomfort are commonly found in patients with multiple complaints. Clustering of some symptoms has been found in common somatic symptom analyses. Because of the complexity involved in the diagnosis of patients with multiple complaints, the aim of this study is to identify and classify patterns of somatic symptoms in individuals assessed during a health examination. Methods A total of 683 patients (437 males, 246 females received a one-day physical examination and completed a structured survey during the period from May 2007 to April 2008. A physical symptoms interview was conducted, and medical and demographic data was collected. Results Based on the factor analysis, 4 clusters of symptoms were identified: 1 pain symptoms, 2 cold symptoms, 3 cardiopulmonary symptoms, and 4 gastrointestinal symptoms. The distribution of symptoms differed between males and females. After varimax rotation of factor patterns, 4 extracted factors emerged. In males, the factors were 1 pain symptoms, 2 cold symptoms, 3 cardiopulmonary symptoms, and 4 gastrointestinal symptoms. In females, the factors were 1 pain symptoms, 2 cold symptoms, 3 cardiopulmonary symptoms, and 4 head and gastrointestinal symptoms. Conclusions Four clusters of somatic symptoms emerged for both males and females; however, the predominant symptoms were different in males and females. Females displayed more head-related symptoms than males. Patients should be thoroughly interviewed about additional symptoms within the same cluster after the recognition of a single somatic complaint.

  12. Common Factor Mechanisms in Clinical Practice and Their Relationship with Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitan-Sierra, Carolina; Hyland, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates three common factor mechanisms that could affect outcome in clinical practice: response expectancy, the affective expectation model and motivational concordance. Clients attending a gestalt therapy clinic (30 clients), a sophrology (therapeutic technique) clinic (33 clients) and a homeopathy clinic (31 clients) completed measures of expectancy and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) before their first session. After 1 month, they completed PANAS and measures of intrinsic motivation, perceived effort and empowerment. Expectancy was not associated with better outcome and was no different between treatments. Although some of the 54 clients who endorsed highest expectations showed substantial improvement, others did not: 19 had no change or deteriorated in positive affect, and 18 had the same result for negative affect. Intrinsic motivation independently predicted changes in negative affect (β = -0.23). Intrinsic motivation (β = 0.24), effort (β = 0.23) and empowerment (β = 0.20) independently predicted positive affect change. Expectancy (β = -0.17) negatively affected changes in positive affect. Clients found gestalt and sophrology to be more intrinsically motivating, empowering and effortful compared with homeopathy. Greater improvement in mood was found for sophrology and gestalt than for homeopathy clients. These findings are inconsistent with response expectancy as a common factor mechanism in clinical practice. The results support motivational concordance (outcome influenced by the intrinsic enjoyment of the therapy) and the affective expectation model (high expectations can lead for some clients to worse outcome). When expectancy correlates with outcome in some other studies, this may be due to confound between expectancy and intrinsic enjoyment. Common factors play an important role in outcome. Intrinsic enjoyment of a therapeutic treatment is associated with better outcome. Active engagement with a

  13. Functional links between Aβ toxicity, endocytic trafficking, and Alzheimer's disease risk factors in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treusch, Sebastian; Hamamichi, Shusei; Goodman, Jessica L; Matlack, Kent E S; Chung, Chee Yeun; Baru, Valeriya; Shulman, Joshua M; Parrado, Antonio; Bevis, Brooke J; Valastyan, Julie S; Han, Haesun; Lindhagen-Persson, Malin; Reiman, Eric M; Evans, Denis A; Bennett, David A; Olofsson, Anders; DeJager, Philip L; Tanzi, Rudolph E; Caldwell, Kim A; Caldwell, Guy A; Lindquist, Susan

    2011-12-01

    Aβ (beta-amyloid peptide) is an important contributor to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We modeled Aβ toxicity in yeast by directing the peptide to the secretory pathway. A genome-wide screen for toxicity modifiers identified the yeast homolog of phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) and other endocytic factors connected to AD whose relationship to Aβ was previously unknown. The factors identified in yeast modified Aβ toxicity in glutamatergic neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans and in primary rat cortical neurons. In yeast, Aβ impaired the endocytic trafficking of a plasma membrane receptor, which was ameliorated by endocytic pathway factors identified in the yeast screen. Thus, links between Aβ, endocytosis, and human AD risk factors can be ascertained with yeast as a model system.

  14. Depression and Alzheimer's disease: is stress the initiating factor in a common neuropathological cascade?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2011-01-01

    . This suggests the existence of common neuropathological mechanisms behind depression and AD. Here we propose that the brain changes associated with depressive episodes that compromise the brain's ability to cope with stress may constitute risk factors for development of AD. Furthermore, in individuals...... with a genetic linkage to depression, there may be an increased vulnerability towards the initiation of a detrimental neurodegenerative cascade. The following review will deal with the various observations reported within the different neurobiological systems known to be involved and affected in depression, like...

  15. The Most Common Detected Risk and Etiologic Factors of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna; Baljic, Rusmir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is the most serious manifestation of thromboembolic disease. Objective: To determine the most common risk and etiologic factors of pulmonary tromboembolism in patients treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year- period from 2008. to 2010. Material and methods: We retrospectively analysed patients with PTE treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period from 2008. to 2010. PTE was diagnosed by high resolute computed tomography, in most of them ventilatory /perfusion scintigraphy (V/P SPECT) was made, with proper laboratory analyses (D-dimmer, platelets , fibrinogen, and if it was needed protein C, S and AT III factor were examined). In all of them echosonography of abdomen and pelvis was done, also the examination by angiologist, and in patients with indications echosonography of the heart and Color Doppler of leg veins was made. We analysed risk and etiologic factors for PTE in each patient. Results: In 222 treated patients with PTE risk factors were found in 124 or 55.86% patients, etiologic factors were found in 31 or 13.96%, and both risk and etiologic factors in one patient were found in 18 or 8.11% patients. Conclusion: PTE is very serious disease that very often has fatal prognosis, and can develop with previously entirely healthy people, and as soon as we become suspicious of its presence we have to made appropriate diagnostic procedures and include appropriate therapy. We can after look for risk and etiologic factors and try to influence them. PMID:23922531

  16. Determination of factors associated with natural soil suppressivity to potato common scab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marketa Sagova-Mareckova

    Full Text Available Common scab of potatoes is a disease, which is difficult to manage due to complex interactions of the pathogenic bacteria (Streptomyces spp. with soil, microbial community and potato plants. In Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in the Czech Republic two sites (Vyklantice and Zdirec were selected for a study of common scab disease suppressivity. At both sites, a field with low disease severity occurs next to one with high severity and the situation was regularly observed over four decades although all four fields undergo a crop rotation. In the four fields, quantities of bacteria, actinobacteria and the gene txtB from the biosynthetic gene cluster of thaxtomin, the main pathogenicity factor of common scab, were analyzed by real-time PCR. Microbial community structure was compared by terminal fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil and potato periderm were characterized by contents of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, magnesium, and iron. Quality of organic matter was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography of soil extracts. The study demonstrated that the suppressive character of the fields is locally specific. At Zdirec, the suppressivity was associated with low txtB gene copies in bulk soil, while at Vyklantice site it was associated with low txtB gene copies in the tuberosphere. The differences were discussed with respect to the effect of abiotic conditions at Zdirec and interaction between potato plant and soil microbial community at Vyklantice. Soil pH, Ca soil content or cation concentrations, although different were not in the range to predict the disease severity. Low severity of common scab was associated with low content of soil C, N, C/N, Ca and Fe suggesting that oligotrophic conditions may be favorable to common scab suppression.

  17. Determination of factors associated with natural soil suppressivity to potato common scab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagova-Mareckova, Marketa; Daniel, Ondrej; Omelka, Marek; Kristufek, Vaclav; Divis, Jiri; Kopecky, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Common scab of potatoes is a disease, which is difficult to manage due to complex interactions of the pathogenic bacteria (Streptomyces spp.) with soil, microbial community and potato plants. In Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in the Czech Republic two sites (Vyklantice and Zdirec) were selected for a study of common scab disease suppressivity. At both sites, a field with low disease severity occurs next to one with high severity and the situation was regularly observed over four decades although all four fields undergo a crop rotation. In the four fields, quantities of bacteria, actinobacteria and the gene txtB from the biosynthetic gene cluster of thaxtomin, the main pathogenicity factor of common scab, were analyzed by real-time PCR. Microbial community structure was compared by terminal fragment length polymorphism analysis. Soil and potato periderm were characterized by contents of carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, sulphur, calcium, magnesium, and iron. Quality of organic matter was assessed by high performance liquid chromatography of soil extracts. The study demonstrated that the suppressive character of the fields is locally specific. At Zdirec, the suppressivity was associated with low txtB gene copies in bulk soil, while at Vyklantice site it was associated with low txtB gene copies in the tuberosphere. The differences were discussed with respect to the effect of abiotic conditions at Zdirec and interaction between potato plant and soil microbial community at Vyklantice. Soil pH, Ca soil content or cation concentrations, although different were not in the range to predict the disease severity. Low severity of common scab was associated with low content of soil C, N, C/N, Ca and Fe suggesting that oligotrophic conditions may be favorable to common scab suppression.

  18. A common SLC26A4-linked haplotype underlying non-syndromic hearing loss with enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chattaraj, Parna; Munjal, Tina; Honda, Keiji

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is the most common radiological abnormality in children with sensorineural hearing loss. Mutations in coding regions and splice sites of the SLC26A4 gene are often detected in Caucasians with EVA. Approximately one-fourth of patients with EVA.......0042). CONCLUSIONS: The CEVA haplotype causally contributes to most cases of Caucasian M1 EVA and, possibly, some cases of M0 EVA. The CEVA haplotype of SLC26A4 defines the most common allele associated with hereditary hearing loss in Caucasians. The diagnostic yield and prognostic utility of sequence analysis...

  19. Factor XIII A-Subunit V34L Variant Affects Thrombus Cross-Linking in a Murine Model of Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Cédric; Ali, Majid; Chaudhry, Waleed W; Ridger, Victoria C; Ariëns, Robert A S; Philippou, Helen

    2016-02-01

    Factor XIII (FXIII) cross-links fibrin upon activation by thrombin. Activation involves cleavage at residue 37 by thrombin, releasing an activation peptide. A common polymorphism (valine to leucine variant at residue 34, V34L), located in the activation peptide, has been associated with increased activation rates and paradoxically a protective effect in cardiovascular disease. There is, currently, no data available on the effects of V34L from in vivo models of thrombosis. We examined the effect of FXIII V34L on clot formation and cross-linking in vivo. We generated a panel of full-length recombinant human FXIII-A2 variants with amino acid substitutions in the activation peptide to investigate the effect of these variants on activation rate, and we used wild-type, V34L, and alanine to glycine variant at residue 33 variants to study the effects of varying FXIII activation rate on thrombus formation in a murine model of FeCl3 injury. FXIII activation assay showed that residues 29, 30, 33, and 34 play a critical role in thrombin interaction. Full-length recombinant human FXIII-A2 V34L has significant effects on clot formation, structure, and lysis in vitro, using turbidity assay. This variant influenced fibrin cross-linking but not size of the thrombus in vivo. Mutations in the activation peptide of full-length recombinant FXIII regulate activation rates by thrombin, and V34L influences in vivo thrombus formation by increased cross-linking of the clot. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  20. Factor Analysis Demonstrates a Common Schizoidal Phenotype within Autistic and Schizotypal Tendency: Implications for Neuroscientific Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Talitha C; Crewther, David P

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral and cognitive dysfunction, particularly social and communication impairments, are shared between autism and schizophrenia spectrum disorders, while evidence for a diametric autism-positive schizophrenia symptom profile is inconsistent. We investigated the shared phenotype at a personality trait level, particularly its resemblance to schizoid personality disorder, as well as differential aspects of the autism-schizophrenia model. Items of the autism spectrum quotient (AQ) and schizotypal personality questionnaire (SPQ) were pseudo-randomly combined, and were completed by 449 (162 male, 287 female) non-clinical participants aged 18-40. A factor analysis revealed three factors; the first represented a shared social disorganization phenotype, the second reflected perceptual oddities specific to schizotypy while the third reflected social rigidity specific to autism. The AQ and SPQ were strongly correlated with Factor 1 (AQ: r = 0.75, p schizotypal tendency, which reflects the schizoid phenotype. Discriminating and independent dimensions of schizotypal and autistic tendency exist in Factors 2 and 3, respectively. Current diagnostic protocols could result in different diagnoses depending on the instrument used, suggesting the need for neuromarkers that objectively differentiate autistic and schizotypal traits and resolve the question of commonality versus co-morbidity.

  1. Concise and Effective Synthesis of 1→2 α-Linked Mannopyranosyl Oligosaccharides and Related Antigenic Factor 34 andDominant of Antigenic Factor 13

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱玉亮; 孔繁祚

    2001-01-01

    A highly concise and effective synthesis of 1→ 2 α-linked mannopyranosyl oligosaccharides was achieved via TMSOTfpromoted condensation of the corresponding benzoylated monosaccharide alkyl orthoester.1→2 α- Linked mannosyl di,trisaccharide,, antigenic factor 34, and dominant of antigenic factor 13 were readily synthesized by the new method.

  2. Link predication based on matrix factorization by fusion of multi class organizations of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Pengfei; Cai, Fei; Feng, Yiding; Wang, Wenjun

    2017-08-21

    Link predication aims at forecasting the latent or unobserved edges in the complex networks and has a wide range of applications in reality. Almost existing methods and models only take advantage of one class organization of the networks, which always lose important information hidden in other organizations of the network. In this paper, we propose a link predication framework which makes the best of the structure of networks in different level of organizations based on nonnegative matrix factorization, which is called NMF (3) here. We first map the observed network into another space by kernel functions, which could get the different order organizations. Then we combine the adjacency matrix of the network with one of other organizations, which makes us obtain the objective function of our framework for link predication based on the nonnegative matrix factorization. Third, we derive an iterative algorithm to optimize the objective function, which converges to a local optimum, and we propose a fast optimization strategy for large networks. Lastly, we test the proposed framework based on two kernel functions on a series of real world networks under different sizes of training set, and the experimental results show the feasibility, effectiveness, and competitiveness of the proposed framework.

  3. Common factors method to predict the carcass composition tissue in kid goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Fernanda Barros Gomes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to analyze the interrelations among weights and carcass measures of the longissimus lumborum muscle thickness and area, and of sternum tissue thickness, measured directly on carcass and by ultrasound scan. Measures were taken on live animals and after slaughter to develop models of multiple linear regression, to estimate the composition of shoulder blade, from selected variables in 89 kids of both genders and five breed groups, raised in feedlot system. The variables considered relevant and not redundant on the information they carry, for the common factor analysis, were used in the carcass composition estimate development models. The presuppositions of linear regression models relative to residues were evaluated, the estimated residues were subjected to analysis of variance and the means were compared by the Student t test. Based in these results, the group of 32 initial variables could be reduced to four variables: hot carcass weight, rump perimeter, leg length and tissue height at the fourth sternum bone. The analysis of common factors was shown as an effective technique to study the interrelations among the independent variables. The measures of carcass dimension, alone, did not add any information to hot carcass weight. The carcass muscle weight can be estimated with high precision from simple models, without the need for information related to gender and breed, and they could be built based on carcass weight, which makes it easy to be applied. The fat and bones estimate models were not as accurate.

  4. The 2011 Leona Tyler Award Address: The Relationship--And Its Relationship to the Common and Specific Factors of Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E.; Budge, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    A debate exists about whether the common factors or specific ingredients are critical to producing the benefits of psychotherapy. A model of the relationship, based on evolved human characteristics related to healing, is presented that integrates common factors and specific ingredients. After the initial bond is formed, the relationship involves…

  5. Exploring the links between macro-level contextual factors and their influence on nursing workforce composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, Allison; Beltrán-Sánchez, Hiram

    2011-11-01

    Research that links macro-level socioeconomic development variables to health care human resources workforce composition is scarce at best. The purpose of this study was to explore the links between nonnursing factors and nursing workforce composition through a secondary, descriptive analysis of year 2000, publicly available national nursing human resources data from Mexico. Building on previous research, the authors conducted multiple robust regression analysis by federal typing of nursing human resources from 31 Mexican states against macro-level socioeconomic development variables. Average education in a state was significantly associated in predicting all types of formally educated nurses in Mexico. Other results suggest that macro-level indicators have a different association with each type of nurse. Context may play a greater role in determining nursing workforce composition than previously thought. Further studies may help to explain differences both within and between countries.

  6. Unraveling 50-Year-Old Clues Linking Neurodegeneration and Cancer to Cycad Toxins: Are microRNAs Common Mediators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Peter; Fry, Rebecca C; Kisby, Glen E

    2012-01-01

    Recognition of overlapping molecular signaling activated by a chemical trigger of cancer and neurodegeneration is new, but the path to this discovery has been long and potholed. Six conferences (1962-1972) examined the puzzling neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of a then-novel toxin [cycasin: methylazoxymethanol (MAM)-β-d-glucoside] in cycad plants used traditionally for food and medicine on Guam where a complex neurodegenerative disease plagued the indigenous population. Affected families showed combinations of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), parkinsonism (P), and/or a dementia (D) akin to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Modernization saw declining disease rates on Guam and remarkable changes in clinical phenotype (ALS was replaced by P-D and then by D) and in two genetically distinct ALS-PDC-affected populations (Kii-Japan, West Papua-Indonesia) that used cycad seed medicinally. MAM forms DNA lesions - repaired by O(6)-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT) - that perturb mouse brain development and induce malignant tumors in peripheral organs. The brains of young adult MGMT-deficient mice given a single dose of MAM show DNA lesion-linked changes in cell-signaling pathways associated with miRNA-1, which is implicated in colon, liver, and prostate cancers, and in neurological disease, notably AD. MAM is metabolized to formaldehyde, a human carcinogen. Formaldehyde-responsive miRNAs predicted to modulate MAM-associated genes in the brains of MGMT-deficient mice include miR-17-5p and miR-18d, which regulate genes involved in tumor suppression, DNA repair, amyloid deposition, and neurotransmission. These findings marry cycad-associated ALS-PDC with colon, liver, and prostate cancer; they also add to evidence linking changes in microRNA status both to ALS, AD, and parkinsonism, and to cancer initiation and progression.

  7. Unraveling 50-year-old clues linking neurodegeneration and cancer to cycad toxins: are microRNAs a common mediator?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eSpencer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of overlapping molecular signaling activated by a chemical trigger of cancer and neurodegeneration is new, but the path to this discovery has been long and potholed. Six conferences (1962-1972 examined the puzzling neurotoxic and carcinogenic properties of a then-novel toxin [cycasin: methylazoxymethanol (MAM-β-D-glucoside] in cycad plants used traditionally for food and medicine on Guam where a complex neurodegenerative disease plagued the indigenous population. Affected families showed combinations of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, parkinsonism (P and/or a dementia (D akin to Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Modernization saw declining disease rates on Guam and remarkable changes in clinical phenotype (ALS was replaced by P-D and then by D and in two genetically distinct ALS-PDC-affected populations (Kii-Japan, West Papua-Indonesia that used cycad seed medicinally. MAM forms DNA lesions -- repaired by O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT -- that perturb mouse brain development and induce malignant tumors in peripheral organs. The brains of young adult MGMT-deficient mice given a single dose of MAM show DNA lesion-linked changes in cell signaling pathways associated with miRNA-1, which is implicated in colon, liver and prostate cancers, and in neurological disease, notably AD. MAM is metabolized to formaldehyde, a human carcinogen. Formaldehyde-responsive miRNAs predicted to modulate MAM-associated genes in the brains of MGMT-deficient mice include miR-17-5p and miR-18d, which regulate genes involved in tumor suppression, DNA repair, amyloid deposition, and neurotransmission. These findings marry cycad-associated ALS-PDC with colon, liver and prostate cancer; they also add to evidence linking changes in microRNA status both to ALS, AD, and parkinsonism, and to cancer initiation and progression.

  8. Factors that affect the physical science career interest of female students: Testing five common hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Lock, Robynne M.; Lung, Florin; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2013-12-01

    There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using multivariate matching methods on national data drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering (PRiSE) project (n=7505), we test the following five commonly held beliefs regarding what factors might impact females’ physical science career interest: (i) having a single-sex physics class, (ii) having a female physics teacher, (iii) having female scientist guest speakers in physics class, (iv) discussing the work of female scientists in physics class, and (v) discussing the underrepresentation of women in physics class. The effect of these experiences on physical science career interest is compared for female students who are matched on several factors, including prior science interests, prior mathematics interests, grades in science, grades in mathematics, and years of enrollment in high school physics. No significant effects are found for single-sex classes, female teachers, female scientist guest speakers, and discussing the work of female scientists. However, discussions about women’s underrepresentation have a significant positive effect.

  9. Cultural Factors in High School Student Motivation to Study Less Commonly Taught Languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Nunn

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning less commonly taught languages (LCTLs such as Japanese can be challenging for American students. Due to the difficulty of learning LCTLs, more effort is required of the learners to become proficient as compared to European languages. Motivation contributes to the learners’ academic success. In the socio-cultural perspective, the learners’ cultural background mediates their cognitive process. This study examines the motivational differences and similarities among two culturally diverse groups of high school learners of Japanese: Asians excluding Japanese-Americans and non-Asians. One hundred forty two students completed a survey. Factor analysis yielded six factors: integrative motivation, instrumental motivation, intrinsic motivation (doing activities for enjoyment, self-efficacy (a belief in one’s ability to succeed, goal specificity, and goal strategy. The motivational differences were confirmed in intrinsic motivation and self-efficacy. Implications of these findings for LCTL teachers suggest practical steps that can be taken on motivational factors that influence students from different cultural backgrounds.

  10. Nod Factor-Independent Nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia Required the Common Plant-Microbe Symbiotic Toolkit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Sandrine; Gully, Djamel; Poitout, Arthur; Patrel, Delphine; Arrighi, Jean-François; Giraud, Eric; Czernic, Pierre; Cartieaux, Fabienne

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a crucial area of research for more sustainable agriculture. Our knowledge of the plant cascade in response to the perception of bacterial Nod factors has increased in recent years. However, the discovery that Nod factors are not involved in the Aeschynomene-Bradyrhizobium spp. interaction suggests that alternative molecular dialogues may exist in the legume family. We evaluated the conservation of the signaling pathway common to other endosymbioses using three candidate genes: Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase (CCaMK), which plays a central role in cross signaling between nodule organogenesis and infection processes; and Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK) and Histidine Kinase1 (HK1), which act upstream and downstream of CCaMK, respectively. We showed that CCaMK, SYMRK, and HK1 are required for efficient nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia. Our results demonstrate that CCaMK and SYMRK are recruited in Nod factor-independent symbiosis and, hence, may be conserved in all vascular plant endosymbioses described so far.

  11. Long-term-stability of relationship structure in family groups of common marmosets, and its link to proactive prosociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenwirth, Christa; Burkart, Judith M

    2017-05-01

    Cooperatively breeding, group-living common marmosets show differentiated relationships, where more strongly bonded dyads within a group engage more in affiliative interactions than less strongly bonded ones. Intriguingly, recent results suggest that strong bonds do not only occur between breeding partners but between individuals from any sex or status, and that strong-bond partners exhibit correlated oxytocin fluctuations (dyadic oxytocin synchrony, OTS) over a period of six weeks. To date, it is unclear whether such relationships are stable over time and whether they are also reflected in higher partner-specific proactive prosociality. To assess the long-term stability of the relationship structure of common marmoset family groups, we investigated whether hormonal and behavioral markers of group structure (dyadic OTS, dyadic affiliation, and individual group integration) in common marmoset families remained stable over a period of six months. We collected baseline urinary OT and social behavior of 36 dyads from three family groups in a non-reproductive period (period A), and again six months later, around the birth of new infants (period B). Patterns of dyadic OTS, dyadic affiliation, and individual group integration were consistent between the two study periods. Oxytocin data from a fourth group (10 dyads), collected in two non-reproductive periods separated by a period of more than five years, could replicate this finding. Furthermore, OTS was also correlated with proactive prosociality that was assessed experimentally for 38 dyads during an earlier study. These results suggest that differentiated relationships are stable over time, even between group members other than the breeding pair, and that more strongly bonded partners also show higher levels of proactive prosociality. Future studies are necessary to identify whether these relationships have an adaptive function, perhaps with regard to positive consequences on cooperativeness.

  12. Effects of interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors on moose resource selection and environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Fryxell, John M; Liu, Hui; Dou, Hongliang; Ma, Yingjie; Jiang, Guangshun

    2017-01-27

    Resource selection of herbivores is a complex ecological process that operates in relation to biological or non-biological factors, which may affect the feeding and movement, and subsequently their spatial distribution and environmental stress. Here, we estimated moose (Alces alces cameloides) resource selection for habitat variables and the effect of interspecific interactions related to roe deer (Capreolus pygargus bedfordi) on its population distribution and environmental stress in the Khingan Mountain region of northeast China at local and regional scales. Different response patterns of moose resource selection, spatial distribution, and environmental stress to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors were shown at the two scales. A general ecological chain, response of moose to interspecific interaction-linked habitat factors, was exhibited at the regional scale, and at the local scale, heterogeneous responses, linkages of habitat selection and environmental stress of moose population might be driven by different interspecific interaction patterns. Our study firstly suggested that moose resource selection, food availability, diet quality, population density and environmental stress indicators were impacted by interactions with the distribution of other sympatric herbivore species and showed differences in ecological response chains at various spatial scales. These findings are useful for sympatric herbivore assembly conservation, habitat quality monitoring and management.

  13. Circulating Cholesterol Levels May Link to the Factors Influencing Parkinson’s Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivesA growing literature suggests that circulating cholesterol levels have been associated with Parkinson’s disease (PD. In this study, we investigated a possible causal basis for the cholesterol-PD link.MethodsFasting plasma cholesterol levels were obtained from 91 PD and 70 age- and gender-matched controls from an NINDS PD Biomarkers Program cohort at the Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine. Based on the literature, genetic polymorphisms in selected cholesterol management genes (APOE, LDLR, LRP1, and LRPAP1 were chosen as confounding variables because they may influence both cholesterol levels and PD risk. First, the marginal structure model was applied, where the associations of total- and LDL-cholesterol levels with genetic polymorphisms, statin usage, and smoking history were estimated using linear regression. Then, potential causal influences of total- and LDL-cholesterol on PD occurrence were investigated using a generalized propensity score approach in the second step.ResultsBoth statins (p < 0.001 and LRP1 (p < 0.03 influenced total- and LDL-cholesterol levels. There also was a trend for APOE to affect total- and LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.08 for both, and for LRPAR1 to affect LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.05. Conversely, LDLR did not influence plasma cholesterol levels (p > 0.19. Based on propensity score methods, lower total- and LDL-cholesterol were significantly linked to PD (p < 0.001 and p = 0.04, respectively.ConclusionThe current study suggests that circulating total- and LDL-cholesterol levels potentially may be linked to the factor(s influencing PD risk. Further studies to validate these results would impact our understanding of the role of cholesterol as a risk factor in PD, and its relationship to recent public health controversies.

  14. Verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance as indicators for changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Acacio Aparecido; Soares, Tielle; Rossetto, Raffaella; van Veen, Johannes Antonie; Tsai, Siu Mui; Kuramae, Eiko Eurya

    2015-09-01

    Here we show that verrucomicrobial community structure and abundance are extremely sensitive to changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism fingerprint and real-time quantitative PCR assay were used to analyze changes in verrucomicrobial communities associated with contrasting soil nutrient conditions in tropical regions. In case study Model I ("Slash-and-burn deforestation") the verrucomicrobial community structures revealed disparate patterns in nutrient-enriched soils after slash-and-burn deforestation and natural nutrient-poor soils under an adjacent primary forest in the Amazonia (R = 0.819, P = 0.002). The relative proportion of Verrucomicrobia declined in response to increased soil fertility after slash-and-burn deforestation, accounting on average, for 4 and 2 % of the total bacterial signal, in natural nutrient-poor forest soils and nutrient-enriched deforested soils, respectively. In case study Model II ("Management practices for sugarcane") disparate patterns were revealed in sugarcane rhizosphere sampled on optimal and deficient soil fertility for sugarcane (R = 0.786, P = 0.002). Verrucomicrobial community abundance in sugarcane rhizosphere was negatively correlated with soil fertility, accounting for 2 and 5 % of the total bacterial signal, under optimal and deficient soil fertility conditions for sugarcane, respectively. In nutrient-enriched soils, verrucomicrobial community structures were related to soil factors linked to soil fertility, such as total nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium and sum of bases, i.e., the sum of calcium, magnesium and potassium contents. We conclude that community structure and abundance represent important ecological aspects in soil verrucomicrobial communities for tracking the changes in chemical factors linked to soil fertility under tropical environmental conditions.

  15. Competitive mechanisms in sentence processing: common and distinct production and reading comprehension networks linked to the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Gina F; Gennari, Silvia P

    2014-01-01

    Despite much interest in language production and comprehension mechanisms, little is known about the relationship between the two. Previous research suggests that linguistic knowledge is shared across these tasks and that the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) may be commonly recruited. However, it remains unclear the extent to which production and comprehension share competition mechanisms. Here we investigate this issue and specifically examine competition in determining the event roles in a sentence (agent or affected participant). We used both behavioral and fMRI methods and compared the reading and production of high- and low-competition sentences, specifically targeting LIFG. We found that activity in pars opercularis (PO), independently identified by a competition-driven localizer, was modulated by competition in both tasks. Psychophysiological interaction analyses seeded in PO revealed task-specific networks: In comprehension, PO only interacted with the posterior temporal lobe, whereas in production, it interacted with a large network including hippocampal, posterior temporal, medial frontal and subcortical structures. Production and comprehension therefore recruit partially distinct functional networks but share competitive processes within fronto-temporal regions. We argue that these common regions store long-term linguistic associations and compute their higher-order contingencies, but competition in production ignites a larger neural network implementing planning, as required by task demands.

  16. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and epilepsy--a missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharfman, Helen E

    2005-01-01

    It has been known for some time that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is critical to normal development of the CNS, and more recently, studies also have documented the ability of BDNF to modify adult CNS structure and function. Therefore, it is no surprise that BDNF has been linked to diseases, such as epilepsy, which may involve abnormal cortical development or altered brain structure and function after maturity. This review evaluates the evidence, particularly from recent studies, that BDNF contributes to the development of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE).

  17. Paget-Schroetter syndrome in the absence of common predisposing factors: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ramy; Dashkova, Irina; Williams, Myia; Kozikowski, Andrzej; Abrol, Neeraj; Gandhi, Anjula; Pekmezaris, Renee

    2017-01-01

    Paget-Schrotter Syndrome (PSS) also known as "effort thrombosis" is a form of primary thrombosis in the subclavian vein at the costoclavicular junction is usually seen in younger patients after repeated strenuous activity of the shoulders and arms. When occurring in younger patients, PSS presents itself with predisposing factors such as unilateral dull, aching pain in the shoulder or axilla and swelling of the arm and hand. We report a rare case of unusual left axillo-subclavian vein thrombosis in absence of clear risk factors and a negative hypercoagulable workup in a 36-year-old Hispanic woman who presented with 2 days duration of left upper extremity pain and swelling after a week of heavy exercise in aerobic class. Very few documented cases of primary or spontaneous ASVT in absence of clear factors and in such anatomical location have been previously reported. The patient was started on strict precautions of left upper extremity immobilization, analgesics in the form of Tylenol 650 mg every 6 h for pain as well as cold compresses. Lovenox 90 mg subcutaneous twice daily (1 mg/kg BID) was started together with warfarin to keep INR 2-3. In addition to the unusual location in the left upper extremity in our case, the absence of common etiologic factors makes our case of Paget-Schroetter Syndrome a very unique one. Presently, there is a lack of guided management of rare conditions such as our case, or consensus among the sources. Physicians should be aware of this rare disease since untreated conditions may be debilitating for the patient and very costly especially if diagnosed with a delay.

  18. Common mental disorders and associated factors: a study of women from a rural area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Bibiane Dias Miranda; Goulart, Bethania Ferreira; Haas, Vanderlei José; Silva, Sueli Riul da; Monteiro, Juliana Cristina Dos Santos; Gomes-Sponholz, Flávia Azevedo; Parreira, Bibiane Dias Miranda; Goulart, Bethania Ferreira; Haas, Vanderlei José; Silva, Sueli Riul da; Monteiro, Juliana Cristina Dos Santos; Gomes-Sponholz, Flávia Azevedo

    2017-05-25

    Identifying the prevalence of Common Mental Disorders and analyzing the influence of sociodemographic, economic, behavioral and reproductive health variables on Common Mental Disorders in women of childbearing age living in the rural area of Uberaba-MG, Brazil. An observational and cross-sectional study. Socio-demographic, economic, behavioral and reproductive health instruments were used, along with the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) to identify common mental disorders. Multiple logistic regression was used for multivariate data analysis. 280 women participated in the study. The prevalence of Common Mental Disorders was 35.7%. In the logistic regression analysis, the variables of living with a partner and education level were associated with Common Mental Disorders, even after adjusting for the other variables. Our findings evidenced an association of social and behavioral factors with Common Mental Disorders among rural women. Identification and individualized care in primary health care are essential for the quality of life of these women. Identificar a prevalência do transtorno mental comum e analisar a influência de variáveis sociodemográficas, econômicas, comportamentais e de saúde reprodutiva sobre o transtorno mental comum em mulheres em idade fértil, residentes na zona rural do município de Uberaba-MG, Brasil. Estudo observacional e transversal. Foram utilizados instrumentos de caracterização sociodemográfica, econômica, comportamental e de saúde reprodutiva, e o Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) para identificar os transtornos mentais comuns. Na análise multivariada dos dados, foi utilizada a regressão logística múltipla. Participaram do estudo 280 mulheres. A prevalência do transtorno mental comum foi de 35,7%. Na análise de regressão logística, as variáveis convivência com o companheiro e escolaridade, associaram-se ao transtorno mental comum, mesmo após o ajuste para as demais variáveis. Os achados evidenciaram a

  19. Factors affecting elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from traditional smoked common carp meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babić, J.; Vidaković, S.; Škaljac, S.; Kartalović, B.; Ljubojević, D.; Ćirković, M.; Teodorović, V.

    2017-09-01

    Smoking techniques have been progressively improved and different procedures have been developed in different regions for treating fish. In these times, the technology is mainly used for enrichment of fish with specific taste and odour, to extend the shelf-life of these perishable products and appearance required widely on the market. A lot of chemical contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed during the combustion of fuel in the smoking process. PAHs are a group of compounds that have been the subject of great concern in the recent years due to their toxic, mutagenic and/or carcinogenic potentials to humans. These fact can have a significant impact on the acceptance of these products by consumers. In this review article, the objective is to describe factors affecting elimination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from traditional smoked common carp meat.

  20. Prevalence of common thrombophilia markers and risk factors in Indian patients with primary venous thrombosis

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    Mahendra Narain Mishra

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Venous thrombosis occurs as a result of interaction of genetic and acquired factors including activated protein C resistance (APC-R, fibrinogen levels, antithrombin, protein C, protein S, lupus anticoagulants and anticardiolipin antibodies. This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of these common thrombophilia markers in Asian Indians with primary venous thrombosis. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a cross-sectional study carried out in Mumbai. METHODS: Samples from 78 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of venous thrombosis and 50 controls were tested. Semi-quantitative estimation (functional assays of protein C, protein S and antithrombin was performed. Quantitative estimation of fibrinogen was done using the Clauss method. Lupus anticoagulants were screened using lupus-sensitive activated partial thromboplastin time and β2-glycoprotein-I dependent anticardiolipin antibodies were estimated by ELISA. APC-R was measured using a clotting-based method with factor V deficient plasma and Crotalus viridis venom. Statistical analysis was performed using Epi-info (version 6. RESULTS: The popliteal vein was the most commonly involved site. Forty-four samples (56% gave abnormal results. The commonest were elevated fibrinogen and APC-R (17.9% each, followed by low protein S (16.6%. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms the literature findings that fibrinogen level estimation and screening for APC-R are important for the work-up on venous thrombosis patients since these, singly or in combination, may lead to a primary thrombotic episode. The frequency of the other thrombophilia markers was higher among the patients than among the controls, but without statistically significant difference.

  1. A common BACE1 polymorphism is a risk factor for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

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    Olga Calero

    Full Text Available The β site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 is the rate-limiting β-secretase enzyme in the amyloidogenic processing of APP and Aβ formation, and therefore it has a prominent role in Alzheimer's disease (AD pathology. Recent evidence suggests that the prion protein (PrP interacts directly with BACE1 regulating its β-secretase activity. Moreover, PrP has been proposed as the cellular receptor involved in the impairment of synaptic plasticity and toxicity caused by Aβ oligomers. Provided that common pathophysiologic mechanisms are shared by Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob (CJD diseases, we investigated for the first time to the best of our knowledge a possible association of a common synonymous BACE1 polymorphism (rs638405 with sporadic CJD (sCJD. Our results indicate that BACE1 C-allele is associated with an increased risk for developing sCJD, mainly in PRNP M129M homozygous subjects with early onset. These results extend the very short list of genes (other than PRNP involved in the development of human prion diseases; and support the notion that similar to AD, in sCJD several loci may contribute with modest overall effects to disease risk. These findings underscore the interplay in both pathologies of APP, Aβ oligomers, ApoE, PrP and BACE1, and suggest that aging and perhaps vascular risk factors may modulate disease pathologies in part through these key players.

  2. Common mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR 3) gene account for achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia, and thanatophoric dwarfism

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    Bonaventure, J.; Rousseau, F.; Legeai-Mallet, L.; LeMerrer, M.; Munnich, A.; Maroteaux, P. [INSERM, Paris (France)

    1996-05-03

    The mapping of the achondroplasia locus to the short arm of chromosome 4 and the subsequent identification of a recurrent missense mutation (G380R) in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR-3) gene has been followed by the detection of common FGFR-3 mutations in two clinically related disorders: thanatophoric dwarfism (types I and II) and hypochondroplasia. The relative clinical homogeneity of achondroplasia was substantiated by demonstration of its genetic homogeneity as more than 98% of all patients hitherto reported exhibit mutations in the transmembrane receptor domain. Although most hypochondroplasia cases were accounted for by a recurrent missense substitution (N540K) in the first tyrosine kinase (TK 1) domain of the receptor, a significant proportion (40%) of our patients did not harbor the N540K mutation and three hypochondroplasia families were not linked to the FGFR-3 locus, thus supporting clinical heterogeneity of this condition. In thanatophoric dwarfism (TD), a recurrent FGFR-3 mutation located in the second tyrosine kinase (TK 2) domain of the receptor was originally detected in 100% of TD II cases; in our series, seven distinct mutations in three different protein domains were identified in 25 of 26 TD I patients, suggesting that TD, like achondroplasia, is a genetically homogenous skeletal disorder. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Fatty acids linked to cardiovascular mortality are associated with risk factors

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    Sven O. E. Ebbesson

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although saturated fatty acids (FAs have been linked to cardiovascular mortality, it is not clear whether this outcome is attributable solely to their effects on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C or whether other risk factors are also associated with FAs. The Western Alaskan Native population, with its rapidly changing lifestyles, shift in diet from unsaturated to saturated fatty acids and dramatic increase in cardiovascular disease (CVD, presents an opportunity to elucidate any associations between specific FAs and known CVD risk factors. Objective: We tested the hypothesis that the specific FAs previously identified as related to CVD mortality are also associated with individual CVD risk factors. Methods: In this community-based, cross-sectional study, relative proportions of FAs in plasma and red blood cell membranes were compared with CVD risk factors in a sample of 758 men and women aged ≥35 years. Linear regression analyses were used to analyze relations between specific FAs and CVD risk factors (LDL-C, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, body mass index, fasting glucose and fasting insulin, 2-hour glucose and 2-hour insulin. Results: The specific saturated FAs previously identified as related to CVD mortality, the palmitic and myristic acids, were adversely associated with most CVD risk factors, whereas unsaturated linoleic acid (18:2n-6 and the marine n-3 FAs were not associated or were beneficially associated with CVD risk factors. Conclusions: The results suggest that CVD risk factors are more extensively affected by individual FAs than hitherto recognized, and that risk for CVD, MI and stroke can be reduced by reducing the intake of palmitate, myristic acid and simple carbohydrates and improved by greater intake of linoleic acid and marine n-3 FAs.

  4. Common Carotid Artery Diameter and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Overweight or Obese Postmenopausal Women

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    Kelly D. Lloyd

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Arterial diameter is an underutilized indicator of vascular health. We hypothesized that interadventitial and lumen diameter of the common carotid artery would be better indicators of vascular health than carotid plaque or intima media thickness (IMT. Participants were 491 overweight or obese, postmenopausal women who were former or current hormone therapy (HT users, 52–62 years, with waist circumference >80 cm. We evaluated cross-sectional associations of cardiovascular risk factors with carotid measures, by HT status. Former HT users had a worse cardiovascular profile than current HT users: larger adventitial (6.94 mm versus 6.79 mm and lumen diameter (5.44 mm versus 5.31 mm, both P<0.01 independent of cardiovascular risk factors; IMT and plaque were similar. Larger diameters were best explained by former HT use, higher pulse pressure, and greater weight. Independent of potential confounders, overweight and obese postmenopausal former HT users had larger carotid diameters than current HT users. Carotid diameter should be considered in studies of HT.

  5. Analysis of the factors linked to a diagnosis of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children.

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    Rivas-Juesas, C; de Dios, J G; Benac-Prefaci, M; Colomer-Revuelta, J

    2017-09-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neuropsychiatric disorder originating from multiple factors. The aim of this study is to determine the percentage of patients with ADHD out of all patients referred to our clinic for assessment, and to explore the epidemiological and clinical factors linked to this diagnosis. retrospective analytical study of a sample of patients under 15 years old sent to the paediatric neurology clinic for suspected ADHD. DSM-IV criteria were used for diagnosis. We completed a binary logistic regression analysis to determine which risk factors were associated with the diagnosis. Of the 280 selected patients, 224 were male (male/female ratio 4:1); mean age (SD) was 8.4 (3.08) years. Almost half (49%) of the patients were referred by their schools and 64.9% were born in the second half of the year, but this tendency was more marked in girls than in boys. Assessment according to DSM-IV criteria resulted in diagnosis of 139 subjects (49.7%). The risk factors linked to diagnosis were male sex, parents with ADHD, associated sleep disorders, tics, and absence of neurodevelopmental delay. Only half of the children referred for suspected ADHD were diagnosed with that condition, and most were among the youngest in their classes, which suggests that suspected ADHD is overestimated. An exhaustive clinical interview investigating the family's psychological disorders and the patient's sleep disorders and tics is needed to improve the diagnostic process. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

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    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  7. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  8. Mathematical problem solving and computers: Investigation of the effect of computer aided instruction in solving lowest common multiple and greatest common factor problems

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    Hande Çamlı

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to determine the effect of computer aided instruction on students’ academic performance in solving Lowest Common Multiple and Greatest Common Factor problems and multiplicative structures. The study was held in the second semester of 2008 for five weeks with a total number of 102 sixth grade students. The research was carried out experimentally and a post test control group design method was used in this experimental study. An academic level test was used at the beginning of the study to compare the existing knowledge of experimental and control groups; and a post test and software developed by the researchers about the topic were used as data collection instruments in this study. The means of scores received in academic success test and post test were analyzed using t-test technique. The results of the study show that the use of computer support in teaching and learning Lowest Common Multiple and Greatest Common Factor problems and multiplicative structures in mathematics lesson may increase students academic success.

  9. Clinical profile, common thrombophilia markers and risk factors in 85 young Indian patients with arterial thrombosis

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    Mahendra Narain Mishra

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Arterial thrombosis may occur consequent to hereditary thrombophilia and increased lipoprotein(a [Lp(a] and fibrinogen. Our aim was to study the prevalence of common thrombophilia markers in 85 consecutive cases of arterial thrombosis. DESIGN AND SETTING: A retrospective study was conducted from 85 consecutive young patients treated as outpatients or admitted due to stroke or myocardial infarction at a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: Eighty-five Indian patients (age < 45 years presenting ischemic stroke (n = 48 or myocardial infarction (n = 37 and 50 controls were studied for seven thrombophilia markers including antithrombin (AT, factor V, protein C, protein S, activated protein C resistance (APC-R, fibrinogen and Lp(a. Functional assays for protein C, protein S, factor V and APC-R were performed using clotting-based methods. Semi-quantitative estimation of fibrinogen was done using Clauss's method and Lp(a using immunoturbidimetry. Statistical analysis was done using the Epi Info 6 software. RESULTS: Thirty-three samples (38.8% tested positive for one or more thrombophilia markers. The three commonest abnormalities were elevated Lp(a (20%, fibrinogen (17.6% and low APC-R (14.2%. Low levels of protein C, protein S and AT were present in 4.7, 9.4 and 7% of the patients, respectively. Overall, the risk factor profile was: smoking (33%, positive family history (15.3%, hyperlipidemia (7%, hypertension, diabetes mellitus and obesity (2.3% each. CONCLUSIONS: An association was found between low levels of protein C, protein S and AT and arterial thrombosis, but only elevated fibrinogen levels, smoking, positive family history and hyperlipidemia showed statistical significance.

  10. Common elements in interleukin 4 and insulin signaling pathways in factor-dependent hematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L M; Keegan, A D; Li, W; Lienhard, G E; Pacini, S; Gutkind, J S; Myers, M G; Sun, X J; White, M F; Aaronson, S A

    1993-05-01

    Interleukin 4 (IL-4), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) efficiently induced DNA synthesis in the IL-3-dependent murine myeloid cell lines FDC-P1 and FDC-P2. Although these factors could not individually sustain long-term growth of these lines, a combination of IL-4 with either insulin or IGF-I did support continuous growth. The principal tyrosine-phosphorylated substrate observed in FDC cells stimulated with IL-4, previously designated 4PS, was of the same size (170 kDa) as the major substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I. These substrates had phosphopeptides of the same size when analyzed by digestion with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease, and each tightly associated with the 85-kDa component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase after factor stimulation. IRS-1, the principal substrate phosphorylated in response to insulin or IGF-I stimulation in nonhematopoietic cells, is similar in size to 4PS. However, anti-IRS-1 antibodies failed to efficiently precipitate 4PS, and some phosphopeptides generated by V8 protease digestion of IRS-1 were distinct in size from the phosphopeptides of 4PS. Nevertheless, IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I were capable of stimulating tyrosine phosphorylation of IRS-1 in FDC cells that expressed this substrate as a result of transfection. These findings indicate that (i) IL-4, insulin, and IGF-I use signal transduction pathways in FDC lines that have at least one major feature in common, the rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of 4PS, and (ii) insulin and IGF-I stimulation of hematopoietic cell lines leads to the phosphorylation of a substrate that may be related to but is not identical to IRS-1.

  11. Mother's postnatal stress: an investigation of links to various factors during pregnancy and post-partum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ewa; Hildingsson, Ingegerd

    2016-12-01

    Higher levels of parental stress have long-term effects on children's health and could lead to dysfunction in the parent-child interaction. Different background factors can be predictors of high parental stress. The aim of this study was to examine parental stress among Swedish women and identify different factors linked to women's parental stress. About 702 women were recruited to a clinical study and followed up six months after birth. Data were collected by two questionnaires, and 279 women completed the Swedish Parental Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ). Less than very good mental health and depressive symptoms after birth were strongly associated with parental stress, and the strongest association was found between post-partum depressive symptoms and high levels of stress in the subscale Incompetence. Multiparity was associated with high stress in two subscales, and lower level of education was a protective factor for stress in nearly all subscales. Depressive symptoms and perceived poor mental health post-partum are the most important factors related to high parental stress. The results point to the importance of identifying and supporting mothers with depressive symptoms, since these women have both mental illness and increased stress. © 2015 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Clinical risk factors for osteoporosis are common among elderly people in Nuuk, Greenland

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    Anna Jakobsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Osteoporosis is a debilitating condition characterized by fractures, pain and premature death. Risk factors for osteoporosis predict the risk of fragility fractures. Aim. To describe the occurrence of risk factors for osteoporosis among populations in Nuuk, the capital of Greenland. Methods. A random sample of women born in 1934–42, 1945–47, 1956, and men born in 1956 were selected from the national civil registry. A questionnaire was sent out in Greenlandic and Danish on risk factors for osteoporosis: family history, smoking habits, alcohol intake, presence of disease, sun exposure, intake of dairy products, age at menopause (women and number of falls. Additional questions included the frequency of back pain, previous fractures, intake of vitamin D and calcium supplements, use of anti-osteoporotic drugs, steroids and other drugs. Results. The questionnaire was sent to 317 subjects confirmed to be living at an address in Nuuk and 181 (57.1% responded. More young women than older women were smokers (60.6% vs. 35.0%; p=0.022 while limited sun exposure was reported by more of the old women (37.2% vs. 5.6%; p=0.003. Family history of osteoporosis was reported by 15.0%, without difference between groups. Alcohol and milk intake did not differ between groups. Premature menopause was reported by 17.9% of the women. Falls within the last year were reported by 42.4% with fewer falls in the oldest age group (21.9% vs. 50.0%; p=0.005. Frequency of fragility fractures increased with age (5.7% vs. 24.3% vs. 30.4%; p=0.02 and the risk of a fragility fracture increased with age (p=0.004; OR, 95% CI: 4.5, 1.6–12.2, reference: below 70 years, when adjusted for smoking, gender and falls. The use of anti-osteoporotic drugs was low (3.4% while 28.8% took calcium and vitamin D supplements. Conclusions. Age is a dominating risk factor for fragility fractures in Greenland. The use of anti-osteoporotic drugs is low in Greenland, even if osteoporotic

  13. Common prognostic factors of work disability among employees with a chronic somatic disease: a systematic review of cohort studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; Heerkens, Y.F.; Engels, J.A.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Dijk, F.J. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Based on prospective and retrospective disease cohort studies, the aim of this review was to determine common prognostic factors for work disability among employees with rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease (IHD

  14. Common prognostic factors of work disability among employees with a chronic somatic disease: a systematic review of cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Detaille; Y.F. Heerkens; J.A. Engels; J.W.J. van der Gulden; F.J.H. van Dijk

    2009-01-01

    Objective Based on prospective and retrospective disease cohort studies, the aim of this review was to determine common prognostic factors for work disability among employees with rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease (IHD)

  15. Common prognostic factors of work disability among employees with a chronic somatic disease: a systematic review of cohort studies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Detaille, S.I.; Heerkens, Y.F.; Engels, J.A.; Gulden, J.W.J. van der; Dijk, F.J. van

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Based on prospective and retrospective disease cohort studies, the aim of this review was to determine common prognostic factors for work disability among employees with rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, and ischemic heart disease

  16. Adrenal Hormones in Common Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus: Influential Factors and Reference Intervals.

