WorldWideScience

Sample records for common enteric infections

  1. Cardioviruses Are Genetically Diverse and Cause Common Enteric Infections in South Asian Children▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkova, Olga; Kapoor, Amit; Victoria, Joseph; Jones, Morris; Wolfe, Nathan; Naeem, Asif; Shaukat, Shahzad; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Angez, Mehar; Zaidi, Sohail; Delwart, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardioviruses cause enteric infections in mice and rats which when disseminated have been associated with myocarditis, type 1 diabetes, encephalitis, and multiple sclerosis-like symptoms. Cardioviruses have also been detected at lower frequencies in other mammals. The Cardiovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family is currently made up of two viral species, Theilovirus and Encephalomyocarditis virus. Until recently, only a single strain of cardioviruses (Vilyuisk virus within the Theilovirus species) associated with a geographically restricted and prevalent encephalitis-like condition had been reported to occur in humans. A second theilovirus-related cardiovirus (Saffold virus [SAFV]) was reported in 2007 and subsequently found in respiratory secretions from children with respiratory problems and in stools of both healthy and diarrheic children. Using viral metagenomics, we identified RNA fragments related to SAFV in the stools of Pakistani and Afghani children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). We sequenced three near-full-length genomes, showing the presence of divergent strains of SAFV and preliminary evidence of a distant recombination event between the ancestors of the Theiler-like viruses of rats and those of human SAFV. Further VP1 sequencing showed the presence of five new SAFV genotypes, doubling the reported genetic diversity of human and animal theiloviruses combined. Both AFP patients and healthy children in Pakistan were found to be excreting SAFV at high frequencies of 9 and 12%, respectively. Further studies are needed to examine the roles of these highly common and diverse SAFV genotypes in nonpolio AFP and other human diseases. PMID:19193786

  2. Cardioviruses are genetically diverse and cause common enteric infections in South Asian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinkova, Olga; Kapoor, Amit; Victoria, Joseph; Jones, Morris; Wolfe, Nathan; Naeem, Asif; Shaukat, Shahzad; Sharif, Salmaan; Alam, Muhammad Masroor; Angez, Mehar; Zaidi, Sohail; Delwart, Eric L

    2009-05-01

    Cardioviruses cause enteric infections in mice and rats which when disseminated have been associated with myocarditis, type 1 diabetes, encephalitis, and multiple sclerosis-like symptoms. Cardioviruses have also been detected at lower frequencies in other mammals. The Cardiovirus genus within the Picornaviridae family is currently made up of two viral species, Theilovirus and Encephalomyocarditis virus. Until recently, only a single strain of cardioviruses (Vilyuisk virus within the Theilovirus species) associated with a geographically restricted and prevalent encephalitis-like condition had been reported to occur in humans. A second theilovirus-related cardiovirus (Saffold virus [SAFV]) was reported in 2007 and subsequently found in respiratory secretions from children with respiratory problems and in stools of both healthy and diarrheic children. Using viral metagenomics, we identified RNA fragments related to SAFV in the stools of Pakistani and Afghani children with nonpolio acute flaccid paralysis (AFP). We sequenced three near-full-length genomes, showing the presence of divergent strains of SAFV and preliminary evidence of a distant recombination event between the ancestors of the Theiler-like viruses of rats and those of human SAFV. Further VP1 sequencing showed the presence of five new SAFV genotypes, doubling the reported genetic diversity of human and animal theiloviruses combined. Both AFP patients and healthy children in Pakistan were found to be excreting SAFV at high frequencies of 9 and 12%, respectively. Further studies are needed to examine the roles of these highly common and diverse SAFV genotypes in nonpolio AFP and other human diseases.

  3. [Bacteriologic and serologic diagnosis of enteral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringelmann, R

    1988-09-01

    Infections of the gastrointestinal tract still are numerous, ranging on the second place after infections of the respiratory tract. Some of them show quite severe or prolonged course. In contrast to other infections, especially those of the urinary tract, laboratory diagnostic of enteritis is only scarcely ordered. During the last ten years new methods and knowledge of etiologic germs like Campylobacter, Yersinia, various types of E. coli, Clostridium difficile, Rotavirus, Adenovirus, Giardia, Blastomyces and Cryptosporidia have been accumulated. A better etiologic diagnosis of these infections should enable the clinician to start a more precise and therefore more effective therapy.

  4. Pathophysiology of enteric infections with Giardia duodenalis

    OpenAIRE

    Buret A.G.

    2008-01-01

    Giardia is the most prevalent human intestinal parasitic protist in the world, and one of the most common parasite of companion animals and young livestock. Giardia is a major cause of diarrhea in children and in travelers. The host-microbial interactions that govern the outcome of infection remain incompletely understood. Findings available to date indicate that the infection causes diarrhea via a combination of intestinal malabsorption and hypersecretion. Malabsorption and maldigestion main...

  5. Infection and cross-infection in a Paediatric Gastro-enteritis unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Bowen Jones

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available A two month study to investigate the incidence o f nosocomial infection was conducted in a paediatric gastroenteritis ward o f a black academic hospital. Enteric pathogens were identified on admission in 61 (47,2% o f 129 patients; 56 bacterial and 25 viral. Six per cent o f patients had a combination o f bacterial and viral pathogens. Enteric pathogens most frequently identified on admission were Campylobacter jejuni in 22%, Rotavirus in 19,3%, EPEC in 10,8% and Shigella spp. in 6,9% patients. Twenty six (20% patients had more than 1 enteric pathogen. The nosocomial infection rate was recorded at 17,1%. EPEC occurred most commonly in 5,3% patients, Salmonella typhimurium in 4,6% and Shigella spp. in 2,3%. Nosocomial infections increased the mean length o f hospital stay from 7,2- 20,2 days. Contributory factors to the spread o f nosocomial infection were the unsatisfactory methods o f bathing patients and giving naso-gastric feeds.

  6. The role of carbohydrates in infection strategies of enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kentaro; Ishiwa, Akiko

    2015-03-01

    Enteric pathogens cause considerable public health concerns worldwide including tropical regions. Here, we review the roles of carbohydrates in the infection strategies of various enteric pathogens including viruses, bacteria and protozoa, which infect the epithelial lining of the human and animal intestine. At host cell entry, enteric viruses, including norovirus, recognize mainly histo-blood group antigens. At the initial step of bacterial infections, carbohydrates also function as receptors for attachment. Here, we describe the function of carbohydrates in infection by Salmonella enterica and several bacterial species that produce a variety of fimbrial adhesions. During invasion by enteropathogenic protozoa, apicomplexan parasites utilize sialic acids or sulfated glycans. Carbohydrates serve as receptors for infection by these microbes; however, their usage of carbohydrates varies depending on the microbe. On the surface of the mucosal tissues of the gastrointestinal tract, various carbohydrate moieties are present and play a crucial role in infection, representing the site of infection or route of access for most microbes. During the infection and/or invasion process of the microbes, carbohydrates function as receptors for various microbes, but they can also function as a barrier to infection. One approach to develop effective prophylactic and therapeutic antimicrobial agents is to modify the drug structure. Another approach is to modify the mode of inhibition of infection depending on the individual pathogen by using and mimicking the interactions with carbohydrates. In addition, similarities in mode of infection may also be utilized. Our findings will be useful in the development of new drugs for the treatment of enteric pathogens.

  7. Enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001149.htm Enteritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteritis is inflammation of the small intestine. Causes Enteritis ...

  8. ACUTE ENTERIC INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN IN IRKUTS REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Anganova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the incidence of acute intestinal infections in children was carried out in Irkutsk region. The study demonstrated significant increase of the incidence of acute intestinal infections in Irkutsk region and revealed exceedance of all-Russia indicators. It is established that bacterial intestinal infections dominate. Among the bacterial pathogens of acute intestinal infections dominated opportunistic bacteria of the family Enterobacteriaceae. The Analysis also revealed the change of quantitative composition in the long-term aspect, and a significant increase in the proportion of bacteria of the genus Klebsiella. Etiological structure of acute enteric infections in children in recent years has changed. The proportion of viruses has increased. The viral infection has had higher growth rate in comparison with bacterial infections

  9. Enteric Ganglionitis in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight in...

  10. Pathogenic characteristics of persistent feline enteric coronavirus infection in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Liesbeth; Van der Lubben, Mariken; te Lintelo, Eddie G; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Geerts, Tamara; Schuijff, Leontine S; Grinwis, Guy C M; Egberink, Herman F; Rottier, Peter J M

    2010-01-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) comprise two biotypes: feline enteric coronaviruses (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis viruses (FIPV). FECV is associated with asymptomatic persistent enteric infections, while FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a usually fatal systemic disease in domestic cats and some wild Felidae. FIPV arises from FECV by mutation. FCoV also occur in two serotypes, I and II, of which the serotype I viruses are by far the most prevalent in the field. Yet, most of our knowledge about FCoV infections relates to serotype II viruses, particularly about the FIPV, mainly because type I viruses grow poorly in cell culture. Hence, the aim of the present work was the detailed study of the epidemiologically most relevant viruses, the avirulent serotype I viruses. Kittens were inoculated oronasally with different doses of two independent FECV field strains, UCD and RM. Persistent infection could be reproducibly established. The patterns of clinical symptoms, faecal virus shedding and seroconversion were monitored for up to 10 weeks revealing subtle but reproducible differences between the two viruses. Faecal virus, i.e. genomic RNA, was detected during persistent FECV infection only in the large intestine, downstream of the appendix, and could occasionally be observed also in the blood. The implications of our results, particularly our insights into the persistently infected state, are discussed.

  11. Enteric Ganglionitis in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orandle, Marlene S.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight into potential pathogenic mechanisms of GI disease. Ganglia from duodenum, ileum, and colon were examined in healthy and acutely infected macaques by using a combination of routine histology, double-label immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. Evaluation of tissues from infected macaques showed progressive infiltration of myenteric ganglia by CD3+ T cells and IBA1+ macrophages beginning as early as 8 days postinfection. Quantitative image analysis revealed that the severity of myenteric ganglionitis increased with time after SIV infection and, in general, was more severe in ganglia from the small intestine than in ganglia from the colon. Despite an abundance of inflammatory cells in myenteric ganglia during acute infection, the ENS was not a target for virus infection. This study provides evidence that the ENS may be playing a role in the pathogenesis of GI disease and enteropathy in HIV-infected people. PMID:17392357

  12. Vaccines against enteric infections for the developing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkinsky, Cecil; Holmgren, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Since the first licensure of the Sabin oral polio vaccine more than 50 years ago, only eight enteric vaccines have been licensed for four disease indications, and all are given orally. While mucosal vaccines offer programmatically attractive tools for facilitating vaccine deployment, their development remains hampered by several factors: —limited knowledge regarding the properties of the gut immune system during early life;—lack of mucosal adjuvants, limiting mucosal vaccine development to live-attenuated or killed whole virus and bacterial vaccines;—lack of correlates/surrogates of mucosal immune protection; and—limited knowledge of the factors contributing to oral vaccine underperformance in children from developing countries.There are now reasons to believe that the development of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and of programmatically sound intervention strategies could enhance the efficacy of current and next-generation enteric vaccines, especially in lesser developed countries which are often co-endemic for enteric infections and malnutrition. These vaccines must be safe and affordable for the world's poorest, confer long-term protection and herd immunity, and must be able to contain epidemics. PMID:25964464

  13. Vaccines against enteric infections for the developing world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerkinsky, Cecil; Holmgren, Jan

    2015-06-19

    Since the first licensure of the Sabin oral polio vaccine more than 50 years ago, only eight enteric vaccines have been licensed for four disease indications, and all are given orally. While mucosal vaccines offer programmatically attractive tools for facilitating vaccine deployment, their development remains hampered by several factors: -limited knowledge regarding the properties of the gut immune system during early life; -lack of mucosal adjuvants, limiting mucosal vaccine development to live-attenuated or killed whole virus and bacterial vaccines; -lack of correlates/surrogates of mucosal immune protection; and -limited knowledge of the factors contributing to oral vaccine underperformance in children from developing countries. There are now reasons to believe that the development of safe and effective mucosal adjuvants and of programmatically sound intervention strategies could enhance the efficacy of current and next-generation enteric vaccines, especially in lesser developed countries which are often co-endemic for enteric infections and malnutrition. These vaccines must be safe and affordable for the world's poorest, confer long-term protection and herd immunity, and must be able to contain epidemics.

  14. Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infection is associated with expansion of the enteric virome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Scott A; Thackray, Larissa B; Zhao, Guoyan; Presti, Rachel; Miller, Andrew D; Droit, Lindsay; Abbink, Peter; Maxfield, Lori F; Kambal, Amal; Duan, Erning; Stanley, Kelly; Kramer, Joshua; Macri, Sheila C; Permar, Sallie R; Schmitz, Joern E; Mansfield, Keith; Brenchley, Jason M; Veazey, Ronald S; Stappenbeck, Thaddeus S; Wang, David; Barouch, Dan H; Virgin, Herbert W

    2012-10-12

    Pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection is associated with enteropathy, which likely contributes to AIDS progression. To identify candidate etiologies for AIDS enteropathy, we used next-generation sequencing to define the enteric virome during SIV infection in nonhuman primates. Pathogenic, but not nonpathogenic, SIV infection was associated with significant expansion of the enteric virome. We identified at least 32 previously undescribed enteric viruses during pathogenic SIV infection and confirmed their presence by using viral culture and PCR testing. We detected unsuspected mucosal adenovirus infection associated with enteritis as well as parvovirus viremia in animals with advanced AIDS, indicating the pathogenic potential of SIV-associated expansion of the enteric virome. No association between pathogenic SIV infection and the family-level taxonomy of enteric bacteria was detected. Thus, enteric viral infections may contribute to AIDS enteropathy and disease progression. These findings underline the importance of metagenomic analysis of the virome for understanding AIDS pathogenesis.

  15. Common oral lesions associated with HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navazesh, M; Lucatorto, F

    1993-09-01

    More than 40 different lesions involving head and neck areas have been associated with HIV infection. The oral cavity may manifest the first sign of HIV infection. Early detection of these conditions can lead to early diagnosis of HIV infection and subsequent appropriate management. Signs, symptoms and management of the most common HIV-associated oral lesions are discussed.

  16. Experimental feline enteric coronavirus infection reveals an aberrant infection pattern and shedding of mutants with impaired infectivity in enterocyte cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarets, Lowiese M. B.; Vermeulen, Ben L.; Theuns, Sebastiaan; Conceição-Neto, Nádia; Zeller, Mark; Roukaerts, Inge D. M.; Acar, Delphine D.; Olyslaegers, Dominique A. J.; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Nauwynck, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) results from mutations in the viral genome during a common feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) infection. Since many virological and immunological data on FECV infections are lacking, the present study investigated these missing links during experimental infection of three SPF cats with FECV strain UCD. Two cats showed mild clinical signs, faecal shedding of infectious virus from 4 dpi, a cell-associated viraemia at inconsistent time points from 5 dpi, a highly neutralising antibody response from 9 dpi, and no major abnormalities in leukocyte numbers. Faecal shedding lasted for 28–56 days, but virus shed during this stage was less infectious in enterocyte cultures and affected by mutations. Remarkably, in the other cat neither clinical signs nor acute shedding were seen, but virus was detected in blood cells from 3 dpi, and shedding of non-enterotropic, mutated viruses suddenly occurred from 14 dpi onwards. Neutralising antibodies arose from 21 dpi. Leukocyte numbers were not different compared to the other cats, except for the CD8+ regulatory T cells. These data indicate that FECV can infect immune cells even in the absence of intestinal replication and raise the hypothesis that the gradual adaptation to these cells can allow non-enterotropic mutants to arise. PMID:26822958

  17. Passive immunotherpay and probiotic agents in enteric infections in children

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Diarrhoeal disease remains one of the leading causes of global childhood morbidity and mortality. Rotavirus and pathogenic Escherichia coli are the most common causes of acute diarrheal illness in children. Oral rehydration therapy (ORT), although effective in management or prevention of dehydration, does not reduce the duration or severity of illness. Hence, there is a need for new interventions to further improve therapy for gastrointestinal (GI) tract infections. We hypot...

  18. common bacterial isolates from infected eyes abstract

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LIVINGSTON

    The common bacterial isolates and their antibiotics susceptibility were studied in 298 bacterial ... Bacteria were isolated most on the eye infections of the conjunctiva ... practitioners to avoid development of resistance from indiscriminate use.

  19. Enteric Infections Circulating during Hajj Seasons, 2011–2013

    KAUST Repository

    Abd El Ghany, Moataz

    2017-09-13

    Hajj, the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia, is a unique mass gathering event that raises public health concerns in the host country and globally. Although gastroenteritis and diarrhea are common among Hajj pilgrims, the microbial etiologies of these infections are unknown. We collected 544 fecal samples from pilgrims with medically attended diarrheal illness from 40 countries during the 2011-2013 Hajj seasons and screened the samples for 16 pathogens commonly associated with diarrheal infections. Bacteria were the main agents detected, in 82.9% of the 228 positive samples, followed by viral (6.1%) and parasitic (5.3%) agents. Salmonella spp., Shigella/enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, and enterotoxigenic E. coli were the main pathogens associated with severe symptoms. We identified genes associated with resistance to third-generation cephalosporins approximate to 40% of Salmonella- and E. coli-positive samples. Hajj-associated foodborne infections pose a major public health risk through the emergence and transmission of antimicrobial drug-resistant bacteria.

  20. Zoonotic enteric parasites transmitted from dogs in Egypt with special concern to Toxocara canis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadallah, Maysa A. I.; Salem, Lobna M. A.

    2015-01-01

    %). Seroprevalence was highest (17/35, 48.57%) in 7-15 years old (COR=6.93, 95% CI=1.75-27.43, p=0.006). Seroprevalence values for T. canis antibodies were higher in those; raising dogs (29.85%), eating raw vegetables (25.21%) and not washing hands before meals (25.45%). T. canis antibodies were detected in 25% of those contacted with soil compared to 30% of those did not. Students were mostly affected (34.29%), followed by nomadic people (32%), house guarders (28%), housewives (20%), military workers (13%), and employees (10%). Conclusion: Detection of enteric parasites in dogs and humans in Egypt substantiates the role posed by dogs in transmitting zoonotic parasites to humans and knock an alarm for common sources of infection for humans and dogs. Common sources may be infected fish or contaminated vegetables that are consumed by dogs or humans or even infected rodents that may contaminate their feed. This pilot study necessitate the need for similar studies and tracing such infection in fish, vegetables, rodent that may be responsible for infecting humans and dogs in order to understand the epidemiology of zoonotic parasitic infection transmitted from dogs to humans. PMID:27047182

  1. Small bowel perforation due to CMV enteritis infection in an HIV-positive patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalopoulos Nick

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytomegalovirus infection of the gastrointestinal tract is common and is more often seen in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS. Although small bowel infection is less common than infection of other parts of the gastrointestinal system, it may lead to perforation, an acute complication, with dreadful results. Case presentation This article reports a case of Cytomegalovirus ileitis with multiple small bowel perforations in a young man with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. The patient developed abdominal pain with diarrhea and fever, and eventually acute abdomen with pneumoperitoneum. The patient had poor prognosis and deceased despite the prompt surgical intervention and the antiviral therapy he received. At pathology a remarkable finding was the presence of viral inclusions in smooth muscle fibers. The destruction of muscle cells was the main cause of perforation. Conclusion Morbidity and mortality associated with perforation from CMV enteritis in AIDS patients are high and the life expectancy is short. Cytomegalovirus disease is multifocal; therefore, excision of one portion of the gastrointestinal tract may be followed by a complication elsewhere. Our case elucidate that muscle cell destruction by the virus is a significant cause leading to perforation.

  2. Bloodstream infection following 217 consecutive systemic-enteric drained pancreas transplants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Walter

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combined kidney pancreas transplantation (PTx evolved as excellent treatment for diabetic nephropathy. Infections remain common and serious complications. Methods 217 consecutive enteric drained PTxs performed from 1997 to 2004 were retrospectively analyzed with regard to bloodstream infection. Immunosuppression consisted of antithymocyteglobuline induction, tacrolimus, mycophenolic acid and steroids for the majority of cases. Standard perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis consisted of pipercillin/tazobactam in combination with ciprofloxacin and fluconazole. Results One year patient, pancreas and kidney graft survival were 96.4%, 88.5% and 94.8%, surgical complication rate was 35%, rejection rate 30% and rate of infection 59%. In total 46 sepsis episodes were diagnosed in 35 patients (16% with a median onset on day 12 (range 1–45 post transplant. Sepsis source was intraabdominal infection (IAI (n = 21, a contaminated central venous line (n = 10, wound infection (n = 5, urinary tract infection (n = 2 and graft transmitted (n = 2. Nine patients (4% experienced multiple episodes of sepsis. Overall 65 pathogens (IAI sepsis 39, line sepsis 15, others 11 were isolated from blood. Gram positive cocci accounted for 50 isolates (77%: Coagulase negative staphylococci (n = 28, i.e. 43% (nine multi-resistant, Staphylococcus aureus (n = 11, i.e. 17% (four multi-resistant, enterococci (n = 9, i.e. 14% (one E. faecium. Gram negative rods were cultured in twelve cases (18%. Patients with blood borne infection had a two year pancreas graft survival of 76.5% versus 89.4% for those without sepsis (p = 0.036, patient survival was not affected. Conclusion Sepsis remains a serious complication after PTx with significantly reduced pancreas graft, but not patient survival. The most common source is IAI.

  3. Post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome: mechanistic insights into chronic disturbances following enteric infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Jennifer K; Bhargava, Amol; Buret, Andre G

    2014-04-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a commonly encountered chronic functional gastrointestinal (GI) disorder. Approximately 10% of IBS patients can trace the onset of their symptoms to a previous a bout of infectious dysentery. The appearance of new IBS symptoms following an infectious event is defined as post-infectious-IBS. Indeed, with the World Health Organization estimating between 2 and 4 billion cases annually, infectious diarrheal disease represents an incredible international healthcare burden. Additionally, compounding evidence suggests many commonly encountered enteropathogens as unique triggers behind IBS symptom generation and underlying pathophysiological features. A growing body of work provides evidence supporting a role for pathogen-mediated modifications in the resident intestinal microbiota, epithelial barrier integrity, effector cell functions, and innate and adaptive immune features, all proposed physiological manifestations that can underlie GI abnormalities in IBS. Enteric pathogens must employ a vast array of machinery to evade host protective immune mechanisms, and illicit successful infections. Consequently, the impact of infectious events on host physiology can be multidimensional in terms of anatomical location, functional scope, and duration. This review offers a unique discussion of the mechanisms employed by many commonly encountered enteric pathogens that cause acute disease, but may also lead to the establishment of chronic GI dysfunction compatible with IBS.

  4. Zoonotic enteric parasites transmitted from dogs in Egypt with special concern to Toxocara canis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maysa A. I. Awadallah

    2015-08-01

    7.62, p˃0.05 did not seem to have a significant association among the examined dogs. Enteric parasitic infection was reported in 31/150 human stools (20.67%. Students were the most affected groups (37.14%, followed by nomadic people (24%, house wives (20%, house guarders and military workers (12%, each, and employees (10%. The identified parasites were Cryptosporidium spp. (9.33%, Ascaris lumbercoides (3.33%, Heterophyes spp. and Ancylostoma spp. (2.66%, each and Paragonimus spp. and Hymenolepis nana (1.33%, each. Toxocara IgG antibodies were detected in 36/150 (24% serum samples investigated. Toxocara IgG antibodies were more prevalent in males (26.66% than females (20%. Seroprevalence was highest (17/35, 48.57% in 7-15 years old (COR=6.93, 95% CI=1.75-27.43, p=0.006. Seroprevalence values for T. canis antibodies were higher in those; raising dogs (29.85%, eating raw vegetables (25.21% and not washing hands before meals (25.45%. T. canis antibodies were detected in 25% of those contacted with soil compared to 30% of those did not. Students were mostly affected (34.29%, followed by nomadic people (32%, house guarders (28%, housewives (20%, military workers (13%, and employees (10%. Conclusion: Detection of enteric parasites in dogs and humans in Egypt substantiates the role posed by dogs in transmitting zoonotic parasites to humans and knock an alarm for common sources of infection for humans and dogs. Common sources may be infected fish or contaminated vegetables that are consumed by dogs or humans or even infected rodents that may contaminate their feed. This pilot study necessitate the need for similar studies and tracing such infection in fish, vegetables, rodent that may be responsible for infecting humans and dogs in order to understand the epidemiology of zoonotic parasitic infection transmitted from dogs to humans.

  5. Echinostoma hortense infection with enteritis diagnosed by upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanishi, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Jun; Nogami, Sadao; Kagawa, Yumiko; Watari, Toshihiro

    2013-07-31

    An 8-year-old male Shiba dog presented with chronic vomiting and diarrhea. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed severe enteritis and infection of the duodenal mucosa with Echinostoma hortense. We performed therapy for parasites and enteritis. The therapy was successful for deworming and temporarily improved the symptoms, but the dog died soon thereafter. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of an antemortem diagnosis of E. hortense infection in a dog.

  6. Enteric Opportunistic Parasitic Infections among HIV-Seropositive Patients at Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta D Patel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enteric opportunistic parasitic infections are the major source of diarrheal disease in developing countries mainly in Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV infected patients. Objective: The study was to detect enteric parasites causing diarrhea and their association with immune status in HIV-seropositive patients. Methods: The present study was conducted in tertiary care teaching Hospital, Baroda between January 2006 to January 2007 involving 100 Human Immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. Stool was examined for enteric parasites by microscopy with special staining methods. Results: A total of 100 HIV sero-positive patients with and without diarrhea were included in the study. Of the 100 patients, the protozoan parasitic infection was found in 28% (28/100. Out of 100 patients, 50 had diarrhea in which parasitic infection was 24 (48% and 4 (4/50 protozoal parasites positive cases did not have diarrhea. A significant difference (p<0.05 was observed in the level of infection of intestinal protozoan between the HIV seropositive with diarrhea and HIV-seropositive without diarrhea. Conclusion Enteric opportunistic parasitic infections were detected in 28% among HIV-seropositive patients. Early detection of enteric parasitic infections will help in the management and to improve the quality of life for HIV-infected individuals. [Natl J Med Res 2015; 5(3.000: 190-193

  7. Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infects and multiplies in enteric glial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To establish the role of enteric glial cells duringinfection with Mycobacterium avium subspeciesparatuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn's disease.METHODS: In order to establish the role of enteric glial cells during infection with M. avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn's disease, Map adhesion experiments on enteric glial cells were performed as well as expression analysis of Map sigma factors during infection.RESULTS: In this study, for the first time, we found a high affinity of MAP to enteric glial cells and we analyzed the expression of MAP sigma factors under different conditions of growth.CONCLUSION: The fact that Map showed a high affinity to the glial cells raises concerns about the complicated etiology of the Crohn's disease. Elucidation of the mechanisms whereby inflammation alters enteric neural control of gut functions may lead to novel treatments for Crohn's disease.

  8. Common avian infection plagued the tyrant dinosaurs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan D S Wolff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tyrannosaurus rex and other tyrannosaurid fossils often display multiple, smooth-edged full-thickness erosive lesions on the mandible, either unilaterally or bilaterally. The cause of these lesions in the Tyrannosaurus rex specimen FMNH PR2081 (known informally by the name 'Sue' has previously been attributed to actinomycosis, a bacterial bone infection, or bite wounds from other tyrannosaurids. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted an extensive survey of tyrannosaurid specimens and identified ten individuals with full-thickness erosive lesions. These lesions were described, measured and photographed for comparison with one another. We also conducted an extensive survey of related archosaurs for similar lesions. We show here that these lesions are consistent with those caused by an avian parasitic infection called trichomonosis, which causes similar abnormalities on the mandible of modern birds, in particular raptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This finding represents the first evidence for the ancient evolutionary origin of an avian transmissible disease in non-avian theropod dinosaurs. It also provides a valuable insight into the palaeobiology of these now extinct animals. Based on the frequency with which these lesions occur, we hypothesize that tyrannosaurids were commonly infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan. For tyrannosaurid populations, the only non-avian dinosaur group that show trichomonosis-type lesions, it is likely that the disease became endemic and spread as a result of antagonistic intraspecific behavior, consumption of prey infected by a Trichomonas gallinae-like protozoan and possibly even cannibalism. The severity of trichomonosis-related lesions in specimens such as Tyrannosaurus rex FMNH PR2081 and Tyrannosaurus rex MOR 980, strongly suggests that these animals died as a direct result of this disease, mostly likely through starvation.

  9. Enteral nutrition volume is not correlated with lower respiratory tract infection in patients on mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomar, A; Guardiola, B; Llompart-Pou, J A; Ayestarán, I; Rodríguez-Pilar, J; Ferreruela, M; Raurich, J M

    To evaluate the effect of enteral nutrition volume, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive drug upon the incidence of lower respiratory tract infections in critically ill patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). A retrospective secondary analysis was carried out. The Intensive Care Unit of a University Hospital. Patients≥18-years-old expected to need MV for more than four days, and receiving enteral nutrition by nasogastric tube within 24h of starting MV. We correlated enteral nutrition volume administered during the first 10 days, gastrointestinal function and the type of acid suppressive therapy with the episodes of lower respiratory tract infection up until day 28. Cox proportional hazards ratios in univariate and adjusted multivariate models were used. Statistical significance was considered for p<0.05. Lower respiratory tract infection episodes. Sixty-six out of 185 patients (35.7%) had infection; 27 patients had ventilator-associated pneumonia; and 39 presented ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Uninfected and infected groups were similar in terms of enteral nutrition volume (54±12 and 54±9mL/h; p=0.94) and caloric intake (19.4±4.9 and 19.6±5.2kcal/kg/d; p=0.81). The Cox proportional hazards model showed neurological indication of MV to be the only independent variable related to infection (p=0.001). Enteral nutrition volume, the type of acid suppressive therapy, and the use of prokinetic agents were not significantly correlated to infection. Enteral nutrition volume and caloric intake, gastrointestinal dysfunction and the type of acid suppressive therapy used were not associated to lower respiratory tract infection in patients on MV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  10. [Enteral nutrition in neurological patients: is there enough vitamin D content in commonly used formulas?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella Romero, F; Alfaro Martínez, J J; Luna López, V; Galicia Martín, I

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency produces inadequate bone mineralization, proximal muscle weakness, abnormal gait and increased risk of falls and fractures. Moreover, in epidemiological studies, has been associated with increased risk of cancer, autoimmune diseases, type 1 and 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and depression. When synthesis through the skin by sun exposure is not possible and the patient can not eat by mouth, as in the advanced stages of various neurological diseases, the supply of vitamin D has to be done by enteral nutrition. The aim of this study is to review the role of vitamin D in a common group of neurological conditions that often require artificial nutrition and analyze whether the vitamin D of different enteral nutrition formulas is adequate to meet the needs of this group of patients. Numerous studies have shown the association between vitamin D deficiency and increased incidence of dementia, stroke and other neurodegenerative diseases. Interventions aimed to increase levels of vit. D and its effects on functional (falls, pain, quality of life) and cardiovascular goals (cardiovascular death, stroke, myocardial infarction, cardiovascular risk factors) have obtained as highlight data a clear reduction of falls and fractures, while the evidence for the other parameters studied is still limited and inconsistent. The content of calcium and vitamin D of enteral formulas is legislated in our country. The total amount of vitamin D for a daily intake of 1,500-2,000 kcal ranges between 300 and 1,600 IU/d (mean ± SD: 32.9 ± 8.5 mg/100 kcal) in the complete formulas for enteral nutrition most commonly used. 50% of the diets studied, for an intake of 2,000 kcal/d, and 90% for an intake of 1,500 kcal/d, provide less than 600 IU/d of vitamin D. Some revised recently guidelines published recommendations of daily intake of vitamin D. The document published by the U.S. Institute of Medicine

  11. Population Density, Poor Sanitation, and Enteric Infections in Nueva Santa Rosa, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarquin, Claudia; Arnold, Benjamin F; Muñoz, Fredy; Lopez, Beatriz; Cuéllar, Victoria M; Thornton, Andrew; Patel, Jaymin; Reyes, Lisette; Roy, Sharon L; Bryan, Joe P; McCracken, John P; Colford, John M

    2016-04-01

    Poor sanitation could pose greater risk for enteric pathogen transmission at higher human population densities because of greater potential for pathogens to infect new hosts through environmentally mediated and person-to-person transmission. We hypothesized that incidence and prevalence of diarrhea, enteric protozoans, and soil-transmitted helminth infections would be higher in high-population-density areas compared with low-population-density areas, and that poor sanitation would pose greater risk for these enteric infections at high density compared with low density. We tested our hypotheses using 6 years of clinic-based diarrhea surveillance (2007-2013) including 4,360 geolocated diarrhea cases tested for 13 pathogens and a 2010 cross-sectional survey that measured environmental exposures from 204 households (920 people) and tested 701 stool specimens for enteric parasites. We found that population density was not a key determinant of enteric infection nor a strong effect modifier of risk posed by poor household sanitation in this setting.

  12. Infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells transmit latent varicella zoster virus infection to the guinea pig enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lin; Wang, Mingli; Chen, Jason J; Gershon, Michael D; Gershon, Anne A

    2014-10-01

    Latent wild-type (WT) and vaccine (vOka) varicella zoster virus (VZV) are found in the human enteric nervous system (ENS). VZV also infects guinea pig enteric neurons in vitro, establishes latency and can be reactivated. We therefore determined whether lymphocytes infected in vitro with VZV secrete infectious virions and can transfer infection in vivo to the ENS of recipient guinea pigs. T lymphocytes (CD3-immunoreactive) were preferentially infected following co-culture of guinea pig or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with VZV-infected HELF. VZV proliferated in the infected T cells and expressed immediate early and late VZV genes. Electron microscopy confirmed that VZV-infected T cells produced encapsulated virions. Extracellular virus, however, was pleomorphic, suggesting degradation occurred prior to release, which was confirmed by the failure of VZV-infected T cells to secrete infectious virions. Intravenous injection of WT- or vOka-infected PBMCs, nevertheless, transmitted VZV to recipient animals (guinea pig > human lymphocytes). Two days post-inoculation, lung and liver, but not gut, contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4, 40, 66 and 67. Twenty-eight days after infection, gut contained DNA and transcripts encoding ORFs 4 and 66 but neither DNA nor transcripts could any longer be found in lung or liver. In situ hybridization revealed VZV DNA in enteric neurons, which also expressed ORF63p (but not ORF68p) immunoreactivity. Observations suggest that VZV infects T cells, which can transfer VZV to and establish latency in enteric neurons in vivo. Guinea pigs may be useful for studies of VZV pathogenesis in the ENS.

  13. Early-life enteric infections: relation between chronic systemic inflammation and poor cognition in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Kolb, Laura E.; Scharf, Rebecca J.; Pendergast, Laura L.; Lang, Dennis R.; Kolling, Glynis L.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal microbiota undergoes active remodeling in the first 6 to 18 months of life, during which time the characteristics of the adult microbiota are developed. This process is strongly influenced by the early diet and enteric pathogens. Enteric infections and malnutrition early in life may favor microbiota dysbiosis and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, resulting in intestinal barrier dysfunction and translocation of intestinal bacterial products, ultimately leading to low-grade, chronic, subclinical systemic inflammation. The leaky gut–derived low-grade systemic inflammation may have profound consequences on the gut–liver–brain axis, compromising normal growth, metabolism, and cognitive development. This review examines recent data suggesting that early-life enteric infections that lead to intestinal barrier disruption may shift the intestinal microbiota toward chronic systemic inflammation and subsequent impaired cognitive development. PMID:27142301

  14. Enteric disease in broiler chickens following experimental infection with chicken parvovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day-old broiler chickens were inoculated orally with the chicken parvovirus strain, chicken parvovirus-P1. In four independent experiments, characteristic clinical signs of enteric disease including watery, mustard color diarrhea and growth retardation were observed following infection. The virus wa...

  15. Probiotics and prebiotics to combat enteric infections and HIV in the developing world: A consensus report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monachese, M.; Cunningham-Rundles, S.; Diaz, M.A.; Guerrant, R.; Hummelen, R.; Kemperman, R.; Kerac, M.; Kort, R.; Merenstein, D.; Panigrahi, P.; Ramakrishna, B.; Safdar, N.; Shane, A.; Trois, L.; Reid, G.

    2011-01-01

    Infectious disease in the developing world continues to represent one of the greatest challenges facing humanity. Every year over a million children suffer and die from the sequela of enteric infections, and in 2008 was estimated almost 2.7 million (UNAIDS 2009 update) adults and children became

  16. Cryptosporidium enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000617.htm Cryptosporidium enteritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cryptosporidium enteritis is an infection of the small intestine that ...

  17. Evaluation of vaccines against enteric infections: a clinical and public health research agenda for developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, John

    2011-01-01

    Enteric infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. To date, vaccines have played a limited role in public health efforts to control enteric infections. Licensed vaccines exist for cholera and typhoid, but these vaccines are used primarily for travellers; and there are two internationally licensed vaccines for rotavirus, but they are mainly used in affluent countries. The reasons that enteric vaccines are little used in developing countries are multiple, and certainly include financial and political constraints. Also important is the need for more cogent evidence on the performance of enteric vaccines in developing country populations. A partial inventory of research questions would include: (i) does the vaccine perform well in the most relevant settings? (ii) does the vaccine perform well in all epidemiologically relevant age groups? (iii) is there adequate evidence of vaccine safety once the vaccines have been deployed in developing countries? (iv) how effective is the vaccine when given in conjunction with non-vaccine cointerventions? (v) what is the level of vaccine protection against all relevant outcomes? and (vi) what is the expected population level of vaccine protection, including both direct and herd vaccine protective effects? Provision of evidence addressing these questions will help expand the use of enteric vaccines in developing countries. PMID:21893543

  18. Evaluation of vaccines against enteric infections: a clinical and public health research agenda for developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, John

    2011-10-12

    Enteric infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. To date, vaccines have played a limited role in public health efforts to control enteric infections. Licensed vaccines exist for cholera and typhoid, but these vaccines are used primarily for travellers; and there are two internationally licensed vaccines for rotavirus, but they are mainly used in affluent countries. The reasons that enteric vaccines are little used in developing countries are multiple, and certainly include financial and political constraints. Also important is the need for more cogent evidence on the performance of enteric vaccines in developing country populations. A partial inventory of research questions would include: (i) does the vaccine perform well in the most relevant settings? (ii) does the vaccine perform well in all epidemiologically relevant age groups? (iii) is there adequate evidence of vaccine safety once the vaccines have been deployed in developing countries? (iv) how effective is the vaccine when given in conjunction with non-vaccine cointerventions? (v) what is the level of vaccine protection against all relevant outcomes? and (vi) what is the expected population level of vaccine protection, including both direct and herd vaccine protective effects? Provision of evidence addressing these questions will help expand the use of enteric vaccines in developing countries.

  19. Enabling Passive Immunization as an Alternative to Antibiotics for Controlling Enteric Infections in Production Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Hald, Birthe; Madsen, M.

    Enteric infections cause major problems in most intensive animal production sectors, including poultry, pigs and cattle, leading to disease, reduced production and compromised welfare. In addition some of these infections are zoonotic, and they are to a large extent responsible for the continued...... massive use of antibiotics in food animals. Thus there is a pressing need for economically feasible, efficient, non-antibiotics based means for controlling the problem. Passive immunization has been known for decades as an efficient way of endowing humans or animals with short-term (weeks) immunity....... To control enteric infections by passive immunization a bolus of immunoglobulin may simply be administered orally. For this to work, large amounts of active immunoglobulins are needed. To be a real alternative to antibiotics the price of the immunoglobulin product needs to be low. We combined an efficient...

  20. Common bacterial urinary tract infections in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimino, J E

    1976-09-01

    Unfortunately, there is no general consensus as to how long patients with bacteriuria or urinary tract infections should be monitored and certainly there is no agreement on how long recurrent episodes should be treated beyond ten days to two weeks. The most important points to remember are: 1. Culture the urine both at the time of therapy and during follow-up. The patient should be examined periodically for the presence of bacteruria. If bacteria cannot be eradicated, at least the physician is aware of the organism most likely causing the patient's symptoms. 2. Do not subject the patient with frequent recurrent (chronic) and complicated infections to continual antibacterial therapy, but rather, manage the acute episodes. 3. Use prophylaxis, particularly single bed-time doses for dysuria and frequency symptoms. 4. Screen for bacteriuria during pregnancy. 5. Avoid the use of catheters except where absolutely necessary. 6. Avoid systemic prophylaxis of infection in patients with catheters; rather, use closed-system drainage with antibacteri-irrigation. It is to be hoped within the next few years, studies now underway will allow specific recommendations regarding the management of asymptomatic bacteruria, the duration of therapy for recurrent infections, the prevention and treatment of L-form bacterial infections, and indications for urologic procedures.

  1. Characteristics of common infections in Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matute Moreno, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of the studies outlined in this thesis was to gain empirical epidemiological and therapeutic knowledge of some common infectious diseases in Nicaragua. So far, relatively little was known about the incidence, etiology, management and antibiotic resistance patterns of common infectio

  2. STUDY OF EPIDEMIOLOGICAL FEATURES OF ACUTE ENTERIC INFECTIONS OF THE VARIOUS ETIOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA OMAROVA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of epidemiological and etiological characteristics inleading forms of acute enteric infections among the population of Kazakhstan is carried out. The age, social and professional factors in development of epidemic process and intestinal infections were observed. 425 tests of feces of persons of various age groups with intestines dysfunction were investigated. Seromonitoring among inhabitants of Almaty and Almaty area by erythrocyte diagnosticum with salmonelesis serogroups A, B, C, D, Е and rare (О(24. Dynamics in occurrence of salmonella antibodies during months of the year was studied.

  3. The gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron exacerbates enteric infection through modification of the metabolic landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Meredith M; Hu, Zeping; Klimko, Claire; Narayanan, Sanjeev; Deberardinis, Ralph; Sperandio, Vanessa

    2014-12-10

    The enteric pathogen enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) causes severe diarrhea, but the influence of the gut microbiota on EHEC infection is largely unknown. A predominant member of the microbiota, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt), is resident at EHEC attachment sites. We show that Bt enhances EHEC virulence gene expression through the transcription factor Cra, which is functionally sensitive to sugar concentrations. This enhanced virulence accompanies increased formation of attaching and effacing (AE) lesions requisite for EHEC colonization. Infection with Citrobacter rodentium, a natural mouse pathogen homologous to EHEC, in Bt-reconstituted mice results in increased gut permeability along with exacerbated host pathology and mortality compared to mice deplete of microflora. Bt modifies the metabolite environment at infection sites, increasing metabolites involved in gluconeogenesis, with stark increases in succinate, which can be sensed by Cra. Our findings suggest that microbiota composition affects disease outcome and may explain links between microbiota composition and disease susceptibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Myxoma and vaccinia viruses exploit different mechanisms to enter and infect human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Nancy Y; Bartee, Eric; Mohamed, Mohamed R; Rahman, Masmudur M; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant

    2010-06-05

    Myxoma (MYXV) and vaccinia (VACV) viruses have recently emerged as potential oncolytic agents that can infect and kill different human cancer cells. Although both are structurally similar, it is unknown whether the pathway(s) used by these poxviruses to enter and cause oncolysis in cancer cells are mechanistically similar. Here, we compared the entry of MYXV and VACV-WR into various human cancer cells and observed significant differences: 1--low-pH treatment accelerates fusion-mediated entry of VACV but not MYXV, 2--the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein inhibits entry of VACV, but not MYXV, 3--knockdown of PAK1 revealed that it is required for a late stage event downstream of MYXV entry into cancer cells, whereas PAK1 is required for VACV entry into the same target cells. These results suggest that VACV and MYXV exploit different mechanisms to enter into human cancer cells, thus providing some rationale for their divergent cancer cell tropisms.

  5. Analysis of experimental mink enteritis virus infection in mink: in situ hybridization, serology, and histopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uttenthal, Åse; Larsen, S; Lund, E;

    1990-01-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were used in in situ hybridization studies to localize cells containing mink enteritis virus (MEV) virion DNA or MEV replicative-form DNA and mRNA. Following the experimental MEV infection of 3-month-old unvaccinated mink, a significant increase in serum antib...... parvoviruses is discussed....... important implications for the pathogenesis of MEV-induced disease. The data presented on MEV are correlated with earlier results on the other mink parvovirus, Aleutian mink disease parvovirus, and a possible explanation for the remarkable differences in pathogenesis of disease caused by these two...

  6. Commensal enteric bacteria lipopolysaccharide impairs host defense against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, T T; Chaturvedi, V; Ertelt, J M; Xin, L; Clark, D R; Kinder, J M; Way, S S

    2015-07-01

    Commensal enteric bacteria maintain systemic immune responsiveness that protects against disseminated or localized infection in extra-intestinal tissues caused by pathogenic microbes. However, as shifts in infection susceptibility after commensal bacteria eradication have primarily been probed using viruses, the broader applicability to other pathogen types remains undefined. In sharp contrast to diminished antiviral immunity, we show commensal bacteria eradication bolsters protection against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection. Enhanced antifungal immunity reflects more robust systemic expansion of Ly6G(hi)Ly6C(int) neutrophils, and their mobilization into infected tissues among antibiotic-treated compared with commensal bacteria-replete control mice. Reciprocally, depletion of neutrophils from expanded levels or intestinal lipopolysaccharide reconstitution overrides the antifungal protective benefits conferred by commensal bacteria eradication. This discordance in antifungal compared with antiviral immunity highlights intrinsic differences in how commensal bacteria control responsiveness for specific immune cell subsets, because pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cells that protect against viruses were suppressed similarly after C. albicans and influenza A virus infection. Thus, positive calibration of antiviral immunity by commensal bacteria is counterbalanced by restrained activation of other immune components that confer antifungal immunity.

  7. Epidemiology and geographical distribution of enteric protozoan infections in Sydney, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Fletcher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. Enteric protozoa are associated with diarrhoeal illnesses in humans; however there are no recent studies on their epidemiology and geographical distribution in Australia. This study describes the epidemiology of enteric protozoa in the state of New South Wales and incorporates spatial analysis to describe their distribution. Design and methods. Laboratory and clinical records from four public hospitals in Sydney for 910 patients, who tested positive for enteric protozoa over the period January 2007-December 2010, were identified, examined and analysed. We selected 580 cases which had residence post code data available, enabling us to examine the geographic distribution of patients, and reviewed the clinical data of 252 patients to examine possible links between protozoa, demographic and clinical features. Results. Frequently detected protozoa were Blastocystis spp. (57%, Giardia intestinalis (27% and Dientamoeba fragilis (12%. The age distribution showed that the prevalence of protozoa decreased with age up to 24 years but increasing with age from 25 years onwards. The geographic provenance of the patients indicates that the majority of cases of Blastocystis (53.1% are clustered in and around the Sydney City Business District, while pockets of giardiasis were identified in regional/rural areas. The distribution of cases suggests higher risk of protozoan infection may exist for some communities. Conclusions. These findings provide useful information for policy makers to design and tailor interventions to target high risk communities. Follow-up investigation into the risk factors for giardiasis in regional/rural area is needed.

  8. Molecular detection of common intestinal parasites: a performance evaluation of the BD Max™ Enteric Parasite Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, R; Judd, E; Eling, J; Newsholme, W; Goldenberg, S D

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the level of agreement of the BD Max™ Enteric Parasite Panel (EPP) with microscopy for the detection of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Entamoeba histolytica in stool samples. A total of 372 stool samples (partly collected on the basis of positive microscopy and partly unselected, consecutive sample submitted for parasite investigation) were tested with EPP according to manufacturer's instructions and also using microscopy according to standard techniques. Discrepant samples were further tested using PCR by the National Parasitology reference laboratory. Levels of agreement and laboratory turnaround times were measured and compared. Overall, positive and negative percent agreement was high between the two methods. However, microscopy resulted in four false positives and one false negative for G. duodenalis and two false positives for Cryptosporidium. Additionally, microscopy could not differentiate between E. histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Median laboratory turnaround time was 65 hours for microscopy; results from EPP could be available after four hours. Blastocycstis hominis was detected by microscopy in one sample and would have been missed if only EPP was performed. The EPP was a good alternative to microscopy, detecting a small number of additional positives that were missed by microscopy. The assay is significantly faster than microscopy and allows laboratory workflows to be streamlined. The risk of missing parasites that are not included in the EPP appears to be minimal in the studied population; however, there may be certain patient groups who would benefit from microscopic examination of stools.

  9. ENTERIC ADENOVIRUS INFECTION IN INFANTS AND YOUNG CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS IN TEHRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jam-Afzon S. Modarres

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are one of the most important etiological agents of serious gastroenteritis among infants and young children. Fecal specimens from patients with an acute gastroenteritis were evaluated for the presence of adenovirus (Ad40, 41 from April 2002 to February 2004. During the study, 1052 samples were collected from children under the age of 5 years in six educational and therapeutic pediatric centers. The specimens were tested for adenovirus (Ad40, 41 by EIA technique in the Virology Department of Pasteur Institute of Iran. Adenoviruses (Ad40, 41 were detected from 27(2.6% samples, but were not detected in 150 samples of healthy control group. In this study the highest rate of adenovirus was found in children aged 6 to 12 months (40.7%, but the male to female ratio inpatients was approximately equal. Adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infections peaked in the winter as 48.1% was detected from December to March. There were a statistically significant difference between age and infection (P < 0.001, also between season with adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection (P = 0.005. Breast-feeding had a protective action against adenovirus (Ad40, 41 infection. This study revealed that enteric adenovirus (Ad40, 41 is an etiological agent of acute gastroenteritis among children in Tehran.

  10. Biliary drainage of the common bile duct with an enteral metal stent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dek, I.M.; van den Elzen, B.D.J.; Fockens, P.; Rauws, E.A.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this case report we present an elderly patient who was referred to our hospital with recurrent episodes of cholangitis that persisted after placement of five metal stents for a distal common bile duct (CBD) stenosis. All metal stents were endoscopically removed from the CBD by forceps after

  11. Critical role of intestinal epithelial cell-derived IL-25 in enteric nematode infection-induced changes in intestinal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current study investigated the mechanism of immune regulation of IL-25 and the contribution of IL-25 to nematode infection-induced alterations in intestinal smooth muscle and epithelial cell function. Mice were infected with an enteric nematode or injected with IL-25 or IL-13. In vitro smooth m...

  12. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kathleen; Singh, Jugpreet; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A; Cannon, Steven B

    2016-08-11

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. The molecular responses in Phaseolus to BCMV infection have not yet been well characterized. We report the transcriptional responses of a widely susceptible variety of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar 'Stringless green refugee') to two BCMV strains, in a time-course experiment. We also report the genome sequence of a previously unreported BCMV strain. The interaction with the known strain NL1-Iowa causes moderate symptoms and large transcriptional responses, and the newly identified strain (Strain 2 or S2) causes severe symptoms and moderate transcriptional responses. The transcriptional profiles of host plants infected with the two isolates are distinct, and involve numerous differences in splice forms in particular genes, and pathway specific expression patterns. We identified differential host transcriptome response after infection of two different strains of Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Virus infection initiated a suite of changes in gene expression level and patterns in the host plants. Pathways related to defense, gene regulation, metabolic processes, photosynthesis were specifically altered after virus infection. Results presented in this study can increase the understanding of host-pathogen interactions and provide resources for further investigations of the biological mechanisms in BCMV infection and defense.

  13. Enteric virus infection risk from intrusion of sewage into a drinking water distribution network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunis, P F M; Xu, M; Fleming, K K; Yang, J; Moe, C L; Lechevallier, M W

    2010-11-15

    Contaminants from the soil surrounding drinking water distribution systems are thought to not enter the drinking water when sufficient internal pressure is maintained. Pressure transients may cause short intervals of negative pressure, and the soil near drinking water pipes often contains fecal material due to the proximity of sewage lines, so that a pressure event may cause intrusion of pathogens. This paper presents a risk model for predicting intrusion and dilution of viruses and their transport to consumers. Random entry and dilution of virus was simulated by embedding the hydraulic model into a Monte Carlo simulation. Special attention was given to adjusting for the coincidence of virus presence and use of tap water, as independently occurring short-term events within the longer interval that the virus is predicted to travel in any branch of the distribution system. The probability that a consumer drinks water contaminated with virus is small, but when this happens the virus concentration tends to be high and the risk of infection may be considerable. The spatial distribution of infection risk is highly heterogeneous. The presence of a chlorine residual reduces the infection risk.

  14. Goblet Cells and Mucins: Role in Innate Defense in Enteric Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice J. Kim

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Goblet cells reside throughout the gastrointestinal (GI tract and are responsible for the production and preservation of a protective mucus blanket by synthesizing and secreting high molecular weight glycoproteins known as mucins. The concept of the mucus layer functioning as a dynamic protective barrier is suggested by studies showing changes in mucins in inflammatory conditions of the GI tract, by the altered goblet cell response in germ-free animals, and by the enhanced mucus secretion seen in response to infections. The mucin-containing mucus layer coating the GI epithelium is the front line of innate host defense. Mucins are likely to be the first molecules that invading pathogens interact with at the cell surface and thus, can limit binding to other glycoproteins and neutralize the pathogen. This review will focus on what is known about goblet cell response in various GI infections and the regulatory networks that mediate goblet cell function and mucin production in response to intestinal insults. In addition, we describe the current knowledge on the role of mucins in intestinal innate defense. It is the aim of this review to provide the readers with an update on goblet cell biology and current understanding on the role of mucins in host defense in enteric infections.

  15. Propidium Monoazide Coupled with PCR Predicts Infectivity of Enteric Viruses in Swine Manure and Biofertilized Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongaro, Gislaine; Hernández, Marta; García-González, María Cruz; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2016-03-01

    The use of propidium monoazide (PMA) coupled with real-time PCR (RT-qPCR or qPCR for RNA or DNA viruses, respectively) was assessed to discriminate infectious enteric viruses in swine raw manure, swine effluent from anaerobic biodigester (AB) and biofertilized soils. Those samples were spiked either with infectious and heat-inactivated human adenovirus-2 (HAdV-2) or mengovirus (vMC0), and PMA-qPCR/RT-qPCR allowed discriminating inactivated viruses from the infective particles, with significant reductions (>99.9%). Then, the procedure was further assayed to evaluate the presence and stability of two non-cultivable viruses (porcine adenovirus and rotavirus A) in natural samples (swine raw manure, swine effluent from AB and biofertilized soils); it demonstrated viral inactivation during the storage period at 23 °C. As a result, the combination of PMA coupled to real-time PCR can be a promising alternative for prediction of viral infectivity in comparison to more labour-intensive and costly techniques such as animal or tissue-culture infectivity methods, and for those viruses that do not have currently available cell culture techniques.