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    Leslie B Hart

    Full Text Available Inshore common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus are exposed to a broad spectrum of natural and anthropogenic stressors. In response to these stressors, the mammalian adrenal gland releases hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone to maintain physiological and biochemical homeostasis. Consequently, adrenal gland dysfunction results in disruption of hormone secretion and an inappropriate stress response. Our objective herein was to develop diagnostic reference intervals (RIs for adrenal hormones commonly associated with the stress response (i.e., cortisol, aldosterone that account for the influence of intrinsic (e.g., age, sex and extrinsic (e.g., time factors. Ultimately, these reference intervals will be used to gauge an individual's response to chase-capture stress and could indicate adrenal abnormalities. Linear mixed models (LMMs were used to evaluate demographic and sampling factors contributing to differences in serum cortisol and aldosterone concentrations among bottlenose dolphins sampled in Sarasota Bay, Florida, USA (2000-2012. Serum cortisol concentrations were significantly associated with elapsed time from initial stimulation to sample collection (p<0.05, and RIs were constructed using nonparametric methods based on elapsed sampling time for dolphins sampled in less than 30 minutes following net deployment (95% RI: 0.91-4.21 µg/dL and following biological sampling aboard a research vessel (95% RI: 2.32-6.68 µg/dL. To examine the applicability of the pre-sampling cortisol RI across multiple estuarine stocks, data from three additional southeast U.S. sites were compared, revealing that all of the dolphins sampled from the other sites (N = 34 had cortisol concentrations within the 95th percentile RI. Significant associations between serum concentrations of aldosterone and variables reported in previous studies (i.e., age, elapsed sampling time were not observed in the current project (p<0.05. Also, approximately 16% of

  17. Is Cholesterol Sulfate Deficiency a Common Factor in Preeclampsia, Autism, and Pernicious Anemia?

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    Jingjing Liu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In a recent paper, we proposed that a contributing factor in autism is a deficiency in cholesterol sulfate supply. In this paper, we investigate a link between preeclampsia and subsequent autism in the child, and we hypothesize that both conditions can be attributed to a severe depletion of cholesterol sulfate. Through studies on the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS database, we demonstrate a strong statistical relationship among the signs and symptoms associated with autism and those associated with preeclampsia, pernicious anemia, and serious adverse reactions to vaccines. We show that VAERS reports associated with symptoms typical of pernicious anemia produce both a set of symptoms that are highly correlated with preeclampsia and another set highly correlated with autism. We explain this observation via an argument that, in a severe reaction, the cascade of events subsequent to vaccination reflects a profuse production of nitric oxide (NO and consequential destruction of both red blood cells (RBCs and cobalamin. This may explain the diverse signs and symptoms associated with both preeclampsia and severe vaccine adverse reactions. We argue that excess NO synthesis, induced by the aluminum and antigen in vaccines, results in hemolysis of RBCs, which allows hemoglobin to scavenge the excess NO, converting it to nitrate. The NO is also scavenged by cobalamin, leading to its inactivation and contributing to subsequent pernicious anemia. Finally, we demonstrate that severe adverse reactions to vaccines can be associated with life-threatening conditions related to the heart and brain, as well as stillbirth, when the vaccine is administered to a woman in the third-trimester of pregnancy, as demonstrated by statistical analysis of the Gardasil records.

  18. Factors associated with gender difference in the intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery

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    Tan, T.-Y.; Lu, C.-H.; Lin, T.-K.; Liou, C.-W. [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Y.-C., E-mail: tengyeowtan@yahoo.co [Department of Neurology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Kaohsiung Medical Center, Chang Gung University College of Medicine, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Schminke, U. [Department of Neurology, Ernst Moritz Arndt University, Greifswald (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Aim: To investigate the gender differences associated with a thinner intima-media thickness (IMT) of the common carotid artery (CCA) in women. Materials and methods: In a sample of 218 consecutive healthy volunteers comprising 110 men and 108 women, the IMT of the CCA was measured using B-mode ultrasonography. Blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, body mass index (BMI), blood lipid profile, homocysteine, folic acid, uric acid, high sensitive C-reactive protein, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels were measured and compared with each other in both genders. Results: The IMT of the CCA was significantly thinner in women than in men (p = 0.012). Blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, BMI, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, homocysteine, uric acid, and TBARS were significantly (p < 0.05) lower, folic acid and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were significantly (p < 0.0001) higher in women compared with men. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that higher serum levels of homocysteine, uric acid, and TBARS, and lower serum levels of HDL-C were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with male sex. Multiple linear regression analysis further revealed that age, sex, and BMI were independently associated with CCA IMT. Conclusions: The IMT of the CCA was thinner in women than in men. Traditional vascular risk factors explain only a small amount of variance in multivariate regression models supporting the hypothesis that other behavioural, sex hormone-related or genetic factors, which have not been sufficiently explored so far, may play a role in the gender differences of IMT.

  19. Common mental disorders and associated factors among final-year healthcare students

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    Edméa Fontes de Oliva Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the prevalence of common mental disorder (CMD and to identify potential associated factors among medical, dental and nursing students. Methods: a cross-sectional study conducted in a public university in Northeast Brazil with 172 undergraduate students of the last three semesters of the medicine, dentistry and nursing courses, in February 2010, using the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20 and a structured questionnaire developed by the authors. Logistic regression was performed for data analysis. Results: the prevalence of CMD was 33.7%. The courses presented no differences in CMD prevalence. The logistic regression analysis showed a strong association of the following variables with CMD: female (OR=4.34, lack of good expectations regarding the future (OR=5.83, course as not a source of pleasure (OR=7.52 and feeling emotionally tense (OR=11.23. Conclusion: the high prevalence suggests that immediate preventive measures should be implemented, such as the setting up of psycho-pedagogic support services for students, and teacher development programs.

  20. Diabetes and cancer: two diseases with obesity as a common risk factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, S K; Maurer, H; Reed, K; Selagamsetty, R

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of evidence to support a connection between diabetes (predominantly type 2), obesity and cancer. Multiple meta-analyses of epidemiological data show that people with diabetes are at increased risk of developing many different types of cancers, along with an increased risk of cancer mortality. Several pathophysiological mechanisms for this relationship have been postulated, including insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced inflammatory processes, dysregulation of sex hormone production and hyperglycaemia. In addition to these potential mechanisms, a number of common risk factors, including obesity, may be behind the association between diabetes and cancer. Indeed, obesity is associated with an increased risk of cancer and diabetes. Abdominal adiposity has been shown to play a role in creating a systemic pro-inflammatory environment, which could result in the development of both diabetes and cancer. Here, we examine the relationship between diabetes, obesity and cancer, and investigate the potential underlying causes of increased cancer risk in individuals with diabetes. Current treatment recommendations for reducing the overall disease burden are also explored and possible areas for future research are considered. PMID:23668396

  1. Common genetic risk factors for venous thrombosis in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang; Wang, Hua-Fang; Lu, Xuan; Jian, Xiao-Rong; Jin, Bi; Zheng, Hong; Li, Yi-Qing; Wang, Qing-Yun; Wu, Tang-Chun; Guo, Huan; Liu, Hui; Guo, Tao; Yu, Jian-Ming; Yang, Rui; Yang, Yan; Hu, Yu

    2013-02-07

    Venous thrombosis is a major medical disorder caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Little is known about the genetic background of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. A total of 1,304 individuals diagnosed with a first venous thrombosis and 1,334 age- and sex-matched healthy participants were enrolled in this study. Resequencing of THBD (encoding thrombomodulin) in 60 individuals with venous thrombosis and 60 controls and a functional assay showed that a common variant, c.-151G>T (rs16984852), in the 5' UTR significantly reduced the gene expression and could cause a predisposition to venous thrombosis. Therefore, this variant was genotyped in a case-control study, and results indicated that heterozygotes had a 2.80-fold (95% confidence interval = 1.88-4.29) increased risk of venous thrombosis. The THBD c.-151G>T variant was further investigated in a family analysis involving 176 first-degree relatives from 38 index families. First-degree relatives with this variant had a 3.42-fold increased risk of venous thrombosis, and their probability of remaining thrombosis-free was significantly lower than that of relatives without the variant. In addition, five rare mutations that might be deleterious were also identified in thrombophilic individuals by sequencing. This study is the largest genetic investigation of venous thrombosis in the Chinese population. Further study on genetics of thrombosis should focus on resequencing of THBD and other hemostasis genes in different populations.

  2. Residential Real Estate in Europe: An Exploration of Common Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druica Elena

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We conduct an exploratory analysis using proxy measures of cross-sectional returns and rental yields in residential real estate. Asset pricing models predict that expected returns should exhibit some sensitivity to one or several fundamental variables that represent a common source of undiversifiable risk. Residential real estate, just like works of art and collectibles, is unique because it represents both an investment vehicle and a durable consumption good. Its pricing and returns should thus reflect both the benefits from portfolio diversification and the effect of supply and demand. In this paper, we investigate the variation in proxy returns and proxy rental yields across 34 major European cities, using a handful of independent variables that should account for the influence of market risk, inflation, and liquidity. In spite of obvious limitations stemming from our sample, we find that the explanatory power of our model is unusually high for a cross-sectional data analysis. Some of our findings concur with other studies showing that in spite of strong segmentation, real estate markets respond to the same structural risk factors. A good portion of our results, however, is hard to explain and interpret. Either we need to take into account cultural differences between Eastern and Western Europe as part of a behavioral approach, or we have to concede that we have been misled by the mismatch in the level of aggregation and the crude estimation of the dependent variables.

  3. Putting the five-factor model into context: evidence linking big five traits to narrative identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raggatt, Peter

    2006-10-01

    The study examined relationships between the Big Five personality traits and thematic content extracted from self-reports of life history data. One hundred and five "mature age" university students (M=30.1 years) completed the NEO PI-R trait measure, and the Personality Web Protocol. The protocol examines constituents of identity by asking participants to describe 24 key "attachments" from their life histories (significant events, people, places, objects, and possessions). Participants sorted these attachments into clusters and provided a self-descriptive label for each cluster (e.g., "adventurous self"). It was predicted that the thematic content of these cluster labels would be systematically related to Big Five trait scores (e.g., that labels referring to strength or positive emotions would be linked to Extraversion). The hypothesized links were obtained for each of the Big Five trait domains except Conscientiousness. Results are discussed with a view to broadening our understanding of the Five-Factor Model in relation to units of personality other than traits.

  4. Family factors as moderators of link between reinforcement sensitivity and child and adolescent problem behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Valeriya B

    2015-02-01

    Moderating effects of family factors on the association between children's reinforcement sensitivity and problem behaviour have been examined in a community sample of 533 children aged from 3 to 17 years. Family type and living in urban areas exacerbated the effect of sensitivity to reward on externalizing, internalizing and impact of problems on everyday life; a high level of the father's education exacerbated the effect of sensitivity to reward on externalizing; family aggression and harsh parenting were found to strengthen the link between sensitivity to reward and the impact of problems on everyday life, whereas family cohesion buffered the negative effect of sensitivity to reward on externalizing and the impact of problems in everyday life.

  5. Binding of factor VIII to von willebrand factor is enabled by cleavage of the von Willebrand factor propeptide and enhanced by formation of disulfide-linked multimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendetowicz, A V; Morris, J A; Wise, R J; Gilbert, G E; Kaufman, R J

    1998-07-15

    von Willebrand factor (vWF) is a multimeric adhesive glycoprotein with one factor VIII binding site/subunit. Prior reports suggest that posttranslational modifications of vWF, including formation of N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds and subsequent cleavage of the propeptide, influence availability and/or affinity of factor VIII binding sites. We found that deletion of the vWF propeptide produced a dimeric vWF molecule lacking N-terminal intersubunit disulfide bonds. This molecule bound fluorescein-labeled factor VIII with sixfold lower affinity than multimeric vWF in an equilibrium flow cytometry assay (approximate KDs, 5 nmol/L v 0.9 nmol/L). Coexpression of propeptide-deleted vWF with the vWF propeptide in trans yielded multimeric vWF that displayed increased affinity for factor VIII. Insertion of an alanine residue at the N-terminus of the mature vWF subunit destroyed binding to factor VIII, indicating that the native mature N-terminus is required for factor VIII binding. The requirement for vWF propeptide cleavage was shown by (1) a point mutation of the vWF propeptide cleavage site yielding pro-vWF that was defective in factor VIII binding and (2) correlation between efficiency of intracellular propeptide cleavage and factor VIII binding. Furthermore, in a cell-free system, addition of the propeptide-cleaving enzyme PACE/furin enabled factor VIII binding in parallel with propeptide cleavage. Our results indicate that high-affinity factor VIII binding sites are located on N-terminal disulfide-linked vWF subunits from which the propeptide has been cleaved.

  6. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo study the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBC. MethodsA total of 235 patients with HBC who were admitted to our hospitals from October 2008 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate of H. pylori in those patients was calculated. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices and 97 patients with portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG, the infection rate of H. pylori was compared between those with different degrees of esophagogastric varices or PHG. In the 32 patients whose blood ammonia was determined, the level of blood ammonia was compared between H. pylori-positive and -negative groups. Between-group comparison of continuous data was performed by t test and analysis of variance, and between-group comparison of categorical data was performed by χ2 test. ResultsThe infection rate of H. pylori in the 235 patients with HBC was 80.85% (190/235. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices, who had tortuous serpentine uplift or bead-like changes of esophageal varices and tumor-like changes (with or without gastric erosion of gastric varices visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild, moderate, and severe varices (50.55% (46/91 vs 43.59% (17/39 vs 76% (19/25, χ2=6.913, P<0.05. In the 97 patients with PHG, who had snake skin-like changes, cherry red spots, scarlet rash, and erosion bleeding of gastric mucosa visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild and severe PHG (43.33% (26/60 vs 67.57% (25/37, χ2=5.391, P<005.In patients whose blood ammonia was determined, patients in H. pylori-positive group had a significantly higher average concentration of blood ammonia than those in H. pylori-negative group (62.76±13.43 vs 47.20±12.51 μmol/L, t= 3.39, P<0

  7. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of changes in serum levels of growth hormone (cGH) in common carps (Cyprinus carpio)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to purify the common native carp growth hormone (ncGH), produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to common native carp growth hormone (ncGH), and further enhance the sensitivity of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for ncGH. Additionally, we investigated changes in serum ncGH levels in carps raised in different environmental conditions. The recombinant grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) growth hormone was purified and used as antigen to immunize the rabbit. The natural ncGH was isolated from the pituitaries of common carp. SDS-PAGE and Western blot utilizing the polyclonal anti-rgcGH antibody confirmed the purification of ncGH from pituitaries. Purified ncGH was then used as an immunogen in the B lymphocyte hybridoma technique. A total of 14 hybridoma cell lines (FMU-cGH 1-14) were established that were able to stably secrete mAbs against ncGH. Among them, eight clones (FMU-cGH1-6, 12 and 13) were successfully used for Western blot while nine clones (FMU-cGH 1-7, 9 and 10) were used in fluorescent staining and immunohistochemistry. Epitope mapping by competitive ELISA demonstrated that these mAbs recognized five different epitopes. A sensitive sandwich ELISA for detection of ncGH was developed using FMU-cGH12 as the coating mAb and FMU-cGH6 as the enzyme labeled mAb. This detection system was found to be highly stable and sensitive, with detection levels of 70 pg/mL. Additionally, we found that serum ncGH levels in restricted food group and in the net cage group increased 6.9-and 5.8-fold, respectively, when compared to controls, demonstrating differences in the GH stress response in common carp under different living conditions.

  8. Serum interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha in febrile seizures: is there a link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; Ayazi, Parviz; Orangpour, Reza; Daneshi-Kohan, Mohammad Mahdi; Sarokhani, Mohammad Reza; Javadi, Amir; Habibi, Morteza; Talebi-Bakhshayesh, Mousa

    2014-10-01

    Febrile seizures are induced by fever and are the most common type of seizures in children. Although numerous studies have been performed on febrile seizures, their pathophysiology remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that cytokines may play a role in the pathogenesis of febrile seizures. The present study was conducted to identify potential links between serum interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and febrile seizures. Ninety-two patients with simple or complex febrile seizures (46 patients per seizure type), and 46 controls with comparable age, sex, and severity of temperature were enrolled. The median concentrations of serum IL-1β in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 0.05, 0.1, and 0.67 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Moreover, the median concentrations of TNF-α in the simple, complex febrile seizure, and control groups were 2.5, 1, and 61.5 pg/mL, respectively (P=0.001). Furthermore, there were significant differences between the case groups in serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels (Pfebrile seizures.

  9. Transcription factors link mouse WAP-T mammary tumors with human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Benjamin; Streichert, Thomas; Wegwitz, Florian; Gevensleben, Heidrun; Klätschke, Kristin; Wagener, Christoph; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V

    2013-03-15

    Mouse models are important tools to decipher the molecular mechanisms of mammary carcinogenesis and to mimic the respective human disease. Despite sharing common phenotypic and genetic features, the proper translation of murine models to human breast cancer remains a challenging task. In a previous study we showed that in the SV40 transgenic WAP-T mice an active Met-pathway and epithelial-mesenchymal characteristics distinguish low- and high-grade mammary carcinoma. To assign these murine tumors to corresponding human tumors we here incorporated the analysis of expression of transcription factor (TF) coding genes and show that thereby a more accurate interspecies translation can be achieved. We describe a novel cross-species translation procedure and demonstrate that expression of unsupervised selected TFs, such as ELF5, HOXA5 and TFCP2L1, can clearly distinguish between the human molecular breast cancer subtypes--or as, for example, expression of TFAP2B between yet unclassified subgroups. By integrating different levels of information like histology, gene set enrichment, expression of differentiation markers and TFs we conclude that tumors in WAP-T mice exhibit similarities to both, human basal-like and non-basal-like subtypes. We furthermore suggest that the low- and high-grade WAP-T tumor phenotypes might arise from distinct cells of tumor origin. Our results underscore the importance of TFs as common cross-species denominators in the regulatory networks underlying mammary carcinogenesis.

  10. Development and validation of DNA markers linked to Sdvy-1, a common bean gene conferring resistance to the yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Yoko; Takeuchi, Toru; Okuyama, Masataka; Sasaki, Jun; Onodera, Kakumasa; Sato, Mikako; Souma, Chihiro; Ebe, Shigehiko

    2014-12-01

    The yellowing strain of Soybean dwarf virus (SbDV-YS) causes yellowing and yield loss in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). The most effective control is achieved through breeding for resistance. An indeterminate climbing cultivar with a white seed coat, 'Oofuku', is resistant to SbDV-YS in inoculation tests. We crossed 'Oofuku' with an elite cultivar, 'Taisho-Kintoki', which is SbDV-YS-susceptible, determinate dwarf with a red-purple seed coat, and performed amplified-fragment-length polymorphism analysis of F3 lines. From nucleotide sequences of the resistant-specific fragments and their flanking regions, we developed five DNA markers, of which DV86, DV386, and DV398 were closely linked to Sdvy-1, a resistance gene. Using the markers, we developed 'Toiku-B79' and 'Toiku-B80', the near-isogenic lines (NILs) incorporating Sdvy-1 in the background of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs had similar growth habit, maturity date and seed shape to those of 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The quality of boiled beans was also similar, except that the NILs had more seed coat cracking than 'Taisho-Kintoki'. The NILs showed no SbDV-YS infection in inoculation tests. We suggest that Sdvy-1 is a useful source of SbDV-YS resistance in common bean.

  11. Meiotic failure in male mice lacking an X-linked factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Gell, Katarina; van der Heijden, Godfried W; Eckardt, Sigrid; Leu, N Adrian; Page, David C; Benavente, Ricardo; Her, Chengtao; Höög, Christer; McLaughlin, K John; Wang, Peijing Jeremy

    2008-03-01

    Meiotic silencing of sex chromosomes may cause their depletion of meiosis-specific genes during evolution. Here, we challenge this hypothesis by reporting the identification of TEX11 as the first X-encoded meiosis-specific factor in mice. TEX11 forms discrete foci on synapsed regions of meiotic chromosomes and appears to be a novel constituent of meiotic nodules involved in recombination. Loss of TEX11 function causes chromosomal asynapsis and reduced crossover formation, leading to elimination of spermatocytes, respectively, at the pachytene and anaphase I stages. Specifically, TEX11-deficient spermatocytes with asynapsed autosomes undergo apoptosis at the pachytene stage, while those with only asynapsed sex chromosomes progress. However, cells that survive the pachytene stage display chromosome nondisjunction at the first meiotic division, resulting in cell death and male infertility. TEX11 interacts with SYCP2, which is an integral component of the synaptonemal complex lateral elements. Thus, TEX11 promotes initiation and/or maintenance of synapsis and formation of crossovers, and may provide a physical link between these two meiotic processes.

  12. Common and unique factors associated with DSM-IV-TR internalizing disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa-McMillan, Charmaine K; Smith, Rita L; Chorpita, Bruce F; Hayashi, Kentaro

    2008-11-01

    With the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders DSM-IV Fourth Edition-Text Revision. Author, Washington, DC. 2000) ahead, decisions will be made about the future of taxonomic conceptualizations. This study examined the factor structure of items from three internalizing disorders (Social Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Depression) on the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for DSM-IV-Child Version (Silverman, W. K., & Albano, A. M. Anxiety disorders interview schedule for children for DSM-IV, child and parent versions. Psychological Corporation, San Antonio, 1996). Two-, three-, and four-factor models emerged in an exploratory factor analysis. Confirmatory factor analysis provided additional empirical support for the four-factor model over the two- or three-factor models. Implications for the structure of the DSM-V taxonomy in children and adolescents are discussed.

  13. Common experiences of pain in children and adolescents--an exploratory factor analysis of a questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krekmanova, Larisa; Hakeberg, Magnus; Robertson, Agneta; Klingberg, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to reduce everyday and dental treatment pain items included in the extended Children's Pain Inventory (CPI), used in a prior study on Swedish children and adolescents. Another aim was to, by means of exploratory factor analysis (EFA), expose hitherto undiscovered dimensions of the CPI pain variables and thus to improve the psychometric properties of CPI. As some pain items are relevant merely to some individuals, a new and more useful questionnaire construction would enhance the internal validity of the instrument in observational surveys. EFA was applied on the extended CPI instrument. 368 children, 8-19 years old, had answered a questionnaire comprising 10 dental and 28 everyday pain variables. These pain items were analysed using a series of sequentially implemented EFA. Interpretations and decisions on the final number of the extracted factors was based on accepted principles; Kaiser's Eigenvalue >1 criterion, inspection of the scree plot and the interpretability of the items loading. The factors were orthogonally rotated using the Varimax method to maximize the amount of variance. Of all tested EFA models in the analysis, a two, three, four, and five factor model surfaced. The interpretability of the factors and their items loading were stepwise examined; the items were modulated and the factors re-evaluated. A four factor pain model emerged as the most interpretable, explaining 79% of the total variance depicting Eigenvalues > 1.014. The factors were named indicating the profile of the content: Factor I cutting trauma to skin/mucosal pain, Factor II head/neck pain, Factor III tenderness/blunt trauma pain, Factor IV oral/dental treatment pain.

  14. Common-mode Voltage Reduction in a Motor Drive System with a Power Factor Correction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adabi, J.; Boora, A.A.; Zare, F.;

    2012-01-01

    to reduce shaft voltage in a three-phase AC motor drive system. In this topology, the AC-DC diode rectifier influences the common-mode voltage generated by the inverter because the placement of the neutral point is changing in different rectifier circuit states. A pulse width modulation technique......Common-mode voltage generated by a power converter in combination with parasitic capacitive couplings is a potential source of shaft voltage in an AC motor drive system. In this study, a three-phase motor drive system supplied with a single-phase AC-DC diode rectifier is investigated in order...... is presented by a proper placement of the zero vectors to reduce the common-mode voltage level, which leads to a cost-effective shaft voltage reduction technique without load current distortion, while keeping the switching frequency constant. Analysis, simulations and experimental implementation have been...

  15. Extensive alternative splicing of the repressor element silencing transcription factor linked to cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Lin Chen

    Full Text Available The repressor element silencing transcription factor (REST is a coordinate transcriptional and epigenetic regulator which functions as a tumor suppressor or an oncogene depending on cellular context, and a truncated splice variant REST4 has been linked to various types of cancer. We performed a comprehensive analysis of alternative splicing (AS of REST by rapid amplification of cDNA ends and PCR amplification of cDNAs from various tissues and cell lines with specific primers. We identified 8 novel alternative exons including an alternate last exon which doubles the REST gene boundary, along with numerous 5'/3' splice sites and ends in the constitutive exons. With the combination of various splicing patterns (e.g. exon skipping and alternative usage of the first and last exons that are predictive of altered REST activity, at least 45 alternatively spliced variants of coding and non-coding mRNA were expressed in a species- and cell-type/tissue-specific manner with individual differences. By examining the repertoire of REST pre-mRNA splicing in 27 patients with kidney, liver and lung cancer, we found that all patients without exception showed differential expression of various REST splice variants between paired tumor and adjacent normal tissues, with striking cell-type/tissue and individual differences. Moreover, we revealed that exon 3 skipping, which causes no frame shift but loss of a domain essential for nuclear translocation, was affected by pioglitazone, a highly selective activator of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ which contributes to cell differentiation and tumorigenesis besides its metabolic actions. Accordingly, this study demonstrates an extensive AS of REST pre-mRNA which redefines REST gene boundary and structure, along with a general but differential link between REST pre-mRNA splicing and various types of cancer. These findings advance our understanding of the complex, context-dependent regulation of

  16. The effects of common risk factors on stock returns: A detrended cross-correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Qingsong; Yang, Bingchan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we investigate the cross-correlations between Fama and French three factors and the return of American industries on the basis of cross-correlation statistic test and multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis (MF-DCCA). Qualitatively, we find that the return series of Fama and French three factors and American industries were overall significantly cross-correlated based on the analysis of a statistic. Quantitatively, we find that the cross-correlations between three factors and the return of American industries were strongly multifractal, and applying MF-DCCA we also investigate the cross-correlation of industry returns and residuals. We find that there exists multifractality of industry returns and residuals. The result of correlation coefficients we can verify that there exist other factors which influence the industry returns except Fama three factors.

  17. Common genetic influences on negative emotionality and a general psychopathology factor in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Jennifer L; Lahey, Benjamin B; van Hulle, Carol; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F; Rathouz, Paul J

    2013-11-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity has supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a "bifactor"; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tested a prediction, derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially-at both phenotypic and genetic levels-with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9-17 years) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors.

  18. Common Genetic Influences on Negative Emotionality and a General Psychopathology Factor in Childhood and Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Jennifer L.; Lahey, Benjamin B.; Hulle, Carol Van; Waldman, Irwin; Krueger, Robert F.; Rathouz, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research using confirmatory factor analysis to model psychopathology comorbidity supported the hypothesis of a broad general factor (i.e., a “bifactor”; Holzinger & Swineford, 1937) of psychopathology in children, adolescents, and adults, with more specific higher-order internalizing and externalizing factors reflecting additional shared variance in symptoms (Lahey et al., 2012; Lahey, Van Hulle, Singh, Waldman, & Rathouz, 2011). The psychological nature of this general factor has not been explored, however. The current study tests a prediction derived from the spectrum hypothesis of personality and psychopathology, that variance in a general psychopathology bifactor overlaps substantially—at both phenotypic and genetic levels—with the dispositional trait of negative emotionality. Data on psychopathology symptoms and dispositional traits were collected from both parents and youth in a representative sample of 1,569 twin pairs (ages 9–17) from Tennessee. Predictions based on the spectrum hypothesis were supported, with variance in negative emotionality and the general factor overlapping substantially at both phenotypic and etiologic levels. Furthermore, stronger correlations were found between negative emotionality and the general psychopathology factor than among other dispositions and other psychopathology factors. PMID:24364617

  19. Common factors in the withdrawal of European aircraft manufacturers from the regional aircraft market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerkens, Johannes M.G.; de Bruijn, E.J.; Steenhuis, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate whether there were common causes for the withdrawal from the regional aircraft market of three established manufacturers (BAE Systems, Fokker and Saab), while competitors thrived. We focus on the markets for 50- and 100-seat aircraft. One cause concerning the 50-seat market was the

  20. Transcriptome of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) through RNA-seq: nodulation, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. We have performed next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) o...

  1. Factors associated with first return to work and sick leave durations in workers with common mental disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flach, Peter A.; Groothoff, Johan W.; Krol, Boudien; Bultmann, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Background: Associations are examined between socio-demographic, medical, work-related and organizational factors and the moment of first return to work (RTW) (within or after 6 weeks of sick leave) and total sick leave duration in sick leave spells due to common mental disorders. Methods: Data are

  2. A Common Susceptibility Factor of Both Autism and Epilepsy: Functional Deficiency of GABA[subscript A] Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jing-Qiong; Barnes, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Autism and epilepsy are common childhood neurological disorders with a great heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes as well as risk factors. There is a high co-morbidity of autism and epilepsy. The neuropathology of autism and epilepsy has similar histology implicating the processes of neurogenesis, neural migration, programmed cell death, and…

  3. Climate vs. soil factors in local adaptation of two common plant species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macel, M.; Lawson, C.S.; Mortimer, S.R.; Smilauerova, M.; Bischoff, A.; Crémieux, L.; Dolezal, J.; Edwards, A.R.; Lanta, V.; Bezemer, T.M.; Putten, van der W.H.; Igual, J.M.; Rodriguez-Barrueco, C.; Müller-Schärer, H.; Steinger, T.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary theory suggests that divergent natural selection in heterogeneous environments can result in locally adapted plant genotypes. To understand local adaptation it is important to study the ecological factors responsible for divergent selection. At a continental scale, variation in climate

  4. A common spatial factor analysis model for measured neighborhood-level characteristics: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethery, Rachel C; Warren, Joshua L; Herring, Amy H; Moore, Kari A B; Evenson, Kelly R; Diez-Roux, Ana V

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the dimensionality of a set of neighborhood-level variables collected on participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) while appropriately accounting for the spatial structure of the data. A common spatial factor analysis model in the Bayesian setting was utilized in order to properly characterize dependencies in the data. Results suggest that use of the spatial factor model can result in more precise estimation of factor scores, improved insight into the spatial patterns in the data, and the ability to more accurately assess associations between the neighborhood environment and health outcomes.

  5. A Common Spatial Factor Analysis Model for Measured Neighborhood-Level Characteristics: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nethery, Rachel C.; Warren, Joshua L.; Herring, Amy H.; Moore, Kari A.B.; Evenson, Kelly R.; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the dimensionality of a set of neighborhood-level variables collected on participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) while appropriately accounting for the spatial structure of the data. A common spatial factor analysis model in the Bayesian setting was utilized in order to properly characterize dependencies in the data. Results suggest that use of the spatial factor model can result in more precise estimation of factor scores, improved insight into the spatial patterns in the data, and the ability to more accurately assess associations between the neighborhood environment and health outcomes. PMID:26372887

  6. Microtubule-Actin Cross-Linking Factor 1: Domains, Interaction Partners, and Tissue-Specific Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryunov, Dmitry; Liem, Ronald K H

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton of most eukaryotic cells is composed of three principal filamentous components: actin filaments, microtubules (MTs), and intermediate filaments. It is a highly dynamic system that plays crucial roles in a wide range of cellular processes, including migration, adhesion, cytokinesis, morphogenesis, intracellular traffic and signaling, and structural flexibility. Among the large number of cytoskeleton-associated proteins characterized to date, microtubule-actin cross-linking factor 1 (MACF1) is arguably the most versatile integrator and modulator of cytoskeleton-related processes. MACF1 belongs to the plakin family of proteins, and within it, to the spectraplakin subfamily. These proteins are characterized by the ability to bridge MT and actin cytoskeletal networks in a dynamic fashion, which underlies their involvement in the regulation of cell migration, axonal extension, and vesicular traffic. Studying MACF1 functions has provided insights not only into the regulation of the cytoskeleton but also into molecular mechanisms of both normal cellular physiology and cellular pathology. Multiple MACF1 isoforms exist, composed of a large variety of alternatively spliced domains. Each of these domains mediates a specific set of interactions and functions. These functions are manifested in tissue and cell-specific phenotypes observed in conditional MACF1 knockout mice. The conditional models described to date reveal critical roles of MACF1 in mammalian skin, nervous system, heart muscle, and intestinal epithelia. Complete elimination of MACF1 is early embryonic lethal, indicating an essential role for MACF1 in early development. Further studies of MACF1 domains and their interactions will likely reveal multiple new roles of this protein in various tissues.

  7. Using Selected Chemical and Physical Factors to Cross-link a BioCo Polymer Binder - Mineral Matrix System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Grabowska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This publication describes research on the course of the process of cross-linking new BioCo polymer binders - in the form of water-based polymer compositions of poly(acrylic acid or poly(sodium acrylate/modified polysaccharide - using selected physical and chemical factors. It has been shown that the type of cross-linking factor used influences the strength parameters of the moulding sand. The crosslinking factors selected during basic research make it possible to obtain sand strengths similar to those of samples of sands bonded with commercial binders. Microwave radiation turned out to be the most effective cross-linking factor in a binder-matrix system. It was proven that adsorption in the microwave radiation field leads to the formation of polymer lattices with hydrogen bonds which play a major role in maintaining the formed cross-linked structures in the binder-matrix system. As a result, the process improves the strength parameters of the sand, whereas the hardening process in a microwave field significantly shortens the setting time.

  8. Combined action of ionizing radiation with another factor: common rules and theoretical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Roh, Changhyun, E-mail: jkkim@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Komarova, Ludmila N.; Petin, Vladislav G., E-mail: vgpetin@yahoo.com [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Two or more factors can simultaneously make their combined effects on the biological objects. This study has focused on theoretical approach to synergistic interaction due to the combined action of radiation and another factor on cell inactivation. A mathematical model for the synergistic interaction of different environmental agents was suggested for quantitative prediction of irreversibly damaged cells after combined exposures. The model takes into account the synergistic interaction of agents and based on the supposition that additional effective damages responsible for the synergy are irreversible and originated from an interaction of ineffective sub lesions. The experimental results regarding the irreversible component of radiation damage of diploid yeast cells simultaneous exposed to heat with ionizing radiation or UV light are presented. A good agreement of experimental results with model predictions was demonstrated. The importance of the results obtained for the interpretation of the mechanism of synergistic interaction of various environmental factors is discussed. (author)

  9. Common Factor Analysis Versus Principal Component Analysis: Choice for Symptom Cluster Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Ju Kim, PhD, RN

    2008-03-01

    Conclusion: If the study purpose is to explain correlations among variables and to examine the structure of the data (this is usual for most cases in symptom cluster research, CFA provides a more accurate result. If the purpose of a study is to summarize data with a smaller number of variables, PCA is the choice. PCA can also be used as an initial step in CFA because it provides information regarding the maximum number and nature of factors. In using factor analysis for symptom cluster research, several issues need to be considered, including subjectivity of solution, sample size, symptom selection, and level of measure.

  10. Parental rearing style: examining for links with personality vulnerability factors for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G

    1993-07-01

    Recent research provides evidence of links between anomalous parenting experiences in childhood and subsequent depression. A study was designed to pursue the possibility that anomalous parenting effects a diathesis to depression by inducing a vulnerable cognitive style rather than by disposing directly to depression. Possible mediating personality style variables were explored in a study of 123 depressed subjects who scored their parents on the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI), as well as completing a state depression and several relevant personality measures. Low self-esteem and a related dysfunction cognitive style were the personality variables most clearly linked with PBI scores, with links persisting after partialling out state levels of depression. Failure to find links between PBI scores and depression levels limited explication of the diathesis stress model.

  11. SVPWM Technique with Varying DC-Link Voltage for Common Mode Voltage Reduction in a Matrix Converter and Analytical Estimation of its Output Voltage Distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhee, Varsha

    Common Mode Voltage (CMV) in any power converter has been the major contributor to premature motor failures, bearing deterioration, shaft voltage build up and electromagnetic interference. Intelligent control methods like Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM) techniques provide immense potential and flexibility to reduce CMV, thereby targeting all the afore mentioned problems. Other solutions like passive filters, shielded cables and EMI filters add to the volume and cost metrics of the entire system. Smart SVPWM techniques therefore, come with a very important advantage of being an economical solution. This thesis discusses a modified space vector technique applied to an Indirect Matrix Converter (IMC) which results in the reduction of common mode voltages and other advanced features. The conventional indirect space vector pulse-width modulation (SVPWM) method of controlling matrix converters involves the usage of two adjacent active vectors and one zero vector for both rectifying and inverting stages of the converter. By suitable selection of space vectors, the rectifying stage of the matrix converter can generate different levels of virtual DC-link voltage. This capability can be exploited for operation of the converter in different ranges of modulation indices for varying machine speeds. This results in lower common mode voltage and improves the harmonic spectrum of the output voltage, without increasing the number of switching transitions as compared to conventional modulation. To summarize it can be said that the responsibility of formulating output voltages with a particular magnitude and frequency has been transferred solely to the rectifying stage of the IMC. Estimation of degree of distortion in the three phase output voltage is another facet discussed in this thesis. An understanding of the SVPWM technique and the switching sequence of the space vectors in detail gives the potential to estimate the RMS value of the switched output voltage of any

  12. Nitrogen-to-Protein Conversion Factors for Crop Residues and Animal Manure Common in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xueli; Zhao, Guanglu; Zhang, Yang; Han, Lujia; Xiao, Weihua

    2017-10-02

    Accurately determining protein content is essential in exploiting biomass as feed and fuel. A survey of biomass samples in China indicated protein contents from 2.65 to 3.98 % for crop residues and from 6.07 to 10.24 % for animal manure. Conversion factors based on amino acid nitrogen (kA) ranged from 5.42 to 6.00 for the former and from 4.78 to 5.36 for the latter, indicating that the traditional factor of 6.25 is not suitable for biomass samples. On the other hand, conversion factors from Kjeldahl nitrogen (kP) ranged from 3.97 to 4.57 and from 2.76 to 4.31 for crop residues and animal manure, respectively. Of note, conversion factors were strongly affected by amino acid composition and levels of nonprotein nitrogen. Thus, kP values of 4.23 for crop residues, 4.11 for livestock manure, and 3.11 for poultry manure are recommended to better estimate protein content from total nitrogen.

  13. Perinatal inflammation: a common factor in the early origins of cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Maria U; Wallace, Megan J; Pepe, Salvatore; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Moss, Timothy J; Burgner, David

    2015-10-01

    Cardiovascular disease continues to be the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality. Traditional risk factors account for only part of the attributable risk. The origins of atherosclerosis are in early life, a potential albeit largely unrecognized window of opportunity for early detection and treatment of subclinical cardiovascular disease. There are robust epidemiological data indicating that poor intrauterine growth and/or prematurity, and perinatal factors such as maternal hypercholesterolaemia, smoking, diabetes and obesity, are associated with adverse cardiovascular intermediate phenotypes in childhood and adulthood. Many of these early-life risk factors result in a heightened inflammatory state. Inflammation is a central mechanism in the development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, but few studies have investigated the role of overt perinatal infection and inflammation (chorioamnionitis) as a potential contributor to cardiovascular risk. Limited evidence from human and experimental models suggests an association between chorioamnionitis and cardiac and vascular dysfunction. Early life inflammatory events may be an important mechanism in the early development of cardiovascular risk and may provide insights into the associations between perinatal factors and adult cardiovascular disease. This review aims to summarise current data on the early life origins of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease, with particular focus on perinatal inflammation.

  14. Characterization of the receptor for endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF) by affinity cross-linking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friesel, R.; Burgess, W.H.; Mehlman, T.; Maciag, T.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have demonstrated high affinity receptors for ECGF on endothelial cells by covalent cross-linking of (/sup 125/I)-ECGF with disuccinimidyl suberate and observe a single chain cross-linked polypeptide species with an apparent M/sub r/ of 170K. The M/sub r/ 170K species represents (/sup 125/I)-ECGF bound to its receptor since (i) excess unlabeled ECGF inhibits the cross-linking of (/sup 125/I)-ECGF, (ii) labeling of the M/sub r/170K species does not take place in the absence of cross-linker, (iii) cells previously shown to be refractory to ECGF and lack ECGF receptors do not yield a cross-linked species, (iv) the cross-linked species can be immunoprecipitated with anti-ECGF antibodies, and (v) preincubation of cells with ECGF at 37/sup 0/C significantly reduces cross-linking while incubation at 4/sup 0/C does not. These data demonstrate that ECGF induced cell proliferation occurs through the occupancy of a specific cell surface polypeptide receptor with an apparent M/sub r/ of 150K, and suggests that internalization of the receptor-ligand complex may be relevant to ECGF-induced signal transduction.

  15. Common Variation in the LRRK2 Gene is a Risk Factor for Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Ignacio F.; Checkoway, Harvey; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W.; Kim, Hojoong M.; Agarwal, Pinky; Alvarez, Victoria; Ribacoba, Renee; Pastor, Pau; Lorenzo-Betancor, Oswaldo; Infante, Jon; Sierra, María; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Mir, Pablo; Ritz, Beate; Rhodes, Shannon L; Colcher, Amy; Van Deerlin, Vivianna; Chung, Kathryn A.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Yearout, Dora; Martinez, Erica; Farin, Federico M.; Wan, Jia Y.; Edwards, Karen L.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Common variants in the LRRK2 gene influence risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) in Asians, but whether the same is true in European-derived populations is less clear. Methods We genotyped 66 LRRK2 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 575 PD patients and 689 controls from the Northwestern U.S. (Tier 1). PD-associated SNPs (p<0.05) were then genotyped in an independent sample of 3617 cases and 2512 controls from the U.S. and Spain (Tier 2). Logistic regression was used to model additive SNP genotype effects adjusted for age and sex among white individuals. Results Two regions showed independent association with PD in Tier 1, and SNPs in both regions were successfully replicated in Tier 2 (rs10878226, combined odds ratio [OR], 1.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.33; p=6.3×10−4; rs11176013, OR, 0.89; CI, 0.83-0.95; p=4.6×10−4). Conclusions Our data suggest that common variation within LRRK2 conveys susceptibility for PD in individuals of European ancestry. PMID:23115130

  16. Rare Syndromes and Common Variants of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J C

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders that cause BDNF haploinsufficiency, such as WAGR syndrome, 11p deletion, and 11p inversion, serve as models for understanding the role of BDNF in human energy balance and neurocognition. Patients with BDNF haploinsufficiency or inactivating mutations of the BDNF receptor exhibit hyperphagia, childhood-onset obesity, intellectual disability, and impaired nociception. Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and ROHHAD syndromes are separate genetic disorders that do not directly affect the BDNF locus but share many similar clinical features with BDNF haploinsufficiency, and BDNF insufficiency is believed to possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of each of these conditions. In the general population, common variants of BDNF that affect BDNF gene expression or BDNF protein processing have also been associated with modest alterations in energy balance and cognitive functioning. Thus, variable degrees of BDNF insufficiency appear to contribute to a spectrum of excess weight gain and cognitive impairment that ranges in phenotypic severity. In this modern era of precision medicine, genotype-specific therapies aimed at increasing BDNF signaling in patients with rare and common disorders associated with BDNF insufficiency could serve as useful approaches for treating obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors driving deforestation in common-pool resources in northern Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Verdin, Gustavo; Kim, Yeon-Su; Hospodarsky, Denver; Tecle, Aregai

    2009-01-01

    The theory of collective action has been extensively used to explain the relationship between common-based property regimes and the conservation of natural resources. However, there are two key components of the theory that literature reports as puzzles in which no consensus exists about their effect on the performance of common-pool resources. These are group size and heterogeneity. This study analyzes the effects of these two key components on the effectiveness of community-based forestry, called ejidos, to protect their forest resources in northern Mexico. We used a multinomial logit model to determine the contribution of 16 explanatory variables to the dependent variable, a measure of success of ejidos defined by the presence of deforested, degraded, or forested conditions. The results show that corn yield, marginality, percent of forest area, total population, a forest value index, distance to markets, roads and towns, were all statistically significant in driving deforested conditions. Deforestation becomes more attractive for poor communities and as corn yield and distance to towns, roads, and markets decrease. In general, group size and heterogeneity had no significant effects on the presence of deforested conditions. Deforestation is driven by resource-specific characteristics, such as location and soil productivity, not by ejidos' attributes, such as total area or number of members. We argue that current institutional policies focusing on the structure of property right arrangements should be shifted (1) to provide better technology for land cultivation; (2) to reduce the marginality problem in poor communities; and (3) to strengthen local institutions.

  18. Interferon Antagonism as a Common Virulence Factor of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Lassa virus (LASV), respectively. Our approach and goals are to (1) determine if the viruses evade host innate immunity; (2) to identify viral genes...HPS-causing viruses , Andes virus (ANDV) and NY-1 virus (NY-1V) can inhibit activation of two important innate immune pathways, double stranded RNA...Virulence Factor of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Adolfo Garcia Sastre, Ph.D

  19. Risk Factors for Recurrence of Symptomatic Common Bile Duct Stones after Cholecystectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyun Oak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The recurrence of CBD stone is still observed in a considerable number of patients. The study was to evaluate the risk factors for recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone in patients who underwent cholecystectomy after the removal of CBD stone. Methods. The medical records of patients who underwent removal of CBD stone with subsequent cholecystectomy were reviewed. The risk factors for the recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone were compared between the recurrence and the nonrecurrence group. Results. The mean follow-up period was 40.6 months. The recurrence of symptomatic CBD stones was defined as the detection of bile duct stones no sooner than 6 months after complete clearance of CBD stones, based on symptoms or signs of biliary complication. 144 patients (68 males, 47.2% were finally enrolled and their mean age was 59.8 (range: 26~86 years. The recurrence of CBD stone occurred in 15 patients (10.4%. The mean period until first recurrence was 25.9 months. The presence of type 1 or 2 periampullary diverticulum and multiple CBD stones were the independent risk factors. Conclusion. For the patients with type 1 or 2 periampullary diverticulum or multiple CBD stones, careful followup is needed for the risk in recurrence of symptomatic CBD stone.

  20. Mental Status as a Common Factor for Masticatory Muscle Pain: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieszko Wieckiewicz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Masticatory muscle pain (MMP is the primary reason for chronic non-odontogenic orofacial pain in the human population. MMP has become a considerable social problem, which affects about 12–14% of the adult population and is 1.5–2 times more frequent in women than in men. This term defines a pain which has its origins in the masticatory muscles. Although MMP is typically felt in the face, jaws, and preauricular area, MMP can radiate to the ear, teeth, head, and neck. This systematic review explains the relationship between MMP and common mental states, such as anxiety, depression, mood and stress-related disorders, and is reported in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. We performed a search in the PubMed database for peer-reviewed articles published after November 1st 2006 in the context of MMP and mental states. According to the defined criteria, 38 studies were finally included into the systematic review, of which prospective cohort studies were found to be the most common. We investigated four primary outcomes (anxiety, depression, mood disorders, and stress-related disorders and several secondary outcomes of search. Seventy-nine percent of studies concerned depression, 42% anxiety, 29% mood disorders, and 21% stress-related disorders. Most of the studies showed a relationship between MMP and alterations in mental status. Nonetheless, the researchers usually evidenced only the co-occurrence of psychiatric disorders and dysfunctions of the masticatory muscles among the group of patients, in large part in women. Moreover, some studies were marked with limited generalizability of the reported results, quality flaws and heterogeneity. In the light of the analyzed literature, the causal relationship between mental states and MMP is still not clearly established.

  1. Effect of various factors on the kinetics of linked ammonia removal from industrial wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Леонідівна Дан

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Work of industrial enterprises results in large amounts of wastewaters. Both domestic and industrial wastewaters contain elements, which are capable even at low concentrations of causing harm to human health and environment. Metallurgical and coke chemical enterprises wastewaters are among the most dangerous and toxic pollutants. The group of the most dangerous pollutants includes ammonium nitrogen. It is usually contained in industrial wastewaters in the linked and free ammonia form. These compounds are capable of provoking not only a disorder in the human nervous system, but also of the development of oncological diseases and even of causing death. For our investigations wastewater samples from one of the largest Ukrainian metallurgical enterprises have been used – AZOVSTAL IRON & STEEL WORKS (Metinvest Holding, Mariupol, Ukraine. As a result of our investigations it has been found that the contents of ammonia nitrogen in AZOVSTAL IRON & STEEL WORKS wastewaters was equal to 300 mg/l, of which the linked ammonia was 190 mg/l. We investigated the possibility of removing linked ammonia from industrial wastewaters depending on the temperature. It has been found that upon heating the contents of linked ammonia in wastewaters is reduced by about 25%. These results are not sufficient to achieve the level of maximum permissible concentration (MPC of ammonia is 2 mg/l. The perspective direction for better removal of linked ammonia is using strong bases (NaOH

  2. Are there genetic paths common to obesity, cardiovascular disease outcomes, and cardiovascular risk factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankinen, Tuomo; Sarzynski, Mark A; Ghosh, Sujoy; Bouchard, Claude

    2015-02-27

    Clustering of obesity, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular disease risk factors is observed in epidemiological studies and clinical settings. Twin and family studies have provided some supporting evidence for the clustering hypothesis. Loci nearest a lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) showing genome-wide significant associations with coronary artery disease, body mass index, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, lipids, and type 2 diabetes mellitus were selected for pathway and network analyses. Eighty-seven autosomal regions (181 SNPs), mapping to 56 genes, were found to be pleiotropic. Most pleiotropic regions contained genes associated with coronary artery disease and plasma lipids, whereas some exhibited coaggregation between obesity and cardiovascular disease risk factors. We observed enrichment for liver X receptor (LXR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR) and farnesoid X receptor/RXR nuclear receptor signaling among pleiotropic genes and for signatures of coronary artery disease and hepatic steatosis. In the search for functionally interacting networks, we found that 43 pleiotropic genes were interacting in a network with an additional 24 linker genes. ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) data were queried for distribution of pleiotropic SNPs among regulatory elements and coding sequence variations. Of the 181 SNPs, 136 were annotated to ≥ 1 regulatory feature. An enrichment analysis found over-representation of enhancers and DNAse hypersensitive regions when compared against all SNPs of the 1000 Genomes pilot project. In summary, there are genomic regions exerting pleiotropic effects on cardiovascular disease risk factors, although only a few included obesity. Further studies are needed to resolve the clustering in terms of DNA variants, genes, pathways, and actionable targets.

  3. Possible protective action of neurotrophic factors and natural compounds against common neurodegenerative diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tadahiro Numakawa

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that altered levels/function of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease. BDNF positively contributes to neural survival and synapse maintenance via stimulating its high afifnity receptor TrkB, making upregulation of BDNF and/or activation of BDNF-related intracellular signaling an attractive approach to treating neurodegenerative diseases. In this short review, I brielfy introduce small natural compounds such as lfavonoids that successfully increase activation of the BDNF system and discuss their beneifcial effects against neurodegeneration.

  4. Prevalence of Common Skin Diseases and Their Associated Factors among Military Personnel in Korea: A Cross-sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon; Park, Young Min

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Ski...

  5. Counting up the risks: How common are risk factors for morbidity and mortality in young people with psychosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Lisa Anne; Mackinnon, Andrew; Foley, Debra L; Morgan, Vera A; Waterreus, Anna; Watts, Gerald F; Castle, David J; Liu, Dennis; Galletly, Cherrie A

    2016-11-17

    This study examined the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular (CV)-related morbidity and mortality in young people with psychosis aged 18 to 24 years. The study included 132 people aged 18 to 24 years who participated in the 2010 second Australian national survey of people living with psychosis. The 2009 World Health Organisation (WHO) Global Health Risks report was used as a framework to determine which specific risk factors were present in each in these young people. The risk factors assessed in this study were smoking, alcohol use, hypertension, overweight/obesity, physical inactivity, high blood glucose, high cholesterol and poor diet. Each risk factor was defined according to WHO criteria. A count of the total number of risk factors present for each participant was determined. Data for male and female participants were compared. Young men had an average of 2.9 (SD 1.2) risk factors. Young women had an average of 2.4 (SD 1.2) risk factors. The most common risk factors were low fruit and vegetable intake (77.9%), cigarette smoking (67.7%), overweight/obesity (55%) and physical inactivity (39.8%). There were no significant differences between men and women in the number of risk factors present, or the prevalence of individual risk factors. This study demonstrated that many of the risk factors that ultimately contribute to disability and premature death are present at an early age in people with psychosis. Preventive measures need to be an integral component of early intervention services for this client population to avert progression to serious CV morbidity and early mortality. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. The Likelihood Ratio Test of Common Factors under Non-Ideal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Angulo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El modelo espacial de Durbin ocupa una posición interesante en econometría espacial. Es la forma reducida de un modelo de corte transversal con dependencia en los errores y puede ser utilizado como ecuación de anidación en un enfoque más general de selección de modelos. En concreto, a partir de esta ecuación puede obtenerse el Ratio de Verosimilitudes conocido como test de Factores Comunes (LRCOM. Como se muestra en Mur y Angulo (2006, este test tiene buenas propiedades si el modelo está correctamente especificado. Sin embargo, por lo que sabemos, no hay referencias en la literatura sobre el comportamiento de este test bajo condiciones no ideales. En concreto, estudiamos el comportamiento del test en los casos de heterocedasticidad, no normalidad, endogeneidad, matrices de contactos densas y no-linealidad. Nuestros resultados ofrecen una visión positiva del test de Factores Comunes que parece una técnica útil en el instrumental propio de la econometría espacial contemporánea.

  7. Seasonal and geographical variation of Linke turbidity factor and its effect on global horizontal irradiance estimation: UAE case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Y. A.; Ghedira, H.

    2011-12-01

    In a clear-sky condition, solar radiation travelling through the Earth's atmosphere encounters atmospheric attenuation caused by several factors. Scattering of solar radiation is mainly caused by air molecules, water vapor, water droplets and dust. On the other hand, the absorption of solar radiation is usually related to the presence of O3, water vapor and CO2 layers in the upper atmosphere. Linke turbidity factor (TL) is commonly used to model the attenuation of solar radiation in the atmosphere. TL is the key parameter used in the Heliosat model, which is developed to estimate the global horizontal irradiance (GHI) at the surface of the earth. TL is calculated by the following equation: T_L=δ/δ_R where δ is the optical thickness of the whole atmosphere, and δR is the optical thickness of the Rayleigh atmosphere, i.e. the clear and dry atmosphere. The problem with TL is its dependence on the air mass (m). Therefore, TL is normalized to an air mass of 2 in order to reduce the daily variance. In this study, the monthly TL(m=2) is computed over 7 ground-based stations available in the UAE (figure 1). Spatial and temporal analysis was performed to assess the seasonal and the geographical distribution of TL over the UAE. The computed TL(m=2) values are then applied in the Heliosat model to compare between the measured and modeled GHI values. The model treats the atmospheric and cloud transmittances separately. First, clear-sky direct normal irradiance (DNI) and diffused horizontal irradiance (DHI) values are computed using TL(m=2), solar zenith angle, air mass, sun-earth distance correction, solar constant and the Rayleigh optical depth, from that the clear-sky GHI is determined. Next, the cloud index is derived from the HRV channel available from the SEVIRI instrument, and from that the cloud transmission is computed. The product of the cloud transmission and the clear-sky GHI produces the modeled GHI. The comparison between TL calculated over the seven stations

  8. Glucocerebrosidase mutations are not a common risk factor for Parkinson disease in North Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Kenya; Vilariño-Güell, Carles; Cobb, Stephanie A; Kachergus, Jennifer M; Ross, Owen A; Wider, Christian; Gibson, Rachel A; Hentati, Faycal; Farrer, Matthew J

    2010-06-21

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) have recently been associated with an increased risk of Parkinson disease (PD). GBA mutations have been observed to be particularly prevalent in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Interestingly, this population also has a high incidence of the Lrrk2 p.G2019S mutation which is similar in North African Arab-Berber populations. Herein, our sequencing of the GBA gene, in 33 North African Arab-Berber familial parkinsonism probands, identified two novel mutations in three individuals (p.K-26R and p.K186R). Segregation analysis of these two variants did not support a pathogenic role. Genotyping of p.K-26R, p.K186R and the common p.N370S in an ethnically matched series consisting of 395 patients with PD and 372 control subjects did not show a statistically significant association (P>0.05). The p.N370S mutation was only identified in 1 sporadic patient with PD and 3 control subjects indicating that the frequency of this mutation in the North African Arab-Berber population is much lower than that observed in Ashkenazi Jews, and therefore arose in the latter after expansion of the Lrrk2 p.G2019S variant in North Africa.

  9. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    and we propose that the fluid effect on mechanical properties of highly porous chalk may be the result of liquid‐solid friction. Applying a different strain or stress rate is influencing the rock strength and needs to be included. The resulting function is shown to relate to the material dependent...... and rate independent b-factor used when describing the time dependent mechanical properties of soft rock or soils. As a consequence it is then possible to further characterize the material constant from the porosity and permeability of the rock as well as from pore fluid density and viscosity which......Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...

  10. Risk and protective factors for sexual aggression and dating violence: common themes and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Martie P

    2014-10-01

    The primary aims of this article are to expand on three themes from the conference articles on risk and protective factors for dating and sexual violence and to offer suggestions that can guide future research. The first theme is the co-occurrence of sexual and dating violence with other forms of violence and other campus health issues. A second topic is the value of prospective studies in revealing temporal patterns of victimization and perpetration. A third theme is the role of peer norms in violence among college students. Suggestions for translating these ideas into research and action are discussed and include the need for comprehensive prevention approaches, more longitudinal research spanning the years before, during, and after college, and the application of social media technology in our interventions strategies. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. A Common Structural Motif in the Binding of Virulence Factors to Bacterial Secretion Chaperones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lilic,M.; Vujanac, M.; Stebbins, C.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella invasion protein A (SipA) is translocated into host cells by a type III secretion system (T3SS) and comprises two regions: one domain binds its cognate type III secretion chaperone, InvB, in the bacterium to facilitate translocation, while a second domain functions in the host cell, contributing to bacterial uptake by polymerizing actin. We present here the crystal structures of the SipA chaperone binding domain (CBD) alone and in complex with InvB. The SipA CBD is found to consist of a nonglobular polypeptide as well as a large globular domain, both of which are necessary for binding to InvB. We also identify a structural motif that may direct virulence factors to their cognate chaperones in a diverse range of pathogenic bacteria. Disruption of this structural motif leads to a destabilization of several chaperone-substrate complexes from different species, as well as an impairment of secretion in Salmonella.

  12. A Reanalysis of Toomela (2003: Spurious measurement error as cause for common variance between personality factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MATTHIAS ZIEGLER

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article reanalyzed data collected by Toomela (2003. The data contain personality self ratings and cognitive ability test results from n = 912 men with military background. In his original article Toomela showed that in the group with the highest cognitive ability, Big-Five-Neuroticism and -Conscientiousness were substantially correlated and could no longer be clearly separated using exploratory factor analysis. The present reanalysis was based on the hypothesis that a spurious measurement error caused by situational demand was responsible. This means, people distorted their answers. Furthermore it was hypothesized that this situational demand was felt due to a person’s military rank but not due to his intelligence. Using a multigroup structural equation model our hypothesis could be confirmed. Moreover, the results indicate that an uncorrelated trait model might represent personalities better when situational demand is partialized. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

  13. Biot Critical Frequency Applied as Common Friction Factor for Chalk with Different Pore Fluids and Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Katrine Alling; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Injection of water into chalk hydrocarbon reservoirs has lead to mechanical yield and failure. Laboratory experiments on chalk samples correspondingly show that the mechanical properties of porous chalk depend on pore fluid and temperature. Water has a significant softening effect on elastic...... and we propose that the fluid effect on mechanical properties of highly porous chalk may be the result of liquid‐solid friction. Applying a different strain or stress rate is influencing the rock strength and needs to be included. The resulting function is shown to relate to the material dependent...... and rate independent b-factor used when describing the time dependent mechanical properties of soft rock or soils. As a consequence it is then possible to further characterize the material constant from the porosity and permeability of the rock as well as from pore fluid density and viscosity which...

  14. An investigation to identify potential risk factors associated with common chronic diseases among the older population in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enemona Emmanuel Adaji

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, chronic diseases are the leading cause of death and their prevalence has constantly increased over the last decade. Objective: This study aimed to identify risk factors associated with common chronic diseases among people aged 50 years and over in India. Materials and Methods: Data from Wave 1 of the 2007/2008 Indian Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE was used to investigate the association between lifestyle choices and chronic diseases using logistic regression. Result: The fully adjusted model showed that significant independent risk factors for angina included area of residence, being diagnosed with diabetes, chronic lung disease (CLD [highest odds ratio (OR 4.77, 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.95-7.70] and arthritis. For arthritis, risk factors included having underlying diabetes, CLD diagnosis, or angina (highest OR 2.32, 95% CI: 1.63-3.31. Risk factors associated with CLD included arthritis, angina (highest OR 4.76, 95% CI: 2.94-7.72, alcohol use, and tobacco use. Risk factors associated with diabetes included level of education, area of residence, socioeconomic status, angina (highest OR 3.59, 95% CI: 2.44-5.29, CLD, arthritis, stroke, and vegetable consumption. Finally, risk factors associated with stroke included diabetes and angina (highest OR 3.34, 95% CI: 1.72-6.50. The presence of any other comorbidity was significantly associated with all five chronic diseases studied. Conclusion: The results show that within the older population, the contribution of lifestyle risk factors to the common chronic diseases investigated in this study was limited. Our findings showed that the major health issue within the study population was multimorbidity.

  15. Common carotid intima-media thickness and von Willebrand factor serum levels in rheumatoid arthritis female patients without cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daza, Leonel; Aguirre, Martin; Jimenez, Martin; Herrera, Rafael; Bollain, J J

    2007-04-01

    High atherosclerosis prevalence was found in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the von Willebrand factor (vWF) was shown to be a marker for endothelial damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association of intima-media thickness of the left common carotid artery with vWF serum levels in rheumatoid arthritis patients without cardiovascular risk factors. We included 55 RA female patients, each with at least 5 years of duration of the disease, and 20 healthy female subjects as members of the control group. The vWF, cholesterol, triglycerides, and the immune variables-rheumatoid factor and reactive C protein-were evaluated. The media thickness and intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients and in the control subjects were assessed by Doppler ultrasound of the left common carotid artery. Although the ages for RA patients and healthy female controls were not different, the IMT of the left common carotid artery (IMT CCA) in rheumatoid arthritis patients was increased in comparison with healthy control measurements, the mean being 0.67 mm (SD 0.18) vs 0.58 mm (SD 0.10) with a p value 0.01. The vWF serum levels showed differences in RA patients from those in control patients, 145.6 (SD 30.08) vs 121.8 (SD 37.17), respectively, with p=0.007. A correlation was also found between vWF with IMT CCA in the RA patients: r=0.390 and p<0.05. We concluded that the measurements of the left common carotid artery intima-media thickness together with the von Willebrand factor serum levels could give valuable information about the artery status and the atherosclerosis process in early stages in patients with rheumatoid arthritis without cardiovascular risk factors.

  16. Common genetic variations in CLOCK transcription factor are associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silvia Sookoian; Gustavo Casta(n)o; Carolina Gemma; Tomas Fernández Gianotti; Carlos Jose Pirola

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of gene variants and derived haplotypes of the CLOCK transcription factor in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and their relation with the disease severity.METHODS: A total of 136 patients with NAFLD and 64 healthy individuals were studied. Liver biopsy was performed in 91 patients. Six tag SNPs showing a minor allele frequency > 10% (rs1554483 C/G; rs11932595A/G; rs4580704 C/G; rs6843722 A/C; rs6850524 C/G and rs4864548 A/G) encompassing 117 kb of chromosome 4and representing 115 polymorphic sites (r2>0.8) were genotyped.RESULTS: rs11932595 and rs6843722 showed significant associations with NAFLD (empiric P = 0.0449and 0.023, respectively). A significant association was also observed between clinical or histologic spectrum of NAFLD and rs1554483 (empiric P = 0.0399), rs6843722(empiric P = 0.0229) and rs6850524 (empiric P =0.00899) and between fibrosis score and rs1554483(empiric P = 0.02697), rs6843722 (empiric P = 0.01898)and rs4864548 (empiric P = 0.02697). Test of haplotypic association showed that CLOCK gene variant haplotypes frequencies in NAFLD individuals significantly differed from those in controls (empiric P = 0.0097).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests a potential role of the CLOCK polymorphisms and their haplotypes in susceptibility to NAFLD and disease severity.

  17. Gene regulation knowledge commons: community action takes care of DNA binding transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sushil; Vercruysse, Steven; Chawla, Konika; Christie, Karen R; Blake, Judith A; Huntley, Rachael P; Orchard, Sandra; Hermjakob, Henning; Thommesen, Liv; Lægreid, Astrid; Kuiper, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A large gap remains between the amount of knowledge in scientific literature and the fraction that gets curated into standardized databases, despite many curation initiatives. Yet the availability of comprehensive knowledge in databases is crucial for exploiting existing background knowledge, both for designing follow-up experiments and for interpreting new experimental data. Structured resources also underpin the computational integration and modeling of regulatory pathways, which further aids our understanding of regulatory dynamics. We argue how cooperation between the scientific community and professional curators can increase the capacity of capturing precise knowledge from literature. We demonstrate this with a project in which we mobilize biological domain experts who curate large amounts of DNA binding transcription factors, and show that they, although new to the field of curation, can make valuable contributions by harvesting reported knowledge from scientific papers. Such community curation can enhance the scientific epistemic process.Database URL: http://www.tfcheckpoint.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Pricing of common cosmetic surgery procedures: local economic factors trump supply and demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Clare; Mattison, Gennaya; Workman, Adrienne; Gupta, Subhas

    2015-02-01

    The pricing of cosmetic surgery procedures has long been thought to coincide with laws of basic economics, including the model of supply and demand. However, the highly variable prices of these procedures indicate that additional economic contributors are probable. The authors sought to reassess the fit of cosmetic surgery costs to the model of supply and demand and to determine the driving forces behind the pricing of cosmetic surgery procedures. Ten plastic surgery practices were randomly selected from each of 15 US cities of various population sizes. Average prices of breast augmentation, mastopexy, abdominoplasty, blepharoplasty, and rhytidectomy in each city were compared with economic and demographic statistics. The average price of cosmetic surgery procedures correlated substantially with population size (r = 0.767), cost-of-living index (r = 0.784), cost to own real estate (r = 0.714), and cost to rent real estate (r = 0.695) across the 15 US cities. Cosmetic surgery pricing also was found to correlate (albeit weakly) with household income (r = 0.436) and per capita income (r = 0.576). Virtually no correlations existed between pricing and the density of plastic surgeons (r = 0.185) or the average age of residents (r = 0.076). Results of this study demonstrate a correlation between costs of cosmetic surgery procedures and local economic factors. Cosmetic surgery pricing cannot be completely explained by the supply-and-demand model because no association was found between procedure cost and the density of plastic surgeons. © 2015 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Factors affecting health seeking behavior for common childhood illnesses in Yemen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webair, Hana Hasan; Bin-Gouth, Abdulla Salim

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Appropriate medical care seeking could prevent a significant number of child deaths and complications due to ill health. This study aims to determine factors affecting health seeking behavior (HSB) for childhood illnesses, thereby improving child survival. Methods A cross sectional study was carried out from January 11 to April 2, 2012. A total of 212 caretakers of children under the age of 5 years participated. Caretakers who visited the vaccination unit in the Shehair Health Center during the study period and had a child with a history of diarrhea, fever, cough, and/or difficulty of breathing during the last 14 days were included. The data were collected by interviewing caretakers and the answers were reported in pretested structured questionnaires. Results Medical care was sought for about half of the sick children (n=109, 51.42%). Seeking medical care was frequently initiated for illnesses that did not improve or worsened. The major reasons for not seeking medical care were “illness was mild” (n=40, 38.83%) and “illness is not for medical treatment” (n=32, 31.07%). The caretakers sought medical care significantly more when they had a higher level of school education (POR [prevalence odds ratio] 5.85, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 2.34–14.61), when the illness was perceived as severe (POR 5.39, 95% CI: 2.81–10.33), and when the child had difficulty of breathing (POR 2.93, 95% CI: 1.10–7.80). Conclusion For the preventable childhood illnesses with existing interventions, appropriate HSB prevalence is low. Symptom type, caretakers’ education, and perception of illness severity are the predictors of HSB. Educational improvement of the mothers, introduction of community based integrated management of childhood illness, and in-depth research are imperative to improve mothers’ HSB. PMID:24187490

  20. Factors affecting health seeking behavior for common childhood illnesses in Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webair HH

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hana Hasan Webair, Abdulla Salim Bin-Gouth Department of Family Medicine, Hadhramout University of Science and Technology, Almukalla, Hadhramout, Yemen Introduction: Appropriate medical care seeking could prevent a significant number of child deaths and complications due to ill health. This study aims to determine factors affecting health seeking behavior (HSB for childhood illnesses, thereby improving child survival. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out from January 11 to April 2, 2012. A total of 212 caretakers of children under the age of 5 years participated. Caretakers who visited the vaccination unit in the Shehair Health Center during the study period and had a child with a history of diarrhea, fever, cough, and/or difficulty of breathing during the last 14 days were included. The data were collected by interviewing caretakers and the answers were reported in pretested structured questionnaires. Results: Medical care was sought for about half of the sick children (n=109, 51.42%. Seeking medical care was frequently initiated for illnesses that did not improve or worsened. The major reasons for not seeking medical care were "illness was mild" (n=40, 38.83% and "illness is not for medical treatment" (n=32, 31.07%. The caretakers sought medical care significantly more when they had a higher level of school education (POR [prevalence odds ratio] 5.85, 95% CI [confidence interval]: 2.34–14.61, when the illness was perceived as severe (POR 5.39, 95% CI: 2.81–10.33, and when the child had difficulty of breathing (POR 2.93, 95% CI: 1.10–7.80. Conclusion: For the preventable childhood illnesses with existing interventions, appropriate HSB prevalence is low. Symptom type, caretakers' education, and perception of illness severity are the predictors of HSB. Educational improvement of the mothers, introduction of community based integrated management of childhood illness, and in-depth research are imperative to improve mothers' HSB

  1. NGC 6778: Strengthening the link between extreme abundance discrepancy factors and central star binarity in planetary nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, David; García-Rojas, Jorge; Corradi, Romano L M; Boffin, Henri M J

    2015-01-01

    We present new optical spectra of the nearby, bright, planetary nebula NGC 6778. The nebula has been known to emit strong recombination lines for more than 40 years but this is the first detailed study of its abundances. Heavy element abundances derived from recombination lines are found to exceed those from collisionally excited lines by a factor of ~20 in an integrated spectrum of the nebula, which is among the largest known abundance discrepancy factors. Spatial analysis of the spectra shows that the abundance discrepancy factor is strongly, centrally peaked, reaching ~40 close to the central star. The central star of NGC 6778 is known to be a short period binary, further strengthening the link between high nebular abundance discrepancy factors and central star binarity.

  2. THE ANTIGENIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PROTEUS X-19 AND TYPHUS RICKETTSIA : II. A STUDY OF THE COMMON ANTIGENIC FACTOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castaneda, M R

    1934-06-30

    A soluble specific substance was isolated from Mexican typhus Rickettsia which gave, with Proteus X-19 antiserum and typhus human serum, the same precipitation reactions as the polysaccharides extracted from B. proteus OX-19. The soluble specific substance extracted from Rickettsia and Proteus OX-19 is likely to be of a polysaccharide nature owing to the strong Molisch reactions obtained with such extracts, the heat stability and the negative protein reactions (biuret). Since, however, it still contains 7 per cent nitrogen, this is not certain. In the antigenic composition of both Proteus X-19 and typhus Rickettsia there is a common soluble specific factor which is responsible for the Weil-Felix reaction.

  3. 0069 Psychosocial work factors, occupational noise exposure, common mental disorders, and the risk of tinnitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther Frederiksen, Thomas; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia H; Stokholm, Zara A

    2014-01-01

    -2010. The study database contained information on individual short-term and long-term noise exposure levels, hearing levels and questionnaire information on common mental disorders and psychosocial work factors. Associations between noise exposure levels, hearing levels, depression, anxiety, burn-out symptoms...... the participants, 17% reported tinnitus, 16% had a hearing handicap (WHO-definition), 3% anxiety disorder, 14% burn-out symptoms, 4% depression, and 8% reported work-related stress. CONCLUSIONS: Tinnitus is expected to represent a heterogeneous group of underlying disorders. We aim at contributing to a better...

  4. Factors linking childhood experiences to adult romantic relationships among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Leslie Gordon; Simons, Ronald L; Landor, Antoinette M; Bryant, Chalandra M; Beach, Steven R H

    2014-06-01

    It is well known that a high-quality relationship with a romantic partner is related to a variety of positive outcomes associated with health and well-being. Establishing such relationships is an important developmental task for young adults, and past research indicates that there is a link between experiences in the family of origin and the success of later intimate relationships. It has been suggested that this association can be explained by the acquisition of social competencies (e.g., emotions, schemas, traits) that are acquired during childhood in the family of origin and, in turn, influence interaction with adult romantic partners. The current study builds on this foundation by identifying particular competencies expected to explain the association between childhood exposure to supportive and harsh parenting and later patterns of interaction with romantic partners. Specifically, we examine anger management, attachment style, hostile attribution bias, and self-control as potential mediators using prospective, longitudinal data from a sample of 345 African American young adults. Results from structural equation modeling indicate that each of the mediators in our study accounts for a significant portion of the effect of parenting on the quality of adult romantic relationships, although the constructs linking parenting to warm interactions with romantic partners are somewhat different from those that link parenting to hostile interactions with romantic partners. Even after accounting for the effect of the mediators, there is still a direct effect of parenting on both warm/loving and hostile/aggressive interactions with romantic partner. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

  5. Linking English-Language Test Scores onto the Common European Framework of Reference: An Application of Standard-Setting Methodology. TOEFL iBT Research Report TOEFL iBt-06. ETS RR-08-34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Richard J.; Wylie, E. Caroline

    2008-01-01

    The Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) describes language proficiency in reading, writing, speaking, and listening on a 6-level scale. In this study, English-language experts from across Europe linked CEFR levels to scores on three tests: the TOEFL® iBT test, the TOEIC® assessment, and the TOEIC "Bridge"™ test.…

  6. The F-box protein Ppa is a common regulator of core EMT factors Twist, Snail, Slug, and Sip1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lander, Rachel; Nordin, Kara; LaBonne, Carole

    2011-07-11

    A small group of core transcription factors, including Twist, Snail, Slug, and Sip1, control epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMTs) during both embryonic development and tumor metastasis. However, little is known about how these factors are coordinately regulated to mediate the requisite behavioral and fate changes. It was recently shown that a key mechanism for regulating Snail proteins is by modulating their stability. In this paper, we report that the stability of Twist is also regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We found that the same E3 ubiquitin ligase known to regulate Snail family proteins, Partner of paired (Ppa), also controlled Twist stability and did so in a manner dependent on the Twist WR-rich domain. Surprisingly, Ppa could also target the third core EMT regulatory factor Sip1 for proteasomal degradation. Together, these results indicate that despite the structural diversity of the core transcriptional regulatory factors implicated in EMT, a common mechanism has evolved for controlling their stability and therefore their function.

  7. A Teaching and Learning Model: A World Sociology Evidenced by Linking Common Social and Societal Realities through the Reciprocity of Thinking and Feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie S. Schiering

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is designed to assist in the comprehension of learners' being multi-faceted persons who are unique. Discovering the whole individual is incumbent upon realizing the teaching/learning environments. This is respective of academic and socio-societal factors, which establish who one is as a learner and teacher. The author proposes and explains the concept of each individual being one who thinks and feels simultaneously with reciprocity existing within and between these two skills —so strongly that it is often difficult to separate one from the other. It's proposed that each of us experiences an interconnectedness and, in many cases, an interdependency with respect to the commonality of social and societal realities within academic and other environments. These interconnections form a world sociology, which is realized by our thinking and feelings. Cross culturally, each one of us being exposed to a mutuality of needs is based in part upon belief and value systems. As one's education evolves, each becomes his/her experiential past with respect to thinking, feeling, actions taken or inactivity's that result in behaviors which define one as an individual learner and teacher. The overall purpose of this paper is to empower the thinker, the learner and the teacher by presenting "Teaching and Learning: A Model for Academic and Social Cognition" (Schiering, Bogner, Buli-Holmberg, 2011. This presents a comprehensive theoretical framework of academic and social cognition, as a basis for effective learning and teaching with implications for practice, as the author maintains that the purpose of theory is to guide practice.

  8. A Teaching and Learning Model: A World Sociology Evidenced by Linking Common Social and Societal Realities through the Reciprocity of Thinking and Feelings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie S. Schiering

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is designed to assist in the comprehension of learners' being multi-faceted persons who are unique. Discovering the whole individual is incumbent upon realizing the teaching/learning environments. This is respective of academic and socio-societal factors, which establish who one is as a learner and teacher. The author proposes and explains the concept of each individual being one who thinks and feels simultaneously with reciprocity existing within and between these two skills —so strongly that it is often difficult to separate one from the other. It's proposed that each of us experiences an interconnectedness and, in many cases, an interdependency with respect to the commonality of social and societal realities within academic and other environments. These interconnections form a world sociology, which is realized by our thinking and feelings. Cross culturally, each one of us being exposed to a mutuality of needs is based in part upon belief and value systems. As one's education evolves, each becomes his/her experiential past with respect to thinking, feeling, actions taken or inactivity's that result in behaviors which define one as an individual learner and teacher. The overall purpose of this paper is to empower the thinker, the learner and the teacher by presenting "Teaching and Learning: A Model for Academic and Social Cognition" (Schiering, Bogner, Buli-Holmberg, 2011. This presents a comprehensive theoretical framework of academic and social cognition, as a basis for effective learning and teaching with implications for practice, as the author maintains that the purpose of theory is to guide practice.

  9. Evaluating factors affecting amphibian mortality on roads: the case of the Common Toad Bufo bufo, near a breeding place

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos, X.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The Common Toad Bufo bufo is the amphibian with the highest rates of road mortality in many European countries. This elevated incidence of road kills has frequently been associated with migration to breeding sites. In this study, we analysed the mortality of the Common Toad in the road network in Catalonia (NE Spain, and investigated the related causative factors on four roads near a breeding site in the Pyrenees. Results suggest that the high mortality rate is due to a combination of factors: toad abundance, traffic density and quality of water bodies for breeding. On the road with the highest incidence of road kills we investigated whether deaths occurred at specific spots or in a random manner. The road was divided into 500 m sections and each section was classified according to biotic (type of vegetation and abiotic (presence of streams, roadside topography variables. Multiple correspondence analysis showed that sections with streams crossing under the road had the highest mortality rate, suggesting that such water bodies flowing into the breeding pond are the toads’ main migratory pathways for hibernation and breeding. As toads use the same migratory routes each year, it is critical to identify areas with a high potential mortality so that efficient measures can be designed to increase wildlife permeability, and thereby reduce habitat fragmentation. This methodology could be applied in other areas with high amphibian mortality.

  10. Multi-group covariance and mean structure modeling of the relationship between the WAIS-III common factors and sex and educational attainment in Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolan, C.V.; Colom, R.; Abad, F.J.; Wicherts, J.M.; Hessen, D.J.; van de Sluis, S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated sex effects and the effects of educational attainment (EA) on the covariance structure of the WAIS-III in a subsample of the Spanish standardization data. We fitted both first order common factor models and second order common factor models. The latter include general intelligence (g

  11. Recurrent X chromosome-linked deletions: discovery of new genetic factors in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giacco, D; Chianese, C; Ars, E; Ruiz-Castañé, E; Forti, G; Krausz, C

    2014-05-01

    The role of X-linked genes and copy-number variations (CNVs) in male infertility remains poorly explored. Our previous array-CGH analyses showed three recurrent deletions in Xq exclusively (CNV67) and prevalently (CNV64, CNV69) found in patients. Molecular and clinical characterisation of these CNVs was performed in this study. 627 idiopathic infertile patients and 628 controls were tested for each deletion with PCR+/-. We used PCR+/- to map deletion junctions and long-range PCR and direct sequencing to define breakpoints. CNV64 was found in 5.7% of patients and in 3.1% of controls (p=0.013; OR=1.89; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.3) and CNV69 was found in 3.5% of patients and 1.6% of controls (p=0.023; OR=2.204; 95% CI 1.05 to 4.62). For CNV69 we identified two breakpoints, types A and B, with the latter being significantly more frequent in patients than controls (p=0.011; OR=9.19; 95% CI 1.16 to 72.8). CNV67 was detected exclusively in patients (1.1%) and was maternally transmitted. The semen phenotype of one carrier (11-041) versus his normozoospermic non-carrier brother strongly indicates a pathogenic effect of the deletion on spermatogenesis. MAGEA9, an ampliconic gene reported as independently acquired on the human X chromosome with exclusive physiological expression in the testis, is likely to be involved in CNV67. We provide the first evidence for X chromosome-linked recurrent deletions associated with spermatogenic impairment. CNV67, specific to spermatogenic anomaly and with a frequency of 1.1% in oligo/azoospermic men, resembles the AZF regions on the Y chromosome with potential clinical implications.

  12. Wat werkt er en hoe? Het common factors model als basis voor de hulpverlening in het sociaal werk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjef de Vries

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available What works and how?  The common factors model as a basis for psychosocial support in social workPsychosocial support in social work in the Netherlands is generalistic, eclectic and integral. Research into the active components therein is scarce. One of the reasons is that the medical model, a meta-model that explains what works in therapy, counseling and support, dominates. The core of the medical model is that specific methods and techniques are remedial for specific problems. The conditions for a method to be effective are: a diagnosis of a specific problem, a psychological explanation of that problem, a theory of change, and the application of (evidence-based specific techniques. The generalistic, eclectic way of working in social work does not fit in with the medical model. The medical model-explanation of what works is strongly present in the development of methods in social work. For example, the 130 methods in the Database Effective Social Interventions (Movisie are all described along the lines of the medical model. A consequence of the medical model is the ever growing development of specific treatments for new or more specific diagnoses. As a result, social work support threatens to become increasingly specific. A second consequence is that the view on the special qualities and active components of social work support remains underexposed and, therefore, not well understood and studied. That makes improvement difficult. Furthermore, both the perspective and the goal of social work do not correspond with the medical model. An essential aspect of social work is the contextual vision: how problems and solutions are embedded in the social environment and daily life of people. The integral support of people in and with their social context is the concretization thereof. The medical model on the other hand decontextualizes people, it often translates life problems into psychological problems that can be "repaired", isolated from the

  13. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Tretyakov

    Full Text Available Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  14. G = MAT: Linking Transcription Factor Expression and DNA Binding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/. PMID:21297945

  15. G =  MAT: linking transcription factor expression and DNA binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tretyakov, Konstantin; Laur, Sven; Vilo, Jaak

    2011-01-31

    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to motifs on the DNA and thus affect gene expression regulation. The qualitative description of the corresponding processes is therefore important for a better understanding of essential biological mechanisms. However, wet lab experiments targeted at the discovery of the regulatory interplay between transcription factors and binding sites are expensive. We propose a new, purely computational method for finding putative associations between transcription factors and motifs. This method is based on a linear model that combines sequence information with expression data. We present various methods for model parameter estimation and show, via experiments on simulated data, that these methods are reliable. Finally, we examine the performance of this model on biological data and conclude that it can indeed be used to discover meaningful associations. The developed software is available as a web tool and Scilab source code at http://biit.cs.ut.ee/gmat/.

  16. Job stress strengthens the link between metabolic risk factors and renal dysfunction in adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurugano, Shinobu; Nakao, Mutsuhiro; Takeuchi, Takeaki; Nomura, Kyoko; Yano, Eiji

    2012-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. The metabolic risk factors obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia are closely associated with renal dysfunction. As psychosocial stress affects these risk factors, here, we examined relationships between metabolic risk factors and renal function, and their association with job stress. The participants were 1,231 Japanese male office workers attending annual health examinations. The estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was determined using the equation recommended by the Japanese Society for Nephrology: eGFR (mL/min/1.73 m(2)) = 194 × age(-0.287) × Cr(-1.094). Job stress was measured using the Job Content Questionnaire based on the job demand-control model. The job strain index equaled the job demand scores divided by the job control scores. The participants were classified into four ordinal groups of job strain index, based on previous studies (i.e., ≤ 0.4 the lowest, 0.4-0.5 lower, 0.5-0.6 higher, or ≥ 0.6 the highest). A significant correlation was found between lowered eGFR and each of the metabolic risk factors waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol (p job stress had an interactive effect on the relationships between eGFR and systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and triglycerides, depending on the job strain index (highest vs. lowest) (p < 0.05). The highly stressed workers exhibited a close association of eGFR with metabolic risk factors like hypertension and dyslipidemia. Therefore, intensive management may be important for preventing the progression of renal dysfunction and cardiovascular complications in those experiencing stress.

  17. Copy number variation of functional RBMY1 is associated with sperm motility: an azoospermia factor-linked candidate for asthenozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanlong; Yang, Xiling; Liu, Yunqiang; Shen, Ying; Tu, Wenling; Dong, Qiang; Yang, Dong; Ma, Yongyi; Yang, Yuan

    2017-05-12

    population. A difference in the distribution of RBMY1 copy number was observed between the group with normal sperm motility and the group with asthenozoospermia. A positive correlation between the RBMY1 copy dosage and sperm motility was identified, and the males with fewer than six copies of RBMY1 showed an elevated risk for asthenozoospermia relative to those with six RBMY1 copies, the most common dosage in the population. The RBMY1 copy dosage was positively correlated with its mRNA and protein level in the testis. Sperm with high motility were found to carry more RBMY1 protein than those with relatively low motility. The RBMY1 protein was confirmed to predominantly localize in the neck and mid-piece region of sperm as well as the principal piece of the sperm tail. Our population study completes a chain of evidence suggesting that RBMY1 influences the susceptibility of males to asthenozoospermia by modulating sperm motility. High sequence similarity between the RBMY1 functional copies and a large number of pseudogenes potentially reduces the accuracy of the copy number detection. The mechanism underlying the CNV in RBMY1 is still unclear, and the effect of the structural variations in the RBMY1 copy cluster on the copy dosage of other protein-coding genes located in the region cannot be excluded, which may potentially bias our observations. Asthenozoospermia is a multi-factor complex disease with a limited number of proven susceptibility genes. This study identified a novel genomic candidate independently contributing to the condition, enriching our understanding of the role of AZF-linked genes in male reproduction. Our finding provides insight into the physiological and pathological characteristics of RBMY1 in terms of sperm motility, supplies persuasive evidence of the significance of RBMY1 copy number analysis in the clinical counselling of male infertility resulting from asthenozoospermia. This work was funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos

  18. Linking Socioeconomic Status to Social Cognitive Career Theory Factors: A Partial Least Squares Path Modeling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jie-Tsuen; Hsieh, Hui-Hsien

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the contributions of socioeconomic status (SES) in predicting social cognitive career theory (SCCT) factors. Data were collected from 738 college students in Taiwan. The results of the partial least squares (PLS) analyses indicated that SES significantly predicted career decision self-efficacy (CDSE);…

  19. Coagulation factor Xa signaling : the link between coagulation and inflammatory bowel disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P.; Spek, C. Arnold

    2009-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by activation of the coagulation cascade and it has long been suspected that coagulation is an essential component of this still largely idiopathic group of diseases. The realization that coagulation factors are not only passive mediators in the prop

  20. Risk Factors Linking Maternal Depressed Mood to Growth in Adolescent Substance Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Rebecca C.; Fleming, Charles B.; Mason, W. Alex; Catalano, Richard F.

    2009-01-01

    Maternal depression has been implicated in the development of adolescent substance use. Conceptualizing depression as a continuum, the aims of this study are to (a) understand the relationship between maternal depressed mood and risk factors associated with adolescent substance use; (b) understand the relationship between maternal depressed mood…

  1. Perceived Best Friend Delinquency Moderates the Link between Contextual Risk Factors and Juvenile Delinquency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fite, Paula; Preddy, Teresa; Vitulano, Michael; Elkins, Sara; Grassetti, Stevie; Wimsatt, Amber

    2012-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of contextual risk factors (i.e., negative life events and neighborhood problems) and perceived best friend delinquency on child self-reported delinquency. More specifically, the present study extended the literature by evaluating whether best friend delinquency moderated the effects of contextual risk…

  2. Implementation of success factors in new product development: The missing link

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne; Harmsen, Hanne

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses companies' lack of implementation of success factors in new product development. Drawing on theory in the competence perspective and an exploratory empirical study, the paper points to two major areas that have not been covered by previous studies on new product development...

  3. Common Factors and Prevention of Postpartum Hemorrhage%产后出血的常见因素及防治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景娟

    2015-01-01

    目的:分析产后出血常见因素与防治措施。方法选取产后出血患者64例,回顾性分析其临床资料,探讨产后出血因素。结果64例患者产后出血原因为子宫收缩乏力51例,软产道裂伤4例,凝血功能障碍2例,胎盘因素7例。结论子宫收缩乏力是产后出血的主要原因,在临床中应重视产后出血预防,做到及早发现、及时干预,保证产妇生命安全。%Objective To analyze the common factors and prevention measures of postpartum hemorrhage. Methods 64 cases of postpartum hemorrhage were selected, the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed, and the factors of postpartum hemorrhage were discussed. Results 64 cases of patients with postpartum hemorrhage causes uterine atony in 51 cases, 4 cases of soft birth canal laceration, coagulation dysfunction in 2 cases, placental factors in 7 cases. Conclusion Uterine contraction fatigue is the main reason for postpartum hemorrhage, should pay attention to postpartum hemorrhage prevention, so early detection, timely intervention, maternal life safety.

  4. Nod Factor-Independent Nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia Required the Common Plant-Microbe Symbiotic Toolkit1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Sandrine; Gully, Djamel; Poitout, Arthur; Patrel, Delphine; Arrighi, Jean-François; Cartieaux, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen fixation in the legume-rhizobium symbiosis is a crucial area of research for more sustainable agriculture. Our knowledge of the plant cascade in response to the perception of bacterial Nod factors has increased in recent years. However, the discovery that Nod factors are not involved in the Aeschynomene-Bradyrhizobium spp. interaction suggests that alternative molecular dialogues may exist in the legume family. We evaluated the conservation of the signaling pathway common to other endosymbioses using three candidate genes: Ca2+/Calmodulin-Dependent Kinase (CCaMK), which plays a central role in cross signaling between nodule organogenesis and infection processes; and Symbiosis Receptor Kinase (SYMRK) and Histidine Kinase1 (HK1), which act upstream and downstream of CCaMK, respectively. We showed that CCaMK, SYMRK, and HK1 are required for efficient nodulation in Aeschynomene evenia. Our results demonstrate that CCaMK and SYMRK are recruited in Nod factor-independent symbiosis and, hence, may be conserved in all vascular plant endosymbioses described so far. PMID:26446590

  5. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauters, Marijke; Frints, Suzanna G; Van Esch, Hilde; Spruijt, Liesbeth; Baldewijns, Marcella M; de Die-Smulders, Christine E M; Fryns, Jean-Pierre; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2014-08-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from 138.7 to 139.8 Mb, harboring only two annotated genes, SOX3 and ATP11C, and was shown to be a direct tandem copy number gain. Unexpectedly, the microduplication did not fully segregate with the disease in this family suggesting that SOX3 duplications have variable penetrance for X-linked hypopituitarism. In the same family, a female fetus presenting with a neural tube defect was also shown to carry the SOX3 copy number gain. Since we also demonstrated increased SOX3 mRNA levels in amnion cells derived from an unrelated t(X;22)(q27;q11) female fetus with spina bifida, we propose that increased levels of SOX3 could be a risk factor for neural tube defects.

  6. Microbial Hub Taxa Link Host and Abiotic Factors to Plant Microbiome Variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew T Agler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant-associated microorganisms have been shown to critically affect host physiology and performance, suggesting that evolution and ecology of plants and animals can only be understood in a holobiont (host and its associated organisms context. Host-associated microbial community structures are affected by abiotic and host factors, and increased attention is given to the role of the microbiome in interactions such as pathogen inhibition. However, little is known about how these factors act on the microbial community, and especially what role microbe-microbe interaction dynamics play. We have begun to address this knowledge gap for phyllosphere microbiomes of plants by simultaneously studying three major groups of Arabidopsis thaliana symbionts (bacteria, fungi and oomycetes using a systems biology approach. We evaluated multiple potential factors of microbial community control: we sampled various wild A. thaliana populations at different times, performed field plantings with different host genotypes, and implemented successive host colonization experiments under lab conditions where abiotic factors, host genotype, and pathogen colonization was manipulated. Our results indicate that both abiotic factors and host genotype interact to affect plant colonization by all three groups of microbes. Considering microbe-microbe interactions, however, uncovered a network of interkingdom interactions with significant contributions to community structure. As in other scale-free networks, a small number of taxa, which we call microbial "hubs," are strongly interconnected and have a severe effect on communities. By documenting these microbe-microbe interactions, we uncover an important mechanism explaining how abiotic factors and host genotypic signatures control microbial communities. In short, they act directly on "hub" microbes, which, via microbe-microbe interactions, transmit the effects to the microbial community. We analyzed two "hub" microbes (the

  7. Potential links between the emerging risk factors for food allergy and vitamin D status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillermin, P J; Ponsonby, A-L; Kemp, A S; Allen, K J

    2013-06-01

    A variety of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the recently described increase in food allergy among children living in developed countries. In this study, we summarize the emerging risk factors for IgE-mediated food allergy in early life, and then review the evidence for and against an association between low vitamin status (VDS) and food allergy. We consider whether each of the epidemiological variables that have been associated with food allergy may also be associated with VDS; and argue that future studies must adequately account for the potential relationships between risk factors for food allergy and VDS, and must also discriminate between vitamin D derived by sun exposure, diet and oral supplementation. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Student, Home, and School Socio-Demographic Factors: Links to School, Home, and Community Arts Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Marianne; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Sudmalis, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the role of student (e.g., age, language background, gender), home (e.g., parent/caregiver education), and school (e.g., school type, size) socio-demographic factors in students' school (e.g., in-school arts tuition, arts engagement), home (e.g., parent/caregiver-child arts interaction), and community (e.g., arts attendance,…

  9. A Framework For Linking Process Factors To Organisational Performance In A Government Department

    OpenAIRE

    Chengedzai Mafini; David Rabolane Isaac Pooe

    2014-01-01

    Organisational performance in the public sector in South Africa remains an issue of concern, due to the fact that most government departments continue to perform below the expected standard. This presented an impetus to conduct research on organisational performance in the sector on a continuous basis, in order to find current solutions. In this study, the relationship between organisational performance and four organisational process factors; namely, organisational structure, change, teamwor...

  10. Student, Home, and School Socio-Demographic Factors: Links to School, Home, and Community Arts Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Marianne; Martin, Andrew J.; Anderson, Michael; Gibson, Robyn; Liem, Gregory Arief D.; Sudmalis, David

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the role of student (e.g., age, language background, gender), home (e.g., parent/caregiver education), and school (e.g., school type, size) socio-demographic factors in students' school (e.g., in-school arts tuition, arts engagement), home (e.g., parent/caregiver-child arts interaction), and community (e.g., arts attendance,…

  11. Inflammation and cancer: macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF)--the potential missing link.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Conroy, H

    2010-11-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was the original cytokine, described almost 50 years ago and has since been revealed to be an important player in pro-inflammatory diseases. Recent work using MIF mouse models has revealed new roles for MIF. In this review, we present an increasing body of evidence implicating the key pro-inflammatory cytokine MIF in specific biological activities related directly to cancer growth or contributing towards a microenvironment favouring cancer progression.

  12. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient.

  13. Can family risk-factors moderate the link between psychopathy and life-history strategy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Međedović Janko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Life History Theory is an explanatory evolutionary framework which explains differences in fitness-relevant outcomes using the characteristics of the environment and individual organisms. Basically, individuals can be positioned somewhere on the r/K continuum of the Life History Strategy (LHS: a K or slow strategy represents later maturity and reproduction, a smaller number of offspring with higher investment in them, while the r (or fast strategy follows the opposite pattern. Previous research offered evidence that psychopathy can represent a trait associated with fast LHS. In the present research we examined the relations between the family risk-factors, a four-factor model of psychopathy and the LHS in a sample of male convicts (N=181. The results have shown that a manipulative and deceitful interpersonal style is associated with slow LHS while shallow affect and antisocial tendencies are related to fast LHS. The interactions between psychopathy and family risk-factors revealed that parental criminal behaviour enhances the relation between fast LHS and psychopathic traits, including the manipulative interpersonal style. The findings are in accordance with the Life History Theory and provide a deeper understanding of the preservation of psychopathy in contemporary populations.

  14. Mechanical Link between Cohesion Establishment and DNA Replication: Ctf7p/Eco1p, a Cohesion Establishment Factor, Associates with Three Different Replication Factor C Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Kenna, Margaret A.; Skibbens, Robert V.