  16. ACUTE ENTERIC INFECTIONS POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION ASSAY IN PEDIATRIC PRACTICE: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D. Sokolova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is estimate the opportunities of local multi-prime PCR reagents kits in children enteric infections etiological diagnostics amongst the patients with diarrhoea vs traditional bacteriological methods. We used 4 kits of reagents that provide multiple pathogens simultaneous indication in one sample: 1 Rotavirus, Norovirus, Astrovirus; 2 Shigella spp./EIEC, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp.; 3 Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis; 4 E. coli: EIEC (enteroinvasive, EPEC (enteropathogenic, ETEC (enterotoxigenic, EHEC (enterohaemorrhagic, EAgEC (enteroaggregative. It has been shown that the viral intestinal infections is increased by 14%, bacterial — in 2,5 times. PCR diagnostics identified in 62% of patients the viral gastroenteritis: Rotavirus (52%, Norovirus (9%, Astrovirus (1%. Detected bacterial pathogens PCR markers number proved up to 2.5 times high than according to bacteriological examination. The spectrum of bacterial agents increased due to E. coli and Y. enterocolitica. PCR diagnostics increased detection of Campylobacter up to 2 times. Detected E. coli DNA prevalence: EPEC — 66%, EAgEC, ETEC and EHEC were 31%, 9% and 4%, respectively. DNA Campylobacter spp. and E. coli constituted 2/3 of all findings: Campylobacter spp. (41%, E. coli (24%, Salmonella spp. (19%, Yersinia spp. (11%, Shigella spp./EIEC (5%. The positive results of bacteriological and serological methods duplicate the positive results of PCR diagnostics. In general, the positive results of PCR diagnosis of bacterial pathogens were detected in 46.35% of the examined patients. In 48.4% of patients identified PCR markers viral — bacterial infection, in 5.25% — of bacterial associations, in 11% of them were found the DNA 2–3 bacterial pathogens. The study was shown in children in St. Petersburg in 2012–2014 dominated rotavirus infection, campylobacteriosis and escherichiosis. The prevalence of viral-bacterial confections is more

  17. Prevalence and Correlates of Genital Infections Among Newly Diagnosed Human Immunodeficiency Virus–Infected Adults Entering Human Immunodeficiency Virus Care in Windhoek, Namibia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djomand, Gaston; Schlefer, Madeleine; Gutreuter, Steve; Tobias, Sarah; Patel, Roopal; DeLuca, Nickolas; Hood, Julia; Sawadogo, Souleymane; Chen, Cheng; Muadinohamba, Alexinah; Lowrance, David W.; Bock, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying and treating genital infections, including sexually transmitted infections (STI), among newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals may benefit both public and individual health. We assessed prevalence of genital infections and their correlates among newly diagnosed HIV-infected individuals enrolling in HIV care services in Namibia. Methods Newly diagnosed HIV-infected adults entering HIV care at 2 health facilities in Windhoek, Namibia, were recruited from December 2012 to March 2014. Participants provided behavioral and clinical data including CD4+ T lymphocyte counts. Genital and blood specimens were tested for gonorrhea, Chlamydia, trichomoniasis, Mycoplasma genitalium, syphilis, bacterial vaginosis, and vulvovaginal candidiasis. Results Among 599 adults, 56% were women and 15% reported consistent use of condoms in the past 6 months. The most common infections were bacterial vaginosis (37.2%), trichomoniasis (34.6%) and Chlamydia (14.6%) in women and M. genitalium (11.4%) in men. Correlates for trichomoniasis included being female (adjusted relative risk, [aRR], 7.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.07–12.65), higher education (aRR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.38–0.89), and lower CD4 cell count (aRR, 1.61; 95% CI, 1.08–2.40). Being female (aRR, 2.39; 95% CI, 1.27–4.50), nonmarried (aRR, 2.30; (95% CI, 1.28–4.14), and having condomless sex (aRR, 2.72; 95% CI, 1.06–7.00) were independently associated with chlamydial infection. Across all infections, female (aRR, 2.31; 95% CI, 1.79–2.98), nonmarried participants (aRR, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.06–1.59), had higher risk to present with any STI, whereas pregnant women (aRR, 1.16, 95% CI 1.03–1.31) were at increased risk of any STI or reproductive tract infection. PMID:27893600

  18. Three-dimensional structure of a protozoal double-stranded RNA virus that infects the enteric pathogen Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Mandy E W; Takagi, Yuko; Parent, Kristin N; Cardone, Giovanni; Nibert, Max L; Baker, Timothy S

    2015-01-15

    Giardia lamblia virus (GLV) is a small, nonenveloped, nonsegmented double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) virus infecting Giardia lamblia, the most common protozoan pathogen of the human intestine and a major agent of waterborne diarrheal disease worldwide. GLV (genus Giardiavirus) is a member of family Totiviridae, along with several other groups of protozoal or fungal viruses, including Leishmania RNA viruses and Trichomonas vaginalis viruses. Interestingly, GLV is more closely related than other Totiviridae members to a group of recently discovered metazoan viruses that includes penaeid shrimp infectious myonecrosis virus (IMNV). Moreover, GLV is the only known protozoal dsRNA virus that can transmit efficiently by extracellular means, also like IMNV. In this study, we used transmission electron cryomicroscopy and icosahedral image reconstruction to examine the GLV virion at an estimated resolution of 6.0 Å. Its outermost diameter is 485 Å, making it the largest totivirus capsid analyzed to date. Structural comparisons of GLV and other totiviruses highlighted a related "T=2" capsid organization and a conserved helix-rich fold in the capsid subunits. In agreement with its unique capacity as a protozoal dsRNA virus to survive and transmit through extracellular environments, GLV was found to be more thermoresistant than Trichomonas vaginalis virus 1, but no specific protein machinery to mediate cell entry, such as the fiber complexes in IMNV, could be localized. These and other structural and biochemical findings provide a basis for future work to dissect the cell entry mechanism of GLV into a "primitive" (early-branching) eukaryotic host and an important enteric pathogen of humans. Numerous pathogenic bacteria, including Corynebacterium diphtheriae, Salmonella enterica, and Vibrio cholerae, are infected with lysogenic bacteriophages that contribute significantly to bacterial virulence. In line with this phenomenon, several pathogenic protozoa, including Giardia lamblia

  19. Common epidemiology of Rickettsia felis infection and malaria, Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediannikov, Oleg; Socolovschi, Cristina; Edouard, Sophie; Fenollar, Florence; Mouffok, Nadjet; Bassene, Hubert; Diatta, Georges; Tall, Adama; Niangaly, Hamidou; Doumbo, Ogobara; Lekana-Douki, Jean Bernard; Znazen, Abir; Sarih, M'hammed; Ratmanov, Pavel; Richet, Herve; Ndiath, Mamadou O; Sokhna, Cheikh; Parola, Philippe; Raoult, Didier

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the epidemiology of Rickettsia felis infection and malaria in France, North Africa, and sub-Saharan Africa and to identify a common vector. Blood specimens from 3,122 febrile patients and from 500 nonfebrile persons were analyzed for R. felis and Plasmodium spp. We observed a significant linear trend (pAfrica also protects against rickettsioses; thus, empirical treatment strategies for febrile illness for travelers and residents in sub-Saharan Africa may require reevaluation.

  20. Antimicrobial and Herbal Drug Resistance in Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Faecal Droppings of Common House Lizard/Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhoj R; Singh, Vidya; Ebibeni, N; Singh, Raj K

    2013-01-01

    From 194 faecal dropping samples of common house geckos collected from offices (60), houses (88), integrated farm units (IFS,18) and hostels, guest houses, and dining rooms of different canteen/mess (HGM, 28), 326 bacterial isolates of enteric bacteria belonging to 17 genera and 34 species were detected. Escherichia coli were the most frequently (39) isolated followed by Citrobacter freundii (33), Klebsiella pneumonia (27), Salmonella indica (12), Enterobacter gergoviae (12), and Ent. agglomerans (11). Other important bacteria isolated from gecko droppings were Listonella damsela (2), Raoultella terrigena (3), S. salamae (2), S. houtenae (3), Edwardsiella tarda (4), Edwardsiella hoshinae (1), and Klebsiella oxytoca (2). Of the 223 isolates tested for antimicrobial drug sensitivity, 27 (12.1%) had multiple drug resistance (MDR). None of the salmonellae or edwardsiellae had MDR however, MDR strains were significantly more common among Escherichia spp. (P = 1.9 × 10(-5)) and isolates from IFS units (P = 3.58 × 10(-23)). The most effective herbal drug, Ageratum conyzoides extract, inhibited growth of only 27.8% of strains tested followed by ethanolic extract of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (13.9%), eucalyptus oil (5.4%), patchouli oil (5.4%), lemongrass oil (3.6%), and sandalwood oil (3.1%), and Artemisia vulgaris essential oil (3.1%).

  1. Antimicrobial and Herbal Drug Resistance in Enteric Bacteria Isolated from Faecal Droppings of Common House Lizard/Gecko (Hemidactylus frenatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoj R. Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available From 194 faecal dropping samples of common house geckos collected from offices (60, houses (88, integrated farm units (IFS,18 and hostels, guest houses, and dining rooms of different canteen/mess (HGM, 28, 326 bacterial isolates of enteric bacteria belonging to 17 genera and 34 species were detected. Escherichia coli were the most frequently (39 isolated followed by Citrobacter freundii (33, Klebsiella pneumonia (27, Salmonella indica (12, Enterobacter gergoviae (12, and Ent. agglomerans (11. Other important bacteria isolated from gecko droppings were Listonella damsela (2, Raoultella terrigena (3, S. salamae (2, S. houtenae (3, Edwardsiella tarda (4, Edwardsiella hoshinae (1, and Klebsiella oxytoca (2. Of the 223 isolates tested for antimicrobial drug sensitivity, 27 (12.1% had multiple drug resistance (MDR. None of the salmonellae or edwardsiellae had MDR however, MDR strains were significantly more common among Escherichia spp. (P=1.9×10-5 and isolates from IFS units (P=3.58×10-23. The most effective herbal drug, Ageratum conyzoides extract, inhibited growth of only 27.8% of strains tested followed by ethanolic extract of Zanthoxylum rhetsa (13.9%, eucalyptus oil (5.4%, patchouli oil (5.4%, lemongrass oil (3.6%, and sandalwood oil (3.1%, and Artemisia vulgaris essential oil (3.1%.

  2. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  3. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Jelesijevic

    Full Text Available Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4 to 2.5 X 10(5 bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3 bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3 organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B

  4. Use of the common marmoset to study Burkholderia mallei infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelesijevic, Tomislav; Zimmerman, Shawn M; Harvey, Stephen B; Mead, Daniel G; Shaffer, Teresa L; Estes, D Mark; Michel, Frank; Quinn, Frederick D; Hogan, Robert J; Lafontaine, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a host-adapted bacterium that does not persist outside of its equine reservoir. The organism causes the zoonosis glanders, which is endemic in Asia, Africa, the Middle East and South America. Infection by B. mallei typically occurs via the respiratory or percutaneous route, and the most common manifestations are life-threatening pneumonia and bacteremia. Glanders is difficult to diagnose and requires prolonged antibiotic therapy with low success rates. There is no vaccine to protect against B. mallei and there is concern regarding its use as a biothreat agent. Thus, experiments were performed to establish a non-human primate model of intranasal infection to study the organism and develop countermeasures. Groups of marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) were inoculated intranasally with B. mallei strain ATCC 23344 and monitored for clinical signs of illness for up to 13 days. We discovered that 83% of marmosets inoculated with doses of 2.5 X 10(4) to 2.5 X 10(5) bacteria developed acute lethal infection within 3-4 days. Signs of disease were severe and included lethargy, inappetence, conjunctivitis, mucopurulent and hemorrhagic nasal discharges, and increased respiratory effort with abdominal lifts. Burkholderia mallei was cultured from the lungs, spleen and liver of these animals, and pathologic examination of tissues revealed lesions characteristic of glanders. Challenge experiments also revealed that 91% of animals infected with doses ranging from 25 to 2.5 X 10(3) bacteria exhibited mild non-specific signs of illness and were culture negative. One marmoset inoculated with 2.5 X 10(3) organisms developed moderate signs of disease and reached humane end-points 8 days post-infection. The liver and spleen of this animal were colonized with the agent and pathological analysis of tissues showed nasal, splenic and hepatic lesions. Taken together, these data indicate that the marmoset is a suitable model to study respiratory infection by B. mallei.

  5. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Neglected Cause of Human Enteric Infections in Côte d’Ivoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraka, Daniel; Savin, Cyril; Kouassi, Stephane; Cissé, Bakary; Koffi, Eugène; Cabanel, Nicolas; Brémont, Sylvie; Faye-Kette, Hortense; Dosso, Mireille; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Background Enteropathogenic Yersinia circulate in the pig reservoir and are the third bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal infections in Europe. In West Africa, reports of human yersiniosis are rare. This study was conducted to determine whether pathogenic Yersinia are circulating in pig farms and are responsible for human infections in the Abidjan District. Methodology/Principal findings From June 2012 to December 2013, pig feces were collected monthly in 41 swine farms of the Abidjan district. Of the 781 samples collected, 19 Yersinia strains were isolated in 3 farms: 7 non-pathogenic Yersinia intermedia and 12 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Farm animals other than pigs and wild animals were not found infected. Furthermore, 2 Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were isolated from 426 fecal samples of patients with digestive disorders. All 14 Y. enterocolitica strains shared the same PFGE and MLVA profile, indicating their close genetic relationship. However, while 6 of them displayed the usual phage type VIII, the other 8 had the highly infrequent phage type XI. Whole genome sequencing and SNP analysis of individual colonies revealed that phage type XI strains had unusually high rates of mutations. These strains displayed a hypermutator phenotype that was attributable to a large deletion in the mutS gene involved in DNA mismatch repair. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that pathogenic Y. enterocolitica circulate in the pig reservoir in Côte d'Ivoire and cause human infections with a prevalence comparable to that of many developed countries. The paucity of reports of yersiniosis in West Africa is most likely attributable to a lack of active detection rather than to an absence of the microorganism. The identification of hypermutator strains in pigs and humans is of concern as these strains can rapidly acquire selective advantages that may increase their fitness, pathogenicity or resistance to commonly used treatments. PMID

  6. Yersinia enterocolitica, a Neglected Cause of Human Enteric Infections in Côte d'Ivoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraka, Daniel; Savin, Cyril; Kouassi, Stephane; Cissé, Bakary; Koffi, Eugène; Cabanel, Nicolas; Brémont, Sylvie; Faye-Kette, Hortense; Dosso, Mireille; Carniel, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia circulate in the pig reservoir and are the third bacterial cause of human gastrointestinal infections in Europe. In West Africa, reports of human yersiniosis are rare. This study was conducted to determine whether pathogenic Yersinia are circulating in pig farms and are responsible for human infections in the Abidjan District. From June 2012 to December 2013, pig feces were collected monthly in 41 swine farms of the Abidjan district. Of the 781 samples collected, 19 Yersinia strains were isolated in 3 farms: 7 non-pathogenic Yersinia intermedia and 12 pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bioserotype 4/O:3. Farm animals other than pigs and wild animals were not found infected. Furthermore, 2 Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains were isolated from 426 fecal samples of patients with digestive disorders. All 14 Y. enterocolitica strains shared the same PFGE and MLVA profile, indicating their close genetic relationship. However, while 6 of them displayed the usual phage type VIII, the other 8 had the highly infrequent phage type XI. Whole genome sequencing and SNP analysis of individual colonies revealed that phage type XI strains had unusually high rates of mutations. These strains displayed a hypermutator phenotype that was attributable to a large deletion in the mutS gene involved in DNA mismatch repair. This study demonstrates that pathogenic Y. enterocolitica circulate in the pig reservoir in Côte d'Ivoire and cause human infections with a prevalence comparable to that of many developed countries. The paucity of reports of yersiniosis in West Africa is most likely attributable to a lack of active detection rather than to an absence of the microorganism. The identification of hypermutator strains in pigs and humans is of concern as these strains can rapidly acquire selective advantages that may increase their fitness, pathogenicity or resistance to commonly used treatments.

  7. Variations of immune parameters in the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus after infection with enteritis pathogen of Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tingting; Zhang, Dong; Liu, Xin; Xiao, Dongxue

    2016-03-01

    Enteritis has been increasingly recognized as one of the major obstacles for the lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus mass culture success. In the present study, the intestinal bacteria strains of the lined seahorses H. erectus suffered from enteritis were isolated, then their pathogenicities were confirmed by artificial infection, and one pathogenic bacteria strain named DS3 was obtained. The median lethal dose (LD50) of strain DS3 for 10 days was determined. The seahorses with different infection levels of uninfected (control), early stage of infection (ESI) and late stage of infection (LSI) were respectively sampled at 0, 3, 6 and 9 days post infection, and 12 immune parameters in the plasma were analyzed. The strain DS3 identified with a biochemical test combined with a molecular method was Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and its LD50 for 10 days was 1.3 × 10(3) cfu/fish. Six parameters including monocytes/leucocytes, leucocytes phagocytic rate, interleukin-2, interferon-α, lysozyme and immunoglobulin M exhibited a generally similar variation trend: highest in the control, second in the ESI and lowest in the LSI throughout the entire experiment. In view of the infection level of V. parahaemolyticus to H. erectus is largely decided by the seahorse's own immune capacity, therefore, these immune parameters were high in the non- or slightly infected seahorses, and low in the severely infected individuals may be an indicator for immune level. These immune parameters may be reliable indicators for the juvenile and broodstock quality assessment. Moreover, clarification of the enteritis pathogen also provides guidances for targeted medicine choice for the lined seahorse.

  8. Common Questions About Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, James J; Hehn, Laura E; Klein, David A

    2016-04-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in women, including healthy women with normal genitourinary anatomy. Recurrent UTI is typically defined as three or more UTIs within 12 months, or two or more occurrences within six months. The same species that caused previous infections is typically responsible for recurrences. In premenopausal women, sexual intercourse three or more times per week, spermicide use, new or multiple sex partners, and having a UTI before 15 years of age are established risk factors. In postmenopausal women, risk is primarily increased by sequelae of lower estrogen levels. Episodes of recurrent UTI are typically characterized by dysuria and urinary frequency or hesitancy. Findings from the history or physical examination that suggest complicated infection or another disease process warrant additional evaluation. At least one symptomatic episode should be verified by urine culture to confirm the diagnosis and guide treatment. Imaging is rarely warranted. Short courses of antibiotics are as effective as longer courses. Patient-initiated treatment lowers the cost of diagnosis, number of physician visits, and number of symptomatic days compared with physician-initiated treatment. It also reduces antibiotic exposure compared with antibiotic prophylaxis. Antibiotic prophylaxis effectively limits UTI recurrence but increases the risk of antibiotic resistance and adverse effects. Cranberry products may reduce recurrent UTIs in premenopausal women, but are less effective than antibiotic prophylaxis, and data are conflicting. Optimal dosing is unknown. Postmenopausal women with atrophic vaginitis may benefit from topical estrogen therapy.

  9. Autoimmunity and infection in common variable immunodeficiency (CVID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Barbieri, Alessandro; Tinazzi, Elisa; Veneri, Dino; Argentino, Giuseppe; Moretta, Francesca; Puccetti, Antonio; Lunardi, Claudio

    2016-09-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by primary hypogammaglobulinemia. B and T cell abnormalities have been described in CVID. Typical clinical features of CVID are recurrent airway infections; lymphoproliferative, autoinflammatory, or neoplastic disorders; and autoimmune diseases among which autoimmune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most common. The coexistence of immunodeficiency and autoimmunity appears paradoxical, since one represents a hypoimmune state and the other a hyperimmune state. Considering both innate and adaptive immune response abnormalities in CVID, it is easier to understand the mechanisms that lead to a breakdown of self-tolerance. CD21(low) B cells derive from mature B cells that have undergone chronic immune stimulation; they are increased in CVID patients. The expansion of CD21(low) B cells is also observed in certain autoimmune diseases. We have studied CD21(low) B cells in patients with CVID, CVID, and ITP and with ITP only. We observed a statistically significant increase in the CD21(low) population in the three pathological groups. Moreover, we found statistical differences between the two groups of CVID patients: patients with ITP had a higher percentage of CD21(low) cells. Our data suggest that CD21(low) cells are related to autoimmunity and may represent a link between infection and autoimmunity.

  10. CLINICAL AND PHARMACOECONOMIC EFFICACY OF NATIONAL LACTOBACILLUS-BASED PROBIOTICS IN COMPLEX THERAPY FOR ACUTE ENTERIC INFECTIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.V. Gonchar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Active use of probiotic medications in children with acute enteric infections (AEI does not always result in noticeable improvement of therapy results, which triggers the need for a study of pharmacoeconomic efficacy of using probiotics. The results of complex therapy for AEI in infants using lactobacillus-based prebiotics and conventional therapy were compared. Key clinical criteria of therapy for AEI were: reduction in inflammatory intestine modifications, elimination of Klebsiella pneumoniae, restoration of indigenous microflora. The results of the conducted study helped identify antagonism of Vitaflora against K. pneumoniae, a positive influence on colitis syndrome progress, as well as identify Biobacton’s impact on the restoration of intestine microbiocenosis.Key words: Acute enteric infections, children, infancy, therapy, prebiotics, pharmacoeconomic efficacy. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(6:10-15

  11. Two necrotic enteritis predisposing factors, dietary fishmeal and Eimeria infection, induce large changes in the caecal microbiota of broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Biao; Stanley, Dragana; Rodgers, Nicholas; Swick, Robert A; Moore, Robert J

    2014-03-14

    It is widely established that a high-protein fishmeal supplemented starter diet and Eimeria infection can predispose birds to the development of clinical necrotic enteritis symptoms following Clostridium perfringens infection. However, it has not been clearly established what changes these treatments cause to predispose birds to succumb to necrotic enteritis. We analysed caecal microbiota of 4 groups of broilers (n=12) using deep pyrosequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons: (1) control chicks fed a control diet, (2) Eimeria infected chicks fed control diet, (3) chicks fed fishmeal supplemented diet and lastly (4) both fishmeal fed and Eimeria infected chicks. We found that the high-protein fishmeal diet had a strong effect on the intestinal microbiota similar to the previously reported effect of C. perfringens infection. We noted major changes in the prevalence of various lactobacilli while the total culturable Lactobacillus counts remained stable. The Ruminococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae, unknown Clostridiales and Lactobacillaceae families were most affected by fishmeal with increases in a number of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that had previously been linked to Crohn's disease and reductions in OTUs known to be butyrate producers. Eimeria induced very different changes in microbiota; Ruminococcaceae groups were reduced in number and three unknown Clostridium species were increased in abundance. Additionally, Eimeria did not significantly influence changes in pH, formic, propionic or isobutyric acid while fishmeal induced dramatic changes in all these measures. Both fishmeal feeding and Eimeria infection induced significant changes in the gut microbiota; these changes may play an important role in predisposing birds to necrotic enteritis.

  12. Pattern of co-infection by enteric pathogenic parasites among HIV sero-positive individuals in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishat Hussain Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: One of the major medical concerns in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHA is management of diarrhea that can lead to severe morbidity and mortality. Such clinical scenario warrants an analysis of intestinal parasites, which are important opportunistic pathogens in PLHA. Owing to the scarcity of recent pattern of intestinal opportunistic infections from this region, the study was designed to determine the opportunistic parasites causing diarrhea in PLHA; and to find out whether there is any significant difference in the enteric parasitic pathogens in patients with different immunological status and in those on highly active anti retro-viral therapy (HAART. Materials and Methods: Analysis of the spectrum of intestinal parasites was carried out with 192 subjects in two groups (142 HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 50 HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea. The routine light microscopic examination was carried out to determine the infection and CD4+ T-Lymphocyte count was estimated using flow cytometry. Results: Enteric parasites were detected in 35.9% of HIV sero-positive patients having diarrhea and 18% of HIV sero-negative patients having diarrhea. Most common opportunistic enteric parasite was Isospora belli (11.5%; others were Entamoeba histolytica (4.7%, Cryptosporidium sp. (3.6%, Strongyloides stercoralis (3.1%, Giardia intestinalis (3.1% and Cyclospora cayatanenesis (1.6%. Opportunistic enteric parasites were detected in significantly low numbers in patients with CD4+ T-Lymphocyte counts >500 cells/ml; and in those taking HAART.

  13. Prevalence of genital chlamydial infection in young women entering a national job training program, 1990-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, K J; Ransom, R L; St Louis, M E; Groseclose, S L; Hadgu, A; Levine, W C; Hayman, C

    2001-08-01

    This analysis describes trends in the prevalence of genital chlamydial infection in economically disadvantaged young women entering a national job training program. We examined chlamydia test data for May 1990 through June 1997 for women aged 16 to 24 years who enrolled in the program. The significance of trends was evaluated with the chi 2 test for trend. Prevalence of chlamydial infection declined 32.9%, from 14.9% in 1990 to 10.0% in 1997 (P < .001). Prevalence decreased significantly in all age groups, racial/ethnic groups, and geographic regions. The decrease in prevalence of chlamydial infection suggests that prevention activities have reached disadvantaged women across the United States; however, prevalence of chlamydial infection remains high, and enhanced prevention efforts in disadvantaged communities are urgently needed.

  14. Prevalence of Genital Chlamydial Infection in Young Women Entering a National Job Training Program, 1990–1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Kristen J.; Ransom, Raymond L.; St. Louis, Michael E.; Groseclose, Samuel L.; Hadgu, Alula; Levine, William C.; Hayman, Charles

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. This analysis describes trends in the prevalence of genital chlamydial infection in economically disadvantaged young women entering a national job training program. Methods. We examined chlamydia test data for May 1990 through June 1997 for women aged 16 to 24 years who enrolled in the program. The significance of trends was evaluated with the χ2 test for trend. Results. Prevalence of chlamydial infection declined 32.9%, from 14.9% in 1990 to 10.0% in 1997 (P < .001). Prevalence decreased significantly in all age groups, racial/ethnic groups, and geographic regions. Conclusions. The decrease in prevalence of chlamydial infection suggests that prevention activities have reached disadvantaged women across the United States; however, prevalence of chlamydial infection remains high, and enhanced prevention efforts in disadvantaged communities are urgently needed. PMID:11499120

  15. Modeling infection and antiviral therapy of enteric viruses using primary intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Yin (Yuebang)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIn this thesis, we first highlighted important clinical complications associated with rotavirus infection in setting of orthotopic organ transplantation, I then analyzed the incidence of rotavirus infection, its diagnosis, its pathogenesis, how to rationally use of

  16. Low dietary iron intake restrains the intestinal inflammatory response and pathology of enteric infection by food-borne bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortman, Guus A M; Mulder, Michelle L M; Richters, Thijs J W; Shanmugam, Nanda K N; Trebicka, Estela; Boekhorst, Jos; Timmerman, Harro M; Roelofs, Rian; Wiegerinck, Erwin T; Laarakkers, Coby M; Swinkels, Dorine W; Bolhuis, Albert; Cherayil, Bobby J; Tjalsma, Harold

    2015-09-01

    Orally administrated iron is suspected to increase susceptibility to enteric infections among children in infection endemic regions. Here we investigated the effect of dietary iron on the pathology and local immune responses in intestinal infection models. Mice were held on iron-deficient, normal iron, or high iron diets and after 2 weeks they were orally challenged with the pathogen Citrobacter rodentium. Microbiome analysis by pyrosequencing revealed profound iron- and infection-induced shifts in microbiota composition. Fecal levels of the innate defensive molecules and markers of inflammation lipocalin-2 and calprotectin were not influenced by dietary iron intervention alone, but were markedly lower in mice on the iron-deficient diet after infection. Next, mice on the iron-deficient diet tended to gain more weight and to have a lower grade of colon pathology. Furthermore, survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was prolonged after iron deprivation. Together, these data show that iron limitation restricts disease pathology upon bacterial infection. However, our data also showed decreased intestinal inflammatory responses of mice fed on high iron diets. Thus additionally, our study indicates that the effects of iron on processes at the intestinal host-pathogen interface may highly depend on host iron status, immune status, and gut microbiota composition.

  17. Prevalence of common gastro-intestinal nematode infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    1National Animal Resources Research Institute (NaLIRRI), P. O. Box 96, ... Uganda Journal of Agricultural Sciences by National Agricultural Research .... gastro-enteritis in small ruminants are due ... University of Edinburgh Project Dates:.

  18. Genome analysis of Clostridium perfringens isolates from healthy and necrotic enteritis infected chickens and turkeys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronco, Troels; Stegger, Marc; Ng, Kim Lee

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Clostridium perfringens causes gastrointestinal diseases in both humans and domestic animals. Type A strains expressing the NetB toxin are the main cause of necrotic enteritis (NE) in chickens, which has remarkable impact on animal welfare and production economy in the international...

  19. Enteric Salmonella or Campylobacter infections and the risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Tine; Simonsen, Jacob; Nielsen, Nete Munk

    2011-01-01

    Enteric pathogens have been implicated in the aetiology of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but increased rates of stool testing of patients with unclear gastrointestinal symptoms might cause detection bias. Hence, the objective of this study was to analyse incidence rates of Crohn's disease and...

  20. Polyclonal and Specific Antibodies Mediate Protective Immunity against Enteric Helminth Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCoy, Kathy D.; Stoel, Maaike; Stettler, Rebecca; Merky, Patrick; Fink, Katja; Senn, Beatrice M.; Schaer, Corinne; Massacand, Joanna; Oderrnatt, Bernhard; Oettgen, Hans C.; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.; Bos, Nicolaas A.; Hengartner, Hans; Macpherson, Andrew J.; Harris, Nicola L.

    2008-01-01

    Anti-helminth immunity involves CD4(+) T cells, yet the precise effector mechanisms responsible for parasite killing or expulsion remain elusive. We now report an essential role for antibodies in mediating immunity against the enteric helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus (Hp), a natural murine parasit

  1. Cross-modulation of pathogen-specific pathways enhances malnutrition during enteric co-infection with Giardia lamblia and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelt, Luther A.; Bolick, David T.; Zaenker, Edna I.; Donowitz, Jeffery; Thomas-Beckett, Rose Viguna; Rogala, Allison; Carroll, Ian M.; Swann, Jonathan R.; Guerrant, Richard L.

    2017-01-01

    Diverse enteropathogen exposures associate with childhood malnutrition. To elucidate mechanistic pathways whereby enteric microbes interact during malnutrition, we used protein deficiency in mice to develop a new model of co-enteropathogen enteropathy. Focusing on common enteropathogens in malnourished children, Giardia lamblia and enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), we provide new insights into intersecting pathogen-specific mechanisms that enhance malnutrition. We show for the first time that during protein malnutrition, the intestinal microbiota permits persistent Giardia colonization and simultaneously contributes to growth impairment. Despite signals of intestinal injury, such as IL1α, Giardia-infected mice lack pro-inflammatory intestinal responses, similar to endemic pediatric Giardia infections. Rather, Giardia perturbs microbial host co-metabolites of proteolysis during growth impairment, whereas host nicotinamide utilization adaptations that correspond with growth recovery increase. EAEC promotes intestinal inflammation and markers of myeloid cell activation. During co-infection, intestinal inflammatory signaling and cellular recruitment responses to EAEC are preserved together with a Giardia-mediated diminishment in myeloid cell activation. Conversely, EAEC extinguishes markers of host energy expenditure regulatory responses to Giardia, as host metabolic adaptations appear exhausted. Integrating immunologic and metabolic profiles during co-pathogen infection and malnutrition, we develop a working mechanistic model of how cumulative diet-induced and pathogen-triggered microbial perturbations result in an increasingly wasted host. PMID:28750066

  2. Marburg virus infection detected in a common African bat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Jonathan S; Pourrut, Xavier; Albariño, César G; Nkogue, Chimène Nze; Bird, Brian H; Grard, Gilda; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Nichol, Stuart T; Leroy, Eric M

    2007-08-22

    Marburg and Ebola viruses can cause large hemorrhagic fever (HF) outbreaks with high case fatality (80-90%) in human and great apes. Identification of the natural reservoir of these viruses is one of the most important topics in this field and a fundamental key to understanding their natural history. Despite the discovery of this virus family almost 40 years ago, the search for the natural reservoir of these lethal pathogens remains an enigma despite numerous ecological studies. Here, we report the discovery of Marburg virus in a common species of fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus) in Gabon as shown by finding virus-specific RNA and IgG antibody in individual bats. These Marburg virus positive bats represent the first naturally infected non-primate animals identified. Furthermore, this is the first report of Marburg virus being present in this area of Africa, thus extending the known range of the virus. These data imply that more areas are at risk for MHF outbreaks than previously realized and correspond well with a recently published report in which three species of fruit bats were demonstrated to be likely reservoirs for Ebola virus.

  3. Marburg virus infection detected in a common African bat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Towner

    Full Text Available Marburg and Ebola viruses can cause large hemorrhagic fever (HF outbreaks with high case fatality (80-90% in human and great apes. Identification of the natural reservoir of these viruses is one of the most important topics in this field and a fundamental key to understanding their natural history. Despite the discovery of this virus family almost 40 years ago, the search for the natural reservoir of these lethal pathogens remains an enigma despite numerous ecological studies. Here, we report the discovery of Marburg virus in a common species of fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus in Gabon as shown by finding virus-specific RNA and IgG antibody in individual bats. These Marburg virus positive bats represent the first naturally infected non-primate animals identified. Furthermore, this is the first report of Marburg virus being present in this area of Africa, thus extending the known range of the virus. These data imply that more areas are at risk for MHF outbreaks than previously realized and correspond well with a recently published report in which three species of fruit bats were demonstrated to be likely reservoirs for Ebola virus.

  4. Field strain feline coronaviruses with small deletions in ORF7b associated with both enteric infection and feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao-Nan; Su, Bi-Ling; Huang, Hui-Pi; Lee, Jih-Jong; Hsieh, Min-Wei; Chueh, Ling-Ling

    2009-06-01

    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) varies greatly from causing subclinical or mild enteric infections to fatal feline infectious peritonitis (FIP). The open reading frame (ORF) 7b of FCoV has been speculated to play a determining role in virulence as deletions were found to be associated with avirulent viruses. To further clarify the correlation between this gene and FIP, clinical samples from 20 cats that had succumbed to wet-type FIP and 20 clinically healthy FCoV-infected cats were analysed. The ORF7b from the peritoneal/pleural effusions of FIP cats and from the rectal swabs of healthy cats was amplified. Of the 40 FCoVs analysed, 32 were found to have an intact 7b gene whereas eight showed deletions of either three or 12 nucleotides. Surprisingly, among the eight viruses with deletions, three were from FIP diseased cats. These results show that deletions in the ORF7b gene are not constrained to low pathogenicity/enteric biotypes but also associated with pathogenicity/FIP biotypes of FCoV.

  5. Would medical students enter an exclusion zone in an infected district with a high mortality rate? An analysis of book reports on 28 (secondary publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Hwang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to ascertain whether medical students would enter a closed area where there was a raging epidemic of an infectious disease with a high fatality rate, and includes reasons for the students entering or refusing to enter. Participants included 50 second-year medical students. They were assigned to read a novel entitled 28, written by Youjeong Jeong, and discuss it in groups. Using their book reports, their decisions of whether or not to enter Hwayang, the city from the novel, and the reasons for their decisions were analyzed; we furthermore investigated the factors affecting their decisions. Among the 50 respondents, 18 students (36% answered that they would enter, and the remaining 32 students (64% answered that they would not enter the zone. The reasons given for entering were responsibility (44%, sense of ethics (33%, social duty (17%, and sense of guilt (6%. The reasons the students provided for not entering were inefficiency (44%, worry regarding family (28%, needlessness of sacrifice (19%, and safety not ensured (9%. Students who had four or fewer family members were more likely to enter Hwayang than were students who had five or more family members (odds ratio, 1.85. Students who had completed over 100 hours of volunteer work were more likely to enter Hwayang than were students who had volunteered less than 100 hours (odds ratio, 2.04. Owing to their “responsibility” as a doctor, 36% of medical students answered that they would enter an exclusion zone in an infected district with a high fatality rate. However, 64% answered they would not enter because of “inefficiency.” For the medical students it is still a question ‘To enter or not to enter?’

  6. Heat Production and Energy Efficiency of Broilers Infected With Necrotic Enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Sadeq, Shawkat A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Choct, Mingan; Swick, Robert A

    2016-03-01

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) in poultry is the most important bacterial disease in terms of economic losses. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of an experimental challenge with necrotic enteritis on respiration and heat production in birds pretreated with dietary acylated starch or antibiotics (AB) zinc bacitracin (50 mg/kg) plus salinomycin (60 mg/kg). In total, 48 1-day-old Ross 308 male broilers were assigned to floor pens until day 10. On day 11, birds were randomly placed into 16 calorimetric chambers with four replicates of three birds per treatment. Treatments were: control, AB, acetylated high-amylose maize starch (SA), or butyrylated high-amylose maize starch (SB). Birds were NE challenged by inoculation with 5000 sporulated oocysts each of Eimeria maxima and Eimeria acervulina and 2500 sporulated oocysts of Eimeria brunetti on day 9 and Clostridium perfringens (3.8 × 10(8) colony-forming units) on day 14. The results showed that heat production (HP), respiratory quotient (RQ), heat increment, weight gain (WG), feed intake (FI), and livability (LV) of birds fed control, SA, and SB diets were lower than birds fed AB at 19 and 42 hr postinoculation (P < 0.05). At 65 hr postchallenge, increased FI and WG of birds were observed, indicating recovery from NE. During the entire period, from day 14 to day 17, birds fed control, SA, and SB had lower WG, FI, HP, RQ, metabolizable energy intake (MEI), and metabolizable energy (P < 0.01) than those fed AB. The data demonstrate that Eimeria sp. and C. perfringens challenge reduces growth performance, HP, RQ, metabolizable energy, and MEI of birds fed control, SA, and SB but not AB diets.

  7. Enteric Infections occuring during an eight Year Period at the Chicago Zoological Park Brookfield, Illinois

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williamson, W.M.; Tilden, E.B.; Getty, R.E.

    1963-01-01

    The bacteriological examinations of abnormal stools, irrespective of the apparent seriousness of the illness, is particularly important in a zoological park where it is difficult to apply measures to keep out possibly infected wild, non-resident animals and mechanical carriers, such as flies, cockro

  8. Impact of waning acquired immunity and asymptomatic infections on case-control studies for enteric pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, Arie H; Swart, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Case-control studies of outbreaks and of sporadic cases of infectious diseases may provide a biased estimate of the infection rate ratio, due to selecting controls that are not at risk of disease. We use a dynamic mathematical model to explore biases introduced in results drawn from case-control stu

  9. Impact of waning acquired immunity and asymptomatic infections on case-control studies for enteric pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Havelaar, Arie H; Swart, Arno

    2016-01-01

    Case-control studies of outbreaks and of sporadic cases of infectious diseases may provide a biased estimate of the infection rate ratio, due to selecting controls that are not at risk of disease. We use a dynamic mathematical model to explore biases introduced in results drawn from case-control stu

  10. Biomarkers in canine parvovirus enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeman, J P; Goddard, A; Leisewitz, A L

    2013-07-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) enteritis has, since its emergence in 1978, remained a common and important cause of morbidity and mortality in young dogs. The continued incidence of parvoviral enteritis is partly due to the virus' capability to evolve into more virulent and resistant variants with significant local gastrointestinal and systemic inflammatory sequelae. This paper reviews current knowledge on historical-, signalment-, and clinical factors as well as several haematological-, biochemical- and endocrine parameters that can be used as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in CPV enteritis. These factors include season of presentation, purebred nature, bodyweight, vomiting, leukopaenia, lymphopaenia, thrombocytopaenia, hypercoagulability, hypercortisolaemia, hypothyroxinaemia, hypoalbuminaemia, elevated C-reactive protein and tumour necrosis factor, hypocholesterolaemia and hypocitrullinaemia. Factors contributing to the manifestations of CPV infection are multiple with elements of host, pathogen, secondary infections, underlying stressors and environment affecting severity and outcome. The availability of several prognosticators has made identification of patients at high risk of death and their subsequent targeted management more rewarding.

  11. Enteric pathogens and soil: a short review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Johanna; Toranzos, Gary A

    2003-03-01

    It is known that soil is a recipient of solid wastes able to contain enteric pathogens in high concentrations. Although the role of soil as a reservoir of certain bacterial pathogens is not in question, recent findings show that soil may have a larger role in the transmission of enteric diseases than previously thought. Many of the diseases caused by agents from soil have been well characterized, although enteric diseases and their link to soil have not been so well studied. Gastrointestinal infections are the most common diseases caused by enteric bacteria. Some examples are salmonellosis ( Salmonella sp.), cholera ( Vibrio cholerae), dysentery ( Shigella sp.) and other infections caused by Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia sp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and many other strains. Viruses are the most hazardous and have some of the lowest infectious doses of any of the enteric pathogens. Hepatitis A, hepatitis E, enteric adenoviruses, poliovirus types 1 and 2, multiple strains of echoviruses and coxsackievirus are enteric viruses associated with human wastewater. Among the most commonly detected protozoa in sewage are Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia intestinalis and Cryptosporidium parvum. This article reviews the existing literature of more than two decades on waste disposal practices that favor the entry of enteric pathogens to soil and the possible consequent role of the soil as a vector and reservoir of enteric pathogens.

  12. The different infectivity of Trichinella spiralis and Trichinella nativa in rat does not solely localize to enteral or parenteral phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Airas, Niina; Näreaho, Anu; Lindén, Jere; Tuomola, Karoliina; Sukura, Antti

    2012-12-01

    Rats are selective hosts for Trichinella nativa; infection levels in their muscles remain low when compared to Trichinella spiralis. To identify in which phase of the life cycle the selective responses take place, rats were infected perorally (p.o.) and intravenously (i.v.) with T. spiralis and T. nativa. Six rats were placed in each group; three rats served as uninfected controls. The infection intensities were examined 5 or 6 weeks after the infection. T. spiralis muscle larva burden was 57 times higher compared to that of T. nativa after p.o. inoculation (mean larvae per gram ± SD, 1,243 ± 378.9 vs. 22 ± 21.5). In i.v. inoculation, 12 times more T. spiralis larvae reached the muscle than with T. nativa. Also, in vitro newborn larva (NBL) production at day 6 postinfection was analyzed for parasites originating from both rat and mouse. The mean number of in vitro-produced NBL of rat-origin T. spiralis during 24 h was 70 (95 % CI, 65-75) and of T. nativa, 23 (95 % CI, 21-24). Intriguingly, this difference was less obvious with mouse-origin female Trichinella. NBL production of mouse origin T. spiralis was 57 (95 % CI, 51-62) and T. nativa, 29 (95 % CI, 26-31). Intestine histology at day 40 post p.o. infection, serological response, and weight dynamics were indistinguishable between the Trichinella species but differed from controls. Our results show that the defense against T. nativa is not solely enteral in rats but may partly be explained by different reproduction processes for the two Trichinella species in rat.

  13. Prevalence trends in chlamydial infections among young women entering the national job training program, 1998-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joesoef, M Riduan; Mosure, Debra J

    2006-09-01

    To assess the trends and risk factors of chlamydial infections in disadvantaged women aged 16 to 24 years entering a national job training program. To assess the impact of chlamydia screening program on chlamydia trend. The authors calculated the prevalence of chlamydia by demographic and geographic characteristics from 106,377 women who were screened from 1998 through 2004. Chlamydia prevalence was inversely associated with age, decreasing from 12.7% in women aged 16 to 17 years to 6.6% in women aged 22 to 24 years. Blacks had the highest prevalence (13.1%). Chlamydia prevalence significantly decreased from 11.7% in 1998 to 10.0% in 2003 and then slightly increased to 10.3% in 2004. After direct standardization and adjustment for the laboratory test type, a similar trend was observed by age and race/ethnicities. Among disadvantaged women aged 16 to 24 years entering a national job training program, the chlamydia prevalence and racial disparities in prevalence were consistently high from 1998 to 2004, especially among younger black women.

  14. Oral zinc and common childhood infections--An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basnet, Sudha; Mathisen, Maria; Strand, Tor A

    2015-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient important for growth and for normal function of the immune system. Many children in developing countries have inadequate zinc nutrition. Routine zinc supplementation reduces the risk of respiratory infections and diarrhea, the two leading causes of morbidity and mortality in young children worldwide. In childhood diarrhea oral zinc also reduces illness duration and risk of persistent episodes. Oral zinc is therefore recommended for the treatment of acute diarrhea in young children. The results from the studies that have measured the therapeutic effect of zinc on acute respiratory infections, however, are conflicting. Moreover, the results of therapeutic zinc for childhood malaria also are so far not promising.This paper gives a brief outline of the current evidence from clinical trials on therapeutic effect of oral zinc on childhood respiratory infections, pneumonia and malaria and also of new evidence of the effect on serious bacterial illness in young infants.

  15. EVALUATION AND PREDICTIVE METHODS OF EPIDEMICAL SITUATION IN THE AREA OF ACUTE ENTERIC INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malysh N.G.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Despite the fact, that nowadays acute intestinal infections (AII sick rate is decreasing, the aggravation of the epidemical situation is always there. Increased attention to AII caused by unpredictable epidemical rises of the AII diseases, which cannot be prevented without assessing the epidemical situation of these infections and forecasting of the levels of sick rate. However, developed mathematical methods of forecasting in most cases do not take into account the risk factors, also they are time-consuming and it is difficult to calculate them; and developed special computer programs, which predict infectious sick rates, are often in the lack in the institutions of sanitary-epidemiological service. An urgent problem for today is establishing of the most influential social and environmental factors, which can make a contribution to the spread of AII. The aim of this work was to improve the method of assessment and prediction of epidemic situation of AII by identifying the influence of climatic and demographic factors. Materials and methods. In order to determine the influence of meteorological and demographic factors on the epidemic process of acute intestinal infections the official reports of the State Sanitary and Epidemiological Service of Ukraine in Sumy region, the Department of Statistics, Sumy Regional Center for Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring have been studied. Results and discussion. The work on the evaluation of the epidemiological situation of the AII begins from collecting data, according to the AII sick rate. The main source of this information is the logbook of infectious diseases, which recorded all sick people that were found in the area. It is necessary to gather the initial information, calculate the sick rate and monthly distribution of AII cases on investigated area and evaluate the tendency. At the same time with accounting of AII cases on investigated territory, takes place a monitoring of air

  16. Common cutaneous dermatophyte infections of the skin and nails

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    structures including the keratinized layers of the skin, hair and nails. Subcutaneous ... pre-pubertal children, whereas adolescents and adults are more likely to develop ... Atypical, generalized, or invasive dermatophyte infections are routinely .... Systemic therapy with griseofulvin was the drug of choice in treating Tinea ...

  17. [The most common infections in the transplanted patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, J R; del Pozo, J L; Quetglás, E G; Azanza, J R

    2006-01-01

    Organ transplantation has become one of the most important areas of medical research and, at present, is still the only therapeutical tool for several diseases. However, there are a number of factors related to transplantation, like immunosuppression and prolonged neutropenia that affect the incidence of infection. These infections are somehow peculiar to transplant recipients. In fact, there are infectious diseases that only occur in immunodepression situations and, moreover, clinical expression of these infectious diseases can be quite different from that in immunocompetent patients. Besides these aspects, some infections, due to the high prevalence described, must be considered for prevention strategies because they continue to be a principal cause of morbidity and mortality, either due to direct effects or to their implication in the pathogenesis of rejection. These strategies commence before transplantation by active immunization through vaccine administration to the patient and to people in the milieu and continue after transplantation with prophylaxis or pre-emptive therapy. The importance of infectious diseases in the evolution and prognosis of transplant recipients gives a special meaning to the understanding of associated infections, their clinical expression and ways of prevention and treatment.

  18. Prevalence of Campylobacter jejuni and enteric bacterial pathogens among hospitalized HIV infected versus non-HIV infected patients with diarrhoea in southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kownhar, Hayath; Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Rajan, Ramachandran; Vengatesan, Appasamy; Rao, Usha Anand

    2007-01-01

    A prevalence study on Campylobacter jejuni and other enteric bacterial pathogens was carried out in 200 HIV infected and 200 non-HIV infected subjects with diarrhoeal symptoms at an AIDS Hospital in southern India. Diarrhoeal specimens were inoculated onto standard culture media as well as onto Columbia and Campylobacter blood agar media for C. jejuni isolation. All the C. jejuni isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility using Kirby-Bauer's method. A significant difference in recovery rates was observed between the 2 groups in relation to C. jejuni (p < or = 0.02; 95% CI 5.5 (1-10) and Shigella spp. (p < or = 0.02; 95% CI 6.5 (1-12). 21 isolates of Shigella spp., 16 C. jejuni, 5 Salmonella typhi, 3 Arcobacter spp., 3 Yersinia enterocolitica, and 2 Aeromonas hydrophila were recovered from the HIV infected cases. All the C. jejuni isolates were sensitive to ciprofloxacin whereas 1 strain was resistant to nalidixic acid. Interestingly, all the 29 Shigella spp. (21 from HIV and 8 from non-HIV cases) were resistant to erythromycin and most were resistant to many other antibiotics used. Our observations underline the need for epidemiological investigations to screen C. jejuni and Shigella spp. in HIV infected subjects with diarrhoea and analyse their antibiograms periodically to minimize disease burden in HIV/AIDS.

  19. Antecedent infections in Fisher syndrome: a common pathogenesis of molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, M; Gilbert, M; Li, J; Koike, S; Takahashi, M; Furukawa, K; Hirata, K; Yuki, N

    2005-05-10

    To assess the production mechanism of anti-GQ1b autoantibody in Fisher syndrome (FS). The authors conducted a prospective case-control serologic study of five antecedent infections (Campylobacter jejuni, cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Haemophilus influenzae) in 73 patients with FS and 73 sex- and age-matched hospital controls (HCs). Serologic evidence in FS patients of C. jejuni (21%) and H. influenzae (8%) infections was present significantly more often than in the HCs. None of the five pathogens examined was found in the 49 (67%) patients with FS. Anti-GQ1b IgG antibody was detected in most FS patients infected with C. jejuni or H. influenzae. Mass spectrometry analysis identified a C. jejuni strain (CF93-6) carrying a GT1a-like lipo-oligosaccharide (LOS) that had been isolated from an FS patient. Immunization of complex ganglioside-lacking knockout mice with the GT1a-like LOS generated IgG class monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that reacted with GQ1b and GT1a. Thin-layer chromatography with immunostaining showed that anti-GQ1b mAb bound to the C. jejuni LOS (50% of the 20 FS-related strains) more commonly than in the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS)-related (7% of 70) or enteritis-related (20% of 65) strains. Anti-GM1 and anti-GD1a mAbs also reacted with the LOS from some FS-related strains (both 20%), but binding frequencies were higher in the GBS-related strains (74 and 57%). The GQ1b epitope was detected in 4 (40%) of the 10 FS-related H. influenzae strains but was absent in strains from patients with GBS (n = 4) and uncomplicated respiratory infections (n = 10). C. jejuni and H. influenzae are related to Fisher syndrome (FS) development, and production of anti-GQ1b autoantibody is mediated by the GQ1b-mimicking lipo-oligosaccharides on those bacteria. The causative agents remain unclear in the majority of patients with FS.

  20. Risk Factors for Surgical-Site Infection Following Common Femoral Artery Endarterectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, Wouter J. M.; Verhoeven, Bart A. N.; van de Mortel, Rob H. W.; Moll, Frans L.; de Vries, Jean-Paul P. M.

    2009-01-01

    Surgical-site infection is a major complication following endarterectomy of the common femoral artery. The aim of this single-center study was to determine risk factors for surgical-site infection after endarterectomy of the common femoral artery and especially the possible association between patch

  1. Increased risk of common infections in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, L M A J; Gorter, K J; Hak, E; Goudzwaard, W L; Schellevis, F G; Hoepelman, A I M; Rutten, G E H M

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical data on the association of diabetes mellitus with common infections are virtually lacking, not conclusive, and often biased. We intended to determine the relative risks of common infections in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and DM2, respectively). METHODS

  2. Enteric parasitic infections in HIV/AIDS patients before and after the highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Paschoalette Rodrigues Bachur

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Enteroparasites are related to gastrointestinal alterations among patients with HIV/AIDS, some causing severe manifestations in the period before the institution of the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. The prevalence of enteroparasitoses in patients with HIV/AIDS seen at two hospitals in Ceará , Brazil, was compared in the pre-HAART (Group 1; n = 482 and HAART (Group 2; n = 100 eras. Fecal parasitologic examinations (FPE were performed using the direct, Lutz, Baermann-Moraes and modified Ziehl-Neelsen methods. The following parasites were detected in Groups 1 and 2, respectively: Strongyloides stercoralis - 30.1% and 11% (p<0.0001, Ascaris lumbricoides - 15.6% and 2% (p<0.0001, hookworms - 13.7% and 2% (p<0.0001, Trichuris trichiura - 13.1% and 1% (p<0.0001, Hymenolepis nana - 0 and 1% (p = 0.1718, Giardia duodenalis - 7.9% and 1% (p = 0.0076, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar - 3.3% and 1% (p = 0.3301, Isospora belli - 4.8% and 1% (p = 0.0993, Cryptosporidium sp. - 8.1% and 0 (p = 0.0007, and non-pathogenic protozoans as well. There was a significant reduction in the prevalence of enteroparasites between the eras (63.9% to 24%; p<0.0001. In the HAART era, the following observations were made: greater frequency of enteroparasites in patients without antiretroviral therapy (p = 0.0575, as in those with AIDS (p = 0.08, and diarrhea (36% of the patients; lack of association with positive FPE (p = 0.626; and non-detection of Cryptosporidium sp. Strongyloides stercoralis showed an elevated prevalence in the two eras and was more frequent in men (32.41% than women (19.04% of Group 1 (p = 0.018, a finding suggesting the transmission of the helminth through sodomy. The advent of the HAART modified the profile of opportunistic infections, including parasites, probably due to the reconstitution of cellular immunity and the direct action of HAART on the parasites.

  3. Common Symptoms from an Uncommon Infection: Gastrointestinal Anisakiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuto Shimamura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinicians can be forgiven for thinking of anisakiasis as a rare condition low in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain. Gastrointestinal anisakiasis is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by consumption of raw or undercooked seafood infected with nematodes of the genus Anisakis. Even though the reported cases indicate that this is a rare disease, the true incidence of the disease could be potentially higher than what is reported in the literature as cases can go undiagnosed. Diagnosis and treatment of gastric anisakiasis are made by a compatible dietary history, direct visualization, and removal of the larvae via gastroscopy. Serologic testing and imaging studies are useful in the diagnosis of intestinal anisakiasis and conservative management should be considered. This disease may mimic other diseases and lead to unnecessary surgery. This emphasizes the importance of suspecting gastrointestinal anisakiasis by history taking and by other diagnostic modalities.

  4. EBV infection is common in gingival epithelial cells of the periodontium and worsens during chronic periodontitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine Vincent-Bugnas

    Full Text Available An amplifying role for oral epithelial cells (ECs in Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV infection has been postulated to explain oral viral shedding. However, while lytic or latent EBV infections of oro/nasopharyngeal ECs are commonly detected under pathological conditions, detection of EBV-infected ECs in healthy conditions is very rare. In this study, a simple non-surgical tissue sampling procedure was used to investigate EBV infection in the periodontal epithelium that surrounds and attaches teeth to the gingiva. Surprisingly, we observed that the gingival ECs of the periodontium (pECs are commonly infected with EBV and may serve as an important oral reservoir of latently EBV-infected cells. We also found that the basal level of epithelial EBV-infection is significantly increased in chronic periodontitis, a common inflammatory disease that undermines the integrity of tooth-supporting tissues. Moreover, the level of EBV infection was found to correlate with disease severity. In inflamed tissues, EBV-infected pECs appear to be prone to apoptosis and to produce larger amounts of CCL20, a pivotal inflammatory chemokine that controls tissue infiltration by immune cells. Our discovery that the periodontal epithelium is a major site of latent EBV infection sheds a new light on EBV persistence in healthy carriers and on the role of this ubiquitous virus in periodontitis. Moreover, the identification of this easily accessible site of latent infection may encourage new approaches to investigate and monitor other EBV-associated disorders.

  5. Presence, infectivity, and stability of enteric viruses in seawater: Relationship to marine water quality in the Florida Keys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetz, J.J.; Lipp, E.K.; Griffin, Dale W.; Lukasik, J.; Wait, D.; Sobsey, M.D.; Scott, T.M.; Rose, J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Concerns about the presence of enteric viruses in the surface waters of the Florida Keys prompted analyses of virus stability and persistence in these waters. In an in vitro study we evaluated the survival of poliovirus and stability of viral RNA in filtered natural seawater (FSW), unfiltered natural seawater (USW), artificial seawater (ASW) and DI water. This study compared cell culture infectivity with direct reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Attenuated poliovirus was seeded in the above water types and incubated in the dark at 22 and 30??C for 60 days. At 22??C, enhanced poliovirus survival and enhanced detection of viral RNA was observed in the seeded DI water control, artificial seawater and FSW samples. Detection of viruses in unfiltered seawater decreased rapidly at both temperatures by both methods of detection, suggesting that in the natural environment detection of enteroviral RNA may indicate a recent contamination event. In addition, in situ sampling in the Florida Keys during the late winter of 2000 revealed the presence of infectious enteroviruses at two sites and no sites exceeded recommended levels of microbial water quality indicators (enterococci or fecal coliform bacteria). ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Occult hepatitis C virus infection is more common than hepatitis B infection in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Pankaj; Nijhawan, Sandeep

    2008-01-01

    Patients of end stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled to study the prevalence of occult and dual hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-occult hepatitis B and C virus infection. One hundred and two patients were enrolled. Thirty patients had HCV infection, three of them were positive in anti-HCV. So, 27 (90%) of HCV-positive patients had occult HCV infection. Eleven (11%) patients had HBV infection. Five patients were positive in anti-HBc...

  7. Occult hepatitis C virus infection is more common than hepatitis B infection in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pankaj Jain; Sandeep Nijhawan

    2008-01-01

    Patients of end stage renal disease on maintenance hemodialysis were enrolled to study the prevalence of occult and dual hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-occult hepatitis B and C virus infection. One hundred and two patients were enrolled. Thirty patients had HCV infection, three of them were positive in anti-HCV. So, 27 (90%) of HCVpositive patients had occult HCV infection. Eleven (11%)patients had HBV infection. Five patients were positive in anti-HBc or HBV-DNA, but negative in HBsAg (occult HBV infection). Three (3%) patients had dual HBV and HCV infection. None of the patients showed changes in viral markers during the follow-up of 8 mo on average (1-12 mo).

  8. Influences of enteral nutrition combined with probiotics on gut microflora and barrier function of rats with abdominal infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-Yi Shen; Huan-Long Qin; Zhi-Guang Gao; Xiao-Bing Fan; Xiao-Ming Hang; Yan-Qun Jiang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the influences of enteral, parenteral nutrition and probiotics delivered by gut on intestinal microecology, epithelial tight junctions, immune and barrier function of rats with abdominal infection.METHODS: Rat abdominal infection models established with cecal ligation and perforation method, were divided into three groups: parenteral nutrition (PN group, n = 7), PN+enteral nutrition (EN group, n = 7) and PN EN + probiotics (probiotics group, n = 7) via the needle jejunostomy and neck vein for five days. The total nutritional supplement of the three groups was isonitrogenic and isocaloric. Probiotics was delivered by jejunostomy 10 mL/d (1 × 108 cfu/mL). The rats were killed on the sixth day. The feces in the cecum were cultured for anaerobic bacterial growth and analyzed with bacterial group DNA fingerprint profile with random amplified polymorphic DNA. The transmembrane binding proteins (occludin) and IgA level in plasma cells of intestine epithelium in colon and terminal ileum were measured by an immunohistochemistry method. The ultrastructure of intestinal epithelial tight junctions in colon and small intestine was observed by electronmicroscopy. Vena cava blood and the homogenated tissue of liver, lung and mesenteric lymph nodes were cultured to determine the bacterial translocations, and endotoxin in the blood from portal vein was detected.RESULTS: (1) The amount of bacteria of gut species in EN group and probiotic group was higher than that in PN group. The DNA-profiles in EN group and probiotic group were similar to that of normal rats. The number of DNAprofiles in probiotics group was much more than that in PN group and EN group. Moreover, there were strange stripes in PN group. (2) The expression of occludin and IgA in the small and large intestine in EN group (2.309± 0.336, 15.440 ± 2.383) and probiotic group (2.938 ±0.515, 16.230 ± 3.183) was improved as compared with PN group (1.207 ± 0.587, P < 0.05, 11.189 ± 2.108, P < 0

  9. Relative disease susceptibility and clostridial toxin antibody responses in three commercial broiler lines co-infected with Clostridium perfringens and Eimeria maxima using an experimental model of necrotic enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necrotic enteritis is an enteric disease of poultry resulting from infection by Clostridium perfringens with co-infection by Eimeria spp. constituting a major risk factor for disease pathogenesis. This study compared three commercial broiler chicken lines using an experimental model of necrotic ente...

  10. Fatigue and job stress as predictors for sickness absence during common infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohren, D.C.; Swaen, G.M.H.; Kant, I.J.; Schayck, C.P. van; Galama, J.M.D.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of health and work-related factors as predictors of subsequent sickness absence when experiencing common infections (common cold, flu-like illness, and gastroenteritis). Self-administered questionnaire data were used (baseline n = 12,140). To

  11. Immune mediated crescentic MPGN secondary to HBV infection: A rare presentation for a common infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareddy, Aswani Srinivas; Rangaswamy, Dharshan; Vankalakunti, Mahesha; Attur, Ravindra Prabhu; Nagaraju, Shankar Prasad; Koti, Neeraja

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection presenting as crescentic glomerulonephritis in the absence of cryoglobulinemia is an extremely rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 44-year-old male with HBV infection, who underwent kidney biopsy for rapidly progressive renal failure and nephrotic range proteinuria. Histopathological evaluation of the kidney biopsy was consistent with immune complex mediated crescentic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN). The patient achieved complete renal and virological remission with steroids, plasmapheresis and antiviral therapy. This case report summarises the importance of early initiation of immunosuppression and plasmapheresis under antiviral coverage for improved clinical outcomes.

  12. Immune mediated crescentic MPGN secondary to HBV infection: A rare presentation for a common infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aswani Srinivas Mareddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV infection presenting as crescentic glomerulonephritis in the absence of cryoglobulinemia is an extremely rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 44-year-old male with HBV infection, who underwent kidney biopsy for rapidly progressive renal failure and nephrotic range proteinuria. Histopathological evaluation of the kidney biopsy was consistent with immune complex mediated crescentic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN. The patient achieved complete renal and virological remission with steroids, plasmapheresis and antiviral therapy. This case report summarises the importance of early initiation of immunosuppression and plasmapheresis under antiviral coverage for improved clinical outcomes.

  13. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  14. Complete genome sequences of two novel bipartite begomoviruses infecting common bean in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Sidorchuk, Lidia; González-Alvarez, Heidy; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Martínez-Zubiaur, Yamila

    2017-05-01

    The common bean is a host for a large number of begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) in the New World. Based on the current taxonomic criteria established for the genus Begomovirus, two new members of this genus infecting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Cuba are herein reported. The cloned bipartite genomes, composed of DNA-A and DNA-B, showed the typical organization of the New World begomoviruses. We propose the names common bean severe mosaic virus and common bean mottle virus for the new begomovirus species.

  15. Safety and efficacy of commonly used antimicrobial agents in the treatment of enterococcal infections: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleyman, Geehan; Zervos, Marcus J

    2016-01-01

    Enterococci have become the second leading cause of nosocomial infections in the U.S, which are associated with higher morbidity, mortality, length of stay, and cost due to escalating resistance to several antimicrobial agents. With limited treatment options, the adverse events associated with the increasing use of available agents must be considered. Safety data about the most commonly used antimicrobial agents to treat enterococcal infections (ampicillin, vancomycin, linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline) derived from animal models, clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance are evaluated. However, most of these agents are not FDA approved and have been used for off-label indications in enterococcal infections. The commonly used antimicrobials to treat enterococcal infections have unique safety profiles and side effects but are generally safe and tolerated in the short-term based on data from clinical trials and post-marketing surveillance. However, serious long-term adverse events may occur, and antibiotic selection should be individualized and based on source of infection, duration, potential drug-related toxicity, and drug-drug interactions to minimize side-effects. Implementing standard precautions and infection control measures, minimizing unnecessary antibiotic exposure, and optimizing treatment and duration with removal of source of infection are essential to prevent the spread of resistance and improve outcomes.

  16. Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a Common Cause of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in the Community▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcher, Sidsel; Tønning, Birgitte; Skov, Robert L.; Prag, Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis, a rare cause of severe infections such as native valve endocarditis, often causes superficial skin infections similar to Staphylococcus aureus infections. We initiated a study to optimize the identification methods in the routine laboratory, followed by a population-based epidemiologic analysis of patients infected with S. lugdunensis in Viborg County, Denmark. Recognition of a characteristic Eikenella corrodens-like odor on Columbia sheep blood agar combined with colony pleomorphism and prominent β-hemolysis after 2 days of incubation, confirmed by API-ID-32 Staph, led to an 11-fold increase in the detection of S. lugdunensis. By these methods we found 491 S. lugdunensis infections in 4 years, corresponding to an incidence of 53 per 100,000 per year, an increase from 5 infections per 100,000 inhabitants in the preceding years. Seventy-five percent of the cases were found in general practice; these were dominated by skin abscesses (36%), wound infections (25%), and paronychias (13%). Fifty-six percent of the infections occurred below the waist, and toes were the most frequently infected site (21%). Only 3% of the patients suffered from severe invasive infections. The median age was 52 years, and the male/female ratio was 0.69. Our study shows that S. lugdunensis is a common cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI) and is probably underrated by many laboratories. S. lugdunensis should be accepted as a significant pathogen in SSTI and should be looked for in all routine bacteriological examinations, and clinicians should be acquainted with the name and the pathology of the bacterium. PMID:19244465

  17. Comparative genome analysis of clostridium perfringens isolates from healthy and necrotic enteritis infected poultry and diseased pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronco, Troels; Lyhs, Ulrike; Stegger, Marc;

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Clostridium perfringens causes gastrointestinal diseases in both humans and domestic animals. Type A strains are the main cause of necrotic enteritis (NE) in chickens, which is a significant economic issue in the international poultry industry. The NetB and Cpb2 toxins seem to be im...

  18. Common beans and cowpeas as complementary foods to reduce environmental enteric dysfunction and stunting in Malawian children: Study protocol for two randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interventions to decrease the burden of childhood malnutrition are urgently needed, as millions of children die annually owing to undernutrition and hundreds of millions more are left cognitively and physically stunted. Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), a pervasive chronic subclinical inflamm...

  19. Aflatoxin and Fumonisin in corn (Zea mays) infected by common smut Ustilago maydis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn infected with Ustilago maydis (common smut) produces galls that are valued food in certain cultures, but may be contaminated with mycotoxins. Field studies conducted in Elizabeth, Mississippi used near isogenic Bt and non-Bt corn hybrids. The levels of aflatoxin and fumonisin were determined i...

  20. Systemic Collyriclum faba (Trematoda: Collyriclidae) Infection in a Wild Common Raven ( Corvus corax ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Aslı; Rogers, Krysta; Houston, Robin

    2017-01-01

    A hatch-year Common Raven ( Corvus corax ) with subcutaneous and internal pseudocysts, filled with fluid, containing a pair of adult trematodes and numerous eggs consistent with Collyriclum faba, died near a riverbank in California, US. While C. faba is incidental in many Passeriformes, this case was a fatal systemic infection.

  1. The white morphotype of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is common in infected humans and virulent in infection models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, S; Petrofsky, M; Yaraei, K; Bermudez, L E; Cangelosi, G A

    2001-12-01

    Isolates of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) form multiple colony types named red-opaque, white-opaque, red-transparent (RT), and white-transparent (WT). The newly discovered WT morphotype is multidrug resistant relative to other variants in vitro. To determine whether the WT morphotype occurs in humans, 32 MAI-positive clinical samples from 2 sites were plated directly onto indicator agar without prior passage in vitro. WT was the predominant morphotype in 26 (81%) of these samples and was absent in only 2 samples. WT variants grew better than isogenic RT variants in mouse and human macrophage models of infection, and RT clones that passed through such systems underwent rapid shifts to the WT morphotype. The RT morphotype was heterogeneous with regard to infectivity. In summary, the white morphotype was common in humans and was favored in disease models. It may play an important role in the establishment and persistence of MAI infection.

  2. Detection by molecular hybridization of pap, afa, and sfa adherence systems in Escherichia coli strains associated with urinary and enteral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambaud, M; Courcoux, P; Labigne-Roussel, A

    1988-01-01

    The genetic determinants responsible for the adherence of Escherichia coli to uroepithelial cells have been identified in recent years by genetic and molecular methods. Specific DNA probes for each of the three operons which have been cloned so far (pap, afa, sfa/foc operons) have been used in colony hybridization experiments to detect the presence of each of these operons in the chromosomal DNA of 443 strains of E. coli; 186 strains were from patients with urinary tract infections (pyelonephritis, 106 strains; cystitis, 59; asymptomatic bacteriuria, 21) and 257 were strains from the stools of healthy subjects (61) or from patients with various enteral infections (196). E. coli strains harbouring the pap operon were found more frequently in the urine of patients with pyelonephritis (p less than 0.001) and cystitis (p less than 0.01) than in control stools. The presence of two operons (pap + afa) or (pap + sfa/foc) was only observed in uropathogenic strains (p less than 0.02). Pap and sfa/foc operons were never found in strains causing enteral infection; however, the afa operon was found in 7.6% of the enteropathogenic E. coli.

  3. [Verotoxin as a major laboratory criterion for Escherichia coli O157-induced enteric infection complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome in infants in the Omsk region].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgikh, T I; Kaftyreva, L A; Voĭtovich, M A; Podkolzin, A T; Galileĭskaia, S B; Lazareva, L I

    2010-08-01

    The paper presents the results of etiological interpretation of the outbreak of Escherichia coli O157-induced enteric infection complicated by hemolytic uremic syndrome in Omsk in spring 2009. Seventeen infants aged 5 months to 2.5 years were examined; of them 9 patients were on hemodialysis. The diagnosis was verified in 7 children, by isolating verotoxin after fecal enrichment on the concentrating nutrient RIDA Enrichment Bouillon medium containing bile salts and mitomycin C, E. coli O157:H7 cultures on the sorbitol medium and/or by identifying E. coli O157 DNA. Six (4 having verotoxin) infants were found to have rotavirus and noro-virus antigens or DNA/RNA, which may make a contribution into the development of mixed infection and increase the risk of complications.

  4. Complete genome sequence of bean leaf crumple virus, a novel begomovirus infecting common bean in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Yepes, Monica; Zambrano, Leidy; Bueno, Juan M; Raatz, Bodo; Cuellar, Wilmer J

    2017-02-10

    A copy of the complete genome of a novel bipartite begomovirus infecting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia was obtained by rolling-circle amplification (RCA), cloned, and sequenced. The virus is associated with leaf crumple symptoms and significant yield losses in Andean and Mesoamerican beans. Such symptoms have been reported increasingly in Colombia since at least 2002, and we detected the virus in leaf material collected since 2008. Sequence analysis showed that the virus is a member of a distinct species, sharing 81% and 76% nucleotide (nt) sequence identity (in DNA-A and DNA-B, respectively) to other begomoviruses infecting common bean in the Americas. The data obtained support the taxonomic status of this virus (putatively named 'bean leaf crumple virus', BLCrV) as a member of a novel species in the genus Begomovirus.

  5. Large Foreign Body as a Nidus for a Common Duct Stone in a Patient Without Spontaneous Biliary Enteric Fistula or Previous Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Cetta

    1993-01-01

    duct, in a patient without spontaneous biliary enteric fistula or previous abdominal surgery. A brief comment on the possible origin of the phytobezoar in this case and on the pattern of deposition of brown material over a pre-existent nidus is also presented.

  6. Commonly affected body sites in 92 Japanese combat sports participants with Trichophyton tonsurans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Yumi; Hiruma, Masataro; Hirose, Nobuyoshi; Ikeda, Shigaku

    2009-07-01

    Outbreaks of Trichophyton tonsurans infection constitute one of the serious problems among combat sports practitioners in Japan. To facilitate the diagnosis of individuals at risk, we undertook a study to determine which body sites are most commonly infected. We reviewed medical data, hairbrush culture results and questionnaire information from patients with T. tonsurans infection who were admitted to the dermatology clinic of Juntendo University hospital from 2000 to 2004. The study included 92 patients (87 males), aged 6-38 years (mean age: 18.4 years old). Eighty-nine patients were judo practitioners and three were wrestlers. Twenty-eight patients (30.4%) were asymptomatic carriers. In 64 patients, 51 patients (55.4%) with tinea corporis, 27 patients (29.3%) with tinea capitis, and/or one patient (1.1%) with tinea manuum were seen. Tinea corporis was observed on the forehead, auricles, nape of the neck, bilateral shoulders, left side of the upper chest, both elbows, back of the left hand to the wrist and both knees. Tinea capitis was most common in the occipitonuchal region at the hairline and in the temporal and frontal regions, at both auricles. Initial screening of these sites might facilitate the identification of the infection especially in judo practitioners.

  7. Acute Sinusitis Resulting in a Craniotomy: An Uncommon Complication of a Common Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Price

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial sinusitis is a common infectious condition. Patients may initially present with an uncomplicated infection and later, despite appropriate initial antibiotic therapy, develop a potentially life-threatening complication. Interventions aimed at alleviating such unexpected events need be prompt and adequate. We describe a case of a patient who initially presented with signs and symptoms of acute sinusitis later to be diagnosed with a frontal epidural abscess.

  8. Acute Sinusitis Resulting in a Craniotomy: An Uncommon Complication of a Common Infection

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Acute bacterial sinusitis is a common infectious condition. Patients may initially present with an uncomplicated infection and later, despite appropriate initial antibiotic therapy, develop a potentially life-threatening complication. Interventions aimed at alleviating such unexpected events need be prompt and adequate. We describe a case of a patient who initially presented with signs and symptoms of acute sinusitis later to be diagnosed with a frontal epidural abscess.

  9. Leishmaniases and HIV/AIDS co-infections: review of common features and management experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ahmed

    2002-04-01

    The visceral and the different spectrum of cutaneous leishmaniases have been incriminated to be among the opportunistic infections co-existing with HIV/AIDS. In co-infections, leishmaniases surface in high prevalence, present frequently atypically, pose difficulties to be detected by routine diagnostic tests, most often result in an unfavorable response to treatment, frequent relapses and in premature deaths. Such presentations and management difficulties shall be highlighted in this review. To extract information on the scope of manifestations and responses to management, literature was surveyed utilizing the Pub Med electronic literature search. In due course, pertinent characteristics surfacing in HIV/AIDS and leishmaniasis co-infections comprising of clinical presentations and parasitological and serological findings were tracked. Investigation options, management approaches, outcomes of various treatment regimen and other intervention strategies were as well explored. Visceral leishmaniasis and HIV-1 are both associated with a depression of T cell response and similar disturbances of cytokine networks. The appearance of HIV has led to numerous atypical clinical manifestations of leishmaniasis among immunocompromised patients to include, recurrences, lingual, cervical, esophageal, mucocutaneous and presentations in other unusual sites. The common clinical presentations of the disease might not always be present being masked by other associated opportunistic infections. Spleen aspiration is more sensitive in immuno-competent visceral visceral leishmaniasis suspects, however, bone marrow aspirate remains the safest and the most frequently employed diagnostic technique in co-infected patients. Several species of Leishmania are incriminated in affecting HIV infected subjects, including formerly unknown zymodemes. In spite of the high number of reported cases of HIV-related VL, the treatment of choice, the best dosage and the duration of therapy appear not to be

  10. Eosinofil enteritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjersøe, P; Rasmussen, S N; Hansen, B F

    2000-01-01

    We present a case of eosinophilic enteritis in a 45 year-old male with clinical and radiological signs of stenotic inflammatory ileal disease. A diagnosis of Crohn's disease was considered. He developed small bowel obstruction and sixty cm of obstructed ileum was resected. Histopathological...... examination revealed the diagnosis of eosinophilic enteritis primarily localized to the tunica muscularis. One year postoperatively he relapsed and small bowel X-ray demonstrated 1 m narrow and irregular ileum. He was treated with mesalamine, azathioprine, and cromoglicate, went into remission and fares well...

  11. Vitamin D deficiency is common in HIV-infected southern Australian adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klassen, Karen M; Fairley, Christopher K; Kimlin, Michael G; Hocking, Jane; Kelsall, Liza; Ebeling, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency can have serious health consequences and may be particularly important for those living with HIV. It is unknown whether HIV infection is a risk factor for vitamin D deficiency. The aim of the study was to determine whether vitamin D deficiency is more common in HIV-infected than in HIV-uninfected individuals. This was a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected and uninfected individuals. A total of 997 HIV-infected participants were from a sexual health clinic in Melbourne with 25(OH)D measurements taken between 2008 and 2012. 3,653 HIV-uninfected individuals were participants in a statewide Victorian survey with 25(OH)D measurements taken between 2009 and 2010. Logistic regression models evaluated the association of HIV status with vitamin D deficiency (25[OH]D5 (aOR 1.4; 95% CI 1.2, 1.8; P<0.001) and HIV infection (aOR 1.7; 95% CI 1.4, 2.1; P<0.001) were associated with vitamin D deficiency. Adults living in southern Australia with HIV were more likely to be vitamin D deficient than the general population.

  12. Reprint of 'Association of helminth infections and food consumption in common eiders Somateria mollissima in Iceland'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirnisson, Karl

    2016-07-01

    Common eider Somateria mollissima L. 1758, subsp. borealis, is widely distributed along the coasts of Iceland. In this study association of parasite infections and food composition was studied among 40 females and 38 males (66 adults, 12 subadults), shot under license on four occasions within the same year (February; before egg-laying in May; after the breeding period in late June; and in November) in Skerjafjörður, SW Iceland. Parasitological examinations revealed 31 helminth species (11 digeneans, ten cestodes, seven nematodes, and three acanthocephalans). Distinct digenean species parasitized the gallbladder, kidney and bursa of Fabricius, whereas other helminths parasitized the gastrointestinal tract. Thirty-six invertebrate prey species were identified as food; waste and bread fed by humans, were also consumed by some birds. Amidostomum acutum was the only parasite found with a direct life cycle, whereas other species were food transmitted and ingested with different invertebrate prey. Opposite to females male birds rarely utilized periwinkles and gammarids as a food source. As a result, Microphallus and Microsomacanthus infection intensities were low except in February, when subadult males were responsible for an infection peak. Females caring for young increased their consumption of periwinkles close to the littoral zone in June; during pre-breeding, females also increased their gammarid intake. As a consequence, Microphallus and Microsomacanthus infection intensities temporarily peaked. Increased food intake (including Mytilus edulis) of females before the egg-laying period resulted in twofold higher Gymnophallus bursicola infection intensity than observed for males. Profilicollis botulus infection reflected seasonal changes in decapod consumption in both genders. Different life history strategies of males and females, especially before and during the breeding season and caring of young, and during molting in distinct feeding areas in summer, promote

  13. Association of helminth infections and food consumption in common eiders Somateria mollissima in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirnisson, Karl

    2015-10-01

    Common eider Somateria mollissima L. 1758, subsp. borealis, is widely distributed along the coasts of Iceland. In this study association of parasite infections and food composition was studied among 40 females and 38 males (66 adults, 12 subadults), shot under license on four occasions within the same year (February; before egg-laying in May; after the breeding period in late June; and in November) in Skerjafjörður, SW Iceland. Parasitological examinations revealed 31 helminth species (11 digeneans, ten cestodes, seven nematodes, and three acanthocephalans). Distinct digenean species parasitized the gallbladder, kidney and bursa of Fabricius, whereas other helminths parasitized the gastrointestinal tract. Thirty-six invertebrate prey species were identified as food; waste and bread fed by humans, were also consumed by some birds. Amidostomum acutum was the only parasite found with a direct life cycle, whereas other species were food transmitted and ingested with different invertebrate prey. Opposite to females male birds rarely utilized periwinkles and gammarids as a food source. As a result, Microphallus and Microsomacanthus infection intensities were low except in February, when subadult males were responsible for an infection peak. Females caring for young increased their consumption of periwinkles close to the littoral zone in June; during pre-breeding, females also increased their gammarid intake. As a consequence, Microphallus and Microsomacanthus infection intensities temporarily peaked. Increased food intake (including Mytilus edulis) of females before the egg-laying period resulted in twofold higher Gymnophallus bursicola infection intensity than observed for males. Profilicollis botulus infection reflected seasonal changes in decapod consumption in both genders. Different life history strategies of males and females, especially before and during the breeding season and caring of young, and during molting in distinct feeding areas in summer, promote

  14. Common mental disorders in TB/HIV co-infected patients in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe Gemeda

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- The relationship between TB/HIV co-infection and common mental disorders (CMD has been scarcely investigated. In this study, we compared the occurrence of CMD in TB/HIV co-infected and non-co-infected HIV patients in Ethiopia. Methods- We conducted a cross sectional study in three hospitals in Ethiopia from February to April, 2009. The study population consisted of 155 TB/HIV co-infected and 465 non-co-infected HIV patients. CMD was assessed through face to face interviews by trained clinical nurses using the Kessler 10 scale. Several risk factors for CMD were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Results- TB/HIV co-infected patients had significantly (p = 0.001 greater risk of CMD (63.7% than the non-co-infected patients (46.7%. When adjusted for the effect of potential confounding variables, the odds of having CMD for TB/HIV co-infected individuals was 1.7 times the odds for non-co-infected patients [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.0, 2.9]. Individuals who had no source of income [OR = 1.7, (95%CI: 1.1, 2.8], and day labourers [OR = 2.4, 95%CI: 1.2, 5.1] were more likely to have CMD as compared to individuals who had a source of income and government employees respectively. Patients who perceived stigma [OR = 2.2, 95%CI: 1.5, 3.2] and who rate their general health as "poor" [OR = 10.0, 95%CI: 2.8, 35.1] had significantly greater risk of CMD than individual who did not perceive stigma or who perceived their general health to be "good". Conclusion- TB/HIV control programs should develop guidelines to screen and treat CMD among TB/HIV co-infected patients. Screening programs should focus on individuals with no source of income, jobless people and day labourers.

  15. Two donor-related infections in a heart transplant recipient : One common, the other a tropical surprise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugemann, Johan; Kampinga, Greetje A.; Riezebos-Brilman, Annelies; Stek, Cari J.; Edel, Jan Pieter; van der Bij, Wim; Sprenger, Herman G.; Zijlstra, Felix

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infection is the most frequent complication after heart transplantation (HTx) In this report and brief literature review we present a recipient who some 6 weeks post HTx had two donor related infections a "common' primary cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and simultaneously a highly unusual

  16. Common Infections in Patients Prescribed Systemic Glucocorticoids in Primary Care: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Fardet

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the relative risk of common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections in the general population of individuals exposed to systemic glucocorticoids, or about the impact of glucocorticoid exposure duration and predisposing factors on this risk.The hazard ratios of various common infections were assessed in 275,072 adults prescribed glucocorticoids orally for ≥15 d (women: 57.8%, median age: 63 [interquartile range 48-73] y in comparison to those not prescribed glucocorticoids. For each infection, incidence rate ratios were calculated for five durations of exposure (ranging from 15-30 d to >12 mo, and risk factors were assessed. Data were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN primary care database. When compared to those with the same underlying disease but not exposed to glucocorticoids, the adjusted hazard ratios for infections with significantly higher risk in the glucocorticoid-exposed population ranged from 2.01 (95% CI 1.83-2.19; p < 0.001 for cutaneous cellulitis to 5.84 (95% CI 5.61-6.08; p < 0.001 for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI. There was no difference in the risk of scabies, dermatophytosis and varicella. The relative increase in risk was stable over the durations of exposure, except for LRTI and local candidiasis, for which it was much higher during the first weeks of exposure. The risks of infection increased with age and were higher in those with diabetes, in those prescribed higher glucocorticoid doses, and in those with lower plasma albumin level. Most associations were also dependent on the underlying disease. A sensitivity analysis conducted on all individuals except those with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produced similar results. Another sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of potential unmeasured confounders such as disease severity or concomitant prescription of chemotherapy suggested that it was unlikely that adjusting for these potential

  17. Enteric viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characteristic clinical signs associated with viral enteritis in young poultry include diarrhea, anorexia, litter eating, ruffled feathers, and poor growth. Intestines may have lesions; intestines are typically dilated and are filled with fluid and gaseous contents. The sequela to clinical disease...

  18. Exploiting common targets in human fertilization and HIV infection: development of novel contraceptive microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncel, Gustavo F

    2006-01-01

    The continued high rates of unintended pregnancies and the unrelentless expansion of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic, especially in less developed countries, warrant the development of novel strategies to help individuals avoid these risks. Dually active compounds displaying contraceptive and microbicidal anti-human immunodeficiency virus (anti-HIV) properties constitute one such strategy. Sharing the same anatomical and functional context, sperm fertilization and genital infection by HIV offer an opportunity for simultaneous intervention. Some of the molecules and mechanisms used by sperm to fertilize the oocyte are similar, if not identical, to those used by HIV while infecting host cells. An example of common structures is the lipid membrane surrounding the spermatozoon and the HIV core. Disruption of its architecture by surface-active compounds exerts both spermicidal and virucidal activity. A more specific alteration of lipid rafts [membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins] by beta-cyclodextrins also results in similar effects. During fertilization and infection, both sperm and HIV interact with their target cell receptors through chemical charges, hydrophobic forces and carbohydrate recognition. Anionic polymers such as cellulose sulphate and polystyrene sulphonate (PSS) inhibit sperm and HIV cell binding. Because some of the molecules involved in this interaction, e.g. heparin sulphate proteoglycan, are also used by other pathogens to infect their target tissues, polyanions exert broad antimicrobial activity as well. During fertilization and infection, sperm and HIV, as well as other microbes, use signal transduction molecules and mechanisms such as adenyl cyclase/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent kinase, calcium and tyrosine phosphorylation, whose inhibition has been shown to impair sperm function and HIV replication. These commonalities at the level of sperm

  19. Experimental cross-species infection of common marmosets by titi monkey adenovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixia Yu

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses are DNA viruses that infect a number of vertebrate hosts and are associated with both sporadic and epidemic disease in humans. We previously identified a novel adenovirus, titi monkey adenovirus (TMAdV, as the cause of a fulminant pneumonia outbreak in a colony of titi monkeys (Callicebus cupreus at a national primate center in 2009. Serological evidence of infection by TMAdV was also found in a human researcher at the facility and household family member, raising concerns for potential cross-species transmission of the virus. Here we present experimental evidence of cross-species TMAdV infection in common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus. Nasal inoculation of a cell cultured-adapted TMAdV strain into three marmosets produced an acute, mild respiratory illness characterized by low-grade fever, reduced activity, anorexia, and sneezing. An increase in virus-specific neutralization antibody titers accompanied the development of clinical signs. Although serially collected nasal swabs were positive for TMAdV for at least 8 days, all 3 infected marmosets spontaneously recovered by day 12 post-inoculation, and persistence of the virus in tissues could not be established. Thus, the pathogenesis of experimental inoculation of TMAdV in common marmosets resembled the mild, self-limiting respiratory infection typically seen in immunocompetent human hosts rather than the rapidly progressive, fatal pneumonia observed in 19 of 23 titi monkeys during the prior 2009 outbreak. These findings further establish the potential for adenovirus cross-species transmission and provide the basis for development of a monkey model useful for assessing the zoonotic potential of adenoviruses.

  20. Management of carotid Dacron patch infection: a case report using median sternotomy for proximal common carotid artery control and in situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illuminati, Giulio; Calio', Francesco G; D'Urso, Antonio; Ceccanei, Gianluca; Pacilè, Maria Antonietta

    2009-01-01

    We report on a 58-year-old male who presented with an enlarging cervical hematoma 3 months following carotid endarterectomy with Dacron patch repair, due to septic disruption of the Dacron patch secondary to presumed infection. The essential features of this case are the control of the proximal common carotid artery gained through a median sternotomy, because the patient was markedly obese with minimal thyromental distance, and the treatment consisting of in situ polytetrafluoroethylene bypass grafting, due to the absence of a suitable autogenous saphenous vein. Median sternotomy is rarely required in case of reintervention for septic false aneurysms and hematomas following carotid endarterectomy but should be considered whenever difficult control of the common carotid artery, when entering the previous cervicotomy, is anticipated. In situ polytetrafluoroethylene grafting can be considered if autogenous vein material is lacking.

  1. Severity of bovine tuberculosis is associated with co-infection with common pathogens in wild boar.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Risco

    Full Text Available Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa, a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes, or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs, was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2, Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV, swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures

  2. Severity of Bovine Tuberculosis Is Associated with Co-Infection with Common Pathogens in Wild Boar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risco, David; Serrano, Emmanuel; Fernández-Llario, Pedro; Cuesta, Jesús M.; Gonçalves, Pilar; García-Jiménez, Waldo L.; Martínez, Remigio; Cerrato, Rosario; Velarde, Roser; Gómez, Luis; Segalés, Joaquím; Hermoso de Mendoza, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Co-infections with parasites or viruses drive tuberculosis dynamics in humans, but little is known about their effects in other non-human hosts. This work aims to investigate the relationship between Mycobacterium bovis infection and other pathogens in wild boar (Sus scrofa), a recognized reservoir of bovine tuberculosis (bTB) in Mediterranean ecosystems. For this purpose, it has been assessed whether contacts with common concomitant pathogens are associated with the development of severe bTB lesions in 165 wild boar from mid-western Spain. The presence of bTB lesions affecting only one anatomic location (cervical lymph nodes), or more severe patterns affecting more than one location (mainly cervical lymph nodes and lungs), was assessed in infected animals. In addition, the existence of contacts with other pathogens such as porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), swine influenza virus, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, Haemophilus parasuis and Metastrongylus spp, was evaluated by means of serological, microbiological and parasitological techniques. The existence of contacts with a structured community of pathogens in wild boar infected by M. bovis was statistically investigated by null models. Association between this community of pathogens and bTB severity was examined using a Partial Least Squares regression approach. Results showed that adult wild boar infected by M. bovis had contacted with some specific, non-random pathogen combinations. Contact with PCV2, ADV and infection by Metastrongylus spp, was positively correlated to tuberculosis severity. Therefore, measures against these concomitant pathogens such as vaccination or deworming, might be useful in tuberculosis control programmes in the wild boar. However, given the unexpected consequences of altering any community of organisms, further research should evaluate the impact of such measures under

  3. Evaluating Common Humoral Responses against Fungal Infections with Yeast Protein Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Paulo S R; Im, Hogune; Clemons, Karl V; Snyder, Michael P; Stevens, David A

    2015-09-04

    We profiled the global immunoglobulin response against fungal infection by using yeast protein microarrays. Groups of CD-1 mice were infected systemically with human fungal pathogens (Coccidioides posadasii, Candida albicans, or Paracoccidioides brasiliensis) or inoculated with PBS as a control. Another group was inoculated with heat-killed yeast (HKY) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After 30 days, serum from mice in the groups were collected and used to probe S. cerevisiae protein microarrays containing 4800 full-length glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fusion proteins. Antimouse IgG conjugated with Alexafluor 555 and anti-GST antibody conjugated with Alexafluor 647 were used to detect antibody-antigen interactions and the presence of GST-fusion proteins, respectively. Serum after infection with C. albicans reacted with 121 proteins: C. posadasii, 81; P. brasiliensis, 67; and after HKY, 63 proteins on the yeast protein microarray, respectively. We identified a set of 16 antigenic proteins that were shared across the three fungal pathogens. These include retrotransposon capsid proteins, heat shock proteins, and mitochondrial proteins. Five of these proteins were identified in our previous study of fungal cell wall by mass spectrometry (Ann. N. Y. Acad. Sci. 2012, 1273, 44-51). The results obtained give a comprehensive view of the immunological responses to fungal infections at the proteomic level. They also offer insight into immunoreactive protein commonality among several fungal pathogens and provide a basis for a panfungal vaccine.

  4. A common-source outbreak of Staphylococcus epidermidis infections among patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, J M; Potter-Bynoe, G; Opal, S M; Dziobek, L; Medeiros, A A

    1990-03-01

    A single strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis caused an outbreak of postoperative wound infections and endocarditis during a 6-month period. Infections caused by the epidemic strain developed more frequently in valve surgery patients than in those undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery (P = .03) and occurred only in patients operated on by surgeon A. None of 17 members of the cardiac surgery team carried the epidemic strain in their anterior nares, axillae, or inguinal folds. Hand cultures were performed on 8 surgical personnel, and only surgeon A carried the epidemic strain on his hands. Isolates from cardiac surgery patients, bypass pump blood cultures, and the hands of the implicated surgeon all had identical antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, plasmid profiles, and EcoRI restriction endonuclease digest patterns. In the 24 months after control measures were implemented, no infections caused by the epidemic strain occurred among open heart surgery patients. The findings suggest that the common-source outbreak of infections among cardiac surgery patients was due to carriage of a strain S. epidermidis on the hands of a cardiac surgeon.

  5. A comparison of self-reported joint symptoms following infection with different enteric pathogens: effect of HLA-B27

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiellerup, P.; Krogfelt, K.A.; Locht, H.

    2008-01-01

    with positive fecal culture for Salmonella, Campylobacter, Yersinia, Shigella, and E. coli were addressed by questionnaires inquiring about gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms and the occurrence of joint pain in a previously healthy joint within 4 weeks after onset of infection. A blood sample was requested for HLA......-B27 typing. RESULTS: Of 3146 patients invited, 2105 (67%) responded to the survey questionnaire. The triggering infections were Campylobacter, 1003; Salmonella, 619; E. coli, 290; Shigella, 102; and Yersinia, 91. JPrea was reported by 294 subjects: Campylobacter, 131 (13.1%); Salmonella, 104 (16.......8%); Yersinia, 21 (23.1%); Shigella, 10 (9.8%); and E. coli, 28 (9.7%). There was a significant association between severity of gastroenteritis and development of arthralgia (p = 0.001). The odds ratio (OR) for JPrea in an HLA-B27-positive individual was 2.62 (95% CI 1.67-3.93) for the entire group...

  6. Effects of Helicobacter pylori infection on common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yuling

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo study the relationship between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori infection and common lethal factors for hepatitis B virus-related cirrhosis (HBC. MethodsA total of 235 patients with HBC who were admitted to our hospitals from October 2008 to October 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The infection rate of H. pylori in those patients was calculated. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices and 97 patients with portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG, the infection rate of H. pylori was compared between those with different degrees of esophagogastric varices or PHG. In the 32 patients whose blood ammonia was determined, the level of blood ammonia was compared between H. pylori-positive and -negative groups. Between-group comparison of continuous data was performed by t test and analysis of variance, and between-group comparison of categorical data was performed by χ2 test. ResultsThe infection rate of H. pylori in the 235 patients with HBC was 80.85% (190/235. In the 155 patients with esophagogastric varices, who had tortuous serpentine uplift or bead-like changes of esophageal varices and tumor-like changes (with or without gastric erosion of gastric varices visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild, moderate, and severe varices (50.55% (46/91 vs 43.59% (17/39 vs 76% (19/25, χ2=6.913, P<0.05. In the 97 patients with PHG, who had snake skin-like changes, cherry red spots, scarlet rash, and erosion bleeding of gastric mucosa visible under endoscopy, there was significant difference in infection rate of H. pylori between patients with mild and severe PHG (43.33% (26/60 vs 67.57% (25/37, χ2=5.391, P<005.In patients whose blood ammonia was determined, patients in H. pylori-positive group had a significantly higher average concentration of blood ammonia than those in H. pylori-negative group (62.76±13.43 vs 47.20±12.51 μmol/L, t= 3.39, P<0

  7. Triple infection with agamid adenovirus 1, Encephaliton cuniculi-like microsporidium and enteric coccidia in a bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilliger, Lionel; Mentré, Véronique; Marschang, Rachel E; Nicolier, Alexandra; Richter, Barbara

    2016-10-12

    A 2-month-old juvenile central bearded dragon was presented for anorexia and cachexia. Another specimen from the same cage had died suddenly 2 weeks prior. Fecal analysis revealed a high quantity of Isospora amphiboluri and a few pinworm eggs. Other examinations were not performed and the animal died a few days later despite supportive care. A third individual from the same cage presented with anorexia and a distended cœlom and was euthanized. In this third dragon, histological examination revealed intestinal coccidiosis, basophilic intranuclear inclusions compatible with adenovirus infection, acute hepatic necrosis with intrahepatocytic and intraenteritic organisms typical of microsporidia and renal gout. A PCR confirmed the diagnosis of adenovirosis. Sequencing showed that the PCR product was 100% identical to the corresponding portion of the agamid adenovirus 1 genome. A PCR for the detection of Encephalitozoon (E.) cuniculi was positive. Partial sequencing revealed 100% identity to an E. cuniculi-like organism previously found in bearded dragons. In cases where environmental factors such as poor hygiene or stress can be excluded, the presence of opportunistic pathogens in high numbers can be due to a systemic (viral) infection with temporary immunosuppression.

  8. Experimental respiratory Marburg virus haemorrhagic fever infection in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smither, Sophie J; Nelson, Michelle; Eastaugh, Lin; Laws, Thomas R; Taylor, Christopher; Smith, Simon A; Salguero, Francisco J; Lever, Mark S

    2013-04-01

    Marburg virus causes a highly infectious and lethal haemorrhagic fever in primates and may be exploited as a potential biothreat pathogen. To combat the infection and threat of Marburg haemorrhagic fever, there is a need to develop and license appropriate medical countermeasures. To determine whether the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) would be an appropriate model to assess therapies against Marburg haemorrhagic fever, initial susceptibility, lethality and pathogenesis studies were performed. Low doses of virus, between 4 and 28 TCID50 , were sufficient to cause a lethal, reproducible infection. Animals became febrile between days 5 and 6, maintaining a high fever before succumbing to disease between 8 and 11 days postchallenge. Typical signs of Marburg virus infection were observed including haemorrhaging and a transient rash. In pathogenesis studies, virus was isolated from the animals' lungs from day 3 postchallenge and from the liver, spleen and blood from day 5 postchallenge. Early signs of histopathology were apparent in the kidney and liver from day 3. The most striking features were observed in animals exhibiting severe clinical signs, which included high viral titres in all organs, with the highest levels in the blood, increased levels in liver function enzymes and blood clotting times, decreased levels in platelets, multifocal moderate-to-severe hepatitis and perivascular oedema.

  9. Chorioretinal scars and visual deprivation are common in children with cochlear implants after congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teär Fahnehjelm, Kristina; Olsson, Monica; Fahnehjelm, Cecilia; Lewensohn-Fuchs, Ilona; Karltorp, Eva

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare visual function and ocular characteristics in children with cochlear implants, due to severe hearing impairment caused by the congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, with control children fitted with cochlear implants due to connexin 26 mutations (Cx26), a genetic cause of hearing impairment. We carried out ophthalmological assessments, including visual acuity, ocular alignment, Ocular Motor Score, biomicroscopy and fundus photography, on 26 children with congenital CMV (median age 8.3 years, range 1.4-16.7) and 13 Cx26 controls (median age 5.6 years, range 1.7-12.5). We found unilateral chorioretinal macular scars that reduced best-corrected visual acuity ≤0.3 in five (19%) of the children with congenital CMV, but in none of the children with Cx26 (p = 0.15). Ocular motility problems were more common among children with congenital CMV, but the difference was not significant (p = 0.20). The vestibulo-ocular reflex was more frequently pathological in children with congenital CMV (p = 0.011). Ocular complications with central chorioretinal scars and ocular motility disturbances were common in children treated with cochlear implants due to severe hearing impairment caused by the congenital CMV infection. Ophthalmological assessments are advisable in such children for early identification, intervention and follow-up. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Common Infections in Patients Prescribed Systemic Glucocorticoids in Primary Care: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fardet, Laurence; Petersen, Irene; Nazareth, Irwin

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the relative risk of common bacterial, viral, fungal, and parasitic infections in the general population of individuals exposed to systemic glucocorticoids, or about the impact of glucocorticoid exposure duration and predisposing factors on this risk. Methods and Findings The hazard ratios of various common infections were assessed in 275,072 adults prescribed glucocorticoids orally for ≥15 d (women: 57.8%, median age: 63 [interquartile range 48–73] y) in comparison to those not prescribed glucocorticoids. For each infection, incidence rate ratios were calculated for five durations of exposure (ranging from 15–30 d to >12 mo), and risk factors were assessed. Data were extracted from The Health Improvement Network (THIN) primary care database. When compared to those with the same underlying disease but not exposed to glucocorticoids, the adjusted hazard ratios for infections with significantly higher risk in the glucocorticoid-exposed population ranged from 2.01 (95% CI 1.83–2.19; p < 0.001) for cutaneous cellulitis to 5.84 (95% CI 5.61–6.08; p < 0.001) for lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). There was no difference in the risk of scabies, dermatophytosis and varicella. The relative increase in risk was stable over the durations of exposure, except for LRTI and local candidiasis, for which it was much higher during the first weeks of exposure. The risks of infection increased with age and were higher in those with diabetes, in those prescribed higher glucocorticoid doses, and in those with lower plasma albumin level. Most associations were also dependent on the underlying disease. A sensitivity analysis conducted on all individuals except those with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease produced similar results. Another sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of potential unmeasured confounders such as disease severity or concomitant prescription of chemotherapy suggested that it was unlikely that

  11. Differential virulence and disease progression following Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Laura E; Weiner, Danielle M; Schimel, Daniel; Lin, Philana Ling; Dayao, Emmanuel; Tankersley, Sarah L; Cai, Ying; Coleman, M Teresa; Tomko, Jaime; Paripati, Praveen; Orandle, Marlene; Kastenmayer, Robin J; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Portevin, Damien; Eum, Seok Yong; Lahouar, Saher; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B; Flynn, Joanne L; Barry, Clifton E

    2013-08-01

    Existing small-animal models of tuberculosis (TB) rarely develop cavitary disease, limiting their value for assessing the biology and dynamics of this highly important feature of human disease. To develop a smaller primate model with pathology similar to that seen in humans, we experimentally infected the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with diverse strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis of various pathogenic potentials. These included recent isolates of the modern Beijing lineage, the Euro-American X lineage, and M. africanum. All three strains produced fulminant disease in this animal with a spectrum of progression rates and clinical sequelae that could be monitored in real time using 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Lesion pathology at sacrifice revealed the entire spectrum of lesions observed in human TB patients. The three strains produced different rates of progression to disease, various extents of extrapulmonary dissemination, and various degrees of cavitation. The majority of live births in this species are twins, and comparison of results from siblings with different infecting strains allowed us to establish that the infection was highly reproducible and that the differential virulence of strains was not simply host variation. Quantitative assessment of disease burden by FDG-PET/CT provided an accurate reflection of the pathology findings at necropsy. These results suggest that the marmoset offers an attractive small-animal model of human disease that recapitulates both the complex pathology and spectrum of disease observed in humans infected with various M. tuberculosis strain clades.

  12. Differential Virulence and Disease Progression following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Infection of the Common Marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Via, Laura E.; Weiner, Danielle M.; Schimel, Daniel; Lin, Philana Ling; Dayao, Emmanuel; Tankersley, Sarah L.; Cai, Ying; Coleman, M. Teresa; Tomko, Jaime; Paripati, Praveen; Orandle, Marlene; Kastenmayer, Robin J.; Tartakovsky, Michael; Rosenthal, Alexander; Portevin, Damien; Eum, Seok Yong; Lahouar, Saher; Gagneux, Sebastien; Young, Douglas B.; Flynn, JoAnne L.

    2013-01-01

    Existing small-animal models of tuberculosis (TB) rarely develop cavitary disease, limiting their value for assessing the biology and dynamics of this highly important feature of human disease. To develop a smaller primate model with pathology similar to that seen in humans, we experimentally infected the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) with diverse strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis of various pathogenic potentials. These included recent isolates of the modern Beijing lineage, the Euro-American X lineage, and M. africanum. All three strains produced fulminant disease in this animal with a spectrum of progression rates and clinical sequelae that could be monitored in real time using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT). Lesion pathology at sacrifice revealed the entire spectrum of lesions observed in human TB patients. The three strains produced different rates of progression to disease, various extents of extrapulmonary dissemination, and various degrees of cavitation. The majority of live births in this species are twins, and comparison of results from siblings with different infecting strains allowed us to establish that the infection was highly reproducible and that the differential virulence of strains was not simply host variation. Quantitative assessment of disease burden by FDG-PET/CT provided an accurate reflection of the pathology findings at necropsy. These results suggest that the marmoset offers an attractive small-animal model of human disease that recapitulates both the complex pathology and spectrum of disease observed in humans infected with various M. tuberculosis strain clades. PMID:23716617

  13. A Dog with Multiple Infections of Enteric Parasitic Zoonosis in Mashhad City, North-East of Iran; a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohaghegh M.A. PhD,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: In this study, we examined stool specimen from a 3-year-old domesticated dog, which was referred to a veterinary clinic with clinical signs such as nausea or vomiting, dysentery, cachexia and rash in Mashhad city, northeast of Iran. Patient & Methods: A 3-year-old pet dog was referred to veterinary clinic of Mashhad in February 2016 by symptoms including, nausea or vomiting, dysentery, cachexia and rash in Mashhad City, Northeast of Iran. For parasitological examination, formalin-ether concentration technique was used. Fecal smears were made from the sediment, stained with iodine and observed by light microscope. Modified Ziehl Neelsen method was used for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. Findings: The animal was infected with 10 disease-causing parasites; Taenia spp., Fasciola spp., Dicrocoelium dendriticum, Acanthocephal spp., Trichuris vulpis, Hook worm, Giardia spp., Blastocystis spp., Eimeria spp., and Cystoisospora spp. Conclusion: Domestic and stray dog could be an important sources for distribution of zoonoses disease especially parasitic agents.

  14. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila França Campos

    Full Text Available We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group. Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We

  15. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Tripanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duz, Ana Luiza Cassin; Cartelle, Christiane Teixeira; Noviello, Maria de Lourdes; Veloso, Vanja Maria; Bahia, Maria Terezinha; Almeida-Leite, Camila Megale; Arantes, Rosa Maria Esteves

    2016-01-01

    We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group) and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group). Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months) pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We hypothesize that the long

  16. Influence of brown stink bug feeding, planting date and sampling time on common smut infection of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytopathogen infections are frequently influenced by both biotic and abiotic factors in a crop field. The effect of brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae), feeding and planting date and sampling time on common smut (Ustilago maydis) infection percentage of maize plants was exa...

  17. Avian pox virus infection in a common barn owl (Tyto alba in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto D. Vargas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available A young common barn owl (Tyto alba was referred to the Núcleo de Reabilitação da Fauna Silvestre (Nurfs, Federal University of Pelotas (UFPel, after been found in a barn of a brick factory in the urban area of Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The bird was apathic, weak and with crusty lesions in the featherless areas (eyes, beak, legs, and died soon after arrival at Nurfs. Necropsy and histopathological examination of the lesions were carried out. The hyperplasia and hypertrophy of the cutaneous lesions, several eosinophilic intracyto-plasmic inclusion bodies in epithelial cells (Bollinger bodies, as well as particles characteristic of poxvirus, observed by electronic microscopy, confirmed the infection by avian poxvirus, what highlights the importance of Tyto alba as carrier of the virus in the wild.

  18. Antimicrobial activity of Arctium lappa constituents against microorganisms commonly found in endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Juliana Vianna; Bergamo, Débora Cristina Baldoqui; Pereira, José Odair; França, Suzelei de Castro; Pietro, Rosemeire Cristina Linhares Rodrigues; Silva-Sousa, Yara T Corrêa

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated in vitro the antimicrobial activity of rough extracts from leaves of Arctium lappa and their phases. The following microorganisms, commonly found in the oral cavity, specifically in endodontic infections, were used: Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans. The agar-diffusion method allowed detection of the hexanic phase as an inhibitor of microbial growth. Bioautographic assays identified antimicrobial substances in the extract. The results showed the existence, in the rough hexanic phase and in its fractions, of constituents that have retention factors (Rf) in three distinct zones, thereby suggesting the presence of active constituents with chemical structures of different polarities that exhibited specificity against the target microorganisms. It may be concluded that the Arctium lappa constituents exhibited a great microbial inhibition potential against the tested endodontic pathogens.

  19. Diagnosis and Treatment of Trichospirura leptostoma Infection in Common Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, James V.; Clapp, Neal K.; Carson, Robert L.; Henke, Marsha A.; McCracken, Malcolm D.; Faulkner, Charles T.; Patton, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Trichospirura leptostoma is a spirurid nematode that inhabits the pancreatic ducts of the common marmoset, Callithrix jacchus, and other New World primates. This parasite was diagnosed in members of this species at the Marmoset Research Center in Oak Ridge, Tennessee colony after their importation from multiple colonies outside the United States. Animals with few parasites in the pancreas had few tissue changes, whereas those with many parasites had moderate to severe fibrosis replacing exocrine tissue. Trichospirura leptostoma can cause chronic pancreatitis, resulting in subclinical to clinical pancreatic insufficiency and secondary malnutrition. Clinical signs of pancreatic insufficiency in affected marmosets included weight loss (despite good appetite) and increased fecal volume. Because earlier reports did not mention treatments, experimental therapeutic regimens were attempted to eliminate infections from the marmosets. In the clinical studies, different doses and treatment periods with ivermectin and fenbendazole were evaluated for therapeutic efficacy. Fenbendazole given daily at a dosage of 50 mg/kg of body weight by gavage for 14 days was the most effective treatment (PI 0.052). Control of the cockroach vector, as well as treatment of infected animals, is needed to prevent Trichospirura leptostoma-induced disease.

  20. A case of reactive arthritis after Salmonella enteritis in a 12-year-old boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Chun

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis comprises a subgroup within infection-associated arthritides in genetically susceptible hosts. Researchers and clinicians recognize two clinical forms of reactive arthritis which occurs after genitourinary tract infection and after gastrointestinal tract infection. Chlamydia infection has been implicated as the most common agent associated with post-venereal reactive arthritis. Studies have proposed Shigella infection, Salmonella infection, or Yersinia infection as the microorganisms responsible for the post-dysenteric form. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA-B27 antigen is the best-known predisposing factor. We report a case of HLA-B27-associated reactive arthritis after Salmonella enteritis at Pusan National University hospital.

  1. Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Does My Child Need? How to Safely Give Acetaminophen Is It a Cold or the Flu? Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family? Too Late for the Flu Vaccine? Common Childhood Infections Can Chronic Ear Infections Cause Long-Term Hearing Loss? Chickenpox Cold Sores Common Cold Diarrhea Fever and ...

  2. Prevalence of Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections among men and women entering the National Job Training Program--United States, 2004-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Heather; Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    National notifiable disease data indicate that there were 99 cases of gonorrhea for every 100,000 persons in the United States in 2009, the lowest recorded gonorrhea rate in US history. However, the extent to which declining case reports signify a reduction in prevalence is unknown. Gonorrhea prevalence was estimated among 16- to 24-year-old men and women entering the National Job Training Program (NJTP) between 2004 and 2009. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the probability of testing positive for gonorrhea over time. A total of 95,184 men and 91,697 women were screened for gonorrhea upon entry to the NJTP between 2004 and 2009. For women, gonorrhea prevalence increased from 2004 (2.6%) to 2006 (2.9%), then decreased steadily through 2009 (1.8%). For men, prevalence increased from 2004 (1.3%) to 2005 (1.6%), then decreased through 2009 (0.9%). Gonorrhea prevalence among black women decreased from 3.6% in 2004 to 2.5% in 2009 and was 2 to 4 times higher than prevalence among white women. Likewise, prevalence among black men decreased from 2.0% to 1.5% and was 8 to 22 times higher than prevalence among white men. After adjusting for gonorrhea risk factors, the odds of women and men testing positive for gonorrhea decreased by 50% and 40%, respectively, from 2004 to 2009. Declining trends in gonorrhea infection among NJTP entrants are similar to those observed in gonorrhea case report data, suggesting that the decrease in case reports is due to a decrease in prevalence. However, targeted interventions are needed to reduce gonorrhea infections in populations with disproportionate risk.

  3. The etiology, risk factors, and interactions of enteric infections and malnutrition and the consequences for child health and development study (MAL-ED): description of the Tanzanian site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mduma, Estomih R; Gratz, Jean; Patil, Crystal; Matson, Kristine; Dakay, Mary; Liu, Sarah; Pascal, John; McQuillin, Lauren; Mighay, Emmanuel; Hinken, Elizabeth; Ernst, Alexandra; Amour, Caroline; Mvungi, Regisiana; Bayyo, Eliwaza; Zakaria, Yeconia; Kivuyo, Sokoine; Houpt, Eric R; Svensen, Erling

    2014-11-01

    The Haydom, Tanzania, site (TZH) of The Etiology, Risk Factors and Interactions of Enteric Infections and Malnutrition and the Consequences for Child Health and Development (MAL-ED) Study is in north-central Tanzania, 300 km from the nearest urban center. TZH is in a remote rural district where most of the population are agropastoralists and grow maize as the staple food. The average household size is 7. The average woman achieves a parity of 6 and has 1 child death. Socioeconomic indicators are poor, with essentially no household having access to electricity, piped water, or improved sanitary facilities (compared with 14%, 7%, and 12%, respectively, reported nationally). The Demographic Health Survey Tanzania 2004 indicated that the region had high rates of stunting and underweight (40% and 31% of children aged <5 years had a height-for-age z score and weight-for-age z score, respectively, of <-2 ) and an under-5 child mortality rate of 5.8%. Human immunodeficiency virus prevalence among 18-month-old children is <0.5%. TZH represents a remote rural African population with profound poverty and malnutrition, but a strong community-based research infrastructure.

  4. Enteric parasites in HIV-1/AIDS-infected patients from a Northwestern São Paulo reference unit in the highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ventura Cardoso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We describe the epidemiology of intestinal parasites in patients from an AIDS reference service in Northeastern São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: Retrospective evaluation was done for all HIV-1/AIDS-positive patients whose Hospital de Base/São José do Rio Preto laboratorial analysis was positive for enteroparasites after diagnosis of HIV-1 infection, from January 1998 to December 2008. Statistical analysis was performed using the R statistical software version 2.4.1. The level of significance adopted was 5%. RESULTS: The most frequent protozoan was Isospora belli (4.2%, followed by Giardia lamblia (3.5%, Entamoeba coli (2.8%, and Cryptosporidium parvum (0.3%. Ancylostoma duodenale (1.4% was the most frequently detected helminth, while Taenia saginata and Strongiloides stercoralis were found in 0.7% of the samples. The results showed that diarrhea was significantly associated with giardiasis and isosporiasis. However, no association was observed between CD4+ cell counts, viral load, and the characteristics of any particular parasite. CONCLUSIONS: Our data may be useful for further comparisons with other Brazilian regions and other developing countries. The data may also provide important clues toward improving the understanding, prevention, and control of enteric parasites around the world.

  5. How often do general practitioners prescribe antibiotics for otitis media and the most common respiratory tract infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jørund Straand

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTObjective:  Design:  Setting:  Material:  Results:  Conclusion:  Key words:  Antibiotics, general practice, diagnoses, respiratory tract infections, otitis media, pharmacoepidemiologyExcept for upper respiratory tract infection, antibiotic treatment is the rule not an exception, forall the diagnoses studied. In general practice, improved communication- and prescribing-skills are probablyessentials for implementing a more evidence based treatment of otitis media, and the common respiratorytract infections. The significance of patient related factors for seeing a GP (or not and for (not expectingantibiotics for otitis media and the common respiratory tract infections should be explored in future research.Antibiotics were issued during 57% of all contacts for the included diagnoses, ranging from 22%(upper respiratory tract infection to 91% (tonsillitis. All patients who had first time office consultations fortonsillitis, acute bronchitis and pneumonia, were prescribed antibiotics. One out of three patients who consultedthe doctor on the telephone for these diagnoses, were also prescribed an antibiotic.8610 physician-patient contacts, and 4909 antibiotic prescriptions for otitis media, upper respiratorytract infection, tonsillitis, sinusitis, acute bronchitis, and pneumonia.Cross sectional, multipractice study.GPs in the Norwegian county of Møre & Romsdal. Data were recorded during two months.To examine how frequently general practitioners actually prescribe antibiotics for patientscontacting them for otitis media, and the most common respiratory tract infection diagnoses, – by the type ofdoctor-patient contact during prescribing, and patients' age and sex.

  6. Comparative antimicrobial efficacy of selected root canal irrigants on commonly isolated microorganisms in endodontic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Sandeep; Saha, Suparna Ganguly; Rajkumar, Balakrishnan; Dhole, Tapan Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of three selected root canal irrigants (BioPure MTAD, metronidazole, aztreonam) against microbes commonly isolated from polymicrobial microbiota of root canal infection. This study was designed with four experimental groups (Group I - Bacteroides fragilis, Group II - Propionibacterium acnes, Group III - Enterococcus faecalis, Group IV - Candida albicans) based on the microbes selected for the study. Group I and Group II bacteria were used to compare and evaluate antimicrobial effect of BioPure MTAD, metronidazole, aztreonam, and normal saline. Group III and Group IV bacteria were used to compare and evaluate antimicrobial efficacy of BioPure MTAD, aztreonam, and normal saline. Normal saline was used as a control irrigant in this study. Agar disc diffusion method was applied to assess and compare the antimicrobial action of selected irrigants. Metronidazole was found to be the most effective root canal irrigant against B. fragilis and P. acnes among the tested irrigants. Mean zone of inhibition against E. faecalis has been shown to be maximum by BioPure MTAD, followed by aztreonam. Antifungal effect against C. albicans was only shown by BioPure MTAD. Overall, BioPure MTAD is the most effective root canal irrigant as it has shown an antibacterial effect against all the tested microorganisms. However, metronidazole showed maximum antibacterial effect against obligate anaerobes. Aztreonam also showed an antibacterial effect in the present study, raising its possibility to be used as a root canal irrigant in the future.