    2003-01-01

    CTF7/ECO1 is an essential yeast gene required for the establishment of sister chromatid cohesion. The findings that CTF7/ECO1, POL30 (PCNA), and CHL12/CTF18 (a replication factor C [RFC] homolog) genetically interact provided the first evidence that the processes of cohesion establishment and DNA replication are intimately coupled—a link now confirmed by other studies. To date, however, it is unknown how Ctf7p/Eco1p function is coupled to DNA replication or whether Ctf7p/Eco1p physically asso...

  15. Prevalence and associated factors of common mental disorders among Ethiopian migrant returnees from the Middle East and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habtamu, Kassahun; Minaye, Abebaw; Zeleke, Waganesh A

    2017-04-19

    Ethiopian migrants to the Middle East and South Africa experience a range of problems at various stages of their migration including overwork, sleep deprivation, denial of food, emotional abuse, difficulty adapting to the host culture, salary denial, sexual abuse, labor exploitation, confiscation of their travel documents, confinement, denial of medication, lack of access to legal service and degrading attitude by employers, traffickers and smugglers. These experiences can be associated with different types of mental disorders. This study sought to determine the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD) and socio-demographic and other migration related associated factors among Ethiopian migrant returnees from the Middle East and South Africa. A cross-sectional study was conducted using non-probability (i.e. purposive, availability and snowball) sampling techniques. Migrant returnees (n = 1036) were contacted individually at their homes in eight high prevalent immigrant returnee locations in Ethiopia. Common mental disorders were assessed using the self-reporting questionnaire (SRQ-20) and a structured questionnaire was employed to collect data on socio-demographic and migration related characteristics. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, univariate logistic regression, and multivariable logistic regression. The prevalence of CMD among migrant returnees was found to be 27.6%. Highly prevalent specific CMD symptoms included headaches, poor appetite, being tired, sleeping problems, and feeling unhappy or nervous. Being originally from Amhara and Oromia regions, being Christian, being divorced, not receiving salary on time, not being able to contact family, unable to prepare for domestic labor abroad, lack of cross- cultural awareness, and lack of knowledge and skills for work were all important risk factors for CMD. Migrants experienced adversities at different stages of their migration which are associated with psychological distress and even to long

  16. Analysis of the impact of economic growth factors to resources and environment in Jiangsu Province – Based on Commoner model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Min

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to response to the increasingly polluted environment, maintain sustainable economic and social development in Jiangsu province, the author calculated the index of the resource environment in Jiangsu, using LMDI(logarithmic-mean Divisia index decomposition method based on the Commoner model(we can see from formula(2,(5,(6&(7, to reflect the three major influencing factors of cumulative effects. In table 2 and figure 3, the research results show the expansion of the size of economy and growth of population make resources consumption increase and environmental pollution aggravate, while technological progress reduce the pressure of resources and environment. According to the findings, the paper proposes the policy recommendations, such as develop circular economy, promote technological innovation and strengthen regional cooperation mechanism and so on to reduce the environmental pollution while economic developing. These will be useful to the policymakers.

  17. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) modulates wound healing through regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano, Isabel; Diez-Marques, Maria L.; Rodriguez-Puyol, Manuel [Department of Physiology, University of Alcala, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain); Herrero-Fresneda, Inmaculada [Nephrology Unit, IDIBELL, Hospital de Bellvitge, Barcelona (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Garcia del Moral, Raimundo [Department of Pathology, University of Granada (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Dedhar, Shoukat [Department of Integrative Oncology, BC Cancer Research Center, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Ruiz-Torres, Maria P., E-mail: mpiedad.ruiz@uah.es [Department of Physiology, University of Alcala, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain); Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego [Nephrology Unit, Hospital Universitario Principe de Asturias, Alcala de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Red de Investigacion Renal Cooperativa (RedinRen) (Spain); Instituto Reina Sofia de Investigacion Nefrologica (Spain)

    2012-11-15

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an intracellular effector of cell-matrix interactions and regulates many cellular processes, including growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation, migration, invasion and angiogenesis. The present work analyzes the role of ILK in wound healing in adult animals using a conditional knock-out of the ILK gene generated with the tamoxifen-inducible Cre-lox system (CRE-LOX mice). Results show that ILK deficiency leads to retarded wound closure in skin. Intracellular mechanisms involved in this process were analyzed in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) isolated from CRE-LOX mice and revealed that wounding promotes rapid activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ILK. Knockdown of ILK resulted in a retarded wound closure due to a decrease in cellular proliferation and loss of HGF protein expression during the healing process, in vitro and in vivo. Alterations in cell proliferation and wound closure in ILK-deficient MEF or mice could be rescued by exogenous administration of human HGF. These data demonstrate, for the first time, that the activation of PI3K and ILK after skin wounding are critical for HGF-dependent tissue repair and wound healing. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK deletion results in decreased HGF expression and delayed scratch wound repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PI3K/ILK/AKT pathway signals through HGF to regulate wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An ILK-dependent increase in HGF expression is responsible for wound healing in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ILK-KO mice are used to confirm the requirement for ILK function in wound healing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human HGF treatment restores delayed wound closure in vitro and in vivo.

  18. A systematic review of factors linked to poor academic performance of disadvantaged students in science and maths in schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Amitava Banerjee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Socio-economic hardships put children in an underprivileged position. This systematic review was conducted to identify factors linked to underachievement of disadvantaged pupils in school science and maths. What could be done as evidence-based practice to make the lives of these young people better? The protocol from preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA was followed. Major electronic educational databases were searched. Papers meeting pre-defined selection criteria were identified. Studies included were mainly large-scale evaluations with a clearly defined comparator group and robust research design. All studies used a measure of disadvantage such as lower SES, language barrier, ethnic minority or temporary immigrant status and an outcome measure like attainment in standardised national tests. A majority of papers capable of answering the research question were correlational studies. The review reports findings from 771 studies published from 2005 to 2014 in English language. Thirty-four studies were synthesised. Results suggest major factors linking deprivation to underachievement can be thematically categorised into a lack of positive environment and support. Recommendations from the research reports are discussed.

  19. Periorbital hyperpigmentation: A study of its prevalence, common causative factors and its association with personal habits and other disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik B Sheth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Periorbital hyperpigmentation (POH is one of the most commonly encountered conditions in routine dermatology practice. There are only few published studies about its prevalence, classification, and pathogenesis but none showing its association with habits, and other medical conditions in Indian patients. Aims: To determine prevalence and type of POH, common causative factors, and its association with personal habits and other disorders within various age and sex groups. Materials and Methods: Two hundred patients attending the dermatology OPD were included in study and were subjected to detailed history, careful clinical and Wood′s lamp examination, eyelid stretch test and laboratory investigations. Clinical photographs of all patients were taken. Results: POH was most prevalent in 16-25 years age group (47.50% and in females (81% of which majority were housewives (45.50%. Commonest form of POH was constitutional (51.50% followed by post inflammatory (22.50%. Lower eyelids were involved in 72.50%. Grade 2 POH was seen in 58%. Wood′s lamp examination showed POH to be dermal in 60.50%. Faulty habits were observed viz. lack of adequate sleep (40%, frequent cosmetic use (36.50%, frequent eye rubbing (32.50%, and lack of correction for errors of refraction like myopia in 12% patients. Strong association of POH with stress (71%, atopy (33% and family history (63% was noted. Conclusions: Periorbital hyperpigmentation is a multi-factorial entity. It is absolutely essential to classify the type of POH and determine underlying causative factors in order to direct appropriate measures for better and successful outcome in future.

  20. Commonly studied polymorphisms in inflammatory cytokine genes show only minor effects on mortality and related risk factors in nonagenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dato, Serena; Krabbe, Karen S; Thinggaard, Mikael; Pedersen, Bente K; Christensen, Kaare; Bruunsgaard, Helle; Christiansen, Lene

    2010-03-01

    Systemic low-grade inflammation is consistently associated with functional status, cognitive functioning, multimorbidity, and survival in oldest olds. If inflammation is either a cause or a consequence of age-related pathology, genetic determinants of late-life survival can reside in cytokine genes polymorphisms, regulating inflammatory responses. The aim of this study was to test associations between commonly studied polymorphisms in interleukin (IL)6, IL10, IL15, and IL18, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha genes and late-life survival in a longitudinal cohort of nonagenarians: the Danish 1905 cohort. Additionally, associations were investigated between inflammatory markers and major predictors of mortality as cognitive and functional status. Modest sex-specific associations were found with survival, cognitive functioning, and handgrip strength. Evaluation of combined genotypes indicated that, in nonagenarian men, the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory activity at IL18 and IL10 loci is protective against cognitive decline. In conclusion, in this large study with virtually complete follow-up, commonly studied polymorphisms in cytokine genes do not have a major impact on late-life survival or associated risk phenotypes.

  1. Association of A Common Haplotype of Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 1α With Type 2 Diabetes in Chinese Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CONG-RONG WANG; CHENG HU; RONG ZHANG; QI-CHEN FANG; XIAO-JING MA; WEI-PING JIA; KUN-SAN XIANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To analyze the association of variants of hepatocyte nuclear factor-1α (HNF-1α) gene with type 2 diabetes in Chinese population. Methods In 152 unrelated type 2 diabetes patients and 93 unrelated controls, eleven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified and genotyped. Statistical analyses were performed to investigate whether these SNPs were associated with diabetes status in our samples. Results In the individual SNP study, no SNP differed significantly in frequency between type 2 diabetes patients and controls. In the haplotype analysis, two haplotype blocks were identified. In haplotype block 1, no evidence was found between common HNF-1α haplotypes and type 2 diabetes. However, in haplotype block 2, a common haplotype GCGC formed by four tagging SNPs (tSNPs) was found to be associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 0.6011, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.4138-0.8732,P=0.0073, empirical P=0.0511, permutation test). A similar trend was also observed in the diplotype analysis, indicating that the increasing copy number of the haplotype GCGC was associated with the decreased frequency of diabetes (P=0.0193). Conclusion The results of this study provide evidence that the haplotype of HNF-1α decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes in Chinese individuals.

  2. Prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jung Min; Ha, Beomman; Lee, Hongsun; Park, Chang Keun; Kim, Hyun Joon; Park, Young Min

    2012-10-01

    This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of common skin diseases and their associated factors among military personnel in Korea. Four dermatologists visited adjacent military units and examined soldiers. A structured questionnaire that included questions about known skin diseases, demographic information, and questions for the Perceived Stress Index was completed for each participant. The soldiers that had been diagnosed with a skin disease answered one additional questionnaire (Skindex-29) which assess the influence of an individual's skin disease on daily life. Of 1,321 soldiers examined, 798 (60.4%) had one or more skin diseases. The three most common skin problems were acne (35.6%), tinea pedis (15.2%) and atopic dermatitis (5.1%). The diseases closely related to the period of military service were acne, tinea pedis, viral warts and corns. The diseases related to the amount of stress were atopic dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and acne. The most troublesome skin diseases were atopic dermatitis, tinea cruris, and seborrheic dermatitis. These results demonstrated that the prevalence of skin disease among military personnel in Korea is very high, and that some of the skin disorders may have a significant influence on their daily lives.

  3. Effects of wetland vs. landscape variables on parasite communities of Rana pipiens: links to anthropogenic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schotthoefer, Anna M.; Rohr, Jason R.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Koehler, Anson V.; Johnson, Catherine M.; Johnson, Lucinda B.; Beasley, Val R.

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of several diseases affecting amphibian populations worldwide has prompted investigations into determinants of the occurrence and abundance of parasites in frogs. To understand the spatial scales and identify specific environmental factors that determine risks of parasitism in frogs, helminth communities in metamorphic frogs of the northern leopard frog (Rana pipiens) were examined in relation to wetland and landscape factors at local (1 km) and regional (10 km) spatial extents in an agricultural region of Minnesota (USA) using regression analyses, ordination, and variance partitioning techniques. Greater amounts of forested and woody wetland habitats, shorter distances between woody wetlands, and smaller-sized open water patches in surrounding landscapes were the most consistently positive correlates with the abundances, richness, and diversity of helminths found in the frogs. Wetland and local landscape variables were suggested as most important for larval trematode abundances, whereas local and regional landscape variables appeared most important for adult helminths. As previously reported, the sum concentration of atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine, was the strongest predictor of larval trematode communities. In this report, we highlight the additional influences of landscape factors. In particular, our data suggest that anthropogenic activities that have resulted in the loss of the availability and connectivity of suitable habitats in the surrounding landscapes of wetlands are associated with declines in helminth richness and abundance, but that alteration of wetland water quality through eutrophication or pesticide contamination may facilitate the transmission of certain parasite taxa when they are present at wetlands. Although additional research is needed to quantify the negative effects of parasitism on frog populations, efforts to reduce inputs of agrochemicals into wetlands to limit larval trematode infections may be warranted

  4. CE: Original Research: Examining the Links Between Lifestyle Factors and Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Hung; Chen, Miao-Chuan; Chien, Nai-Hui; Wu, Li-Yu

    2016-12-01

    : Background: As it is in many other developed countries, obesity is a growing health concern in Taiwan, affecting nearly 20% of the adult population. Obesity can increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Recent data indicate that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in Taiwan is 25.5%. Yet some overweight and obese individuals have normal metabolic profiles. It's not clear why some overweight or obese people remain metabolically healthy while others do not. The purpose of this study was to examine lifestyle risk factors for metabolic syndrome in people who are overweight or obese. We were particularly interested in distinguishing those lifestyle factors associated with metabolic health in this population. Data collected from community-based physical examinations in northern Taiwan were used for this cross-sectional study. A survey was conducted from 2013 to 2014. We collected data on demographic variables, clinically pertinent measures (weight; height; waist circumference; blood pressure; and levels of fasting blood glucose, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), and lifestyle factors (smoking, drinking, exercise, and dietary habits). To analyze the data, we used percentage, mean, standard deviation, χ test, independent t test, the Fisher exact test, phi correlation, and logistic regression. The overall prevalence of metabolic syndrome among all 734 participants was 36.4%. For the normal weight, overweight, and obese groups, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was 12.4%, 36.4%, and 61.6%, respectively. The results of logistic regression showed, however, that obese individuals who exercised regularly and ate sufficient amounts of fruit were less likely to have metabolic syndrome, and that overweight individuals who were nonsmokers and ate sufficient amounts of vegetables were also less likely to have metabolic syndrome. Lifestyle factors may significantly affect the development of metabolic

  5. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  6. Transcription factor ATF3 links host adaptive response to breast cancer metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolford, Chris C.; McConoughey, Stephen J.; Jalgaonkar, Swati P.; Leon, Marino; Merchant, Anand S.; Dominick, Johnna L.; Yin, Xin; Chang, Yiseok; Zmuda, Erik J.; O’Toole, Sandra A.; Millar, Ewan K.A.; Roller, Stephanie L.; Shapiro, Charles L.; Ostrowski, Michael C.; Sutherland, Robert L.; Hai, Tsonwin

    2013-01-01

    Host response to cancer signals has emerged as a key factor in cancer development; however, the underlying molecular mechanism is not well understood. In this report, we demonstrate that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), a hub of the cellular adaptive response network, plays an important role in host cells to enhance breast cancer metastasis. Immunohistochemical analysis of patient tumor samples revealed that expression of ATF3 in stromal mononuclear cells, but not cancer epithelial cells, is correlated with worse clinical outcomes and is an independent predictor for breast cancer death. This finding was corroborated by data from mouse models showing less efficient breast cancer metastasis in Atf3-deficient mice than in WT mice. Further, mice with myeloid cell–selective KO of Atf3 showed fewer lung metastases, indicating that host ATF3 facilitates metastasis, at least in part, by its function in macrophage/myeloid cells. Gene profiling analyses of macrophages from mouse tumors identified an ATF3-regulated gene signature that could distinguish human tumor stroma from distant stroma and could predict clinical outcomes, lending credence to our mouse models. In conclusion, we identified ATF3 as a regulator in myeloid cells that enhances breast cancer metastasis and has predictive value for clinical outcomes. PMID:23921126

  7. Ecological and genetic factors linked to contrasting genome dynamics in seed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, A R; Leitch, I J

    2012-05-01

    The large-scale replacement of gymnosperms by angiosperms in many ecological niches over time and the huge disparity in species numbers have led scientists to explore factors (e.g. polyploidy, developmental systems, floral evolution) that may have contributed to the astonishing rise of angiosperm diversity. Here, we explore genomic and ecological factors influencing seed plant genomes. This is timely given the recent surge in genomic data. We compare and contrast the genomic structure and evolution of angiosperms and gymnosperms and find that angiosperm genomes are more dynamic and diverse, particularly amongst the herbaceous species. Gymnosperms typically have reduced frequencies of a number of processes (e.g. polyploidy) that have shaped the genomes of other vascular plants and have alternative mechanisms to suppress genome dynamism (e.g. epigenetics and activity of transposable elements). Furthermore, the presence of several characters in angiosperms (e.g. herbaceous habit, short minimum generation time) has enabled them to exploit new niches and to be viable with small population sizes, where the power of genetic drift can outweigh that of selection. Together these processes have led to increased rates of genetic divergence and faster fixation times of variation in many angiosperms compared with gymnosperms.

  8. Structure shows that a glycosaminoglycan and protein recognition site in factor H is perturbed by age-related macular degeneration-linked single nucleotide polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Andrew P; Deakin, Jon A; Schmidt, Christoph Q; Blaum, Bärbel S; Egan, Claire; Ferreira, Viviana P; Pangburn, Michael K; Lyon, Malcolm; Uhrín, Dusan; Barlow, Paul N

    2007-06-29

    A common single nucleotide polymorphism in the factor H gene predisposes to age-related macular degeneration. Factor H blocks the alternative pathway of complement on self-surfaces bearing specific polyanions, including the glycosaminoglycan chains of proteoglycans. Factor H also binds C-reactive protein, potentially contributing to noninflammatory apoptotic processes. The at risk sequence contains His (rather than Tyr) at position 402 (384 in the mature protein), in the seventh of the 20 complement control protein (CCP) modules (CCP7) of factor H. We expressed both His(402) and Tyr(402) variants of CCP7, CCP7,8, and CCP6-8. We determined structures of His(402) and Tyr(402) CCP7 and showed them to be nearly identical. The side chains of His/Tyr(402) have similar, solvent-exposed orientations far from interfaces with CCP6 and -8. Tyr(402) CCP7 bound significantly more tightly than His(402) CCP7 to a heparin affinity column as well as to defined-length sulfated heparin oligosaccharides employed in gel mobility shift assays. This observation is consistent with the position of the 402 side chain on the edge of one of two glycosaminoglycan-binding surface patches on CCP7 that we inferred on the basis of chemical shift perturbation studies with a sulfated heparin tetrasaccharide. According to surface plasmon resonance measurements, Tyr(402) CCP6-8 binds significantly more tightly than His(402) CCP6-8 to immobilized C-reactive protein. The data support a causal link between H402Y and age-related macular degeneration in which variation at position 402 modulates the response of factor H to age-related changes in the glycosaminoglycan composition and apoptotic activity of the macula.

  9. Common mental disorders and related factors in undergraduate and graduate students from three dental schools in Cartagena, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Simancas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considering the growing incidence of mental disorders in young population worldwide, the aim of this research is to estimate the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMD and related factors in dental students from Cartagena, Colombia. Methodology: A cross sectional study will be performed on all undergraduate and graduate students of Dentistry in Cartagena, Colombia. A population of 1.072 students will be completed by taking a census. The measurement of CMD will be made through Goldberg’s 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12 using a self-administered survey about the presence of sociodemographic, personal and academic factors. It will be requested a full list of the participating dental students from each center and codes will be assigned to maintain data confiden-tiality. Once the information is collected, it will be tabulated and analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics through X2, student’s t-test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Additionally, CMD found in the final sample will be described: anxiety and depression, social dysfunction and loss of confidence and self-esteem. The statistical analysis will be done using STATA™ for Windows. Expected outcomes: it aims to study presence and distribution of CMD among dental students and their relationship with other variables of interest. Then, taking that information into account, to suggest possible intervention strategies targeted according to risk type.

  10. Generating induced pluripotent stem cells from common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) fetal liver cells using defined factors, including Lin28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, Ikuo; Maeda, Takuji; Shimada, Hiroko; Kawai, Kenji; Okada, Yohei; Igarashi, Hiroshi; Oiwa, Ryo; Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi; Aoki, Mikio; Kimura, Toru; Shiozawa, Seiji; Shinohara, Haruka; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-09-01

    Although embryonic stem (ES) cell-like induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have potential therapeutic applications in humans, they are also useful for creating genetically modified human disease models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we generated common marmoset iPS cells from fetal liver cells via the retrovirus-mediated introduction of six human transcription factors: Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, Nanog, and Lin28. Four to five weeks after introduction, several colonies resembling marmoset ES cells were observed and picked for further expansion in ES cell medium. Eight cell lines were established, and validation analyses of the marmoset iPS cells followed. We detected the expression of ES cell-specific surface markers. Reverse transcription-PCR showed that these iPS cells expressed endogenous Oct-3/4, Sox2, Klf4, c-Myc, Nanog and Lin28 genes, whereas all of the transgenes were silenced. Karyotype analysis showed that two of three iPS cell lines retained a normal karyotype after a 2-month culture. Both embryoid body and teratoma formation showed that marmoset iPS cells had the developmental potential to give rise to differentiated derivatives of all three primary germ layers. In summary, we generated marmoset iPS cells via the transduction of six transcription factors; this provides a powerful preclinical model for studies in regenerative medicine.

  11. Chronic Periodontitis in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Oxidative Stress as a Common Factor in Periodontal Tissue Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vidya S; Patil, Vijayetha P; Gokhale, Neeraja; Acharya, Anirudh; Kangokar, Praveenchandra

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence of periodontitis is significantly higher among people with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. Majority of tissue destruction in periodontitis is considered to be the result of an aberrant inflammatory/immune response to microbial plaque and involve prolonged release of reactive oxygen species (ROS). There is increased evidence for compromised antioxidant capacity in periodontal tissues and fluids which may be an added factor for tissue damage in periodontitis. To study the possible role of Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant status in blood among chronic periodontitis patients with and without Type 2 Diabetes mellitus. The study comprised of total 100 subjects among which 25 were normal healthy controls, 25 were gingivitis patients, 25 were chronic periodontitis patients (CP) and 25 were having chronic periodontitis with type 2 diabetes (CP with DM). ROS levels were determined as MDA (Malondialdehyde) and antioxidant status as plasma total antioxidant capacity (TAC), vitamin C and erythrocyte Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activity. There was significant increase in MDA levels in all the patient groups compared with healthy controls (pperiodontitis patients with diabetes (r=0.566, p=0.003). There is increased oxidative stress in chronic periodontitis with and without type 2 diabetes indicating a common factor involvement in tissue damage. More severe tissue destruction in periodontitis is associated with excessive ROS generation which is positively correlated in type 2 diabetic subjects.

  12. Periodontitis as a risk factor for systemic disease: Are microparticles the missing link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badran, Zahi; Struillou, Xavier; Verner, Christian; Clee, Thibaud; Rakic, Mia; Martinez, Maria C; Soueidan, Assem

    2015-06-01

    Periodontitis is an oral inflammatory disease affecting the teeth supportive tissue. Its bacterial infectious etiology is well established. Periodontitis has been associated with increased prevalence of systemic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, preeclampsia, preterm birth and inflammatory bowel disease. The rational of considering periodontitis as risk factor for systemic disease is the passage of inflammatory cytokines and/or bacteria in the bloodstream, thus affecting distant organs. Membrane microparticles are released by multiple cells in inflammatory environment. Recent data suggested the role of these microparticles in the pathogenic process of many systemic diseases, that can be also associated to periodontitis. We hypothesized that periodontitis could be a chronic reservoir of microparticles, hence elucidating partially the interaction with systemic diseases initiation or progression.

  13. Mediator MED23 Links Pigmentation and DNA Repair through the Transcription Factor MITF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Xia

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA repair is related to many physiological and pathological processes, including pigmentation. Little is known about the role of the transcriptional cofactor Mediator complex in DNA repair and pigmentation. Here, we demonstrate that Mediator MED23 plays an important role in coupling UV-induced DNA repair to pigmentation. The loss of Med23 specifically impairs the pigmentation process in melanocyte-lineage cells and in zebrafish. Med23 deficiency leads to enhanced nucleotide excision repair (NER and less DNA damage following UV radiation because of the enhanced expression and recruitment of NER factors to chromatin for genomic stability. Integrative analyses of melanoma cells reveal that MED23 controls the expression of a melanocyte master regulator, Mitf, by modulating its distal enhancer activity, leading to opposing effects on pigmentation and DNA repair. Collectively, the Mediator MED23/MITF axis connects DNA repair to pigmentation, thus providing molecular insights into the DNA damage response and skin-related diseases.

  14. Protein interaction network of alternatively spliced isoforms from brain links genetic risk factors for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas, Roser; Yang, Xinping; Lin, Guan Ning; Kang, Shuli; Shen, Yun; Ghamsari, Lila; Broly, Martin; Rodriguez, Maria; Tam, Stanley; Trigg, Shelly A; Fan, Changyu; Yi, Song; Tasan, Murat; Lemmens, Irma; Kuang, Xingyan; Zhao, Nan; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Michaelson, Jacob J; Vacic, Vladimir; Calderwood, Michael A; Roth, Frederick P; Tavernier, Jan; Horvath, Steve; Salehi-Ashtiani, Kourosh; Korkin, Dmitry; Sebat, Jonathan; Hill, David E; Hao, Tong; Vidal, Marc; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2014-04-11

    Increased risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) is attributed to hundreds of genetic loci. The convergence of ASD variants have been investigated using various approaches, including protein interactions extracted from the published literature. However, these datasets are frequently incomplete, carry biases and are limited to interactions of a single splicing isoform, which may not be expressed in the disease-relevant tissue. Here we introduce a new interactome mapping approach by experimentally identifying interactions between brain-expressed alternatively spliced variants of ASD risk factors. The Autism Spliceform Interaction Network reveals that almost half of the detected interactions and about 30% of the newly identified interacting partners represent contribution from splicing variants, emphasizing the importance of isoform networks. Isoform interactions greatly contribute to establishing direct physical connections between proteins from the de novo autism CNVs. Our findings demonstrate the critical role of spliceform networks for translating genetic knowledge into a better understanding of human diseases.

  15. Novel Burkholderia mallei Virulence Factors Linked to Specific Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memišević, Vesna; Zavaljevski, Nela; Pieper, Rembert; Rajagopala, Seesandra V.; Kwon, Keehwan; Townsend, Katherine; Yu, Chenggang; Yu, Xueping; DeShazer, David; Reifman, Jaques; Wallqvist, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is an infectious intracellular pathogen whose virulence and resistance to antibiotics makes it a potential bioterrorism agent. Given its genetic origin as a commensal soil organism, it is equipped with an extensive and varied set of adapted mechanisms to cope with and modulate host-cell environments. One essential virulence mechanism constitutes the specialized secretion systems that are designed to penetrate host-cell membranes and insert pathogen proteins directly into the host cell's cytosol. However, the secretion systems' proteins and, in particular, their host targets are largely uncharacterized. Here, we used a combined in silico, in vitro, and in vivo approach to identify B. mallei proteins required for pathogenicity. We used bioinformatics tools, including orthology detection and ab initio predictions of secretion system proteins, as well as published experimental Burkholderia data to initially select a small number of proteins as putative virulence factors. We then used yeast two-hybrid assays against normalized whole human and whole murine proteome libraries to detect and identify interactions among each of these bacterial proteins and host proteins. Analysis of such interactions provided both verification of known virulence factors and identification of three new putative virulence proteins. We successfully created insertion mutants for each of these three proteins using the virulent B. mallei ATCC 23344 strain. We exposed BALB/c mice to mutant strains and the wild-type strain in an aerosol challenge model using lethal B. mallei doses. In each set of experiments, mice exposed to mutant strains survived for the 21-day duration of the experiment, whereas mice exposed to the wild-type strain rapidly died. Given their in vivo role in pathogenicity, and based on the yeast two-hybrid interaction data, these results point to the importance of these pathogen proteins in modulating host ubiquitination pathways, phagosomal escape, and actin

  16. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nickels

    Full Text Available Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6 and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4. Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16 in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10 in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37 in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98 in those with an alcohol intake of <20 g/day and 1.45 (1.14-1.85 in those who drank ≥ 20 g/day. Additionally, interaction was found between 1p11.2-rs11249433 and ever being parous (Pinteraction = 5.3 × 10(-5, with a per-allele OR of 1.14 (1.11-1.17 in parous women and 0.98 (0.92-1.05 in nulliparous women. These data provide first strong evidence that the risk of breast cancer associated with some common genetic variants may vary with environmental risk factors.

  17. Evidence of gene-environment interactions between common breast cancer susceptibility loci and established environmental risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Stefan; Truong, Thérèse; Hein, Rebecca; Stevens, Kristen; Buck, Katharina; Behrens, Sabine; Eilber, Ursula; Schmidt, Martina; Häberle, Lothar; Vrieling, Alina; Gaudet, Mia; Figueroa, Jonine; Schoof, Nils; Spurdle, Amanda B; Rudolph, Anja; Fasching, Peter A; Hopper, John L; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Southey, Melissa C; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Fletcher, Olivia; Gibson, Lorna; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Peto, Julian; Humphreys, Manjeet K; Wang, Jean; Cordina-Duverger, Emilie; Menegaux, Florence; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Bojesen, Stig E; Lanng, Charlotte; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Bernstein, Leslie; Clarke, Christina A; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Harth, Volker; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Lambrechts, Diether; Smeets, Dominiek; Neven, Patrick; Paridaens, Robert; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Obi, Nadia; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine M; Giles, Graham G; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Offit, Kenneth; John, Esther M; Miron, Alexander; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Cramp, Helen; Connley, Dan; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly; Titus, Linda; Egan, Kathleen; Cahoon, Elizabeth K; Rajaraman, Preetha; Sigurdson, Alice J; Doody, Michele M; Guénel, Pascal; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Hall, Per; Easton, Doug F; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Milne, Roger L; Chang-Claude, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Various common genetic susceptibility loci have been identified for breast cancer; however, it is unclear how they combine with lifestyle/environmental risk factors to influence risk. We undertook an international collaborative study to assess gene-environment interaction for risk of breast cancer. Data from 24 studies of the Breast Cancer Association Consortium were pooled. Using up to 34,793 invasive breast cancers and 41,099 controls, we examined whether the relative risks associated with 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms were modified by 10 established environmental risk factors (age at menarche, parity, breastfeeding, body mass index, height, oral contraceptive use, menopausal hormone therapy use, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, physical activity) in women of European ancestry. We used logistic regression models stratified by study and adjusted for age and performed likelihood ratio tests to assess gene-environment interactions. All statistical tests were two-sided. We replicated previously reported potential interactions between LSP1-rs3817198 and parity (Pinteraction = 2.4 × 10(-6)) and between CASP8-rs17468277 and alcohol consumption (Pinteraction = 3.1 × 10(-4)). Overall, the per-allele odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for LSP1-rs3817198 was 1.08 (1.01-1.16) in nulliparous women and ranged from 1.03 (0.96-1.10) in parous women with one birth to 1.26 (1.16-1.37) in women with at least four births. For CASP8-rs17468277, the per-allele OR was 0.91 (0.85-0.98) in those with an alcohol intake of environmental risk factors.

  18. Common and distinct DNA-binding and regulatory activities of the BEN-solo transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qi; Ren, Aiming; Westholm, Jakub O; Duan, Hong; Patel, Dinshaw J; Lai, Eric C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the BEN (BANP, E5R, and NAC1) domain was recognized as a new class of conserved DNA-binding domain. The fly genome encodes three proteins that bear only a single BEN domain ("BEN-solo" factors); namely, Insensitive (Insv), Bsg25A (Elba1), and CG9883 (Elba2). Insv homodimers preferentially bind CCAATTGG palindromes throughout the genome to mediate transcriptional repression, whereas Bsg25A and Elba2 heterotrimerize with their obligate adaptor, Elba3 (i.e., the ELBA complex), to recognize a CCAATAAG motif in the Fab-7 insulator. While these data suggest distinct DNA-binding properties of BEN-solo proteins, we performed reporter assays that indicate that both Bsg25A and Elba2 can individually recognize Insv consensus sites efficiently. We confirmed this by solving the structure of Bsg25A complexed to the Insv site, which showed that key aspects of the BEN:DNA recognition strategy are similar between these proteins. We next show that both Insv and ELBA proteins are competent to mediate transcriptional repression via Insv consensus sequences but that the ELBA complex appears to be selective for the ELBA site. Reciprocally, genome-wide analysis reveals that Insv exhibits significant cobinding to class I insulator elements, indicating that it may also contribute to insulator function. Indeed, we observed abundant Insv binding within the Hox complexes with substantial overlaps with class I insulators, many of which bear Insv consensus sites. Moreover, Insv coimmunoprecipitates with the class I insulator factor CP190. Finally, we observed that Insv harbors exclusive activity among fly BEN-solo factors with respect to regulation of Notch-mediated cell fate choices in the peripheral nervous system. This in vivo activity is recapitulated by BEND6, a mammalian BEN-solo factor that conserves the Notch corepressor function of Insv but not its capacity to bind Insv consensus sites. Altogether, our data define an array of common and distinct biochemical and functional

  19. Disruption of STAT5b-Regulated Sexual Dimorphism of the Liver Transcriptome by Diverse Factors Is a Common Event.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiyu Oshida

    Full Text Available Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b (STAT5b is a growth hormone (GH-activated transcription factor and a master regulator of sexually dimorphic gene expression in the liver. Disruption of the GH hypothalamo-pituitary-liver axis controlling STAT5b activation can lead to metabolic dysregulation, steatosis, and liver cancer. Computational approaches were developed to identify factors that disrupt STAT5b function in a mouse liver gene expression compendium. A biomarker comprised of 144 STAT5b-dependent genes was derived using comparisons between wild-type male and wild-type female mice and between STAT5b-null and wild-type mice. Correlations between the STAT5b biomarker gene set and a test set comprised of expression datasets (biosets with known effects on STAT5b function were evaluated using a rank-based test (the Running Fisher algorithm. Using a similarity p-value ≤ 10(-4, the test achieved a balanced accuracy of 99% and 97% for detection of STAT5b activation or STAT5b suppression, respectively. The STAT5b biomarker gene set was then used to identify factors that activate (masculinize or suppress (feminize STAT5b function in an annotated mouse liver and primary hepatocyte gene expression compendium of ~1,850 datasets. Disruption of GH-regulated STAT5b is a common phenomenon in liver in vivo, with 5% and 29% of the male datasets, and 11% and 13% of the female datasets, associated with masculinization or feminization, respectively. As expected, liver STAT5b activation/masculinization occurred at puberty and suppression/feminization occurred during aging and in mutant mice with defects in GH signaling. A total of 70 genes were identified that have effects on STAT5b activation in genetic models in which the gene was inactivated or overexpressed. Other factors that affected liver STAT5b function were shown to include fasting, caloric restriction and infections. Together, these findings identify diverse factors that perturb the

  20. The identification of factors linked to the potential acceptance of transgenic biopharmaceuticals: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duguay, Francois; Katsanis, Lea Prevel; Thakor, Mrugank V

    2003-01-01

    In this exploratory study, Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory was used to identify which factors are likely to contribute to the potential acceptance of transgenic biopharmaceuticals (TG-Bs). These products are not yet available to the general public. A scale was designed to assess three of five core attributes related to the potential adoption rate of innovations (Rogers 1995), as well as to measure potential acceptance characteristics for biotechnology products. These attributes were relative advantage, compatibility with existing values, and complexity. In addition, two other characteristics were included: knowledge (Gartrell and Gartrell 1979) and perceived risks (Bauer 1960). The survey was completed by 74 consumers (78% response rate) using convenience sampling. The research findings show that Rogers' three core attributes are supported, but that knowledge andperceived risks were excluded from the model. The model for transgenic biopharmaceuticals consists of: 1. Consumer-related benefits (positively correlated to potential adoption). 2. New types of animals (negatively correlated to potential 3. Perceived complexity (negatively correlated to potential adoption). All the scaled items developed for this study were highly significant, which indicates that they can be used successfully by other researchers working in this field. As TG-Bs are a discontinuous innovation, biotechnology companies may need to present the benefits of these products, as well as the ease of their use prior to their launch, in order to increase their potential acceptance by consumers.

  1. The adaptor protein MITA links virus-sensing receptors to IRF3 transcription factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Yang, Yan; Li, Shu; Wang, Yan-Yi; Li, Ying; Diao, Feici; Lei, Caoqi; He, Xiao; Zhang, Lu; Tien, Po; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2008-10-17

    Viral infection triggers activation of transcription factors such as NF-kappaB and IRF3, which collaborate to induce type I interferons (IFNs) and elicit innate antiviral response. Here, we identified MITA as a critical mediator of virus-triggered type I IFN signaling by expression cloning. Overexpression of MITA activated IRF3, whereas knockdown of MITA inhibited virus-triggered activation of IRF3, expression of type I IFNs, and cellular antiviral response. MITA was found to localize to the outer membrane of mitochondria and to be associated with VISA, a mitochondrial protein that acts as an adaptor in virus-triggered signaling. MITA also interacted with IRF3 and recruited the kinase TBK1 to the VISA-associated complex. MITA was phosphorylated by TBK1, which is required for MITA-mediated activation of IRF3. Our results suggest that MITA is a critical mediator of virus-triggered IRF3 activation and IFN expression and further demonstrate the importance of certain mitochondrial proteins in innate antiviral immunity.

  2. A transcription factor links growth rate and metabolism in the hypersaline adapted archaeon Halobacterium salinarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todor, Horia; Dulmage, Keely; Gillum, Nicholas; Bain, James R; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Schmid, Amy K

    2014-09-01

    Co-ordinating metabolism and growth is a key challenge for all organisms. Despite fluctuating environments, cells must produce the same metabolic outputs to thrive. The mechanisms underlying this 'growth homeostasis' are known in bacteria and eukaryotes, but remain unexplored in archaea. In the model archaeon Halobacterium salinarum, the transcription factor TrmB regulates enzyme-coding genes in diverse metabolic pathways in response to glucose. However, H. salinarum is thought not to catabolize glucose. To resolve this discrepancy, we demonstrate that TrmB regulates the gluconeogenic production of sugars incorporated into the cell surface S-layer glycoprotein. Additionally, we show that TrmB-DNA binding correlates with instantaneous growth rate, likely because S-layer glycosylation is proportional to growth. This suggests that TrmB transduces a growth rate signal to co-regulated metabolic pathways including amino acid, purine, and cobalamin biosynthesis. Remarkably, the topology and function of this growth homeostatic network appear conserved across domains despite extensive alterations in protein components.

  3. Identification of SSR and RAPD markers linked to a resistance allele for angular leaf spot in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris line ESAL 550

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilvan Ferreira da Silva

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify RAPD and SSR markers associated with a resistant allele for angular leaf spot (Phaeoisariopsis griseola from the line 'ESAL 550', derived from the Andean 'Jalo EEP 558' cultivar, to assist selection of resistant genotypes. The resistant line 'ESAL 550' and the susceptible cultivar 'Carioca MG' were crossed to generate F1 and F2 populations. One hundred and twenty F2:3 families were evaluated. The DNA of the 12 most resistant families was bulked and the same was done with the DNA of the 10 most susceptible, generating two contrasting bulks. One RAPD and one SSR marker was found to be linked in coupling phase to the resistant allele. The SSR marker was amplified by the primer PV-atct001(282C, and its distance from the resistant allele was 7.6 cM. This is the most useful marker for indirect selection of resistant plants in segregating populations. The RAPD marker was amplified by the primer OPP07(857C linked in coupling phase to the resistant allele, and distant 24.4 cM. Therefore, this RAPD marker is not so useful in assisting selection because it is too far from the resistant allele.

  4. Male longevity in Sardinia, a review of historical sources supporting a causal link with dietary factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pes, G M; Tolu, F; Dore, M P; Sechi, G P; Errigo, A; Canelada, A; Poulain, M

    2015-04-01

    The identification of a hot spot of exceptional longevity, the Longevity Blue Zone (LBZ), in the mountain population of Sardinia has aroused considerable interest toward its traditional food as one of the potential causal factors. This preliminary study on the traditional Sardinian diet has been supported by the literature available, which has been carefully reviewed and compared. Up to a short time ago, the LBZ population depended mostly upon livestock rearing, and consumption of animal-derived foods was relatively higher than in the rest of the island. The nutrition transition (NT) in urbanized and lowland areas began in the mid-1950s, fueled by economic development, whereas in the LBZ it started later owing to prolonged resistance to change by a society organized around a rather efficient pastoral economy. Even nowadays a large proportion of the population in this area still follows the traditional diet based on cereal-derived foods and dairy products. The LBZ cohorts comprising individuals who were of a mature age when NT began may have benefited both from the high-quality, albeit rather monotonous, traditional diet to which they had been exposed most of their life and from the transitional diet, which introduced positive changes such as more variety, increased consumption of fruits and vegetables and moderate meat intake. It could be speculated that these changes may have brought substantial health benefits to this particular aging group, which was in need of nutrient-rich food at this specific time in life, thereby resulting in a decreased mortality risk and, in turn, life-span extension.

  5. Free fatty acids link metabolism and regulation of the insulin-sensitizing fibroblast growth factor-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Knut; Andres, Janin; Biedasek, Katrin; Weicht, Jessica; Bobbert, Thomas; Sabath, Markus; Meinus, Sabine; Reinecke, Franziska; Möhlig, Matthias; Weickert, Martin O; Clemenz, Markus; Pfeiffer, Andreas F H; Kintscher, Ulrich; Spuler, Simone; Spranger, Joachim

    2009-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21 improves insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism in obese or diabetic animal models, while human studies revealed increased FGF-21 levels in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Given that FGF-21 has been suggested to be a peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor (PPAR) alpha-dependent regulator of fasting metabolism, we hypothesized that free fatty acids (FFAs), natural agonists of PPARalpha, might modify FGF-21 levels. The effect of fatty acids on FGF-21 was investigated in vitro in HepG2 cells. Within a randomized controlled trial, the effects of elevated FFAs were studied in 21 healthy subjects (13 women and 8 men). Within a clinical trial including 17 individuals, the effect of insulin was analyzed using an hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp and the effect of PPARgamma activation was studied subsequently in a rosiglitazone treatment trial over 8 weeks. Oleate and linoleate increased FGF-21 expression and secretion in a PPARalpha-dependent fashion, as demonstrated by small-interfering RNA-induced PPARalpha knockdown, while palmitate had no effect. In vivo, lipid infusion induced an increase of circulating FGF-21 in humans, and a strong correlation between the change in FGF-21 levels and the change in FFAs was observed. An artificial hyperinsulinemia, which was induced to delineate the potential interaction between elevated FFAs and hyperinsulinemia, revealed that hyperinsulinemia also increased FGF-21 levels in vivo, while rosiglitazone treatment had no effect. The results presented here offer a mechanism explaining the induction of the metabolic regulator FGF-21 in the fasting situation but also in type 2 diabetes and obesity.

  6. Bacteraemia during Transurethral Resection of the Prostate: What Are the Risk Factors and Is It More Common than We Think?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amar Raj Mohee

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the microbial causes, incidence, duration, risk factors and clinical implications of bacteraemia occurring during transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP surgery to better inform prophylaxis strategies. An ethically approved, prospective, cohort study of patients undergoing TURP was conducted. Clinical information and follow-up details were collected using standardized data collection sheets. Blood was obtained for culture at 6 different time points peri-procedure. Standard of care antibiotic prophylaxis was given prior to surgery. Bacteriuria was assessed in a pre-procedure urine sample. Histopathology from all prostate chips was assessed for inflammation and malignancy. 73 patients were consented and 276 blood samples obtained. No patients developed symptomatic bacteraemia during the procedure, 17 patients developed asymptomatic bacteraemia (23.2%. Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most common organisms cultured. 10 minutes after the start of the TURP, the odds ratio (OR of developing bacteraemia was 5.38 (CI 0.97-29.87 p = 0.05, and 20 minutes after the start of the procedure, the OR was 6.46 (CI 1.12-37.24, p = 0.03, compared to before the procedure. We also found an association between the development of intra-operative bacteraemia and recent antibiotic use (OR 4.34, CI 1.14-16.62, p = 0.032, the presence of a urinary catheter (OR 4.92, CI 1.13-21.51, p = 0.034 and a malignant histology (OR 4.90, CI 1.30-18.46, p = 0.019. There was no statistical relationship between pre-operative urine culture results and blood culture results. This study shows that asymptomatic bacteraemia is commonly caused by TURP and occurs in spite of antibiotic prophylaxis. Our findings challenge the commonly held view that urine is the primary source of bacteraemia in TURP-associated sepsis and raise the possibility of occult prostatic infection as a cause of bacteraemia. More work will be needed

  7. A transcription elongation factor that links signals from the reproductive system to lifespan extension in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Arjumand Ghazi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, the aging of the soma is influenced by the germline. When germline-stem cells are removed, aging slows and lifespan is increased. The mechanism by which somatic tissues respond to loss of the germline is not well-understood. Surprisingly, we have found that a predicted transcription elongation factor, TCER-1, plays a key role in this process. TCER-1 is required for loss of the germ cells to increase C. elegans' lifespan, and it acts as a regulatory switch in the pathway. When the germ cells are removed, the levels of TCER-1 rise in somatic tissues. This increase is sufficient to trigger key downstream events, as overexpression of tcer-1 extends the lifespan of normal animals that have an intact reproductive system. Our findings suggest that TCER-1 extends lifespan by promoting the expression of a set of genes regulated by the conserved, life-extending transcription factor DAF-16/FOXO. Interestingly, TCER-1 is not required for DAF-16/FOXO to extend lifespan in animals with reduced insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Thus, TCER-1 specifically links the activity of a broadly deployed transcription factor, DAF-16/FOXO, to longevity signals from reproductive tissues.

  8. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha is a common genetic risk factor for asthma, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, and systemic lupus erythematosus in a Mexican pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Morales, Silvia; Velázquez-Cruz, Rafael; Ramírez-Bello, Julián; Bonilla-González, Edmundo; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Escamilla-Guerrero, Guillermo; Cuevas, Francisco; Espinosa-Rosales, Francisco; Martínez-Aguilar, Nora Ernestina; Gómez-Vera, Javier; Baca, Vicente; Orozco, Lorena

    2009-04-01

    There is a great deal of evidence that points to the association of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) gene as a common genetic factor in the pathogenesis of diseases that are caused by inflammatory and/or autoimmune etiologies. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified in the TNF-alpha promoter region have been associated with disease susceptibility and severity. We investigated whether -308G/A and -238G/A TNF-alpha polymorphisms were associated with asthma, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) in a pediatric Mexican population. In a case-control study of 725 patients (asthma: 226, JRA: 171, and SLE: 328) and 400 control subjects, the participants were analyzed using the allelic discrimination technique. The genotype distribution of both TNF-alpha polymorphisms was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in each group. However, there were significant differences in the allele frequency of TNF-alpha-308A between the patients and the healthy controls. This allele was detected in 2.9% of the controls, 6.0% of asthmatic and JRA patients (p = 0.002 and p = 0.0086), and 6.7% of SLE patients (p = 0.00049); statistical significance was maintained after ancestry stratification (asthma: p = 0.0143, JRA: p = 0.0083, and SLE: p = 0.0026). Stratification by gender showed that the risk for the -308A allele in asthma and JRA was greater in females (OR = 4.16, p = 0.0008 and OR = 4.4, p = 0.0002, respectively). The TNF-alpha -238A allele showed an association only with JRA in males (OR = 2.89, p = 0.004). These results support the concept that the TNF-alpha gene is a genetic risk factor for asthma, SLE, and JRA in the pediatric Mexican population.

  9. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

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    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  10. Common genetic variants near the Brittle Cornea Syndrome locus ZNF469 influence the blinding disease risk factor central corneal thickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Lu

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Central corneal thickness (CCT, one of the most highly heritable human traits (h(2 typically>0.9, is important for the diagnosis of glaucoma and a potential risk factor for glaucoma susceptibility. We conducted genome-wide association studies in five cohorts from Australia and the United Kingdom (total N = 5058. Three cohorts were based on individually genotyped twin collections, with the remaining two cohorts genotyped on pooled samples from singletons with extreme trait values. The pooled sample findings were validated by individual genotyping the pooled samples together with additional samples also within extreme quantiles. We describe methods for efficient combined analysis of the results from these different study designs. We have identified and replicated quantitative trait loci on chromosomes 13 and 16 for association with CCT. The locus on chromosome 13 (nearest gene FOXO1 had an overall meta-analysis p-value for all the individually genotyped samples of 4.6x10(-10. The locus on chromosome 16 was associated with CCT with p = 8.95x10(-11. The nearest gene to the associated chromosome 16 SNPs was ZNF469, a locus recently implicated in Brittle Cornea Syndrome (BCS, a very rare disorder characterized by abnormal thin corneas. Our findings suggest that in addition to rare variants in ZNF469 underlying CCT variation in BCS patients, more common variants near this gene may contribute to CCT variation in the general population.

  11. FACTORES RELACIONADOS CON LA URGENCIA HIPERTENSIVA EN UN ÁREA DE SALUD URBANA DE SANTA CLARA / Factors linked to hypertensive emergency in an urban health area of Santa Clara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis López Casanova

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: Arterial hypertension manifest itself in many individuals with the appearance of an acute event, the hypertensive emergency, which takes place many times in hypertensive individuals who have not been diagnosed or who have been incorrectly treated. The aim of this research is to characterize the factors linked to the hypertensive emergency. Method: A descriptive, cross-sectional study in a sample formed by 150 patients presenting the above mentioned condition who were treated at the Emergency Department of the Santa Clara Polyclinic during the period from January 2007 to January 2008. The clinical and epidemiological variables were gathered by means of interviews with the patients. Chi square was used in the statistical analysis. Results: There was a predominance of male patients (54 %, the age group between 46 and 60 years of age (54 % and the white race in both sexes (57,4 %. The most common associated illnesses were ischemic heart disease (18.6 % and diabetes mellitus (14 %. Captopril was the first therapeutic choice in 82,7 percent of the cases, presenting a high resolution rate (80,6 %. It was determined that 49 percent of the patients were not correctly controlled, and that the adherence to the pharmacologic treatment was moderate in 49,3 percent and bad in 30 percent of the cases. Conclusions: The hypertensive emergency prevailed in males and in the age group between 46 and 60 years of age. Ischemic heart disease and diabetes mellitus were the most common associated illnesses; as well as a family history of arterial hypertension, smoking and obesity as atherosclerotic risk factors. Arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus were associated with a higher lack of response to standard therapy. Captopril was the most commonly usedmedication, showing a high resolution rate. The lack of adherence to the treatment and the inadequate control prevailed.

  12. The Krüppel-like Factor 15 as a Molecular Link between Myogenic Factors and a Chromosome 4q Transcriptional Enhancer Implicated in Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriev, Petr; Petrov, Andrei; Ansseau, Eugenie; Stankevicins, Luiza; Charron, Sébastien; Kim, Elena; Bos, Tomas Jan; Robert, Thomas; Turki, Ahmed; Coppée, Frédérique; Belayew, Alexandra; Lazar, Vladimir; Carnac, Gilles; Laoudj, Dalila; Lipinski, Marc; Vassetzky, Yegor S.

    2011-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a dominant hereditary disease with a prevalence of 7 per 100,000 individuals, is associated with a partial deletion in the subtelomeric D4Z4 repeat array on chromosome 4q. The D4Z4 repeat contains a strong transcriptional enhancer that activates promoters of several FSHD-related genes. We report here that the enhancer within the D4Z4 repeat binds the Krüppel-like factor KLF15. KLF15 was found to be up-regulated during myogenic differentiation induced by serum starvation or by overexpression of the myogenic differentiation factor MYOD. When overexpressed, KLF15 activated the D4Z4 enhancer and led to overexpression of DUX4c (Double homeobox 4, centromeric) and FRG2 (FSHD region gene 2) genes, whereas its silencing caused inactivation of the D4Z4 enhancer. In immortalized human myoblasts, the D4Z4 enhancer was activated by the myogenic factor MYOD, an effect that was abolished upon KLF15 silencing or when the KLF15-binding sites within the D4Z4 enhancer were mutated, indicating that the myogenesis-related activation of the D4Z4 enhancer was mediated by KLF15. KLF15 and several myogenesis-related factors were found to be expressed at higher levels in myoblasts, myotubes, and muscle biopsies from FSHD patients than in healthy controls. We propose that KLF15 serves as a molecular link between myogenic factors and the activity of the D4Z4 enhancer, and it thus contributes to the overexpression of the DUX4c and FRG2 genes during normal myogenic differentiation and in FSHD. PMID:21937448

  13. Explaining the link between access-to-care factors and health care resource utilization among individuals with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Minchul Kim,1 Jinma Ren,1 William Tillis,2,3 Carl V Asche,1,4 Inkyu K Kim,5 Carmen S Kirkness1 1Department of Internal Medicine, Center for Outcomes Research, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, 2OSF St Francis Medical Center, 3Department of Internal Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Peoria, Peoria, 4Department of Pharmacy Systems, Outcomes and Policy, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, Chicago, IL, 5Battelle Memorial Institute, Atlanta, GA, USA Background: Limited accessibility to health care may be a barrier to obtaining good care. Few studies have investigated the association between access-to-care factors and COPD hospitalizations. The objective of this study is to estimate the association between access-to-care factors and health care utilization including hospital/emergency department (ED visits and primary care physician (PCP office visits among adults with COPD utilizing a nationally representative survey data. Methods: We conducted a pooled cross-sectional analysis based upon a bivariate probit model, utilizing datasets from the 2011–2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System linked with the 2014 Area Health Resource Files among adults with COPD. Dichotomous outcomes were hospital/ED visits and PCP office visits. Key covariates were county-level access-to-care factors, including the population-weighted numbers of pulmonary care specialists, PCPs, hospitals, rural health centers, and federally qualified health centers. Results: Among a total of 9,332 observations, proportions of hospital/ED visits and PCP office visits were 16.2% and 44.2%, respectively. Results demonstrated that access-to-care factors were closely associated with hospital/ED visits. An additional pulmonary care specialist per 100,000 persons serves to reduce the likelihood of a hospital/ED visit by 0.4 percentage points (pp (P=0.028. In contrast, an additional hospital per 100,000 persons increases the

  14. Linking neuroscientific research on decision making to the educational context of novice students assigned to a multiple-choice scientific task involving common misconceptions about electrical circuits

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    Patrice ePotvin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the brain-based mechanisms of uncertainty and certainty associated with answers to multiple-choice questions involving common misconceptions about electric circuits. Twenty-two (22 scientifically novice participants (humanities and arts college students were asked, in an fMRI study, whether or not they thought the light bulbs in images presenting electric circuits were lighted up correctly, and if they were certain or uncertain of their answers. When participants reported that they were unsure of their responses, analyses revealed significant activations in brain areas typically involved in uncertainty (anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula cortex, and superior/dorsomedial frontal cortex and in the left middle/superior temporal lobe. Certainty was associated with large bilateral activations in the occipital and parietal regions usually involved in visuospatial processing. Correct-and-certain answers were associated with activations that suggest a stronger mobilization of visual attention resources when compared to incorrect-and-certain answers. These findings provide insights into brain-based mechanisms of uncertainty that are activated when common misconceptions, identified as such by science education research literature, interfere in decision making in a school-like task. We also discuss the implications of these results from an educational perspective.

  15. Linking neuroscientific research on decision making to the educational context of novice students assigned to a multiple-choice scientific task involving common misconceptions about electrical circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Patrice; Turmel, Elaine; Masson, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the brain-based mechanisms of uncertainty and certainty associated with answers to multiple-choice questions involving common misconceptions about electric circuits. Twenty-two scientifically novice participants (humanities and arts college students) were asked, in an fMRI study, whether or not they thought the light bulbs in images presenting electric circuits were lighted up correctly, and if they were certain or uncertain of their answers. When participants reported that they were unsure of their responses, analyses revealed significant activations in brain areas typically involved in uncertainty (anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula cortex, and superior/dorsomedial frontal cortex) and in the left middle/superior temporal lobe. Certainty was associated with large bilateral activations in the occipital and parietal regions usually involved in visuospatial processing. Correct-and-certain answers were associated with activations that suggest a stronger mobilization of visual attention resources when compared to incorrect-and-certain answers. These findings provide insights into brain-based mechanisms of uncertainty that are activated when common misconceptions, identified as such by science education research literature, interfere in decision making in a school-like task. We also discuss the implications of these results from an educational perspective.

  16. A Functional Link between the Histone Demethylase PHF8 and the Transcription Factor ZNF711 in X-Linked Mental Retardation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine-Kohlbrecher, Daniela; Christensen, Jesper; Vandamme, Julien;

    2010-01-01

    X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) is an inherited disorder that mostly affects males and is caused by mutations in genes located on the X chromosome. Here, we show that the XLMR protein PHF8 and a C. elegans homolog F29B9.2 catalyze demethylation of di- and monomethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H......3K9me2/me1). The PHD domain of PHF8 binds to H3K4me3 and colocalizes with H3K4me3 at transcription initiation sites. Furthermore, PHF8 interacts with another XMLR protein, ZNF711, which binds to a subset of PHF8 target genes, including the XLMR gene JARID1C. Of interest, the C. elegans PHF8 homolog...... is highly expressed in neurons, and mutant animals show impaired locomotion. Taken together, our results functionally link the XLMR gene PHF8 to two other XLMR genes, ZNF711 and JARID1C, indicating that MR genes may be functionally linked in pathways, causing the complex phenotypes observed in patients...

  17. Competitivity of the common-bean plant relative to the weed alexandergrass [Brachiaria plantaginea (link hitch.] Competitividade do feijoeiro-comum com o capim-marmelada [Brachiaria plantaginea (link hitch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Passini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Methodologies of competitive interaction quantification between weeds and crops are not widely elucidated and compared in the literature. The competitive ability of common-bean (Phaseolus vulgaris relative to alexandergrass (Brachiaria plantaginea was assessed and two approaches of replacement series experiment analysis were compared. The response of the species to the presence of each other at different densities and proportion was evaluated. Replacement series at total densities of 625, 816 and 1,111 plants m-2 were performed at the proportions of common-bean:alexandergrass of 100:0 (pure stand of common-bean, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100% (pure stand of alexandergrass, at four replicates in a randomized block design. Data analyses were performed by the qualitative compared to the quantitative approach. The quantitative approach provided larger number of information than did the qualitative approach, and indicated that there was intraspecific competition among common-bean plants, and a minimum of interspecific competition from alexandergrass. There was no intraspecific competition among alexandergrass plants, being the crop effect on the weed larger than the effect among alexandergrass plants. The ecological niche differentiation was partial, since the crop intraspecific competition was larger than the interspecific, and the last one was negligible, at the same time that the weed interspecific competition was larger than the intraspecific. Common-bean, as a competitor species, is superior to alexandergrass.As metodologias de quantificação das interações competitivas entre plantas cultivadas e daninhas não estão amplamente elucidadas e comparadas na literatura. A competitividade da cultura de feijão-comum (Phaseolus vulgaris em relação ao capim-marmelada (Brachiaria plantaginea foi avaliada pela comparação entre o método qualitativo e um método quantitativo de análise de resultados. A resposta de cada espécie à presença da

  18. Impact on offspring methylation patterns of maternal gestational diabetes mellitus and intrauterine growth restraint suggest common genes and pathways linked to subsequent type 2 diabetes risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilter, Claire R; Cooper, Wendy N; Cliffe, Kerry M; Skinner, Benjamin M; Prentice, Philippa M; Nelson, LaTasha; Bauer, Julien; Ong, Ken K; Constância, Miguel; Lowe, William L; Affara, Nabeel A; Dunger, David B

    2014-11-01

    Size at birth, postnatal weight gain, and adult risk for type 2 diabetes may reflect environmental exposures during developmental plasticity and may be mediated by epigenetics. Both low birth weight (BW), as a marker of fetal growth restraint, and high birth weight (BW), especially after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), have been linked to increased risk of adult type 2 diabetes. We assessed DNA methylation patterns using a bead chip in cord blood samples from infants of mothers with GDM (group 1) and infants with prenatal growth restraint indicated by rapid postnatal catch-up growth (group 2), compared with infants with normal postnatal growth (group 3). Seventy-five CpG loci were differentially methylated in groups 1 and 2 compared with the controls (group 3), representing 72 genes, many relevant to growth and diabetes. In replication studies using similar methodology, many of these differentially methylated regions were associated with levels of maternal glucose exposure below that defined by GDM [the Hyperglycemia and Adverse Pregnancy Outcome (HAPO) study] or were identified as changes observed after randomized periconceptional nutritional supplementation in a Gambian cohort characterized by maternal deprivation. These studies provide support for the concept that similar epigenetic modifications may underpin different prenatal exposures and potentially increase long-term risk for diseases such as type 2 diabetes.

  19. Resective surgery for liver tumor:a multivariate analysis of causes and risk factors linked to postoperative complications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enrico Benzoni; Dario Lorenzin; Umberto Baccarani; Gian Luigi Adani; Alessandro Favero; Alessandro Cojutti; Fabrizio Bresadola; Alessandro Uzzau

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In spite of accurate selection of patients eligible for resection, and although advances in surgical techniques and perioperative management have greatly contributed to reducing the rate of perioperative deaths, stress must be placed on reducing the postoperative complication rates reported to be still as high as 50%. This study was designed to analyze the causes and foreseeable risk factors linked to postoperative morbidity on the grounds of data derived from a single-center surgical population. METHODS: From September 1989 to March 2005, 287 consecutive patients, affected either with HCC or liver metastasis, had liver resection at our department. Among the HCC series we recorded 98 patients (73.2%) in Child-Pugh class A, 32 (23.8%) in class B and 4 in class C (3%). In 104 colorectal metastases, 71% were due to colon cancer, 25% rectal, 3% sigmoid, and 1% anorectal. In 49 non-colorectal metastases, 22.4% were derived from breast cancer, 63.2% gastrointestinal tumors (excluding colon) and 14.4%other cancers. We performed 80 wedge resections, 77 bisegmentectomies and/or left lobectomies, 74 segmentectomies, 22 major hepatectomies, 20 left hepatectomies, and 14 trisegmentectomies. RESULTS: The in-hospital mortality rate in this series was 4.5%, and the morbidity rate was 47.7%, because of pleural effusion (30%), hepatic abscess (25%), hepatic insufifciency (19%), ascites (10%), hemoperitoneum (10%), or biliary ifstula (6%). The variables associated with the technical aspects of the surgical procedure that were responsible for the complications were: a Pringle maneuver length more than 20 minutes (P=0.001);the type of liver resection procedure, including major hepatectomy (P=0.02), left hepatectomy (P=0.04), trisegmentectomy (P=0.04), bisegmentectomy and/or left lobectomy (P=0,04);and a blood transfusion of more than 600 ml (P=0.04). CONCLUSION: The evaluation of causes and foreseeable risk factors linked to postoperative morbidity during the planning of

  20. Placental insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) and its relation to litter size in the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Julienne N; Eklund, Amy; Tardif, Suzette

    2009-12-01

    The primate placenta produces a wide variety of hormones throughout gestation that regulate placental function and fetal growth. One such hormone is insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II), a peptide implicated in cell division, differentiation, and amino acid transport. IGF-II concentrations were measured in 23 common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) term placentas from twin and triplet litters in order to determine whether previously described differences in fetoplacental phenotype such as placental and litter mass and placental surface area were related to differences in endocrine function. IGF-II was extracted from frozen tissue samples and measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit designed for human tissue, which was validated for marmoset placenta. IGF-II concentrations were not related to placental or litter mass, and twin and triplet placentas did not differ in total concentration. However, per individual fetus, triplets were associated with a significant 42% reduction in IGF-II concentration (P = 0.03), and IGF-II concentration per gram of fetal mass was a third lower in triplet litters. The triplet placenta exhibits a global expansion of the surface area which was contrasted by a per unit area reduction in IGF-II concentration (r = -0.75, P = 0.01), a pattern that explains why twin and triplet placentas overall did not differ in concentration. Per fetus, triplet pregnancies are associated with relatively less maternal mass, placental mass and microscopic surface area suggesting that the intrauterine growth of triplets is supported by systems that increase the efficiency of nutrient transfer. The finding that individual triplet fetuses are also associated with significantly lower IGF-II concentrations is consistent with the view that the marmoset fetoplacental unit exhibits a flexible pattern of placental allocation and metabolism. Plasticity in placental endocrine and metabolic function is likely to play an important role in the ability of the

  1. Factors associated with multimorbidity and its link with poor blood pressure control among 223,286 hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Wang, Harry H X; Cheung, Clement S K; Tong, Ellen L H; Sek, Antonio C H; Cheung, N T; Yan, Bryan P Y; Yu, Cheuk-Man; Griffiths, Sian M; Coats, Andrew J S

    2014-11-15

    Multimorbidity has become the norm worldwide as populations age. It remains, however, infrequently researched. This study evaluated factors associated with multimorbidity in a predominantly Chinese hypertensive population. We included all adult patients prescribed their first antihypertensive agents in the entire public sector in Hong Kong from a validated database. Multimorbidity was defined as having one or more medical conditions (cardiovascular diseases; respiratory diseases; diabetes or impaired fasting glucose; renal disease) in addition to hypertension. We studied the prevalence of multimorbidity and performed multinomial regression analyses to evaluate factors independently associated with multimorbidity. 223,286 hypertensive patients (average age of 59.9 years, SD 17.6) were included. The prevalence of having 0, 1 and ≥ 2 additional conditions was 59.6%, 32.8% and 7.5%, respectively. The most common conditions were cardiovascular disease (24.2%) and diabetes (23.0%), followed by respiratory disorders (14.6%) and renal disease (10.9%). Older age (>50 years), male sex, lower household income, receipt of social security allowance and suboptimal blood pressure control (>140 mmHg or >90 mmHg; >130 mmHg or >80 mmHg for diabetes patients; AOR = 3.38-4.49) were significantly associated with multimorbidity. There exists a synergistic effect among these variables as older (≥ 70 years), male patients receiving security allowance had substantially higher prevalence of multimorbidity (19.9% vs 7.5% among all patients). Multimorbidity is very common in hypertensive patients and its prevalence increased markedly with the presence of risk factors identified in this study. Hypertensive patients with multimorbidities should receive more meticulous clinical care as their blood pressure control tends to be poorer.

  2. The archaebacterial hypusine-containing protein. Structural features suggest common ancestry with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartig, D; Lemkemeier, K; Frank, J; Lottspeich, F; Klink, F

    1992-03-01

    The amino acid hypusine is formed by post-translational modification of a lysine residue in eukaryotes and archaebacteria but up to now only the eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF-5A has been known to contain this unique component. We isolated and purified a hypusine-containing protein from the thermophilic archaebacterium Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. The mainly cytosolic protein comprised about 0.03% of the post-ribosomal supernatant protein. No other hypusine-containing protein could be detected in S. acidocaldarius. The molar ratio of hypusine/hypusine-containing protein was 1:1. SDS/PAGE showed a molecular mass of 16.8 kDa; a pI of 7.8 for the native protein resulted from IEF. The N-terminus was blocked. Four cyanogen bromide fragments were partially sequenced and used to derive two 17-base oligonucleotide probes. A 3-kb HindIII fragment of genomic DNA hybridizing with both probes was cloned. By sequencing of exonuclease III deletion clones an open reading frame of 405 nucleotides was found coding for a protein of 135 amino acids with a molecular mass of 15 kDa. It contained all cyanogen bromide sequences analysed. Sequence alignment revealed that seven of eight residues around Lys40 in the Sulfolobus hypusine-containing protein were identical to the nonapeptides centered by hypusine in the three eIF-5A proteins sequenced so far. The Edman procedure gave no phenylthiohydantoin derivative for this position. For a central region of 44 residues a sequence similarity of 54% between the archaebacterial and eukaryotic proteins was calculated; for the total sequence about 33% similarity resulted. In addition, there were a number of conservative changes. The unique lysine modification surrounded by a conserved sequence strongly suggests a common ancestry of archaebacterial hypusine-containing protein and eIF-5A. Together with similarities in molecular mass and intracellular localization, it may point to an analogous biochemical function.

  3. Disability due to maternal common mental disorders (CMDs as a risk factor for chronic childhood malnutrition: cross-sectional study

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    Jorge Lopes Cavalcante-Neto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The disability associated with maternal common mental disorders (CMDs is among the possible explanations for the association between chronic childhood malnutrition and CMDs. CMDs may impair the mother's ability to perform her role, particularly in deprived environments. The present study aimed to evaluate whether disability relating to CMDs could be part of the pathway of the association between childhood malnutrition and maternal CMDs. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study conducted in two institutions: one for malnourished children and another for eutrophic children living in a low-income community in the state of Alagoas, Brazil. METHOD: The cases consisted of 55 malnourished children aged from 12 to 60 months who were attending a nutritional rehabilitation center, with height-for-age z-scores < 2. The controls were 70 eutrophic children of the same age who were attending a day care center in the same area as the cases. The Self-Report Questionnaire made it possible to identify likely cases of maternal CMD. The Sheehan Disability Scale enabled evaluation of the associated disability. RESULTS: Chronic childhood malnutrition was significantly associated with maternal disability relating to CMDs (OR = 2.28; 95% CI: 1.02-5.1. The best logistic regression model using chronic childhood malnutrition as the dependent variable included the following independent variables: higher number of people living in the household; absence of the biological father from the household; and maternal disability relating to CMDs. CONCLUSIONS: If confirmed, the association between chronic childhood malnutrition and maternal disability relating to CMDs may be useful in helping to identify the causal chain between childhood malnutrition and maternal CMDs and to indicate environmental risk factors associated with chronic childhood malnutrition.

  4. Annotation, Phylogeny and Expression Analysis of the Nuclear Factor Y Gene Families in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris

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    Carolina eRípodas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, plant nuclear factor Y (NF-Y genes have gained major interest due to their roles in many biological processes in plant development or adaptation to environmental conditions, particularly in the root nodule symbiosis established between legume plants and nitrogen fixing bacteria. NF-Ys are heterotrimeric transcriptional complexes composed of three subunits, NF-YA, NF-YB and NF-YC, which bind with high affinity and specificity to the CCAAT box, a cis element present in many eukaryotic promoters. In plants, NF-Y subunits consist of gene families with about ten members each. In this study, we have identified and characterized the NF-Y gene families of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, a grain legume of worldwide economical importance and the main source of dietary protein of developing countries. Expression analysis showed that some members of each family are up-regulated at early or late stages of the nitrogen fixing symbiotic interaction with its partner Rhizobium etli. We also showed that some genes are differentially accumulated in response to inoculation with high or less efficient R. etli strains, constituting excellent candidates to participate in the strain-specific response during symbiosis. Genes of the NF-YA family exhibit a highly structured intron-exon organization. Moreover, this family is characterized by the presence of upstream ORFs when introns in the 5' UTR are retained and miRNA target sites in their 3' UTR, suggesting that these genes might be subjected to a complex post-transcriptional regulation. Multiple protein alignments indicated the presence of highly conserved domains in each of the NF-Y families, presumably involved in subunit interactions and DNA binding. The analysis presented here constitutes a starting point to understand the regulation and biological function of individual members of the NF-Y families in different developmental processes in this grain legume.

  5. N-linked glycans within the A2 domain of von Willebrand factor modulate macrophage-mediated clearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chion, Alain; O'Sullivan, Jamie M; Drakeford, Clive; Bergsson, Gudmundur; Dalton, Niall; Aguila, Sonia; Ward, Soracha; Fallon, Padraic G; Brophy, Teresa M; Preston, Roger J S; Brady, Lauren; Sheils, Orla; Laffan, Michael; McKinnon, Thomas A J; O'Donnell, James S

    2016-10-13

    Enhanced von Willebrand factor (VWF) clearance is important in the etiology of von Willebrand disease. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying VWF clearance remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of VWF domains and specific glycan moieties in regulating in vivo clearance. Our findings demonstrate that the A1 domain of VWF contains a receptor-recognition site that plays a key role in regulating the interaction of VWF with macrophages. In A1-A2-A3 and full-length VWF, this macrophage-binding site is cryptic but becomes exposed following exposure to shear or ristocetin. Previous studies have demonstrated that the N-linked glycans within the A2 domain play an important role in modulating susceptibility to ADAMTS13 proteolysis. We further demonstrate that these glycans presented at N1515 and N1574 also play a critical role in protecting VWF against macrophage binding and clearance. Indeed, loss of the N-glycan at N1515 resulted in markedly enhanced VWF clearance that was significantly faster than that observed with any previously described VWF mutations. In addition, A1-A2-A3 fragments containing the N1515Q or N1574Q substitutions also demonstrated significantly enhanced clearance. Importantly, clodronate-induced macrophage depletion significantly attenuated the increased clearance observed with N1515Q and N1574Q in both full-length VWF and A1-A2-A3. Finally, we further demonstrate that loss of these N-linked glycans does not enhance clearance in VWF in the presence of a structurally constrained A2 domain. Collectively, these novel findings support the hypothesis that conformation of the VWF A domains plays a critical role in modulating macrophage-mediated clearance of VWF in vivo.

  6. Common etiological factors of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and suicidal behavior: a population-based study in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljung, Therese; Chen, Qi; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik

    2014-08-01

    The prevention of suicidal behavior is one of the most important tasks for mental health clinicians. Although a few studies have indicated an increased risk of suicidal behavior among individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, the development of more effective ways of identifying and modifying the risk is hampered by our limited understanding of the underlying mechanisms for this association. To explore whether attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and suicidal behavior share genetic and environmental risk factors. Matched cohort design across different levels of family relatedness recorded from January 1, 1987, to December 31, 2009. We identified 51 707 patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (through patient and prescribed drug registers) in Sweden and their relatives by linking longitudinal population-based registers. Control participants were matched 1:5 on sex and birth year. Any record of suicide attempt or completed suicide defined by discharge diagnoses of the International Classification of Diseases. Individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (probands) had increased risks of attempted and completed suicide, even after adjusting for comorbid psychiatric disorders (odds ratio [OR] = 3.62 [95% CI, 3.29-3.98] and 5.91 [95% CI, 2.45-14.27], respectively). The highest familial risk was observed among first-degree relatives (attempted suicide: OR = 2.42 [95% CI, 2.36-2.49] among parents of probands with ADHD and OR = 2.28 [95% CI, 2.17-2.40] among full siblings of probands with ADHD; completed suicide: OR = 2.24 [95% CI, 2.06-2.43] and OR = 2.23 [1.83-2.73], respectively), whereas the risk was considerably lower among more genetically distant relatives (attempted suicide: OR = 1.59 [95% CI, 1.47-1.73] among maternal half siblings, OR = 1.57 [95% CI, 1.45-1.70] among paternal half siblings, and OR = 1.39 [95% CI, 1.35-1.43] among cousins; completed suicide: OR = 1.51 [95% CI, 1

  7. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffery S Pettis

    linked to colony performance and laboratory and field data provide evidence that temperature extremes are a potential causative factor.

  8. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettis, Jeffery S; Rice, Nathan; Joselow, Katie; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Chaimanee, Veeranan

    2016-01-01

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 months when historically a queen might live one to two years. This high rate of queen failure coincides with the high mortality rates of colonies in the US, some years with >50% of colonies dying. In the current study, surveys of sperm viability in US queens were made to determine if sperm viability plays a role in queen or colony failure. Wide variation was observed in sperm viability from four sets of queens removed from colonies that beekeepers rated as in good health (n = 12; average viability = 92%), were replacing as part of normal management (n = 28; 57%), or where rated as failing (n = 18 and 19; 54% and 55%). Two additional paired set of queens showed a statistically significant difference in viability between colonies rated by the beekeeper as failing or in good health from the same apiaries. Queens removed from colonies rated in good health averaged high viability (ca. 85%) while those rated as failing or in poor health had significantly lower viability (ca. 50%). Thus low sperm viability was indicative of, or linked to, colony performance. To explore the source of low sperm viability, six commercial queen breeders were surveyed and wide variation in viability (range 60-90%) was documented between breeders. This variability could originate from the drones the queens mate with or temperature extremes that queens are exposed to during shipment. The role of shipping temperature as a possible explanation for low sperm viability was explored. We documented that during shipment queens are exposed to temperature spikes ( 40°C) and these spikes can kill 50% or more of the sperm stored in queen spermathecae in live queens. Clearly low sperm viability is linked to

  9. Colony Failure Linked to Low Sperm Viability in Honey Bee (Apis mellifera) Queens and an Exploration of Potential Causative Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettis, Jeffery S.; Rice, Nathan; Joselow, Katie; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Chaimanee, Veeranan

    2016-01-01

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 months when historically a queen might live one to two years. This high rate of queen failure coincides with the high mortality rates of colonies in the US, some years with >50% of colonies dying. In the current study, surveys of sperm viability in US queens were made to determine if sperm viability plays a role in queen or colony failure. Wide variation was observed in sperm viability from four sets of queens removed from colonies that beekeepers rated as in good health (n = 12; average viability = 92%), were replacing as part of normal management (n = 28; 57%), or where rated as failing (n = 18 and 19; 54% and 55%). Two additional paired set of queens showed a statistically significant difference in viability between colonies rated by the beekeeper as failing or in good health from the same apiaries. Queens removed from colonies rated in good health averaged high viability (ca. 85%) while those rated as failing or in poor health had significantly lower viability (ca. 50%). Thus low sperm viability was indicative of, or linked to, colony performance. To explore the source of low sperm viability, six commercial queen breeders were surveyed and wide variation in viability (range 60–90%) was documented between breeders. This variability could originate from the drones the queens mate with or temperature extremes that queens are exposed to during shipment. The role of shipping temperature as a possible explanation for low sperm viability was explored. We documented that during shipment queens are exposed to temperature spikes ( 40°C) and these spikes can kill 50% or more of the sperm stored in queen spermathecae in live queens. Clearly low sperm viability is linked to

  10. Cumulative impact of common genetic variants and other risk factors on colorectal cancer risk in 42 103 individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Tenesa, Albert; Farrington, Susan M.; Ballereau, Stephane; Brewster, David H.; Koessler, Thibaud; Pharoah, Paul; Schafmayer, Clemens; Hampe, Jochen; Voelzke, Henry; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hoffmeister, Michael; Brenner, Hermann; von Holst, Susanna; Picelli, Simone; Lindblom, Annika; Jenkins, Mark A.; Hopper, John L.; Casey, Graham; Duggan, David; Newcomb, Polly A.; Abuli, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellvi-Bel, Sergi; Niittymaeki, Iina; Tuupanen, Sari; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri; Zanke, Brent; Hudson, Tom; Gallinger, Steven; Barclay, Ella; Martin, Lynn; Gorman, Maggie; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Walther, Axel; Kerr, David; Lubbe, Steven; Broderick, Peter; Chandler, Ian; Pittman, Alan; Penegar, Steven; Campbell, Harry; Tomlinson, Ian; Houlston, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Colorectal cancer (CRC) has a substantial heritable component. Common genetic variation has been shown to contribute to CRC risk. A study was conducted in a large multi-population study to assess the feasibility of CRC risk prediction using common genetic variant data combined with other r

  11. Linking the spatial patterns of organisms and abiotic factors to ecosystem function and management: insights from semi-arid environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. T. Maestre

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Numerous theoretical and modeling studies have demonstrated the ecological significance of the spatial patterning of organisms on ecosystem functioning and dynamics. However, there is a paucity of empirical evidence that quantitatively shows how changes in the spatial patterns of the organisms forming biotic communities are directly related to ecosystem structure and functioning. In this article, I review a series of experiments and observational studies conducted in semi-arid environments from Spain (degraded calcareous shrubland, steppes dominated by Stipa tenacissima, and gypsum shrublands to: 1 evaluate whether the spatial patterns of the dominant biotic elements in the community are linked to ecosystem structure and functioning, and 2 test if these patterns, and those of abiotic factors, can be used to improve ecosystem restoration. In the semiarid steppes we found a significant positive relationship between the spatial pattern of the perennial plant community and: i the water status of S. tenacissima and ii perennial species richness and diversity. Experimental plantings conducted in these steppes showed that S. tenacissima facilitated the establishment of shrub seedlings, albeit the magnitude and direction of this effect was dependent on rainfall conditions during the first yr after planting. In the gypsum shrubland, a significant, direct relationship between the spatial pattern of the biological soil crusts and surrogates of ecosystem functioning (soil bulk density and respiration was found. In a degraded shrubland with very low vegetation cover, the survival of an introduced population of the shrub Pistacia lentiscus showed marked spatial patterns, which were related to the spatial patterns of soil properties such as soil compaction and sand content. These results provide empirical evidence on the importance of spatial patterns for maintaining ecosystem structure and functioning in semi-arid ecosystems

  12. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-08-23

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology-pleckstrin homology module, the catalytic site of these GEFs, with dissociation constants of approximately 0.3 microM. Binding to the GEFs required assembly of the MII into filaments and actin-stimulated ATPase activity. Binding of MII suppressed GEF activity. Accordingly, inhibition of MII ATPase activity caused release of GEFs and activation of Rho GTPases. Depletion of betaPIX GEF in migrating NIH3T3 fibroblasts suppressed lamellipodial protrusions and focal complex formation induced by MII inhibition. The results elucidate a functional link between MII and Rac1/Cdc42 GTPases, which may regulate protrusion/adhesion dynamics in migrating cells.

  13. SUMO-Dependent Synergism Involving Heat Shock Transcription Factors with Functions Linked to Seed Longevity and Desiccation Tolerance

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    Raúl Carranco

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A transcriptional synergism between HaHSFA9 (A9 and HaHSFA4a (A4a contributes to determining longevity and desiccation tolerance of sunflower (Helianthus annuus, L. seeds. Potential lysine SUMOylation sites were identified in A9 and A4a and mutated to arginine. We show that A9 is SUMOylated in planta at K38. Although we did not directly detect SUMOylated A4a in planta, we provide indirect evidence from transient expression experiments indicating that A4a is SUMOylated at K172. Different combinations of wild type and SUMOylation site mutants of A9 and A4a were analyzed by transient expression in sunflower embryos and leaves. Although most of the precedents in literature link SUMOylation with repression, the A9 and A4a synergism was fully abolished when the mutant forms for both factors were combined. However, the combination of mutant forms of A9 and A4a did not affect the nuclear retention of A4a by A9; therefore, the analyzed mutations would affect the synergism after the mutual interaction and nuclear co-localization of A9 and A4a. Our results suggest a role for HSF SUMOylation during late, zygotic, embryogenesis. The SUMOylation of A9 (or A4a would allow a crucial, synergic, transcriptional effect that occurs in maturing sunflower seeds.

  14. A single transcription factor regulates evolutionarily diverse but functionally linked metabolic pathways in response to nutrient availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Amy K; Reiss, David J; Pan, Min; Koide, Tie; Baliga, Nitin S

    2009-01-01

    During evolution, enzyme-coding genes are acquired and/or replaced through lateral gene transfer and compiled into metabolic pathways. Gene regulatory networks evolve to fine tune biochemical fluxes through such metabolic pathways, enabling organisms to acclimate to nutrient fluctuations in a competitive environment. Here, we demonstrate that a single TrmB family transcription factor in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1 globally coordinates functionally linked enzymes of diverse phylogeny in response to changes in carbon source availability. Specifically, during nutritional limitation, TrmB binds a cis-regulatory element to activate or repress 113 promoters of genes encoding enzymes in diverse metabolic pathways. By this mechanism, TrmB coordinates the expression of glycolysis, TCA cycle, and amino-acid biosynthesis pathways with the biosynthesis of their cognate cofactors (e.g. purine and thiamine). Notably, the TrmB-regulated metabolic network includes enzyme-coding genes that are uniquely archaeal as well as those that are conserved across all three domains of life. Simultaneous analysis of metabolic and gene regulatory network architectures suggests an ongoing process of co-evolution in which TrmB integrates the expression of metabolic enzyme-coding genes of diverse origins.

  15. Management Options and Factors Affecting Control of a Common Waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Biotype Resistant to Protoporphyrinogen Oxidase-Inhibiting Herbicides

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    Dana B. Harder

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Repeated use of protox-inhibiting herbicides has resulted in a common waterhemp (Amaranthus rudis Sauer biotype that survived lactofen applied up to 10 times the labeled rate. Field and greenhouse research evaluated control options for this biotype of common waterhemp. In the field, PRE applications of flumioxazin at 72 g ai ha−1, sulfentrazone at 240 g ai ha−1, and isoxaflutole at 70 g ai ha−1 controlled common waterhemp >90% up to 6 weeks after treatment. POST applications of fomesafen at 330 g ai ha−1, lactofen at 220 g ai ha−1, and acifluorfen at 420 g ai ha−1 resulted in <60% visual control of common waterhemp, but differences were detected among herbicides. In the greenhouse, glyphosate was the only herbicide that controlled protox resistant waterhemp. The majority of herbicide activity from POST flumioxazin, fomesafen, acifluorfen, and lactofen was from foliar placement, but control was less than 40% regardless of placement. Control of common waterhemp seeded at weekly intervals after herbicide treatment with flumioxazin, fomesafen, sulfentrazone, atrazine, and isoxaflutole exceeded 85% at 0 weeks after herbicide application (WAHA, while control with isoxaflutole was greater than 60% 6 WAHA. PRE and POST options for protox-resistant common waterhemp are available to manage herbicide resistance.

  16. Critical assessment of the research outcomes of European birth cohorts: linking environmental factors with non-communicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piler, P; Kandrnal, V; Bláha, L

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this review paper was to stimulate collaborative discussions toward the development of a general concept of an open source protocol for a feasible and efficient longitudinal birth cohort study exploring non-communicable diseases (NCDs), their multifactorial etiology and relations between various risk factors. The present paper systematically reviews the design of existing birth cohorts in Europe containing environmental exposure data, and assesses a quantity and quality of their research outcomes as their potential to be an effective tool for studying non-communicable diseases and their risk factors. European birth cohorts with more than 3000 participants have been included in the study. A total number of scientific papers published in the internationally recognized journals and their impact factors and citation records were evaluated for all cohorts as surrogates for their efficiency to contribute to NCDs understanding and thus their prevention. The birth cohorts contributing most significantly to the NCD understanding shared common features: (i) study size between 10,000 and 15,000 mother-child pairs; (ii) repeated assessment of children from prenatal into adulthood; and (iii) availability of biological samples. Smaller cohorts and cohorts with a specific focus generated a lower number of publications; however, these often received considerably a higher number of citations. General cohort studies with 10,000-15,000 mother-child pairs allow a broader context interpretation, publish a higher number of articles, and often lead to the formation of infrastructures for 'spin-off (nested) studies'. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence for increased SOX3 dosage as a risk factor for X-linked hypopituitarism and neural tube defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauters, M.; Frints, S.G.; Esch, H. van; Spruijt, L.; Baldewijns, M.M.; Die-Smulders, C.E.M. de; Fryns, J.P.; Marynen, P.; Froyen, G.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic duplications of varying lengths at Xq26-q27 involving SOX3 have been described in families with X-linked hypopituitarism. Using array-CGH we detected a 1.1 Mb microduplication at Xq27 in a large family with three males suffering from X-linked hypopituitarism. The duplication was mapped from

  18. Evaluation of What Parents Know about Their Children's Drug Use and How They Perceive the Most Common Family Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Jose-Ramon Fernandez; Villa, Roberto Secades; Seco, Guillermo Vallejo; Perez, Jose-Manuel Errasti

    2003-01-01

    Research on family risk factors for addictive behaviors in young people has not paid a great deal of attention to parents' knowledge of their children's addictive behaviors and of the family risk factors that affect such behaviors. The aim of this work is to compare knowledge about these two aspects in two groups of parents that differ regarding…

  19. LM-type tests for idiosyncratic and common unit roots in the exact factor model with AR(1) dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solberger, M.; Zhou, X.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments within the panel unit-root literature have illustrated how the exact factor model serves as a parsimonious framework and allows for consistent maximum likelihood inference even when it is misspecified contra the more general approximate factor model. In this paper we consider an

  20. Relations between common and specific factors of anxiety sensitivity and distress tolerance and fear, distress, and alcohol and substance use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Nicholas P; Macatee, Richard J; Norr, Aaron M; Raines, Amanda M; Schmidt, Norman B

    2015-06-01

    Whereas it has been speculated that the psychopathology risk factors anxiety sensitivity (AS) and distress tolerance (DT) are highly overlapping, no studies have examined whether a core affect sensitivity construct explains this relation. It was hypothesized that, in a sample of 808 treatment-seeking individuals (M(age) = 35.11, SD = 14.94), the best-fitting confirmatory factor analysis model of AS and DT would comprise a common underlying affect sensitivity factor orthogonal to DT and lower-order AS factors (physical, cognitive, and social concerns). It was also hypothesized that specific relations between the factors and fear, distress, and alcohol/substance use disorders would emerge. The best-fitting model comprised a common affect sensitivity factor orthogonal to DT and lower-order AS factors. Whereas the affect sensitivity and DT factors were associated with fear, distress, and alcohol/substance use disorders, AS cognitive concerns was only related to distress disorders and AS social concerns was only related to fear disorders.

  1. Integrin-linked kinase mediates the hydrogen peroxide-dependent transforming growth factor-β1 up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ramos, M; de Frutos, S; Griera, M; Luengo, A; Olmos, G; Rodriguez-Puyol, D; Calleros, L; Rodriguez-Puyol, M

    2013-08-01

    Transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) has been recognized as a central mediator in many pathological events related to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins accumulation, where their locally increased expression has been implicated in the fibrosis process of numerous organs, including glomerular fibrosis in the kidney. We and others have reported the TGF-β1 synthesis regulation by reactive oxygen species (ROS), and moreover we also described the implication of integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in the AP-1-dependent TGF-β1 up-regulation. Thus, we propose here that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-dependent TGF-β1 regulation may be mediated by ILK activation. First we confirmed the increase in TGF-β1 expression in human mesangial cells (HMC) after treatment with H2O2 or with an alternative H2O2-generating system such as the glucose-oxidase enzyme (GOX). By using immunoblotting, immunofluorescence, and ELISA techniques, we demonstrate that extracellular H2O2 up-regulates TGF-β1 transcription, as well as increases TGF-β1 promoter activity. Furthermore, catalase-decreased intracellular H2O2 abolished TGF-β1 up-regulation. The use of pharmacological inhibitors as well as knockdown of ILK with small interfering RNA (siRNA) demonstrated the implication of a PI3K/ILK/AKT/ERK MAPK signaling pathway axis in the H2O2-induced TGF-β1 overexpression. Finally, we explored the physiological relevance of these findings by treating HMC with angiotensin II, a known stimuli of H2O2 synthesis. Our results confirm the relevance of previous findings after a more physiological stimulus. In summary, our results provide evidence that ILK activity changes may act as a mechanism in response to different stimuli such as H2O2 in the induced TGF-β1 up-regulation in pathological or even physiological conditions.

  2. Transcription factor Ets-1 links glucotoxicity to pancreatic beta cell dysfunction through inhibiting PDX-1 expression in rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Sha, Min; Wang, Yanyang; Wu, Tijun; Shan, Wei; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Wenbo; Zhu, Yunxia; Sun, Yujie; Shi, Yuguang; Bleich, David; Han, Xiao

    2016-02-01

    'Glucotoxicity' is a term used to convey the negative effect of hyperglycaemia on beta cell function; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms that impair insulin secretion and gene expression are poorly defined. Our objective was to define the role of transcription factor v-ets avian erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homologue 1 (Ets-1) in beta cell glucotoxicity. Primary islets and Min6 cells were exposed to high glucose and Ets-1 expression was measured. Recombinant adenovirus and transgenic mice were used to upregulate Ets-1 expression in beta cells in vitro and in vivo, and insulin secretion was assessed. The binding activity of H3/H4 histone on the Ets-1 promoter, and that of forkhead box (FOX)A2, FOXO1 and Ets-1 on the Pdx-1 promoter was measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation and quantitative real-time PCR assay. High glucose induced upregulation of Ets-1 expression and hyperacetylation of histone H3 and H4 at the Ets-1 gene promoter in beta cells. Ets-1 overexpression dramatically suppressed insulin secretion and biosynthesis both in vivo and in vitro. Besides, Ets-1 overexpression increased the activity of FOXO1 but decreased that of FOXA2 binding to the pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1 (PDX-1) homology region 2 (PH2), resulting in inhibition of Pdx-1 promoter activity and downregulation of PDX-1 expression and activity. In addition, high glucose promoted the interaction of Ets-1 and FOXO1, and the activity of Ets-1 binding to the Pdx-1 promoter. Importantly, PDX-1 overexpression reversed the defect in pancreatic beta cells induced by Ets-1 excess, while knockdown of Ets-1 prevented hyperglycaemia-induced dysfunction of pancreatic beta cells. Our observations suggest that Ets-1 links glucotoxicity to pancreatic beta cell dysfunction through inhibiting PDX-1 expression in type 2 diabetes.

  3. Socio-Economic Factors Related to Moral Reasoning in Childhood and Adolescence: The Missing Link between Brain and Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Carla Silvia eCaravita

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuroscientific and psychological research on moral development has until now developed independently, referring to distinct theoretical models, contents and methods. In particular, the influence of socio-economic and cultural factors on morality has been broadly investigated by psychologists but as yet has not been investigated by neuroscientists. The value of bridging these two areas both theoretically and methodologically has, however, been suggested. This study aims at providing a first connection between neuroscientific and psychological literature on morality by investigating whether socio-economic dimensions, i.e. living socio-geographic/economic area, immigrant status and SES, affect moral reasoning as operationalized in moral domain theory (a seminal approach in psychological studies on morality and in Greene and colleagues’ (2001 perspective (one of the main approaches in neuroethics research. Participants were 81 primary school (M = 8.98 yrs.; SD = 0.39, 72 middle school (M = 12.14 yrs.; SD = 0.61 and 73 high school (M = 15.10 yrs.; SD = 0.38 students from rural and urban areas. Participants’ immigrant status (native vs. immigrant and family SES level were recorded. Moral reasoning was assessed by means of a series of personal and impersonal dilemmas based on Greene and colleagues' (2001 neuroimaging experiment and a series of moral and socio-conventional rule dilemmas based on the moral domain theory. Living socio-geographic/economic area, immigrant status and SES mainly affected evaluations of moral and, to a higher extent, socio-conventional dilemmas, but had no impact on judgment of personal and impersonal dilemmas. Results are mainly discussed from the angle of possible theoretical links and suggestions emerging for studies on moral reasoning in the frameworks of neuroscience and psychology.

  4. Sigma-1 receptor chaperone and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: emerging links between cardiovascular disease and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a close relationship between depression and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although it is known that the central nervous system (CNS) contributes to this relationship, the detailed mechanisms involved in this process remain unclear. Recent studies suggest that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) molecular chaperone sigma-1 receptor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) play a role in the pathophysiology of CVD and depression. Several meta-analysis studies have showed that levels of BDNF in the blood of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) are lower than normal controls, indicating that blood BDNF might be a biomarker for depression. Furthermore, blood levels of BDNF in patients with CVD are also lower than normal controls. A recent study using conditional BDNF knock-out mice in animal models of myocardial infarction highlighted the role of CNS-mediated mechanisms in the cardioprotective effects of BDNF. In addition, a recent study shows that decreased levels of sigma-1 receptor in the mouse brain contribute to the association between heart failure and depression. Moreover, sigma-1 receptor agonists, including the endogenous neurosteroid dehydroepiandosterone (DHEA) and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluvoxamine, show potent cardioprotective and antidepressive effects in rodents, via sigma-1 receptor stimulation. Interestingly, agonist activation of sigma-1 receptors increased the secretion of mature BDNF from its precursor proBDNF via chaperone activity in the ER. Given the role of ER stress in the pathophysiology of CVD and MDD, the author will discuss the potential link between sigma-1 receptors and BDNF-TrkB pathway in the pathophysiology of these two diseases. Finally, the author will make a case for potent sigma-1 receptor agonists and TrkB agonists as new potential therapeutic drugs for depressive patients with CVD.

  5. The Role of Outside-School Factors in Science Education: A Two-Stage Theoretical Model Linking Bourdieu and Sen, with a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokpinar, Tuba; Reiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The literature in science education highlights the potentially significant role of outside-school factors such as parents, cultural contexts and role models in students' formation of science attitudes and aspirations, and their attainment in science classes. In this paper, building on and linking Bourdieu's key concepts of habitus, cultural and…

  6. The Role of Outside-School Factors in Science Education: A Two-Stage Theoretical Model Linking Bourdieu and Sen, with a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokpinar, Tuba; Reiss, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The literature in science education highlights the potentially significant role of outside-school factors such as parents, cultural contexts and role models in students' formation of science attitudes and aspirations, and their attainment in science classes. In this paper, building on and linking Bourdieu's key concepts of habitus, cultural and…

  7. Risk Factors and Epidemiology of the Ten Most Common Salmonella Serovars from Patients in Thailand: 2002-2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Rene S.; Bangtrakulnonth, A.; Pulsrikarn, C.

    2009-01-01

    . Choleraesuis was recovered with a higher frequency from patients in Bangkok and the central region, whereas S. Enteritidis was recovered predominantly from patients in the southern region. This study also indicates a shift in prevalence of the most common Salmonella serovars responsible for human infections...

  8. Influence of in ovo mercury exposure, lake acidity, and other factors on common loon egg and chick quality in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a field study in Wisconsin to characterize in ovo mercury (Hg) exposure in common loons (Gavia immer). Total Hg mass fractions ranged from 0.17 to 1.23 ìg/g wet weight (ww) in eggs collected from nests on lakes representing a wide range of pH (5.0 - 8.1) and ...

  9. Comparison of Methods for Adjusting Incorrect Assignments of Items to Subtests Oblique Multiple Group Method Versus Confirmatory Common Factor Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stuive, Ilse; Kiers, Henk A.L.; Timmerman, Marieke E.

    2009-01-01

    A common question in test evaluation is whether an a priori assignment of items to subtests is supported by empirical data. If the analysis results indicate the assignment of items to subtests under study is not supported by data, the assignment is often adjusted. In this study the authors compare t

  10. Commonly studied polymorphisms in inflammatory cytokine genes show only minor effects on mortality and related risk factors in nonagenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dato, Serena; Krabbe, Karen S; Thinggaard, Mikael;

    2010-01-01

    , in nonagenarian men, the balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory activity at IL18 and IL10 loci is protective against cognitive decline. In conclusion, in this large study with virtually complete follow-up, commonly studied polymorphisms in cytokine genes do not have a major impact on late-life survival...