  7. Identification of an astrovirus commonly infecting laboratory mice in the US and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Kondov, Nikola O; Hayashimoto, Nobuhito; Uchida, Ritsuki; Cha, Yunhee; Beyer, Ashley I; Wong, Walt; Pesavento, Patricia A; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Muench, Marcus O; Delwart, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Mice (Mus musculus) are the most commonly used laboratory animals. Viral metagenomics on tissues of immunodeficient mice revealed sequences of a novel mammalian astrovirus. Using PCR, we screened mice from 4 breeders, 4 pharmaceutical companies, 14 research institutes and 30 universities in the US and Japan. Mice from one US breeder tested positive while none from Japanese breeders were positive for MuAstV. Mice in over half of the universities (19/30), institutes (7/14) and pharmaceutical animal facilities (2/4) investigated revealed the presence of MuAstV. Nine mice strains tested positive including both immunodeficient strains (NSG, NOD-SCID, NSG-3GS, C57BL6-Timp-3 (-/-), and uPA-NOG) and immunocompetent strains (B6J, ICR, Bash2, BALB/c). Our data indicates that MuAstV has a wide geographical, institutional and host strain distribution. Comparison of the MuAstV RdRp sequences showed numerous mutations indicating ongoing viral divergence in different facilities. This study demonstrates the need for metagenomic screening of laboratory animals to identify adventitious infections that may affect experimental outcomes.

  8. Identification of an astrovirus commonly infecting laboratory mice in the US and Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Fei Fan Ng

    Full Text Available Mice (Mus musculus are the most commonly used laboratory animals. Viral metagenomics on tissues of immunodeficient mice revealed sequences of a novel mammalian astrovirus. Using PCR, we screened mice from 4 breeders, 4 pharmaceutical companies, 14 research institutes and 30 universities in the US and Japan. Mice from one US breeder tested positive while none from Japanese breeders were positive for MuAstV. Mice in over half of the universities (19/30, institutes (7/14 and pharmaceutical animal facilities (2/4 investigated revealed the presence of MuAstV. Nine mice strains tested positive including both immunodeficient strains (NSG, NOD-SCID, NSG-3GS, C57BL6-Timp-3 (-/-, and uPA-NOG and immunocompetent strains (B6J, ICR, Bash2, BALB/c. Our data indicates that MuAstV has a wide geographical, institutional and host strain distribution. Comparison of the MuAstV RdRp sequences showed numerous mutations indicating ongoing viral divergence in different facilities. This study demonstrates the need for metagenomic screening of laboratory animals to identify adventitious infections that may affect experimental outcomes.

  9. The application of loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detection of common pathogenic bacteria in lower respiratory tract infections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈愉生

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the spectrum of common pathogenic bacteria of low respiratory tract infection by loop-mediated isothermal amplification(LAMP)of nucleic acid test and to prove the clinical significance of this method.Methods A total of 289 qualified sputum samples from patients with lower respiratory tract infections in Fujian Province were detected by LAMP technique,and then the distribution of pathogenic bacteria was analyzed.The positive cases(the patients whose specific3

  10. Constraints on Viral Evolution during Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection Arising from a Common-Source Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Justin R.; Laskey, Sarah; Wasilewski, Lisa N.; Munshaw, Supriya; Fanning, Liam J.; Kenny-Walsh, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Extraordinary viral sequence diversity and rapid viral genetic evolution are hallmarks of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Viral sequence evolution has previously been shown to mediate escape from cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) and neutralizing antibody responses in acute HCV infection. HCV evolution continues during chronic infection, but the pressures driving these changes are poorly defined. We analyzed plasma virus sequence evolution in 5.2-kb hemigenomes from multiple longitudinal time points isolated from individuals in the Irish anti-D cohort, who were infected with HCV from a common source in 1977 to 1978. We found phylogenetically distinct quasispecies populations at different plasma time points isolated late in chronic infection, suggesting ongoing viral evolution and quasispecies replacement over time. We saw evidence of early pressure driving net evolution away from a computationally reconstructed common ancestor, known as Bole1b, in predicted CTL epitopes and E1E2, with balanced evolution toward and away from the Bole1b amino acid sequence in the remainder of the genome. Late in chronic infection, the rate of evolution toward the Bole1b sequence increased, resulting in net neutral evolution relative to Bole1b across the entire 5.2-kb hemigenome. Surprisingly, even late in chronic infection, net amino acid evolution away from the infecting inoculum sequence still could be observed. These data suggest that, late in chronic infection, ongoing HCV evolution is not random genetic drift but rather the product of strong pressure toward a common ancestor and concurrent net ongoing evolution away from the inoculum virus sequence, likely balancing replicative fitness and ongoing immune escape. PMID:22973048

  11. Incidence of common opportunistic infections in HIV-infected individuals in Pune, India: analysis by stages of immunosuppression represented by CD4 counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghate, Manisha; Deshpande, Swapna; Tripathy, Srikanth; Nene, Madhura; Gedam, Preeti; Godbole, Sheela; Thakar, Madhuri; Risbud, Arun; Bollinger, Robert; Mehendale, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    Opportunistic infections (OIs) influence the morbidity and mortality due to HIV infections. Data from India on the incidence of OIs among HIV-infected individuals by stages of immunodeficiency are scarce. Between September 2002 and November 2004, HIV-infected individuals were enrolled in a prospective study in Pune. They were clinically and immunologically evaluated quarterly. Incidence rates of specific OIs were calculated. Median CD4 counts in HIV-infected male and female patients at baseline were 197/mm(3) and 413/mm(3), respectively. Tuberculosis was the most common OI with an incidence of 15.4 (95% CI 12.2-19.2) per 100 person-years, followed by oral candidiasis 11.3 (95% CI 8.6-14.5), herpes zoster 10.1 (95% CI 7.6-13.1), and cryptococcal meningitis 1.7 (95% CI 0.8-3.1) per 100 person-years. Patients with baseline CD4 counts of 350/mm(3) (p<0.001). The high incidence of commonly reported OIs in Indian HIV-infected individuals highlights the need for early screening and also the need to increase awareness in healthcare providers, in order to improve decisions regarding prophylaxis for prevention and appropriate therapeutic intervention. Emphasis needs to be given to the early diagnosis and management of tuberculosis in HIV-infected individuals.

  12. The potential influence of common viral infections diagnosed during hospitalization among critically ill patients in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makesha Miggins

    Full Text Available Viruses are the most common source of infection among immunocompetent individuals, yet they are not considered a clinically meaningful risk factor among the critically ill. This work examines the association of viral infections diagnosed during the hospital stay or not documented as present on admission to the outcomes of ICU patients with no evidence of immunosuppression on admission. This is a population-based retrospective cohort study of University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC academic centers in the U.S. from the years 2006 to 2009. The UHC is an alliance of over 90% of the non-profit academic medical centers in the U.S. A total of 209,695 critically ill patients were used in this analysis. Eight hospital complications were examined. Patients were grouped into four cohorts: absence of infection, bacterial infection only, viral infection only, and bacterial and viral infection during same hospital admission. Viral infections diagnosed during hospitalization significantly increased the risk of all complications. There was also a seasonal pattern for viral infections. Specific viruses associated with poor outcomes included influenza, RSV, CMV, and HSV. Patients who had both viral and bacterial infections during the same hospitalization had the greatest risk of mortality RR 6.58, 95% CI (5.47, 7.91; multi-organ failure RR 8.25, 95% CI (7.50, 9.07; and septic shock RR 271.2, 95% CI (188.0, 391.3. Viral infections may play a significant yet unrecognized role in the outcomes of ICU patients. They may serve as biological markers or play an active role in the development of certain adverse complications by interacting with coincident bacterial infection.

  13. EARLY ENTERAL FEEDING AND DELAYED ENTERAL FEEDING- A COMPARATIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alli Muthiah

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nutrients form the fuel for the body, which comes in the form of carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. The body is intended to burn fuels in order to perform work. Starvation with malnutrition affects the postoperative patients and patients with acute pancreatitis. There is an increased risk of nosocomial infections and a delay in the wound healing may be noted. They are more prone for respiratory tract infections. Enteral Nutrition (EN delivers nutrition to the body through gastrointestinal tract. This also includes the oral feeding. This study will review the administration, rationale and assess the pros and cons associated with the early initiation of enteral feeding. The aim of this study is to evaluate if early commencement of enteral nutrition compared to traditional management (delayed enteral feeding is associated with fewer complications and improved outcome-  In patients undergoing elective/emergency gastrointestinal surgery.  In patients with acute pancreatitis. It is also used to determine whether a period of starvation (nil by mouth after gastrointestinal surgery or in the early days of acute pancreatitis is beneficial in terms of specific outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective cohort interventional study was conducted using 100 patients from July 2012 to November 2012. Patients satisfying the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. Patients admitted in my unit for GIT surgeries or acute pancreatitis constituted the test group, while patients admitted in other units for similar disease processes constituted the control group. RESULTS Our study concluded that early enteral feeding resulted in reduced incidence of surgical site infections. When the decreased length of stay, shorter convalescent period and the lesser post-interventional fatigue were taken into account, early enteral feeding has a definite cost benefit.CONCLUSION Early enteral feeding was beneficial associated with fewer

  14. Advantages of enteral nutrition over parenteral nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Seres, David S.; Valcarcel, Monika; Guillaume, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    It is a strong and commonly held belief among nutrition clinicians that enteral nutrition is preferable to parenteral nutrition. We provide a narrative review of more recent studies and technical reviews comparing enteral nutrition with parenteral nutrition. Despite significant weaknesses in the existing data, current literature continues to support the use of enteral nutrition in patients requiring nutrition support, over parenteral nutrition.

  15. Consumption of unprocessed cow's milk protects infants from common respiratory infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loss, G.; Depner, M.; Ulfman, L.H.; Neerven, van R.J.J.; Hose, A.J.; Genuneit, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Breast-feeding is protective against respiratory infections in early life. Given the co-evolutionary adaptations of humans and cattle, bovine milk might exert similar anti-infective effects in human infants. Objective: To study effects of consumption of raw and processed cow's milk on co

  16. The impact of common infections on school absenteeism during an academic year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azor-Martínez, Ernestina; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Yolada; Seijas-Vazquez, Maria Luisa; Cobos-Carrascosa, Elena; Santisteban-Martínez, Joaquin; Martínez-López, Jose Miguel; Jimenez-Noguera, Esperanza; Galan-Requena, María del Mar; Garrido-Fernández, Pablo; Strizzi, Jenna M; Gimenez-Sanchez, Francisco

    2014-06-01

    School absenteeism because of infections is one of the most important problems facing both public and private primary schools. The aim of the study was to assess the impact of infections on school absenteeism and their reduction with a handwashing program using hand sanitizer. The study was an 8-month-long, randomized, controlled open study (N = 1,609 children, aged 4-12 years old) at 5 state schools in Almeria (Spain). The experimental group (EG) washed their hands with soap and water, complemented with the use of hand sanitizer, and the control group (CG) followed the usual handwashing procedure. The total number of episodes and days missed as well as those because of upper respiratory infections and gastrointestinal infections were compared in both groups with a Z-test. The students were absent 12,386 days in 7,945 episodes. The incidence of total absent episodes and percent of missed days, including those because of upper respiratory infections and gastrointestinal infections, were significantly lower in the EG than the CG (P absenteeism because of infections in schools is reduced when a hand hygiene program utilizing sanitizing gels is properly carried out, especially during the flu season. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Radiological features of viral infection of lower respiratory tract in infants and children : infection by common virus other than RS virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, In Cheol; Kim, Woo Sun; Kim, In One; Lee, Hoan Jong; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung [College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    There have been report on radiological features of lower respiratory track infection in infants and children caused by RSV(respiratory syncytial virus) in KOREA. The aims of this study were to summarize radiological features of lower respiratory tract infection caused by common viral agents other than RSV and to find any specific radiological features which might provide clue to the etiologic diagnosis. We retrospectively analyzed radiological features in 51 children with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and identification of viral agents(except RSV). They included parainfluenza (n=22), adenovirus(n=16), influenza A(n=11), influenza 8(n=2) virus infections. The mean age of the patients was 23 months. Major radiological findings of viral lower respiratory tract infection were bilateral parahilar peribronchial infiltration(62%), bilateral overaeration(60%), atelectasis(59%)(segmental or subsegmental atelectasis(43%), lobar atelectasis(16%)) and patchy or confluent consolidation(20%). Pleural effusion was seen in only one case and hilar adenopathy was not observed in any of them. In the cares of adeno virus, consolidation was seen in 5 cases(31%) including 3 cases(19%) of extensive confluent consolidations and overaerations were less frequent findings(44%) than in other viruses. In 24 patients with radiological follow up for more than 1 week, consolidation improved most rapidly, while was persistent atelectasis. The major radiologic features in viral lower respiratory tract infection(except RSV) were overinflation, bilateral peribronchial infiltration and atelectasis. In adenoviral infection, confluent consolidations which are usually seen in bacterial pneumonia were more common findings than in other viral lower respiratory tract infections.

  18. Malabsorption syndrome observed in the common octopus Octopus vulgaris infected with Aggregata octopiana (Protista: Apicomplexa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestal, C; Páez de la Cadena, M; Pascual, S

    2002-08-15

    Octopus vulgaris infected with Aggregata octopiana were collected from an open-water culture system in the Ría of Aldán (NW Spain). Digestive tract infection values were determined with the use of a Neubauer chamber by counting the number of A. octopiana sporocysts. After determining enzyme activity values by the colorimetric Api-Zym system Biomerieux, one representative enzyme of glycosidases, peptid hydrolases and phosphoric hydrolases showing high activity was spectrophotometrically analysed. The enzymes were maltase and leucine-aminopeptidase (LAP) involved in the absorption process, and acid phosphatase, a lysosomic enzyme, respectively. Enzymatic activity of maltase and LAP decreased significantly, with increased sporocyst counts. However, acid phosphatase activity increased with severity of infection, indicating the presence of degradative enzymes from phagocytic cells in the infected area. A detrimental effect on gastrointestinal function may result from a decrease or malfunction of absorption enzymes. The results suggest a malabsorption syndrome resulting from parasitic infection.

  19. Catheter-associated and nosocomial urinary tract infections: antibiotic resistance and influence on commonly used antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Potic B; Ivan, Ignjatovic M

    2009-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate resistance between community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTI), nosocomialy-acquired urinary tract infections (NAUTI), and empirical therapy adequacy. E. coli is the predominant pathogen of both CAUTI and NAUTI, followed by Klebsiella spp. in NAUTI and Pseudomonas spp. in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. The highest level of general resistance was found among isolates of NAUTI and catheter-associated UTI followed by CAUTI isolates. Absolute or high level resistance for commonly used empirical antimicrobial therapy was found in catheter-associated UTI and NAUTI while resistance among CAUTI was respectable. Patients with NAUTI as well as patients with catheter-associated urinary tract infections have similar resistance and similar microorganisms isolated as a causative agents, and should not be empirically treated unless the clinical emergency requests.

  20. Does well-child care education improve consultations and medication management for childhood fever and common infections? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetoom, Kirsten K B; Smits, Jacqueline J M; Ploum, Luc J L; Verbakel, Jan Y; Dinant, Geert-Jan; Cals, Jochen W L

    2017-03-01

    Fever is common in preschool children and is often caused by benign self-limiting infections. Parents' lack of knowledge and fever phobia leads to high healthcare consumption. To systematically review the effect of providing educational interventions about childhood fever and common infections in well-child clinics (WCCs), prior to illness episodes, on parental practices: healthcare-seeking behaviour (frequency of physician consultations, appropriateness of consultations) and medication management. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science were searched. We included randomised controlled trials evaluating interventions in WCC settings focusing on educating parents prior to new illness episodes to improve parental practices during episodes of childhood fever and common infections. Data were extracted on study design, sample characteristics, type of intervention, outcome measures and results. Eight studies were eligible for data extraction. Educating parents, in WCCs, prior to new episodes of childhood fever and common infections reduces daytime physician consultations of parents, home visits and telephone consultations, and enhances medication management. However, single and multicomponent interventions vary in effectiveness in reducing the frequency of daytime physician consultations and differ in their potential to reduce the number of home visits and general practitioner out-of-hours contacts. Only multicomponent interventions achieved a reduction in telephone consultations and improved medication management. Educating parents in WCCs prior to episodes of childhood fever and common infections showed potential to improve parental practices in terms of healthcare-seeking behaviour and medication management. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. Molecular epidemiology survey of enteric adenovirus infection in children with diarrhea in Shaoguan%韶关市腹泻患儿肠道腺病毒感染的分子流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖华基

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate and analyze the molecular epidemiology of enteric adenovirus infection in the children with diarrhea in Shaoguan. Methods 250 children with diarrhea in Shaoguan from January 2010 to December 2013 were selected as the study subjects and their diarrhea feces were collected to receive adenovirus detection. Results Twelve children with enteric adenovirus infection were detected, with a positive rate of 4.80%(12/250). Of the 12 children with enteric adenovirus infection(EAdV), 9 children had type 41 enteric adenovirus infection, accounting for 3.60%(9/250). Three children had type 40 enteric adenovirus infection, accounting for 1.20%(3/250). Enteric adenovirus infection mainly concentrated in the infants and young children under the age of 2 years, and its attack rate was not obviously related to the sex, residence, season and other factors, with no significant differences(P>0.05). The children mainly displayed fever, diarrhea and vomiting symptoms. Conclusion Enteric adenovirus infection is an important cause of diarrhea in children and is mainly caused by type 41 enteric adenovirus. Enhancing monitoring of infants and young children and offering timely and specific treatment once infection occurs are of important significance to improving the children's state of illness and promoting prognosis.%目的:对韶关市腹泻患儿肠道腺病毒感染进行分子流行病学调查分析。方法选取2010年1月~2013年12月韶关市腹泻患儿250例作为研究对象,收集其腹泻粪便并展开腺病毒检测。结果本次研究结果共检测出12例肠道腺病毒感染患儿,阳性率为4.80%(12/250)。12例肠道腺病毒(EAdV)感染患儿中,属于肠道腺病毒41型的9例,占3.60%(9/250)。属于肠道腺病毒40型的3例,占1.20%(3/250)。腺病毒感染主要集中在2岁以下的婴幼儿儿童,且发病率与性别、居住地、季节等因素之间无明显的联系,差异不显著(P>0.05)

  2. Relationship between common viral upper respiratory tract infections and febrile seizures in children from Suzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jihong; Yan, Wenhua; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Gu, Qing

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the potential predisposing factors for the development of febrile seizures among children with upper respiratory tract infection in the eastern Chinese region. Participants were individuals aged 6 months and 6 years (n = 189) who were diagnosed with febrile seizure, complicated with upper respiratory tract infection, and 174 age-matched children who had upper respiratory tract infection without seizures as controls. The viral antigens including influenza A and B, parainfluenza, adenovirus, and respiratory syncytial virus were detected from nasopharyngeal aspirates. The incidence of influenza A infection was much higher in patients with febrile seizure than controls, especially those children aged >36 months. Patients with influenza A infection had higher body temperatures at seizure occurrence, shorter seizure duration, and shorter fever duration before seizure onset. Influenza A infections are frequently associated with febrile seizure in children with upper respiratory tract infection. During an influenza epidemic, effective vaccination of children, especially those with a past history of febrile seizure, may minimize the development of febrile seizure. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Public health and budget impact of probiotics on common respiratory tract infections: a modelling study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Lenoir-Wijnkoop

    Full Text Available Two recent meta-analyses by the York Health Economics Consortium (YHEC and Cochrane demonstrated probiotic efficacy in reducing the duration and number of common respiratory tract infections (CRTI and associated antibiotic prescriptions. A health-economic analysis was undertaken to estimate the public health and budget consequences of a generalized probiotic consumption in France.A virtual age- and gender-standardized population was generated using a Markov microsimulation model. CRTI risk factors incorporated into this model were age, active/passive smoking and living in a community setting. Incidence rates and resource utilization were based on the 2011-2012 flu season and retrieved from the French GPs Sentinelles network. Results of both meta-analyses were independently applied to the French population to estimate CRTI events, assuming a generalized probiotic use compared to no probiotics during winter months: -0.77 days/CRTI episode (YHEC scenario or odds-ratio 0.58 for ≥1 CRTI episode (Cochrane scenario with vs. without probiotics. Economic perspectives were National Health System (NHS, society, family. Outcomes included cost savings related to the reduced numbers of CRTI episodes, days of illness, number of antibiotic courses, sick leave days, medical and indirect costs.For France, generalized probiotic use would save 2.4 million CRTI-days, 291,000 antibiotic courses and 581,000 sick leave days, based on YHEC data. Applying the Cochrane data, reductions were 6.6 million CRTI days, 473,000 antibiotic courses and 1.5 million sick days. From the NHS perspective, probiotics' economic impact was about €14.6 million saved according to YHEC and €37.7 million according to Cochrane. Higher savings were observed in children, active smokers and people with more frequent human contacts.Public health and budget impact of probiotics are substantial, whether they reduce CRTI episodes frequency or duration. Noteworthy, the 2011-12 winter CRTI

  4. Public Health and Budget Impact of Probiotics on Common Respiratory Tract Infections: A Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir-Wijnkoop, Irene; Gerlier, Laetitia; Bresson, Jean-Louis; Le Pen, Claude; Berdeaux, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Two recent meta-analyses by the York Health Economics Consortium (YHEC) and Cochrane demonstrated probiotic efficacy in reducing the duration and number of common respiratory tract infections (CRTI) and associated antibiotic prescriptions. A health-economic analysis was undertaken to estimate the public health and budget consequences of a generalized probiotic consumption in France. Methods A virtual age- and gender-standardized population was generated using a Markov microsimulation model. CRTI risk factors incorporated into this model were age, active/passive smoking and living in a community setting. Incidence rates and resource utilization were based on the 2011-2012 flu season and retrieved from the French GPs Sentinelles network. Results of both meta-analyses were independently applied to the French population to estimate CRTI events, assuming a generalized probiotic use compared to no probiotics during winter months: -0.77 days/CRTI episode (YHEC scenario) or odds-ratio 0.58 for ≥1 CRTI episode (Cochrane scenario) with vs. without probiotics. Economic perspectives were National Health System (NHS), society, family. Outcomes included cost savings related to the reduced numbers of CRTI episodes, days of illness, number of antibiotic courses, sick leave days, medical and indirect costs. Results For France, generalized probiotic use would save 2.4 million CRTI-days, 291,000 antibiotic courses and 581,000 sick leave days, based on YHEC data. Applying the Cochrane data, reductions were 6.6 million CRTI days, 473,000 antibiotic courses and 1.5 million sick days. From the NHS perspective, probiotics’ economic impact was about €14.6 million saved according to YHEC and €37.7 million according to Cochrane. Higher savings were observed in children, active smokers and people with more frequent human contacts. Conclusions Public health and budget impact of probiotics are substantial, whether they reduce CRTI episodes frequency or duration. Noteworthy

  5. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Infection in Cases of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Comparison with Crohn's Disease and Johne's Disease: Common Neural and Immune Pathogenicities▿

    OpenAIRE

    Scanu, Antonio M.; Bull, Tim J; Cannas, Sara; Sanderson, Jeremy D.; Sechi, Leonardo A; Dettori, Giuseppe; Zanetti, Stefania; Hermon-Taylor, John

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease, a systemic infection and chronic inflammation of the intestine that affects many species, including primates. Infection is widespread in livestock, and human populations are exposed. Johne's disease is associated with immune dysregulation, with involvement of the enteric nervous system overlapping with features of irritable bowel syndrome in humans. The present study was designed to look for an association between Mycobacteri...

  6. Mitochondrial genes support a common origin of rodent malaria parasites and Plasmodium falciparum's relatives infecting great apes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanquart Samuel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the most acute form of human malaria. Most recent studies demonstrate that it belongs to a monophyletic lineage specialized in the infection of great ape hosts. Several other Plasmodium species cause human malaria. They all belong to another distinct lineage of parasites which infect a wider range of primate species. All known mammalian malaria parasites appear to be monophyletic. Their clade includes the two previous distinct lineages of parasites of primates and great apes, one lineage of rodent parasites, and presumably Hepatocystis species. Plasmodium falciparum and great ape parasites are commonly thought to be the sister-group of all other mammal-infecting malaria parasites. However, some studies supported contradictory origins and found parasites of great apes to be closer to those of rodents, or to those of other primates. Results To distinguish between these mutually exclusive hypotheses on the origin of Plasmodium falciparum and its great ape infecting relatives, we performed a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis based on a data set of three mitochondrial genes from 33 to 84 malaria parasites. We showed that malarial mitochondrial genes have evolved slowly and are compositionally homogeneous. We estimated their phylogenetic relationships using Bayesian and maximum-likelihood methods. Inferred trees were checked for their robustness to the (i site selection, (ii assumptions of various probabilistic models, and (iii taxon sampling. Our results robustly support a common ancestry of rodent parasites and Plasmodium falciparum's relatives infecting great apes. Conclusions Our results refute the most common view of the origin of great ape malaria parasites, and instead demonstrate the robustness of a less well-established phylogenetic hypothesis, under which Plasmodium falciparum and its relatives infecting great apes are closely related to rodent parasites. This study sheds light

  7. Serotyping and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern of Common Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infections in Koohdasht, Lorestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amraei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background One of the most common diseases worldwide is urinary tract infection (UTI. The main agents causing these infections are bacteria. Urinary tract infections occur when uropathogens colonize the urethra, migrate to the bladder and invade urinary tract cells. Objectives The purpose of this study was the detection of uropathogens causing UTIs, as well as serotyping and antibiotic susceptibility of the most common bacteria. Materials and Methods The study was performed on 300 urine samples collected from patients referred to Koohdasht Imam Khomeini hospital of Lorestan province. After culturing the samples and determination of uropathogens, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Serotyping was performed for the most common uropathogens by polyvalent and monovalent antisera. Results Of the 300 samples, 61 samples (20.33% were positive for UTIs. Among these, 49 samples (80.33% were Gram-negative bacteria and 12 (19.67% Gram-positive. The most common uropathogens in UTIs were Escherichia coli (55.74%, Proteus species (11.47%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (11.47%, Citrobacter species (8.20%, Staphylococcus aureus (8.20% and Klebsiella species (4.92%, respectively. The rate of UTI in females (83.61% was more than males (16.39%. The highest level of resistance was towards trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and the lowest to ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and nitrofurantoin. The most common uropathogen was Escherichia coli and the most common serotypes were O142:K86 and O25:K11, respectively. Conclusions The treatment of UTIs and resistance control in bacteria should be done based on common strains and choosing an effective antibiotic. Therefore, the determination of prevalent bacterial strains in UTIs of each region based on laboratory tests is very important.

  8. Nutrición enteral en el paciente neurológico: ¿es suficiente el contenido en vitamina D en las fórmulas de uso habitual? Enteral nutrition in neurological patients: is there enough vitamin D content in commonly used formulas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Botella Romero

    2012-04-01

    órmulas completas de nutrición enteral de uso más común. El 50% de las dietas estudiadas, para una ingesta de 2.000 kcal/d, y el 90%, para una ingesta de 1.500 kcal/d, aportan menos de 600 UI/d de vitamina D. Discusión: Algunas guías publicadas recientemente han revisado las recomendaciones de ingesta diaria de vitamina D. El documento publicado por el Instituto de Medicina de EE.UU recomienda para los adultos, entre 19 y 70 años, 600 UI/d y, por encima de los 70 a, se proponen 800 UI/d de vitamina D. Estas cantidades son consideradas insuficientes por otras sociedades científicas que establecen que para conseguir unos niveles sanguíneos de 25(OHD iguales o superiores a 30 ng/ml puede requerirse un aporte diario de 1.500-2.000 UI y una cantidad dos o tres veces mayor si existe deficiencia previa. Conclusiones: Se necesitan más estudios controlados para averiguar cual es la dosis adecuada de vitamina D en fases avanzadas de la enfermedad neurológica, donde es difícil e improbable la exposición solar. Sugerimos que el contenido en vitamina D probablemente debería ser reconsiderado en las fórmulas de nutrición enteral, que, a la luz de las publicaciones recientes, aparecen como claramente insuficientes para aportes energéticos estándar (1.500-2.000 kcal.Introduction: Vitamin D deficiency produces inadequate bone mineralization, proximal muscle weakness, abnormal gait and increased risk of falls and fractures. Moreover, in epidemiological studies, has been associated with increased risk of cancer, autoimmune diseases, type 1 and 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases and depression. When synthesis through the skin by sun exposure is not possible and the patient can not eat by mouth, as in the advanced stages of various neurological diseases, the supply of vitamin D has to be done by enteral nutrition. Objectives: The aim of this study is to review the role of vitamin D in a common group of neurological

  9. Sequential trace element changes in serum and blood during a common viral infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisk, Peter; Ola Darnerud, Per; Friman, Göran; Blomberg, Jonas; Ilbäck, Nils-Gunnar

    2007-01-01

    When trace elements are used as diagnostic tools during disease, it is important to know whether the balance is changed in free or bound elements. Although acute infections are associated with changed trace element balance in serum/plasma, it is not known whether changes occur concomitantly in serum and blood. In the present study the human coxsackievirus B3 (CB3), here adapted to Balb/c mice, was used to study whether infection alters the normal physiological trace element balance in blood and serum. Virus was quantitatively measured in two target organs (pancreas and liver) of this infection by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), showing high concentrations of virus proving ongoing infection. Concentrations of 14 elements were measured in whole blood and serum using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) on days 3, 6 and 9 of the infection. Free and total thyroxine were measured in serum to prove metabolic changes associated with the infection. The thyroxine decreased, while iron and the Cu/Zn ratio in serum increased as a response to the infection. No clear changes in these elements were observed in blood. Cd and Hg tended to decrease in serum but to increase in blood, indicating accumulation in blood cells. Moreover, Al showed a similar decreasing trend in both serum and blood. A correlation between serum and blood levels was observed at different time points of the disease for 9 of the elements. However, As was the only element indicating correlations between serum and blood during the entire course of the disease.

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of common carp anterior kidney during Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 infection: Immunoglobulin repertoire and homologue functional divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neave, Matthew J.; Sunarto, Agus; McColl, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) infects koi and common carp and causes widespread mortalities. While the virus is a significant concern for aquaculture operations in many countries, in Australia the virus may be a useful biocontrol agent for pest carp. However, carp immune responses to CyHV-3, and the molecular mechanisms underpinning resistance, are not well understood. Here we used RNA-Seq on carp during different phases of CyHV-3 infection to detect the gene expression dynamics of both host and virus simultaneously. During acute CyHV-3 infection, the carp host modified the expression of genes involved in various immune systems and detoxification pathways. Moreover, the activated pathways were skewed toward humoral immune responses, which may have been influenced by the virus itself. Many immune-related genes were duplicated in the carp genome, and often these were expressed differently across the infection phases. Of particular interest were two interleukin-10 homologues that were not expressed synchronously, suggesting neo- or sub-functionalization. The carp immunoglobulin repertoire significantly diversified during active CyHV-3 infection, which was followed by the selection of high-affinity B-cells. This is indicative of a developing adaptive immune response, and is the first attempt to use RNA-Seq to understand this process in fish during a viral infection. PMID:28148967

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of common carp anterior kidney during Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 infection: Immunoglobulin repertoire and homologue functional divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neave, Matthew J; Sunarto, Agus; McColl, Kenneth A

    2017-02-02

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) infects koi and common carp and causes widespread mortalities. While the virus is a significant concern for aquaculture operations in many countries, in Australia the virus may be a useful biocontrol agent for pest carp. However, carp immune responses to CyHV-3, and the molecular mechanisms underpinning resistance, are not well understood. Here we used RNA-Seq on carp during different phases of CyHV-3 infection to detect the gene expression dynamics of both host and virus simultaneously. During acute CyHV-3 infection, the carp host modified the expression of genes involved in various immune systems and detoxification pathways. Moreover, the activated pathways were skewed toward humoral immune responses, which may have been influenced by the virus itself. Many immune-related genes were duplicated in the carp genome, and often these were expressed differently across the infection phases. Of particular interest were two interleukin-10 homologues that were not expressed synchronously, suggesting neo- or sub-functionalization. The carp immunoglobulin repertoire significantly diversified during active CyHV-3 infection, which was followed by the selection of high-affinity B-cells. This is indicative of a developing adaptive immune response, and is the first attempt to use RNA-Seq to understand this process in fish during a viral infection.

  12. Infection Sources of a Common Non-tuberculous Mycobacterial Pathogen, Mycobacterium avium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiuchi, Yukiko; Iwamoto, Tomotada; Maruyama, Fumito

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust. The formation of aerosols containing NTM arising from shower water, soil, and pool water implies that these niches can be infection sources. Furthermore, genotyping has shown that clinical isolates are identical to environmental ones from household tap water, bathrooms, potting soil, and garden soil. Therefore, to prevent and treat MAC diseases, it is essential to identify the infection sources for these organisms, because patients with these diseases often suffer from reinfections and recurrent infections with them. In the environmental sources, MAC and other NTM organisms can form biofilms, survive within amoebae, and exist in a free-living state. Mycobacterial communities are also likely to occur in these infection sources in households. Water distribution systems are a transmission route from natural water reservoirs to household tap water. Other infection sources include areas with frequent human contact, such as soil and bathrooms, indicating that individuals may carry NTM organisms that concomitantly attach to their household belongings. To explore the mechanisms associated with the global spread of infection and MAC transmission routes, an epidemiological population-wide genotyping survey would be very useful. A good example of the power of genotyping comes from M. avium subsp. hominissuis, where close genetic relatedness was found between isolates of it from European patients and pigs in Japan and Europe, implying global transmission of this bacterium

  13. Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Broiler Chicken Meat of Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian Origin at Estonian Retail Level and from Patients with Severe Enteric Infections in Estonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäesaar, M; Kramarenko, T; Meremäe, K; Sõgel, J; Lillenberg, M; Häkkinen, L; Ivanova, M; Kovalenko, K; Hörman, A; Hänninen, M-L; Roasto, M

    2016-03-01

    The resistance patterns of Campylobacter spp. isolated from retail broiler chicken meat originating either from Estonia, Lithuania or Latvia collected in Estonia were determined. Additionally, in collaboration with the laboratories of several Estonian hospitals, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns were determined for Campylobacter isolates from patients with severe Campylobacter enteric infections. The isolates were identified at the species level by the PCR method. Respectively, 88.8% of the isolates were C. jejuni, and 11.2% were C. coli. In total, 126 Campylobacter isolates of broiler chicken meat and human origin were tested for minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) with the broth microdilution VetMIC(TH) method (National Veterinary Institute; Uppsala, Sweden) for a total of six antimicrobials. Resistance to one or more antimicrobials was detected in 62 (63.3%) of Campylobacter broiler chicken meat isolates and in 20 (71.4%) of human-origin isolates. Large proportions of the broiler chicken meat isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin (60.2%). Multidrug resistance (i.e. to three or more unrelated antimicrobials) was detected in five (5.1%) C. jejuni isolates. Among the human isolates, 20 (71.4%) were resistant to fluoroquinolones, and two (7.1%) C. jejuni isolates exhibited multidrug resistance. The chicken meat isolates of Estonian origin were the most susceptible. However, a high proportion of fluoroquinolone-resistant C. jejuni isolates were found in Latvian and Lithuanian products. The results of this study indicate that the problems caused by the inappropriate use of antimicrobials extend beyond the country in which a food originates; therefore, both domestic and international interventions and agreements are required to implement common policies on antimicrobial usage and to minimize the emergence of Campylobacter drug resistance.

  14. Common errors in the treatment of intra-abdominal infections: the irrational use of antimicrobial agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda De Simone

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance (AR is a global, emergent problem because an increasing numbers of serious community acquired and nosocomial infections are caused by resistant bacterial pathogens. It is a direct consequence of the excessive and irrational use of antibiotics. The use of antimicrobial agents – aimed to decrease morbidity and mortality rate related to intra-abdominal infections – is very high, often improper, in the Departments of General and Emergency Surgery and Intensive Cure Units. Source control and empiric antibiotic therapy have to be administrated as early as possible to decrease high mortality rates in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock and, in this, the general surgeon has a crucial role. Proper antimicrobial stewardship in selecting an appropriate antibiotic and optimizing its dose and duration to cure intraabdominal infections may prevent the emergence of AR and decrease costs for antibiotics.

  15. Surgical site infections following colorectal cancer surgery: a randomized prospective trial comparing common and advanced antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biffi Roberto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An antimicrobial dressing containing ionic silver was found effective in reducing surgical-site infection in a preliminary study of colorectal cancer elective surgery. We decided to test this finding in a randomized, double-blind trial. Methods Adults undergoing elective colorectal cancer surgery at two university-affiliated hospitals were randomly assigned to have the surgical incision dressed with Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing or a common dressing. To blind the patient and the nursing and medical staff to the nature of the dressing used, scrub nurses covered Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber with a common wound dressing in the experimental arm, whereas a double common dressing was applied to patients of control group. The primary end-point of the study was the occurrence of any surgical-site infection within 30 days of surgery. Results A total of 112 patients (58 in the experimental arm and 54 in the control group qualified for primary end-point analysis. The characteristics of the patient population and their surgical procedures were similar. The overall rate of surgical-site infection was lower in the experimental group (11.1% center 1, 17.5% center 2; overall 15.5% than in controls (14.3% center 1, 24.2% center 2, overall 20.4%, but the observed difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.451, even with respect to surgical-site infection grade 1 (superficial versus grades 2 and 3, or grade 1 and 2 versus grade 3. Conclusions This randomized trial did not confirm a statistically significant superiority of Aquacel® Ag Hydrofiber dressing in reducing surgical-site infection after elective colorectal cancer surgery. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00981110

  16. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double......-lumen duodenal perfusion/aspiration techniques over 6 hours. Subjects were assigned to no feeding (n = 7), duodenal feeding with a polymeric diet (n = 7) or low-fat elemental diet (n = 6), mid-distal jejunal feeding (n = 11), or intravenous feeding (n = 5). All diets provided 40 kcal/kg ideal body weight/d and 1...

  17. Common Genetic Pathways Regulate Organ-Specific Infection-Related Development in the Rice Blast Fungus[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Sara L.; Besi, Maria I.; Galhano, Rita; Franceschetti, Marina; Goetz, Stephan; Lenhert, Steven; Osbourn, Anne; Sesma, Ane

    2010-01-01

    Magnaporthe oryzae is the most important fungal pathogen of rice (Oryza sativa). Under laboratory conditions, it is able to colonize both aerial and underground plant organs using different mechanisms. Here, we characterize an infection-related development in M. oryzae produced on hydrophilic polystyrene (PHIL-PS) and on roots. We show that fungal spores develop preinvasive hyphae (pre-IH) from hyphopodia (root penetration structures) or germ tubes and that pre-IH also enter root cells. Changes in fungal cell wall structure accompanying pre-IH are seen on both artificial and root surfaces. Using characterized mutants, we show that the PMK1 (for pathogenicity mitogen-activated protein kinase 1) pathway is required for pre-IH development. Twenty mutants with altered pre-IH differentiation on PHIL-PS identified from an insertional library of 2885 M. oryzae T-DNA transformants were found to be defective in pathogenicity. The phenotypic analysis of these mutants revealed that appressorium, hyphopodium, and pre-IH formation are genetically linked fungal developmental processes. We further characterized one of these mutants, M1373, which lacked the M. oryzae ortholog of exportin-5/Msn5p (EXP5). Mutants lacking EXP5 were much less virulent on roots, suggesting an important involvement of proteins and/or RNAs transported by EXP5 during M. oryzae root infection. PMID:20348434

  18. Education on Sexually Transmitted Infections: Finding Common Ground among Youth, Parents, Providers and Policy Advocates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joan R.

    2008-01-01

    Outcomes from sex education are shaped not only by the knowledge and attitudes of youth but also by groups influential in young people's lives. American youth bear one of the highest rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in the industrialized world. Four constituencies with important roles in communicating about STIs are youth, parents,…

  19. Epidemiology, Seasonality and Factors Associated with Rotavirus Infection among Children with Moderate-to-Severe Diarrhea in Rural Western Kenya, 2008–2012: The Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omore, Richard; Tate, Jacqueline E.; O’Reilly, Ciara E.; Ayers, Tracy; Williamson, John; Moke, Feny; Schilling, Katie A.; Awuor, Alex O.; Jaron, Peter; Ochieng, John B.; Oundo, Joseph; Parashar, Umesh D.; Parsons, Michele B.; Bopp, Cheryl C.; Nasrin, Dilruba; Farag, Tamer H.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Nataro, James P.; Panchalingam, Sandra; Levine, Myron M.; Laserson, Kayla F.; Nuorti, J. Pekka; Mintz, Eric D.; Breiman, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate factors associated with rotavirus diarrhea and to describe severity of illness among children <5 years old with non-dysenteric, moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) in rural western Kenya. Methods We analyzed data from children <5 years old with non-dysenteric MSD enrolled as cases in the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) in Kenya. A non-dysenteric MSD case was defined as a child with ≥3 loose stools in 24 hrs. and one or more of the following: sunken eyes, skin tenting, intravenous rehydration, or hospitalization, who sought care at a sentinel health center within 7 days of illness onset. Rotavirus antigens in stool samples were detected by ELISA. Demographic and clinical information was collected at enrollment and during a single follow-up home visit at approximately 60 days. We analyzed diarrhea severity using a GEMS 17 point numerical scoring system adapted from the Vesikari score. We used logistic regression to evaluate factors associated with rotavirus infection. Results From January 31, 2008 to September 30, 2012, among 1,637 (92%) non-dysenteric MSD cases, rotavirus was detected in stools of 245 (15.0%). Rotavirus-positive compared with negative cases were: younger (median age, 8 vs. 13 months; p<0.0001), had more severe illness (median severity score, 9 vs 8; p<0.0001) and had to be hospitalized more frequently (37/245 [15.1%] vs. 134/1,392 [9.6%]), p <0.013). Independent factors associated with rotavirus infection included age 0–11 months old (aOR = 5.29, 95% CI 3.14–8.89) and presenting with vomiting ≥3 times/24hrs (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI [1.91–3.48]). Rotavirus was detected more commonly in warm and dry months than in the cool and rainy months (142/691 [20%] vs 70/673 [10%]) p<0.0001). Conclusions Diarrhea caused by rotavirus is associated with severe symptoms leading to hospitalization. Consistent with other settings, infants had the greatest burden of disease. PMID:27494517

  20. [Vulnerability of women in common-law marriage to becoming infected with HIV/AIDS: a study of social representations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Larissa Silva Abreu; Paiva, Mirian Santos; de Oliveira, Jeane Freitas; da Nóbrega, Sheva Maia

    2012-04-01

    This article discusses the social representations of women living in common-law marriage in terms of their vulnerability to becoming infected with HIV/AIDS. Data were obtained through the free association of words, and consisted of an excerpt of a study founded on the Social Representations Theory developed with HIV-negative women living in the state capital and cities in the interior of Bahia. The correspondence factor analysis showed significance for the variables: origin, education level and time spent in common-law marriage. Their acceptance of marital affairs emerged as a vulnerability factor for respondents with one to five years spent in common-law marriage, living in cities in the interior. Women from the capital, with 6-10 years spent in common-law marriage, reported monogamy as a form of prevention. Women with a longer common-law marriage who had completed only a primary education reported feeling invulnerable, which was the opposite of those with one to five years in common-law marriage with a secondary education. Results show there is a need for more interventions aiming to denaturalize the socio-cultural coercions that generate representations and make women in common-law marriages more vulnerable to AIDS.

  1. Effect of the Consumption of a Fermented Milk on Common Infections in Children Aged 3-6 Years, Attending Day Care Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    Common Infectious Diseases, Occuring in Healthy Children,; Including Upper Respiratory Tract Infections (Defined as; Rhinopharyngitis, Sore Throat, Sinusitis and Otitis), Lower; Respiratory Tract Infections (Defined as Bronchitis,; Pneumopathy and Flu and Flu-like Syndromes), and; Gastrointestinal Tract Infection Defined as Gastroenteritis.

  2. Contribution of Common Infections to Cardiovascular risk in HIV Positive Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berquist, Victoria; Hoy, Jennifer F; Trevillyan, Janine M

    HIV-positive individuals are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease due to complex interactions between the increased incidence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and HIV and antiretroviral-associated inflammation and dyslipidemia. Increasing evidence suggests that a number of important co-pathogens, including cytomegalovirus, hepatitis C virus, and periodontal disease, are likely to also be contributing. Mechanisms such as molecular mimicry and modification of lipids play a role; however, induction of systemic inflammation is the likely key pathogenic link by which this occurs. Treatments to reduce the presence of infection, such as antibiotics, antivirals, or dental hygiene, show potential as modifiers of cardiovascular risk in HIV-positive individuals. This review will discuss the evidence regarding the contribution of these key co-pathogens, Chlamydia pneumoniae, cytomegalovirus, and hepatitis C virus, to cardiovascular risk in HIV-positive individuals. It will also review the roles that inflammation, microbial translocation, and periodontal infection play in promoting cardiovascular disease. The potential cardiovascular benefits of treating these infections with antimicrobials (such as valganciclovir) or improvements in dental hygiene (in the setting of periodontal disease) will be explored. As the life expectancy of HIV-positive individuals increases and the HIV-positive population thus ages, reducing the impact of age-related comorbidities, and particularly cardiovascular disease, will be of increasing importance at both an individual and population level.

  3. Human bocavirus infections are common in Beijing population indicated by sero-antibody prevalence analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Lin-qing; QIAN Yuan; ZHU Ru-nan; DENG Jie; WANG Fang; DONG Hui-jin; SUN Yu; LI Yan

    2009-01-01

    Background Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified human parvovirus that was originally detected in the respiratory secretions of children with respiratory infections. This study aimed to learn about the importance of HBoV infections by revealing the prevalence of serum antibodies against HBoV in Beijing population.Methods Two batches of serum specimens collected in different periods were tested by Western blotting for specific IgG against HBoV using recombinant VP2 as antigen.Results Out of 677 serum specimens collected during April 1996 to March 1997, 400 (59.1%) were positive and antibody positive rate for another batch of 141 serum specimens collected in August, 2005 from adults aged from 20 years to over 60 years was 78.7% (111/141). Comparison of the sero-prevalence profiles for serum specimens collected during 1996-1997 to those collected in 2005 indicated that the antibody positive rate for specimens collected in 2005 was higher than that of the corresponding age groups collected during 1996-1997.Conclusions The data suggest that HBoV has been circulating in Beijing population for at least over 10 years, and most of children had been exposed to HBoV by age of 7 years. Higher HBoV antibody positive rate shown in the serum specimens collected in 2005 suggested that infections by HBoV have been increased in Beijing population in recent years.

  4. Congenital cytomegalovirus infection - a common cause of hearing loss of unknown aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karltorp, Eva; Hellström, Sten; Lewensohn-Fuchs, Ilona; Carlsson-Hansén, Eva; Carlsson, Per-Inge; Engman, Mona-Lisa

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection as a cause of various types of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in a group of nonsyndromic children with otherwise unknown aetiology of hearing loss. Furthermore, the occurrence of combined congenital CMV infection and connexin 26 (Cx26) mutations was investigated. The dried blood spot (DBS) cards of 45 children with various degrees of hearing deficits and 46 children with severe/profound hearing loss were tested for CMV DNA with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The DBS cards of the 46 children with severe/profound hearing loss were also analysed for Cx26 mutations. Of the 45 children with various degrees of hearing loss, nine were positive for CMV DNA (20%). The nine children represented severe/profound, mild and unilateral hearing loss. From the 46 children with severe/profound hearing loss, nine of 46 (20%) were positive for CMV DNA. In addition, three of the CMV DNA-positive children were carriers of mutations of Cx26. Congenital CMV infection is a high risk factor in hearing impairment among children. © 2012 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica © 2012 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  5. Experimental Yersinia pseudotuberculosis enteritis in laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-10-18

    Oct 18, 2007 ... Visceral organs of infected rabbits showed enteritis with necrotic lesions but no pathological changes were .... effects of the host's immune system and thus survive and .... The estimation of bacterial power of the blood J. Hyg.

  6. CD8 T Cells Enter the Splenic T Cell Zones Independently of CCR7, but the Subsequent Expansion and Trafficking Patterns of Effector T Cells after Infection Are Dysregulated in the Absence of CCR7 Migratory Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Benechet, Alexandre P; Lefrançois, Leo; Khanna, Kamal M

    2015-12-01

    CCR7 is an important chemokine receptor that regulates T cell trafficking and compartmentalization within secondary lymphoid organs. However, the T cell-intrinsic role of CCR7 during infection in the spleen is not well understood. This study was designed to understand how CCR7-dependent localization and migration of CD8(+) T cells in different compartments of the spleen affected the primary and recall responses after infection. To this end, we used adoptive transfer of naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells (OT-I) that either lacked CCR7 or constitutively expressed CCR7 (CD2-CCR7) in mice that were subsequently infected i.v. with Listeria monocytogenes. We show that naive CCR7(-/-)CD8(+) T cells failed to enter the T cell zone, whereas CD2-CCR7 OT-I cells were exclusively confined to the T cell zones of the spleen. Surprisingly, however, CCR7(-/-) OT-I cells entered the T cell zones after infection, but the entry and egress migratory pattern of these cells was dysregulated and very distinct compared with wild-type OT-I cells. Moreover, CCR7-deficient OT-I cells failed to expand robustly when compared with wild-type OT-I cells and were preferentially skewed toward a short-lived effector cell differentiation pattern. Interestingly, CCR7(-/-), CD2-CCR7, and wild-type OT-I memory cells responded equally well to rechallenge infection. These results highlight a novel role of CCR7 in regulating effector CD8 T cell migration in the spleen and demonstrate differential requirement of CCR7 for primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to infection.

  7. Infection of the heart of the common bream, Abramis brama (L.), with Myxobolus s.l. dogieli (Myxozoa, Myxobolidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, K; Cech, G; Székely, C

    2008-08-01

    Myxobolus dogieli Bykhovskaya-Pavlovskaya & Bykhovski, 1940 is regarded as a site specific myxosporean, infecting the heart of cyprinid fish. During a survey of the myxosporean fauna of Lake Balaton fish, heart myxobolosis was found in the common bream, Abramis brama, with heavy infection of the ventricle and the bulbus arteriosus in some infected bream. Developing and mature plasmodia were mostly in the connective tissue of the subepicardium and subendocardium. Plasmodia developing in the subendocardium protruded into the lumen of the heart, while plasmodia developing in the subepicardium protruded over the epicardium forming large sausage-like outgrowths. Plasmodia with mature spores were found in the summer. The shape and size of the spores corresponded to those of the original description. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 18S rDNA sequence of M. dogieli showed that this species fit well in the genus Myxobolus. As no molecular data are available on spores from the type host, common carp, the species studied by us is temporarily designated as Myxobolus s.l. dogieli.

  8. Common infections and the role of burnout in a Dutch working population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohren, D.C.; Swaen, G.M.H.; Kant, I.J.; Amelsvoort, L.G. van; Borm, P.J.; Galama, J.M.D.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if burnout is a risk factor for common cold, flu-like illness and gastroenteritis. METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study among 12,140 employees at baseline, using three consecutive self-administered questionnaires. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-General Survey (MBI-

  9. Hepatitis A Associated with Chylothorax: An Uncommon Presentation of a Common Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kayur; Shinde, Supriya; Rego, Sylvan; Shet, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Extra-hepatic manifestations have seldom been described with hepatitis A, which usually manifests as mild hepatic dysfunction. We report a 3-year-old boy presenting with 3 days of fever, vomiting, abdominal distention and scleral icterus. On examination, he had tachypnea, hepatosplenomegaly, ascites and right-sided pleural effusion. A diagnostic pleural tap yielded a milky, lymphocyte-predominant exudative aspirate, with pleural fluid triglycerides of 175 mg/dl, suggestive of chylothorax. Serology for anti-HAV IgM was positive in both blood and pleural fluid. The massive effusion causing collapse of the underlying lung was drained by tube thoracostomy, which was followed by complete resolution within 2 weeks. This is the first reported case of chylothorax associated with hepatitis A infection. This report highlights that pleural effusion associated with hepatitis A infection is usually a benign, self-limiting condition which should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pleural effusion or chylothorax in a patient with acute viral hepatitis.

  10. Viral vector vaccines expressing nucleoprotein and phosphoprotein genes of avian bornaviruses ameliorate homologous challenge infections in cockatiels and common canaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbert, Marita; Römer-Oberdörfer, Angela; Herden, Christiane; Malberg, Sara; Runge, Solveig; Staeheli, Peter; Rubbenstroth, Dennis

    2016-11-10

    Avian bornaviruses are causative agents of proventricular dilatation disease (PDD), an often fatal disease of parrots and related species (order Psittaciformes) which is widely distributed in captive psittacine populations and may affect endangered species. Here, we established a vaccination strategy employing two different well described viral vectors, namely recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that were engineered to express the phosphoprotein and nucleoprotein genes of two avian bornaviruses, parrot bornavirus 4 (PaBV-4) and canary bornavirus 2 (CnBV-2). When combined in a heterologous prime/boost vaccination regime, NDV and MVA vaccine viruses established self-limiting infections and induced a bornavirus-specific humoral immune response in cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and common canaries (Serinus canaria forma domestica). After challenge infection with a homologous bornavirus, shedding of bornavirus RNA and viral loads in tissue samples were significantly reduced in immunized birds, indicating that vaccination markedly delayed the course of infection. However, cockatiels still developed signs of PDD if the vaccine failed to prevent viral persistence. Our work demonstrates that avian bornavirus infections can be repressed by vaccine-induced immunity. It represents a first crucial step towards a protective vaccination strategy to combat PDD in psittacine birds.

  11. Protective role for TLR4 signaling in atherosclerosis progression as revealed by infection with a common oral pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Chie; Papadopoulos, George; Gudino, Cynthia V; Weinberg, Ellen O; Barth, Kenneth R; Madrigal, Andrés G; Chen, Yang; Ning, Hua; LaValley, Michael; Gibson, Frank C; Hamilton, James A; Genco, Caroline A

    2012-10-01

    Clinical and epidemiological studies have implicated chronic infections in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been proposed that common mechanisms of signaling via TLRs link stimulation by multiple pathogens to atherosclerosis. However, how pathogen-specific stimulation of TLR4 contributes to atherosclerosis progression remains poorly understood. In this study, atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein-E null (ApoE(-/-)) and TLR4-deficient (ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-)) mice were orally infected with the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice were markedly more susceptible to atherosclerosis after oral infection with P. gingivalis. Using live animal imaging, we demonstrate that enhanced lesion progression occurs progressively and was increasingly evident with advancing age. Immunohistochemical analysis of lesions from ApoE(-/-)TLR4(-/-) mice revealed an increased inflammatory cell infiltrate composed primarily of macrophages and IL-17 effector T cells (Th17), a subset linked with chronic inflammation. Furthermore, enhanced atherosclerosis in TLR4-deficient mice was associated with impaired development of Th1 immunity and regulatory T cell infiltration. In vitro studies suggest that the mechanism of TLR4-mediated protective immunity may be orchestrated by dendritic cell IL-12 and IL-10, which are prototypic Th1 and regulatory T cell polarizing cytokines. We demonstrate an atheroprotective role for TLR4 in response to infection with the oral pathogen P. gingivalis. Our results point to a role for pathogen-specific TLR signaling in chronic inflammation and atherosclerosis.

  12. Aggregata (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) infection in the common octopus Octopus vulgaris from the West Mediterranean Sea: The infection rates and possible effect of faunistic, environmental and ecological factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Hernández, E.; Barcala, E.; Berriatua, E.; García-Ayala, A.; Muñoz, P.

    2013-10-01

    Prevalence and distribution of the coccidian parasite Aggregata octopiana (Protozoa: Apicomplexa) in common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) in the Mediterranean Spanish coasts were studied. A total of 114 octopuses were sampled from 30 geographic sectors by trawl fleet, and whitish macroscopic oocysts typical of A. octopiana infection were recorded in 96% of octopuses in the digestive tract and mainly in intestine and spiral caecum. The univariate analysis showed that lesion extension varied according to specific octopus, environmental and faunistic variables. A subsequent multivariable analysis indicated that the risk of macroscopic lesions in the caecum was greater in males compared to females, in octopuses living in deeper compared to shallower waters and in hauls where the crustacean Pagurus excavatus was present. The study provides further evidence of the abundance of A. octopiana in octopus ecosystems urging for further studies to evaluate its health impact. The combined abundance of infected octopuses and P. excavatus merits attention.

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis enters a viable but non-cultivable (persistent) state within herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) co-infected host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Srilekha; Vanover, Jennifer; Dessus-Babus, Sophie; Whittimore, Judy; Howett, Mary K; Wyrick, Priscilla B; Schoborg, Robert V

    2006-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies have shown that double infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and Chlamydia trachomatis occurs in vivo. We hypothesized that co-infection would alter replication of these agents. To test this hypothesis, HeLa cells were infected with C. trachomatis serovar E, followed 24 h later by HSV-2 strain 333. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analyses indicated that, by 10 h after HSV addition, reticulate bodies (RBs) in co-infected cells were swollen, aberrantly shaped and electron-lucent. In infectious titre assays, HSV-2 co-infection abrogated production of infectious chlamydial progeny. Western blot analyses indicated that accumulation of chlamydial major outer membrane protein (MOMP) was decreased by HSV co-infection while accumulation of chlamydial heat-shock protein 60-1 (HSP60-1) was increased. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) experiments indicated that chlamydial genome copy number was unaltered by HSV-2 superinfection. Semi-quantitative, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) experiments demonstrated that levels of chlamydial groEL, ftsK, ftsW, dnaA and unprocessed 16S rRNA transcripts were not changed by HSV-2 super-infection. These data indicate that HSV-2 superinfection drives chlamydia into a viable but non-cultivable state, which is the hallmark of persistence. Because chlamydial HSP60-1 has been associated with immunopathology in vivo, these results also suggest that disease severity might be increased in co-infected individuals.