  11. Forest commons and local enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhatre, Ashwini; Agrawal, Arun

    2008-09-09

    This article examines the relationship between local enforcement and forests used as commons. It uses a unique multicountry dataset, created over the past 15 years by the International Forestry Resources and Institutions Research Program. Drawing on original enforcement and forest commons data from 9 countries, we find that higher levels of local enforcement have a strong and positive but complex relationship to the probability of forest regeneration. This relationship holds even when the influence of a number of other factors such as user group size, subsistence, and commercial importance of forests, size of forest, and collective action for forest improvement activities is taken into account. Although several of the above factors have a statistically significant relationship to changes in the condition of forest commons, differences in levels of local enforcement strongly moderate their link with forest commons outcomes. The research, using data from diverse political, social, and ecological contexts, shows both the importance of enforcement to forest commons and some of the limits of forest governance through commons arrangements.

  12. Synthesis and purification of a toxin-linked conjugate targeting epidermal growth factor receptor in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chengyuan; Li, Yang; Li, Zhixin; Huang, Haiyan; Xu, Kan; Xu, Haiyang; Bai, Jieying; Li, Xiao; Zhao, Gang

    2012-05-01

    Aberrant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling is a common feature of multiple tumor types, including glioblastoma (GBM). As such, EGFR has emerged as an attractive target for antitumor therapy. In the present study, we sought to develop an immunotoxin capable of specifically targeting EGFR-expressing cells and mediating inhibition of cell growth and cell killing. The Luffin P1 (LP1) ribosome inactivating protein was chosen to generate a fusion protein, antiEGFR/LP1, based upon its potent protein synthesis inhibition and small size (5 kDa). LP1 was fused to the C-terminus of an anti-EGFR single-chain antibody (scFv). The recombinant antiEGFR/LP1 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli, and refolded and purified on an immobilized Ni(2+)-affinity chromatography column. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis revealed that antiEGFR/LP1 was sufficiently expressed. Confocal microscopy and flow cytometry demonstrated that antiEGFR/LP1 bound specifically to EGFR-positive cells (U251), as almost no binding to EGFR-negative (Jurkat cells) was observed under identical time and dosage conditions. Finally, the MTT cell viability assay showed that antiEGFR/LP1 elicited obvious cytotoxicity toward EGFR-positive tumor cells. Collectively, these results suggest that antiEGFR/LP1 is biologically active and specific toward EGFR-positive tumor cells and may represent an effective EGFR-targeted cancer therapy.

  13. Disability due to maternal common mental disorders (CMDs) as a risk factor for chronic childhood malnutrition: cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Lopes Cavalcante-Neto; Cristiane Silvestre de Paula; Telma Maria de Menezes Toledo Florêncio; Claudio Torres de Miranda

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT: CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: The disability associated with maternal common mental disorders (CMDs) is among the possible explanations for the association between chronic childhood malnutrition and CMDs. CMDs may impair the mother's ability to perform her role, particularly in deprived environments. The present study aimed to evaluate whether disability relating to CMDs could be part of the pathway of the association between childhood malnutrition and maternal CMDs. DESIGN AND SETTING:...

  14. Prevalence of Common Mental Disorders in a Rural District of Kenya, and Socio-Demographic Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Kiima

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Association between common mental disorders (CMDs, equity, poverty and socio-economic functioning are relatively well explored in high income countries, but there have been fewer studies in low and middle income countries, despite the considerable burden posed by mental disorders, especially in Africa, and their potential impact on development. This paper reports a population-based epidemiological survey of a rural area in Kenya. A random sample of 2% of all adults living in private households in Maseno, Kisumu District of Nyanza Province, Kenya (50,000 population, were studied. The Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R was used to determine the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMDs. Associations with socio-demographic and economic characteristics were explored. A CMD prevalence of 10.8% was found, with no gender difference. Higher rates of illness were found in those who were of older age and those in poor physical health. We conclude that CMDs are common in Kenya and rates are elevated among people who are older, and those in poor health.

  15. Prevalence of common mental disorders in a rural district of Kenya, and socio-demographic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Rachel; Njenga, Frank; Okonji, Marx; Kigamwa, Pius; Baraza, Makheti; Ayuyo, James; Singleton, Nicola; McManus, Sally; Kiima, David

    2012-05-01

    Association between common mental disorders (CMDs), equity, poverty and socio-economic functioning are relatively well explored in high income countries, but there have been fewer studies in low and middle income countries, despite the considerable burden posed by mental disorders, especially in Africa, and their potential impact on development. This paper reports a population-based epidemiological survey of a rural area in Kenya. A random sample of 2% of all adults living in private households in Maseno, Kisumu District of Nyanza Province, Kenya (50,000 population), were studied. The Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R) was used to determine the prevalence of common mental disorders (CMDs). Associations with socio-demographic and economic characteristics were explored. A CMD prevalence of 10.8% was found, with no gender difference. Higher rates of illness were found in those who were of older age and those in poor physical health. We conclude that CMDs are common in Kenya and rates are elevated among people who are older, and those in poor health.

  16. Common Mechanisms Underlying the Proconflict Effects of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor, A Benzodiazepine Inverse Agonist and Electric Foot-Shock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Sietse F. de; Katz, Jonathan L.; Valentino, Rita J.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a benzodiazepine inverse agonist (methyl-6,7-dimethoxy-4-ethyl-β-carboline-3-carboxylate; DMCM) and electric foot-shock on rat conflict behavior were characterized and compared. Rats were trained to lever press under a multiple fixed-ratio schedul

  17. NF-κB Links TLR2 and PAR1 to Soluble Immunomodulator Factor Secretion in Human Platelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damien, Pauline; Cognasse, Fabrice; Payrastre, Bernard; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil; Arthaud, Charles-Antoine; Eyraud, Marie-Ange; Phipps, Richard P.; McNicol, Archibald; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind

    2017-01-01

    The primary toll-like receptor (TLR)-mediated immune cell response pathway common for all TLRs is MyD88-dependent activation of NF-κB, a seminal transcription factor for many chemokines and cytokines. Remarkably, anucleate platelets express the NF-κB machinery, whose role in platelets remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the contribution of NF-κB in the release of cytokines and serotonin by human platelets, following selective stimulation of TLR2 and protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1), a classical and non-classical pattern-recognition receptor, respectively, able to participate to the innate immune system. We discovered that platelet PAR1 activation drives the process of NF-κB phosphorylation, in contrast to TLR2 activation, which induces a slower phosphorylation process. Conversely, platelet PAR1 and TLR2 activation induces similar ERK1/2, p38, and AKT phosphorylation. Moreover, we found that engagement of platelet TLR2 with its ligand, Pam3CSK4, significantly increases the release of sCD62P, RANTES, and sCD40L; this effect was attenuated by incubating platelets with a blocking anti-TLR2 antibody. This effect appeared selective since no modulation of serotonin secretion was observed following platelet TLR2 activation. Platelet release of sCD62P, RANTES, and sCD40L following TLR2 or PAR1 triggering was abolished in the presence of the NF-κB inhibitor Bay11-7082, while serotonin release following PAR1 activation was significantly decreased. These new findings support the concept that NF-κB is an important player in platelet immunoregulations and functions. PMID:28220122

  18. An analysis of fetal hemoglobin variation in sickle cell disease: the relative contributions of the X-linked factor, beta-globin haplotypes, alpha-globin gene number, gender, and age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y C; Smith, K D; Moore, R D; Serjeant, G R; Dover, G J

    1995-02-15

    Five factors have been shown to influence the 20-fold variation of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) levels in sickle cell anemia (SS): age, sex, the alpha-globin gene number, beta-globin haplotypes, and an X-linked locus that regulates the production of Hb F-containing erythrocytes (F cells), ie, the F-cell production (FCP) locus. To determine the relative importance of these factors, we studied 257 Jamaican SS subjects from a Cohort group identified by newborn screening and from a Sib Pair study. Linear regression analyses showed that each variable, when analyzed alone, had a significant association with Hb F levels (P haplotypes, alpha-globin genes, and age accounted for less than 10% of the variation. The association between the beta-globin haplotypes and Hb F levels becomes apparent if the influence of the FCP locus is removed by analyzing only individuals with the same FCP phenotype. Thus, the FCP locus is the most important factor identified to date in determining Hb F levels. The variation within each FCP phenotype is modulated by factors associated with the three common beta-globin haplotypes and other as yet unidentified factor(s).

  19. Eating-related environmental factors in underweight eating disorders and obesity: are there common vulnerabilities during childhood and early adolescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, I; Villarejo, C; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Perpiñá, C; Vilarrasa, N; Granero, R; Cebolla, A; Botella, C; Montserrat-Gil de Bernabe, M; Penelo, E; Casella, S; Islam, M A; Orekhova, E; Casanueva, F F; Karwautz, A; Menchón, J M; Treasure, J; Fernández-Aranda, F

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to examine whether there is an association between individual, social and family influences and dysfunctional eating patterns early in life and the likelihood of developing a subsequent underweight eating disorder (ED) or obesity. The total sample comprised 152 individuals (underweight ED, n = 45; obese patients, n = 65; healthy controls; n = 42) from Barcelona, Spain. The Cross-Cultural Questionnaire (CCQ) was used to assess early eating influences as well as individual and family eating patterns and attitudes towards food. Even though a few shared eating influences emerged for both groups, unique factors were also observed. Whereas relationship with friends, teasing about eating habits by family members and the mass media were of specific relevance to the underweight ED group, the patient's own physical appearance, body dissatisfaction, teasing about eating habits by friends, teasing about body shape by family members and dysfunctional eating patterns were unique to obesity. Overlapping environmental risk factors provide evidence for integral prevention and intervention approaches that simultaneously tackle a range of weight-related problems. The unique factors might be important for targeting high-risk individuals. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  20. Prenatal exposure to common environmental factors affects brain lipids and increases risk of developing autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christine T; Wais, Joshua; Crawford, Dorota A

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) has been on the rise over recent years. The presence of diverse subsets of candidate genes in each individual with an ASD and the vast variability of phenotypical differences suggest that the interference of an exogenous environmental component may greatly contribute to the development of ASDs. The lipid mediator prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ) is released from phospholipids of cell membranes, and is important in brain development and function; PGE2 is involved in differentiation, synaptic plasticity and calcium regulation. The previous review already described extrinsic factors, including deficient dietary supplementation, and exposure to oxidative stress, infections and inflammation that can disrupt signaling of the PGE2 pathway and contribute to ASDs. In this review, the structure and establishment of two key protective barriers for the brain during early development are described: the blood-brain barrier; and the placental barrier. Then, the first comprehensive summary of other environmental factors, such as exposure to chemicals in air pollution, pesticides and consumer products, which can also disturb PGE2 signaling and increase the risk for developing ASDs is provided. Also, how these exogenous agents are capable of crossing the protective barriers of the brain during critical developmental periods when barrier components are still being formed is described. This review underlines the importance of avoiding or limiting exposure to these factors during vulnerable periods in development.

  1. Perceptual learning transfer: Salience of the common element as a factor contributing to the intermixed/blocked effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, Antonio A; Prados, Jose

    2014-10-01

    Rats received intermixed or blocked preexposure to 2 similar flavor compounds, AX and BX. Following preexposure, conditioning trials took place in which a novel compound stimulus NX was paired with an illness-induced unconditioned stimulus. Animals that were given intermixed preexposure to AX and BX showed lower generalization of the aversive response conditioned to NX to a new compound, ZX, than animals that were given blocked preexposure. The results support the proposal that intermixed preexposure reduces the salience of the common element X to a greater extent than blocked preexposure. The way in which current theories of perceptual learning can predict a differential salience of X after intermixed and blocked preexposure is discussed.

  2. General practitioners' self-perceived ability to recognize severity of common mental disorders: an underestimated factor in case identification?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykletun Arnstein

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have shown that general practitioners (GPs under-diagnose common mental disorders, and that training courses hardly improve this practice. The influence of GPs' self-perceived ability to recognize the severity of such disorders on these facts has not been investigated. This study explores: 1 GPs' perceived ability to recognize major depressive episode (MDE and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD in their patients; 2 The GPs' observed ability to recognize severity of these disorders; and 3 If the observed ability to recognize severity is associated with their perceived ability. Methods In a cross-sectional design 40 Norwegian GPs examined 15 – 28 patients each (total N = 724. The GPs' rated their perceived ability to recognize MDE and GAD on a four-point Likert-scale. The GPs' observed ability to recognize severity was defined as the mean of the correlations between the GPs rating of Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale and the diagnostic reference standards for MDE and GAD filled in by patients. Results Twenty-two GPs considered their perceived ability to recognize MDE as rather good, and the other 18 as moderate/bad. For GAD 12 GPs' perceived their ability as rather good, while 28 considered their ability to be moderate/bad. The observed ability to recognize severity concerning MDE was 0.63 and concerning GAD 0.45. There was no significant association between GPs' perceived and observed abilities to recognize MDE (p = 0.19 and GAD (p = 0.34 Conclusion This study found a discrepancy between the GPs' perceived and observed ability to recognize common mental disorders. The lack of association between GPs' perceived and observed ability to recognize such disorders indicate low understanding of own recognition abilities. This might contribute to explain the low effectiveness of interventions aimed to increase GPs' abilities to recognize mental disorders.

  3. Factor analysis of olfactory responses in Drosophila melanogaster enhancer-trap lines as a method for ascertaining common reception components for different odorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Fernando; Kim, Min-Su; Hovemann, Bernard; Alcorta, Esther

    2002-01-01

    Olfactory information is transmitted to the brain using combinatorial receptor codes; consequently, a single reception element can be activated by different odorants. Several methods have been applied to describe from a functional point of view those odorants sharing olfactory reception components. A genetic approach in Drosophila melanogaster used correlation between behavioral responses to different odorants for deducing common olfactory pathway-genes. A factor analysis applied to behavioral responses to five odorants of 27 antennal enhancer-trap lines revealed three components, explaining 82.1% of the total observed variance. A first factor affects simultaneously the response to ethyl acetate, propionaldehyde, and acetone. A second factor was related to responses to ethyl acetate, ethyl alcohol, and acetone, and, finally, the third factor associates responses to acetic acid and ethyl acetate. They contribute by 35.1%, 36.9%, and 28%, respectively, to the explained variance.

  4. Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Common warts By Mayo Clinic Staff Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny ...

  5. Identification of Common AFLP Markers Linked with Resistance to Bacterial Wilt in Potato%马铃薯青枯病抗性的共性AFLP标记的初步定位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郜刚; 金黎平; 屈冬玉; 连勇; 闫桂琴; 段江燕

    2005-01-01

    The bulked Segregant Analysis (BSA) was used to examine and evaluate the feasibility and the efficiency of the identification of markers linked to resistance to bacterial wilt (Ralstonia solanacearum) in potato. A highly resistant primitive cultivated species Solanum phureja was employed to generate a mapping population to perform the bulked segregant analysis for screening of AFLP markers linked with the resistance. Another population which had genetic similarity to the mapping population was used for testing of the markers achieved. A novel strategy named common AFLP marker was used to identify the genomic position of the molecular markers in the linkage map mapped before. Several informative primer combinations were employed in the detection and the common AFLP markers ATG/CTC 307.0, ATG/CTC 246.0, ATG/CTC 191.0 and AAC/CAC 79.0 were considered as markers that associated with the resistance and located on the relevant chromosome maps. The markers were located on chromosome 1 and 12 and may be used for other related studies.%利用集群分类法(bulked segregant analysis, BSA)对与马铃薯青枯病(Ralstonia solanacearum) 抗性连锁的分子标记进行了分析.以马铃薯青枯病高抗性的原始栽培种Solanum phureja获得的二倍体群体为作图群体进行AFLP标记的初步筛选,另选一个与作图群体有较大亲缘关系和相近遗传背景的二倍体群体对所获标记进行验证.在标记鉴定过程中使用了共性AFLP标记(common AFLP marker)的方法.通过与已构建的连锁图谱的比较分析,获得了4个与马铃薯青枯病抗性相关的4个AFLP标记ATG/CTC 307.0, ATG/CTC 246.0, ATG/CTC 191.0和AAC/CAC 79.0,将其分别定位于染色体1和12上,可望应用于其它相关研究.

  6. A Polynomial Greatest Common Factor Of Numerical Matrix%多项式最大公因式的数值矩阵求法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩建玲

    2012-01-01

    求多项式的最大公因式常用分解因式和辗转相除法,分解因式对次数较高的多项式有一定难度,而辗转相除法又比较繁琐,根据矩阵的性质提出了一种求两个及两个以上多项式的最大公因式的方法——数值矩阵法。%Find the greatest common divisor of polynomials commonly used decomposition type and Euclidean algorithm, factored some difficulty on the number of higher polynomial, Euclidean algorithm is more complicated. According to the nature of the matrix to a request of two or more for the greatest common divisor of polynomials - numerical matrix method.

  7. Execution of diagnostic testing has a stronger effect on emergency department crowding than other common factors: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahisa Kawano

    Full Text Available STUDY OBJECTIVE: We compared the effects of execution of diagnostic tests in the emergency department (ED and other common factors on the length of ED stay to identify those with the greatest impacts on ED crowding. METHODS: Between February 2010 and January 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional, single-center study in the ED of a large, urban, teaching hospital in Japan. Patients who visited the ED during the study period were enrolled. We excluded (1 patients scheduled for admission or pharmaceutical prescription, and (2 neonates requiring intensive care transferred from other hospitals. Multivariate linear regression was performed on log-transformed length of ED stay in admitted and discharged patients to compare influence of diagnostic tests and other common predictors. To quantify the range of change in length of ED stay given a unit change of the predictor, a generalized linear model was used for each group. RESULTS: During the study period, 55,285 patients were enrolled. In discharged patients, laboratory blood tests had the highest standardized β coefficient (0.44 among common predictors, and increased length of ED stay by 72.5 minutes (95% CI, 72.8-76.1 minutes. In admitted patients, computed tomography (CT had the highest standardized β coefficient (0.17, and increased length of ED stay by 32.7 minutes (95% CI, 40.0-49.9 minutes. Although other common input and output factors were significant contributors, they had smaller standardized β coefficients in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: Execution of laboratory blood tests and CT had a stronger influence on length of ED stay than other common input and output factors.

  8. Short-term spatial variation in the demography of a common Neotropical liana is influenced by environmental factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franci, Luciana De Campos; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Svenning, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    We used matrix models to investigate the relation between population dynamics of the liana Mansoa difficilis and environmental factors in frag- mented Atlantic forest in Brazil. The fate (growth and mortality) of individuals and the number of new individuals were recorded for 3 years in 100 plots...... of light availability on k was less important than tree community structure, which allowed high population growth rates only in a small part of the forest. These findings support the notion that tree community characteristics are the key to understand and predict the observed recent increase in the density...

  9. Improved Detection of Common Variants Associated with Schizophrenia by Leveraging Pleiotropy with Cardiovascular-Disease Risk Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Ole A; Djurovic, Srdjan; Thompson, Wesley K;

    2013-01-01

    -pleiotropy-informed method for improving gene discovery with the use of GWAS summary-statistics data. We applied this methodology to identify additional loci associated with schizophrenia (SCZ), a highly heritable disorder with significant missing heritability. Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest comorbidity...... between SCZ and cardiovascular-disease (CVD) risk factors, including systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, low- and high-density lipoprotein, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and type 2 diabetes. Using stratified quantile-quantile plots, we show enrichment of SNPs associated with SCZ as a function...

  10. Factores socioculturales y psicológicos vinculados a la lactancia materna exclusiva Sociocultural and psychological factors linked to exclusive breastfeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regla Caridad Broche Candó

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la lactancia materna ha sido la forma de alimentación más segura para el ser humano en toda su historia. Esta leche es la única que asegura al niño pequeño una alimentación adecuada y le protege de las infecciones. Objetivo: determinar el comportamiento de los principales factores socioculturales y psicológicos vinculados a la práctica y abandono de la lactancia materna exclusiva y su repercusión en el estado de salud de los lactantes. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo de corte transversal, en el municipio Diego Ibarra, Estado de Carabobo, en el año 2008. La muestra estuvo conformada por 96 lactantes cuyas madres dieron su consentimiento informado para participar en este. Resultados: se observó un predominio de las madres adolescentes asociado al abandono de la lactancia materna antes de los 4 meses, la secundaria fue el nivel escolar más frecuente en la serie, sin embargo, el predominio de la categoría de obrera o técnica se asoció a una lactancia menor de 4 meses. Conclusiones: al nacimiento predominó la lactancia materna mixta, con una tendencia progresiva al uso de la lactancia artificial a partir del cuarto mes. Se encontró mayor frecuencia de madres con conocimientos deficientes sobre la lactancia materna, y fueron estas las que lactaron a sus bebés por menor tiempo. Más de las tres cuartas partes de las mujeres refirieron como causa de abandono de la lactancia materna exclusiva, que el niño se quedaba con hambre y la insuficiente disponibilidad de leche en las mamas.Introduction: the breastfeeding has been the more safe feeding way for human being in all its history. This type of milk is the only assuring the infant a proper feeding while protecting him of infections. Objective: to determine the behavior of main sociocultural and psychological factors linked to practice and giving up of the exclusive breastfeeding and its repercussion on infant health status. Methods: a cross-sectional and

  11. Organisational and human factors in risk management: common beliefs, deceived ideas; Les Facteurs Organisationnels et Humains de la gestion des risques: idees recues, idees decues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-09-22

    The author propose critical discussions of common beliefs about the ineluctability of human error, individual ability, the validity of written procedures, good organisation, the culture of safety, the contribution of quality approaches to safety, the continuous improvement of safety, the good usage of the return on experience, the rigour and objectivity of the FOH (organisational and human factor) approach, and appealing to experts in FOHs

  12. Personal Values as Mitigating Factors in the Link between Income and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the European Social Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgellis, Yannis; Tsitsianis, Nicholas; Yin, Ya Ping

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey, we examine the link between income, reference income and life satisfaction across Western Europe. We find that whilst there is a strong positive relationship between income and life satisfaction, reference or comparison income exerts a strong negative influence. Interestingly, our…

  13. Personal Values as Mitigating Factors in the Link between Income and Life Satisfaction: Evidence from the European Social Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgellis, Yannis; Tsitsianis, Nicholas; Yin, Ya Ping

    2009-01-01

    Using data from the first two rounds of the European Social Survey, we examine the link between income, reference income and life satisfaction across Western Europe. We find that whilst there is a strong positive relationship between income and life satisfaction, reference or comparison income exerts a strong negative influence. Interestingly, our…

  14. The Human Factor in Dissemination: Field Agent Roles in Their Organizational Context. Linking R&D with Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Karen Seashore; Kell, Diane

    Linking agents, called "field agents," coordinated and provided educational improvement services to schools participating in the National Institute of Education's Research and Development Utilization (RDU) program. To assess the field agents' roles, attitudes, behaviors, and client relations, researchers surveyed and interviewed agents,…

  15. Colony failure linked to low sperm viability in honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens and an exploration of potential causative factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queen health is closely linked to colony performance in honey bees as a single queen is normally responsible for all egg laying and brood production within the colony. In the U. S. in recent years, queens have been failing at a high rate; with 50% or greater of queens replaced in colonies within 6 m...

  16. Status hierarchy, attractiveness hierarchy and sex ratio : Three contextual factors explaining the status-aggression link among adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Michiel; Dijkstra, Jan; Veenstra, René

    2013-01-01

    The moderating effects of three specific conditions (status hierarchy, attractiveness hierarchy and sex ratio) on the link between status (popularity) and physical and relational aggression were examined in a large sample of adolescent boys (N = 1,665) and girls (N = 1,637) (M age = 13.60). In line

  17. Status hierarchy, attractiveness hierarchy and sex ratio : Three contextual factors explaining the status-aggression link among adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, Michiel; Dijkstra, Jan; Veenstra, René

    The moderating effects of three specific conditions (status hierarchy, attractiveness hierarchy and sex ratio) on the link between status (popularity) and physical and relational aggression were examined in a large sample of adolescent boys (N = 1,665) and girls (N = 1,637) (M age = 13.60). In line

  18. Status Hierarchy, Attractiveness Hierarchy and Sex Ratio: Three Contextual Factors Explaining the Status-Aggression Link among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, Michiel; Dijkstra, Jan Kornelis; Veenstra, Rene

    2013-01-01

    The moderating effects of three specific conditions (status hierarchy, attractiveness hierarchy and sex ratio) on the link between status (popularity) and physical and relational aggression were examined in a large sample of adolescent boys ("N" = 1,665) and girls ("N" = 1,637) ("M" age = 13.60). In line with the…

  19. Common variation at 1q24.1 (ALDH9A1 is a potential risk factor for renal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Y R Henrion

    Full Text Available So far six susceptibility loci for renal cell carcinoma (RCC have been discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS. To identify additional RCC common risk loci, we performed a meta-analysis of published GWAS (totalling 2,215 cases and 8,566 controls of Western-European background with imputation using 1000 Genomes Project and UK10K Project data as reference panels and followed up the most significant association signals [22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 3 indels in eight genomic regions] in 383 cases and 2,189 controls from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. A combined analysis identified a promising susceptibility locus mapping to 1q24.1 marked by the imputed SNP rs3845536 (Pcombined =2.30x10-8. Specifically, the signal maps to intron 4 of the ALDH9A1 gene (aldehyde dehydrogenase 9 family, member A1. We further evaluated this potential signal in 2,461 cases and 5,081 controls from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC GWAS of RCC cases and controls from multiple European regions. In contrast to earlier findings no association was shown in the IARC series (P=0.94; Pcombined =2.73x10-5. While variation at 1q24.1 represents a potential risk locus for RCC, future replication analyses are required to substantiate our observation.

  20. Genome-wide association study confirms SNPs in SNCA and the MAPT region as common risk factors for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Todd L; Scott, William K; Almonte, Cherylyn; Burt, Amber; Powell, Eric H; Beecham, Gary W; Wang, Liyong; Züchner, Stephan; Konidari, Ioanna; Wang, Gaofeng; Singer, Carlos; Nahab, Fatta; Scott, Burton; Stajich, Jeffrey M; Pericak-Vance, Margaret; Haines, Jonathan; Vance, Jeffery M; Martin, Eden R

    2010-03-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder with a cumulative prevalence of greater than one per thousand. To date three independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have investigated the genetic susceptibility to PD. These studies implicated several genes as PD risk loci with strong, but not genome-wide significant, associations. In this study, we combined data from two previously published GWAS of Caucasian subjects with our GWAS of 604 cases and 619 controls for a joint analysis with a combined sample size of 1752 cases and 1745 controls. SNPs in SNCA (rs2736990, p-value = 6.7 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0109, odds ratio (OR) = 1.29 [95% CI: 1.17-1.42] G vs. A allele, population attributable risk percent (PAR%) = 12%) and the MAPT region (rs11012, p-value = 5.6 x 10(-8); genome-wide adjusted p = 0.0079, OR = 0.70 [95% CI: 0.62-0.79] T vs. C allele, PAR%= 8%) were genome-wide significant. No other SNPs were genome-wide significant in this analysis. This study confirms that SNCA and the MAPT region are major genes whose common variants are influencing risk of PD.

  1. Sequence variants in SLC16A11 are a common risk factor for type 2 diabetes in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amy L; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Churchhouse, Claire; Márquez-Luna, Carla; García-Ortíz, Humberto; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Burtt, Noël P; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Florez, Jose C; Orozco, Lorena; Haiman, Christopher A; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Altshuler, David

    2014-02-06

    Performing genetic studies in multiple human populations can identify disease risk alleles that are common in one population but rare in others, with the potential to illuminate pathophysiology, health disparities, and the population genetic origins of disease alleles. Here we analysed 9.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in each of 8,214 Mexicans and other Latin Americans: 3,848 with type 2 diabetes and 4,366 non-diabetic controls. In addition to replicating previous findings, we identified a novel locus associated with type 2 diabetes at genome-wide significance spanning the solute carriers SLC16A11 and SLC16A13 (P = 3.9 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.29). The association was stronger in younger, leaner people with type 2 diabetes, and replicated in independent samples (P = 1.1 × 10(-4); OR = 1.20). The risk haplotype carries four amino acid substitutions, all in SLC16A11; it is present at ~50% frequency in Native American samples and ~10% in east Asian, but is rare in European and African samples. Analysis of an archaic genome sequence indicated that the risk haplotype introgressed into modern humans via admixture with Neanderthals. The SLC16A11 messenger RNA is expressed in liver, and V5-tagged SLC16A11 protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Expression of SLC16A11 in heterologous cells alters lipid metabolism, most notably causing an increase in intracellular triacylglycerol levels. Despite type 2 diabetes having been well studied by genome-wide association studies in other populations, analysis in Mexican and Latin American individuals identified SLC16A11 as a novel candidate gene for type 2 diabetes with a possible role in triacylglycerol metabolism.

  2. Factors influencing distribution and local coexistence of diploids and tetraploids of Vicia cracca: inferences from a common garden experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliášová, Anežka; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2017-07-01

    Vicia cracca diploids and autotetraploids are highly parapatric in Europe; tetraploids reside in western and northern part, whereas diploids occupy much drier south-eastern part. They meet together in a Central European contact zone. This distribution pattern raised questions about a transformative effect of polyploidization on plant performance and environmental tolerances. We investigated plant survival, growth, and seed production in two water regimes in a common garden experiment using seeds collected from five localities in the Central European contact zone where diploids and tetraploids occur in sympatry. Obtained data imply that tetraploids of V. cracca are not generally superior in performance to diploids. Significantly larger seeds from tetraploid mother plants collected in the field were not correlated with greater stature of the seedlings. Nonetheless, tetraploids might have a potential to out-compete diploids in the long run due to the tetraploids' ability of greater growth which manifested in the second year of cultivation. Considering the response of diploids and tetraploids to water supply, drought stressed tetraploids but not diploids produced a higher proportion of aborted seeds than watered ones, which implies that tetraploids are more drought susceptible than diploids. On the other hand, decreased plant height in drought stresses tetraploids, which simultaneously increased total seed production, may suggest that tetraploids have a greater ability to avoid local extinction under unfavourable conditions by enhancing biomass allocation into production of seeds at the cost of lower growth. The significant interaction between ploidy level and locality in several traits suggests possible polyfyletic origin of tetraploids and the necessity to clarify the history of the tetraploids in Europe.

  3. Hepatitis B virus is still the most common etiologic factor of liver cirrhosis: Results from a single center in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahat Başyigit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It is important to examine the epidemiology of liver cirrhosis (LC because of it is a preventable disease. In this single-center study, we aimed to determine the epidemiological characteristics and etiology of LC in Central Anatolian region of Turkey. Methods: We reviewed data of patients with liver cirrhosis who presented to outpatient and inpatient clinics of our medical center between January 1, 2011 and September 31, 2014 Results: Overall, 135 patients were included to the study: 91 men (67.4% and 44 women (33% with a mean age of 63±14,3 years (range: 15–87years. The primary causes of cirrhosis were chronic hepatitis B (CHB (n: 52, 38.5% and cryptogenic cirrhosis (n: 33, 24.4%. CHB was the main etiology of cirrhosis in men (49.5% and cryptogenic LC was predominant in women (40.9%. Patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were solely male. Percentage of patients with autoimmune hepatitis was significantly higher among women (70%. The percentage of patients with HBV was similar between patients aged50 years (31.6% and 39.7%, respectively, but percentage of patients with hepatitis C virus was lower (5.3% in patients aged50 years (14.7%. There was no cirrhotic patients under 50 years of age due to a genetic disorder Conclusion: Despite national vaccination program, effective treatment regimens and intensive screening methods against hepatitis B virus, it remains to be the most common cause of LC in our country.

  4. Data replicating the factor structure and reliability of commonly used measures of resilience: The Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale, Resilience Scale, and Scale of Protective Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madewell, A N; Ponce-Garcia, E; Martin, S E

    2016-09-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the article entitled "Assessing Resilience in Emerging Adulthood: The Resilience Scale (RS), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), and Scale of Protective Factors (SPF)" (Madewell and Ponce-Garcia, 2016) [1]. The data were collected from a sample of 451 college students from three universities located in the Southwestern region of the United States: 374 from a large public university and 67 from two smaller regional universities. The data from the three universities did not significantly differ in terms of demographics. The data represent participant responses on six measurements to include the Resilience Scale-25 (RS-25), Resilience Scale-14 (RS-14), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale-25 (CD-RISC-25), Connor Davidson Resilience Scale-10 (CD-RISC-10), Scale of Protective Factors-24 (SPF-24), and the Life Stressor Checklist Revised (LSC-R).

  5. Analysis of Common Influencing Factors of Well Logging Curve%测井曲线常见影响因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文博; 宋晓莉

    2015-01-01

    There are many common influencing factors in well logging curve, no matter how well logging instrument developed, the common influencing factors are still exists. Identify and solve those influence factors contribute to improve the quality of the original well logging curve. Base on the past experience of practice, This paper analyses the factors of spontaneous potential, electrode of 4 meters,microelec-trode, acoustic, gamma, dual induction and gives the method of resolving the problems.%测井曲线常见影响因素很多,不管测井仪器如何发展,这些常规的影响因素依然存在,认识和解决这些影响因素对于提高测井原始曲线质量有着至关重要的作用。文章根据作者多年的现场经验,分析了自然电位、4m电极、微电极、声波、伽马和感应曲线的影响因素,并给出了解决这些异常曲线的方法。

  6. Factors influencing the en route survivorship and post-voyage growth of a common ship biofouling organism, Bugula neritina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimanski, Kate B; Piola, Richard F; Goldstien, Sharyn J; Floerl, Oliver; Grandison, Clare; Atalah, Javier; Hopkins, Grant A

    2016-09-01

    The likelihood that viable non-indigenous biofouling species will survive a voyage on a vessel is influenced by a range of factors, including the speed, duration, and route of the voyage and the amount of time the vessel spends in port. In this study, a land-based dynamic flow device was used to test the effect of recruit age, vessel speed and voyage duration on the survivorship and growth of the bryozoan Bugula neritina. In the experiment, one-week-old recruits had a higher likelihood (100%) of surviving voyages than older (one-month-old, 90%) or younger (one-day-old, 79%) recruits, but survival was not influenced by vessel speed (6 and 18 knots) or voyage duration (two and eight days). The results suggest that the non-indigenous species B. neritina can be effectively transferred at a range of ages but one-week-old recruits are more likely to survive the translocation process and survive in the recipient environment.

  7. Tissue factor expression and multidrug resistance in cancer: two aspects of a common cellular response to a hostile milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwaleed, B A; Cooper, A J

    2000-12-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the main physiological initiator of blood coagulation and its activation or de-encryption within plasma membranes is important for trapping, extravasation and angiogenesis in the development and spread of solid malignancies. Multidrug resistance is also an adaptive response in malignant (and normal) cells. It is often mediated by the over-expression of the P-glycoprotein (P-gP) efflux pump. Both TF and P-gP tend to be expressed together, perhaps as part of a coherent 'crisis management' response of cells to environmental change or challenge. An associated feature in such a response appears to be the reversal of normal phospholipid charge asymmetry in the plasma membrane bilayer. Responses to environmental stimuli affect function in normal and malignant tissue. Uniting the study of TF expression or de-encryption and MDR-1 phenotype would be biologically enlightening and might ultimately influence clinical cancer management and the control of thrombotic problems associated with treatment. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  8. A common site within factor H SCR 7 responsible for binding heparin, C-reactive protein and streptococcal M protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakis, Eleni; Jokiranta, T Sakari; Male, Dean A; Ranganathan, Shoba; Ormsby, Rebecca J; Fischetti, Vince A; Mold, Carolyn; Gordon, David L

    2003-04-01

    The complement inhibitor factor H (fH) interacts via its seventh short consensus repeat (SCR) domain with multiple ligands including heparin, streptococcal M protein and C-reactive protein (CRP). The aim of this study was to localize the residues in SCR 7 required for these interactions. We initially built a homology model of fH SCR 6-7 using the averaged NMR structures of fH SCR 15-16 and vaccinia control protein SCR 3-4 as templates. Electrostatic potentials of the model's surface demonstrated a co-localization of three clusters of positively charged residues on SCR 7, labeled site A (R369 and K370), site B (R386 and K387) and site C (K392). These residues, localized to the linker region preceding SCR 7 and to the end of a "hypervariable loop" in SCR 7, were systematically replaced with uncharged alanine residues in an fH construct containing SCR 1-7. The resulting proteins were expressed in the methylotrophic yeast, Pichia pastoris. By ELISA analysis we demonstrated: first, that substituting site A inhibited heparin and CRP binding; secondly, that substituting site B inhibited binding to heparin, CRP and M protein; and thirdly, that substituting site C clearly inhibited only heparin binding.

  9. Bioactive factors in uteroplacental and systemic circulation link placental ischemia to generalized vascular dysfunction in hypertensive pregnancy and preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dania A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-06-15

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-associated disorder characterized by hypertension, and could lead to maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality; however, the pathophysiological mechanisms involved are unclear. Predisposing demographic, genetic and environmental risk factors could cause localized abnormalities in uteroplacental cytoactive factors such as integrins, matrix metalloproteinases, cytokines and major histocompatibility complex molecules leading to decreased vascular remodeling, uteroplacental vasoconstriction, trophoblast cells apoptosis, and abnormal development of the placenta. Defective placentation and decreased trophoblast invasion of the myometrium cause reduction in uteroplacental perfusion pressure (RUPP) and placental ischemia/hypoxia, an important event in preeclampsia. RUPP could stimulate the release of circulating bioactive factors such as the anti-angiogenic factors soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 and soluble endoglin that cause imbalance with the pro-angiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor, or cause the release of inflammatory cytokines, reactive oxygen species, hypoxia-induced factor-1 and AT1 angiotensin receptor agonistic autoantibodies. The circulating bioactive factors target endothelial cells causing generalized endotheliosis, endothelial dysfunction, decreased vasodilators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin and increased vasoconstrictors such as endothelin-1 and thromboxane A2, leading to increased vasoconstriction. The bioactive factors also stimulate the mechanisms of VSM contraction including Ca(2+), protein kinase C, and Rho-kinase and induce extracellular matrix remodeling leading to further vasoconstriction and hypertension. While therapeutic options are currently limited, understanding the underlying mechanisms could help design new interventions for management of preeclampsia.

  10. Scandinavian links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthiessen, Christian Wichmann; Knowles, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    centres, one joins more thinly populated regions, and the last one links peripheral areas. Two of them (The Great Belt Link and the Oresund Link) have been constructed and are in full operation. The third (the Fehmarnbelt Link) has been decided 2008 on bilateral government level. The three links...

  11. Common gene variants in the tumor necrosis factor (TNF and TNF receptor superfamilies and NF-kB transcription factors and non-Hodgkin lymphoma risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia S Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A promoter polymorphism in the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF (TNF G-308A is associated with increased non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL risk. The protein product, TNF-alpha, activates the nuclear factor kappa beta (NF-kappaB transcription factor, and is critical for inflammatory and apoptotic responses in cancer progression. We hypothesized that the TNF and NF-kappaB pathways are important for NHL and that gene variations across the pathways may alter NHL risk. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We genotyped 500 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs from 48 candidate gene regions (defined as 20 kb 5', 10 kb 3' in the TNF and TNF receptor superfamilies and the NF-kappaB and related transcription factors, in 1946 NHL cases and 1808 controls pooled from three independent population-based case-control studies. We obtained a gene region-level summary of association by computing the minimum p-value ("minP test". We used logistic regression to compute odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for NHL and four major NHL subtypes in relation to SNP genotypes and haplotypes. For NHL, the tail strength statistic supported an overall relationship between the TNF/NF-kappaB pathway and NHL (p = 0.02. We confirmed the association between TNF/LTA on chromosome 6p21.3 with NHL and found the LTA rs2844484 SNP most significantly and specifically associated with the major subtype, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL (p-trend = 0.001. We also implicated for the first time, variants in NFKBIL1 on chromosome 6p21.3, associated with NHL. Other gene regions identified as statistically significantly associated with NHL included FAS, IRF4, TNFSF13B, TANK, TNFSF7 and TNFRSF13C. Accordingly, the single most significant SNPs associated with NHL were FAS rs4934436 (p-trend = 0.0024, IRF4 rs12211228 (p-trend = 0.0026, TNFSF13B rs2582869 (p-trend = 0.0055, TANK rs1921310 (p-trend = 0.0025, TNFSF7 rs16994592 (p-trend = 0.0024, and TNFRSF13C rs6002551

  12. Thrombomodulin-dependent effect of factor V Leiden mutation on the cross-linking of α2-plasmin inhibitor to fibrin and its consequences on fibrinolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koncz, Zsuzsa; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Haramura, Gizella; Mezei, Zoltán A; Muszbek, László

    2012-09-01

    It has been shown that thrombomodulin (TM) considerably delays factor XIII (FXIII) activation and this effect is abrogated by Factor V Leiden (FV(Leiden)) mutation. The aim of the study was to explore the effect of TM on the cross-linking of α(2)-plasmin inhibitor (α(2)-PI) to fibrin in plasma samples of different FV genotypes and how this effect is related to the impaired fibrinolysis of FV(Leiden) carriers. In the plasma samples of fifteen individuals with different FV genotypes and in FV deficient plasma supplemented with wild type FV or FV(Leiden) coagulation was initiated by recombinant human tissue factor and phospholipids with or without recombinant human TM (rhTM). In the recovered clots the extent of α(2)-PI-fibrin cross-linking was evaluated by Western blotting and quantitative densitometry. The effect of rhTM on tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) induced clot lysis was measured by turbidimetric method. rhTM significantly delayed the formation of α(2)-PI-fibrin α-chain heterodimers/oligomers in plasma samples containing wild type FV. This effect of rhTM was impaired in the presence of FV(Leiden). rhTM delayed tPA-induced clot lysis and this effect of rhTM was more pronounced in plasma containing FV(Leiden). When TAFIa was inhibited by potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor, rhTM accelerated clot lysis in the presence of wild type FV, which is explained by the delayed α(2)-PI-fibrin cross-linking. This effect of rhTM did not prevail in the presence of FV(Leiden). FV(Leiden) abrogates the delaying effect of rhTM on α(2)-PI-fibrin cross-linking, which contributes to the impaired fibrinolysis observed in FV(Leiden) carriers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The link in Linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Jane C; Chiale, Pablo A; Gonzalez, Mario D; Baranchuk, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    We present 2 cases of the slow-fast form of AVNRT with initially narrow QRS complexes followed by sudden unexpected transition to persistently wide QRS complexes due to aberrant intraventricular conduction. Introduction of a properly timed extrastimulus in one case and critical oscillations in cycle length due to short-long coupling in the second case set the stage for the initial bundle branch block. However, persistence of the aberrancy pattern once the initial event abated was maintained by the "linking" phenomenon. Delayed, retrograde concealed activation from the contralateral bundle branch perpetuated the initial bundle branch block. PMID:23840106

  14. Linking Social--Environmental Risk Factors with Aggression in Suburban Adolescents: The Role of Social--Cognitive Mediators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Goldweber, Asha; Garbarino, James

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that social--cognitive factors mediate the association between social--environmental risk and aggression in high-risk samples, but less is known about the relation among these factors in suburban youth. The present study examined whether such an association occurred for suburban youth exposed to low levels of social…

  15. Glucokinase links Kruppel-like factor 6 to the regulation of hepatic insulin sensitivity in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bechmann, Lars P.; Gastaldelli, Amalia; Vetter, Diana; Patman, Gillian L.; Pascoe, Laura; Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Lee, Ursula E.; Fiel, Isabel; Munoz, Ursula; Ciociaro, Demetrio; Lee, Young-Min; Buzzigoli, Emma; Miele, Luca; Hui, Kei Y.; Bugianesi, Elisabetta; Burt, Alastair D.; Day, Christopher P.; Mari, Andrea; Agius, Loranne; Walker, Mark; Friedman, Scott L.; Reeves, Helen L.

    2012-01-01

    The polymorphism, KLF6-IVS1-27A, in the Kruppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) transcription factor gene enhances its splicing into antagonistic isoforms and is associated with delayed histological progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To explore a potential role for KLF6 in the development

  16. Eosinophil Count Is a Common Factor for Complex Metabolic and Pulmonary Traits and Diseases: The LifeLines Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashirova, Dinara; Prins, Bram P.; Corpeleijn, Eva; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Franke, Lude; van der Harst, Pim; Navis, Gerjan; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Postma, Dirkje S.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Boezen, H. Marike; Vonk, Judith; Snieder, Harold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.

    2016-01-01

    There is ongoing debate on the association between eosinophil count and diseases, as previous studies were inconsistent. We studied the relationship of eosinophil count with 22 complex metabolic, cardiac, and pulmonary traits and diseases. From the population-based LifeLines Cohort Study (N = 167,729), 13,301 individuals were included. We focused on relationship of eosinophil count with three classes of metabolic (7 traits, 2 diseases), cardiac (6 traits, 2 diseases), and pulmonary (2 traits, 2 diseases) outcomes. Regression analyses were applied in overall, women and men, while adjusted for age, sex, BMI and smoking. A p-value of <0.00076 was considered statistically significant. 58.2% of population were women (mean±SD 51.3±11.1 years old). In overall, one-SD higher of ln-eosinophil count was associated with a 0.04 (±SE ±0.002;p = 6.0×10−6) SD higher levels in ln-BMI, 0.06 (±0.007;p = 3.1×10−12) SD in ln-TG, 0.04 (±0.003;p = 7.0×10−6) SD in TC, 0.04 (±0.004;p = 6.3×10−7) SD in LDL, 0.04 (±0.006;p = 6.0×10−6) SD in HbA1c; and with a 0.05 (±0.004;p = 1.7×10−8) SD lower levels in HDL, 0.05 (±0.007;p = 3.4×10−23) SD in FEV1, and 0.09 (±0.001;p = 6.6×10−28) SD in FEV1/FVC. A higher ln-eosinophil count was associated with 1.18 (95%CI 1.09–1.28;p = 2.0×10−5) odds ratio of obesity, 1.29 (1.19–1.39;p = 1.1×10−10) of metabolic syndrome, 1.40 (1.25–1.56;p = 2.7×10−9) of COPD and 1.81 (1.61–2.03;p = 1.0×10−23) of asthma. Similar results were found in women. We found no association between ln-eosinophil count either with blood pressure indices in overall, women and men; or with BMI, LDL, HbA1c and obesity in men. In a large population based cohort, we confirmed eosinophil count as a potential factor implicated in metabolic and pulmonary outcomes. PMID:27978545

  17. Nuclear factor-κB is a common upstream signal for growth differentiation factor-5 expression in brown adipocytes exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines and palmitate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinoi, Eiichi; Iezaki, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Yoneda, Yukio, E-mail: yyoneda@p.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • GDF5 expression is up-regulated by IL-1β, TNF-α and palmitate in brown pre-adipocytes. • NF-κB stimulates promoter activity and expression of GDF5 in brown pre-adipocytes. • Recruitment of NF-κB to the GDF5 promoter is facilitated in BAT from ob/ob mice. • An NF-κB inhibitor prevents upregulation of GDF5 expression in brown pre-adipocytes. - Abstract: We have previously demonstrated that genetic and acquired obesity similarly led to drastic upregulation in brown adipose tissue (BAT), rather than white adipose tissue, of expression of both mRNA and corresponding protein for the bone morphogenic protein/growth differentiation factor (GDF) member GDF5 capable of promoting brown adipogenesis. In this study, we evaluated expression profiles of GDF5 in cultured murine brown pre-adipocytes exposed to pro-inflammatory cytokines and free fatty acids (FFAs), which are all shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of obesity. Both interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were effective in up-regulating GDF5 expression in a concentration-dependent manner, while similar upregulation was seen in cells exposed to the saturated FFA palmitate, but not to the unsaturated FFA oleate. In silico analysis revealed existence of the putative nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) binding site in the 5′-flanking region of mouse GDF5, whereas introduction of NF-κB subunits drastically facilitated both promoter activity and expression of GDF5 in brown pre-adipocytes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed significant facilitation of the recruitment of NF-κB to the GDF5 promoter in lysed extracts of BAT from leptin-deficient ob/ob obese mice. Upregulation o GDF5 expression was invariably inhibited by an NF-κB inhibitor in cultured brown pre-adipocytes exposed to IL-1β, TNF-α and palmitate. These results suggest that obesity leads to upregulation of GDF5 expression responsible for the promotion of brown adipogenesis through a mechanism

  18. Common Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen Common Terms Below is a list of diabetes-related ... a skin condition characterized by darkened skin patches; common in people whose body is not responding correctly ...

  19. Linking supply to demand: the neuronal monocarboxylate transporter MCT2 and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid receptor GluR2/3 subunit are associated in a common trafficking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Karin; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Parent, Annabelle; Repond, Cendrine; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Di Luca, Monica; Pellerin, Luc

    2009-05-01

    MCT2 is the major neuronal monocarboxylate transporter (MCT) that allows the supply of alternative energy substrates such as lactate to neurons. Recent evidence obtained by electron microscopy has demonstrated that MCT2, like alpha-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors, is localized in dendritic spines of glutamatergic synapses. Using immunofluorescence, we show in this study that MCT2 colocalizes extensively with GluR2/3 subunits of AMPA receptors in neurons from various mouse brain regions as well as in cultured neurons. It also colocalizes with GluR2/3-interacting proteins, such as C-kinase-interacting protein 1, glutamate receptor-interacting protein 1 and clathrin adaptor protein. Coimmunoprecipitation of MCT2 with GluR2/3 and C-kinase-interacting protein 1 suggests their close interaction within spines. Parallel changes in the localization of both MCT2 and GluR2/3 subunits at and beneath the plasma membrane upon various stimulation paradigms were unraveled using an original immunocytochemical and transfection approach combined with three-dimensional image reconstruction. Cell culture incubation with AMPA or insulin triggered a marked intracellular accumulation of both MCT2 and GluR2/3, whereas both tumor necrosis factor alpha and glycine (with glutamate) increased their cell surface immunolabeling. Similar results were obtained using Western blots performed on membrane or cytoplasm-enriched cell fractions. Finally, an enhanced lactate flux into neurons was demonstrated after MCT2 translocation on the cell surface. These observations provide unequivocal evidence that MCT2 is linked to AMPA receptor GluR2/3 subunits and undergoes a similar translocation process in neurons upon activation. MCT2 emerges as a novel component of the synaptic machinery putatively linking neuroenergetics to synaptic transmission.

  20. The Dysregulation Profile in middle childhood and adolescence across reporters: factor structure, measurement invariance, and links with self-harm and suicidal ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutz, Marike H F; Geeraerts, Sanne B; van Baar, Anneloes L; Deković, Maja; Prinzie, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a phenotype of severe dysregulation, the Dysregulation Profile (DP), has been identified. DP consists of elevated scores on the Anxious/Depressed (AD), Aggressive Behavior (AGG) and Attention Problems (AP) scales of the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL), Teacher Report Form (TRF), or Youth Self Report (YSR). A drawback in current research is that DP has been conceptualized and operationalized in different manners and research on the factor structure of DP is lacking. Therefore, we examined the factor structure of DP across multiple reporters, measurement invariance across gender, parents, and time, as well as links between DP and self-harm and suicidal ideation. Data from a large community sample were used (N = 697), covering middle childhood (Mage = 7.90, (SD = 1.16) and adolescence (Mage = 13.93, SD = 1.14). Mothers, fathers, teachers, and youth themselves reported on children's emotional and behavioral problems using the CBCL, TRF, and YSR. Results indicated that in middle childhood and in adolescence, a bifactor model with a general factor of Dysregulation alongside three specific factors of AD, AGG, and AP fitted best, compared to a second-order or one-factor model. The model showed good fit for mother, father, teacher, and youth reports and showed invariance across gender, parents and time. Youth, mother, and father reported Dysregulation was uniquely and positively related to adolescent-reported self-harm and suicidal ideation. The DP is best conceptualized as a broad dysregulation syndrome, which exists over and above anxiety/depression, aggression, and attention problems as specific problems. The bifactor model of DP explains the uniqueness and interrelatedness of these behavioral problems and can help explaining shared and non-shared etiology factors. The exclusive link between the general dysregulation factor and adolescents' self-harm and suicidal ideation further established the clinical relevance of the bifactor model.

  1. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In the course of a year, people ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest ...

  2. The link between high-fat meals and postprandial activation of blood coagulation factor VII possibly involves kallikrein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L F; Marckmann, P; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2000-01-01

    Contrary to low-fat meals, high-fat meals are known to cause postprandial factor VII (FVII) activation, but the mechanism is unknown. To study the postprandial FVII activation in detail, 18 young men consumed in randomized order high-fat or low-fat test meals. Fasting and non-fasting blood samples...... that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins may activate prokallikrein. Neither plasma triglycerides nor kallikrein and activated FVII were statistically associated. This may suggest that additional factors are involved in the postprandial FVII activation. No clear evidence for a role of tissue factor expression...

  3. 桐乡市常见恶性肿瘤危险因素分析%An Analysis on Risk Factors of Common Malignant Tumors in Tongxiang City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓怡; 沈毅; 韩雅斌; 李秋月

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解桐乡市常见恶性肿瘤的危险因素。方法收集桐乡市恶性肿瘤1154例,采用多病例组1∶1匹配的病例对照研究方法,利用多因素非条件Logistic回归模型分析桐乡市常见恶性肿瘤的危险因素。结果精神长期处于压抑状态或者经历精神创伤与肺癌、结直肠癌、肝癌、胃癌和乳腺癌的发病相关(OR=3.590、3.923、3.896、12.429和11.291)。肺癌、胃癌、结直肠癌和肝癌的共同危险因素有相关疾病史和肿瘤家族史。饮茶和多吃新鲜水果蔬菜是肺癌的保护因素(OR=0.569和3.161),而吸烟是肺癌和胃癌的危险因素(OR=3.826和5.699)。饮酒为结直肠癌和肝癌的危险因素(OR=3.593和5.316),而少吃烟熏食品则有利于预防结直肠癌的发生(OR=0.093)。结论吸烟、饮酒、饮食等生活方式,精神、心理因素、疾病史和肿瘤家族史等为桐乡市常见恶性肿瘤的危险因素。%Objective To explore the risk factors of common malignant tumors in Tongxiang City.Methods A total of 1 1 54 malignant tumor cases were collected and multi-case group was built.The design method of 1 to 1 matching case-control study was used.The data was analyzed by multiple-factor non-conditional Logistic regression analysis.Results Long term depressed state or psychic trauma was the risk factor of 5 common malignant tumors including lung cancer, colorectal cancer,liver cancer,gastric cancer and breast cancer (OR =3.590,3.923,3.896,1 2.429 and 1 1.291 respectively).The common risk factors relating to lung cancer,gastric cancer and colorectal cancer were diseases history (OR=2.81 7,7.799 and 7.650)and family history of cancer(OR=3.674,6.594 and 1 1.954).Drinking tea and eating more fresh fruits and vegetables were protective factors of lung cancer(OR=0.569 and 3.1 61 ),but smoking was a risk factor for lung cancer and gastric cancer(OR=3.826 and 5.699).Alcohol drinking was the risk factor

  4. 舰员普通感冒影响因素分析%Analysis of the risk factors of common cold in the naval afloat unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓阳; 姜毅; 方庭正; 段蕴铀

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors of common cold in the naval afloat unit.Methods A retrospective survey was made on the 694 naval afloat personnel and the case-control study was performed.The subjects were divided into the more liable to common cold group (common cold per year ≥ 2 twice) (totaling 365 cases) and the less liable to common cold group (common cold per year < 2 twice) (totaling 329 cases),by depending on their liability to cold.Multivariate risk factors of common cold were analyzed by using logistic regression method.Results Single factor or univariate analysis showed that there was statistical significance in educational background,active smoking and passive smoking,vegetable consumption,fruit consumption,sleep quality,exercise,application of antibiotics per year,when comparisons were made between two groups (P < 0.05).Multivariate analysis showed that related factors of common cold were educational background,active smoking and passive smoking,fruit consumption (< 3 times per week),sleep quality,exercise(< 3 times per week) and application of antibiotics per year(> 3 times) after adjustment of the influential factors,with odds ratio and 95% confidence interval being respectively 0.681 (0.470-0.986),1.812 (1.046-3.138),2.160 (1.337-3.490),2.109 (1.495-3.205),4.204 (2.927-6.038),2.440 (1.584-3.758)and 5.178 (3.486-7.691).The factor of vegetable consumption (< 3 times per week) was positively correlated with common cold.Conclusions The study demonstrated that educational background was an independent protective factor of common cold,while active smoking,passive smoking,fruit consumption (< 3 times per week),sleep quality and exercise (< 3 times per week) were independent risk factors of common cold.%目的 探讨舰员普通感冒的影响因素.方法 采用病例对照的方法进行研究,以问卷调查的形式选取694例舰艇部队舰员进行回顾性调查,按易患感冒程度分成易

  5. A common G10430A mutation (Gly 60 Ser) in the factor IX gene describes the presence of moderate and mild hemophilia B in the majority of the Gujarati population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Leera; Ghosh, Kanjaksha; Shetty, Shrimati

    2007-05-01

    Hemophilia B is an X-linked recessively inherited bleeding disorder afflicting humans across all socio-economic as well as racial groups. A wide range of mutations showing high heterogeneity has been reported in different populations. Thus, it has been difficult to adopt a cost-effective strategy for the genetic diagnosis of hemophilia B families. We report the presence of a common G10430A mutation in exon d of the factor IX gene, wherein the highly conserved Gly 60 residue of the first epidermal growth like domain was changed to Ser in 22 out of 22 moderately severe to mild hemophilia B patients originating from Gujarat. None of the eight Gujarati severe hemophilia B patients, 30 normal Gujarati men, and 20 moderately severe to mild hemophilia B patients belonging to other communities showed the presence of this mutation. This mutation occurred in the same haplotype background thereby suggesting a 'founder effect.' The direct detection of this G10430A mutation can be used for accurate carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis in mild to moderate factor-IX-deficient patients belonging to the Gujarat state of western India.

  6. PHEX 3'-UTR c.*231A>G near the polyadenylation signal is a relatively common, mild, American mutation that masquerades as sporadic or X-linked recessive hypophosphatemic rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumm, Steven; Huskey, Margaret; Cajic, Adela; Wollberg, Valerie; Zhang, Fan; Madson, Katherine L; Wenkert, Deborah; McAlister, William H; Gottesman, Gary S; Whyte, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Heritable forms of hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) include X-linked dominant (XLH), autosomal recessive, and autosomal dominant HR (from deactivating mutations in PHEX, DMP1 or ENPP1, and activating mutations in FGF23, respectively). Over 30 years, we have cared for 284 children with HR. For those 72 deemed sporadic XLH, we preliminarily reported mutation analysis for 30 subjects. Eleven had PHEX mutations. However, the remaining 19 lacked readily identifiable defects in PHEX, DMP1, or FGF23. In 2008, a novel single-base change near the polyadenylation (pA) signal in the 3'-UTR of PHEX was identified in XLH by other investigators. This c.*231A > G mutation is 3-bp upstream of the putative pA signal (AATAAA) in PHEX. Accordingly, we investigated whether this 3'-UTR defect accounted for HR in any of these 19 sporadic XLH patients. PCR amplification and sequencing of their 3'-UTR region showed the c.*231A > G mutation in four unrelated boys. Then, among an additional 22 of our 72 "sporadic" XLH patients, one boy and one girl were found to have the 3'-UTR defect, totaling six patients. Among these 52 sporadic XLH patients with PHEX analysis, 36 were girls and 16 were boys; ie, a ∼2:1 gender ratio consistent with XLH. However, finding five boys and only one girl with this 3'-UTR mutation presented an unexplained gender bias (p = 0.02). Haplotyping for the five boys, all reportedly unrelated, showed a common core haplotype suggesting a founder. Five of their six mothers had been studied clinically and biochemically (three radiologically). Remarkably, the seemingly unaffected mothers of four of these boys carried the 3'-UTR mutation. These healthy women had normal height, straight limbs, lacked the radiographic presentation of XLH, and showed normal or slight decreases in fasting serum Pi levels and/or TmP/GFR. Hence, PHEX c.*231A > G can masquerade as sporadic or X-linked recessive HR.

  7. Statistics Related Self-Efficacy A Confirmatory Factor Analysis Demonstrating a Significant Link to Prior Mathematics Experiences for Graduate Level Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Larwin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined students' statistics-related self-efficacy, as measured with the current statistics self-efficacy (CSSE inventory developed by Finney and Schraw (2003. Structural equation modeling was used to check the confirmatory factor analysis of the one-dimensional factor of CSSE. Once confirmed, this factor was used to test whether a significant link to prior mathematics experiences exists. Additionally a new post-structural equation modeling (SEM application was employed to compute error-free latent variable score for CSSE in an effort to examine the ancillary effects of gender, age, ethnicity, department, degree level, hours completed, expected course grade, number of college-level math classes, current GPA on students' CSSE scores. Results support the one-dimensional construct and as expected, the model demonstrated a significant link between CSSE scores and prior mathematics experiences to CSSE. Additionally the students' department, expected grade, and number of prior math classes were found to have a significant effect on student's CSSE scores.

  8. Normal values for intima-media thickness of the common carotid artery--an update following a novel risk factor profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randrianarisoa, Elko; Rietig, Roderich; Jacob, Stephan; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Haering, Hans-Ulrich; Rittig, Kilian; Balletshofer, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    There is a widely approved influence of novel risk factors like the body fat distribution and the associated metabolic syndrome, subclinical inflammation, insulin resistance and prediabetic disturbances in glucose metabolism on the progression of atherosclerosis. Former studies examining normal values for intima-media thickness (IMT) did not consider all of these new study results in detail. We therefore aimed to assess an update on age- and gender-specific normal values for IMT accounting for these novel risk factors. We evaluated IMT by high-resolution ultrasound (13 MHz) on the far wall of the common carotid artery in 801 subjects without cardiovascular disease (428 women aged 46.2±12.9 years; 373 men aged 47.3±13.3 years). After precise evaluation and exclusion of 14 cardiovascular risk factors, 90% limits of IMT were determined by parametric statistics. The reference limits of IMT according to the age classes 18-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50-59 years were estimated as 0.47, 0.59, 0.67 and 0.70 mm in women and 0.47, 0.62, 0.72 and 0.80 mm in men. Age and gender-specific normal values for IMT are lower than reported in former studies after additionally accounting for novel cardiovascular risk factors. The still widely regarded upper IMT limit of 1 mm must be strictly regarded as obsolete.

  9. Expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor and its receptor in microglia activation is linked to teratogen-induced neuronal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, A-J; Dheen, S T; Ling, E-A

    2002-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to teratogen agents is linked to the pathogenesis of neurodevelopment disorders, but the mechanisms leading to the neurodevelopmental disturbance are poorly understood. To elucidate this, an in vitro model of microglial activation induced by neuronal injury has been characterized. In this connection, exposure of primary microglial cells to the conditioned medium from the neuronal damage induced by teratogen, cyclophosphamide, is accompanied by a reactive microgliosis as assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, lectin histochemistry, double labeling immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. Our results showed that reactive microglia were capable of releasing various cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-beta and nitric oxide. Also, we have shown that macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) was in fact produced by the reactive microglia. Concomitant to this was the increased expression of M-CSF receptor in these cells following the teratogen-induced neuronal injury. The up-regulation of M-CSF receptor suggests that the cells are capable of responding to self-derived M-CSF in an autocrine fashion. Results with antibody neutralization further suggest that microglial proinflammatory response, as manifested by cytokine expression in culture, is mediated by M-CSF, which acts as a molecular signal that initiates a microglial reaction. We therefore suggest that microglial activation following cyclophosphamide treatment is not only a response to the neuronal damage, but is also a cause of the damage during pathogenesis of neurodevelopment disorders. To this end, the increased expression of M-CSF and its receptor on microglia would be directly linked to the active cell proliferation and proinflammatory response in the teratogen-induced injury.

  10. Subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size, a predictor of type 2 diabetes, is linked to chromosome 1q21--q23 and is associated with a common polymorphism in LMNA in Pima Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, C; Wolford, J K; Hanson, R L; Foley, J E; Tataranni, P A; Bogardus, C; Pratley, R E

    2001-03-01

    Large subcutaneous abdominal adipocyte size (s.c. abd. AS) is associated with insulin resistance and predicts type 2 diabetes in Pima Indians. Because type 2 diabetes is familial, we aimed to determine whether mean s.c. abd. AS is also familial and if so, to identify chromosomal regions linked to this measure. Body composition (hydrodensitometry) and mean s.c. abd. AS (fat biopsy) were measured in 295 Pima Indians (179 with normal, 80 with impaired, and 36 with diabetic glucose tolerance) representing 164 nuclear families. Mean s.c. abd. AS, adjusted for age, sex, and percentage body fat was a familial trait (heritability h(2) = 0.48, P T substitution) in exon 10 of LMNA (GenBank X03444) was associated with reduced age-, sex- and percentage body fat-adjusted mean s.c. abd. AS [0.80 +/- 0.17 (CC), 0.76 +/- 0.15 (CT), 0.73 +/- 0.16 (TT) microg lipid/cell, P < 0.05 for CC vs TT]. These findings indicate that approximately half of the variance in mean s.c. abd. AS can be attributed to familial factors and that genetic variation in LMNA might not only underlie rare cases of FPLD, but may also contribute to variation in adipocyte size in the general population. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  11. Factors Determining Allocation of Common Costs in the Financial Services Sector: A Study of Rural Banks in the Ashanti Region of Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben K. Agyei-Mensah

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the necessary conditions for organisational controls to work is that the manager whose performance is being measured must be able to affect the results in a material way. The controllability principle in management accounting is one of the central tenets of responsibility accounting, (Merchant and Van der Stede, 2007.The study assessed whether in measuring the performance of these branches factors that are within the control of these branches are considered. In addition the study examined the impact of contingent factors on the application of the controllability principle.The study found out that branch managers do not have full autonomy and control over common resources costs which form part of their evaluation, even though management accounting theory suggest that.The study findings also revealed that profitability (i.e. operating profit margin, Return on shareholders' capital and liquidity (i.e. current ratio and working capital ratio have varied impact on the use of performance measures, and the allocation of common costs to branches in the rural banks in the Ashanti Region of Ghana.

  12. Molecular Analysis of G1691A Mutation in Factor 5 Leiden and its relation with mtDNA common deletion in Human Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Garoosi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In general, miscarriage is one of the most common complications of pregnancy and it is the pregnancy loss before 20 weeks of gestation or birth weight below500 grams. Recurrent Pregnancy Loss is defined as two or more spontaneous miscarriages. Genetic disorders such as mutations can be involved in miscarriage. Considering the importance of this issue, in this study, G1691A mutation of coagulation factor 5 and common deletion mutation in the mitochondrial genome(4977-bp deletion in mtDNA were investigated as factors which can influence miscarriage, especially recurrent miscarriage. Materials and Methods: For this study 41 patients with the history of miscarriage and 48 healthy women with successful delivery were selected and completed the questionnaires which included questions such as miscarriage history, age, blood type and then Blood samples were taken. After extraction of DNA from each sample, the studied mutations were determined using PCR method. At the end, analysis of the results and assessment of other important and effective factors in them was done using Epi Info software and using chi square (X2 test. Results: Among the patients ,there were 29.25% patients with one miscarriage, 65.85% patients with two miscarriages and 4.9% patients with three miscarriages. There was no homozygous genotype in the study of G1691A mutations in both groups, and prevalence of heterozygotes was 17% among patients and 4.17% among controls. On the other hand, frequency of 4977-bp deletion in mtDNA in patients group and control group was 68.29% and 14.58%, respectively. Analysis showed that frequency of G1691A mutations and common deletion mutation in mtDNA in patients group were higher than controls and were statistically significant . Although the opportunity to have miscarriage in GA genotype and carriers of common deletion is more than control, but there is not any correlation between these two mutations and their inheritability and also they

  13. Eye color, hair color, blood type, and the rhesus factor: exploring possible genetic links to sexual orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Lee; Ficek, Christopher; Burke, Donald; Das, Shyamal

    2008-02-01

    The present study sought to expand the limited evidence that sexual orientation is influenced by genetic factors. This was accomplished by seeking statistical differences between heterosexuals and homosexuals for four traits that are known to be genetically determined: eye color, natural hair color, blood type, and the Rhesus factor. Using a sample of over 7,000 U.S. and Canadian college students supplemented with additional homosexual subjects obtained through internet contacts, we found no significant differences between heterosexuals and homosexuals regarding eye color or hair color. In the case of blood type and the Rh factor, however, interesting patterns emerged. Heterosexual males and females exhibited statistically identical frequencies of the A blood type, while gay men exhibited a relatively low incidence and lesbians had a relatively high incidence (p homosexuals of both sexes were Rh- when compared to heterosexuals (p < .06). The findings suggest that a connection may exist between sexual orientation and genes both on chromosome 9 (where blood type is determined) and on chromosome 1 (where the Rh factor is regulated).

  14. The link between high-fat meals and postprandial activation of blood coagulation factor VII possibly involves kallikrein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L F; Marckmann, P; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2000-01-01

    Contrary to low-fat meals, high-fat meals are known to cause postprandial factor VII (FVII) activation, but the mechanism is unknown. To study the postprandial FVII activation in detail, 18 young men consumed in randomized order high-fat or low-fat test meals. Fasting and non-fasting blood sample...

  15. Factors and common conditions associated with adolescent dietary supplement use: an analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Roger B

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the prevalence of dietary supplement (DS use in American adolescents. We conducted this study to analyze the prevalence of DS use and factors associated with this use in a national population-based sample. Methods We used data from the 1999 – 2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES for adolescents age 11 to 19. Using weighted logistic regression, we identified demographic and clinical factors associated with the use of any DS, vitamins or minerals, herbs and other DS. Results Among the 5,306 responses representing approximately 36 million Americans 11–19 years old, 27% reported use of one or more DS in the prior month. The most commonly used DS were: multivitamins (16% and vitamin C (6%. In the multivariable analysis, African American [adjusted odds ratio 0.40 (0.31–0.50 95% CI] and Mexican American [0.55 (0.44–0.69] adolescents were less likely to use DS compared with non-Hispanic whites. DS use was more common in those who used prescription medications [1.37 (1.10–1.72] and among those who had a diagnosis of chronic headaches [1.25 (1.04–1.50]. DS use was less common among those reporting fair or poor health status [0.59 (0.40–0.88]. Conclusion Twenty seven percent of American adolescents use DS. DS use is higher among teens that use prescription medications; physicians and pharmacists should be aware of this, ask patients, and check for potential interactions.

  16. Scratch that itch: revisiting links between self-directed behaviour and parasitological, social and environmental factors in a free-ranging primate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Valéria; MacIntosh, Andrew J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Different hypotheses explain variation in the occurrence of self-directed behaviour such as scratching and self-grooming: a parasite hypothesis linked with ectoparasite load, an environmental hypothesis linked with seasonal conditions and a social hypothesis linked with social factors. These hypotheses are not mutually exclusive but are often considered separately. Here, we revisited these hypotheses together in female Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata fuscata) of Kōjima islet, Japan. We input occurrences of scratching and self-grooming during focal observations in models combining parasitological (lice load), social (dominance rank, social grooming, aggression received and proximity), and environmental (rainfall, temperature and season) variables. Using an information-theory approach, we simultaneously compared the explanatory value of models against each other using variation in Akaike's information criterion and Akaike's weights. We found that evidence for models with lice load, with or without environmental–social parameters, was stronger than that for other models. In these models, scratching was positively associated with lice load and social grooming whereas self-grooming was negatively associated with lice load and positively associated with social grooming, dominance rank and number of female neighbours. This study indicates that the study animals scratch primarily because of an immune/stimulus itch, possibly triggered by ectoparasite bites/movements. It also confirms that self-grooming could act as a displacement activity in the case of social uncertainty. We advocate that biological hypotheses be more broadly considered even when investigating social processes, as one does not exclude the other. PMID:28018646

  17. Poliomyelitis outbreaks in Angola genetically linked to India: risk factors and implications for prevention of outbreaks due to wild poliovirus importations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sarah; Goodson, James L; Aramburu, Javier; Morais, Alda; Gaye, Abou; Wannemuehler, Kathleen; Buffington, Joanna; Gerber, Sue; Wassilak, Steven; Uzicanin, Amra

    2011-05-12

    We conducted an investigation of two outbreaks of poliomyelitis in Angola during 2007-2008 due to wild poliovirus (WPV) genetically linked to India. A case-control study including 27 case-patients and 76 age- and neighborhood-matched control-subjects was conducted to assess risk factors associated with paralytic poliomyelitis, and epidemiologic links to India were explored through in-depth case-patient interviews. In multivariable analysis, case-patients were more likely than control-subjects to be undervaccinated with fewer than four routine doses of oral poliovirus vaccine (adjusted matched odds ratio [aMOR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-13.6) and have an adult household member who traveled outside the province of residence in the 2 months preceding onset of paralysis (aMOR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.2-8.6). No epidemiologic link with India was identified. These findings underscore the importance of routine immunization to prevent outbreaks following WPV importations and suggest a possible role of adults in sustaining WPV transmission.

  18. Student Commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  19. A Factor Linking Floral Organ Identity and Growth Revealed by Characterization of the Tomato Mutant unfinished flower development (ufd).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyatos-Pertíñez, Sandra; Quinet, Muriel; Ortíz-Atienza, Ana; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Pons, Clara; Giménez, Estela; Angosto, Trinidad; Granell, Antonio; Capel, Juan; Lozano, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Floral organogenesis requires coordinated interactions between genes specifying floral organ identity and those regulating growth and size of developing floral organs. With the aim to isolate regulatory genes linking both developmental processes (i.e., floral organ identity and growth) in the tomato model species, a novel mutant altered in the formation of floral organs was further characterized. Under normal growth conditions, floral organ primordia of mutant plants were correctly initiated, however, they were unable to complete their development impeding the formation of mature and fertile flowers. Thus, the growth of floral buds was blocked at an early stage of development; therefore, we named this mutant as unfinished flower development (ufd). Genetic analysis performed in a segregating population of 543 plants showed that the abnormal phenotype was controlled by a single recessive mutation. Global gene expression analysis confirmed that several MADS-box genes regulating floral identity as well as other genes participating in cell division and different hormonal pathways were affected in their expression patterns in ufd mutant plants. Moreover, ufd mutant inflorescences showed higher hormone contents, particularly ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and strigol compared to wild type. Such results indicate that UFD may have a key function as positive regulator of the development of floral primordia once they have been initiated in the four floral whorls. This function should be performed by affecting the expression of floral organ identity and growth genes, together with hormonal signaling pathways.

  20. X-linked primary ciliary dyskinesia due to mutations in the cytoplasmic axonemal dynein assembly factor PIH1D3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcese, Chiara; Patel, Mitali P.; Shoemark, Amelia; Kiviluoto, Santeri; Legendre, Marie; Williams, Hywel J.; Vaughan, Cara K.; Hayward, Jane; Goldenberg, Alice; Emes, Richard D.; Munye, Mustafa M.; Dyer, Laura; Cahill, Thomas; Bevillard, Jeremy; Gehrig, Corinne; Guipponi, Michel; Chantot, Sandra; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Thomas, Lucie; Jeanson, Ludovic; Copin, Bruno; Tamalet, Aline; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Papon, Jean- François; Garin, Antoine; Pin, Isabelle; Vera, Gabriella; Aurora, Paul; Fassad, Mahmoud R.; Jenkins, Lucy; Boustred, Christopher; Cullup, Thomas; Dixon, Mellisa; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Bush, Andrew; Chung, Eddie M. K.; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Loebinger, Michael R.; Wilson, Robert; Armengot, Miguel; Escudier, Estelle; Hogg, Claire; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Antony, Dinu; Barroso, Inês; Beales, Philip L.; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Cirak, Sebahattin; Cosgrove, Catherine; Allan, Daly; Durbin, Richard; Fitzpatrick, David; Floyd, Jamie; Foley, A. Reghan; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; McCarthy, Shane; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; Parker, Victoria; Payne, Felicity; Plagnol, Vincent; Raymond, Lucy; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter J.; Schmidts, Miriam; Semple, Robert; Serra, Eva; Stalker, Jim; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Walter, Klaudia; Amselem, Serge; Sun, Zhaoxia; Bartoloni, Lucia; Blouin, Jean-Louis; Mitchison, Hannah M.

    2017-01-01

    By moving essential body fluids and molecules, motile cilia and flagella govern respiratory mucociliary clearance, laterality determination and the transport of gametes and cerebrospinal fluid. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder frequently caused by non-assembly of dynein arm motors into cilia and flagella axonemes. Before their import into cilia and flagella, multi-subunit axonemal dynein arms are thought to be stabilized and pre-assembled in the cytoplasm through a DNAAF2–DNAAF4–HSP90 complex akin to the HSP90 co-chaperone R2TP complex. Here, we demonstrate that large genomic deletions as well as point mutations involving PIH1D3 are responsible for an X-linked form of PCD causing disruption of early axonemal dynein assembly. We propose that PIH1D3, a protein that emerges as a new player of the cytoplasmic pre-assembly pathway, is part of a complementary conserved R2TP-like HSP90 co-chaperone complex, the loss of which affects assembly of a subset of inner arm dyneins. PMID:28176794

  1. A factor linking floral organ identity and growth revealed by characterization of the tomato mutant unfinished flower development (ufd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Poyatos-Pertíñez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Floral organogenesis requires coordinated interactions between genes specifying floral organ identity and those regulating growth and size of developing floral organs. With the aim to isolate regulatory genes linking both developmental processes (i.e. floral organ identity and growth in the tomato model species, a novel mutant altered in the formation of floral organs was further characterized. Under normal growth conditions, floral organ primordia of mutant plants were correctly initiated, however, they were unable to complete their development impeding the formation of mature and fertile flowers. Thus, the growth of floral buds was blocked at an early stage of development; therefore, we named this mutant as unfinished flower development (ufd. Genetic analysis performed in a segregating population of 543 plants showed that the abnormal phenotype was controlled by a single recessive mutation. Global gene expression analysis confirmed that several MADS-box genes regulating floral identity as well as other genes participating in cell division and different hormonal pathways were affected in their expression patterns in ufd mutant plants. Moreover, ufd mutant inflorescences showed higher hormone contents, particularly ethylene precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC and strigol compared to wild type. Such results indicate that UFD may have a key function as positive regulator of the development of floral primordia once they have been initiated in the four floral whorls. This function should be performed by affecting the expression of floral organ identity and growth genes, together with hormonal signalling pathways.

  2. Distribution and Diversity of Soil Microfauna from East Antarctica: Assessing the Link between Biotic and Abiotic Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Alejandro Velasco-Castrillón; Schultz, Mark B.; Federica Colombo; Gibson, John A. E.; Davies, Kerrie A.; Austin, Andrew D.; Stevens, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial life in Antarctica has been described as some of the simplest on the planet, and mainly confined to soil microfaunal communities. Studies have suggested that the lack of diversity is due to extreme environmental conditions and thought to be driven by abiotic factors. In this study we investigated soil microfauna composition, abundance, and distribution in East Antarctica, and assessed correlations with soil geochemistry and environmental variables. We examined 109 soil samples fro...

  3. Myosin II directly binds and inhibits Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors: a possible link to Rho family GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chan-Soo; Choi, Chang-Ki; Shin, Eun-Young; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Kim, Eung-Gook

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration requires the coordinated spatiotemporal regulation of actomyosin contraction and cell protrusion/adhesion. Nonmuscle myosin II (MII) controls Rac1 and Cdc42 activation, and cell protrusion and focal complex formation in migrating cells. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we show that MII interacts specifically with multiple Dbl family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Binding is mediated by the conserved tandem Dbl homology–pleckstrin homology modu...

  4. ARF6-Regulated Endocytosis of Growth Factor Receptors Links Cadherin-Based Adhesion to Canonical Wnt Signaling in Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-01-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular ...

  5. Oral Hygiene Status in a General Population of Iran, 2011: A Key Lifestyle Marker in Relation to Common Risk Factors of Non-Communicable Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereshteh Asgari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background To estimate Oral Hygiene (OH status in the Iranian population in 2011, and to determine the influence of socio-economic characteristics on OH, and its interrelation with common risk factors of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs. Methods Data including a total of 12,105 individuals aged 6-70 years were obtained from the sixth round of the surveys of NCDs risk factors in Iran. OH was recorded through a structured questionnaire measuring daily frequencies of tooth brushing and dental flossing. Descriptive analyses were performed on demographic characteristics in the complex sample survey setting. We also employed weighted binary logistic regression to compute Odds Ratio (OR as a measure of association between the response and explanatory factors. Furthermore, to construct an asset index, we utilized Principal Component Analysis (PCA. Results The percentage with minimum recommended daily OH practices was 3.7% among men and 7.7% among women (OR= 2.3; P< 0.001. Urban citizens were more likely to have their teeth cleaned compared to rural people (OR= 2.8; P< 0.001. For both genders, a relatively better condition was observed in the 25–34 age group (male: 5.6%; female: 10.3%. In addition, OH status improved significantly by increase in both level of education (P< 0.001 and economic status (P< 0.001. There were also apparent associations between self-care practices and specific behavioral risk factors, though the correlation with dietary habits and tobacco use could be largely explained by socio-economic factors. Conclusion OH situation in Iran calls for urgent need to assign proper interventions and strategies toward raising public awareness and reducing disparities in access to health facilities.

  6. Tissue Factor in Dermatitis Herpetiformis and Bullous Pemphigoid: Link between Immune and Coagulation System in Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Zebrowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH and bullous pemphigoid (BP are skin diseases associated with eosinophilic and neutrophilic infiltrations. Although chemokines are critical for the selective accumulation and activation of various leukocyte subsets in the inflammatory process, there are few findings concerning inflammatory cells and production of coagulation factors in blistering diseases. Skin biopsies were taken from 14 patients with DH, 27 with BP, and 20 control subjects. The localization and expression of tissue factor (TF in skin lesions and perilesional skin were studied by immunohistochemistry and confirmed by Western Blot. Moreover the plasma concentrations of TF were measured by immunoassays. D dimers, fibrinogen, and selected coagulation parameters were measured by routine methods. Expression of TF in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in dermis was detected in skin biopsies from BP patients. Examined TF expression was detected in perilesional skin of all BP patients too. The expression of TF was not observed in biopsies from healthy people and DH patients. The findings of the study show an increased expression of tissue factor in the lesional and perilesional skin of patients with bullous pemphigoid. The difference in chemokine pattern expression and variations in the cellular infiltration in BP and DH cause variable expression of TF.

  7. Modulation of p53 activity by IκBα: Evidence suggesting a common phylogeny between NF-κB and p53 transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Erwin W

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this work we present evidence that the p53 tumor suppressor protein and NF-κB transcription factors could be related through common descent from a family of ancestral transcription factors regulating cellular proliferation and apoptosis. P53 is a homotetrameric transcription factor known to interact with the ankyrin protein 53BP2 (a fragment of the ASPP2 protein. NF-κB is also regulated by ankyrin proteins, the prototype of which is the IκB family. The DNA binding sequences of the two transcription factors are similar, sharing 8 out of 10 nucleotides. Interactions between the two proteins, both direct and indirect, have been noted previously and the two proteins play central roles in the control of proliferation and apoptosis. Results Using previously published structure data, we noted a significant degree of structural alignment between p53 and NF-κB p65. We also determined that IκBα and p53 bind in vitro through a specific interaction in part involving the DNA binding region of p53, or a region proximal to it, and the amino terminus of IκBα independently or cooperatively with the ankyrin 3 domain of IκBα In cotransfection experiments, κBα could significantly inhibit the transcriptional activity of p53. Inhibition of p53-mediated transcription was increased by deletion of the ankyrin 2, 4, or 5 domains of IκBα Co-precipitation experiments using the stably transfected ankyrin 5 deletion mutant of κBα and endogenous wild-type p53 further support the hypothesis that p53 and IκBα can physically interact in vivo. Conclusion The aggregate results obtained using bacterially produced IκBα and p53 as well as reticulocyte lysate produced proteins suggest a correlation between in vitro co-precipitation in at least one of the systems and in vivo p53 inhibitory activity. These observations argue for a mechanism involving direct binding of IκBα to p53 in the inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity, analogous to

  8. Association of socio-economic, gender and health factors with common mental disorders in women: a population-based study of 5703 married rural women in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidhaye, Rahul; Patel, Vikram

    2010-12-01

    There are few population-based studies from low- and middle-income countries that have described the association of socio-economic, gender and health factors with common mental disorders (CMDs) in rural women. Population-based study of currently married rural women in the age group of 15-39 years. The baseline data are from the National Family Health Survey-II conducted in 1998. A follow-up study was conducted 4 years later in 2002-03. The outcome of CMD was assessed using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Due to the hierarchical nature and complex survey design, data were analysed using mixed-effect logistic regression with random intercept model. A total of 5703 women (representing 83.5% of eligible women) completed follow-up. The outcome of CMD was observed in 609 women (10.7%, 95% confidence interval 9.8-11.6). The following factors were independently associated with the outcome of CMD in the final multivariable model: higher age, low education, low standard of living, recent intimate partner violence (IPV), husband's unsatisfactory reaction to dowry, husband's alcohol use and women's own tobacco use. Socio-economic and gender disadvantage factors are independently associated with CMDs in this population of women. Strategies that address structural determinants, for example to promote women's education and reduce their exposure to IPV, may reduce the burden of CMDs in women.

  9. A study on p53 gene alterations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and their correlation to common dietary risk factors among population of the Kashmir valley

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Imtiyaz Murtaza; Dhuha Mushtaq; Mushtaq A Margoob; Amit Dutt; Nisar Ahmad Wani; Ishfaq Ahmad; Mohan Lal Bhat

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To systematically examine the extent of correlation of risk factors, such as age, consumed dietary habit and familial predisposition with somatic Tp53 molecular lesion causal to elevate carcinogenesis severity of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) among the Kashmiri population of Northern India.METHODS: All cases (n = 51) and controls (n = 150) were permanent residents of the Kashmir valley. Genetic alterations were determined in exons 5-8 of Tp53 tumor suppressor gene among 45 ESCC cases histologically confirmed by PCR-SSCP analysis. Data for individual cancer cases (n = 45) and inpatient controls (n = 150) with non-cancer disease included information on family history of cancer, thirty prevailing common dietary risk factors along with patient's age group. Correlation of genetic lesion in p53 exons to animistic data from these parameters was generated by Chi-square test to all 45 histologically confirmed ESCC cases along with healthy controls.RESULTS: Thirty-five of 45 (77.8%) histologically characterized tumor samples had analogous somatic mutation as opposed to 1 of 45 normal sample obtained from adjacent region from the same patient showed germline mutation. The SSCP analysis demonstrated that most common p53 gene alterations were found in exon 6 (77.7%), that did not correlate with the age of the individual and clinicopathological parameters but showed significant concordance (P < 0.05) with familial history of cancer (CD = 58), suggesting germline predisposition at an unknown locus, and dietary habit of consuming locally grown Brassica vegetable "Hakh" (CD = 19.5),red chillies (CD = 20.2), hot salty soda tea (CD = 2.37) and local baked bread (CD = 1.1).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that somatic chromosomal mutations, especially in exon 6 of Tp53 gene, among esophageal cancer patients of an ethnically homogenous population of Kashmir valley are closely related to continued exposure to various common dietary risk factors, especially hot salty tea

  10. Growth factor and proteinase profile of Vivostat® platelet-rich fibrin linked to tissue repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Rasmussen, Karina; Pakkenberg, Bente

    2014-01-01

    . Leucocyte, erythrocyte and platelet counts in whole blood and fibrin-I were determined by automated haematology analyser. Platelet concentration in PRF was quantified manually by stereologic analysis of Giemsa-stained tissue sections, and the total content of five growth factors and MMP-9 by enzyme...... and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 were quantified using novel analytical methods. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten healthy non-thrombocytopenic volunteers donated blood for generation of intermediate fibrin-I and final PRF. Anticoagulated whole blood and serum procured in parallel served as baseline controls......·001]. MMP-9 was reduced 139-fold (P applications....

  11. Growth, condition factor, and bioenergetics modeling link warmer stream temperatures below a small dam to reduced performance of juvenile steelhead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauter, S.T.; Connolly, P.J.

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the growth and feeding performance of juvenile steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss using field measures and bioenergetics modeling. Juvenile steelhead populations were sampled from mid-June through August 2004 at study sites upstream and downstream of Hemlock Dam. The growth and diet of juvenile steelhead were determined for a warm (summer) and subsequent (late summer) transitional period at each study site. Empirical data on the growth and diet of juvenile steelhead and mean daily temperatures were used in a bioenergetics model to estimate the proportion of maximum consumption achieved by juvenile steelhead by site and period. Modeled estimates of feeding performance were better for juvenile steelhead at the upstream compared to the downstream site during both periods. The median condition factor of juvenile steelhead did not change over the summer at the upstream site, but showed a significant decline over time at the downstream site. A negative trend in median condition factor at the downstream site supported bioenergetics modeling results that suggested the warmer stream temperatures had a negative impact on juvenile steelhead. Bioenergetics modeling predicted a lower feeding performance for juvenile steelhead rearing downstream compared to upstream of Hemlock Dam although food availability appeared to be limited at both study sites during the warm period. Warmer water temperatures, greater diel variation, and change in diel pattern likely led to the reduced feeding performance and reduced growth, which could have affected the overall survival of juvenile steelhead downstream of Hemlock Dam. ?? 2010 by the Northwest Scientific Association.

  12. Is GERD a Factor in Osteonecrosis of the Jaw? Evidence of Pathology Linked to G6PD Deficiency and Sulfomucins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Nancy L.; Li, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ), a rare side effect of bisphosphonate therapy, is a debilitating disorder with a poorly understood etiology. FDA's Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) provides the opportunity to investigate this disease. Our goals were to analyze FAERS data to discover possible relationships between ONJ and specific conditions and drugs and then to consult the scientific literature to deduce biological explanations. Our methodology revealed a very strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and bisphosphonate-induced ONJ, suggesting acidosis as a key factor. Overgrowth of acidophilic species, particularly Streptococcus mutans, in the oral microbiome in the context of insufficient acid buffering due to impaired salivary glands maintains the low pH that sustains damage to the mucosa. Significant associations between ONJ and adrenal insufficiency, vitamin C deficiency, and Sjögren's syndrome were found. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency can explain much of the pathology. An inability to maintain vitamin C and other antioxidants in the reduced form leads to vascular oxidative damage and impaired adrenal function. Thus, pathogen-induced acidosis, hypoxia, and insufficient antioxidant defenses together induce ONJ. G6PD deficiency and adrenal insufficiency are underlying factors. Impaired supply of adrenal-derived sulfated sterols such as DHEA sulfate may drive the disease process.

  13. Is GERD a Factor in Osteonecrosis of the Jaw? Evidence of Pathology Linked to G6PD Deficiency and Sulfomucins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Seneff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteonecrosis of the jaw (ONJ, a rare side effect of bisphosphonate therapy, is a debilitating disorder with a poorly understood etiology. FDA’s Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS provides the opportunity to investigate this disease. Our goals were to analyze FAERS data to discover possible relationships between ONJ and specific conditions and drugs and then to consult the scientific literature to deduce biological explanations. Our methodology revealed a very strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and bisphosphonate-induced ONJ, suggesting acidosis as a key factor. Overgrowth of acidophilic species, particularly Streptococcus mutans, in the oral microbiome in the context of insufficient acid buffering due to impaired salivary glands maintains the low pH that sustains damage to the mucosa. Significant associations between ONJ and adrenal insufficiency, vitamin C deficiency, and Sjögren’s syndrome were found. Glucose 6 phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency can explain much of the pathology. An inability to maintain vitamin C and other antioxidants in the reduced form leads to vascular oxidative damage and impaired adrenal function. Thus, pathogen-induced acidosis, hypoxia, and insufficient antioxidant defenses together induce ONJ. G6PD deficiency and adrenal insufficiency are underlying factors. Impaired supply of adrenal-derived sulfated sterols such as DHEA sulfate may drive the disease process.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the differentiation-linked human K4 promoter is dependent upon esophageal-specific nuclear factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opitz, O G; Jenkins, T D; Rustgi, A K

    1998-09-11

    The stratified squamous epithelium comprises actively proliferating basal cells that undergo a program of differentiation accompanied by morphological, biochemical, and genetic changes. The transcriptional regulatory signals and the genes that orchestrate this switch from proliferation to differentiation can be studied through the keratin gene family. Given the localization of keratin 4 (K4) to the early differentiated suprabasal compartment and having previously demonstrated that targeted disruption of this gene in murine embryonic stem cells results in impairment of the normal differentiation program in esophageal and corneal epithelial cells, we studied the transcriptional regulation of the human K4 promoter. A panel of K4 promoter deletions were found in transient transfection assays to be predominantly active in esophageal and corneal cell lines. A critical cis-regulatory element resides between -163 and -140 bp and contains an inverted CACACCT motif. A site-directed mutated version of this motif within the K4 promoter renders it inactive, whereas the wild-type version is active in a heterologous promoter system. It specifically binds esophageal-specific zinc-dependent transcriptional factors. Our studies demonstrate that regulation of the human K4 promoter is in part mediated through tissue-specific transcriptional factors.

  15. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  16. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  17. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... defects developed in 75%, 28%, and 15%, respectively. The probability of developing end-stage renal disease or deafness before the age of 40 yr was 12% and 10%, respectively, in girls and women versus 90 and 80%, respectively, in boys and men. The risk of progression to end-stage renal disease appears...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  18. X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jais, Jean Philippe; Knebelmann, Bertrand; Giatras, Iannis

    2003-01-01

    Alport syndrome (AS) is a type IV collagen hereditary disease characterized by progressive hematuric nephritis, hearing loss, and ocular changes. Mutations in the COL4A5 collagen gene are responsible for the more common X-linked dominant form of the disease characterized by much less severe disease...... in girls and women. A "European Community Alport Syndrome Concerted Action" (ECASCA) group was established to delineate the Alport syndrome phenotype in each gender and to determine genotype-phenotype correlations in a large number of families. Data concerning 329 families, 250 of them with an X...... to increase after the age of 60 yr in women. Because of the absence of genotype-phenotype correlation and the large intrafamilial phenotypic heterogeneity, early prognosis of the disease in X-linked Alport syndrome carriers remains moot. Risk factors for developing renal failure have been identified...

  19. Evaluation of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in normal and breast tumor tissues and their link with breast cancer prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furrer, Daniela; Lemieux, Julie; Côté, Marc-André; Provencher, Louise; Laflamme, Christian; Barabé, Frédéric; Jacob, Simon; Michaud, Annick; Diorio, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Amplification of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene is associated with worse prognosis and decreased overall survival in breast cancer patients. The HER2 gene contains several polymorphisms; two of the best-characterized HER2 polymorphisms are Ile655Val and Ala1170Pro. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between these two HER2 polymorphisms in normal breast and breast cancer tissues and known breast cancer prognostic factors in a retrospective cohort study of 73 women with non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. HER2 polymorphisms were assessed in breast cancer tissue and normal breast tissue using TaqMan assay. Ala1170Pro polymorphism in normal breast tissue was associated with age at diagnosis (p = 0.007), tumor size (p = 0.004) and lymphovascular invasion (p = 0.06). Similar significant associations in cancer tissues were observed. No association between the Ile655Val polymorphism and prognostic factors were observed. However, we found significant differences in the distribution of Ile655Val (p = 0.03) and Ala1170Pro (p = 0.01) genotypes between normal breast and breast tumor tissues. This study demonstrates that only the Ala1170Pro polymorphism is associated with prognostic factors in HER2-positive breast cancer patients. Moreover, our results suggest that both HER2 polymorphisms could play a significant role in carcinogenesis in non-metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer women.

  20. QCI Common

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    There are many common software patterns and utilities for the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute that can and should be shared across projects. Otherwise we find duplication of code which adds unwanted complexity. This is a software product seeks to alleviate this by providing common utilities such as object factories, graph data structures, parameter input mechanisms, etc., for other software products within the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute. This work enables pure basic research, has no export controlled utilities, and has no real commercial value.

  1. The Nuclear Factor kappaB Pathway: A Link to the Immune System in the Radiation Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Reitz, Guenther; Chishti, Arif Ali; Koch, Kristina; Manchanda, Kashish

    Understanding the cellular radiation response is an essential prerequisite for the risk assessment of astronauts’ space radiation exposure during long-term space missions and for effective countermeasure development. In addition to the space radiation effects, other environmental factors during space missions such as microgravity have profound effects on the body, e.g. suppression of the innate and acquired immune response. Exposure to ionizing radiation modulates immune responses in a complex dose-dependent pattern, with possible anti-inflammatory effects in the low dose range, expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines at moderate doses and immunosuppression after exposure to higher doses due to precursor cell death together with concomitant exacerbated innate immune responses. A central regulator in the immune system is the transcription factor Nuclear Factor kB (NF-kappaB). In this work, the role of NF-kappaB in the cellular response to space relevant radiation qualities was analyzed. It was shown with a recombinant human NF-kappaB reporter cell line that heavy ions with a linear energy transfer (LET) of 100-300 keV/µm have a nine times higher potential to activate the NF-kappaB pathway compared to X-rays (150 kV). ATM was essential for NF-kappaB activation in response to X-rays and heavy ions. Knockdown of the NF-kappaB subunit RelA (p65) resulted in higher sensitivity towards X-rays. Reverse Transcriptase real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) experiments showed that after exposure to radiation, NF-kappaB predominantly upregulates genes involved in intercellular communication processes, especially genes coding for chemokines, suggesting an important contribution of NF-kappaB in the molecular profile of the reaction to radiation, which can comprise features of inflammation and wound healing processes. This is process is strictly NF-kappaB dependent as this response is completely absent in RelA knockdown cells. These results show that the role of NF-kappaB in

  2. The role of outside-school factors in science education: a two-stage theoretical model linking Bourdieu and Sen, with a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokpinar, Tuba; Reiss, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The literature in science education highlights the potentially significant role of outside-school factors such as parents, cultural contexts and role models in students' formation of science attitudes and aspirations, and their attainment in science classes. In this paper, building on and linking Bourdieu's key concepts of habitus, cultural and social capital, and field with Sen's capability approach, we develop a model of students' science-related capability development. Our model proposes that the role of outside-school factors is twofold, first, in providing an initial set of science-related resources (i.e. habitus, cultural and social capital), and then in conversion of these resources to science-related capabilities. The model also highlights the distinction between science-related functionings (outcomes achieved by individuals) and science-related capabilities (ability to achieve desired functionings), and argues that it is necessary to consider science-related capability development in evaluating the effectiveness of science education. We then test our theoretical model with an account of three Turkish immigrant students' science-related capabilities and the role of outside-school factors in forming and extending these capabilities. We use student and parent interviews, student questionnaires and in-class observations to provide an analysis of how outside-school factors influence these students' attitudes, aspirations and attainment in science.