  14. Mucin dynamics and enteric pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuckin, Michael A; Lindén, Sara K; Sutton, Philip; Florin, Timothy H

    2011-04-01

    The extracellular secreted mucus and the cell surface glycocalyx prevent infection by the vast numbers of microorganisms that live in the healthy gut. Mucin glycoproteins are the major component of these barriers. In this Review, we describe the components of the secreted and cell surface mucosal barriers and the evidence that they form an effective barricade against potential pathogens. However, successful enteric pathogens have evolved strategies to circumvent these barriers. We discuss the interactions between enteric pathogens and mucins, and the mechanisms that these pathogens use to disrupt and avoid mucosal barriers. In addition, we describe dynamic alterations in the mucin barrier that are driven by host innate and adaptive immune responses to infection.

  15. New type of pathogenicity of Thelohanellus kitauei Egusa & Nakajima, 1981 infecting the skin of common carp Cyprinus carpio L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yanhua; Gu, Zemao; Guo, Qingxiang; Wu, Zizhen; Wang, Hongmei; Liu, Yang

    2016-02-01

    Thelohanellus kitauei Egusa & Nakajima, 1981 is a common parasite infecting the intestine of common carp Cyprinus carpio L., resulting in mass mortality or loss of economic value of cultured carp. In the present study, T. kitauei infecting host skin was detected. The morphological, molecular and histological data of this parasite in the new organ record are presented. Morphological analysis showed the current specimen morphologically similar to T. kitauei from the intestine. Despite the spore length and polar capsule length of the current specimen larger than those of T. kitauei from the intestine, ranges of dimensions overlap, which is more suggestive of intraspecific variation than distinct species. BLAST search revealed that the present small subunit ribosomal DNA gene sequence is identical to those of T. kitauei. Histologically, most of spores distributed in the stratum spongiosum of dermis, and some spores in the strata compactum of host skin were also observed. Above all, both morphology and molecular analysis indicated that the current species from the skin of common carp is conspecific with T. kitauei from the intestine of carp and organ habitats transfer of T. kitauei from host intestine to skin may have occurred.

  16. E. coli enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000296.htm E. coli enteritis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. E. coli enteritis is swelling (inflammation) of the small intestine from ...

  17. Pruritus is a common feature in sheep infected with the BSE agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Martin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The variability in the clinical or pathological presentation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs in sheep, such as scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, has been attributed to prion protein genotype, strain, breed, clinical duration, dose, route and type of inoculum and the age at infection. The study aimed to describe the clinical signs in sheep infected with the BSE agent throughout its clinical course to determine whether the clinical signs were as variable as described for classical scrapie in sheep. The clinical signs were compared to BSE-negative sheep to assess if disease-specific clinical markers exist. Results Forty-seven (34% of 139 sheep, which comprised 123 challenged sheep and 16 undosed controls, were positive for BSE. Affected sheep belonged to five different breeds and three different genotypes (ARQ/ARQ, VRQ/VRQ and AHQ/AHQ. None of the controls or BSE exposed sheep with ARR alleles were positive. Pruritus was present in 41 (87% BSE positive sheep; the remaining six were judged to be pre-clinically infected. Testing of the response to scratching along the dorsum of a sheep proved to be a good indicator of clinical disease with a test sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 98% and usually coincided with weight loss. Clinical signs that were displayed significantly earlier in BSE positive cases compared to negative cases were behavioural changes, pruritic behaviour, a positive scratch test, alopecia, skin lesions, teeth grinding, tremor, ataxia, loss of weight and loss of body condition. The frequency and severity of each specific clinical sign usually increased with the progression of disease over a period of 16–20 weeks. Conclusion Our results suggest that BSE in sheep presents with relatively uniform clinical signs, with pruritus of increased severity and abnormalities in behaviour or movement as the disease progressed. Based on the studied sheep, these clinical features appear to

  18. Pruritus is a common feature in sheep infected with the BSE agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konold, Timm; Bone, Gemma; Vidal-Diez, Alberto; Tortosa, Raul; Davis, Andrew; Dexter, Glenda; Hill, Peter; Jeffrey, Martin; Simmons, Marion M; Chaplin, Melanie J; Bellworthy, Susan J; Berthelin-Baker, Christine

    2008-04-29

    The variability in the clinical or pathological presentation of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) in sheep, such as scrapie and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), has been attributed to prion protein genotype, strain, breed, clinical duration, dose, route and type of inoculum and the age at infection. The study aimed to describe the clinical signs in sheep infected with the BSE agent throughout its clinical course to determine whether the clinical signs were as variable as described for classical scrapie in sheep. The clinical signs were compared to BSE-negative sheep to assess if disease-specific clinical markers exist. Forty-seven (34%) of 139 sheep, which comprised 123 challenged sheep and 16 undosed controls, were positive for BSE. Affected sheep belonged to five different breeds and three different genotypes (ARQ/ARQ, VRQ/VRQ and AHQ/AHQ). None of the controls or BSE exposed sheep with ARR alleles were positive. Pruritus was present in 41 (87%) BSE positive sheep; the remaining six were judged to be pre-clinically infected. Testing of the response to scratching along the dorsum of a sheep proved to be a good indicator of clinical disease with a test sensitivity of 85% and specificity of 98% and usually coincided with weight loss. Clinical signs that were displayed significantly earlier in BSE positive cases compared to negative cases were behavioural changes, pruritic behaviour, a positive scratch test, alopecia, skin lesions, teeth grinding, tremor, ataxia, loss of weight and loss of body condition. The frequency and severity of each specific clinical sign usually increased with the progression of disease over a period of 16-20 weeks. Our results suggest that BSE in sheep presents with relatively uniform clinical signs, with pruritus of increased severity and abnormalities in behaviour or movement as the disease progressed. Based on the studied sheep, these clinical features appear to be independent of breed, affected genotype, dose, route

  19. Does pyuria always suggest urinary tract infection with common microorganisms? Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Mehmet; Kaya, Hüseyin; Taşdemir, Zeynep Atam

    2017-07-18

    Genitourinary system tuberculosis (GUTB) is a chronic granulomatous infection in which tuberculous bacilli affect one or more organs in the genitourinary system. In this report, an unusual presentation of miliary tuberculosis was presented as GUTB. A 15-year-old girl presented with complaints of severe abdominal pain and dysuria. Abdominal examination showed tenderness and defense. Pyuria and microscopic hematuria were observed. Acute abdominal causes could not be excluded through abdominal ultrasound. On abdominal computed tomography, a necrotic lesion was detected in the right kidney. Acid-fast bacilli were detected in the urine. Quartet anti-tuberculosis therapy was started. After treatment, static renal scintigraphy with 99mTc-dimer captosuccinic acid and single-photon emission CT imaging showed parenchymal injury. In any suspected patient, voiding symptoms, abdominal or flank pain, sterile pyuria, and hematuria should be kept in mind as the presenting manifestations of GUTB in the differential diagnosis.

  20. Myxobolus taibaiensis sp. n. (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) infecting the intestinal wall of common carp Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhua; Hua, Congjie; Zhang, Qianqian; Zhao, Yuanli; Zhang, Dong; Zhang, Jinyong

    2017-01-10

    Myxobolus taibaiensis sp. n. was found in the inner intestinal wall of common carp, Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, during the investigation of fish parasite fauna in Lake Taibai, located in the middle reach of the Yangtze River, China. The whitish ellipsoidal plasmodia, up to 2.9 mm long and 1.7 mm wide, developed in the circular muscle layer of the intestinal wall and produced significant compression into adjacent tissues, but no significant inflammatory responses were observed against this infection. Mature spores are oval in frontal view and lemon-like in lateral and apical view, averaging 10.2-11.2 µm (10.8 ± 0.2 µm) in length, 9.1-9.9 µm (9.6 ± 0.2 µm) in width and 6.1-6.6 µm (6.3 ± 0.1 µm) in thickness. Polar capsules are pyriform, equal in size, slightly converging anteriorly, measuring 4.4-5.4 µm (5.0 ± 0.2 µm) in length by 3.2-3.6 µm (3.4 ± 0.1 µm) in width. Polar filaments coiled with four to five turns and arranged perpendicular to the polar capsule length, measuring up to 106 µm. Myxobolus taibaiensis sp. n. is morphologically similar to Myxobolus rotundatus Achmerov, 1956 which also infects the inner wall of the intestine of common carp. However, the small subunit ribosomal DNA sequence identity was only 94%, generally beyond the intraspecies variation in the genus. Phylogenetically, this new species is sister to M. rotundatus and then clusters with M. shantungensis Hu, 1965 to form an independent common carp-infecting cluster within the Henneguya-Myxobolus clade.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Infections are Common and Predict Mortality in a Retrospective Cohort Study of Taiwanese Patients With Oral Cavity Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Li-Ang; Huang, Chung-Guei; Tsao, Kuo-Chien; Liao, Chun-Ta; Kang, Chung-Jan; Chang, Kai-Ping; Huang, Shiang-Fu; Chen, I-How; Fang, Tuan-Jen; Li, Hsueh-Yu; Yang, Shu-Li; Lee, Li-Yu; Hsueh, Chuen; Lin, Chien-Yu; Fan, Kang-Hsing; Chang, Tung-Chieh; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-11-01

    confirmed in the 2008 cohort (c-statistic = 0.71).We conclude that HPV infections are common in Taiwanese OCC patients and predict 5-year OS. If independently validated, our composite prognostic score comprising HPV16 infection may be useful for allocating OCC patients to risk-adapted therapies.

  2. Anti-Inflammatory and Antiapoptotic Responses to Infection: A Common Denominator of Human and Bovine Macrophages Infected with Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naiara Abendaño

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map is the causative agent of a chronic intestinal inflammation in ruminants named Johne's disease or paratuberculosis and a possible etiopathological agent of human Crohn's disease (CD. Analysis of macrophage transcriptomes in response to Map infection is expected to provide key missing information in the understanding of the role of this pathogen in establishing an inappropriate and persistent infection in a susceptible host and of the molecular mechanisms that might underlie the early phases of CD. In this paper we summarize transcriptomic studies of human and bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs, and macrophages-like cell lines in vitro infected with Map. Most studies included in this paper consistently reported common gene expression signatures of bovine and human macrophages in response to Map such as enhanced expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-6, which promote bacterial survival. Overexpression of IL-10 could be responsible for the Map-associated reduction in the expression of the proapoptotic TNF-α gene observed in bovine and human macrophages.

  3. Parasitic infections in HIV infected individuals: Diagnostic & therapeutic challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, parasites have been one of the most common opportunistic infections (OIs) and one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-infected patients. Due to severe immunosuppression, enteric parasitic pathogens in general are emerging and are OIs capable of causing diarrhoeal disease associated with HIV. Of these, Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli are the two most common intestinal protozoan p...

  4. Leukocyte-derived IFN-α/β and epithelial IFN-λ constitute a compartmentalized mucosal defense system that restricts enteric virus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanel Mahlakõiv

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial cells are a major port of entry for many viruses, but the molecular networks which protect barrier surfaces against viral infections are incompletely understood. Viral infections induce simultaneous production of type I (IFN-α/β and type III (IFN-λ interferons. All nucleated cells are believed to respond to IFN-α/β, whereas IFN-λ responses are largely confined to epithelial cells. We observed that intestinal epithelial cells, unlike hematopoietic cells of this organ, express only very low levels of functional IFN-α/β receptors. Accordingly, after oral infection of IFN-α/β receptor-deficient mice, human reovirus type 3 specifically infected cells in the lamina propria but, strikingly, did not productively replicate in gut epithelial cells. By contrast, reovirus replicated almost exclusively in gut epithelial cells of IFN-λ receptor-deficient mice, suggesting that the gut mucosa is equipped with a compartmentalized IFN system in which epithelial cells mainly respond to IFN-λ that they produce after viral infection, whereas other cells of the gut mostly rely on IFN-α/β for antiviral defense. In suckling mice with IFN-λ receptor deficiency, reovirus replicated in the gut epithelium and additionally infected epithelial cells lining the bile ducts, indicating that infants may use IFN-λ for the control of virus infections in various epithelia-rich tissues. Thus, IFN-λ should be regarded as an autonomous virus defense system of the gut mucosa and other epithelial barriers that may have evolved to avoid unnecessarily frequent triggering of the IFN-α/β system which would induce exacerbated inflammation.

  5. A survey of metacercarial infections in commonly edible fish and crab hosts prevailing in Manipur, Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athokpam, Voleentina Devi; Tandon, Veena

    2015-09-01

    Food-borne trematode infections, which are mainly transmitted through consumption of inadequately cooked or raw fish and crabs, affect a large section of population, particularly in Southeast Asian countries, thus eliciting a remarkable morbidity and causing serious damage to health. In India, centering in several mountainous regions of the Northeast, the natives have the habit of consuming such fish or crabs that still sustain viable infective larval stage (metacercaria) of trematode flukes in their muscle tissue. The present study was undertaken to ascertain the spectrum of metacercarial diversity in commonly edible freshwater fishes and crab species in the northeastern state of Manipur and to adjudge their zoonotic potential, if any. Commonly edible fishes belonging to 15 species from 12 localities and crabs belonging to 2 species from 11 localities across Manipur state were surveyed for the purpose. The study revealed that 3 species of fishes (Channa punctatus, C. straitus and Wallago attu) harboured 4 different types of metacercariae belonging to 4 trematode families-Euclinostomum heterostomum (Clinostomidae); Lophosicyadiplostomum sp. and Posthodiplostomum sp. (Diplostomidae); and Polylekithum sp. (Allocreadiidae) in addition to adult flukes of Isoparorchis hypselobagri (Isoparorchiidae). Among these, metacercariae of Posthodiplostomum showed the highest prevalence (2.33 %) though a low abundance, while for other species the prevalence ranged between 0.25 and 1.19 %. The crab species (Barythelphusa lugubris masoniana and Potamiscus manipuriensis) were found infected with 4 different types of metacercariae representing the genera Paragonimus (Troglotrematidae) and Microphallus (Microphallidae). The paragonimids showed a higher rate of occurrence (~4-25 %) compared to microphallids (~15 %). The crustaceans surveyed emerged as prospective intermediate hosts for lungflukes. Identifying the potent vectors for zoonotic parasites helps in control measures

  6. Ranking of the Ecological Disaster Areas According to Coliform Contamination and the Incidence of Acute Enteric Infections of the Population in Kyzylorda Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omarova, Mariya N.; Orakbay, Lyazzat Zh.; Shuratov, Idelbay H.; Kenjebayeva, Asiya T.; Zhumagalieva, Aizhan B.; Sarsenova, Ainur B.

    2016-01-01

    The paper is devoted to monitoring the environmental coliform bacteria (CB) contamination (soil and water) in the environmental disaster areas in the Kazakhstan part of the Aral Sea Region and ranking districts by their level of contamination and the rate of gastrointestinal infections (GI). The research was done in environmental disaster areas…

  7. HOSPITAL BASED SURVEILLANCE OF ENTERIC PARASITES AN D COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF INTESTINAL PARASITIC INFECT IONS IN THE HOSPITAL CHILDREN WITH RURAL SCHOOL CHILDREN AT KANCHEEPURAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumudavathi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Intestinal parasitic infections (IPIs are prevalent in developing countries like India and have been the important cau se of morbidity and mortality especially in children. OBJECTIVES: Estimate prevalence of various intestinal parasitic infections in hospital as well as in rural school children to obtain an ac curate understanding of the burden and cause of intestinal parasitic infections in Kancheepuram. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 2654 stool samples were collected, processed, and mic roscopically examined for intestinal parasites. 2267 were adults and remaining 387 were c hildren. In addition, 314 rural school children were also included in the study. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of IPIs was estimated as 32.59% (739/2267 in hospital adults an d 55.50% (215/387 in hospital children and 56.68% (178/314 in rural school children; high prevalence rate was found among hospital children and in school children when compared to adu lts. Among the protozoans E. histolytica was the highest, followed by Giardia and among the helminths hookworm was highest followed by Ascaris lumbricoides, Enterobius vermicularis, H ymenolepis nana and Strongoloides larvae respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Intestinal parasitic infections spreads due to low s tandards of personal hygiene, poor sanitation, open air defecatio n and an illiterate population, thus suggesting need for regular surveys to minimize the IPIs rate in the community.

  8. Wealth and Its Associations with Enteric Parasitic Infections in a Low-Income Community in Peru: Use of Principal Component Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nundy, Shantanu; Gilman, Robert H.; Xiao, Lihua; Cabrera, Lilia; Cama, Rosa; Ortega, Ynes R.; Kahn, Geoffrey; Cama, Vitaliano A.

    2011-01-01

    The association of wealth and infections with Giardia, Cryptosporidium, Cyclospora, and microsporidia were examined in a longitudinal cohort conducted in Peru from 2001 to 2006. Data from 492 participants were daily clinical manifestations, weekly copro-parasitological diagnosis, and housing characteristics and assets owned (48 variables), and these data were used to construct a global wealth index using principal component analysis. Data were analyzed using continuous and categorical (wealth tertiles) models. Participant's mean age was 3.43 years (range = 0–12 years), with average follow-up of 993 days. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified significant associations between wealth and infections with Giardia and microsporidia. Participants with greater wealth indexes were associated with protection against Giardia (P 14 days). For microsporidia, greater wealth was protective (P = 0.066 continuous and P = 0.042 by tertiles). Contrarily, infections with Cryptosporidium and Cyclospora were independent of wealth. Thus, subtle differences in wealth may affect the frequency of specific parasitic infections within low-income communities. PMID:21212198

  9. Validation of a serum neutralization test for detection of antibodies specific to cyprinid herpesvirus 3 in infected common and koi carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabon, J.; Louboutin, L.; Castric, J.

    2017-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the aetiological agent of a serious infective, notifiable disease affecting common carp and varieties. In survivors, infection is generally characterized by a subclinical latency phase with restricted viral replication. The CyHV-3 genome is difficult to detect i...

  10. Chronic radiation enteritis and malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Gwilym James; Brooke, Rachael; De Silva, Aminda Niroshan

    2013-07-01

    Radiation enteritis is defined as the loss of absorptive capacity of the intestine following irradiation, which is most commonly seen after radiotherapy for pelvic and abdominal malignancies. It is divided into acute and chronic forms and usually presents with diarrhea and malabsorption. Malnutrition is a common complication of chronic radiation enteritis (CRE). We reviewed the etiology, prevalence, symptoms, diagnosis and management of CRE and CRE with malnutrition in this article. Functional short bowel syndrome as a cause of malnutrition in CRE is also considered. The diagnostic work-up includes serum markers, endoscopy, cross-sectional imaging and the exclusion of alternative diagnoses such as recurrent malignancy. Management options of CRE include dietary manipulation, anti-motility agents, electrolyte correction, probiotics, parenteral nutrition, surgical resection and small bowel transplantation. Treatment may also be required for coexisting conditions including vitamin B12 deficiency, bile acid malabsorption and depression.

  11. Incidence and Trends of Infections with Pathogens Transmitted Commonly Through Food and the Effect of Increasing Use of Culture-Independent Diagnostic Tests on Surveillance - Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network, 10 U.S. Sites, 2013-2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marder, Ellyn P; Cieslak, Paul R; Cronquist, Alicia B; Dunn, John; Lathrop, Sarah; Rabatsky-Ehr, Therese; Ryan, Patricia; Smith, Kirk; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Vugia, Duc J; Zansky, Shelley; Holt, Kristin G; Wolpert, Beverly J; Lynch, Michael; Tauxe, Robert; Geissler, Aimee L

    2017-04-21

    Foodborne diseases represent a substantial public health concern in the United States. CDC's Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) monitors cases reported from 10 U.S. sites* of laboratory-diagnosed infections caused by nine enteric pathogens commonly transmitted through food. This report describes preliminary surveillance data for 2016 on the nine pathogens and changes in incidences compared with 2013-2015. In 2016, FoodNet identified 24,029 infections, 5,512 hospitalizations, and 98 deaths caused by these pathogens. The use of culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs) by clinical laboratories to detect enteric pathogens has been steadily increasing since FoodNet began surveying clinical laboratories in 2010 (1). CIDTs complicate the interpretation of FoodNet surveillance data because pathogen detection could be affected by changes in health care provider behaviors or laboratory testing practices (2). Health care providers might be more likely to order CIDTs because these tests are quicker and easier to use than traditional culture methods, a circumstance that could increase pathogen detection (3). Similarly, pathogen detection could also be increasing as clinical laboratories adopt DNA-based syndromic panels, which include pathogens not often included in routine stool culture (4,5). In addition, CIDTs do not yield isolates, which public health officials rely on to distinguish pathogen subtypes, determine antimicrobial resistance, monitor trends, and detect outbreaks. To obtain isolates for infections identified by CIDTs, laboratories must perform reflex culture(†); if clinical laboratories do not, the burden of culturing falls to state public health laboratories, which might not be able to absorb that burden as the adoption of these tests increases (2). Strategies are needed to preserve access to bacterial isolates for further characterization and to determine the effect of changing trends in testing practices on surveillance.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors for cats testing positive for feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukaemia virus infection in cats entering an animal shelter in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, M C; Vigeant, S; Dale, A

    2017-11-01

    AIMS To estimate the prevalence of cats testing positive for antibodies to feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) antigens in domestic cats entering a New Zealand animal shelter, based on a commercial point-of-care ELISA, to identify risk factors associated with cats testing positive, and to compare the results obtained from the ELISA with those obtained using PCR-based testing. METHOD A cross-sectional study was performed on 388 cats entering the Royal New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals animal shelter in Auckland, New Zealand between 7 February 2014 and 30 May 2014. Whole blood samples were collected from each cat and tested for FIV antibody and FeLV antigen using a commercial point-of-care ELISA. Information on the signalment and health status of the cat at the time of entry was also recorded. Blood and saliva samples from a subset of cats were tested for FIV and FeLV proviral DNA using a real-time PCR assay. RESULTS Of the 388 cats in the study sample, 146 (37.6%) had been relinquished by owners, 237 (62.4%) were strays, and 5 (1.3%) were of unknown origin. Overall, 53/388 (13.7%) cats tested positive for FIV antibodies and 4/388 (1.0%) were positive for FeLV antigen. Stray cats had a higher FIV seroprevalence than relinquished cats (42/237 (17.8%) vs. 11/146 (7.5%); p=0.008). Of 53 cats that were FIV-seropositive, 51 (96%) tested positive for FIV proviral DNA using PCR testing of blood. Of these 51 cats, 28 (55%) were positive by PCR testing of saliva. Of the four cats that were FeLV antigen-positive by ELISA, two (50%) were positive for FeLV proviral DNA by PCR testing of blood. The odds of a cat being seropositive for FIV were greater for intact compared to desexed cats (OR=3.3; 95% CI=1.6-7.4) and for male compared to female cats (OR=6.5; 95% CI=3.2-14.0). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The seroprevalence for FIV was 14% among cats entering an animal shelter in Auckland, whereas the prevalence of

  13. Acute HIV-1 infection is as common as malaria in young febrile adults seeking care in coastal Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Eduard J; Mugo, Peter; Prins, Henrieke A B; Wahome, Elizabeth; Thiong'o, Alexander N; Mwashigadi, Grace; van der Elst, Elisabeth M; Omar, Anisa; Smith, Adrian D; Graham, Susan M

    2014-06-01

    Febrile adults are usually not tested for acute HIV-1 infection (AHI) in Africa. We assessed a strategy to diagnose AHI among young adult patients seeking care. Young adults (malaria using a rapid test, with PCR confirmation of positives. In 3602 adults seeking care, overall HIV-1 prevalence was 3.9%: 7.6% (68/897) among patients meeting AHI criteria vs. 2.6% (71/2705) among those who did not (P Malaria was confirmed by PCR in four (1.7%) of the 241 febrile patients. AHI was as common as confirmed malaria in young febrile adults seeking care. An AHI detection strategy targeting young febrile adults seeking care at pharmacies and health facilities is feasible and should be considered as an HIV-prevention strategy in high-transmission settings.

  14. Clinical observation of early enteral nutrition in prevention of pulmonary infections after esophageal cancer surgery%食管癌术后早期肠内营养预防肺部感染的临床观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐锦红; 李敏; 魏琳

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨食管癌术后早期肠内营养对于肺部感染临床预防效果,为临床工作提供帮助.方法 选取医院2011年5月-2012年5月行食管癌手术切除患者50例,采用随机数字表法分为肠外营养组和肠内营养组,每组各25例,分别术后给予全静脉肠外营养支持和鼻肠管滴注肠内营养支持;比较两组患者肺部感染发生率、治疗前后血清白蛋白、血红蛋白、丙氨酸转氨酶、天冬氨酸转氨酶水平、术后排气时间、体重下降等.结果 肠外营养组患者肺部感染发生率为32.0%0,明显高于肠内营养组患者肺部感染发生率的12.0%,组间比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);肠外营养组和肠内营养组患者血清白蛋白、血红蛋白、丙氨酸转氨酶及天冬氨酸转氨酶水平组间比较差异无统计学意义;肠内营养组患者疗后血清白蛋白、血红蛋白、丙氨酸转氨酶及天冬氨酸转氨酶指标分别为(35.5±6.1) g/L、(90.2±10.4) g/L、(63.7±8.8) U/L、(73.3±13.7)U/L,均明显优于肠外营养组的(39.7±7.5) g/L、(99.6±13.8) g/L、(37.1±6.2) U/L、(36.4±7.4) U/L,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05);同时肠内营养组患者术后排气时间及体重下降指标分别为(67.2±5.0)h、(1.9±0.5) kg,均明显优于肠外营养组的(90.8±7.5)h、(2.6±1.0) kg,组间比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05).结论 食管癌术后早期肠内营养可有效改善术后营养水平,降低肺部感染发生风险,具有临床使用价值.%OBJECTIVE To investigate clinical preventive effects of early enteral nutrition on lung infections after esophageal cancer surgery so as to guide the clinical treatment.METHODS Totally 50 children with surgical resection of esophageal cancer were chosen from the hospital in the period from May 2011 to May 2012 and were randomly divided into two groups including the parenteral nutrition group (25 children) with parenteral nutrition support and the enteral

  15. A Prospective Cohort Study of Common Childhood Infections in South African HIV-exposed Uninfected and HIV-unexposed Infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slogrove, Amy L.; Esser, Monika M.; Cotton, Mark F.; Speert, David P.; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Singer, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Much evidence of HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infant infectious morbidity predates availability of maternal combination antiretroviral therapy and does not control for universal risk factors (preterm birth, low birth weight, suboptimal breastfeeding and poverty). Methods: This prospective cohort study identified HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers and their newborns from South African community midwife unit. The primary outcome, infectious cause hospitalization or death before 6 months of age, was compared between HEU and HIV-unexposed (HU) infants and classified for type and severity using validated study-specific case definitions. Adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were calculated by logistic regression including stratified analyses conditioned on breastfeeding. Results: One hundred and seventy-six (94 HEU and 82 HU) mother–infant pairs were analyzed. HIV-infected mothers were older (median, 27.8 vs. 24.7 years; P < 0.01) and HU infants more often breastfed (81/82 vs. 35/94; P < 0.001). Groups were similar for maternal education, antenatal course, household characteristics, birth weight, gestational age and immunizations. The primary outcome occurred in 17 (18%) HEU and 10 (12%) HU infants [aOR, 1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44–4.55]. In stratified analysis restricted to breastfed infants, the aOR for hospitalization due to very severe infection or death was 4.2 (95% CI: 1.00–19.2; P = 0.05) for HEU infants. Hospitalization for diarrhea was more common in HEU than HU infants [8/94 (8.5%) vs. 1/82 (1.2%); P = 0.04]. Conclusion: The difference between HEU and HU infants in the probability of infectious cause hospitalization or death in the first 6 months of life was not significant. However, among breastfed infants, severe infectious morbidity occurred more often in HEU than HU infants. PMID:28081048

  16. Extended-spectrum ß-Lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae as a Common Cause of Urinary Tract Infections in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidanagama, Dhammika; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Lewkebandara, Rashmi; Joyce, Maria; Nicholson, Bradly P.; Nagahawatte, Ajith; Bodinayake, Champica K.; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan; Woods, Christopher W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE) are increasingly reported as pathogens in urinary tract infections (UTIs). However, in Sri Lanka, the clinical and molecular epidemiology of ESBL-PE implicated in UTIs has not been well described. Materials and Methods We conducted prospective, laboratory-based surveillance from October to December 2013 at a tertiary care hospital in southern Sri Lanka and enrolled patients ≥1 year of age with clinically relevant UTIs due to ESBL-PE. Isolate identity, antimicrobial drug susceptibility, and ESBL production were determined. Presence of ß-lactamase genes, bla SHV, bla TEM, and bla CTX-M, was identified by polymerase chain reaction. Results During the study period, Enterobacteriaceae were detected in 184 urine samples, with 74 (40.2%) being ESBL producers. Among 47 patients with ESBL-PE who had medical records available, 38 (80.9%) had clinically significant UTIs. Most UTIs (63.2%) were community acquired and 34.2% were in patients with diabetes. Among 36 cultured ESBL-PE isolates, significant susceptibility (>80%) was only retained to amikacin and the carbapenems. The group 1 bla CTX-M gene was present in 90.0% of Escherichia coli isolates and all Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae isolates. The bla SHV and bla TEM genes were more common in K. pneumoniae (75% and 50%) and E. cloacae (50% and 50%) isolates than in E. coli (10% and 20%) isolates, respectively. Conclusion The majority of UTIs caused by ESBL-PE were acquired in the community and due to organisms carrying the group 1 CTX-M ß-lactamase. Further epidemiologic studies of infections due to ESBL-PE are urgently needed to better prevent and treat these infections in South Asia. PMID:27704730

  17. Clotrimazole/betamethasone diproprionate: a review of costs and complications in the treatment of common cutaneous fungal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, H L; Shwayder, Tor A; Bieszk, Nella; Fivenson, David P

    2002-01-01

    The use of antifungal/corticosteroid combinations as topical therapy for dermatophytoses has been criticized as being less effective, more expensive, and the cause of more adverse cutaneous reactions than antifungal monotherapy. The combination of clotrimazole and betamethasone diproprionate (Lotrisone) is a mix of an azole antifungal and a high-potency corticosteroid, and is one of the most widely prescribed of these combinations. Our objective was to describe the beneficial and deleterious effects of Lotrisone in the treatment of common cutaneous fungal infections and its relative cost-effectiveness. We did a literature review documenting clinical trial data and adverse reactions to Lotrisone and collected a cost analysis of topical antifungal prescribing data over a 2-month period from a large midwestern staff-model health maintenance organization (HMO). Lotrisone is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of tinea pedis, tinea cruris, and tinea corporis in adults and children more than 12 years of age. Treatment is limited to 2 weeks in the groin area and 4 weeks on the feet. The most concerning adverse effects of Lotrisone were reported in children and included treatment failure, striae distensae, hirsuitism, and growth retardation. This combination was also reported to have decreased efficacy in clearing candidal and Trichophyton infections as compared to single-agent antifungals. Lotrisone was considerably more expensive than clotrimazole alone and was found to account for more than 50% of topical antifungal expenditures as prescribed by primary care physicians, but only 7% of topical antifungals prescribed by dermatologists. We found that Lotrisone was shown to have the potential to induce many steroid-related side effects and to be less cost effective than antifungal monotherapy. This combination should be used judiciously in the treatment of cutaneous fungal infections and may not be appropriate for use in children.

  18. Common mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes: a key role of chronic bacterial infection and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklossy, Judith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2016-04-01

    Strong epidemiologic evidence and common molecular mechanisms support an association between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and type 2-diabetes. Local inflammation and amyloidosis occur in both diseases and are associated with periodontitis and various infectious agents. This article reviews the evidence for the presence of local inflammation and bacteria in type 2 diabetes and discusses host pathogen interactions in chronic inflammatory disorders. Chlamydophyla pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and spirochetes are demonstrated in association with dementia and brain lesions in AD and islet lesions in type 2 diabetes. The presence of pathogens in host tissues activates immune responses through Toll-like receptor signaling pathways. Evasion of pathogens from complement-mediated attack results in persistent infection, inflammation and amyloidosis. Amyloid beta and the pancreatic amyloid called amylin bind to lipid bilayers and produce Ca(2+) influx and bacteriolysis. Similarly to AD, accumulation of amylin deposits in type 2 diabetes may result from an innate immune response to chronic bacterial infections, which are known to be associated with amyloidosis. Further research based on an infectious origin of both AD and type 2 diabetes may lead to novel treatment strategies.

  19. Characteristics of males infected with common Neisseria gonorrhoeae sequence types in the Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project, San Francisco, California, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Kyle T; Marcus, Julia L; Barry, Pennan M; Pandori, Mark W; Buono, Sean; Hess, David; Philip, Susan S

    2013-10-15

    We analyzed 265 urethral Neisseria gonorrhoeae specimens collected from symptomatic males at San Francisco's municipal sexually transmitted disease clinic, a participant in the Gonococcal Isolate Surveillance Project, during 2009. We used N. gonorrhoeae multiantigen sequence typing to describe characteristics of patients infected with common sequence type families. Specimens were classified into 6 homology-based families and 1 additional family of all other identified strains. Strain family results were combined with results of culture-based antibiotic sensitivity minimum inhibitory concentration, sociodemographic and behavioral risk data collected at the clinic, and presence or absence of the mosaic penicillin-binding protein 2 (penA) allele. Characteristics of patients were compared across strain families through the use of χ(2) statistics. Among men who have sex with men, strain distribution differed by those reporting receptive oral sex as their only urethral exposure (P = 0.04), by number of sex partners (P = 0.03), and by race/ethnicity (P gonorrhoeae infection could help develop a more complete epidemiology of gonorrhea in the United States.

  20. Development and Efficacy Assessment of an Enteric Coated Porous Tablet Loaded With F4 Fimbriae for Oral Vaccination of Piglets against F4+ Escherichia coli Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Atul; Gowda, D V; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Siddaramaiah

    2016-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is one of the major causes contributing to the development of diarrhoea and mortality in new born, suckling and newly weaned piglets. To date, no preventive/treatment strategy showed promising results, which could be due to the lack of potent vaccines, and/or due to the development of resistance of ETEC to antibiotics. Therefore, in the present investigation, a novel porous sodium alginate (SA) tablet formulation loaded with F4 fimbriae antigen was developed and tested for efficacy against ETEC infections in piglet models. Precompression parameters of the powder mixes and post compression parameters of tablets have been evaluated and results were found to be satisfactory. Loading of F4 fimbrial antigens into the tablets was achieved by inducing pores in the tablets via the sublimation of camphor followed by incubation with purified F4 fimbriae. The loaded tablets have been coated with Eudragit L100 to protect the F4 fimbriae from (a) highly acidic gastric environment; (b) proteolytic cleavage by pepsin; and (c) to promote subsequent release in the intestine. Evaluation of developed F4 fimbrial tablets in a Pig model demonstrated induction of mucosal immunity, and a significant reduction of F4+ E. coli in faeces. Therefore, F4 fimbriae loaded porous tablets could be a novel oral vaccination candidate to induce mucosal and systemic immunity against ETEC infections.

  1. A Case of Typhoid Fever with Hepatic Granulomas and Enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shraddha Narechania

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The common histopathologic hepatic manifestations in patients infected with Salmonella include cloudy swelling and balloon degeneration with vacuolation of the hepatocytes and steatosis. Hepatic granulomas are a very rare finding, so far reported in very few cases. We report a 64-year-old patient with Salmonella enteritis who was found to have multiple 1.4 to 1.6 cm hypoechoic liver masses on ultrasound of the abdomen which on biopsy revealed hepatic granulomas. This case highlights the importance of keeping the differential diagnosis of Salmonella typhi (S. typhi in mind in a patient with hepatic granulomas.

  2. A case of typhoid Fever with hepatic granulomas and enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narechania, Shraddha; Duran, Marc; Karivedu, Vidhya; Gopalakrishna, K V

    2015-01-01

    The common histopathologic hepatic manifestations in patients infected with Salmonella include cloudy swelling and balloon degeneration with vacuolation of the hepatocytes and steatosis. Hepatic granulomas are a very rare finding, so far reported in very few cases. We report a 64-year-old patient with Salmonella enteritis who was found to have multiple 1.4 to 1.6 cm hypoechoic liver masses on ultrasound of the abdomen which on biopsy revealed hepatic granulomas. This case highlights the importance of keeping the differential diagnosis of Salmonella typhi (S. typhi) in mind in a patient with hepatic granulomas.

  3. 昏迷患者肠内营养方式对预防肺部感染的护理体会%Nursing Experience of Coma patients with Enteral Nutrition Preventing Pulmonary Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄洁梅

    2013-01-01

      目的:比较经鼻胃管置管肠内营养支持与经皮胃造瘘肠内营养支持对长期昏迷患者预防肺部感染效果的差异。方法:将46例长期昏迷患者随机分为置管组及造瘘组,置管组行经鼻胃管置管肠内营养支持,造瘘组行经皮胃造瘘肠内营养支持,比较两组在气道护理、肺部感染发生率的差异。结果:置管组的胃液返流、日吸痰次数、肺部感染的发生情况均多于造瘘组(P<0.01)。结论:在相同的肺部护理措施下,经皮胃造瘘肠内营养支持在患者气道保护方面明显优于经鼻胃管置管肠内营养支持。%Objective:To compare the differences between enteral nutrition support with nasogastric tube and percutaneous gastrosto-my preventing pulmonary infection for patients with long-term coma. Methods:46 patients with long-term coma were randomly di-vided into catheter group and fistulation group, catheter group was given enteral nutrition support with nasogastric tube, and fistula-tion group with percutaneous gastrostomy, to compare the differences in airway care and incidence of pulmonary infection between two groups. Results: The incidence of gastric regurgitation, daily times of sputum suction, pulmonary infection in catheter group were all higher than those in fistulation group (P<0.01). Conclusion:With the same intervention of pulmonary nursing, enteral nutri-tion support with percutaneous gastrostomy is better than that with nasogastric tube in the matter of airway protection of patients.

  4. COMMON ORGANISMS AND ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY OF E COLI IN URINARY TRACT INFECTION, IN A TERTIARY CARE TEACHING HOSPITAL, NORTHERN KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanavas

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI includes a spectrum of Asymptomatic Bacteruria (ABU, Cystitis, Prostitis and Pyelonephritis. Except in ABU, UTI is represented by symptomatic disease that warrants antimicrobial therapy. 1 Many of the studies have shown increasing antibiotic resistance to these agents. This study consists of a retrospective observational study of culture and sensitivity of 150 urinary samples, collected from patients who presented with symptoms of UTI, in a tertiary care teaching hospital, Northern Kerala, irrespective of their age and sex for a period of six months from June 2015 to November 2015. These results are then analyzed to find common organisms causing UTI in different age groups in either sex and their respective antibiotic resistance are noted. Out of 150 urinary samples 69.34% were sterile, while 30.66% were culture positive. Among the culture positive patients sex distribution was almost equal, with a slight female predominance, having a contribution of 54.35% females and 45.65% males. The most common organism was found to be E.coli, which contributed more than 50 per cent of total culture positivity (54.35%. Others include Staphylococci, Klebsiella Pnuemoniae, Proteus species, Pseudomonas, Enterococci, Candida Albicans etc. Collateral damage is an ecological adverse effect that resist the use of a highly efficacious drug to be considered as first line agent. Our study shows that drugs causing minimal collateral damages like Nitrofurantoin and Fosfomycin can be used as first line agent for treatment of UTI.

  5. Campylobacter Enteritis among Children in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Pourmand

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter enteritis is a common form of acute gastroenteritis. Among children, especially in developing countries, Campylobacter infections can cause sever life-threatening diarrheal disease. The incidence of Campylobacter infection among children is age related with a higher incidence among younger children in the developing world whereas in industrialized countries the incidence is highest in older children. In a study of American children, Campylobacter was isolated in 4.8% of diarrheal stools in aged 1-4 years. In 1985 the prevalence of Campylobacter diarrheal was 4.4%, whereas in current report 6% of stool samples from children aged<5 years with diarrhea grew Campylobacter jejuni. There were no significant differences between age groups of patients. All thirteen isolated strains of Campylobacter were resistance to Bactrim, Colistin and Polymyxin B and were sensitive to Neomycin, Erythromycin, Gentamicin and Nalidixic acid. The incidence of human campylobacteriosis is increasing worldwide. Thus, public health awareness about the problem is necessary, with a view towards setting up national surveillance programs.

  6. Trends and factors in human immunodeficiency virus and/or hepatitis C virus testing and infection among injection drug users newly entering methadone maintenance treatment in Guangdong Province, China 2006-2013: a consecutive cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yin; Liu, Yu; Zou, Xia; Chen, Wen; Ling, Li

    2017-07-13

    To assess trends and related factors in HIV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody testing and infection among injection drug users (IDUs) newly entering methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in Guangdong Province, China. Consecutive cross sectional surveys were conducted in 14 MMT clinics from July 2006 to December 2013 in Guangdong Province, China. IDUs were excluded if they were re-enrolled or referred from other MMT clinics. Trend tests were used to examine HIV and/or HCV testing and infection, sociodemographic characteristics, drug use related behaviours and the past 3 month sexual behaviours on enrolment. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify correlates of HIV and/or HCV testing and infection. 7539 IDUs with an average age of 35.6±6.2 years were newly enrolled with a history of injection for an average of 11.8±4.9 years. The average frequency of injection before enrolment had been increasing. HIV, HCV and HIV/HCV dual testing increased from 2006 to 2013 (ptrend0.05) until reaching a peak in 2011, excluding the first year. Associating with fellow drug users 1-4 times during the past month, injecting for 15+ years and having multiple sexual partners during the past 3 months predicted higher percentages for HIV and/or HCV testing (ptests (pdrug use and sharing needles or sharing more frequently were major risk factors for HIV, HCV and HIV/HCV co-infection (p<0.05). The prevalence of HIV and HCV were high and quite stable among new IDU entrants in MMT. Publicising MMT, routine screening, and behavioural and structural interventions is needed. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. Transcriptome analysis reveals genes commonly induced by Botrytis cinerea infection, cold, drought and oxidative stresses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Sham

    Full Text Available Signaling pathways controlling biotic and abiotic stress responses may interact synergistically or antagonistically. To identify the similarities and differences among responses to diverse stresses, we analyzed previously published microarray data on the transcriptomic responses of Arabidopsis to infection with Botrytis cinerea (a biotic stress, and to cold, drought, and oxidative stresses (abiotic stresses. Our analyses showed that at early stages after B. cinerea inoculation, 1498 genes were up-regulated (B. cinerea up-regulated genes; BUGs and 1138 genes were down-regulated (B. cinerea down-regulated genes; BDGs. We showed a unique program of gene expression was activated in response each biotic and abiotic stress, but that some genes were similarly induced or repressed by all of the tested stresses. Of the identified BUGs, 25%, 6% and 12% were also induced by cold, drought and oxidative stress, respectively; whereas 33%, 7% and 5.5% of the BDGs were also down-regulated by the same abiotic stresses. Coexpression and protein-protein interaction network analyses revealed a dynamic range in the expression levels of genes encoding regulatory proteins. Analysis of gene expression in response to electrophilic oxylipins suggested that these compounds are involved in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors. Our results suggest an overlap among genes involved in the responses to biotic and abiotic stresses in Arabidopsis. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. Identifying genes that are commonly expressed in response to environmental stresses, and further analyzing the functions of their encoded products, will increase our understanding of the plant stress response. This information could identify targets

  8. The enteric nervous system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sasselli, Valentina; Pachnis, Vassilis; Burns, Alan J

    2012-01-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS), the intrinsic innervation of the gastrointestinal tract, consists of numerous types of neurons, and glial cells, that are distributed in two intramuscular plexuses that extend along the entire...

  9. A common polymorphism in the interleukin-8 gene promoter is associated with an increased risk for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garey, Kevin W; Jiang, Zhi-Dong; Ghantoji, Shashank; Tam, Vincent H; Arora, Vaneet; Dupont, Herbert L

    2010-12-15

    Neutrophil recruitment coordinated by intestinal interleukin (IL)-8 secretion is a key component in the pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). We hypothesized that a common single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the -251 region of the IL-8 gene promoter may be predictive of recurrent CDI. This was a prospective cohort study of hospitalized adult patients with CDI who were admitted to a large, university-affiliated medical center from 2007 through 2008. Patients were monitored for 3 months after diagnosis of CDI and assessed for recurrent CDI (defined as a return of diarrhea that required treatment after initial symptom resolution). DNA was isolated from blood samples, and genetic sequencing was performed using polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing. The association between IL-8 genotype and recurrent CDI was assessed using univariate and multivariate statistics. Ninety-six patients with a mean (± standard deviation) age of 61 ± 16 years (54% of whom were female and 63% of whom were white) were identified. The overall incidence of recurrent CDI was 24%. IL-8 allele frequency was similar to previously reported findings (for A/A, 27%; for A/T, 53%; and for T/T, 20%). The incidence of recurrent CDI was 38% in patients with the A/A allele and 19% in all other patients (relative risk, 2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-4.13) (P = .043). This study indicates that a common SNP in the IL-8 gene promoter is an independent predictor of recurrent CDI. Our results could offer risk stratification for patients at high risk for recurrent CDI.

  10. HIV, opiates, and enteric neuron dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, J J

    2015-04-01

    Human immune deficient virus (HIV) is an immunosuppressive virus that targets CD4(+) T-lymphocytes. HIV infections cause increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancer. HIV infection can also alter central nervous system (CNS) function causing cognitive impairment. HIV does not infect neurons but it does infect astrocytes and microglia in the CNS. HIV can also infect enteric glia initiating an intestinal inflammatory response which causes enteric neural injury and gut dysfunction. Part of the inflammatory response is HIV induced production of proteins including, Transactivator of transcription (Tat) which contribute to neuronal injury after release from HIV infected glial cells. A risk factor for HIV infection is intravenous drug use with contaminated needles and chronic opiate use can exacerbate neural injury in the nervous system. While most research focuses on the actions of Tat and other HIV related proteins and opiates on the brain, recent data indicate that Tat can cause intestinal inflammation and disruption of enteric neuron function, including alteration of Na(+) channel activity and action potential generation. A paper published in this issue of Neurogastroenterology and Motility extends these findings by identifying an interaction between Tat and morphine on enteric neuron Na(+) channels and on intestinal motility in vivo using a Tat expressing transgenic mouse model. These new data show that Tat protein can enhance the inhibitory actions of morphine on action potential generation and propulsive motility. These findings are important to our understanding of how HIV causes diarrhea in infected patients and for the use of opioid drugs to treat HIV-induced diarrhea.

  11. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety of interrupting maintenance therapy for previous opportunistic infections other than Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among patients with HIV infection who respond to potent antiretroviral therapy has not been well documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of interrupting m...

  12. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The safety of interrupting maintenance therapy for previous opportunistic infections other than Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia among patients with HIV infection who respond to potent antiretroviral therapy has not been well documented. OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety of interrupting m...

  13. Isolation and Characterization of Plant-Pathogenic Streptomyces Species Associated with Common Scab-Infected Potato Tubers in Newfoundland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyans, Joanna K; Bown, Luke; Bignell, Dawn R D

    2016-02-01

    Potato common scab (CS) is an economically important crop disease that is caused by several members of the genus Streptomyces. In this study, we characterized the plant-pathogenic Streptomyces spp. associated with CS-infected potato tubers harvested in Newfoundland, Canada. A total of 17 pathogenic Streptomyces isolates were recovered from potato scab lesions, of which eight were determined to be most similar to the known CS pathogen S. europaeiscabiei. All eight S. europaeiscabiei isolates were found to produce the thaxtomin A phytotoxin and to harbor the nec1 virulence gene, and most also carry the putative virulence gene tomA. The remaining isolates appear to be novel pathogenic species that do not produce thaxtomin A, and only two of these isolates were determined to harbor the nec1 or tomA genes. Of the non-thaxtomin-producing isolates, strain 11-1-2 was shown to exhibit a severe pathogenic phenotype against different plant hosts and to produce a novel, secreted phytotoxic substance. This is the first report documenting the plant-pathogenic Streptomyces spp. associated with CS disease in Newfoundland. Furthermore, our findings provide further evidence that phytotoxins other than thaxtomin A may also contribute to the development of CS by Streptomyces spp.

  14. Infection of Common Marmosets with GB Virus B Chimeric Virus Encoding the Major Nonstructural Proteins NS2 to NS4A of Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shaomei; Li, Tingting; Liu, Bochao; Xu, Yuxia; Sun, Yachun; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Yuanzhan; Shuai, Lifang; Chen, Zixuan; Allain, Jean-Pierre; Li, Chengyao

    2016-09-15

    A lack of immunocompetent-small-primate models has been an obstacle for developing hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccines and affordable antiviral drugs. In this study, HCV/GB virus B (GBV-B) chimeric virus carrying the major nonstructural proteins NS2 to NS4A (HCV NS2 to -4A chimera) was produced and used to infect common marmosets, since HCV NS2 to NS4A proteins are critical proteases and major antigens. Seven marmosets were inoculated intrahepatically with HCV NS2 to -4A chimera RNA for primary infection or intravenously injected with chimera-containing serum for passage infection. Three animals used as controls were injected with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or GBV-B, respectively. Six of seven HCV NS2 to -4A chimera-infected marmosets exhibited consistent viremia and one showed transient viremia during the course of follow-up detection. All six infected animals with persistent circulating viremia presented characteristics typical of viral hepatitis, including viral RNA and proteins in hepatocytes and histopathological changes in liver tissue. Viremia was consistently detected for 5 to 54 weeks of follow-up. FK506 immunosuppression facilitated the establishment of persistent chimera infection in marmosets. An animal with chimera infection spontaneously cleared the virus in blood 7 weeks following the first inoculation, but viral-RNA persistence, low-level viral protein, and mild necroinflammation remained in liver tissue. The specific antibody and T-cell response to HCV NS3 in this viremia-resolved marmoset was boosted by rechallenging, but no viremia was detected during 57 weeks of follow-up. The chimera-infected marmosets described can be used as a suitable small-primate animal model for studying novel antiviral drugs and T-cell-based vaccines against HCV infection. HCV infection causes approximately 70% of chronic hepatitis and is frequently associated with primary liver cancer globally. Chimpanzees have been used as a reliable primate model for HCV infection

  15. Clostridium perfringens: A review of enteric diseases in dogs, cats and wild animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is a gram-positive anaerobic bacillus that is commonly part of the microbiota of humans and animals. It is considered a common enteric pathogen, but the pathogenesis and the predisposing factors of the disease commonly differ between host species. Thus, specific research is necessary to understand the role of this pathogen, how to diagnose it, and which control measures are applicable. The aim of this paper is to review the current knowledge of C. perfringens infections in dogs, cats and wild animals.

  16. Campylobacter jejuni enteritis and reactive arthritis

    OpenAIRE

    Short, C. D.; Klouda, P T; Smith, Lorna

    1982-01-01

    A further case of reactive arthritis following Campylobacter jejuni enteritis is reported. The interim results of a small prospective study are discussed. It may be desirable to do serological studies for campylobacter infection in the investigation of mono- or polyarthritis of acute onset.

  17. Redescription and molecular analysis of Myxobolus shantungensis Hu, 1965 (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) infecting common carp Cyprinus carpio haematopterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Gu, Zemao; Zhang, Yunchao; Zeng, Lingbing

    2011-12-01

    Myxobolus shantungensis Hu, 1965 infects gill arches of common carp Cyprinus carpio haematopterus (Temminck and Schlegel), causing serious pathological effects on host fish. An inadequate original description and absence of molecular data make accurate early diagnosis challenging. To augment the original description, M. shantungensis is redescribed here using morphological and molecular biological methods. Mature spores of M. shantungensis were ellipsoidal or apple shaped in frontal view and lemon shaped in lateral view, averaging 8.2  ±  0.3 μm (8.0-9.0 μm) ×  10.1 ±  0.5 μm (9.2-11.1 μm)  ×  6.9  ±  0.3 μm (6.0-7.4 μm). Some spores had three to four "V"-shaped valve edge markings on the posterior of the spore. The two equal polar capsules were oval, measuring 4.3  ±  0.3 μm (3.8-5.0 μm)  ×  3.2  ±  0.2 μm (2.8-3.5 μm), situated at the anterior extremity of the spore. Polar filaments coiled with six to seven turns. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the surface of mature spores of M. shantungensis was generally pitted with a number of irregular ridges in shape. M. shantungensis is also characterized on the molecular level using the sequence of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene. A BLAST search revealed that this sequence did not match any available sequences in GenBank.

  18. Epidemiologic relationship between Toscana virus infection and Leishmania infantum due to common exposure to Phlebotomus perniciosus sandfly vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Bichaud

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Sand flies are recognised vectors of parasites in the genus Leishmania and a number of arthropod-borne viruses, in particular viruses within the genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae. In southern France, Toscana phlebovirus (TOSV is recognized as a prominent cause of summer meningitis. Since Leishmania and TOSV have a common vector (Phlebotomus perniciosus, an epidemiologic link has been assumed for a long time. However, there is no scientific evidence of such a link between human leishmaniosis and phleboviral infections. To identify a possible link, we investigated the presence and distribution of antibodies against these two microorganisms (i in individuals and (ii at a spatial level in the city of Marseille (south-eastern France. Five hundred sera were selected randomly in the biobank of the Department of Parasitology of the Public Hospitals of Marseille. All sera were previously tested for IgG against Leishmania by Western Blotting, and TOSV IgG were detected by indirect immunofluorescence. The seropositivity rates were 21.4% for TOSV and 28% for Leishmania. Statistical analysis demonstrated that seropositivity for one pathogen was significantly associated with seropositivity to the other pathogen. This result provided the first robust evidence for the existence of an epidemiological relationship between Leishmania infantum and TOSV. Addresses of tested patients were geolocalized and integrated into Geographical Information System software, in order to test spatial relationship between the two pathogens. Spatial analysis did not allow to identify (i specific patterns for the spatial distribution of positive serological results for TOSV or Leishmania, and (ii a spatial relationship between Leishmania and TOSV positive serological results. This may reflect the fact that the sample studied was not powerful enough to demonstrate either a spatial clustering or co-location, i.e. that the actual risk exposure area is smaller than the mean of

  19. ENFit Enteral Nutrition Connectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenter, Peggi; Lyman, Beth

    2016-12-01

    New enteral connectors are now available based on the development of standards using the International Organization of Standardization process to prevent misconnections between systems that should not connect. Enteral devices with the new patient access connectors, called ENFit, are being now introduced for the purpose of improving patient safety. Transitioning to these new connectors poses benefits and challenges for facilities or agencies implementing these new devices. Information from appropriate resources should be sought by clinicians who need to partner with their suppliers and clinical organizations to see how best to meet these challenges.

  20. Plasmodium vivax sub-patent infections after radical treatment are common in Peruvian patients: results of a 1-year prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Van den Eede

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an increasing body of literature reporting treatment failure of the currently recommended radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax infections. As P. vivax is the main malaria species outside the African continent, emerging tolerance to its radical treatment regime could have major consequences in countries like Peru, where 80% of malaria cases are due to P. vivax. Here we describe the results of a 1-year longitudinal follow up of 51 confirmed P. vivax patients living around Iquitos, Peruvian Amazon, and treated according to the Peruvian national guidelines. METHODOLOGY: Each month a blood sample for microscopy and later genotyping was systematically collected. Recent exposure to infection was estimated by detecting antibodies against the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP and all PCR confirmed P. vivax infections were genotyped with 16 polymorphic microsatellites. RESULTS: During a 1-year period, 84 recurrent infections, 22 positive also by microscopy, were identified, with a median survival time to first recurrent infection of 203 days. Most of them (71% were asymptomatic; in 13 patients the infection persisted undetected by microscopy for several consecutive months. The genotype of mostly recurrent infections differed from that at day 0 while fewer differences were seen between the recurrent infections. The average expected heterozygosity was 0.56. There was strong linkage disequilibrium (I(A(s = 0.29, p<1.10(-4 that remained also when analyzing only the unique haplotypes, suggesting common inbreeding. CONCLUSION: In Peru, the P. vivax recurrent infections were common and displayed a high turnover of parasite genotypes compared to day 0. Plasmodium vivax patients, even when treated according to the national guidelines, may still represent an important parasite reservoir that can maintain transmission. Any elimination effort should consider such a hidden reservoir.

  1. Plasmodium vivax Sub-Patent Infections after Radical Treatment Are Common in Peruvian Patients: Results of a 1-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Christopher; Gamboa, Dionicia; Grande, Tanilu; Rodriguez, Hugo; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Anné, Jozef; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Erhart, Annette

    2011-01-01

    Background There is an increasing body of literature reporting treatment failure of the currently recommended radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax infections. As P. vivax is the main malaria species outside the African continent, emerging tolerance to its radical treatment regime could have major consequences in countries like Peru, where 80% of malaria cases are due to P. vivax. Here we describe the results of a 1-year longitudinal follow up of 51 confirmed P. vivax patients living around Iquitos, Peruvian Amazon, and treated according to the Peruvian national guidelines. Methodology Each month a blood sample for microscopy and later genotyping was systematically collected. Recent exposure to infection was estimated by detecting antibodies against the P. vivax circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and all PCR confirmed P. vivax infections were genotyped with 16 polymorphic microsatellites. Results During a 1-year period, 84 recurrent infections, 22 positive also by microscopy, were identified, with a median survival time to first recurrent infection of 203 days. Most of them (71%) were asymptomatic; in 13 patients the infection persisted undetected by microscopy for several consecutive months. The genotype of mostly recurrent infections differed from that at day 0 while fewer differences were seen between the recurrent infections. The average expected heterozygosity was 0.56. There was strong linkage disequilibrium (IAs = 0.29, p<1.10−4) that remained also when analyzing only the unique haplotypes, suggesting common inbreeding. Conclusion In Peru, the P. vivax recurrent infections were common and displayed a high turnover of parasite genotypes compared to day 0. Plasmodium vivax patients, even when treated according to the national guidelines, may still represent an important parasite reservoir that can maintain transmission. Any elimination effort should consider such a hidden reservoir. PMID:21297986

  2. Uncomplicated E Coli Urinary Tract Infection in College Women: A Follow-Up Study of E Coli Sensitivities to Commonly Prescribed Antibiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansbach, Robert K.; Dybus, Karen; Bergeson, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    Treatment of uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) has changed in the past few years with researchers advocating empiric treatment for shorter periods of time without the use of cultures. Researchers report that antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli (E coli) to commonly prescribed antibiotics in uncomplicated UTIs has been increasing.…

  3. Ultrasound evaluation of the enteric duplication cyst: the gut signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Serafino, Marco; Mercogliano, Carmela; Vallone, Gianfranco

    2016-06-01

    Gastrointestinal duplication cyst is a rare congenital anomaly that may occur anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract from the tongue to the anus. Such cysts occur most commonly in the small bowel and about half are in the mesenteric border of the ileum. Such cystic duplications communicate only rarely with the intestinal lumen although the cysts are attached to the intestine and may even share a common wall with the adjacent alimentary tract. These lesions can vary in shape, being cystic or tubular, and often show the same structure of the adjacent normal bowel. It is usually asymptomatic and complications are rare but they may include obstruction by volvulus or intussusception, bleeding, infection, and perforation. When diagnosed these lesions should be surgically resected to avoid future possible complications. The authors present a case of enteric cystic duplication and its ultrasound appearance in a 12-month-old Caucasian female infant cause of acute abdominal pain and intestinal obstruction, thus requiring urgent surgery.