  3. Leptin as an important link between obesity and cardiovascular risk factors in men with acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmen, Nergis; Helvaci, Aysen; Gunaldi, Meral; Sasani, Hadi; Yildirmak, Sembol Turkmen

    2016-01-01

    The levels of leptin, a major regulator of lipid metabolism, may increase in obesity, and contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome. Leptin is produced by adipose tissue and is a peptide hormone, which has strong association with obesity, elevated cardiovascular risk, and morbidity. The present study was designed to evaluate the relationships between leptin levels, obesity, and cardiovascular risk factors in men with acute myocardial infarction. Twenty-four obese and twenty-three nonobese male patients, who had experienced their first myocardial infarction, were included in the study. Their leptin levels, biochemical parameters, and anthropometric measures were obtained. Mean leptin levels were significantly higher in the obese group compared to the nonobese group (2.53ng/mL versus 1.23ng/mL; pobesity and diastolic blood pressure in male patients with myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 Cardiological Society of India. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. National differences in predictors of suicide among young and elderly citizens: linking societal predictors to psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wesley C H; Bond, Michael Harris

    2006-01-01

    Suicide is usually conceptualized as arising either because of social phenomena or individual dynamics. In this study, these approaches were combined by analyzing suicide rates of younger people aged 15-24 and elderly aged 65-74 from 54 nations using societal variables in conjunction with psychological measures of citizen characteristics as mediators. A mediated analysis showed that psychological citizen factors, like home satisfaction and happiness, mediated the impact of societal variables, like the sex ratio, in predicting suicide rates. We found different psychological and societal predictors for young and elderly suicides, with elderly suicide rates being much more predictable. An age-responsive Durkheimian framework focusing on the dynamics of social integration at different ages was used to interpret these results.

  5. Leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) links heterotrimeric G proteins of the G(12) family to Rho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, S; Chikumi, H; Gutkind, J S

    2000-11-24

    A putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), termed leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG), was recently identified upon fusion to the coding sequence of the MLL gene in acute myeloid leukemia. Although the function of LARG is still unknown, it exhibits a number of structural domains suggestive of a role in signal transduction, including a PDZ domain, a LH/RGS domain, and a Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology domain. Here, we show that LARG can activate Rho in vivo. Furthermore, we present evidence that LARG is an integral component of a novel biochemical route whereby G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and heterotrimeric G proteins of the G alpha(12) family stimulate Rho-dependent signaling pathways.

  6. The transcription factor EGR1 localizes to the nucleolus and is linked to suppression of ribosomal precursor synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Ponti

    Full Text Available EGR1 is an immediate early gene with a wide range of activities as transcription factor, spanning from regulation of cell growth to differentiation. Numerous studies show that EGR1 either promotes the proliferation of stimulated cells or suppresses the tumorigenic growth of transformed cells. Upon interaction with ARF, EGR1 is sumoylated and acquires the ability to bind to specific targets such as PTEN and in turn to regulate cell growth. ARF is mainly localized to the periphery of nucleolus where is able to negatively regulate ribosome biogenesis. Since EGR1 colocalizes with ARF under IGF-1 stimulation we asked the question of whether EGR1 also relocate to the nucleolus to interact with ARF. Here we show that EGR1 colocalizes with nucleolar markers such as fibrillarin and B23 in the presence of ARF. Western analysis of nucleolar extracts from HeLa cells was used to confirm the presence of EGR1 in the nucleolus mainly as the 100 kDa sumoylated form. We also show that the level of the ribosomal RNA precursor 47S is inversely correlated to the level of EGR1 transcripts. The EGR1 iseffective to regulate the synthesis of the 47S rRNA precursor. Then we demonstrated that EGR1 binds to the Upstream Binding Factor (UBF leading us to hypothesize that the regulating activity of EGR1 is mediated by its interaction within the transcriptional complex of RNA polymerase I. These results confirm the presence of EGR1 in the nucleolus and point to a role for EGR1 in the control of nucleolar metabolism.

  7. Distribution and diversity of soil microfauna from East Antarctica: assessing the link between biotic and abiotic factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Velasco-Castrillón

    Full Text Available Terrestrial life in Antarctica has been described as some of the simplest on the planet, and mainly confined to soil microfaunal communities. Studies have suggested that the lack of diversity is due to extreme environmental conditions and thought to be driven by abiotic factors. In this study we investigated soil microfauna composition, abundance, and distribution in East Antarctica, and assessed correlations with soil geochemistry and environmental variables. We examined 109 soil samples from a wide range of ice-free habitats, spanning 2000 km from Framnes Mountains to Bailey Peninsula. Microfauna across all samples were patchily distributed, from complete absence of invertebrates to over 1600 specimens/gram of dry weight of soil (gdw, with highest microfauna abundance observed in samples with visible vegetation. Bdelloid rotifers were on average the most widespread found in 87% of sampled sites and the most abundant (44 specimens/gdw. Tardigrades occurred in 57% of the sampled sites with an abundance of 12 specimens/gdw. Nematodes occurred in 71% of samples with a total abundance of 3 specimens/gdw. Ciliates and mites were rarely found in soil samples, with an average abundance of 1.3 and 0.04 specimens/gdw, respectively. We found that microfaunal composition and abundance were mostly correlated with the soil geochemical parameters; phosphorus, NO3 (- and salinity, and likely to be the result of soil properties and historic landscape formation and alteration, rather than the geographic region they were sampled from. Studies focusing on Antarctic biodiversity must take into account soil geochemical and environmental factors that influence population and species heterogeneity.

  8. Distribution and Diversity of Soil Microfauna from East Antarctica: Assessing the Link between Biotic and Abiotic Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco-Castrillón, Alejandro; Schultz, Mark B.; Colombo, Federica; Gibson, John A. E.; Davies, Kerrie A.; Austin, Andrew D.; Stevens, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial life in Antarctica has been described as some of the simplest on the planet, and mainly confined to soil microfaunal communities. Studies have suggested that the lack of diversity is due to extreme environmental conditions and thought to be driven by abiotic factors. In this study we investigated soil microfauna composition, abundance, and distribution in East Antarctica, and assessed correlations with soil geochemistry and environmental variables. We examined 109 soil samples from a wide range of ice-free habitats, spanning 2000 km from Framnes Mountains to Bailey Peninsula. Microfauna across all samples were patchily distributed, from complete absence of invertebrates to over 1600 specimens/gram of dry weight of soil (gdw), with highest microfauna abundance observed in samples with visible vegetation. Bdelloid rotifers were on average the most widespread found in 87% of sampled sites and the most abundant (44 specimens/gdw). Tardigrades occurred in 57% of the sampled sites with an abundance of 12 specimens/gdw. Nematodes occurred in 71% of samples with a total abundance of 3 specimens/gdw. Ciliates and mites were rarely found in soil samples, with an average abundance of 1.3 and 0.04 specimens/gdw, respectively. We found that microfaunal composition and abundance were mostly correlated with the soil geochemical parameters; phosphorus, NO3− and salinity, and likely to be the result of soil properties and historic landscape formation and alteration, rather than the geographic region they were sampled from. Studies focusing on Antarctic biodiversity must take into account soil geochemical and environmental factors that influence population and species heterogeneity. PMID:24498126

  9. The transcription factor EGR1 localizes to the nucleolus and is linked to suppression of ribosomal precursor synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Donatella; Bellenchi, Gian Carlo; Puca, Rosa; Bastianelli, Daniela; Maroder, Marella; Ragona, Giuseppe; Roussel, Pascal; Thiry, Marc; Mercola, Dan; Calogero, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    EGR1 is an immediate early gene with a wide range of activities as transcription factor, spanning from regulation of cell growth to differentiation. Numerous studies show that EGR1 either promotes the proliferation of stimulated cells or suppresses the tumorigenic growth of transformed cells. Upon interaction with ARF, EGR1 is sumoylated and acquires the ability to bind to specific targets such as PTEN and in turn to regulate cell growth. ARF is mainly localized to the periphery of nucleolus where is able to negatively regulate ribosome biogenesis. Since EGR1 colocalizes with ARF under IGF-1 stimulation we asked the question of whether EGR1 also relocate to the nucleolus to interact with ARF. Here we show that EGR1 colocalizes with nucleolar markers such as fibrillarin and B23 in the presence of ARF. Western analysis of nucleolar extracts from HeLa cells was used to confirm the presence of EGR1 in the nucleolus mainly as the 100 kDa sumoylated form. We also show that the level of the ribosomal RNA precursor 47S is inversely correlated to the level of EGR1 transcripts. The EGR1 iseffective to regulate the synthesis of the 47S rRNA precursor. Then we demonstrated that EGR1 binds to the Upstream Binding Factor (UBF) leading us to hypothesize that the regulating activity of EGR1 is mediated by its interaction within the transcriptional complex of RNA polymerase I. These results confirm the presence of EGR1 in the nucleolus and point to a role for EGR1 in the control of nucleolar metabolism.

  10. Variations in diatom communities at genus and species levels in peatlands (central China) linked to microhabitats and environmental factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xu; Bu, Zhaojun; Stevenson, Mark A; Cao, Yanmin; Zeng, Linghan; Qin, Bo

    2016-10-15

    Peatlands are a specialized type of organic wetlands, fulfilling essential roles as global carbon sinks, headwaters of rivers and biodiversity hotspots. Despite their importance, peatlands are being lost at an alarming rate due to human disturbance and climatic variability. Both the scientific and regulatory communities have focused considerable attention on developing tools for assessing environmental changes in peatlands. Diatoms are widely used in biomonitoring studies of lakes, rivers and streams as they have high abundance, specific ecological preferences and can respond rapidly to environmental change. However, diatom-based assessment studies in peatlands remain limited. The aims of this study were to identify indicator species and genus for three types of habitats (hummocks, hollows and ditch edges) in peatlands (central China), to examine the effects of physiochemical factors on diatom composition at genus and species levels, and to compare the efficiency of species- and genus-level identification in environmental assessment. Our results revealed that hummocks were characterized by drought-tolerant diatoms, while hollows were dominated by species and genus preferring wet conditions. Ditch edges were characterized by diatoms with different life strategies. Depth to water table, redox potential, conductivity and calcium were significant predictors of both genus- and species-level composition. According to ordination analyses, pH was not correlated with species composition while it was a significant factor associated with genus-level composition. Genus-level composition outperformed species composition in describing the response of diatoms to environmental variables. Our results indicate that diatoms can be useful environmental indicators of peatlands, and show that genus-level taxonomic analysis can be a potential tool for assessing environmental change in peatlands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Five Common Glaucoma Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Us Donate In This Section Five Common Glaucoma Tests en Español email Send this article to ... year or two after age 35. A Comprehensive Glaucoma Exam To be safe and accurate, five factors ...

  12. Latest Research: Genetic Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature: Vision Latest Research: Genetic Links Past Issues / Summer 2008 Table of Contents ... inside the eye is a risk factor for glaucoma. Summer 2008 Issue: Volume 3 Number 3 Page ...

  13. Ca isotope stratigraphy across the Cenomanian-Turonian OAE 2: Links between volcanism, seawater geochemistry, and the carbonate fractionation factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Vivier, Alice D. C.; Jacobson, Andrew D.; Lehn, Gregory O.; Selby, David; Hurtgen, Matthew T.; Sageman, Bradley B.

    2015-04-01

    The Ca isotope composition of marine carbonate rocks offers potential to reconstruct drivers of environmental change in the geologic past. This study reports new, high-precision Ca isotope records (δ44/40Ca; 2σSD = ± 0.04 ‰) for three sections spanning a major perturbation to the Cretaceous ocean-climate system known as Ocean Anoxic Event 2 (OAE 2): central Colorado, USA (Portland #1 core), southeastern France (Pont d'Issole), and Hokkaido, Japan (Oyubari, Yezo Group). In addition, we generated new data for selected samples from Eastbourne, England (English Chalk), where a previous Ca isotope study was completed using different methodology (Blättler et al., 2011). Strata of the Yezo Group contain little carbonate (∼1 wt.% on average) and accordingly did not yield a clear δ44/40Ca signal. The Portland core and the Pont d'Issole section display comparable δ44/40Ca values, which increase by ∼ 0.10- 0.15 ‰ at the onset of OAE 2 and then decrease to near-initial values across the event. The Eastbourne δ44/40Ca values are higher than previously reported. They are also higher than the δ44/40Ca values for the Portland core and the Pont d'Issole section but define a similar pattern. According to a numerical model of the marine Ca cycle, elevated hydrothermal inputs have little impact on seawater δ44/40Ca values. Elevated riverine (chemical weathering) inputs produce a transient negative isotope excursion, which significantly differs from the positive isotope excursions observed in the Portland, Pont d'Issole, and Eastbourne records. A decrease in the magnitude of the carbonate fractionation factor provides the best explanation for a positive shift in δ44/40Ca values, especially given the rapid nature of the excursion. Because a decrease in the fractionation factor corresponds to an increase in the Ca/CO3 ratio of seawater, we tentatively attribute the positive Ca isotope excursion to transient ocean acidification, i.e., a reduction in the concentration of

  14. Instituting Commoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . STEALTH.unlimited

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the origins of the notion of management, this paper explores how commons governance is constituted by the earlier influential research of Elinor Ostrom, and pursues this with reference to scholars such as Saki Bailey, who emphasises that the choice of regulatory frame is ultimately a political one. We then argue that commons have to be ‘instituted’ in an open manner in order to remain accessible. This demands a set of scripts, rules or agreements that keep the process of commoning in place, and, simultaneously, keep commoning in a constant process of reproduction. We examine this tension and look at the shift in understanding about what ‘institutions of the commons’ have entailed in practice over the course of the last century and a half. Finally, we return to the political dimension to touch upon the question of whether, with the disappearance of the welfare state, a coherent concept of society can emerge from the current upsurge of commons initiatives.

  15. Systems Pharmacogenomics Finds RUNX1 Is an Aspirin-Responsive Transcription Factor Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Voora, MD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin prevents cardiovascular disease and colon cancer; however aspirin's inhibition of platelet COX-1 only partially explains its diverse effects. We previously identified an aspirin response signature (ARS in blood consisting of 62 co-expressed transcripts that correlated with aspirin's effects on platelets and myocardial infarction (MI. Here we report that 60% of ARS transcripts are regulated by RUNX1 – a hematopoietic transcription factor - and 48% of ARS gene promoters contain a RUNX1 binding site. Megakaryocytic cells exposed to aspirin and its metabolite (salicylic acid, a weak COX-1 inhibitor showed up regulation in the RUNX1 P1 isoform and MYL9, which is transcriptionally regulated by RUNX1. In human subjects, RUNX1 P1 expression in blood and RUNX1-regulated platelet proteins, including MYL9, were aspirin-responsive and associated with platelet function. In cardiovascular disease patients RUNX1 P1 expression was associated with death or MI. RUNX1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal malignancies. We show that RUNX1 P1 expression is associated with colon cancer free survival suggesting a role for RUNX1 in aspirin's protective effect in colon cancer. Our studies reveal an effect of aspirin on RUNX1 and gene expression that may additionally explain aspirin's effects in cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  16. Analysis: linking laboratory data to human factors and inclusion of persons with disabilities in diabetes technology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann S

    2011-09-01

    In this issue of Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Friedrichs and colleagues present a study of the injection force of four reusable insulin pens and another study of the dosing accuracy of three different insulin pens. For the study of injection force, the authors claim that lower injection force has numerous advantages for patients, including making use of pens easier for people with decreased hand strength. For the study of dosing accuracy, the authors state that dose accuracy is critical for glycemic control. Both study designs have significant strengths, including measurements of the variable of interest using two different methodologies and thorough documentation of methods and materials. However, the careful, precise measurements of injection force and dosing accuracy are not matched by equivalent precision supporting the significance of the studies. The authors do not provide any information about what measured injection force is easy or difficult for individuals with and without manual problems or what level of dosing inaccuracy is clinically significant. Therefore, the implications for practice remain unclear. Data about these and other relevant human factors are needed to provide meaningful context for laboratory measurements of diabetes technologies. Furthermore, researchers conducting studies of diabetes technology that include human subjects should intentionally recruit persons with disabilities so diabetes care professionals can know whether and how technical information about diabetes technology applies to the full range of patients, including those with disabilities.

  17. Longitudinal pathways linking family factors and sibling relationship qualities to adolescent substance use and sexual risk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Patricia L; Khoo, Siek Toon

    2005-12-01

    This 3-wave, 5-year longitudinal study tested the contributions of family contextual factors and sibling relationship qualities to younger siblings' substance use, sexual risk behaviors, pregnancy, and sexually transmitted disease. More than 220 non-White families participated (67% Latino and 33% African American), all of which involved a younger sibling (133 girls and 89 boys; mean age = 13.6 years at Time 1) and an older sister (mean age = 17 years at Time 1). Results from structural equation latent growth curve modeling indicated that qualities of the sibling relationship (high older sister power, low warmth/closeness, and low conflict) mediated effects from several family risks (mothers' single parenting, older sisters' teen parenting, and family's receipt of aid) to younger sibling outcomes. Model results were generally stronger for sister-sister pairs than for sister-brother pairs. Findings add to theoretical models that emphasize the role of family and parenting processes in shaping sibling relationships, which, in turn, influence adolescent outcomes.

  18. Systems Pharmacogenomics Finds RUNX1 Is an Aspirin-Responsive Transcription Factor Linked to Cardiovascular Disease and Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voora, Deepak; Rao, A Koneti; Jalagadugula, Gauthami S; Myers, Rachel; Harris, Emily; Ortel, Thomas L; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S

    2016-09-01

    Aspirin prevents cardiovascular disease and colon cancer; however aspirin's inhibition of platelet COX-1 only partially explains its diverse effects. We previously identified an aspirin response signature (ARS) in blood consisting of 62 co-expressed transcripts that correlated with aspirin's effects on platelets and myocardial infarction (MI). Here we report that 60% of ARS transcripts are regulated by RUNX1 - a hematopoietic transcription factor - and 48% of ARS gene promoters contain a RUNX1 binding site. Megakaryocytic cells exposed to aspirin and its metabolite (salicylic acid, a weak COX-1 inhibitor) showed up regulation in the RUNX1 P1 isoform and MYL9, which is transcriptionally regulated by RUNX1. In human subjects, RUNX1 P1 expression in blood and RUNX1-regulated platelet proteins, including MYL9, were aspirin-responsive and associated with platelet function. In cardiovascular disease patients RUNX1 P1 expression was associated with death or MI. RUNX1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene in gastrointestinal malignancies. We show that RUNX1 P1 expression is associated with colon cancer free survival suggesting a role for RUNX1 in aspirin's protective effect in colon cancer. Our studies reveal an effect of aspirin on RUNX1 and gene expression that may additionally explain aspirin's effects in cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  19. Cleavage factor I links transcription termination to DNA damage response and genome integrity maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Gaillard

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During transcription, the nascent pre-mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps before being exported to the cytoplasm. The 3'-end processing machinery involves different proteins, this function being crucial to cell growth and viability in eukaryotes. Here, we found that the rna14-1, rna15-1, and hrp1-5 alleles of the cleavage factor I (CFI cause sensitivity to UV-light in the absence of global genome repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, CFI mutants were proficient in UV-lesion repair in a transcribed gene. DNA damage checkpoint activation and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII degradation in response to UV were delayed in CFI-deficient cells, indicating that CFI participates in the DNA damage response (DDR. This is further sustained by the synthetic growth defects observed between rna14-1 and mutants of different repair pathways. Additionally, we found that rna14-1 suffers severe replication progression defects and that a functional G1/S checkpoint becomes essential in avoiding genetic instability in those cells. Thus, CFI function is required to maintain genome integrity and to prevent replication hindrance. These findings reveal a new function for CFI in the DDR and underscore the importance of coordinating transcription termination with replication in the maintenance of genomic stability.

  20. A Link Between Nerve Growth Factor Metabolic Deregulation and Amyloid-β-Driven Inflammation in Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iulita, Maria Florencia; Caraci, Filippo; Cuello, Augusto Claudio

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome, cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain progressively degenerate. This neurotransmitter system is the main source of acetylcholine to the cortex and hippocampus. In the mature and fully differentiated central nervous system, the phenotype of forebrain cholinergic neurons and their nerve terminals in cortex and hippocampus depend on the continuous endogenous supply of nerve growth factor (NGF). It has been recently demonstrated that NGF is secreted from cortical neurons in an activity-dependent manner as a precursor molecule, proNGF. Individuals with Alzheimer's disease and Down syndrome exhibit proNGF accumulation in cortex, yet cholinergic neurons become atrophic in both diseases, despite the apparent abundance of the NGF precursor. This review illustrates the recent evidence that NGF metabolism is affected both in Alzheimer's disease and in Down syndrome brains and also discusses a role for amyloid-β peptides and central nervous system inflammation in unleashing such deficits. It further considers the potential of the NGF metabolic pathway as a new pharmacological target to slow down the neurodegenerative process both in Alzheimer's disease and in individuals with Down syndrome.

  1. Cleavage Factor I Links Transcription Termination to DNA Damage Response and Genome Integrity Maintenance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Hélène; Aguilera, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    During transcription, the nascent pre-mRNA undergoes a series of processing steps before being exported to the cytoplasm. The 3′-end processing machinery involves different proteins, this function being crucial to cell growth and viability in eukaryotes. Here, we found that the rna14-1, rna15-1, and hrp1-5 alleles of the cleavage factor I (CFI) cause sensitivity to UV-light in the absence of global genome repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Unexpectedly, CFI mutants were proficient in UV-lesion repair in a transcribed gene. DNA damage checkpoint activation and RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) degradation in response to UV were delayed in CFI-deficient cells, indicating that CFI participates in the DNA damage response (DDR). This is further sustained by the synthetic growth defects observed between rna14-1 and mutants of different repair pathways. Additionally, we found that rna14-1 suffers severe replication progression defects and that a functional G1/S checkpoint becomes essential in avoiding genetic instability in those cells. Thus, CFI function is required to maintain genome integrity and to prevent replication hindrance. These findings reveal a new function for CFI in the DDR and underscore the importance of coordinating transcription termination with replication in the maintenance of genomic stability. PMID:24603480

  2. ARF6-regulated endocytosis of growth factor receptors links cadherin-based adhesion to canonical Wnt signaling in epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellon-Cardenas, Oscar; Clancy, James; Uwimpuhwe, Henriette; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2013-08-01

    Wnt signaling has an essential role in embryonic development as well as stem/progenitor cell renewal, and its aberrant activation is implicated in many diseases, including several cancers. β-Catenin is a critical component of Wnt-mediated transcriptional activation. Here we show that ARF6 activation during canonical Wnt signaling promotes the intracellular accumulation of β-catenin via a mechanism that involves the endocytosis of growth factor receptors and robust activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). ERK promotes casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation of α-catenin, leading to destabilization of the adherens junctions and a subsequent increase in cytoplasmic pools of active β-catenin and E-cadherin. ERK also phosphorylates LRP6 to amplify the Wnt transduction pathway. The aforementioned Wnt-ERK signaling pathway initiates lumen filling of epithelial cysts by promoting cell proliferation in three-dimensional cell cultures. This study elucidates a mechanism responsible for the switch in β-catenin functions in cell adhesion at the adherens junctions and Wnt-induced nuclear signaling.

  3. Genetic factor common to schizophrenia and HIV infection is associated with risky sexual behavior: antagonistic vs. synergistic pleiotropic SNPs enriched for distinctly different biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Polimanti, Renato; Kranzler, Henry R; Farrer, Lindsay A; Zhao, Hongyu; Gelernter, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and HIV infection are serious disorders with a complex phenotypic relationship. Observational studies have described their comorbidity; their genetic correlation is not well studied. We performed extensive analysis in search of common genetic factors for SZ and HIV, and their relationship with risky sexual behavior (RSB). Summary statistics from genome-wide association studies of HIV infection and schizophrenia were obtained and 2379 European Americans were genotyped and assessed for RSB score. Genetic relationships between traits were analyzed in three ways: linkage disequilibrium (LD) score regression to estimate genetic correlation; GPA (Genetic analysis incorporating Pleiotropy and Annotation) to test pleiotropy and identify pleiotropic loci; polygenic risk scores (PRS) of SZ and HIV to predict RSB using linear regression. We found significant pleiotropy (p = 5.31E - 28) and a positive genetic correlation (cor = 0.17, p = 0.002) for SZ and HIV infection. Pleiotropic SNPs with opposite effect directions (antagonistic) and SNPs with the same effect direction (synergistic) were enriched for distinctly different biological functions. SZ PRS computed with antagonistically pleiotropic SNPs consistently predicted RSB score with nominal significance, but SZ PRS based on either synergistically pleiotropic SNPs or all SNPs did not predict RSB. The epidemiologic correlation between schizophrenia and HIV can partly be explained by overlapping genetic risk factors, which are related to risky sexual behavior.

  4. Neighbourhood risk factors for Common Mental Disorders among young people aged 10-20 years: a structured review of quantitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Sarah; Pain, Rachel; Fuller, Sara; Khatib, Yasmin; Rothon, Catherine; Stansfeld, Stephen A; Daya, Shari

    2013-03-01

    We present a critical review of research concerning the vulnerability of mental health of young people in the 10-20 year age range to neighbourhood factors that are theoretically associated with increased risk of Common Mental Disorders (CMDs). We interpreted 'neighbourhood factors' as attributes and processes in the local social and physical environment that young people inhabit, beyond the immediate household. We conducted an extensive search, and a structured method of assessment of the research papers that met our search criteria. We draw conclusions about the research evidence on this topic and identify issues needing further discussion and investigation. We focus particularly on quantitative research that aims to measure these relationships. We note that parallel to this research, a significant body of qualitative research on the geographical experiences of young people (though not specifically on their mental health) offers a rich source of background information to illuminate the statistical findings. We conclude with some reflections on the future challenges for research in this field.

  5. A common polymorphism in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF) modulates human cortical plasticity and the response to rTMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeran, Binith; Talelli, Penelope; Mori, Francesco; Koch, Giacomo; Suppa, Antonio; Edwards, Mark; Houlden, Henry; Bhatia, Kailash; Greenwood, Richard; Rothwell, John C

    2008-12-01

    The brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF) is one of many genes thought to influence synaptic plasticity in the adult brain and shows a common single nucleotide polymorphism (BDNF Val66Met) in the normal population that is associated with differences in hippocampal volume and episodic memory. It is also thought to influence possible synaptic changes in motor cortex following a simple motor learning task. Here we extend these studies by using new non-invasive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) techniques that directly test the excitability and plasticity of neuronal circuits in human motor cortex in subjects at rest. We investigated whether the susceptibility to TMS probes of plasticity is significantly influenced by the BDNF polymorphism. Val66Met carriers were matched with Val66Val individuals and tested on the following protocols: continuous and intermittent theta burst TMS; median nerve paired associative stimulation; and homeostatic plasticity in the TDCS/1 Hz rTMS model. The response of Met allele carriers differed significantly in all protocols compared with the response of Val66Val individuals. We suggest that this is due to the effect of BNDF on the susceptibility of synapses to undergo LTP/LTD. The circuits tested here are implicated in the pathophysiology of movement disorders such as dystonia and are being assessed as potential new targets in the treatment of stroke. Thus the polymorphism may be one factor that influences the natural response of the brain to injury and disease.

  6. Assessment of causal link between psychological factors and symptom exacerbation in inflammatory bowel disease: a protocol for systematic review of prospective cohort studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schoultz Mariyana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammatory bowel disease is an idiopathic chronic disease that affects around 28 million people worldwide. Symptoms are distressing and have a detrimental effect on patients’ quality of life. A possible link between exacerbation of symptoms and psychological factors has been suspected but not established. Previous reviews concerned with this link had conceptual and methodological limitations. In this paper we set out a protocol that lays the foundations for a systematic review that will address these shortcomings. The aim of this review is to provide researchers and clinicians with clarity on the role of psychological factors in inflammatory bowel disease symptom exacerbation. Method/design We will identify all original, published, peer reviewed studies relevant to the topic and published in English from inception to November 2012. The databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and PsychINFO will be systematically searched. The search terms will include: inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, psychological stress, mental stress, life stress, family stress, hassles, social stress, coping, mood disorders, anxiety and depression in sequential combinations. Studies will be screened according to predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria by two reviewers. We will include clinical prospective cohort studies of all human participants aged 18 years or over with a diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. All eligible papers will be independently and critically appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP tool by two reviewers. Two reviewers will independently extract and synthesise data from the studies using a predefined data extraction sheet. Disagreements will be resolved by discussion between reviewers and a third party will be consulted if agreement is not reached. Synthesised data will be analysed using Bradford Hill criterion for causality. If data permits, meta-analysis will be

  7. Body Esteem as a Common Factor of a Tendency Toward Binge Eating and Sexual Dissatisfaction Among Women: The Role of Dissociation and Stress Response During Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Giovanni; Lo Sauro, Carolina; Ricca, Valdo; Rellini, Alessandra H

    2017-08-01

    Several studies have suggested a relevant overlap between eating disorders and sexual dysfunction involving the emotional component of body image esteem and dissociative experiences. To evaluate the common maintaining factors of sexual dysfunction and vulnerability to pathologic eating behaviors and their relation to a physiologic stress response. In the present cross-sectional study, we evaluated a non-clinical sample of 60 heterosexual women (25-35 years old) for dissociation during sex with a partner, body image disturbance, and tendency toward pathologic eating behaviors. We also evaluated the stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation in response to a sexual stimulus and its association with binge eating and dissociation. Participants completed the Clinician-Administered Dissociative States Scale, the Sexual Satisfaction Scale-Women, the Body Esteem Scale for Adolescents and Adults, and the Eating Attitudes Test Short Version. Furthermore, we assessed cortisol levels before, during, and after exposure to explicit sexual stimuli shown within a laboratory setting. Dysfunctional body image esteem and a tendency toward binge-eating behaviors were associated with greater sexual distress in women. In particular, body esteem was significantly associated with greater dissociation during sex with a partner. Moreover, women who reported greater dissociation during sex with a partner and a tendency toward binge-eating behaviors showed higher levels of cortisol in response to sexual stimuli. These results support further research based on trans-diagnostic treatments targeted to dissociation and body image esteem, which could lessen sexual dysfunction and vulnerability to pathologic eating behaviors. Despite the small sample and self-reported questionnaires, this is the first study to consider the association of the stress response during sexual stimuli with sexual distress and with pathologic eating behaviors adopting a dimensional approach. Body

  8. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  9. Science commons

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    SCP: Creative Commons licensing for open access publishing, Open Access Law journal-author agreements for converting journals to open access, and the Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine for retaining rights to self-archive in meaningful formats and locations for future re-use. More than 250 science and technology journals already publish under Creative Commons licensing while 35 law journals utilize the Open Access Law agreements. The Addendum Engine is a new tool created in partnership with SPARC and U.S. universities. View John Wilbanks's biography

  10. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  11. The anti-apoptotic factor Che-1/AATF links transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and DNA damage response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanciulli Maurizio

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Che-1 is a RNA polymerase II binding protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of E2F target genes and in cell proliferation. Recently, it has been shown that Che-1 accumulates in cells responding to genotoxic agents such as Doxorubicin and ionizing radiation. The DNA damage-activated checkpoint kinases ATM and Chk2 interact with and phosphorylate Che-1, enhancing its accumulation and stability, and promoting Che-1-mediated transcription of p53-responsive genes and of p53 itself, as evidenced by microarray analysis. This transcriptional response is suppressed by expression of a Che-1 mutant lacking ATM and Chk2 phosphorylation amino acid residues, or by depletion of Che-1 by RNA silencing. In addition, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis has shown that Che-1 is released from E2F target genes and recruited to the p21 and p53 promoters after DNA damage. Che-1 contributes to the maintenance of the G2/M checkpoint in response to genotoxic stress. These findings identify a new mechanism by which the checkpoint kinases regulate, via the novel effector Che-1, the p53 pathway. Lastly, increasing evidence suggests that Che-1 may be involved in apoptotic signaling in neural tissues. In cortical neurons, Che-1 exhibits anti-apoptotic activity, protecting cells from neuronal damage induced by amyloid β-peptide. In cerebellar granule neurons, Che-1 interacts with Tau in the cytoplasmic compartment and this interaction is modulated during neuronal apoptosis. Finally, Che-1 directly interacts with the neuronal cell-death inducer "NRAGE" which downregulates endogenous Che-1 by targeting it for proteasome-dependent degradation. These findings identify Che-1 as a novel cytoprotective factor against apoptotic insults and suggest that Che-1 may represent a potential target for therapeutic application.

  12. Influence of Environmental and Genetic Factors Linked to Celiac Disease Risk on Infant Gut Colonization by Bacteroides Species▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ester; De Palma, Giada; Capilla, Amalia; Nova, Esther; Pozo, Tamara; Castillejo, Gemma; Varea, Vicente; Marcos, Ascensión; Garrote, José Antonio; Polanco, Isabel; López, Ana; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; García-Novo, Maria Dolores; Calvo, Carmen; Ortigosa, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sanz, Yolanda

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving genetic and environmental factors whose interaction might influence disease risk. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of milk-feeding practices and the HLA-DQ genotype on intestinal colonization of Bacteroides species in infants at risk of CD development. This study included 75 full-term newborns with at least one first-degree relative suffering from CD. Infants were classified according to milk-feeding practice (breast-feeding or formula feeding) and HLA-DQ genotype (high or low genetic risk). Stools were analyzed at 7 days, 1 month, and 4 months by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The Bacteroides species diversity index was higher in formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants. Breast-fed infants showed a higher prevalence of Bacteroides uniformis at 1 and 4 months of age, while formula-fed infants had a higher prevalence of B. intestinalis at all sampling times, of B. caccae at 7 days and 4 months, and of B. plebeius at 4 months. Infants with high genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. vulgatus, while those with low genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. ovatus, B. plebeius, and B. uniformis. Among breast-fed infants, the prevalence of B. uniformis was higher in those with low genetic risk than in those with high genetic risk. Among formula-fed infants, the prevalence of B. ovatus and B. plebeius was increased in those with low genetic risk, while the prevalence of B. vulgatus was higher in those with high genetic risk. The results indicate that both the type of milk feeding and the HLA-DQ genotype influence the colonization process of Bacteroides species, and possibly the disease risk. PMID:21642397

  13. Influence of environmental and genetic factors linked to celiac disease risk on infant gut colonization by Bacteroides species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ester; De Palma, Giada; Capilla, Amalia; Nova, Esther; Pozo, Tamara; Castillejo, Gemma; Varea, Vicente; Marcos, Ascensión; Garrote, José Antonio; Polanco, Isabel; López, Ana; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; García-Novo, Maria Dolores; Calvo, Carmen; Ortigosa, Luis; Palau, Francesc; Sanz, Yolanda

    2011-08-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy involving genetic and environmental factors whose interaction might influence disease risk. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of milk-feeding practices and the HLA-DQ genotype on intestinal colonization of Bacteroides species in infants at risk of CD development. This study included 75 full-term newborns with at least one first-degree relative suffering from CD. Infants were classified according to milk-feeding practice (breast-feeding or formula feeding) and HLA-DQ genotype (high or low genetic risk). Stools were analyzed at 7 days, 1 month, and 4 months by PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). The Bacteroides species diversity index was higher in formula-fed infants than in breast-fed infants. Breast-fed infants showed a higher prevalence of Bacteroides uniformis at 1 and 4 months of age, while formula-fed infants had a higher prevalence of B. intestinalis at all sampling times, of B. caccae at 7 days and 4 months, and of B. plebeius at 4 months. Infants with high genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. vulgatus, while those with low genetic risk showed a higher prevalence of B. ovatus, B. plebeius, and B. uniformis. Among breast-fed infants, the prevalence of B. uniformis was higher in those with low genetic risk than in those with high genetic risk. Among formula-fed infants, the prevalence of B. ovatus and B. plebeius was increased in those with low genetic risk, while the prevalence of B. vulgatus was higher in those with high genetic risk. The results indicate that both the type of milk feeding and the HLA-DQ genotype influence the colonization process of Bacteroides species, and possibly the disease risk.

  14. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 T869C Gene Polymorphism Is Associated with Acquired Sick Sinus Syndrome via Linking a Higher Serum Protein Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Yow Chen

    Full Text Available Familial sick sinus syndrome is associated with gene mutations and dysfunction of ion channels. In contrast, degenerative fibrosis of the sinus node tissue plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acquired sick sinus syndrome. There is a close relationship between transforming growth factor-β1 mediated cardiac fibrosis and acquired arrhythmia. It is of interest to examine whether transforming growth factor-β1 is involved in the pathogenesis of acquired sick sinus syndrome.Overall, 110 patients with acquired SSS and 137 age/gender-matched controls were screened for transforming growth factor-β1 and cardiac sodium channel gene polymorphisms using gene sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism methods. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the serum level of transforming growth factor-β1.Two transforming growth factor-β1 gene polymorphisms (C-509T and T+869C and one cardiac sodium channel gene polymorphism (H588R have been identified. The C-dominant CC/CT genotype frequency of T869C was significantly higher in acquired sick sinus syndrome patients than in controls (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.16-3.75, P = 0.01. Consistently, the level of serum transforming growth factor-β1 was also significantly greater in acquired sick sinus syndrome group than in controls (5.3±3.4 ng/ml vs. 3.7±2.4 ng/ml, P = 0.01. In addition, the CC/CT genotypes showed a higher transforming growth factor-β1 serum level than the TT genotype (4.25 ± 2.50 ng/ml vs. 2.71± 1.76 ng/ml, P = 0.028 in controls.Transforming growth factor-β1 T869C polymorphism, correlated with high serum transforming growth factor-β1 levels, is associated with susceptibility to acquired sick sinus syndrome.

  15. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-06-30

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways.

  16. Tips and step-by-step protocol for the optimization of important factors affecting cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (CELISA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandini, R; Boeynaems, J M; Wérenne, J; Ghanem, G

    2001-01-01

    CELISA, or cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, is a powerful and easy to use technique to study cell surface antigens under different stimulations. Nevertheless, some factors must be discussed and optimized prior to reaching a reproducible CELISA. These include the choice of cell density, fixative agent, blocking agent, culture medium, optimal antibody dilutions, and incubation time. In this paper, we first present a short review of some references devoted to CELISA by means of a comparison of these parameters, followed by their description. Then, we describe and study these different parameters using practical examples comparing TNF-induced ICAM-1 expression as an end point, on HBL melanoma and HUVEC. These cell lines were also chosen because they differ in their ability to grow as discontinuous and continuous layers, respectively. Furthermore, we designed a comprehensive flow chart, as well as a complete step-by-step protocol for CELISA optimization.

  17. Is Increased Susceptibility to Balkan Endemic Nephropathy in Carriers of Common GSTA1 (*A/*B Polymorphism Linked with the Catalytic Role of GSTA1 in Ochratoxin A Biotransformation? Serbian Case Control Study and In Silico Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorica Reljic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Although recent data suggest aristolochic acid as a putative cause of Balkan endemic nephropathy (BEN, evidence also exists in favor of ochratoxin A (OTA exposure as risk factor for the disease. The potential role of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, such as the glutathione transferases (GSTs, in OTA biotransformation is based on OTA glutathione adducts (OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG in blood and urine of BEN patients. We aimed to analyze the association between common GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 polymorphisms and BEN susceptibility, and thereafter performed an in silico simulation of particular GST enzymes potentially involved in OTA transformations. GSTA1, GSTM1, GSTT1 and GSTP1 genotypes were determined in 207 BEN patients and 138 non-BEN healthy individuals from endemic regions by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Molecular modeling in silico was performed for GSTA1 protein. Among the GST polymorphisms tested, only GSTA1 was significantly associated with a higher risk of BEN. Namely, carriers of the GSTA1*B gene variant, associated with lower transcriptional activation, were at a 1.6-fold higher BEN risk than those carrying the homozygous GSTA1*A/*A genotype (OR = 1.6; p = 0.037. In in silico modeling, we found four structures, two OTB-SG and two OTHQ-SG, bound in a GSTA1 monomer. We found that GSTA1 polymorphism was associated with increased risk of BEN, and suggested, according to the in silico simulation, that GSTA1-1 might be involved in catalyzing the formation of OTHQ-SG and OTB-SG conjugates.

  18. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  19. Novel Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Gene and Their Associations with Growth Traits in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Feng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I plays an important role in the growth and development of vertebrates. To study polymorphisms of IGF-I, we screened a total of 4555 bp of genomic sequences in four exons and partial introns for the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP in common carp (Cyprinus carpio. Three SNPs (g.3759T>G, g.7627T>A and g.7722T>C in intron 2 and a nonsynonymous SNP (g.7892C>T in exon 3 were identified in a pilot population including random parents and their progenies. 289 progenies were further genotyped for studying possible associations between genotypes or combined genotypes and growth traits. The results showed that the locus g.7627T>A was significantly associated with body weight and body length, and fish with genotype AA had a mean body weight 5.9% higher than those with genotype TT. No significant associations were observed between genotypes of other loci and growth traits. However, when both g.7627T>A and g.7722T>C were considered, the combined genotype TT/TT was extremely associated with the lowest values of body length and body weight and the highest K value in comparison with other diplotypes (p < 0.01. These results suggest that genotype AA at g.7627T>A and its combined genotypes with alleles from another locus have positive effects on growth traits, which would be a candidate molecular marker for further studies in marker-assisted selection in common carp.

  20. Links between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: serum lipids or atherosclerosis per se?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Alexandersen, P

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological observations suggest links between osteoporosis and risk of acute cardiovascular events and vice versa. Whether the two clinical conditions are linked by common pathogenic factors or atherosclerosis per se remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether serum lipids and p...... and polymorphism in the ApoE gene modifying serum lipids could be a biological linkage....

  1. Links between cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis in postmenopausal women: serum lipids or atherosclerosis per se?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Y Z; Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Alexandersen, P

    2007-01-01

    Epidemiological observations suggest links between osteoporosis and risk of acute cardiovascular events and vice versa. Whether the two clinical conditions are linked by common pathogenic factors or atherosclerosis per se remains incompletely understood. We investigated whether serum lipids...... and polymorphism in the ApoE gene modifying serum lipids could be a biological linkage....

  2. FACTORES VINCULADOS AL TRATAMIENTO Y LA ADHERENCIA TERAPÉUTICA DE LA INSUFICIENCIA CARDÍACA EN UN ÁREA DE SALUD URBANA / Factors linked to the treatment and therapeutic adherence of patients suffering from cardiac insufficiency in an urban health area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Triana de la Paz

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives: Cardiac insufficiency is a major health problem with a social, economic and human impact. It causes a serious limitation in the quality of life of patients. An important aspect in the patients’ evolution is their adherence to the treatment. In primary health care, not all the professionals are familiar with the therapeutic procedures. This study was aimed at determining the factors linked to the treatment and therapeutic adherence of patients diagnosed with cardiac insufficiency. Methods: a cross-sectional descriptive study of the total amount of patients suffering from cardiac insufficiency (56 in the family doctor’s consulting room Nº 3 of Santa Clara Polyclinic was carried out. The sources of the collected data were the medical certificates, the individual and family medical histories and the personal interviews. Results: cardiac insufficiency prevailed in the age group between 70 and 79 years of age (44,6 %, and among women (66,1 %. The total adherence to the treatment prevailed with 78.6 percent, and the incomplete adherence was 21,4 percent. The most common functional classification were class II (46,4 % and class III (37,5 %. The digitalics and diuretics were the most common medication (82,1 % and 71,4 %respectively. There was an incorrect treatment in 39.3 percent of the cases and inadequate knowledge in 45 percent of the doctors. Conclusions: The therapeutic adherence of the patients was not linked to age and gender. The incomplete adherence was higher in patients with an inadequate follow up, in functional classifications II and III. The digitalics and diuretics were the most commonly used medications. There was a wrong treatment in a large number of patients, as well as inadequate knowledge in the professionals.

  3. Depression And The Link With Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arup Kumar Dhar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an outline of the association between major depressive disorder (MDD and coronary heart disease (CHD. Much is known about the two individual clinical conditions; however it is not until recently, that biological mechanisms have been uncovered that link both MDD and CHD. The activation of stress pathways have been implicated as a neurochemical mechanism that links MDD and CHD. Depression is known to be associated with poorer outcomes of CHD. Psychological factors such as major depression and stress are now known as risk factors for developing CHD which is as important and is independent of classic risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus and cigarette smoking. Both conditions have great socioeconomic importance given that depression and CHD are likely to be two of the three leading causes of global burden of disease. Better understanding of the common causal pathways will help us delineate more appropriate treatments.

  4. Norovirus translation requires an interaction between the C Terminus of the genome-linked viral protein VPg and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Liliane; Bailey, Dalan; Leen, Eoin N; Emmott, Edward P; Chaudhry, Yasmin; Roberts, Lisa O; Curry, Stephen; Locker, Nicolas; Goodfellow, Ian G

    2014-08-01

    Viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to usurp the host cell translation machinery to enable translation of the viral genome in the presence of high levels of cellular mRNAs. Noroviruses, a major cause of gastroenteritis in man, have evolved a mechanism that relies on the interaction of translation initiation factors with the virus-encoded VPg protein covalently linked to the 5' end of the viral RNA. To further characterize this novel mechanism of translation initiation, we have used proteomics to identify the components of the norovirus translation initiation factor complex. This approach revealed that VPg binds directly to the eIF4F complex, with a high affinity interaction occurring between VPg and eIF4G. Mutational analyses indicated that the C-terminal region of VPg is important for the VPg-eIF4G interaction; viruses with mutations that alter or disrupt this interaction are debilitated or non-viable. Our results shed new light on the unusual mechanisms of protein-directed translation initiation.

  5. Communication Links

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    This interactive tutorial helps learners to: Identify key upward, lateral, downward, and informal communication links in their organizations. , Reflect on the benefits, control, satisfaction, information filters, and feedback mechanism of various communication links in the organizations. OCL1000 Communicating Change in Complex Organizations

  6. Operative links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2010-01-01

    as networks: second, a semantic perspective on discourses and concepts of health, and, third, a health pedagogical perspective on participation, intervention, and roles. This paper argues for the importance of 'operative links' between different levels in health strategies. It is proposed that such links...

  7. Risk factors for suicidal behaviour in individuals on disability pension due to common mental disorders - a nationwide register-based prospective cohort study in Sweden.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Rahman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Common mental disorders (CMD have become one of the leading causes for disability pension (DP. Studies on predictors of adverse health outcome following DP are sparse. This study aimed to examine the association of different socio-demographic factors and health care consumption with subsequent suicidal behaviour among individuals on DP due to CMD. METHOD: This is a population-based prospective cohort study based on register data. All individuals aged 18-64 years, living in Sweden on 31-Dec-2004 who in 2005 were on DP due to CMD (N = 46 745 were followed regarding suicide attempt and suicide (2006-10. Univariate and multivariate hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for suicidal behaviour were estimated by Cox regression. RESULTS: During the five-year follow-up, 1 046 (2.2% and 210 (0.4% individuals attempted and committed suicide, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed that young age (18-24 years and low education predicted suicide attempt, while living alone was associated with both higher suicide attempt and suicide (range of HRs 1.23 to 1.68. Combined prescription of antidepressants with anxiolytics during 2005 and inpatient care due to mental diagnoses or suicide attempt (2001-05 were strongly associated with suicide attempt and suicide (range of HRs 1.3 to 4.9, while inpatient care due to somatic diagnoses and specialized outpatient care due to mental diagnoses during 2001-05 only predicted suicide attempt (HR 1.45; 95% CI: 1.3-1.7; HR 1.30; 95% CI: 1.1-1.7. CONCLUSIONS: Along with socio-demographic factors, it is very important to consider type of previous healthcare use and medication history when designing further research or intervention aiming at individuals on DP due to CMD. Further research is warranted to investigate both characteristics of disability pension due to CMD, like duration, diagnoses and grade as well as mechanisms to subsequent suicidal behavior, taking potential gender differences into

  8. Link Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoho, Steve

    Link analysis is a collection of techniques that operate on data that can be represented as nodes and links. This chapter surveys a variety of techniques including subgraph matching, finding cliques and K-plexes, maximizing spread of influence, visualization, finding hubs and authorities, and combining with traditional techniques (classification, clustering, etc). It also surveys applications including social network analysis, viral marketing, Internet search, fraud detection, and crime prevention.

  9. A study on biochemical facet of anemia in cancers: A strong link between erythropoietin and tumor necrosis factor alpha in anemic cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kalyani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The three direct factors that could lead cancer patients to anemia, apart from therapy are iron deficiency, inflammatory cytokines surge and decreased erythropoietin (Epo. Our aim was to quantify biochemical and hematologic markers serum Epo, ferritin (Fe and tum