  4. Effects of enteral nutrition on imflammatory factors with lung caner complicated pulmonary infection%早期肠内营养对中晚期肺癌合并肺炎患者炎症因子的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张静; 康红刚; 王丽萍; 王彦文

    2016-01-01

    Objective :To investigate the effects of enteral nutrition on blood and inflammation factor lev‐els in patients with lung cancer complicated pulmonary infection .Methods:86 cases of lung cancer complicated with pulmonary infection admitted were randomly divided into enteral nutrition(EN) groups (43 cases) and control group (47 cases) .EN group before and after treatment were given enteral nutrition (Nutricia) as enteral nutrition prepara‐tion 200~300 g/d+ ordinary diet ,were continuously taking more than 14 days;control group fed on ordinary diet and the same level of two groups of antibiotic drugs .3 days of treatment were measured before and after treatment , inflammation index 7 days in serum and hematological indexes .Record the application time of antibiotics and the ad‐verse reactions such as vomiting ,diarrhea and so on during the course of treatment .Results :The level of treatment after 3 days in the EN group of interleukin‐6 (IL‐6) and alpha‐1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) were lower than those in the control group (P0 .05) .During the period of enteral nutrition support ,there were 3 cases of abdominal distension in EN group ,2 cases of diarrhea ,4 of abdominal distension and 2 of diarrhea in the control group .There was no significant difference in the incidence of adverse reactions between the two groups (P>0 .05) . The time of antibiotic application in EN group was 6 .41 ± 1 .28days ,the control group was 9 .32 ± 2 .25days ,the difference between the two groups was statistically significant (P<0 .05) .Conclusion :The application of nutritional agents in the treatment of lung cancer complicated with pneumonia can improve the curative effect of antibiotics in the treatment of pulmonary infection ,and is well tolerated .%目的:探讨肠内营养制剂对中晚期肺癌合并肺炎患者炎症因子的影响。方法:86例肺癌合并肺炎患者,分为肠内营养组(EN组)(43例)和对照组(47例)。EN组给予肠

  5. Detection and characterization of enteric viruses in flood water from the 2011 thai flood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaosuwankul, Nathamon; Thippornchai, Narin; Yamashita, Akifumi; Vargas, Ronald E Morales; Tunyong, Witawat; Mahakunkijchareon, Yuvadee; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Okabayashi, Tamaki; Leaungwutiwong, Pornsawan

    2013-01-01

    Severe flooding, which is associated with numerous outbreaks of a wide range of infectious diseases, particularly those caused by enteric viruses, occurred in all areas of Thailand in 2011. To determine the prevalence of five human enteric viruses, namely enterovirus, rotavirus (RV), norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and hepatitis E virus, in the flood water, 100 water samples were collected from flood-damaged areas in central Thailand. Viral RNA was extracted from concentrated samples and analyzed by RT-PCR and sequencing. NV was the most commonly detected pathogen in the tested samples (14%). RV and HAV were detected in 9% and 7% of samples, respectively. This study is the first to detect enteric viral genes in flood water in Thailand. Furthermore, it is the first to detect an NV gene in any type of environmental water in Thailand. These results provide useful information for estimating the risk of flood waterborne viral infection.

  6. [New nutrients in enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez Martínez, C

    2000-01-01

    1. Medical and surgical stress (major surgery, sepsis, injuries,...) increases requirements of certain essential nutrients and others considered non-essential or semi-essential. 2. Some nutrients such as glutamine, arginine, omega 3 fatty acids nucleotides, ... have a considerable influence on the immune function (delayed hypersensitivity, lymphocyte sub-population counts, immunological tests,..) and improve certain metabolic and nutritional indices (nitrogen balance, medium and short life proteins,...). For this reason, they are called "immunonutrients" or "immunity regulators". 3. The supply of special enteral formulas for situations of immunological compromise, with the addition of one or more of the nutrients considered today as "immunity regulators" has increased since 1988 in both absolute and percentage terms. 4. These nutrient-enriched enteral formulas improve the rate of infections, reduce the number of days on ventilator equipment, the length of hospital stays for critical patients, with a more marked effect on surgical patients. 5. The evidence seems today to support the use of enriched formulas with critical patients. Nonetheless, some caution must be maintained as it has not been possible to show any reduction in the mortality of the cases studied nor, in short, in the prognosis of patients affected by situations of hypercatabolism and reduced immunity. 6. We feel that their use should, therefore, be carried out in accordance with the protocols and in patients expected to survive, where the evolution reveals severe catabolism unhindered by conventional therapy.

  7. Enteric parvovirus infections of chickens and turkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken and turkey parvoviruses are members of the Parvovirus family. Comparative sequence analysis of their genome structure revealed that they should form a new genus within the vertebrate Parvovirinae subfamily. The first chicken and turkey parvoviruses were identified by electron microscopy duri...

  8. Laboratory Investigation of Childhood Enteric Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of tI’tS.methionme.labeled proteins [1211. Recontnendations Patients with onset of diarrhea after starting a course of...phase immune electron microscopy (SPIEM), counter- immunoelectrophoresis, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of viral RNA, radioimmunoassay (RIA...described [171,172]. The technique involves axenic culture of the isolates [173], lysis, and starch gel electrophoresis followed by visualization of

  9. Enteric alpha defensins in norm and pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisitsyn Nikolai A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbes living in the mammalian gut exist in constant contact with immunity system that prevents infection and maintains homeostasis. Enteric alpha defensins play an important role in regulation of bacterial colonization of the gut, as well as in activation of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses of the adaptive immune system cells in lamina propria. This review summarizes currently available data on functions of mammalian enteric alpha defensins in the immune defense and changes in their secretion in intestinal inflammatory diseases and cancer.

  10. Rapid diagnostic tests for typhoid and paratyphoid (enteric) fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijedoru, Lalith; Mallett, Sue; Parry, Christopher M

    2017-01-01

    infection from a patient’s blood or bone marrow). Background Typhoid fever and paratyphoid fever are infections caused by the bacteria Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Paratyphi A respectively. The term ‘enteric fever’ is used to describe both infections. Enteric fever can be difficult to diagnose as the signs and symptoms are similar to those of other infectious diseases that cause fever such as malaria. The recommended test to confirm if a person has enteric fever is to grow the Salmonella from their blood. It takes at least 48 hours to give a result, so cannot help healthcare workers make a diagnosis the same day the blood culture is taken. Blood cultures may give a negative result even though a person has enteric fever. The test also requires a laboratory and trained staff, which are often unavailable in communities where enteric fever is common. Rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are designed to be easy to use, and to deliver a quick result without the need for a blood culture laboratory. The cost of an enteric fever RDT would be significantly less than a blood culture, and requires less training to perform. Study characteristics Cochrane researchers searched the available literature up to 4 March 2016 and included 37 studies. Most studies recruited participants from South Asia. Most participants were adults, with 22 studies including children. All of the RDTs evaluated detected Salmonella Typhi (typhoid fever) only. Quality of the evidence The Cochrane researchers evaluated the quality of the data for each study using a standardized checklist called QUADAS-2. High quality studies that compared different types of RDT in the same patients were few in number. Two-thirds of the included studies did not evaluate the RDTs in the context of patients who are typically tested for the disease. Many studies utilized a particular study design (a case control study) which risks overestimating RDT accuracy. In the studies evaluating the Typhidot RDT, it was often unclear how many

  11. Safe interruption of maintenance therapy against previous infection with four common HIV-associated opportunistic pathogens during potent antiretroviral therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Ole; Reiss, Peter; Uberti-Foppa, Caterina;

    2002-01-01

    maintenance therapy for cytomegalovirus (CMV) end-organ disease, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, cerebral toxoplasmosis, and extrapulmonary cryptococcosis in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. DESIGN: Observational study. SETTING: Seven European HIV cohorts. PATIENTS: 358...... identified: 162 for CMV disease, 103 for MAC infection, 75 for toxoplasmosis, and 39 for cryptococcosis. During 781 person-years of follow-up, five patients had relapse. Two relapses (one of CMV disease and one of MAC infection) were diagnosed after maintenance therapy was interrupted when the CD4 lymphocyte....... One relapse (toxoplasmosis) was diagnosed after maintenance therapy interruption at a CD4 lymphocyte count greater than 200 x 10(6) cells/L for 15 months. The overall incidences of recurrent CMV disease, MAC infection, toxoplasmosis, and cryptococcosis were 0.54 per 100 person-years (95% CI, 0.07 to 1...

  12. 鸭肠炎病毒强毒参考株在感染鸭体内的动态分布研究%Dynamic Distribution of Duck Enteritis Virus Standard Challenge Strain in Experimentally Infected Ducklings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文晶亮; 李俊平; 李启红; 李岭; 孙淼; 李慧姣; 杨承槐; 夏业才

    2014-01-01

    为研究鸭肠炎病毒( DEV)强毒株在感染鸭体内的动态分布规律,根据DEV的gD基因序列设计检测引物RT-gDF和RT-gDR,建立了特异性强、敏感性高、重复性好的检测DEV的SYBR GreenⅠ实时荧光定量PCR方法。应用已建立的方法,对DEV强毒参考株感染鸭的组织脏器进行了定量检测。结果显示,接种后6 h即可在所有受检组织中检测到DEV DNA,随着病程发展, DNA拷贝数持续升高,直至接种5 d后感染鸭全部死亡。其中结肠病毒DNA拷贝数为最高,达到1013.26 copies/g,法氏囊、肝脏和盲肠次之,约1012 copies/g。证实了DEV强毒对感染鸭的免疫器官、神经组织和消化系统均具有广泛的嗜性。%To explore the dynamic distribution of duck enteritis virus challenge standard strain ( DEV CSC ) in experimentally infected ducklings, the specific primers ( RT-gDF and RT-gDR) were designed according to the gene DEV gD, and the SYBR GreenⅠreal-time fluorescent quantitative PCR method for virulent strain with satisfaction of specificity, sensibility and repeatability was established. Copies of DEV DNA were quantified in the collected tissues by the fluorescent quantitative PCR method. In result, DEV CSC DNA were firstly detected in all the samples at six hours after inoculation and the DNA copies subsequently continued to rise till the death of all the ducklings infected with DEV CSC virulent strain five days after inoculation. The DNA copies of DEV CSC strain in colon(1013.26 copies/g) of dead ducklings was highest, and then came to bursa of Fabricius, caecum and liver, about 1012 copies/g. The results above comfirmed that the virulent strain CSC had broad tissue tropism on immune organs, nerve tissue and digestive system of infected ducks.

  13. Microbiological contamination of enteral feeding solutions used in Costa Rican hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Maria Laura; Monge, Rafael; Chávez, Carolina

    2003-09-01

    Enteral feeding is the most common and preferred modality for providing nutritional support to hospital patients with a functional gastrointestinal tract that can not satisfy their nutritional requirements. Nevertheless, enteral feeding may be an important cause of bacterial infection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbial contamination level of enteral feedings distributed in Costa Rican hospitals. A total of 124 samples of enteral feeding, coming from five different hospitals from San José, Costa Rica, were evaluated during the second semester of 1997 and first of 1998 for the presence and identification of total and fecal coliforms, Pseudomonas sp. and Listeria sp. A subpopulation of the Pseudomonas isolated was analyzed for their antibiotic susceptibility patterns. The concentration of Gram negative rods in the samples of enteral feeding solutions ranged from 10(3) to 10(7) CFU/mL, markedly exceeding the permissible level (10(2) CFU/mL or less). The coliforms most frequently isolated included Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coil, Serratia sp. and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Pseudomonas sp. was isolated in more than 70% of the samples made from commercial based solutions, fruits and vegetables. P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens were the species most frequently isolated. Listeria sp. was not isolated from enteral solutions samples. The results obtained demonstrate that it is urgent to assure strict hygiene during the preparation and handling of all enteral feed in order to avoid bacterial growth. The implementation of HACCP (Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points) system will be required in a near future for better quality control of enteral nutrition mixtures.

  14. Avian necrotic enteritis: Experimental models, climate change, and vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    This review summarizes recent developments in disease models, pathogenesis, host immunity, risk factors, and vaccine development for Clostridium perfringens infection of poultry and necrotic enteritis (NE). The increasing trends of legislative restrictions and voluntary removal of antibiotic growth...

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi genotyping supports a common source of infection in a school-related oral outbreak of acute Chagas disease in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Bello, Z; Thomas, M C; López, M C; Zavala-Jaspe, R; Noya, O; DE Noya, B Alarcón; Abate, T

    2014-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi I, a discrete typing unit (DTU) found in human infections in Venezuela and other countries of the northern region of South America and in Central America, has been recently classified into five intra-DTU genotypes (Ia, Ib, Ic, Id, Ie) based on sequence polymorphisms found in the spliced leader intergenic region. In this paper we report the genotype identification of T. cruzi human isolates from one outbreak of acute orally acquired Chagas disease that occurred in a non-endemic region of Venezuela and from T. cruzi triatomine and rat isolates captured at a guava juice preparation site which was identified as the presumptive source of infection. The genotyping of all these isolates as TcId supports the view of a common source of infection in this oral Chagas disease outbreak through the ingestion of guava juice. Implications for clinical manifestations and dynamics of transmission cycles are discussed.

  16. [Chonic diarrhea and malabsorption due to common variable immunodeficiency, gastrectomy and giardiasis infection: a difficult nutritional management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-López, M E; González-molero, I; Ramírez-Plaza, C P; Soriguer, F; Olveira, G

    2011-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a frequent cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. Surgery is the only potentially curative therapy, although the adverse effects of surgery are common and considerable. Common variable immunodeficiency is in many cases cause of gastrointestinal system problems such as chronic diarrhea caused by infestation with giardia lamblia, nodular lymphoid hiperplasia ad loss of villi leading frequently to malapsortion and malnutrition. Nutritional deficiencies due to malapsorption (postgastrectomy and secondary to loss of villi, giardiasis and common variable inmunodeficiency) are common. We present the case of a patient with gastric cancer who underwent a gastrectomy with common variable hipogammaglobulinemia and chronic infestation by giardia lamblia, with serious diarrhea resistant to treatment and malabsorption.

  17. [Dengue infection: A common cause of febrile syndrome in patients from Quibdó, Chocó, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Berta Nelly; Piedrahita, Leidy Diana; Agudelo, Ivony Yireth; Marín, Katherine; Ramírez, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Quibdó, a municipality in Chocó, has poor public services and weather and social conditions that favor dengue transmission. However, there are few studies about this problem in this district. To determine the frequency of dengue infection in patients with acute febrile syndrome and to compare clinical features among dengue infected patients with other febrile diseases. A cross-sectional study was conducted from January, 2008, to March, 2010. The study population comprised patients with febrile syndrome of seven or fewer days of evolution, recruited from hospitals in the town. Dengue diagnosis was made in serum samples by detection of IgM antibodies, NS1 antigen, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and virus isolation. Clinical and laboratory information from the patients was obtained. During the study period, 469 patients with acute febrile syndrome were recruited, of whom 98.3% were Afro-descendant. Dengue fever was found in 28.4% of the cases. Four dengue serotypes were identified with DENV-1 predominance. The ages ranged from zero to 76 years. From all patients, 70.7% of cases were classified as dengue without warning signs. Nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, cough, nasal congestion and sore throat were significantly more frequent in patients with another febrile disease. Active surveillance of the acute febrile syndrome allowed for the detection of undiagnosed cases of dengue; the observed frequency of this infection suggests that the study area has a high risk of dengue infection.

  18. Current knowledge on alleviating Helicobacter pylori infections through the use of some commonly known natural products: bench to bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliga Raman Murali

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium, has been classified as a class I carcinogen by the World Health Organization and recognized as the causative agent for peptic ulcers, duodenal ulcer, gastritis, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas, and gastric cancer. Owing to their alarming rate of drug resistance, eradication of H. pylori remains a global challenge. Triple therapy consisting of a proton pump inhibitor, clarithromycin, and either amoxicillin or metronidazole, is generally the recommended standard for the treatment of H. pylori infection. Complementary and alternative medicines have a long history in the treatment of gastrointestinal ailments and various compounds has been tested for anti-H. pylori activity both in vitro and in vivo; however, their successful use in human clinical trials is sporadic. Hence, the aim of this review is to analyze the role of some well-known natural products that have been tested in clinical trials in preventing, altering, or treating H. pylori infections. Whereas some in vitro and in vivo studies in the literature have demonstrated the successful use of a few potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections, others indicate a need to consider natural products, with or without triple therapy, as a useful alternative in treating H. pylori-related infections. Thus, the reported mechanisms include killing of H. pylori urease inhibition, induction of bacterial cell damage, and immunomodulatory effect on the host immune system. Furthermore, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the successful use of some potential natural products for the treatment of H. pylori-related infections. Nevertheless, the routine prescription of potential complementary and alternative medicines continues to be restrained, and evidence on the safety and efficacy of the active compounds remains a subject of ongoing debate.

  19. Comparative examination of cats with feline leukemia virus-associated enteritis and other relevant forms of feline enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipar, A; Kremendahl, J; Jackson, M L; Reinacher, M

    2001-07-01

    Cats with feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated enteritis (FAE), enteritis of other known viral etiology (parvovirus [PV], enteric coronavirus [CoV]), and enteritis of unknown etiology with histologic features similar to those of FAE and PV enteritis (EUE) and FeLV-negative and FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations were examined. Amount and types of infiltrating leukocytes in the jejunum and activity and cellular constituents of mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow were determined. PV and CoV infections were confirmed by immunohistologic demonstration of PV and CoV antigen, ultrastructural demonstration of viral particles in the intestinal content, and in situ hybridization for PV genome. FeLV infection was detected by immunohistology for gp70, p27, and p15E. Latent FeLV infection was excluded by polymerase chain reaction methods for exogenous FeLV DNA. Enterocyte lesions involved the crypts in cats with PV enteritis, FAE, and EUE and the villous tips in cats with CoV enteritis. Inflammatory infiltration was generally dominated by mononuclear cells and was moderate in the unaltered intestine and in cats with PV enteritis and marked in cats with FAE, CoV enteritis, and EUE. In cats with EUE, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-positive macrophages were relatively numerous, suggesting recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes. Lymphoid tissues were depleted in cats with PV enteritis and with EUE but were normal or hyperplastic in cats with FAE. Bone marrow activity was decreased in cats with PV enteritis; in cats with FAE or EUE and in FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations, activity was slightly increased. In cats with FAE and PV enteritis, a T-cell-dominated response prevailed. EUE showed some parallels to human inflammatory bowel disease, indicating a potential harmful effect of infiltrating macrophages on the intestinal epithelium.

  20. Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000164.htm Enteral nutrition - child - managing problems To use the sharing features ... trouble breathing, call 911. References Mcclave SA. Enteral nutrition. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil ...

  1. Prevalencia de infección tuberculosa latente en población inmigrante que ingresa en prisión Prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection amongst immigrants entering prison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Solé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Estudiar la prevalencia de infección tuberculosa latente (ITL y sus factores predictivos en población reclusa inmigrante. Métodos: Estudio prospectivo realizado en mayo y junio de 2009. Se realizó intradermorreacción de Mantoux (IDRM, considerándose positiva la induración ≥ 10 mm. Se recogen las variables: edad, origen, reincidencia, tiempo en España, consumo de heroína y/o cocaína, uso de drogas intravenosas e infección VIH. Se calcula la tasa de ITL y la tasa global de infección (ITL más antecedente de tuberculosis. Para estudiar factores predictivos, se realizó un análisis bivariante y multivariante mediante regresión logística. Resultados: Se estudiaron 152 varones inmigrantes al ingreso en prisión. Edad media: 31,9 años ± 7,8. El 37,3% consumidor de heroína y/o cocaína y el 7,5% usuarios de drogas por vía intravenosa (UDI. 12 tenían IDRM previa positiva y 6 antecedente de TB. Se realizó IDRM a 134, 63 con resultado positivo y 71 con resultado negativo. Tasa de ITL: 49,3%. Tasa global de infección: 53,3%. Bivariadamente, se asoció a la ITL: la reincidencia (67,4% vs 36,4% en primarios, p=0,001, la edad (76% en los ≥ 40 años vs 40,4% en menores de esa edad; p=0,002 y el consumo de heroína y/o cocaína (60% en consumidores vs 39,3% en no consumidores; p= 0,02. El análisis multivariante sólo confirmó la asociación con la edad (p=0,001; OR: 2,34, IC= 1,39-3,94. Conclusiones: La tasa de ITL en inmigrantes que ingresan en prisión es muy elevada. Se recomienda en todos un completo estudio, con especial dedicación a los más vulnerables como los inmigrantes de mayor edad.Objective: To study the prevalence of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI and the predictive factors amongst immigrants entering prison. Methods: prospective study conducted in May and June of 2009. The tuberculin skin test (TST was performed, with induration of ≥ 10 mm being regarded as positive. Variables collected were: age

  2. [Fiber and enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Candela, C; de Cos Blanco, A I; Iglesias Rosado, C

    2002-01-01

    Dietary fibre is a mixture of various substances and is essential for maintaining appropriate intestinal functionality and it is currently considered to be a necessary part of a healthy diet. Current recommendations for fibre consumption by adults range from 20 to 35 g/day. Enteral nutrition is an emerging therapeutic variation in both hospital and domestic settings. To a great extent, this development has been made possible thanks to the design of new formulas that adapt better and better to the clinicla conditions or our patients. The type of fibre used in these preparations varies greatly. Some have only one source of fibre while others use differnet combinations. There are currently 32 formulas available on the Spanish market, without counting the modules or specific preparations of individual types of fibre. Despite the enormous advances in the knowledge of the beneficial effects of fibre, the fact of the matter is that enteral nutrition that we routinely prescribe in normal clinical practice does not contain fibre. The are several explanations for this, perhaps the most plausible is that these formulas may lead to problems in their administration and tolerance. It is necessary to choose the correct calibre of catheter and define the best infusion method and timing. Another difficulty may be the gastrointestinal tolerance of the formulas containing fibre. No large-scale problems of intolerance have however been described in healthy volunteers nor in patients with acute or chronic pathologies, although it is of fundamental importance to monitor the rhythm of depositions in all patients with enteral nutrition (EN) and ensure proper intake of liquids, which would also be useful to prevent occlusion of the catheter. The theoretical benefits of EN with fibre with a view to maintaining or improving normal intestinal structure and function are very varied. Nonetheless, it has noit yet been possible to prove many of these effects in controlled clinical trials. At the

  3. Common duckweed (Lemna minor is a versatile high-throughput infection model for the Burkholderia cepacia complex and other pathogenic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euan L S Thomson

    Full Text Available Members of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc have emerged in recent decades as problematic pulmonary pathogens of cystic fibrosis (CF patients, with severe infections progressing to acute necrotizing pneumonia and sepsis. This study presents evidence that Lemna minor (Common duckweed is useful as a plant model for the Bcc infectious process, and has potential as a model system for bacterial pathogenesis in general. To investigate the relationship between Bcc virulence in duckweed and Galleria mellonella (Greater wax moth larvae, a previously established Bcc infection model, a duckweed survival assay was developed and used to determine LD50 values. A strong correlation (R(2 = 0.81 was found between the strains' virulence ranks in the two infection models, suggesting conserved pathways in these vastly different hosts. To broaden the application of the duckweed model, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC and five isogenic mutants with previously established LD50 values in the larval model were tested against duckweed, and a strong correlation (R(2 = 0.93 was found between their raw LD50 values. Potential virulence factors in B. cenocepacia K56-2 were identified using a high-throughput screen against single duckweed plants. In addition to the previously characterized antifungal compound (AFC cluster genes, several uncharacterized genes were discovered including a novel lysR regulator, a histidine biosynthesis gene hisG, and a gene located near the gene encoding the recently characterized virulence factor SuhB(Bc. Finally, to demonstrate the utility of this model in therapeutic applications, duckweed was rescued from Bcc infection by treating with bacteriophage at 6-h intervals. It was observed that phage application became ineffective at a timepoint that coincided with a sharp increase in bacterial invasion of plant tissue. These results indicate that common duckweed can serve as an effective infection model for the investigation of bacterial

  4. Hand washing with soap and water together with behavioural recommendations prevents infections in common work environment: an open cluster-randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savolainen-Kopra, Carita; Haapakoski, Jaason; Peltola, Piia A; Ziegler, Thedi; Korpela, Terttu; Anttila, Pirjo; Amiryousefi, Ali; Huovinen, Pentti; Huvinen, Markku; Noronen, Heikki; Riikkala, Pia; Roivainen, Merja; Ruutu, Petri; Teirilä, Juha; Vartiainen, Erkki; Hovi, Tapani

    2012-01-16

    Hand hygiene is considered as an important means of infection control. We explored whether guided hand hygiene together with transmission-limiting behaviour reduces infection episodes and lost days of work in a common work environment in an open cluster-randomized 3-arm intervention trial. A total of 21 clusters (683 persons) were randomized to implement hand hygiene with soap and water (257 persons), with alcohol-based hand rub (202 persons), or to serve as a control (224 persons). Participants in both intervention arms also received standardized instructions on how to limit the transmission of infections. The intervention period (16 months) included the emergence of the 2009 influenza pandemic and the subsequent national hand hygiene campaign influencing also the control arm. In the total follow-up period there was a 6.7% reduction of infection episodes in the soap-and water arm (p = 0.04). Before the onset of the anti-pandemic campaign, a statistically significant (p = 0.002) difference in the mean occurrence of infection episodes was observed between the control (6.0 per year) and the soap-and-water arm (5.0 per year) but not between the control and the alcohol-rub arm (5.6 per year). Neither intervention had a decreasing effect on absence from work. We conclude that intensified hand hygiene using water and soap together with behavioural recommendations can reduce the occurrence of self-reported acute illnesses in common work environment. Surprisingly, the occurrence of reported sick leaves also increased in the soap-and water-arm. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00981877 The Finnish Work Environment Fund and the National Institute for Health and Welfare.

  5. Hand washing with soap and water together with behavioural recommendations prevents infections in common work environment: an open cluster-randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savolainen-Kopra Carita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hand hygiene is considered as an important means of infection control. We explored whether guided hand hygiene together with transmission-limiting behaviour reduces infection episodes and lost days of work in a common work environment in an open cluster-randomized 3-arm intervention trial. Methods A total of 21 clusters (683 persons were randomized to implement hand hygiene with soap and water (257 persons, with alcohol-based hand rub (202 persons, or to serve as a control (224 persons. Participants in both intervention arms also received standardized instructions on how to limit the transmission of infections. The intervention period (16 months included the emergence of the 2009 influenza pandemic and the subsequent national hand hygiene campaign influencing also the control arm. Results In the total follow-up period there was a 6.7% reduction of infection episodes in the soap-and water arm (p = 0.04. Before the onset of the anti-pandemic campaign, a statistically significant (p = 0.002 difference in the mean occurrence of infection episodes was observed between the control (6.0 per year and the soap-and-water arm (5.0 per year but not between the control and the alcohol-rub arm (5.6 per year. Neither intervention had a decreasing effect on absence from work. Conclusions We conclude that intensified hand hygiene using water and soap together with behavioural recommendations can reduce the occurrence of self-reported acute illnesses in common work environment. Surprisingly, the occurrence of reported sick leaves also increased in the soap-and water-arm. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00981877 Source of funding The Finnish Work Environment Fund and the National Institute for Health and Welfare.

  6. Hand washing with soap and water together with behavioural recommendations prevents infections in common work environment: an open cluster-randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene is considered as an important means of infection control. We explored whether guided hand hygiene together with transmission-limiting behaviour reduces infection episodes and lost days of work in a common work environment in an open cluster-randomized 3-arm intervention trial. Methods A total of 21 clusters (683 persons) were randomized to implement hand hygiene with soap and water (257 persons), with alcohol-based hand rub (202 persons), or to serve as a control (224 persons). Participants in both intervention arms also received standardized instructions on how to limit the transmission of infections. The intervention period (16 months) included the emergence of the 2009 influenza pandemic and the subsequent national hand hygiene campaign influencing also the control arm. Results In the total follow-up period there was a 6.7% reduction of infection episodes in the soap-and water arm (p = 0.04). Before the onset of the anti-pandemic campaign, a statistically significant (p = 0.002) difference in the mean occurrence of infection episodes was observed between the control (6.0 per year) and the soap-and-water arm (5.0 per year) but not between the control and the alcohol-rub arm (5.6 per year). Neither intervention had a decreasing effect on absence from work. Conclusions We conclude that intensified hand hygiene using water and soap together with behavioural recommendations can reduce the occurrence of self-reported acute illnesses in common work environment. Surprisingly, the occurrence of reported sick leaves also increased in the soap-and water-arm. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00981877 Source of funding The Finnish Work Environment Fund and the National Institute for Health and Welfare. PMID:22243622

  7. 简析婴幼儿的“分离焦虑”--幼儿园新生入园常见问题%A Brief Analysis on the "Separation Anxiety" of Young Children:Common Problems upon New Students' Enter-ing Kindergarten

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐云

    2014-01-01

    分离焦虑是指当孩子和亲密的抚养者面临分离时,会产生一种不安情绪和不适应行为,而这种情绪和行为,依不同年龄,会有不同的行为反应,它是儿童时期较常见的一种情绪障碍,每个孩子都可能会有,只是轻重程度不同而已。新入园的幼儿分离焦虑主要是由陌生环境、人际关系以及自身的适应能力所导致的,根据幼儿分离焦虑产生的原因分析,得出缓解策略。%Separation anxiety refers to a kind of unease and in-adaptability when a child is faced with the separation from his in-timate caregivers, and there are different behavioral responses in accordance with different ages. It is a common mood disorder maybe during every child's childhood, and the difference is its degree. New kindergarten students' separation anxiety is mainly caused by the strange environment, interpersonal relationship and their own adaptability. Based on the analysis of the causes of children's separation anxiety, this paper concluded strategies of alleviating it.

  8. Entering the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vince, Gaia

    2016-04-01

    There is growing evidence that we are now entering a new geological age defined by human influence on the planet, the Anthropocene. Millions of years from now, a stripe in the accumulated layers of rock on Earth's surface will reveal our human fingerprint just as we can see evidence of dinosaurs in rocks of the Jurassic, or the explosion of life that marks the Cambrian. There is now no part of the planet untouched by human influence. The realisation that we wield such planetary power requires a quite extraordinary shift in perception, fundamentally toppling the scientific, cultural and religious philosophies that define our place in the world. This session explores these issues and examines our new relationship with nature now that we so strongly influence the biosphere. And this session will look at what the impacts of our planetary changes mean for us, and how we might deal with the consequences of the Anthropocene we have created.

  9. Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 infecting common bean Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes show differential infection patterns between gene pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 (PvEV-1) and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 (PvEV-2), in breeding-lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) as well as other Phaseolus species collected from two...

  10. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L. Williams

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV-specific antibodies (Abs can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC, has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI, which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B

  11. Common causes of vaginal infections and antibiotic susceptibility of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age attending at Felegehiwot Referral Hospital, Ethiopia: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulu, Wondemagegn; Yimer, Mulat; Zenebe, Yohannes; Abera, Bayeh

    2015-05-13

    Bacterial vaginosis, candidal, trichomonal and Gonococcal vaginal infections are a major health problems associated with gynecologic complications and increase in replication, shedding and transmission of HIV and other STIs in women of reproductive age. The study aimed at determining the prevalence of common vaginal infections and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of aerobic bacterial isolates in women of reproductive age, attending Felegehiwot referral Hospital. A hospital based cross sectional study was conducted from May to November, 2013. Simple random sampling technique was used. Demographic variables were collected using a structured questionnaire. Clinical data were collected by physicians. Two vaginal swab specimens were collected from each participant. Wet mount and Gram staining were carried out to identify motile T.vaginalis, budding yeast and clue cells. All vaginal specimens were cultured for aerobic bacterial isolates using standard microbiology methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility was performed using disc diffusion technique as per the standard by Kirby-Bauer method. The results were analyzed using descriptive, chi-square and fisher's exact test as appropriate. A total of 409 women in reproductive age (15 - 49 years) participated in the study. The median age of the women was 28 years. Overall, 63 (15.4 %) of women had vaginal infections. The proportion of vaginal infection was higher in non-pregnant (17.3 %) than pregnant women (13.3 %) (P = 0.002). The most common identified vaginal infections were candidiasis (8.3 %) and bacterial vaginosis (2.8 %) followed by trichomoniasis (2.1 %). The isolation rate of N. gonorrhoeae and group B Streptococcus colonization was 4 (1 %) and 6 (1.2 %), respectively. Bacterial vaginosis was higher in non-pregnant (5.6 %) than pregnant women (0.5 %) (P = 0.002). Religion, age, living in rural area and having lower abdominal pain were significantly associated with bacterial vaginosis and

  12. Development and Application of a Blastocystis Subtype-Specific PCR Assay Reveals that Mixed-Subtype Infections Are Common in a Healthy Human Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Pauline D; Stensvold, Christen Rune; Cotter, Paul D

    2015-06-15

    The human gut is host to a diversity of microorganisms, including the single-celled microbial eukaryote Blastocystis. Research has shown that most carriers host a single Blastocystis subtype (ST), which is unusual given the considerable within-host species diversity observed for other microbial genera in this ecosystem. However, our limited knowledge of both the incidence and biological significance of Blastocystis diversity within hosts (i.e., so-called mixed infections) is likely due to problems with existing methodologies. Here, we developed and applied Blastocystis ST-specific PCRs for the investigation of the most common subtypes of Blastocystis (ST1 to ST4) to a healthy human cohort (n = 50). We detected mixed infections in 22% of the cases, all of which had been identified as single-ST infections in a previous study using state-of-the-art methods. Our results show that certain STs occur predominantly as either single (ST3 and 4) or mixed (ST1) infections, which may reflect inter alia transient colonization patterns and/or cooperative or competitive interactions between different STs. Comparative analyses with other primers that have been used extensively for ST-specific analysis found them unsuitable for detection of mixed- and, in some cases, single-ST infections. Collectively, our data shed new light on the diversity of Blastocystis within and between human hosts. Moreover, the development of these PCR assays will facilitate future work on the molecular epidemiology and significance of mixed infections in groups of interest, including health and disease cohorts, and also help identify sources of Blastocystis transmission to humans, including identifying potential animal and environmental reservoirs. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Multiple Trypanosoma infections are common amongst Glossina species in the new farming areas of Rufiji district, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malele Imna I

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tsetse flies and trypanosomiasis are among several factors that constrain livestock development in Tanzania. Over the years Rufiji District was excluded from livestock production owing to tsetse fly infestation, however, a few years ago there was an influx of livestock following evictions aimed at conserving the Usangu wetlands. Methods A study was conducted to determine the efficiency of available traps for catching tsetse flies, Glossina species infesting the area, their infection rates and Trypanosoma species circulating in the area. Trapping was conducted during the semi dry season for a total of 30 days (ten days each month during the onset of the dry season of May - July 2009. Harvested flies after every 24 hours were dissected and examined under a light microscope for trypanosome infections and whole fly DNA was extracted from 82 flies and analyzed for trypanosomes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using different sets of primers. Results The proportions of total tsetse catches per trap were in the following decreasing order S3 (33%, H-Trap (27%, Pyramidal (19%, sticky panel (11% and biconical trap (10%. Of the 1200 trapped flies, 75.6% were identified as Glossina pallidipes, 11.7% as G. brevipalpis, 9.6% as G. austeni and 3.0% G. morsitans morsitans. Dissections revealed the overall infection rate of 6.6% (13/197. Whole DNA was extracted from 82 tsetse flies and the prevalence of trypanosomes circulating in the area in descending order was 92.7% (76/82 for T. simiae; 70.7% (58/82 for T. brucei types; 48.8% (40/82 for the T. vivax types and 32.9% (27/82 for the T. congolense types as determined by PCR. All trypanosome types were found in all tsetse species analysed except for the T. congolense types, which were absent in G. m. morsitans. None of the T. brucei positive samples contained human infective trypanosomes by SRA - PCR test Conclusion All tsetse species found in Rufiji are biologically important in the

  14. Enteral Feeding Set Handling Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Beth; Williams, Maria; Sollazzo, Janet; Hayden, Ashley; Hensley, Pam; Dai, Hongying; Roberts, Cristine

    2017-04-01

    Enteral nutrition therapy is common practice in pediatric clinical settings. Often patients will receive a pump-assisted bolus feeding over 30 minutes several times per day using the same enteral feeding set (EFS). This study aims to determine the safest and most efficacious way to handle the EFS between feedings. Three EFS handling techniques were compared through simulation for bacterial growth, nursing time, and supply costs: (1) rinsing the EFS with sterile water after each feeding, (2) refrigerating the EFS between feedings, and (3) using a ready-to-hang (RTH) product maintained at room temperature. Cultures were obtained at baseline, hour 12, and hour 21 of the 24-hour cycle. A time-in-motion analysis was conducted and reported in average number of seconds to complete each procedure. Supply costs were inventoried for 1 month comparing the actual usage to our estimated usage. Of 1080 cultures obtained, the overall bacterial growth rate was 8.7%. The rinse and refrigeration techniques displayed similar bacterial growth (11.4% vs 10.3%, P = .63). The RTH technique displayed the least bacterial growth of any method (4.4%, P = .002). The time analysis in minutes showed the rinse method was the most time-consuming (44.8 ± 2.7) vs refrigeration (35.8 ± 2.6) and RTH (31.08 ± 0.6) ( P < .0001). All 3 EFS handling techniques displayed low bacterial growth. RTH was superior in bacterial growth, nursing time, and supply costs. Since not all pediatric formulas are available in RTH, we conclude that refrigerating the EFS between uses is the next most efficacious method for handling the EFS between bolus feeds.

  15. Ocelots on Barro Colorado Island are infected with feline immunodeficiency virus but not other common feline and canine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Samuel P; Kays, Roland W; Moreno, Ricardo; TerWee, Julie A; Troyer, Jennifer L; VandeWoude, Sue

    2008-07-01

    Transmission of pathogens from domestic animals to wildlife populations (spill-over) has precipitated local wildlife extinctions in multiple geographic locations. Identifying such events before they cause population declines requires differentiating spillover from endemic disease, a challenge complicated by a lack of baseline data from wildlife populations that are isolated from domestic animals. We tested sera collected from 12 ocelots (Leopardus pardalis) native to Barro Colorado Island, Panama, which is free of domestic animals, for antibodies to feline herpes virus, feline calicivirus, feline corona virus, feline panleukopenia virus, canine distemper virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), typically a species-specific infection. Samples also were tested for feline leukemia virus antigens. Positive tests results were only observed for FIV; 50% of the ocelots were positive. We hypothesize that isolation of this population has prevented introduction of pathogens typically attributed to contact with domestic animals. The high density of ocelots on Barro Colorado Island may contribute to a high prevalence of FIV infection, as would be expected with increased contact rates among conspecifics in a geographically restricted population.

  16. Myxobolus neurophilus Guilford 1963 (Myxosporea: Myxobolidae): a common parasite infecting yellow perch Perca flavescens (Mitchell, 1814) in Saskatchewan, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, S J; Griffin, M J; Quiniou, S; Khoo, L; Bollinger, T K

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to identify a myxosporidian parasite infecting the central nervous system of yellow perch Perca flavescens (Mitchell, 1814) observed while investigating a fish kill in Saskatchewan, Canada. Fish were collected from seven different lakes, from two distinct watersheds. Sixty-four per cent (54/86) of yellow perch contained myxozoan pseudocysts located throughout the spinal cord and brain. Myxospores measured 16.5 μm (range 16.2-16.8) long and 8.2 μm (range 7.9-8.4) wide and contained two pyriform, mildly dissymmetrical, polar capsules measuring 7.7 μm (range 7.3-8.1) long and 2.7 μm (range 2.4-3.0) wide. The polar capsules each contained a single polar filament, with 7-9 turns per polar filament coil. Sequencing of the 18S SSU rDNA gene demonstrated >99% similarity to Myxobolus neurophilus. In 60% of infected fish, there was a mild to moderate, non-suppurative myelitis or encephalitis, or both, associated with myxospores. Axonal degeneration was present in rare cases. These findings extend the geographical distribution of M. neurophilus and suggest it may be widespread in yellow perch populations in Saskatchewan. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Molecular and Genomic Characterization of Enteric Pathogens Circulating during Hajj

    KAUST Repository

    Alsomali, Mona

    2016-05-01

    Hajj, the annual Muslim pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia is a unique mass gathering event that attracts approximately 3 million pilgrims from around the globe. This diverse pilgrim population coupled with the nature of the performed activities raise major public health concerns in the host country with potential global implications. Although gastroenteritis and diarrhea are common among the pilgrims performing Hajj, the microbial etiologies of these infections are still unknown. We used molecular and antigenic approaches to identify the main pathogens associated with Hajj diarrhea. 544 fecal samples from pilgrims suffering from diarrhea whilst performing Hajj during three consecutive seasons (2011-2013) and 99 control samples from 2011 were screened for 16 pathogens that include bacterial, parasitic and viral etiologies that are commonly associated with diarrheal infections. At least one of the screened pathogens could be detected in 42% (n=228) of the samples from the diarrheal cases. Bacteria were the main agents detected in 83% (n=189) of the positive samples, followed by viral and parasitic agents detected in 6% (n=14) and 5% (n=12) respectively. We have also standardized a 16S-based metagenomic approach to identify the gut microbiome in diarrheal cases and non-diarrheal controls in 76 samples. Also, we have standardized a shotgun metagenomics protocol for the direct characterization (diagnosis) of enteric pathogens without cultivation. This approach was used successfully to identify viral (adenovirus) and bacterial causes of Enterotoxigenic E. coli diarrhea from Hajj samples. The findings in this study fill in clear gaps in our knowledge of the etiologies associated with diarrheal infections during Hajj. Foodborne bacteria were the major contributors to Hajj-diarrheal infections. This was coupled with the increased incidences of antimicrobial resistance loci associated with the identified bacteria. These findings would help the public health policy makers to

  18. [Secondary aorto-enteric fistula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordanengo, F; Boneschi, M; Miani, S; Erba, M; Beretta, L

    1998-01-01

    Aortic graft fistula is a rare and life-threatening complication after aortic reconstruction. The incidence ranges from 0.5 to 4%, and even if the diagnosis and treatment is appropriate, the results of surgery are poor: mortality rate ranges from 14 to 70%. The optimal method of treatment is still controversial; prosthetic removal and extra-anatomic bypass has been advocated as the standard method, but more recently, because the high mortality rate associated with this procedure, some have prompted to recommend in situ aortic graft replacement as a more successful treatment. Personal experience with incidence (0.7%) outcome and mortality (57%) in 7 patients treated over a period of 6 years (1990-1996) is reported. Results from this group are compared with another group (6 patients) previously treated (1975-1982) for the same pathology. Our results after 10 years, show the same incidence (0.7 vs 0.6%) and an elevated and unchanged mortality (57 vs 66%). Better results in the management of aorto-enteric fistulas could be achieved with the removal of infected infrarenal aortic prosthetic grafts and in situ homografts replacement.

  19. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities, ventricular dilatation, altered cellular functions, inflammation, and neuronal injury in brains of mice due to common, persistent, parasitic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwang Jong-Hee

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Worldwide, approximately two billion people are chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii with largely unknown consequences. Methods To better understand long-term effects and pathogenesis of this common, persistent brain infection, mice were infected at a time in human years equivalent to early to mid adulthood and studied 5–12 months later. Appearance, behavior, neurologic function and brain MRIs were studied. Additional analyses of pathogenesis included: correlation of brain weight and neurologic findings; histopathology focusing on brain regions; full genome microarrays; immunohistochemistry characterizing inflammatory cells; determination of presence of tachyzoites and bradyzoites; electron microscopy; and study of markers of inflammation in serum. Histopathology in genetically resistant mice and cytokine and NRAMP knockout mice, effects of inoculation of isolated parasites, and treatment with sulfadiazine or αPD1 ligand were studied. Results Twelve months after infection, a time equivalent to middle to early elderly ages, mice had behavioral and neurological deficits, and brain MRIs showed mild to moderate ventricular dilatation. Lower brain weight correlated with greater magnitude of neurologic abnormalities and inflammation. Full genome microarrays of brains reflected inflammation causing neuronal damage (Gfap, effects on host cell protein processing (ubiquitin ligase, synapse remodeling (Complement 1q, and also increased expression of PD-1L (a ligand that allows persistent LCMV brain infection and CD 36 (a fatty acid translocase and oxidized LDL receptor that mediates innate immune response to beta amyloid which is associated with pro-inflammation in Alzheimer's disease. Immunostaining detected no inflammation around intra-neuronal cysts, practically no free tachyzoites, and only rare bradyzoites. Nonetheless, there were perivascular, leptomeningeal inflammatory cells, particularly contiguous to the aqueduct of

  20. Infecciones más comunes en el paciente trasplantado The most common infections in the transplanted patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Yuste

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available El trasplante es uno de los avances médicos más importante y, actualmente, sigue representando la única esperanza terapéutica de muchas enfermedades. Sin embargo, existen factores asociados al trasplante, como los estados de neutropenia y la inmunosupresión, que favorecen la aparición de infecciones. Estas infecciones tienen peculiaridades en los pacientes trasplantados. En este sentido, existen enfermedades infecciosas que prácticamente sólo aparecen en situaciones de inmunosupresión y además, la expresión clínica de determinadas infecciones puede ser distinta a las que tendría un paciente inmunocompetente. Por otra parte, algunas infecciones, dada su elevada prevalencia, deben ser subsidiarias de estrategias preventivas ya que su aparición implica un aumento de la morbimortalidad, bien por la propia enfermedad o por la aparición de posibles episodios de rechazo asociados. Estas estrategias se inician antes del trasplante con la adecuación de pautas de vacunación tanto al propio paciente como a las personas de su entorno y se continúan tras la realización del mismo con pautas de profilaxis y de tratamiento anticipado. Dada la importancia de las infecciones en la evolución y pronóstico de los pacientes trasplantados es importante conocer la patología infecciosa asociada, sus manifestaciones clínicas y sus formas de prevención y tratamiento.Organ transplantation has become one of the most important areas of medical research and, at present, is still the only therapeutical tool for several diseases. However, there are a number of factors related to transplantation, like immunosuppression and prolonged neutropenia that affect the incidence of infection. These infections are somehow peculiar to trasplant recipients. In fact, there are infectious diseases that only occur in immunodepression situations and, moreover, clinical expression of these infectious diseases can be quite different from that in immunocompetent patients

  1. Seroepidemiology of porcine enteric sapovirus in pig farms in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, Ana C; Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; de Rolo, Morella; Vizzi, Esmeralda; Buesa, Javier; Liprandi, Ferdinando; Ludert, Juan E

    2010-10-15

    Porcine enteric sapovirus (PES) has been shown to cause diarrhea under experimental conditions in gnotobiotic piglets. However, the role of PES as enteric pathogens in porcine farms remains unclear. To further understand the PES-host interactions under field conditions, a serological survey was carried out. To this end the capsid gene of a PES isolate was cloned in the baculovirus expression system and an ELISA was developed based on virus-like particles from the baculovirus-expressed PES capsid protein. A total of 85 serum samples collected from pigs ranging from 8 weeks to over 54 weeks of age were analyzed. An overall seroprevalence to PESs of 62% was found, with significant differences (p<0.05) found between ages. Pigs younger than 10 weeks old and older than 12 weeks old showed high seroprevalences (70-100%), while pigs aged 10-12 weeks showed no detectable serum antibodies levels. Our results suggest that PES infections are common in pigs and that passively acquired maternal antibodies are soon replaced by actively acquired antibodies, whose titers increase gradually with age and that probably are maintained during lifetime. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Modular enteral nutrition in pediatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo Sanchís, S; Prenafeta Ferré, M T; Sempere Luque, M D

    1991-01-01

    Modular Enteral Nutrition may be a substitute for Parenteral Nutrition in children with different pathologies. Study of 4 children with different pathologies selected from a group of 40 admitted to the Maternal-Childrens Hospital "Valle de Hebrón" in Barcelona, who received modular enteral nutrition. They were monitored on a daily basis by the Dietician Service. Modular enteral nutrition consists of modules of proteins, peptides, lipids, glucids and mineral salts-vitamins. 1.--Craneo-encephalic traumatisms with loss of consciousness, Feeding with a combination of parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition for 7 days. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended and modular enteral nutrition alone used up to a total of 43 days. 2.--55% burns with 36 days of hyperproteic modular enteral nutrition together with normal feeding. A more rapid recovery was achieved with an increase in total proteins and albumin. 3.--Persistent diarrhoea with 31 days of modular enteral nutrition, 5 days on parenteral nutrition alone and 8 days on combined parenteral nutrition and modular enteral nutrition. In view of the tolerance and good results of the modular enteral nutrition, the parenteral nutrition was suspended. 4.--Mucoviscidosis with a total of 19 days on modular enteral nutrition, 12 of which were exclusively on modular enteral nutrition and 7 as a night supplement to normal feeding. We administered proteic intakes of up to 20% of the total calorific intake and in concentrations of up to 1.2 calories/ml of the final preparation, always with a good tolerance. Modular enteral nutrition can and should be used as a substitute for parenteral nutrition in children with different pathologies, thus preventing the complications inherent in parenteral nutrition.

  3. Toll-like receptor 4 promoter polymorphisms: common TLR4 variants may protect against severe urinary tract infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryndís Ragnarsdóttir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Polymorphisms affecting Toll-like receptor (TLR structure appear to be rare, as would be expected due to their essential coordinator role in innate immunity. Here, we assess variation in TLR4 expression, rather than structure, as a mechanism to diversify innate immune responses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced the TLR4 promoter (4,3 kb in Swedish blood donors. Since TLR4 plays a vital role in susceptibility to urinary tract infection (UTI, promoter sequences were obtained from children with mild or severe disease. We performed a case-control study of pediatric patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU or those prone to recurrent acute pyelonephritis (APN. Promoter activity of the single SNPs or multiple allelic changes corresponding to the genotype patterns (GPs was tested. We then conducted a replication study in an independent cohort of adult patients with a history of childhood APN. Last, in vivo effects of the different GPs were examined after therapeutic intravesical inoculation of 19 patients with Escherichia coli 83972. We identified in total eight TLR4 promoter sequence variants in the Swedish control population, forming 19 haplotypes and 29 genotype patterns, some with effects on promoter activity. Compared to symptomatic patients and healthy controls, ABU patients had fewer genotype patterns, and their promoter sequence variants reduced TLR4 expression in response to infection. The ABU associated GPs also reduced innate immune responses in patients who were subjected to therapeutic urinary E. coli tract inoculation. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that genetic variation in the TLR4 promoter may be an essential, largely overlooked mechanism to influence TLR4 expression and UTI susceptibility.

  4. Association study of common genetic variants and HIV-1 acquisition in 6,300 infected cases and 7,200 controls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J McLaren

    Full Text Available Multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS have been performed in HIV-1 infected individuals, identifying common genetic influences on viral control and disease course. Similarly, common genetic correlates of acquisition of HIV-1 after exposure have been interrogated using GWAS, although in generally small samples. Under the auspices of the International Collaboration for the Genomics of HIV, we have combined the genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data collected by 25 cohorts, studies, or institutions on HIV-1 infected individuals and compared them to carefully matched population-level data sets (a list of all collaborators appears in Note S1 in Text S1. After imputation using the 1,000 Genomes Project reference panel, we tested approximately 8 million common DNA variants (SNPs and indels for association with HIV-1 acquisition in 6,334 infected patients and 7,247 population samples of European ancestry. Initial association testing identified the SNP rs4418214, the C allele of which is known to tag the HLA-B*57:01 and B*27:05 alleles, as genome-wide significant (p = 3.6 × 10⁻¹¹. However, restricting analysis to individuals with a known date of seroconversion suggested that this association was due to the frailty bias in studies of lethal diseases. Further analyses including testing recessive genetic models, testing for bulk effects of non-genome-wide significant variants, stratifying by sexual or parenteral transmission risk and testing previously reported associations showed no evidence for genetic influence on HIV-1 acquisition (with the exception of CCR5Δ32 homozygosity. Thus, these data suggest that genetic influences on HIV acquisition are either rare or have smaller effects than can be detected by this sample size.

  5. ENTERIC PARASITES IN PATIENTS LIVING WITH HIV & AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: HIV is a major global public health issue. Most of the patients with HIV disease die of infections other than HIV. Gastrointestinal infections are very common in patients with HIV infection or AIDS . AIMS : To detect opportunistic intestinal parasi tes in patients living with HIV & AIDS and relate it with CD4 count. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A single stool sample was obtained in sterile plastic containers from the patients attending pre ART. The stool samples were examined macroscopically and microscopica lly. Formalin ether concentration method was used. The modified Ziehl Neelsen staining method was used for the detection of the oocyst of coccidian parasites. CD4 count was measured on partec flow cytometry. RESULTS: Out of the 53 patient s, 33(62.26% were males and 20 (37.73% were femal es with age between 25 - 65 years . The study population consist of 4 patients with CD4 count > 500 cells/μl , 22 patients with CD4 count 200 - 499 cells/μl and 27 patients with CD4 count < 200 cells/μl. Enteric parasites we re detec ted by microscopy in 21 (39.62% stool samples . Number of samples showing parasites were Cryptospridium 11 (20.75%, Strongyloides stercoralis 3(5.6% , Cyclospora 1 (1.8%. Ascaris lumbricoides 3 (5.6%, Ancylostoma duodenale 1 (1.8% and Tenia eggs 2(3.7%. Ov erall, Cryptosporidium 11 (20.75% was the most frequently encountered pathogen in the study population. CONCLUSIONS: The results of our study highlight the importance of evaluation of HIV infected individuals with diarrhoea for intestinal parasitic infect ions which may help in better management of these patients.

  6. Clinical epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance of nontyphoidal Salmonella enteric infections in children : 2012-2014%2012-2014年儿童非伤寒沙门菌肠道感染的临床流行病学特征及耐药模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏仲秋; 常海岭; 李月芳; 许学斌; 曾玫

    2016-01-01

    inflammatory diarrhea were included into this study from the Children's Hospital of Fudan University during January 2012 through December 2014.Salmonella species and other major enteric bacteria were routinely isolated from the fresh stool sample of the enrolled patients at their first visit to the enteric clinic.Salmonella isolates were serotyped and tested for antimicrobial susceptibility testing using Kirby-Bauer method at the reference laboratory of Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention.All enrolled cases had clinical records.The enumeration data were described by constituent ratio.Result Of the enrolled 3 143 patients,742 (23.6%) were confirmed to have Salmonella infections,and NTS was identified in 738 (23.5%) cases and Salmonella Paratyphi B was identified in 4 (0.1%) cases,respectively.The isolation rate of NTS exceeded diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (6.7%,182/2 727),Campylobacter (4.1%,129/3 143) and Shigella (2.4%,77/3 143).Nine serogroups and 41 serovars were identified in 742 salmonella isolates.Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Typhimurium were the most common serovars,representing 42.6% (316/742) and 28.2% (209/742) of isolates,respectively.NTS infections were prevalent year-round with a seasonal peak from May to October.The common symptoms included tever (57.5%,424/738) and blood-in-stool (31.0%,229/738).Antimicrobial susceptibility showed only 8 (1.1%) of 742 isolates sensitive to 16 tested antibiotics.Resistance to the current first-line antibiotics such as the third-generation and (or) fourth-generation cephalosporins (cefotaxime and cefepime),ciprofloxacin was detected in 10.0% (74/738),8.1% (60/738) and 1.1% (8/738),respectively.Conclusion NTS is the leading causative agent responsible for bacterial inflammatory diarrhea in Shanghainese children.The prevalence of NTS enteric infections show an increasing trend year by year.It is essential to continuously monitor the antimicrobial resistance of NTS and

  7. Association study of common genetic variants and HIV-1 acquisition in 6,300 infected cases and 7,200 controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaren, Paul J; Coulonges, Cédric; Ripke, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Multiple genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been performed in HIV-1 infected individuals, identifying common genetic influences on viral control and disease course. Similarly, common genetic correlates of acquisition of HIV-1 after exposure have been interrogated using GWAS, although...... that this association was due to the frailty bias in studies of lethal diseases. Further analyses including testing recessive genetic models, testing for bulk effects of non-genome-wide significant variants, stratifying by sexual or parenteral transmission risk and testing previously reported associations showed...... no evidence for genetic influence on HIV-1 acquisition (with the exception of CCR5Δ32 homozygosity). Thus, these data suggest that genetic influences on HIV acquisition are either rare or have smaller effects than can be detected by this sample size....

  8. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonissen, Gunther; Van Immerseel, Filip; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Timbermont, Leen; Verlinden, Marc; Janssens, Geert Paul Jules; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Hessenberger, Sabine; Martel, An; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON) is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (Penteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  9. Nucleoporin NUP153 phenylalanine-glycine motifs engage a common binding pocket within the HIV-1 capsid protein to mediate lentiviral infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A Matreyek

    Full Text Available Lentiviruses can infect non-dividing cells, and various cellular transport proteins provide crucial functions for lentiviral nuclear entry and integration. We previously showed that the viral capsid (CA protein mediated the dependency on cellular nucleoporin (NUP 153 during HIV-1 infection, and now demonstrate a direct interaction between the CA N-terminal domain and the phenylalanine-glycine (FG-repeat enriched NUP153 C-terminal domain (NUP153(C. NUP153(C fused to the effector domains of the rhesus Trim5α restriction factor (Trim-NUP153(C potently restricted HIV-1, providing an intracellular readout for the NUP153(C-CA interaction during retroviral infection. Primate lentiviruses and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV bound NUP153(C under these conditions, results that correlated with direct binding between purified proteins in vitro. These binding phenotypes moreover correlated with the requirement for endogenous NUP153 protein during virus infection. Mutagenesis experiments concordantly identified NUP153(C and CA residues important for binding and lentiviral infectivity. Different FG motifs within NUP153(C mediated binding to HIV-1 versus EIAV capsids. HIV-1 CA binding mapped to residues that line the common alpha helix 3/4 hydrophobic pocket that also mediates binding to the small molecule PF-3450074 (PF74 inhibitor and cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 6 (CPSF6 protein, with Asn57 (Asp58 in EIAV playing a particularly important role. PF74 and CPSF6 accordingly each competed with NUP153(C for binding to the HIV-1 CA pocket, and significantly higher concentrations of PF74 were needed to inhibit HIV-1 infection in the face of Trim-NUP153(C expression or NUP153 knockdown. Correlation between CA mutant viral cell cycle and NUP153 dependencies moreover indicates that the NUP153(C-CA interaction underlies the ability of HIV-1 to infect non-dividing cells. Our results highlight similar mechanisms of binding for disparate host factors

  10. The Comparison of Antagonistic Effects of Normal Vaginal Lactobacilli and Some Commonly used Antibiotics on Isolated Bacteria of Uterine Infections in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouya Dini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Uterine infections are one of the major reproductive complications during postpartum. The antibiotics and antiseptic agents used in the treatment of postpartum infections have residues in food, induce bacterial resistance, increase the financial costs and cause failure in defense mechanism of host. On the other hand, nowadays the administration of probiotics is considered as an alternative method for the prevention and treatment of infections. Therefore, preventive treatment with probiotic product could decrease the usage of antibiotic and bring advantages in dairy farm systems. The objective of this study was screening of the antagonistic properties of isolated vaginal Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB against the most prevalent bacteria in uterine infections in order to investigate their probiotic potentials as an alternative approach for prevention of uterine infections. LAB were isolated from sampling of cranial part of vagina during estrus phase and luteal phase of Holstein dairy cattle and pathogens bacteria were isolated from merits and endometritis specimens which referred to our veterinary laboratory. The antagonistic activity of isolated LAB against uterine pathogens was tested by Agar spot test. Antibiotic susceptibilities of pathogenic strains to commonly used antibiotics were investigated by using disc diffusion method. Inhibition zones around both the probiotic spots and the antibiotic discs were classified to weak, moderate and strong categories and their antagonistic efficacies were compared. Isolated LAB had antagonistic effects against all the pathogenic strains including both gram negative and gram positive, Arcanobacterium pyogenes and Pseudomonas aeroginosa were the most sensitive bacteria (with 12.60 and 14 mm an average inhibition zone, respectively. LAB had the least antagonistic effects on Clostridium perfringens (3.6 mm of an average inhibition zone. Comparing the antagonistic efficacies, the percentages of overall

  11. Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes 001 and 176 - the common denominator of C. difficile infection epidemiology in the Czech Republic, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutova, Marcela; Matejkova, Jana; Kuijper, Ed J; Drevinek, Pavel; Nyc, Otakar

    2016-07-21

    In 2014, 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic participated in a survey of the incidence of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in the country. The mean CDI incidence was 6.1 (standard deviation (SD):7.2) cases per 10,000 patient bed-days and 37.8 cases (SD: 41.4) per 10,000 admissions. The mean CDI testing frequency was 39.5 tests (SD: 25.4) per 10,000 patient bed-days and 255.8 tests (SD: 164.0) per 10,000 admissions. A total of 774 C. difficile isolates were investigated, of which 225 (29%) belonged to PCR ribotype 176, and 184 isolates (24%) belonged to PCR ribotype 001. Multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) revealed 27 clonal complexes formed by 84% (190/225) of PCR ribotype 176 isolates, and 14 clonal complexes formed by 77% (141/184) of PCR ribotype 001 isolates. Clonal clusters of PCR ribotypes 176 and 001 were observed in 11 and 7 hospitals, respectively. Our data demonstrate the spread of two C. difficile PCR ribotypes within 18 hospitals in the Czech Republic, stressing the importance of standardising CDI testing protocols and implementing mandatory CDI surveillance in the country.

  12. Microscopic enteritis: Bucharest consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostami, Kamran; Aldulaimi, David; Holmes, Geoffrey; Johnson, Matt W; Robert, Marie; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fléjou, Jean-François; Sanders, David S; Volta, Umberto; Derakhshan, Mohammad H; Going, James J; Becheanu, Gabriel; Catassi, Carlo; Danciu, Mihai; Materacki, Luke; Ghafarzadegan, Kamran; Ishaq, Sauid; Rostami-Nejad, Mohammad; Peña, A Salvador; Bassotti, Gabrio; Marsh, Michael N; Villanacci, Vincenzo

    2015-03-07

    Microscopic enteritis (ME) is an inflammatory condition of the small bowel that leads to gastrointestinal symptoms, nutrient and micronutrient deficiency. It is characterised by microscopic or sub-microscopic abnormalities such as microvillus changes and enterocytic alterations in the absence of definite macroscopic changes using standard modern endoscopy. This work recognises a need to characterize disorders with microscopic and submicroscopic features, currently regarded as functional or non-specific entities, to obtain further understanding of their clinical relevance. The consensus working party reviewed statements about the aetiology, diagnosis and symptoms associated with ME and proposes an algorithm for its investigation and treatment. Following the 5(th) International Course in Digestive Pathology in Bucharest in November 2012, an international group of 21 interested pathologists and gastroenterologists formed a working party with a view to formulating a consensus statement on ME. A five-step agreement scale (from strong agreement to strong disagreement) was used to score 21 statements, independently. There was strong agreement on all statements about ME histology (95%-100%). Statements concerning diagnosis achieved 85% to 100% agreement. A statement on the management of ME elicited agreement from the lowest rate (60%) up to 100%. The remaining two categories showed general agreement between experts on clinical presentation (75%-95%) and pathogenesis (80%-90%) of ME. There was strong agreement on the histological definition of ME. Weaker agreement on management indicates a need for further investigations, better definitions and clinical trials to produce quality guidelines for management. This ME consensus is a step toward greater recognition of a significant entity affecting symptomatic patients previously labelled as non-specific or functional enteropathy.

  13. Environmental enteric dysfunction is associated with altered bile acid metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED), a clinically asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, and increased gut permeability, is common among children in developing countries. Because of abnormal gut mucosa and altered gut microbiome, EED coul...

  14. Type 1 Diabetes and Type 1 Interferonopathies: Localization of a Type 1 Common Thread of Virus Infection in the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie S.E. Jean-Baptiste

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D has been associated with both genetic and environmental factors. Increasing incidence of T1D worldwide is prompting researchers to adopt different approaches to explain the biology of T1D, beyond the presence and activity of autoreactive lymphocytes. In this review, we propose inflammatory pathways as triggers for T1D. Within the scope of those inflammatory pathways and in understanding the pathogenesis of disease, we suggest that viruses, in particular Coxsackieviruses, act by causing a type 1 interferonopathy within the pancreas and the microenvironment of the islet. As such, this connection and common thread represents an exciting platform for the development of new diagnostic, treatment and/or prevention options.

  15. Type 1 Diabetes and Type 1 Interferonopathies: Localization of a Type 1 Common Thread of Virus Infection in the Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Baptiste, Virginie S E; Xia, Chang-Qing; Clare-Salzler, Michael J; Horwitz, Marc S

    2017-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been associated with both genetic and environmental factors. Increasing incidence of T1D worldwide is prompting researchers to adopt different approaches to explain the biology of T1D, beyond the presence and activity of autoreactive lymphocytes. In this review, we propose inflammatory pathways as triggers for T1D. Within the scope of those inflammatory pathways and in understanding the pathogenesis of disease, we suggest that viruses, in particular Coxsackieviruses, act by causing a type 1 interferonopathy within the pancreas and the microenvironment of the islet. As such, this connection and common thread represents an exciting platform for the development of new diagnostic, treatment and/or prevention options. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Samonella, Shigella and Yersinia: cellular aspects of host-bacteria interactions in enteric diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis Roberta

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A successful infection of the human intestine by enteropathogenic bacteria depends on the ability of bacteria to attach and colonize the intestinal epithelium and, in some cases, to invade the host cell, survive intracellularly and disseminate from cell to cell. To accomplish these processes bacteria have evolved an arsenal of molecules that are mostly secreted by dedicated type III secretion systems, and that interact with the host, subverting normal cellular functions. Here we overview the most important molecular strategies developed by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Shigella flexneri, and Yersinia enterocolitica to cause enteric infections. Despite having evolved different effectors, these four microorganisms share common host cellular targets.

  17. Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activities of Essential Oil of Nepeta Cataria L. Against Common Causes of Oral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiar Zomorodian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Over the past two decades, there has been a growing trend in using oral hygienic products from natural resources such as essential oils and plant extracts. Nepeta cataria L. is a member of the mint family (Labiatae with several medicinal properties. The objective of this study was to determine the chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of essential oils (EOs from N. cataria leaves against pathogens causing oral infections.Materials and Methods: The chemical composition of EOs from N. cataria was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was evaluated by broth micro-dilution in 96 well plates as recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI methods. The plates were incubated at 30°C for 24-48 h (fungi or at 37°C for 24 h (bacteria.Results: The analysis of the EOs indicated that 4a-α, 7-α, 7a-β-nepetalactone (55-58%, and 4a-α, 7-β, 7a-α-nepetalactone (30-31.2% were the major compounds of the EOs at all developmental stages. The tested EOs exhibited antimicrobial activities against the tested bacteria at concentrations of 0.125-4 µL/mL. Moreover, the oils entirely inhibited the growth of Candida species at a concentration less than 1 µL/mL.Conclusion: Based on these results, the EO of N. cataria can possibly be used as an antimicrobial agent in the treatment and control of oral pathogens.

  18. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991–2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Berni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45% episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs, 89,558 (11% for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs, 286,969 (35% for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs and 79,224 (10% for acute otitis media (AOM. The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%, penicillin-V (24%, erythromycin (11%, flucloxacillin (11% and oxytetracycline (6%. In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991–1999 and for LRTIs in 2000–2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%.

  19. Genetic factor common to schizophrenia and HIV infection is associated with risky sexual behavior: antagonistic vs. synergistic pleiotropic SNPs enriched for distinctly different biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Polimanti, Renato; Kranzler, Henry R; Farrer, Lindsay A; Zhao, Hongyu; Gelernter, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and HIV infection are serious disorders with a complex phenotypic relationship. Observational studies have described their comorbidity; their genetic correlation is not well studied. We performed extensive analysis in search of common genetic factors for SZ and HIV, and their relationship with risky sexual behavior (RSB). Summary statistics from genome-wide association studies of HIV infection and schizophrenia were obtained and 2379 European Americans were genotyped and assessed for RSB score. Genetic relationships between traits were analyzed in three ways: linkage disequilibrium (LD) score regression to estimate genetic correlation; GPA (Genetic analysis incorporating Pleiotropy and Annotation) to test pleiotropy and identify pleiotropic loci; polygenic risk scores (PRS) of SZ and HIV to predict RSB using linear regression. We found significant pleiotropy (p = 5.31E - 28) and a positive genetic correlation (cor = 0.17, p = 0.002) for SZ and HIV infection. Pleiotropic SNPs with opposite effect directions (antagonistic) and SNPs with the same effect direction (synergistic) were enriched for distinctly different biological functions. SZ PRS computed with antagonistically pleiotropic SNPs consistently predicted RSB score with nominal significance, but SZ PRS based on either synergistically pleiotropic SNPs or all SNPs did not predict RSB. The epidemiologic correlation between schizophrenia and HIV can partly be explained by overlapping genetic risk factors, which are related to risky sexual behavior.

  20. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991–2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Ellen; Scott, Laura A.; Jenkins-Jones, Sara; De Voogd, Hanka; Rocha, Monica S.; Butler, Chris C.; Morgan, Christopher Ll.; Currie, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45%) episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), 89,558 (11%) for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), 286,969 (35%) for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and 79,224 (10%) for acute otitis media (AOM). The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%), penicillin-V (24%), erythromycin (11%), flucloxacillin (11%) and oxytetracycline (6%). In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991–1999 and for LRTIs in 2000–2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%. PMID:27384588

  1. Non-Response to Antibiotic Treatment in Adolescents for Four Common Infections in UK Primary Care 1991-2012: A Retrospective, Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berni, Ellen; Scott, Laura A; Jenkins-Jones, Sara; De Voogd, Hanka; Rocha, Monica S; Butler, Chris C; Morgan, Christopher Ll; Currie, Craig J

    2016-07-04

    We studied non-response rates to antibiotics in the under-reported subgroup of adolescents aged 12 to 17 years old, using standardised criteria representing antibiotic treatment failure. Routine, primary care data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) were used. Annual, non-response rates by antibiotics and by indication were determined. We identified 824,651 monotherapies in 415,468 adolescents: 368,900 (45%) episodes for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), 89,558 (11%) for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), 286,969 (35%) for skin/soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and 79,224 (10%) for acute otitis media (AOM). The most frequently prescribed antibiotics were amoxicillin (27%), penicillin-V (24%), erythromycin (11%), flucloxacillin (11%) and oxytetracycline (6%). In 1991, the overall non-response rate was 9.3%: 11.9% for LRTIs, 9.5% for URTIs, 7.1% for SSTIs, 9.7% for AOM. In 2012, the overall non-response rate was 9.2%. Highest non-response rates were for AOM in 1991-1999 and for LRTIs in 2000-2012. Physicians generally prescribed antibiotics to adolescents according to recommendations. Evidence of antibiotic non-response was less common among adolescents during this 22-year study period compared with an all-age population, where the overall non-response rate was 12%.

  2. A GAL4-like protein is involved in the switch between biotrophic and necrotrophic phases of the infection process of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum on common bean. .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufresne, M; Perfect, S; Pellier, A L; Bailey, J A; Langin, T

    2000-09-01

    Random insertional mutagenesis was conducted with the hemibiotrophic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, causal agent of common bean anthracnose. Nine mutants that were altered in their infection process on the host plant were generated. One of these, H433 is a nonpathogenic mutant able to induce necrotic spots on infected leaves rapidly. These spots are similar to those observed during the hypersensitive reaction. Cytological observations showed that the development of the mutant H433 is stopped at the switch between the biotrophic and the necrotrophic phases. This mutant carries two independent insertions of the transforming plasmid pAN7-1. Complementation studies using the wild-type genomic regions corresponding to the two insertions showed that one is responsible for the H433 phenotype. Sequencing analysis identified a single open reading frame that encoded a putative transcriptional activator belonging to the fungal zinc cluster (Zn[II](2)Cys(6)) family. The corresponding gene was designated CLTA1 (for C. lindemuthianum transcriptional activator 1). Expression studies showed that CLTA1 is expressed in low amounts during in vitro culture. Targeted disrupted strains were generated, and they exhibited the same phenotype as the original mutant H433. Complementation of these disrupted strains by the CLTA1 gene led to full restoration of pathogenicity. This study demonstrates that CLTA1 is both a pathogenicity gene and a regulatory gene involved in the switch between biotrophy and necrotrophy of the infection process of a hemibiotrophic fungus.

  3. Parasitic infections in HIV infected individuals: Diagnostic & therapeutic challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissapatorn, Veeranoot; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao

    2011-01-01

    After 30 years of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, parasites have been one of the most common opportunistic infections (OIs) and one of the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality associated with HIV-infected patients. Due to severe immunosuppression, enteric parasitic pathogens in general are emerging and are OIs capable of causing diarrhoeal disease associated with HIV. Of these, Cryptosporidium parvum and Isospora belli are the two most common intestinal protozoan parasites and pose a public health problem in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients. These are the only two enteric protozoan parasites that remain in the case definition of AIDS till today. Leismaniasis, strongyloidiasis and toxoplasmosis are the three main opportunistic causes of systemic involvements reported in HIV-infected patients. Of these, toxoplasmosis is the most important parasitic infection associated with the central nervous system. Due to its complexity in nature, toxoplasmosis is the only parasitic disease capable of not only causing focal but also disseminated forms and it has been included in AIDS-defining illnesses (ADI) ever since. With the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), cryptosporidiosis, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, strongyloidiasis, and toxoplasmosis are among parasitic diseases reported in association with immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). This review addresses various aspects of parasitic infections in term of clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic challenges associated with HIV-infection. PMID:22310820

  4. Use of Quantile Regression to Determine the Impact on Total Health Care Costs of Surgical Site Infections Following Common Ambulatory Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Margaret A; Tian, Fang; Wallace, Anna E; Nickel, Katelin B; Warren, David K; Fraser, Victoria J; Selvam, Nandini; Hamilton, Barton H

    2017-02-01

    To determine the impact of surgical site infections (SSIs) on health care costs following common ambulatory surgical procedures throughout the cost distribution. Data on costs of SSIs following ambulatory surgery are sparse, particularly variation beyond just mean costs. We performed a retrospective cohort study of persons undergoing cholecystectomy, breast-conserving surgery, anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, and hernia repair from December 31, 2004 to December 31, 2010 using commercial insurer claims data. SSIs within 90 days post-procedure were identified; infections during a hospitalization or requiring surgery were considered serious. We used quantile regression, controlling for patient, operative, and postoperative factors to examine the impact of SSIs on 180-day health care costs throughout the cost distribution. The incidence of serious and nonserious SSIs was 0.8% and 0.2%, respectively, after 21,062 anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, 0.5% and 0.3% after 57,750 cholecystectomy, 0.6% and 0.5% after 60,681 hernia, and 0.8% and 0.8% after 42,489 breast-conserving surgery procedures. Serious SSIs were associated with significantly higher costs than nonserious SSIs for all 4 procedures throughout the cost distribution. The attributable cost of serious SSIs increased for both cholecystectomy and hernia repair as the quantile of total costs increased ($38,410 for cholecystectomy with serious SSI vs no SSI at the 70th percentile of costs, up to $89,371 at the 90th percentile). SSIs, particularly serious infections resulting in hospitalization or surgical treatment, were associated with significantly increased health care costs after 4 common surgical procedures. Quantile regression illustrated the differential effect of serious SSIs on health care costs at the upper end of the cost distribution.

  5. Efficiency of diagnostic methods for correlation between prevalence of enteric protozoan parasites and HIV/AIDS status--an experience of a tertiary care hospital in East Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Bineeta; Sinha, Sanchaita; Das, Shukla; Rustagi, Nitesh; Jhamb, Rajat

    2010-10-01

    Since the beginning of the AIDS pandemic, opportunistic infections have been recognized as common complications of HIV infection. Enteric protozoan parasitic infections are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV infected patients. The present study is, therefore, aimed to determine the prevalence of these parasites and study their association with immune status in HIV patients with emphasis on the correlation between various diagnostic techniques to give an accurate diagnosis to avoid empirical treatment. This prospective study, carried out between November 2009 and May 2010 included all HIV seropositive patients presenting with diarrhea to the ART center. A total of 64 stool samples were analyzed by wet mount examination, three different staining techniques, and antigen detection by ELISA for various enteric protozoan infections. Total prevalence of enteric protozoan parasites was 30%. Among the total cases, Cryptosporidium was seen in 12% cases followed by Giardia, E. histolytica and Isospora belli. The maximum diagnostic yield for coccidian parasites was with safranin-methylene blue staining technique. Parasitic burden contributes towards early morbidity in HIV infection. This study provides important information about prevalence of intestinal protozoan parasites in HIV infection. A combination of procedures should be carried out for the screening of stool specimens of HIV patients for better diagnosis and management.

  6. 腹盆腔放疗诱发肠道微生态失调与肠源性感染的实验研究%Pelvic radiotherapy induces dysbiosis of gut microbiota and enteric infection in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冉曦; 申明强; 曹乐; 王军平; 李蓉; 粟永萍; 王艾平

    2015-01-01

    目的 探索腹盆腔放疗照射对肠道微生态的影响及其与肠源性感染的关系.方法 模拟腹盆腔放疗照射BALB/c小鼠,2.0 Gy/d,连续照射5 d/周,分别于照射3周、5周和6周后停照1周的时间点收集回肠组织及其内容物样本.用实时定量RT-PCR检测抗菌肽和促炎性因子的表达;用PCR检测细菌在小鼠体内的移位情况;用变性梯度凝胶电泳技术检测分析肠道微生态的特征.结果 腹盆腔照射诱发了肠道潘氏细胞隐窝素-1和4表达紊乱,照射3周或照射6周后停照1周,小鼠回肠隐窝素-1和-4均呈现显著性降低(t=-7.43、-3.54、-4.72、-4.27,P<0.05);而照射5周小鼠回肠隐窝素-1和-4表达明显升高(t=6.15、5.75,P<0.05).放疗模拟照射3和5周时小鼠肠道微生物区系多样性指数和丰富度显著降低(t=-3.49、-4.19、-3.44、-4.97,P<0.05),呈现以乳酸杆菌等益生菌减少,大肠杆菌和弗氏志贺氏菌等条件致病菌增多为特征的微生态失调.受照小鼠肠系膜淋巴结和血液中的细菌DNA阳性率明显增高.照射3和5周后回肠组织IL-1β、IL-6和TNF-α显著性高表达(t=4.85、6.16、7.71、4.60、4.86、5.97,P<0.05);照射6周后停照1周时,肠道促炎性因子的表达量有所回落,但IL-1β和TNF-α的表达量仍显著性高表达(t=3.67、5.88,P<0.05).结论 腹盆腔放疗可诱发肠道抗菌肽表达紊乱,引起肠道微生态失调,进而导致肠源性细菌移位及感染性炎症的发生.微生态可能成为减轻放疗患者消化道不良反应的有效干预靶点.%Objective To explore the changes of gut microbiota in response to abdominal and pelvic radiotherapy and its potential relationship with intestinal infection.Methods Irradiation was delivered to the abdominal region of BALB/c mice,following the regular human pelvic-radiotherapy protocol,2.0 Gy/d,continuous 5 d/week.Samples of ileum tissue and the intestinal content were collected at different time points of

  7. Gastro-enteritis in huisartsenpeilstations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, W.J. van; Vinje, J.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duijnhoven, Y.T.P.H. van

    1998-01-01

    De incidentie van huisartsconsulten voor gastro-enteritis van 77 per 10.000 persoonjaren lijkt een lichte daling te vertonen t.o.v. de incidentie van 90 per 10.000 persoonjaren in een vergelijkbaar onderzoek in 1992-1993. De belangrijkste verwekkers van gastro-enteritis waarvoor de huisarts wordt ge

  8. Gastro-enteritis in huisartsenpeilstations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, M.A.S. de; Koopmans, M.P.G.; Kortbeek, L.M.; Leeuwen, W.J. van; Vinje, J.; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Duijnhoven, Y.T.P.H. van

    1998-01-01

    De incidentie van huisartsconsulten voor gastro-enteritis van 77 per 10.000 persoonjaren lijkt een lichte daling te vertonen t.o.v. de incidentie van 90 per 10.000 persoonjaren in een vergelijkbaar onderzoek in 1992-1993. De belangrijkste verwekkers van gastro-enteritis waarvoor de huisarts wordt

  9. Shanghai Fever: A Fatal Form of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Enteric Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Pankaj; Mandal, Kartik Chandra; Mukhopadhyay, Madhumita; Debnath, Bidyut

    2015-10-01

    Outcome of pseudomonas enteric fever is unpredictable as multiple systemic lethal complications occur abruptly. A 9-month-old girl with multiple ileal perforations, leukocoria, ecthyma gangrenosum, hemiplegia and a perforated ulcer in the soft palate. Blood culture suggested Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Operative repair of multiple ileal perforations and multidisciplinary management was provided. On 10th post-operative day, patient succumbed to multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Early detection and management of complications of P. aeruginosa enteric disease is important.

  10. Campylobacter enteritis on Hopi and Navajo Indian reservations. Clinical and epidemiologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engleberg, N C; Correa-Villaseñor, A; North, C Q; Crow, T; Wells, J G; Blake, P A

    1984-07-01

    From June 22 through September 30, 1981, stool specimens from 522 Hopi and Navajo outpatients were cultured because of diarrheal illnesses at the Keams Canyon Indian Health Service Hospital, Arizona. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated from the specimens of 26 (5%) of the patients. This pathogen was found as frequently as Shigella in patients younger than 2 years or older than 20 years, but was significantly less common in the 2 to 20-year age group (P<.000001). Campylobacter enteritis was indistinguishable clinically from shigellosis in adult patients, but in children younger than 5 years, a rectal temperature higher than 38 degrees C (100.5 degrees F) was significantly more common with Shigella than with Campylobacter infection (P=.003). In a field study of 20 families, we found that households with a case of Campylobacter enteritis were more likely than age- and community-matched controls to own farm animals (P=.05), but were not more likely to own household pets. C jejuni is less common than Shigella as a cause of summer seasonal diarrhea and dysentery among the Hopi and Navajos; the striking differences in the age-specific rates of these two infections suggest different routes of transmission.

  11. Increasing rates and clinical consequences of nalidixic acid-resistant isolates causing enteric fever in returned travellers: an 18-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, S; Schulz, T; Vinton, P; Korman, T; Torresi, J

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the rate and clinical consequences of nalidixic acid-resistant (NAR) isolates in travellers with enteric fever presenting to a hospital in a developed country. We retrospectively examined microbiologically confirmed cases of enteric fever in adult returned travellers over an 18-year period presenting to two tertiary referral hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. There were 59 cases of Salmonella typhi infection, 43 cases of S. paratyphi A infection and two cases of S. paratyphi B infection. Most patients reported recent travel to India (36%) or Indonesia (29%). NAR isolates were commonly encountered (41% of all isolates), particularly from India (75%), Pakistan (80%) and Bangladesh (60%). The number of NAR isolates increased progressively after 2003. Patients with NAR isolates had prolonged mean fever clearance time (5.6 vs. 3.3 days, P = 0.03) and prolonged hospital stay (7.9 vs. 5.7 days, P = 0.02) compared to non-resistant isolates. This represents the largest report of NAR enteric fever in returned travellers. NAR isolates predominate in cases of enteric fever from South Asia and result in prolonged fever clearance time and hospital stay. Empiric therapy with alternative antibiotics such as ceftriaxone or azithromycin should be considered in patients with suspected enteric fever from this region.

  12. Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Vanzzini Zago

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective, and descriptive study about the support that the laboratory of microbiology aids can provide in the diagnosis of ocular infections in patients whom were attended a tertiary-care hospital in México City in a 10-year-time period. We describe the microbiological diagnosis in palpebral mycose; in keratitis caused by Fusarium, Aspergillus, Candida, and melanized fungi; endophthalmitis; one Histoplasma scleritis and one mucormycosis. Nowadays, ocular fungal infections are more often diagnosed, because there is more clinical suspicion and there are easy laboratory confirmations. Correct diagnosis is important because an early medical treatment gives a better prognosis for visual acuity. In some cases, fungal infections are misdiagnosed and the antifungal treatment is delayed.

  13. The effect of Artemisia annua on broiler performance, on intestinal microbiota and on the course of a Clostridium perfringens infection applying a necrotic enteritis disease model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Ricarda M; Grevsen, Kai; Ivarsen, Elise

    2012-01-01

    The aerial parts of the plant Artemisia annua contain essential oils having antimicrobial properties against Clostridium perfringens Type A, the causal agent for necrotic enteritis in broilers. In two experiments, the influence of increasing dietary concentrations of dried A. annua leaves (0, 5, 10...... and 20 g/kg) and n-hexane extract from fresh A. annua leaves (0, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) on broiler performance was investigated. Dried plant material decreased feed intake and body weight in a dose-dependent manner, and 10 and 20 g/kg diet tended to improve the feed conversion ratio. The n......-hexane extract also reduced feed intake, but broiler weight tended to decrease only at the highest dietary concentration. The feed conversion ratio tended to improve when birds received 250 and 500 mg/kg n-hexane extract. In a third experiment, a necrotic enteritis disease model was applied to investigate...

  14. The DNA damage response: a common pathway in the regulation of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligand expression in normal, infected and cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eCerboni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NKG2D and DNAM-1 are two activating receptors, present on the surface of NK cells and other cells of the immune system. Their ligands – MICA, MICB, ULBP1-6 for NKG2D, PVR/CD155 and Nectin-2/CD112 for DNAM-1 - can be constitutively expressed at low levels in some normal cells, but they are more often defined as stress-induced, since different stimuli can positively regulate their expression. In this review, we describe the molecular mechanisms involved in the up-regulation of NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligands under different physiological and pathological stress conditions, including mitosis, viral infections, and cancer. We will focus on the DNA damage response, as recent advances in the field have uncovered its important role as a common signaling pathway in the regulation of both NKG2D and DNAM-1 ligand expression in response to very diverse conditions and stimuli.

  15. FREEQUNCY OF ESCHERICHIA COLI IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED URINARY TRACT INFECTION AND THEIR RESISTANCE PATTERN AGAINST SOME COMMONLY USED ANTI BACTERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Jamshed, Fareeda; Ahmad, Wajeeha

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a very common health problem and Escherichia coli (E coli) are the most common organisms associated with community acquired UTI. Unfortunately these bacteria have developed extensive resistance against most of the commonly used antibacterials. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and resistance pattern of E. Coli in patients of community acquired UTI in an area in northern part of Pakistan. Urine specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed as community acquired UTI. Urine routine examination (Urine RE) was done and samples positive for UTI (Pus cells >10/High Power Field) were included in the study. These samples were inoculated on Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar plates and incubated at 37 degrees C for 36 hours. Suspected colonies were then inoculated further on EMB plates for pure cultures of E. Coli characterized by certain morphological characteristics. IMViC was applied for the confirmation of E coli. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests of E. Coli were performed with standardized commercial susceptibility discs (OXOID). Out of 50 specimens, positive for UTI by urine RE, 20 showed pure growth of E. Coli on culture (40%). The majority of the isolates (28%; n=14) were from women while only 12% (n=6) were from men. Escherichia coli showed a high rate of resistance towards Ampicillin (90%), Tetracycline (70%), Erythromycin (70%) and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (55%). Sparfloxacin showed better results (45%) than ciprofloxacin (50%). Out of 20 E. Coli isolates, two (10%) were resistant to all the antibacterials except chloramphenicol, eight isolates (40%) showed resistance to six or more than six while 14 (70%) were resistant to four or more than four drugs. Rate of resistance of E. Coli against commonly used antibacterials was quite high and majority of the strains showed multidrug resistance.

  16. IDENTIFICATION OF MAJALAYA COMMON CARP STRAINS RESISTANT TO KHV INFECTION USING CYCA-DAB1*05 ALLELE AS THE MARKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimuddin Alimuddin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cyca-DAB1*05 allele of major histocompatibility complex class II genes is recently suggested to have a link with the European common carp strain resistant to koi herpesvirus (KHV. In this study, a set of specific primers for Cyca-DAB1*05 was designed and applied as a marker to identify broodstocks of majalaya common carp strain subsequently used as a candidate resistant to KHV infection. From a total of 23 broodstock subjected to PCR analysis, two female and male fish, both having (P and no Cyca-DAB1*05 (N, were selected and then diallelly mated. Disease resistance of progenies from 10 crosses was determined by a survival analysis in pond rearing and a laboratory challenge-test using cohabitation method. The results have revealed that the average survivals of PxP progenies for pond rearing and KHV challenge test were 86% and 100% higher (P < 0.05 respectively compared to that of NxN fish. Survival rate of PxN/NxP progenies was significantly lower (P < 0.05 than that of PxP fish. Furthermore, PCR analysis showed that almost 91% progenies of PxP crosses seemed to have a KHV resistant gene marker. Thus, this study suggests that the marker is associated with the KHV resistance in majalaya common carp strain, and farming of PxP progenies can be useful to increase common carp production.

  17. Coatings comprising chitosan and Mentha piperita L. or Mentha × villosa Huds essential oils to prevent common postharvest mold infections and maintain the quality of cherry tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Ingrid Conceição Dantas; de Oliveira, Priscila Dinah Lima; Pontes, Alline Lima de Souza; Lúcio, Ana Sílvia Suassuna Carneiro; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Madruga, Marta Suely; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-02

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of coatings comprising shrimp chitosan (CHI) and Mentha piperita L. (MPEO) or Mentha × villosa Huds (MVEO) essential oils to control mold infections caused by Aspergillus niger, Botrytis cinerea, Penicillium expansum and Rhizopus stolonifer in cherry tomato fruits (Solanum lycopersicum L.) during storage at room temperature (25°C for 12 days) and low temperature (12°C for 24 days). The effects of the coatings on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of cherry tomato fruits during storage were also assessed. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of CHI against all test fungi was 8 mg/mL, whereas the MIC for both MPEO and MVEO was 5 μL/mL. Combinations of CHI at 4 mg/mL and MPEO or MVEO at 2.5 or 1.25 μL/mL strongly inhibited the mycelial growth and spore germination of target fungi. The coatings comprising CHI and MPEO or CHI and MVEO at the different tested concentrations delayed the growth of decay-causing fungi in artificially contaminated tomato fruit during storage at either room temperature or low temperature. The assayed coatings preserved the quality of cherry tomato fruit during storage, in terms of physicochemical and sensory attributes. These results indicate that coatings comprising CHI and MPEO or CHI and MVEO represent promising postharvest treatments to prevent common postharvest mold infections in cherry tomato fruit during storage without affecting the quality of the fruit.

  18. Pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.L. Santos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Infections with Salmonella serotypes are a major cause of food-borne diseases worldwide. Animal models other than the mouse have been employed for the study of nontyphoidal Salmonella infections because the murine model is not suitable for the study of Salmonella-induced diarrhea. The microbe has developed mechanisms to exploit the host cell machinery to its own purpose. Bacterial proteins delivered directly into the host cell cytosol cause cytoskeletal changes and interfere with host cell signaling pathways, which ultimately enhance disease manifestation. Recently, marked advances have been made in our understanding of the molecular interactions between Salmonella serotypes and their hosts. Here, we discuss the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of Salmonella-induced enteritis.

  19. Neonatal enteral feeding tubes as loci for colonisation by members of the Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrell, Edward; Kucerova, Eva; Loughlin, Michael; Caubilla-Barron, Juncal; Hilton, Anthony; Armstrong, Richard; Smith, Craig; Grant, Judith; Shoo, Shiu; Forsythe, Stephen

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether neonatal nasogastric enteral feeding tubes are colonised by the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter spp. (Enterobacter sakazakii) and other Enterobacteriaceae, and whether their presence was influenced by the feeding regime. One hundred and twenty-nine tubes were collected from two neonatal intensive care units (NICU). A questionnaire on feeding regime was completed with each sample. Enterobacteriaceae present in the tubes were identified using conventional and molecular methods, and their antibiograms determined. The neonates were fed breast milk (16%), fortified breast milk (28%), ready to feed formula (20%), reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF, 6%), or a mixture of these (21%). Eight percent of tubes were received from neonates who were 'nil by mouth'. Organisms were isolated from 76% of enteral feeding tubes as a biofilm (up to 107 cfu/tube from neonates fed fortified breast milk and reconstituted PIF) and in the residual lumen liquid (up to 107 Enterobacteriaceae cfu/ml, average volume 250 mul). The most common isolates were Enterobacter cancerogenus (41%), Serratia marcescens (36%), E. hormaechei (33%), Escherichia coli (29%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (25%), Raoultella terrigena (10%), and S. liquefaciens (12%). Other organisms isolated included C. sakazakii (2%),Yersinia enterocolitica (1%),Citrobacter freundii (1%), E. vulneris (1%), Pseudomonas fluorescens (1%), and P. luteola (1%). The enteral feeding tubes were in place between 48 h (13%). All the S. marcescens isolates from the enteral feeding tubes were resistant to amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav. Of additional importance was that a quarter of E. hormaechei isolates were resistant to the 3rd generation cephalosporins ceftazidime and cefotaxime. During the period of the study, K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens caused infections in the two NICUs. This study shows that neonatal enteral feeding tubes, irrespective of feeding regime, act as loci for the

  20. Neonatal enteral feeding tubes as loci for colonisation by members of the Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Craig

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to determine whether neonatal nasogastric enteral feeding tubes are colonised by the opportunistic pathogen Cronobacter spp. (Enterobacter sakazakii and other Enterobacteriaceae, and whether their presence was influenced by the feeding regime. Methods One hundred and twenty-nine tubes were collected from two neonatal intensive care units (NICU. A questionnaire on feeding regime was completed with each sample. Enterobacteriaceae present in the tubes were identified using conventional and molecular methods, and their antibiograms determined. Results The neonates were fed breast milk (16%, fortified breast milk (28%, ready to feed formula (20%, reconstituted powdered infant formula (PIF, 6%, or a mixture of these (21%. Eight percent of tubes were received from neonates who were 'nil by mouth'. Organisms were isolated from 76% of enteral feeding tubes as a biofilm (up to 107 cfu/tube from neonates fed fortified breast milk and reconstituted PIF and in the residual lumen liquid (up to 107 Enterobacteriaceae cfu/ml, average volume 250 μl. The most common isolates were Enterobacter cancerogenus (41%, Serratia marcescens (36%, E. hormaechei (33%, Escherichia coli (29%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (25%, Raoultella terrigena (10%, and S. liquefaciens (12%. Other organisms isolated included C. sakazakii (2%,Yersinia enterocolitica (1%,Citrobacter freundii (1%, E. vulneris (1%, Pseudomonas fluorescens (1%, and P. luteola (1%. The enteral feeding tubes were in place between 48 h (13%. All the S. marcescens isolates from the enteral feeding tubes were resistant to amoxicillin and co-amoxiclav. Of additional importance was that a quarter of E. hormaechei isolates were resistant to the 3rd generation cephalosporins ceftazidime and cefotaxime. During the period of the study, K. pneumoniae and S. marcescens caused infections in the two NICUs. Conclusion This study shows that neonatal enteral feeding tubes

  1. 肠内营养支持在80岁以上反复肺部感染患者中的应用%Clinical application of enteral nutrition support in patients aged over 80 years with recurrent pulmonary infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴宁; 黄方; 齐玉琴; 陈雪松; 张兴虎; 万文辉; 钱晓明

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate clinical value of enteral nutrition support in elderly patients with recurrent pulmonary infection. Methods The application of enteral nutrition support in 34 cases of elderly patients with recurrent pulmonary infection were analyzed, 18 patients were treated with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy (PEG/J) , another 16 patients used nasogastric tube. Both groups took equal calories and nitrogen, and nutritional support time was more than 2 months. Results After enteral nutrition support, nutritional status of all patients was improved. There was no significant difference between two groups. However, the frequency of reflux, aspiration, and aspirated pneumonia occurred in PEG/J group was obviously less than those in nasogastric tube group, and the difference between two groups was significant (F<0. 05). Conclusions Appropriate way of enteral nutrition in elderly patients with recurrent pulmonary infection can not only improve the nutritional status, but also reduce the incidence of pulmonary infection, and the immune function could be improved, and then promote the rehabilitation of patients.%目的 探讨肠内营养支持在≥80岁反复肺部感染患者中的临床应用效果. 方法 对34例≥80岁反复肺部感染患者肠内营养支持情况进行分析.采用经皮内镜下胃造瘘术(PEG/J)治疗组18例,采用鼻胃管治疗组16例,摄入同等热量和同等氮量,营养支持时间>2月. 结果 经肠内营养支持后,全部患者的营养状况得到改善,2组各指标差异无显著性.PEG/J治疗组反流、误吸、吸入性肺炎的发生次数均明显少于鼻胃管组,对比差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05). 结论 在≥80岁反复肺部感染患者中选择合适的肠内营养支持方式,不仅可以改善病人的营养状况,还可以减少肺部感染的发生,提高机体免疫功能,促进病人的康复.

  2. Pediatric Enteral Access Device Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhadi, Ruba A; Rahe, Katina; Lyman, Beth

    2016-10-13

    Enteral nutrition (EN) support has proven to be a nutrition intervention that can provide full or partial calories to promote growth and development in infants and children. To supply these nutrients, an enteral access device is required, and the use of these devices is growing. Placement of the proper device for the patient need, along with appropriate care and monitoring, is required for individualized patient management. When complications arise, early identification and management can prevent more serious morbidity. Complication management requires a tiered approach starting with staff nurses and ending with a physician expert. In addition to this, each institution needs to have an approach that is coordinated among disciplines and departments to promote consistency of practice. The formation of an enteral access team is a conduit for clinical experts to provide education to families, patients, and healthcare professionals while serving as a platform to address product and practice issues. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Technical aspects of enteral nutrition.

    OpenAIRE

    Keymling, M

    1994-01-01

    Advances in technical aspects of enteral feeding such as the manufacture of tubes from polyurethane or silicone have helped promote the science of enteral nutrition. Nasoenteral tubes have few complications, apart from a high unwanted extubation rate and some reluctance from patients because of cosmetic unacceptability. Needle jejunostomy has low morbidity but can only be placed at laparotomy. Percutaneous gastrotomy (in all its different guises) has been established as a low risk procedure a...

  4. Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Interactions between biofilms and the environment. FEMS Microbiol Rev. 1997;20:291–303. 4. Webb LX, Wagner W, Carroll D, et al. Osteomyelitis and...treatment of osteomyelitis . Biomed Mater. 2008;3: 034114. 6. Gristina AG. Biomaterial-centered infection: microbial adhesion versus tissue integration...vertebral osteomyelitis . Spine. 2007;32: 2996–3006. 15. Beckham JD, Tuttle K, Tyler KL. Reovirus activates transforming growth factor ß and bone

  5. Potential of berberine to enhance antimicrobial activity of commonly used antibiotics for dairy cow mastitis caused by multiple drug-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X; Yang, C; Li, Y; Liu, X; Wang, Y

    2015-08-19

    Berberine is a plant alkaloid with antimicrobial activity against a variety of microorganisms. In this study, the antimicrobial properties of berberine against multi-drug resistant field isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis were investigated using berberine alone or in combination with a commonly used antibiotics in veterinary clinics, including penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin. The results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations of berberine, penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin against field S. epidermidis isolates were 2-512, 0.8-213, 0.4-1024, and 0.4-256 mg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, the synergistic effects of antimicrobial activity against these multi-drug resistant isolates were observed when the berberine was combined with penicillin, lincomycin, or amoxicillin; no antagonistic effect of the combination was detected in any of the clinical isolates. These observations were further confirmed using a time-killing assay, in which a combination of 2 agents yielded a greater than 2.03-2.44 log10 decrease in colony-forming unit/mL compared with each agent alone. These findings suggest that berberine is a promising compound for preventing and treating multi-drug resistant S. epidermidis infected mastitis in dairy cows either alone or in combination with other commonly used antibiotics, such as penicillin, lincomycin, and amoxicillin.

  6. Molecular typing of Streptococcus pyogenes from remote Aboriginal communities where rheumatic fever is common and pyoderma is the predominant streptococcal infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M I; Towers, R J; Fagan, P; Carapetis, J R; Currie, B J

    2007-11-01

    Aboriginal Australians in remote communities have high rates of rheumatic heart disease (RHD); yet pharyngitis is reportedly rare whilst pyoderma is common. Some strains of group A streptococci (GAS) have preference for the throat and others for the skin depending on M protein type. A study in three remote communities provided 350 GAS isolates for emm sequence typing, 244 were also emm pattern typed. There was 100% correlation between emm sequence and pattern type. Patterns D and E (non-throat tropic) made up 71% of throat and 87% of skin isolates although patterns A-C (throat tropic) were more common in the throat than the skin (RR 2.3, 95% CI 1.4-3.8) whilst the opposite was found for pattern D (RR 2.2, 95% CI 1.7-3.0). Pattern E favoured the throat (RR 1.4, 95% CI 1.1-1.8). Where environmental factors predispose to skin infection, emm pattern types D and E prevail, whatever the recovery site.

  7. Induction of Haemolysis and DNA Fragmentation in a Normal and Malarial-Infected Blood by Commonly - used Antimalarial Drugs in the North-Western Region of Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Aliyu; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Erukainure, Ochuko Lucky; Habila, Nathan; Idowu, Aimola Asegame; Ndidi, Uche Samuel; Malami, Ibrahim; Zailani, Halliru; Kudan, Zeenat Bello; Muhammad, Bilal Abdullahi

    2016-01-01

    Antimalarial drugs are medicines that are used to prevent or treat malaria effectively at different stages in the life cycle of the malarial parasites. In spite of this, a good number of these drugs have the potential to cause harm when they are misused or abused. This study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of commonly-used antimalarial drugs in the North Western region of Nigeria on haemolysis and DNA fragmentation in the blood of normal and malarial infected humans ex vivo. The drugs used were artemisinine, artesunate, chloroquine, coartem and quinine (0.5-8.0 mg/ml). Haemolysis, haemoglobin status and DNA fragmentations were assayed for using standard procedures. It was observed that all the drugs induced a remarkable dose-dependent haemolysis with more pronounced effects on apparently healthy humans. There was a significant (P DNA fragmentation when compared with control. Commonly-used antimalarial drugs induced haemolysis and altered haemoglobin status which may spontaneously increases the cellular iron levels; a substrate for Fenton and Haber Weiss reactions, and eventually induces DNA fragmentation. Hence, adequate care should be taken during prescription with total avoidance for self medications and/or drugs abuse as a result of their adverse effects within the red blood cells and its immediate microenvironment.

  8. COMMON INFECTIONS OF THE EAR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    April 2004 Vol.22 No.4 CME. 193. KAREN COHEN. MB ChB ... the ear canal and they are usually in the 40 - 50-year age group. ... Treatment. The treatment of choice is intravenous antibiotics consisting of aminoglyco- side, piperacillin and ...

  9. Enteric protozoa of cats and their zoonotic potential-a field study from Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinney, Barbara; Ederer, Christina; Stengl, Carina; Wilding, Katrin; Štrkolcová, Gabriela; Harl, Josef; Flechl, Eva; Fuehrer, Hans-Peter; Joachim, Anja

    2015-05-01

    Domestic cats can be infected with a variety of enteric protozoa. Genotyping of protozoan species, especially Giardia as the most common, can improve assessment of their relevance as zoonotic agents. For an overview on the occurrence of feline enteric protozoa, 298 faecal samples of cats from private households, catteries and animal shelters in Austria were collected. All samples were examined by flotation and using a rapid test for Giardia (FASTest). For the detection of Tritrichomonas blagburni, freshly voided faeces (n = 40) were processed using a commercial culturing system (InPouch TF-Feline). Genotyping was done at the β-giardin gene loci (each sample) and triosephosphate isomerase gene loci (positive samples) for Giardia and at the 18S rRNA gene (positive samples) for Cryptosporidium. Thirty-seven samples (12.4%) were positive for Giardia by flotation and/or using a rapid test. Cryptosporidium was present in 1.7%, Cystoisospora in 4.0%, Sarcocystis in 0.3% and T. blagburni in 2.5% of the samples. Genotyping revealed Giardia cati, the potentially zoonotic Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium felis. Most of the infected cats had no diarrhoea. Cats from shelters were significantly more often infected than owned cats (p = 0.01). When comparing Giardia detection methods, the rapid test had a higher sensitivity than flotation. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results were mostly independent from the other two tests.

  10. Detection of enteric pathogens in Turkey flocks affected with severe enteritis, in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura-Alvarez, Joelma; Nuñez, Luis F N; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Knöbl, Terezinha; Chacón, Jorge L; Moreno, Andrea M; Jones, Richard C; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2014-08-01

    Twenty-two flocks of turkeys affected by enteric problems, with ages between 10 and 104 days and located in the Southern region of Brazil, were surveyed for turkey by PCR for turkey astrovirus type 2 (TAstV-2), turkey coronavirus (TCoV), hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV), rotavirus, reovirus, Salmonella spp., and Lawsonia intracellularis (Li) infections. Eleven profiles of pathogen combination were observed. The most frequently encountered pathogen combinations were TCoV-Li, followed by TCoV-TAstV-2-Li, TCoV-TastV-2. Only TCoV was detected as the sole pathogen in three flocks. Eight and 19 flocks of the 22 were positive for TAstV-2 and TCoV, respectively. Six were positive for Salmonella spp. and L. intracellularis was detected in 12 turkey flocks. Reovirus and HEV were not detected in this survey. These results throw new light on the multiple etiology of enteritis in turkeys. The implications of these findings and their correlation with the clinical signs are comprehensively discussed, illustrating the complexity of the enteric diseases.

  11. Campylobacter enteritis in adult patients with acute diarrhea from 2005 to 2009 in Beijing, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jie; SUN Xin-ting; ZENG Zheng; YU Yan-yan

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been a marked global increase in the incidence of human Campylobacter enteritis in recent years. This study investigated the epidemiological and clinical features of Campylobacter enteritis in adult patients suffering from acute diarrhea.Methods This was a retrospective review of Campylobacter enteritis in adult patients with acute diarrhea presenting at Beijing University First Hospital, Beijing, China, in the summer and autumn (April to October) of 2005 to 2009. The data collected included the species of campylobacter identified, and the age, gender, clinical manifestations and results of laboratory test on stool samples collected from the patients. Campylobacter sensitivity tests to various antimicrobial agents were conducted on 80 specimens. Chi-square tests were applied using SPSS13.0 software and a two-sided P value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant.Results Campylobacter spp. isolated from the stool specimens of 142 patients with diarrhea represented 14.9% of all the cases examined. C. jejuni was identified in 127 patients (89.4%) and C. coli in 15 others (10.6%). The infection incidence was highest in the age range of 21-30 years which comprised 21.7% of the total cases examined. Most cases of diarrhea (46 patients) occurred in June. Watery diarrhea (97.2%), abdominal pain (72.5%) and fever (64.8%) were the most common manifestations of enteric campylobacteriosis. Only four patients (2.8%) had bloody diarrhea. The antimicrobial resistance rates were: cefoperazone (100%), levofloxacin (61.3%), gentamicin (12.5%), erythromycin (6.3%), and azithromycin (2.5%).Conclusions Campylobacter was prevalent among adults with acute diarrhea from 2005 to 2009 in Beijing, China. The large number of those afflicted by the disease warrants the commission of a large multicenter study to determine the extent of enteric campylobacteriosis in this region.

  12. Fungal nail infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nails - fungal infection; Onychomycosis; Infection - fungal - nails; Tinea unguium ... hair, nails, and outer skin layers. Common fungal infections include: Athlete's foot Jock itch Ringworm on the ...

  13. Pediatric enteric neuropathies: diagnosis and current management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfal, Maggie L; Goldstein, Allan M

    2017-06-01

    Neurointestinal diseases are increasingly recognized as causes of significant gastrointestinal morbidity in children. This review highlights the most common pediatric enteric neuropathies and their diagnosis and management, emphasizing insights and discoveries from the most recent literature available. The embryologic and histopathologic causes of enteric neuropathies are varied. They range from congenital aganglionosis in Hirschsprung disease, to autoimmune-mediated loss of neuronal subtypes in esophageal achalasia and Chagas disease, to degenerative neuropathies in some cases of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and gastroparesis. Increased awareness of the clinical presentation and diagnostic evaluation of these conditions is essential as it allows for earlier initiation of treatment and improved outcomes. Most current therapies, which include medical management, neurostimulation, and operative intervention, aim to minimize the symptoms caused by these conditions. The evidence base for many of these treatments in children is poor, and multiinstitutional prospective studies are needed. An innovative therapy on the horizon involves using neuronal stem cell transplantation to treat the underlying disorder by replacing the missing or damaged neurons in these diseases. Although recent advances in basic and clinical neurogastroenterology have significantly improved our awareness and understanding of enteric neuropathies, the efficacy of current treatment approaches is limited. The development of novel therapies, including pharmacologic modulators of neurointestinal function, neurostimulation to enhance gut motility, and neuronal cell-based therapies, is essential to improve the long-term outcomes in children with these disorders.

  14. Meat-based enteral nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derevitskay, O. K.; Dydykin, A. S.

    2017-09-01

    Enteral nutrition is widely used in hospitals as a means of nutritional support and therapy for different diseases. Enteral nutrition must fulfil the energy needs of the body, be balanced by the nutrient composition and meet patient’s nutritional needs. Meat is a source of full-value animal protein, vitamins and minerals. On the basis of this research, recipes and technology for a meat-based enteral nutrition product were developed. The product is a ready-to-eat sterilised mixture in the form of a liquid homogeneous mass, which is of full value in terms of composition and enriched with vitamins and minerals, consists of particles with a size of not more than 0.3 mm and has the modified fat composition and rheological characteristics that are necessary for passage through enteral feeding tubes. The study presents experimental data on the content of the main macro- and micro-nutrients in the developed product. The new product is characterised by a balanced fatty acid composition, which plays an important role in correction of lipid metabolism disorders and protein-energy deficiency, and it is capable of satisfying patients’ daily requirements for vitamins and the main macro- and microelements when consuming 1500-2000 ml. Meat-based enteral nutrition can be used in diets as a standard mixture for effective correction of the energy and anabolic requirements of the body and support of the nutritional status of patients, including those with operated stomach syndrome.

  15. Occurrence of glucocorticoids discharged from a sewage treatment plant in Japan and the effects of clobetasol propionate exposure on the immune responses of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) to bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Kei; Sato, Kentaro; Shibano, Takazumi; Isobe, Tomohiko; Suzuki, Go; Kitamura, Shin-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    The present study evaluated the environmental risks to common carp (Cyprinus carpio) posed by glucocorticoids present in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. To gather information on the seasonal variations in glucocorticoid concentration, the authors sampled the effluent of a Japanese STP every other week for 12 mo. Six of 9 selected glucocorticoids were detected in the effluent, with clobetasol propionate and betamethasone 17-valerate detected at the highest concentrations and frequencies. The present study's results indicated that effluent glucocorticoid concentration may depend on water temperature, which is closely related to the removal efficiency of the STP or to seasonal variations in the public's use of glucocorticoids. In a separate experiment, to clarify whether glucocorticoids in environmental water increase susceptibility to bacterial infection in fish, the authors examined the responses to bacterial infection (Aeromonas veronii) of common carp exposed to clobetasol propionate. Clobetasol propionate exposure did not affect bacterial infection-associated mortality. In fish infected with A. veronii but not exposed to clobetasol propionate, head kidney weight and number of leukocytes in the head kidney were significantly increased (p < 0.05), whereas these effects were not observed in infected fish exposed to clobetasol. This suggests that clobetasol propionate alleviated bacterial infection-associated inflammation. Together, these results indicate that susceptibility to bacterial infection in common carp is not affected by exposure to glucocorticoids at environmentally relevant concentrations.

  16. Predisposing factors and prevention of Clostridium perfringens-associated enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaart, Janneke G; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Gröne, Andrea

    2013-09-01

    Clostridium perfringens is one of the major causes of intestinal disease in humans and animals. Its pathogenicity is contributed to by the production of a variety of toxins. In addition, predisposing environmental factors are important for the induction of C. perfringens-associated enteritis as shown by infection models. Environmental contamination, gastric and intestinal pH, intestinal microflora, nutrition, concurrent infections, and medical interventions may influence the intestinal colonization, growth, and toxin production by C. perfringens. Prevention of C. perfringens-associated enteritis may be mediated by the use of feed additives like probiotics, prebiotics, organic acids, essential oils, bacteriophages, lysozymes, bacteriocins, and antimicrobial peptides. Here we summarize and discuss published data on the influence of different environmental predisposing factors and preventive measures. Further research should focus on feed composition and feed additives in order to prevent C. perfringens-associated enteritis.

  17. In vitro antibacterial effects of Cinnamomum extracts on common bacteria found in wound infections with emphasis on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buru, Ayuba Sunday; Pichika, Mallikarjuna Rao; Neela, Vasanthakumari; Mohandas, Kavitha

    2014-05-14

    Cinnamomum species have been widely used in many traditional systems of medicine around the world. In the Malaysian traditional system of medicine, the leaves, stem bark and stem wood of Cinnamomum iners, Cinnamomum porrectum, Cinnamomum altissimum and Cinnamomum impressicostatum have been used to treat wound infections. To study the antibacterial effects of Cinnamomum iners, Cinnamomum porrectum, Cinnamomum altissimum and Cinnamomum impressicostatum against common bacteria found in wound infections with primary focus on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The crude extracts from the leaves, stem-bark and stem-wood of Cinnamomum iners, Cinnamomum porrectum, Cinnamomum altissimum and Cinnamomum impressicostatum were obtained using sequential extraction with hexane, ethylacetate, methanol and water. The volatile oils were obtained by hydro-distillation. The antibacterial activities of extracts were investigated using disk diffusion assays and broth microdilution assays. The volatile oils obtained from the stem-bark of Cinnamomum altissimum, Cinnamomum porrectum and Cinnamomum impressicostatum have shown significant antibacterial activity against a wide range of Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria including MRSA. A few test extracts have shown better activity against MRSA as compared to methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Amongst all the test extracts, Cinnamomum impressicostatum stem-bark water extract produced the largest inhibition zone of 21.0mm against MRSA while its inhibition zone against MSSA was only 8.5mm. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of this extract against MRSA was 19.5 μg mL(-1) and the corresponding minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was 39.0 μg mL(-1). This study has scientifically validated the traditional use of Cinnamomum species in treating wound infections. Of high scientific interest was the observation that the antibacterial effect of Cinnamomum impressicostatum stem-bark crude water

  18. Indiscretion enteritis. A Rabelaisian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, E D; Collins, J; Burke, C

    1986-12-01

    A 76-year-old man had small bowel obstruction and organic small bowel disease following a series of bizarre massive gustatory insults that involved food, medications, and mega-mineral-vitamin supplements. Intestinal obstruction required partial small bowel resection. The dietary indiscretions resulted in severe enteritis (indiscretion enteritis). The sequence has been termed a Rabelaisian syndrome after the great French writer and physician, Francois Rabelais, who vividly described bizarre gustatory habits. Gut injury may result from unwise oral intake of various foods and mineral supplements.

  19. Supplementary studies on Myxobolus tsangwuensis Chen, 1954 (Myxozoa: Myxosporea) infecting the gills of common carp Cyprinus carpio (L.): molecular and histological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mingjun; Liu, Yang; Jia, Luo; Zhai, Yanhua; Deng, Qiong; Gu, Zemao

    2014-10-01

    Myxobolus tsangwuensis Chen, 1954 is a common parasite infecting the gills of common carp Cyprinus carpio (L.). It was described simply in the original description and its molecular data was absent, which makes the accurate diagnosis challenging. Here we supplemented its description based on the morphological, histological and molecular data. It was characterized by the presence of small round or ellipsoidal plasmodia in the gills of host and histology showed the plasmodia developed in the capillary network of the gill lamella. Mature spores of M. tsangwuensis were ellipsodal in frontal view and lemon shaped in lateral view, averaging 11.2 ± 0.7 (10.2-12.5) μm × 9.3 ± 0.3 (8.5-10.0) μm × 6.2 ± 0.4 (5.5-7.0) μm. Spores valves were symmetrical and smooth. Occasionally, a small intercapsular appendix was observed. Two polar capsules were pyriform with different sizes, measuring 5.0 ± 0.2 (4.4-5.3) μm × 3.1 ± 0.1 (2.9-3.5) μm and 3.9 ± 0.2 (3.4-4.3) μm × 2.5 ± 0.2 (2.0-2.8) μm, respectively. Polar filaments coiled five to seven turns in large polar capsule and three to four turns in the small polar capsule. Some spores were surrounded by the mucous envelope that was not recorded in the original description. Molecular analysis revealed that the present SSU rDNA sequences did not match any available sequences in GenBank and phylogenetic analysis showed M. tsangwuensis was sister to M. basilamellaris and M. musseliusae.

  20. The Comparison of Continuous and Intermittent Enteral Nutrition In Cerebrovascular Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levent Güngör

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Dysphagia and malnutrition are not so rare in stroke patients, and have an unfavorable influence on recovery. Nutritional support may reduce infections, duration of hospital stay and mortality. However, there is no clear evidence about the modality of nasogastric nutrition. In this study, intermittent and continuous enteral nutrition is compared by means of pulmonary infections and gastrointestinal tolerance, among acute cerebrovascular patients. METHODS: Sixty two acute cerebrovascular patients with dysphagia were included the study. The same volume of nutrition product was infused 4 times daily to 31 patients, and continuously for 24 hours to the remaining 31. After 10 days of follow-up, the rates of pulmonary infections, diarrhea, increased gastric residual volumes, vomiting and tube occlusion were compared between two groups. RESULTS: Twenty patients developed pneumonia (32% and 8 diarrhea (13%. Mortality due to complications associated with tube feeding was 6%. Aspiration and related pneumonia was present in 11 patients in the intermittent nutrition group (35%, and in 9 patients in the continuous nutrition group (29%. The rate of pulmonary infection was not statistically different between two groups (p>0.05. Diarrhea was observed in 7 intermittently fed patients (23%, while was present only in 1 patient (3% in the continuously fed group. Diarrhea was more common in the intermittent nutrition group, just at the statistical border (p=0.05. None of the patients developed tube occlusion, vomiting and gastric retention. The rate of mortality and the interruption of feeding was not significantly different between two groups (p>0.05. CONCLUSION: Diarrhea and pulmonary infections are more prevalent with intermittent tube feeding with respect to continuous enteral nutrition, though the difference is not so conspicuous. The reason may be contamination of the equipments and the feeding solution because of frequent manipulation and

  1. Phenotypic changes in the brain of SIV-infected macaques exposed to methamphetamine parallel macrophage activation patterns induced by the common gamma-chain cytokine system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikki eBortell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available One factor in the development of neuroAIDS is the increase in the migration of pro-inflammatory CD8 T cells across the Blood Brain Barrier. Typically these cells are involved with keeping the viral load down. However, the persistence of above average numbers of CD8 T cells in the brain, not necessarily specific to viral peptides, is facilitated by the upregulation of IL15 from astrocytes, in the absence of IL2, in the brain environment. Both IL15 and IL2 are common gamma chain (γc cytokines. Here, using the non-human primate model of neuroAIDS, we have demonstrated that exposure to Methamphetamine, a powerful illicit drug that has been associated with HIV exposure and neuroAIDS severity, can cause an increase in molecules of the γc system. Among these molecules, IL15, which is upregulated in astrocytes by Methamphetamine, and that induces the proliferation of T cells, may also be involved in driving an inflammatory phenotype in innate immune cells of the brain. Therefore, Methamphetamine and IL15 may be critical in the development and aggravation of Central Nervous System immune-mediated inflammatory pathology in HIV-infected drug abusers.

  2. Three new species of Myxobolus Bütschli, 1882 (Myxozoa: Myxobolidae) infecting the common nase Chondrostoma nasus (L.) in the River Danube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cech, Gábor; Borzák, Réka; Molnár, Kálmán; Székely, Csaba

    2015-10-01

    The common nase Chondrostoma nasus (L.) is a frequent cyprinid fish in the River Danube. In a survey on its infection with myxosporeans, eight different Myxobolus spp. spore types were found in the gills, swim bladder, fins and intestinal wall. Of these, spore types representing three species were studied in detail by morphological and molecular methods. Based on the differences in 18S rDNA sequences, two new species of Myxobolus Bütschli, 1882 from the gills and one from the swim bladder are described: M. arrabonensis n. sp., M. szentendrensis n. sp. and M. paksensis n. sp. The new species resembled M. muelleri Bütschli, 1882, M. intimus Zaika, 1965 and M. cycloides Gurley, 1893, all parasitic in leuciscine cyprinids, in spore size and location in the host, but exhibited differences in partial 18S rDNA sequences as follows: M. arrabonensis - M. muelleri (1.4%), M. szentendrensis - M. intimus (2.8%), M. paksensis - M. cycloides (2.4%). Based on the significant differences in rDNA sequences, the three forms are considered to represent new, hitherto undescribed species in spite of their morphological similarities to some Myxobolus spp. forming spores in identical locations in genetically closely related cyprinids of the subfamily Leuciscinae.

  3. Postweaning performance of calves from Angus, Brahman, and reciprocal-cross cows grazing endophyte-infected tall fescue or common bermudagrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M A; Phillips, W A; Brown, A H; Coleman, S W; Jackson, W G; Miesner, J R

    1999-01-01

    Data from 403 Polled Hereford-sired calves from Angus, Brahman, and reciprocal-cross cows were used to evaluate the effects of preweaning forage environment on postweaning performance. Calves were spring-born in 1991 to 1994 and managed on either endophyte-infected tall fescue (E+) or common bermudagrass (BG) during the preweaning phase. After weaning, calves were shipped to the Grazinglands Research Laboratory, El Reno, OK and stratified to one of two winter stocker treatments by breed and preweaning forage; stocker treatments were winter wheat pasture (WW) or native range plus supplemental CP (NR). Each stocker treatment was terminated in March, calves grazed cool-season grasses, and calves were then moved to a feedlot phase in June. In the feedlot phase, calves were fed to approximately 10 mm fat over the 12th rib and averaged approximately 115 d on feed. When finished, calves were weighed and shipped to Amarillo, TX for slaughter. Averaged over calf breed group, calves from E+ gained faster during the stocker phase (Pcarcass weights (Pcarcass weight (P<.16). These data suggest that few carryover effects from tall fescue preweaning environments exist, other than lighter, but acceptable, weights through slaughter. These data further suggest that the tolerance to E+ in calves from reciprocal-cross cows, expressed in weaning weights, moderated postweaning weight differences between E+ and BG compared to similar comparisons in calves from purebred cows.

  4. Infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930176 Immunodiagnosis of tuberculousmeningitis.WANG Yongjun(王拥军),et al.Xuanwu Hosp,Capital Med Instit,Beijing,100053.Chin J Intern Med 1992;31(9):549-551.The detection of special anti-mycobacterialantibodies in cerebrospinal fluid(CSF)was e-valuated.Among all the common coated anti-gens,it was found that PPD was the most poten-tial one.Seven detecting methods were com-pared.It was shown that the classic ELISA tec-nique was worth recommending.The results ofthe experiments revealed that absorbancemethod was better than titration method.IgG

  5. Natural Bioactive Food Components for Improving Enteral Tube Feeding Tolerance in Adult Patient Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchnia, Adam J; Conlon, Beth; Greenberg, Norman

    2017-08-01

    Tube feeding (TF) is the most common form of nutrition support. In recent years, TF administration has increased among patient populations within and outside hospital settings, in part due to greater insurance coverage, reduced use of parenteral nutrition, and improved formularies suitable for sole source nutrition. With increasing life expectancy and improved access to TFs, the number of adults dependent on enteral nutrition is expected to grow. However, enteral TF intolerance (ETFI) is the most common complication of TFs, typically presenting with at least 1 adverse gastrointestinal event, including nausea, diarrhea, and constipation. ETFI often leads to reductions in TF volume with associated energy and protein deficits. Potentially ensuing malnutrition is a major public health concern due its effects on increased risk of morbidity and mortality, infections, prolonged hospital length of stay, and higher healthcare costs. As such, there is a need for intervention strategies to prevent and reduce ETFI. Incorporating whole foods with bioactive properties is a promising strategy. Emerging research has elucidated bioactive properties of whole foods with specific benefits for the prevention and management of adverse gastrointestinal events commonly associated with TFs. However, lack of evidence-based recommendations and technological challenges have limited the use of such foods in commercial TF formulas. This review addresses research gaps by discussing 5 whole foods (rhubarb, banana, curcumin, peppermint oil, and ginger) with bioactive attributes identified through literature searches and clinical experience as having substantial scientific rationale to consider their application for ETFI in adult populations.

  6. Colleges Enter the Information Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current Issues in Higher Education, 1983

    1983-01-01

    The implications for higher education of the U.S. transformation from an industrial to an information society are discussed in six papers. Russell Edgerton provides an overview in "Entering the Information Society: An Introduction." In "The Computer: An Enabling Instrument," Louis Robinson considers the current era of the personalization of the…

  7. Enteral Tube Feeding and Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, David Sheridan; Kimmel, David

    2006-01-01

    To determine the effects of enteral tube feeding on the incidence of pneumonia, we performed a retrospective review of all clients at our institution who had gastrostomy or jejunostomy tubes placed over a 10-year period. Ninety-three subjects had a history of pneumonia before feeding tube insertion. Eighty had gastrostomy and 13, jejunostomy…

  8. Yi Can Enter 2007 NBA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王玉辉

    2007-01-01

    China’s top young basketball player Yi Jianlian has been given the green light to enter the NBA,after his club finally agreed to let him join the NBA draft."This is a great chance and also a test for me,"said the 2.12-metre forward.

  9. Intrathoracic enteric foregut duplication cyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birmole B

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available A one month old male child presented with respiratory distress since day 10 of life. There was intercostal retraction and decreased air entry on the right side. Investigations revealed a well defined cystic mass in the posterior mediastinum with vertebral anomalies, the cyst was excised by posterolateral thoracotomy. Histopathology revealed it to be an enteric foregut duplication cyst.

  10. Nutrición enteral

    OpenAIRE

    Barrachina Bellés, Lidón; García Hernández, Misericordia; Oto Cavero, Isabel

    1984-01-01

    Este trabajo nos introduce en la administración de la nutrición enteral, haciendo una revisión de los aspectos a tener en cuenta tanto en sus indicaciones, vias, tipos, métodos, cuidados y complicaciones más importantes.

  11. Analysis on Common Factors of Diabetes Complicated with Infections and its Countermeasures%糖尿病并发感染的常见因素分析及对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单萍; 石瑞新; 李秀翠; 吕林; 杨建辉

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨糖尿病患者常见的并发感染类型及感染的常见因素,为做好患者的护理工作提供参考资料.方法 共抽取本院2010年1月- 2012年1月间收治的糖尿病患者102例,其中感染患者36例,包括17例男性和19例女性.通过观察感染内容来分析感染的主要类型,并分析总结感染的常见因素. 结果 常见的感染类型有泌尿系统感染、呼吸道感染、皮肤感染、消化道感染等.且感染因素与年龄和病程有一定关系,常见的泌尿系统感染多发于女性.结论 以后的护理工作中,除了常规护理外,还应加强与患者的沟通,指导他们正确的饮食,运动及药物相结合的治疗.%Objective To explore the common infection types and common factors of infections in diabetes patients, and to provide reference for nursing care of the patients. Methods A total of 102 diabetes patients hospitalized in the Fourth Hospital of Qinhuangdao from January 2010 to January 2012 were selected. Among them, there were 36 patients with infections, including 17 males and 19 males. The main types of infections were analyzed, and the common factors were summari2ed. Results The common types of infections were urinary tract infection, respiratory tract infection, skin infection, gastrointestinal infection, etc. The infection factors were correlated with age and duration of illness. Common urological infection occurred mostly in females. Conclusions We should enhance the communication with patients and guide the patients in combination therapy of correct dietary, exercise and medication in our nursing work besides routine nursing care.

  12. Thermal Inactivation of Foodborne Enteric Viruses and Their Viral Surrogates in Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Hayriye; D'Souza, Doris H; Davidson, P Michael

    2015-08-01

    Foodborne viruses, in particular human norovirus and hepatitis A virus, are the most common causes of food-associated infections and foodborne illness outbreaks around the world. Since it is currently not possible to cultivate human noroviruses and the wild-type strain of hepatitis A virus in vitro, the use of a variety of viral surrogates is essential to determine appropriate thermal processing conditions to reduce the risk associated with their contamination of food. Therefore, the objectives of this review are to (i) present pertinent characteristics of enteric foodborne viruses and their viral surrogates, (ii) discuss the viral surrogates currently used in thermal inactivation studies and their significance and value, (iii) summarize available data on thermal inactivation kinetics of enteric viruses, (iv) discuss factors affecting the efficacy of thermal treatment, (v) discuss suggested mechanisms of thermal inactivation, and (vi) provide insights on foodborne enteric viruses and viral surrogates for future studies and industrial applications. The overall goal of this review is to contribute to the development of appropriate thermal processing protocols to ensure safe food for human consumption.

  13. [Enteral nutrition in burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J L; Garrido, M; Gómez-Cía, T; Serrera, J L; Franco, A; Pumar, A; Relimpio, F; Astorga, R; García-Luna, P P

    1992-01-01

    Nutritional support plays an important role in the treatment of patients with burns. Due to the severe hypercatabolism that develops in these patients, oral support is insufficient in most cases, and this makes it essential to initiate artificial nutritional support (either enteral or parenteral). Enteral nutrition is more physiological than parenteral, and data exist which show that in patients with burns, enteral nutrition exercises a protective effect on the intestine and may even reduce the hypermetabolic response in these patients. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerance of enteral nutritional support with a hypercaloric, hyperproteic diet with a high content of branched amino acids in the nutritional support of patients suffering from burns. The study included 12 patients (8 males and 4 females), admitted to the Burns Unit. Average age was 35 +/- 17 years (range: 21-85 years). The percentage of body surface affected by the burns was 10% in two cases, between 10-30% in three cases, between 30-50% in five cases and over 50% in two cases. Initiation of the enteral nutrition was between twenty-four hours and seven days after the burn. The patients were kept in the unit until they were discharged, and the average time spent in the unit was 31.5 days (range: 17-63 days). Total energetic requirements were calculated based on Harris-Benedict, with a variable aggression factor depending on the body surface burned, which varied from 2,000 and 4,000 cal day. Nitrogenous balance was determined on a daily basis, and plasmatic levels of total proteins, albumin and prealbumin on a weekly basis. There was a significant difference between the prealbumin values at the initiation and finalization of the enteral nutrition (9.6 +/- 2.24 mg/dl compared with 19.75 +/- 5.48 mg/dl; p diet was very good, and only mild complications such as diarrhoea developed in two patients. Enteral nutrition is a suitable nutritional support method for patients with

  14. Graft placement with an omental flap for ruptured infective common iliac aneurysm in a patient with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device: alternative surgical approach avoiding driveline injury and pathogen identification by 16S ribosomal DNA gene analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Masatoshi; Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Sakatsume, Ko; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Shimizu, Takuya; Akamatsu, Daijirou; Kakuta, Risako; Gu, Yoshiaki; Kaku, Mitsuo; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Goto, Hitoshi; Ohuchi, Noriaki; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2016-12-01

    Patients supported by mechanical circulatory support have to wait for longer periods for heart transplantation in Japan. Infective events are a major complication and influence survival. Here, we present the case of a patient with an implantable left ventricular assist device for 6 months who had the complication of ruptured infective common iliac aneurysm. Graft placement with an omental flap was successfully performed via the alternative surgical approach to avoid percutaneous driveline injury. In samples of aortic specimens, 16S ribosomal DNA gene analysis identified Helicobacter cinaedi. Complete removal of the infected tissue and correct pathogen identification may have been relevant to the good clinical course.

  15. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy in the Enteral Feeding of the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan-Lin Chen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Today we are faced with an aging society that may develop malnutrition because of dysphagia related to dementia, stroke, and malignancy seen often in the elderly. The preferred form of nutritional supplementation for this group is enteral nutrition, and the most appropriate long-term method is by use of a gastrostomy. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG was first introduced in 1980 as an alternative to the traditional operative procedure and rapidly became the preferred procedure. In geriatric patients, the principal indications are neurological dysphagia and malnutrition, related to an underlying disease or anorexia-cachexia in very elderly. PEG is contraindicated in the presence of respiratory distress, previous gastric resection, total esophageal obstruction, coagulation disorders and sepsis in the elderly. Common complications include wound infection, leakage, hemorrhage, and fistula in the general population, but aspiration pneumonia is the major case of death in this group. Risks and complications of PEG must be discussed with patients and their families; and the decision for percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy insertion should only be made after careful consideration and discussion between managing physicians, allied health professionals, and the patient and/or family. Four ethical principles may help make feeding decisions: beneficence, non-maleficence, autonomy and justice. Attentive long-term care after tube replacement is mandatory. Acceptance of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy placement by patients and their families tends to increase once favorable outcomes are offered.

  16. Comparison of canine parvovirus with mink enteritis virus by restriction site mapping.

    OpenAIRE

    McMaster, G K; Tratschin, J D; Siegl, G

    1981-01-01

    The genomes of canine parvovirus and mink enteritis virus were compared by restriction enzyme analysis of their replicative-form DNAs. Of 79 mapped sites, 68, or 86%, were found to be common for both types of DNA, indicating that canine parvovirus and mink enteritis virus are closely related viruses. Whether they evolved from a common precursor or whether canine parvovirus is derived from mink enteritis virus, however, cannot be deduced from our present data.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL AND CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY OF RIFAXIMIN SELECTIVE ENTERIC ANTIBIOTIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    article editorial

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Solvay pharma expands its product portfolio, by launching alfa normix (rifaximin for the treatment of the gastroenteric infections. Alfa normix is a non-systemic broad-spectrum antibiotic to treat acute gastroenteric infections and is prescribed for the travelers suffering from diarrhea, the overgrowth of microorganisms in the intestinal tract, hepatic encephalopathy, symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease of the segmented intestine, and chronic inflammation of the intestinal tract, as well as to prevent the infectious complications in the event of the colorectal surgeries. The first medication deliveries to Russia are scheduled for march 2008.Key words: rifaximin, infectious diarrhea, enteric infections.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  19. DEVELOPMENT OF HOMOLOGOUS VIRAL INTERNAL CONTROLS FOR USE IN RT-PCR ASSAYS OF WATERBORNE ENTERIC VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enteric viruses often contaminate water sources causing frequent outbreaks of gastroenteritis. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays are commonly used for detection of human enteric viruses in environmental and drinking water samples. RT-PCR provides ...

  20. Enteric Diseases of Poultry with Special Attention to Clostridium perfringens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafez Mohamed Hafez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The enteric heath of growing poultry is imperative to success of the production. The basic role of poultry production is turning feed stuffs into meat. Any changes in this turning process, due to mechanical, chemical or biological disturbance of digestive system (enteric disorders is mostly accompanied with high economic losses due to poor performance, increased mortality rates and increased medication costs. The severity of clinical signs and course of the disorders are influenced several factors such as management, nutrition and the involved agent(s. Several pathogens (viruses, bacteria and parasites are incriminated as possible cause of enteric disorders either alone (mono-causal, in synergy with other micro-organisms (multi-causal, or with non-infectious causes such as feed and /or management related factors. In addition, excessive levels of mycotoxins and biogenic amines in feed lead to enteric disorders. Also factors such as high stocking density, poor litter conditions, poor hygiene and high ammonia level and other stressful situation may reduce the resistance of the birds and increases their susceptibility to infections. Under field conditions, however, under filed conditions it is difficult to determine whether the true cause of enteric disorders, is of infectious or non-infectious origin. In recent years and since the ban of use of antimicrobial growth promoters in several countries the incidence of intestinal disorders especially those caused by clostridial infection was drastically increased. The present review described in general the several factors involved in enteric disorders and summarized the available literatures about Clostridium perfringens infection in poultry.

  1. Enteral nutrition intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrentieva, Athina; Kontakiotis, Theodore; Bitzani, Militsa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency of enteral feeding intolerance in critically ill septic burn patients, the effect of enteral feeding intolerance on the efficacy of feeding, the correlation between the infection marker (procalcitonin [PCT]) and the nutrition status marker (prealbumin) and the impact of feeding intolerance on the outcome of septic burn patients. From January 2009 to December 2012 the data of all burn patients with the diagnosis of sepsis who were placed on enteral nutrition were analyzed. Septic patients were divided into two groups: group A, septic patients who developed feeding intolerance; group B, septic patients who did not develop feeding intolerance. Demographic and clinical characteristics of patients were analyzed and compared. The diagnosis of sepsis was applied to 29% of all patients. Of these patients 35% developed intolerance to enteral feeding throughout the septic period. A statistically significant increase in mean PCT level and a decrease in prealbumin level was observed during the sepsis period. Group A patients had statistically significant lower mean caloric intake, higher PCT:prealbumin ratio, higher pneumonia incidence, higher Sequential Organ Failure Assessment Maximum Score, a longer duration of mechanical ventilation, and a higher mortality rate in comparison with the septic patients without gastric feeding intolerance. The authors concluded that a high percentage of septic burn patients developed enteral feeding intolerance. Enteral feeding intolerance seems to have a negative impact on the patients' nutritional status, morbidity, and mortality.

  2. 2005-2007年广州地区腹泻儿童感染轮状病毒情况分析%Analysis of Enteric Rotavirus Infection among Diarrheal Children in Gnangzhou from 2005 to 2007

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尹应先; 肖密丝; 欧志英; 朱冰

    2009-01-01

    目的 了解近3年来广州地区儿童肠道轮状病毒感染情况.方法 收集2005年1月至2007年12月收治的包括门诊和住院的急性腹泻患儿的大便标本,采用免疫胶体金技术对标本进行轮状病毒抗原检测.结果 轮状病毒2005、2006和2007年平均感染率分别为44.70%、38.22%和39.99%;与2006、2007年相比,2005年轮状病毒感染高峰和波谷均向后推延1个月.抗原检测阳性例数在6~24个月婴幼儿最高,全年感染率在性别上差异无统计学意义.结论 轮状病毒是引起婴幼儿病毒感染性腹泻的主要病原体,气候可能对广州地区轮状病毒感染有较大影响.%Objective To study the occurrence of rotaviras infection among children in Guangzhou area.Methods Stool specimens were collected from over 30,000 inpatients and outpatients, with an age of less than 5 years old, suffering from acute diarrhea admitted in Guangzhou Children's hospital during the period of Jan 2005 to Dec 2007. Immune colloidal gold technique was used to test the presence of rotavirus antigens in stool specimens. Results A total of 33,211 specimens were tested. The average positive rate of infection in 2005, 2006 and 2007 was 44.70%, 38.22% and 39.99%, respectively. Compared with 2006 and 2007, the peak of infection was one month delayed in 2005. The rate of positive retavirus antigen detection was highest in infants aged 6~24 months. Sex difference in infection was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion Rotavims is the single most important causative agent of severe acute diarrhea among young children in Guangzhou, China. Climatological factors, such as temperature, may affect the epidemiologic patterns of rotavirus infection in Guangzhou.

  3. [National registry of home enteral nutrition in Spain 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luengo Pérez, L M; Chicharro, M L; Cuerda, C; García Luna, P P; Rabassa Soler, A; Romero, A; Irles, J A; Penacho, M A; Camarero, E; Martínez Olmos, M A; Calañas, A; Parés, R M; Lecha, M; Gómez Candela, C; Zapata, A; Pérez de la Cruz, A; Luis, D de; Wanden-Berghe, C; Cantón, A; Laborda, L; Matía, P; Martí, E

    2009-01-01

    To communicate the results from the registry of Home-Based Enteral Nutrition of the NADYASENPE group in 2007. We included every patient in the registry with home enteral nutrition any time from January 1st to December 31st of 2007. The number of patients with home enteral nutrition in 2007 was 5,107 (52% male) from 28 different hospitals. 95.4% of them were 15 yr or older, with a mean age of 67.96 +/- 18.12, and 4.2 +/- 3.38 among patients aged 14 yr or less. The most common underlying diseases were neurological (37.8%) and neoplastic diseases (29.3%). Enteral nutrition was administered p.o. in most patients (63.5%), followed by nasogastric tube (25.9%), while gastrostomy was only used in 9.2%. The mean time in enteral nutrition support was 9.4 months and the most common reasons for withdrawal were death (58.7%) and switching to oral intake (32%). Activity was limited in 31.4% of patients and 36.01% were house-bound. Most patients needed partial (26.51%) or total (37.68%) care assistance. Enteral formula was provided by hospitals to 69.14% of patients and by pharmacies to 30.17% of them, while disposable material was provided by hospitals to 81.63% and by Primary Care to the remaining patients. In 2007, there has been an increase of more than 30% of patients registered with home enteral nutrition comparing with 2006, without any big difference in other data, but a higher proportion of patients with enteral nutrition p.o.

  4. Tinea Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The skin may become itchy and red, with blisters and cracking of the skin. The infection may ... my sheets and towels every day? ResourcesDiagnosis and Management of Common Tinea Infections by SL Noble, Pharm. ...

  5. Campylobacter Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter infection is a common foodborne illness. You get it from eating raw or undercooked poultry. You ... whether you need to take antibiotics. To prevent campylobacter infection, cook poultry thoroughly. Use a separate cutting ...

  6. Anaerobic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the face and neck, sometimes after a dental infection or procedure such as a tooth extraction or ... adults of all ages. The most common are dental infections, inflammation of the abdominal lining (peritonitis), and abscesses ...

  7. White paper on guidelines concerning enteric nervous system stem cell therapy for enteric neuropathies⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Alan J.; Goldstein, Allan M.; Newgreen, Donald F.; Stamp, Lincon; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Metzger, Marco; Hotta, Ryo; Young, Heather M.; Andrews, Peter W.; Thapar, Nikhil; Belkind-Gerson, Jaime; Bondurand, Nadege; Bornstein, Joel C.; Chan, Wood Yee; Cheah, Kathryn; Gershon, Michael D.; Heuckeroth, Robert O.; Hofstra, Robert M.W.; Just, Lothar; Kapur, Raj P.; King, Sebastian K.; McCann, Conor J.; Nagy, Nandor; Ngan, Elly; Obermayr, Florian; Pachnis, Vassilis; Pasricha, Pankaj J.; Sham, Mai Har; Tam, Paul; Berghe, Pieter Vanden

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing focus on the development of novel stem cell based therapies for the treatment of disorders and diseases affecting the enteric nervous system (ENS) of the gastrointestinal tract (so-called enteric neuropathies). Here, the idea is that ENS progenitor/stem cells could be transplanted into the gut wall to replace the damaged or absent neurons and glia of the ENS. This White Paper sets out experts’ views on the commonly used methods and approaches to identify, isolate, purify, expand and optimize ENS stem cells, transplant them into the bowel, and assess transplant success, including restoration of gut function. We also highlight obstacles that must be overcome in order to progress from successful preclinical studies in animal models to ENS stem cell therapies in the clinic. PMID:27059883

  8. Antioxidant and phytochemical properties of Carpobrotus edulis (L. bolus leaf used for the management of common infections in HIV/AIDS patients in Eastern Cape Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omoruyi Beauty E

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carpobrotus edulis (Mesembryanthemaceae, also known as igcukuma in Xhosa language is a medicinal plant used by the traditional healers to treat common infections in HIV/AIDS patients. Based on this information, we researched on the plant phytoconstituents, as well as its inhibitory effect using aqueous and three different organic solvent extracts in order to justify its therapeutic usage. Methods Antioxidant activity of the extracts were investigated spectrophotometrically against 1,1- diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS diammonium salt, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, nitric oxide (NO, and ferric reducing power, Total phenols, flavonoids, flavonols, proanthocyanidins, tannins, alkaloids and saponins were also determined using the standard methods. Results Quantitative phytochemical analysis of the four solvent extracts revealed a high percentage of phenolics (55.7 ± 0.404% in the acetone extract, with appreciable amount of proanthocyanidins (86.9 ± 0.005% and alkaloids (4.5 ± 0.057% in the aqueous extract, while tannin (48.9 ± 0.28% and saponin (4.5 ± 0.262% were major constituents of the ethanol extract. Flavonoids (0.12 ± 0.05% and flavonols (0.12 ± 0.05% were found at higher level in the hexane extract in comparison with the other extracts. The leaf extracts demonstrated strong hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity, with the exception of water and ethanol extracts. IC50 values of the aqueous and ethanolic extract against DPPH, ABTS, and NO were 0.018 and 0.016; 0.020 and 0.022; 0.05 and 0.023 mg/ml, respectively. The reducing power of the extract was found to be concentration dependent. Conclusion The inhibitory effect of the extracts on free radicals may justify the traditional use of this plant in the management of common diseases in HIV/AIDs patients in Eastern Cape Province. Overall, both aqueous and ethanol were found to be the best

  9. Aetiological role of common respiratory viruses in acute lower respiratory infections in children under five years: A systematic review and meta–analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Shi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute lower respiratory infection (ALRI remains a major cause of childhood hospitalization and mortality in young children and the causal attribution of respiratory viruses in the aetiology of ALRI is unclear. We aimed to quantify the absolute effects of these viral exposures. Methods: We conducted a systematic literature review (across 7 databases of case–control studies published from 1990 to 2014 which investigated the viral profile of 18592 children under 5 years with and without ALRI. We then computed a pooled odds ratio and virus–specific attributable fraction among the exposed of 8 common viruses – respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, influenza (IFV, parainfluenza (PIV, human metapneumovirus (MPV, adenovirus (AdV, rhinovirus (RV, bocavirus (BoV, and coronavirus (CoV. Findings: From the 23 studies included, there was strong evidence for causal attribution of RSV (OR 9.79; AFE 90%, IFV (OR 5.10; AFE 80%, PIV (OR 3.37; AFE 70% and MPV (OR 3.76; AFE 73%, and less strong evidence for RV (OR 1.43; AFE 30% in young children presenting with ALRI compared to those without respiratory symptoms (asymptomatic or healthy children. However, there was no significant difference in the detection of AdV, BoV, or CoV in cases and controls. Conclusions This review supports RSV, IFV, PIV, MPV and RV as important causes of ALRI in young children, and provides quantitative estimates of the absolute proportion of virus–associated ALRI cases to which a viral cause can be attributed.

  10. Transcriptome analysis reveals common differential and global gene expression profiles in bluetongue virus serotype 16 (BTV-16 infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs in sheep and goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue is an economically important infectious, arthropod borne viral disease of domestic and wild ruminants, caused by Bluetongue virus (BTV. Sheep are considered the most susceptible hosts, while cattle, buffalo and goats serve as reservoirs. The viral pathogenesis of BTV resulting in presence or absence of clinical disease among different hosts is not clearly understood. In the present study, transcriptome of sheep and goats peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with BTV-16 was explored. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs identified were found to be significantly enriched for immune system processes - NFκB signaling, MAPK signaling, Ras signaling, NOD signaling, RIG signaling, TNF signaling, TLR signaling, JAK-STAT signaling and VEGF signaling pathways. Greater numbers of DEGs were found to be involved in immune system processes in goats than in sheep. Interestingly, the DEHC (differentially expressed highly connected gene network was found to be dense in goats than in sheep. Majority of the DEHC genes in the network were upregulated in goats but down-regulated in sheep. The network of differentially expressed immune genes with the other genes further confirmed these findings. Interferon stimulated genes - IFIT1 (ISG56, IFIT2 (ISG54 and IFIT3 (ISG60 responsible for antiviral state in the host were found to be upregulated in both the species. STAT2 was the TF commonly identified to co-regulate the DEGs, with its network showing genes that are downregulated in sheep but upregulated in goats. The genes dysregulated and the networks perturbed in the present study indicate host variability with a positive shift in immune response to BTV in goats than in sheep.

  11. Enteric viruses in molluscan shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Rosanna; Macaluso, Alessia; Lanni, Luigi; Saccares, Stefano; Di Giamberardino, Fabiola; Cencioni, Barbara; Petrinca, Anna Rita; Divizia, Maurizio

    2007-10-01

    One hundred and thirty-seven bivalves were collected for environmental monitoring and the market; all the samples were analysed by RT-PCR test. Bacteriological counts meeting the European Union shellfish criteria were reached by 69.5% of all the samples, whereas the overall positive values for enteric virus presence were: 25.5%, 18.2%, 8.0% and 2.1% for Rotavirus, Astrovirus, Enteroviruses, Norovirus, respectively. Mussels appear to be the most contaminated bivalves, with 64.8% of positive samples, 55.7% and 22.7% respectively for clams and oysters, whereas in the bivalves collected for human consumption 50.7% were enteric virus positive, as compared to 56.4% of the samples collected for growing-area classification. The overall positive sample was 54.0%.

  12. CERN openlab enters fifth phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Andrew Purcell

    2015-01-01

    CERN openlab is a unique public-private partnership between CERN and leading ICT companies. At the start of this year, openlab officially entered its fifth phase, which will run until the end of 2017. For the first time in its history, it has extended beyond the CERN community to include other major European and international research laboratories.   Founded in 2001 to develop the innovative ICT systems needed to cope with the unprecedented computing challenges of the LHC, CERN openlab unites science and industry at the cutting edge of research and innovation. In a white paper published last year, CERN openlab set out the main ICT challenges it will tackle during its fifth phase, namely data acquisition, computing platforms, data storage architectures, computer management and provisioning, networks and connectivity, and data analytics. As it enters its fifth phase, CERN openlab is expanding to include other research laboratories. "Today, research centres in other disciplines are also st...

  13. Emergence of ciprofloxacin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing enteric bacteria in hospital wastewater and clinical sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Meenu; Yaser, Nawar Hadi; Naz, Suraiya; Fatima, Mansha; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the incidence of ciprofloxacin-resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enteric bacteria in hospital wastewater and clinical sources. Enteric bacteria, mainly Escherichia coli, were isolated from clinical sources (urinary tract and gastrointestinal tract infections; 80 isolates) and hospital wastewater (103 isolates). The antibiotic resistance profile and ESBL production of the isolates were investigated by disc diffusion assay and combined disc diffusion test, respectively. Plasmid profiling was performed by agarose gel electrophoresis, and elimination of resistance markers was performed by a plasmid curing experiment. Antibiotic susceptibility testing revealed a high incidence of β-lactam resistance, being highest to ampicillin (88.0%) followed by amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, cefpodoxime, cefotaxime, aztreonam, cefepime and ceftazidime. Among the non-β-lactam antibiotics, the highest resistance was recorded to nalidixic acid (85.7%). Moreover, 50.8% of enteric bacteria showed resistance to ciprofloxacin. Among 183 total enteric bacteria, 150 (82.0%) exhibited multidrug resistance. ESBL production was detected in 78 isolates (42.6%). A significantly higher incidence of ciprofloxacin resistance was observed among ESBL-producing enteric bacteria both in clinical (P=0.0015) and environmental isolates (P=0.012), clearly demonstrating a close association between ESBL production and ciprofloxacin resistance. Plasmid profiling of selected ESBL-positive strains indicated the presence of one or more plasmids of varying sizes. Plasmid curing resulted in loss of ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime resistance markers simultaneously from selected ESBL-positive isolates, indicating the close relationship of these markers. This study revealed a common occurrence of ciprofloxacin-resistant ESBL-producing enteric bacteria both in hospital wastewater and clinical sources, indicating a potential public health threat.

  14. Enteric fever in Cambodian children is dominated by multidrug-resistant H58 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi with intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emary, Kate; Moore, Catrin E; Chanpheaktra, Ngoun; An, Khun Peng; Chheng, Kheng; Sona, Soeng; Duy, Pham Thanh; Nga, Tran Vu Thieu; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Amornchai, Premjit; Kumar, Varun; Wijedoru, Lalith; Stoesser, Nicole E; Carter, Michael J; Baker, Stephen; Day, Nicholas P J; Parry, Christopher M

    2012-12-01

    Infections with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi isolates that are multidrug resistant (MDR: resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole) with intermediate ciprofloxacin susceptibility are widespread in Asia but there is little information from Cambodia. We studied invasive salmonellosis in children at a paediatric hospital in Siem Reap, Cambodia. Between 2007 and 2011 Salmonella was isolated from a blood culture in 162 children. There were 151 children with enteric fever, including 148 serovar Typhi and three serovar Paratyphi A infections, and 11 children with a non-typhoidal Salmonella infection. Of the 148 serovar Typhi isolates 126 (85%) were MDR and 133 (90%) had intermediate ciprofloxacin susceptibility. Inpatient antimicrobial treatment was ceftriaxone alone or initial ceftriaxone followed by a step-down to oral ciprofloxacin or azithromycin. Complications developed in 37/128 (29%) children admitted with enteric fever and two (1.6%) died. There was one confirmed relapse. In a sample of 102 serovar Typhi strains genotyped by investigation of a subset of single nucleotide polymorphisms, 98 (96%) were the H58 haplotype, the majority of which had the common serine to phenylalanine substitution at codon 83 in the DNA gyrase. We conclude that antimicrobial-resistant enteric fever is common in Cambodian children and therapeutic options are limited.

  15. Enteral nutrition in critical patients

    OpenAIRE

    Botello Jaimes, Jhon Jairo; Medico Cuidado Intensivo Clínica San Marcel / Jefe de Urgencias y Unidad de Cuidado Especial Clínica San Marcel / Docente Medicina Interna y Cuidado Intensivo Universidad de Manizales / Docente Internado de Urgencias y de PROFUNDIZACION Urgencias, Cuidado Intermedio e Intensivo Universidad de Caldas / Docente del programa de enfermería Universidad Católica de Manizales / Instructor Internacional / Director Fundación Versalles / Candidato a Magíster en Educación Docencia. Envío co rrespondencia:. Avenida Alberto Mendoza No 93-25 - Clínica San Marcel.; González Rincón, Alejandra; Enfermería Universidad Católica de Manizales. Miembro directivo Fundación Versalles. Miembro Correspondiente Asociación Colombiana de Trauma y Miembro Activo de la Sociedad Panamericana de Trauma. Envío correspondencia: alejita_gonzalez12@ hotmail.com . Calle 50 No 24-14 – Fundación Versalles.

    2010-01-01

    Nutritional support in critically ill patients is of vital importance for its impact on morbidity, hospital stay and preservation of tissue mass among others. It must ensure nutritional support to all critically ill patients enterally ideally by reduced bacterial translocationand stimulation of the function of the intestinal villi. In recent years we have studied immunonutrients as glutamine, arginine, fatty acids and nucleotides with promising effects (Immune response, Intestinal barrier or ...

  16. A Map Enters the Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    'modes of mattering'. In this paper I explore what difference digital cartography can make to STS practice. I draw on three examples from my own work where digitally mediated maps have entered the conversation and made critical, often surprising, differences to the research process. In my first example...... it was trying to chart. I use these examples to discuss the potential modes of mattering afforded by digital cartography in STS....

  17. Phlegmonous enteritis in a patient with congestive heart failure and colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namkung, Sook; Yoo, Yoon Sik; Hwang, Im Kyung; Kim, Bong Soo; Bae, Sang Hoon; Choi, Young Hee [Hallym University, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-12-01

    Phlegmonous enteritis is a rare infective inflammatory disease of the intestine, predominantly involving the submucosal layer. It is difficult to diagnose and often fatal. Its association with alcoholism and various liver diseases, although rarely reported, is well documented. We report a case of phlegmonous enteritis in a male patient with congestive heart failure and colon cancer, and describe the ultrasonographic and CT findings.

  18. Cytokine responses in very low birth weight infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van den Berg; R.M. van Elburg; L. Vermeij; A. van Zwol; G.R. van den Brink; J.W.R. Twisk; E.E.S. Nieuwenhuis; W.P.F. Fetter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Very low birth weight (VLBW) infants receiving glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition may present with a lower infection rate, which may result from enhanced antimicrobial innate or Th1 cytokine responses. We investigated whether glutamine-enriched enteral nutrition in VLBW infants increase

  19. Prevalence, characteristics and correlates of enteric pathogenic protozoa in drinking water sources in Molyko and Bomaka, Cameroon: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsoh, Fuh Anold; Wung, Buh Amos; Atashili, Julius; Benjamin, Pokam Thumamo; Marvlyn, Eba; Ivo, Keumami Katte; Nguedia, Assob Jules Clément

    2016-11-08

    Access to potable water remains a major challenge particularly in resource-limited settings. Although the potential contaminants of water are varied, enteric pathogenic protozoa are known to cause waterborne diseases greatly. This study aimed at investigating the prevalence, characteristics and correlates of enteric pathogenic protozoa in drinking water sources in Buea, Cameroon. A cross-sectional study was conducted using 155 water samples collected from various drinking sources (boreholes, springs, taps and wells). Each sample was subjected to physicochemical examinations (pH, turbidity, odour and sliminess) and parasitological analysis (wet mount, modified Ziehl-Neelsen stain) to determine the presence of enteric pathogenic protozoa. A data collection tool was used to note characteristics of collected samples and the data was analysed using EPI-INFO Version 3.5.3. The overall prevalence of enteric pathogenic protozoa in water sources was 62.6 %. Eight species of enteric protozoa were observed with Cryptosporidium parvum being the most predominant (45.8 %). Spring water was the most contaminated source with enteric protozoa (85.7 %) while pipe borne water had all eight species of protozoa identified. A pH of 6 was the only significant factor associated with the prevalence of these pathogens in water sources. The prevalence of enteric protozoa in water sources in Molyko and Bomaka is high, spring water is the most contaminated water source and Cryptosporidium parvum is the most common protozoa contaminating water. A water pH of 6 is associated to the prevalence of protozoa. Community members need to be educated to treat water before drinking to avoid infection by enteric protozoa in water and further studies with larger samples of water need to be conducted to find other correlates of the presence of protozoa in water.

  20. New parameters available on Sysmex XE-5000 hematology analyzers contribute to differentiating dengue from leptospirosis and enteric fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehadian, A; Michels, M; de Mast, Q; Prihatni, D; Puspita, M; Hartantri, Y; Sinarta, S; van der Ven, A J A M; Alisjahbana, B

    2015-12-01

    Distinguishing dengue virus infection from other febrile thrombocytopenic illnesses such as leptospirosis or enteric fever is important but difficult, due to the unavailability of reliable diagnostic tests. Sysmex XE-5000 hematology analyzers use fluorescence flow cytometry to quantitate new parameters including cells in the atypical lymphocyte area (AL), high-fluorescent lymphocyte counts (HFLC), immature granulocytes (IG), and immature platelets (IPF). This study aimed to investigate whether these parameters can help to discriminate between the diseases. We compared hematocytometry performed by a Sysmex XE-5000 analyzer in Indonesian adults with dengue (n = 93), leptospirosis (n = 11), and enteric fever (n = 6) infection, and in healthy controls (n = 28). Receiver operating characteristic curves comparing dengue and leptospirosis showed that dengue was characterized by increased %AL (AUC 0.87; 95% CI 0.70-1.03), %HFLC (AUC 0.89; 95% CI 0.78-0.99), and %IPF (AUC 0.81; 95% CI 0.65-0.97), while patients with leptospirosis had increased %IG (AUC 0.86; 95% CI 0.71-1.02). Low %AL, %HFLC, and %IG supported a diagnosis of enteric fever. The detection of AL, HFLC, IG, and IPF by Sysmex XE-5000 hematology analyzers can help to differentiate between common causes of febrile illnesses with thrombocytopenia in dengue endemic areas. We recommend further investigating the discriminatory value of these parameters in clinical practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infect...

  2. Application of enteric viruses for fecal pollution source tracking in environmental waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial source tracking (MST) tools are used to identify sources of fecal pollution for accurately assessing public health risk and implementing best management practices (BMPs). This review focuses on the potential of enteric viruses for MST applications. Following host infect...

  3. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Enteric Viruses in Children with Diarrhea in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafissatou Ouédraogo

    Full Text Available Enteric viruses are a major cause of diarrhea in children, especially those under five years old. Identifying the viral agents is critical to the development of effective preventive measures. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and genetic diversity of common enteric viruses in children under five years old in Burkina Faso. Stool samples from children with (n = 263 and without (n = 50 diarrhea disorders were collected in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso from November 2011 to September 2012. Rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, adenovirus and Aichivirus A were detected using real-time or end-point (RT-PCR. Rotavirus strains were G and P genotyped by multiplex RT-PCR and other viral strains were characterized by sequencing of viral subgenomic segements. At least one viral agent was detected in 85.6% and 72% of the symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, respectively. Rotavirus (63.5%, adenovirus (31.2% and genogroup II norovirus (18.2% were the most prevalent viruses in symptomatic patients, but only rotavirus and genogroup II norovirus were significantly associated with diarrhea (OR: 7.9, 95%CI: 3.7-17; OR: 3.5, 95%CI: 1-11.7, respectively. Sapovirus (10.3%, astrovirus (4.9%, genogroup I norovirus (2.7% and Aichivirus A (0.8% were less prevalent. The predominant genotype of rotavirus was G9P[8] (36.5%, and the predominant norovirus strain was GII.4 variant 2012 (71.4%. Among sapovirus, the genogroup II (87.5% predominated. Astrovirus type 1 (41.7% was the most frequent astrovirus identified. Aichivirus A belonged to the three genotypes (A, B and C. Enteric adenoviruses type 40 and 41 were identified in 10.2% and 5.1% respectively. Several cases of co-infections were detected. The results highlight the high prevalence and the high diversity of enteric viruses in Burkinabe children.

  4. 2013 European Guideline on the management of proctitis, proctocolitis and enteritis caused by sexually transmissible pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Henry J C; Zingoni, Adele; White, John A; Ross, Jonathan D C; Kreuter, Alexander

    2014-06-01

    Proctitis is defined as an inflammatory syndrome of the distal 10-12 cm of the anal canal, also called the rectum. Infectious proctitis can be sexually transmitted via genital-anal mucosal contact, but some also via mutual masturbation.N. gonorrhoeae,C. trachomatis(including lymphogranuloma venereum), Herpes Simplex Virus andT. pallidumare the most common sexually transmitted anorectal pathogens. Shigellosis can be transferred via oral-anal contact and may lead to proctocolitis or enteritis. Although most studies on these infections have concentrated on men who have sex with men (MSM), a significant proportion of women have anal intercourse and therefore may also be at risk. A presumptive clinical diagnosis of proctitis can be made when there are symptoms and signs, and a definitive diagnosis when the results of laboratory tests are available. The symptoms of proctitis include anorectal itching, pain, cramps (tenesmus) and discharge in and around the anal canal. Asymptomatic proctitis occurs frequently and can only be detected by laboratory tests. The majority of rectal chlamydia and gonococcal infections are asymptomatic. Therefore when there is a history of receptive anal contact, exclusion of anorectal infections is generally indicated as part of standard screening for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Condom use does not guarantee protection from bacterial and protozoan STIs, which are often spread without penile penetration.

  5. Common Warts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diseases and Conditions Common warts By Mayo Clinic Staff Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny ...

  6. Infected colonic duplication: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Seon; Lee, Young Hwan; Kang, Eugene; Oh, Yeon Kyun; Yun, Ki Jung [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine and Hospital, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    An enteric duplication is a relatively common congenital anomaly, which is rarely complicated by infection. We report the radiologic findings including ultrasound, barium enema and computed tomography (CT) of an infected colonic duplication that was confirmed by pathology. This case demonstrated a complex hypoechoic cystic mass with a thick wall and septa in the left lower quadrant of abdomen and increased the color flow on the Color Doppler ultrasonography. On CT images, the cystic mass contained multiple enhancing septa, infiltrated to the mesocolon and displaced the adjacent bowels. On exploration, a large cystic mass with an abscess attached to the mesocolic border adhering to the small bowel was found.

  7. [Clinical and epidemiological aspects of enteritis due to Salmonella hadar. II. Environmental contamination by Salmonella hadar in Shizuoka Prefecture--studies on the feasibility of reducing S. hadar infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Y; Masuda, H; Kanazashi, S; Hosoki, Y; Itoh, K; Ohishi, K; Nishina, T; Handa, Y; Shiozawa, K; Miwa, Y

    1992-01-01

    A systematic examination was performed for environmental food contamination by Salmonella in poultry farms, broiler chickens, broiler processing plants and meat on the market. Salmonella was isolated from 219 of 1197 samples and the serotypes showed a wide distribution. (Table 1-1). S. hadar accounted for 37.1% (96) of all isolations (259). The contamination rate of broiler chickens on arrival at broiler processing plants is relatively low. However, in the broiler processing plants, containers, processing machinery, cooling water and slaughters were highly contaminated by Salmonella, S. hadar being the most prominent serotype in the plants. 64% of chicken meat on the market was contaminated by Salmonella, S. hadar being the second most prominent serotype. 11% of the pork and none of the beef or horseflesh was contaminated by Salmonella. These results indicate that poultry is the main source of S. hadar infection in humans. However, no S. hadar was isolated from cultures of 119 samples of feed for chickens from each delivery (Table 1-1). Thus, as the main source of infection by S. hadar of broiler chickens, an association with the feed seems to be ruled out. S. hadar was isolated at three of 18 poultry farms within Shizuoka Prefecture. Follow-up studies were performed at the three poultry farms which revealed that in two of them, Salmonella was completely eradicated on completion of disinfection. In the other one farm, which is still being disinfected, various strains of Salmonella including S. hadar still survived. We conclude that the main cause of the problem is the magnification of contamination of Salmonella-free material during the process at the broiler processing plants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Role of FODMAP content in enteral nutrition-associated diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmos, Emma P

    2013-12-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms including diarrhea are common complications of enteral nutrition (EN); however, the cause is unclear. Mode of EN delivery that alters digestion and possibly absorption is suggested to contribute to the high incidence of diarrhea; however, enteral formula is frequently blamed. Most research has focused on fiber-supplemented EN, with a meta-analysis showing that fiber reduces the incidence of diarrhea in non-intensive care unit studies. Other hypotheses include formula osmolality and FODMAP (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols) content. FODMAPs are poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates that exert an osmotic effect. Dietary FODMAPs have been shown to reduce gastrointestinal symptoms, including diarrhea, in those with irritable bowel syndrome and, given a high-enough dose, will induce a laxative effect in most people. As FODMAPs are commonly added to enteral formula and EN is frequently used as the main source of nutrition, it is reasonable to hypothesize that EN provides more FODMAPs than usual dietary intake and increases risk for developing diarrhea. This hypothesis was assessed through a retrospective study showing that the standard-use enteral formula Isosource 1.5 had a protective effect of developing diarrhea. The only characteristic unique to Isosource 1.5 was the lower FODMAP content as determined through methodologies previously validated for food analysis. Methodologies for application to enteral formulas are currently undergoing formal validation. Once confirmed for application in enteral formula, future directions include FODMAP analysis of specific ingredients to increase understanding of potential problems associated with enteral formula and a randomized, controlled trial investigating the role of formula FODMAP content.

  9. Multiple Isolated Enteric Duplication Cysts in an Infant - A Diagnostic Dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udiya, Alok Kumar; Shetty, Gurucharan S; Chauhan, Udit; Singhal, Shweta; Prabhu, Shailesh M

    2016-01-01

    Completely isolated enteric duplication cysts are a rare variety of enteric duplication cysts having an independent blood supply with no communication with any part of the adjacent bowel segment. We report a case showing two completely isolated enteric duplication cysts originating in the greater omentum and transverse mesocolon in an infant. Multiple isolated enteric duplication cysts involving non-contiguous bowel segments have not been previously reported in the literature. In addition the transverse mesocolon duplication cyst was infected showing septations and loss of double wall sign resulting in difficulty in imaging diagnosis. Both the cysts were excised and confirmed on histopathology.

  10. Antimicrobial effect of Malaysian vegetables against enteric bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hassanain Al-Talib; Norliana Dalila Mohamad Ali; Mohamed Harreez Suhaimi; Siti Shafika Nabila Rosli; Nurul Huda Othman; Nur Ain Sakinah Mansor; Amira Kartini Sulaiman Shah; Nurul Syuhada Ariffin; Alyaa Al-Khateeb

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antibacterial activities of green vegetables(pennywort,mint, garlic, parsley and celery) against four common enteric bacteria [Salmonella enterica(ATCC 25957)(S. enterica), Shigella flexneri(ATCC 12022)(S. flexneri),Escherichia coli(ATCC 43889)(E. coli) and Enterobacter cloacae(ATCC 13047)(E. cloacae)] as an alternative medicine for controlling food borne diarrhea disease and the synergistic effect of green vegetables against those bacteria.Methods: Five common vegetables(pennywort, mint, garlic, parsley and celery) were purchased and extracted. The antimicrobial activities of these extracts were tested against four common enteric bacteria(S. enterica, S. flexneri, E. coli and E. cloacae). Ten different concentrations of the extracts(from 640 to 1.25 mg/m L) were prepared and used for the study. The minimal inhibitory concentration(MIC) was determined by the broth dilution method. The antimicrobial activities were assessed by using both well diffusion and disc diffusion methods.Results: Garlic extract showed excellent inhibitory effects on all enteric bacteria. Other plants(parsley, celery, mint and pennywort) were not effective against enteric bacteria.The MIC of garlic against S. flexneri and E. cloacae was 40 mg/m L. The MIC of S. enterica and E. coli were 20 and 10 mg/m L, respectively. The performance of the well diffusion method was better than that of the disc diffusion method with clear and sharp inhibition zones of tested bacteria against plant extracts.Conclusions: Garlic had excellent antimicrobial effects against enteric bacteria and was recommended to be given to patients with gastroenteritis. The other vegetables(pennywort, mint, parsley and celery) showed no inhibitory effects on enteric bacteria but still can be used for its richness in vitamins and fibers. The performance of the well diffusion method was better than that of the disc diffusion method in detecting the antibacterial effects of green vegetables.

  11. Haemorrhagic enteritis seroconversion in turkey breeders: field observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Ceruti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Seroconversion to viral haemorrhagic enteritis (HE was studied in seven flocks of turkey breeders (17.974 birds in total, after 20 weeks of the onset of egg production. They showed no clinical signs, and mortality rate was normal. However, the infection caused a drop in egg production lasting about five weeks (-2.32 eggs laid during this period, but had no effect on hatching parameters.

  12. Optimising decision making on illness absenteeism due to fever and common infections within childcare centres: development of a multicomponent intervention and study protocol of a cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peetoom, K K B; Crutzen, R; Bohnen, J M H A; Verhoeven, R; Nelissen-Vrancken, H J M G; Winkens, B; Dinant, G J; Cals, J W L

    2017-07-26

    Evidence has shown that children 0-4 year-old attending childcare are prone to acquire infections compared to children cared for at home, with fever being the most common symptom. Illness absenteeism due to fever and common infections is substantial and mostly driven by unrealistic concerns and negative attitude towards fever of both childcare staff and parents, resulting in illness absenteeism from childcare, work absenteeism among parents and healthcare service use. The objective of this study is to optimise decision making among childcare staff on illness absenteeism due to fever and common infections in childcare. Underlying determinants of behavioural change were targeted by means of a multicomponent intervention. A multicomponent intervention was developed to improve decision making, using the stepwise approach of Intervention Mapping, and in close collaboration with stakeholders and experts. The intervention consisted of 1) a two-hour educational session on fever among childcare staff; 2) an online video for childcare staff and parents emphasising key information of the educational session; 3) a decision tool for childcare staff and parents in the format of a traffic light system to estimate the severity of illness and corresponding advices for childcare staff and parents; 4) an information booklet regarding childhood fever, common infections, and self-management strategies for childcare staff and parents. The multicomponent intervention will be evaluated in a cluster randomised trial with a 12-week follow-up period and absenteeism due to illness (defined as the percentage of childcare days absent due to illness on the total of childcare days during a 12-week period) as primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures are: incidence rate and duration of illness episodes, knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, and risk perception on fever and common infections of childcare staff and parents, healthcare service use in general and paracetamol use, and work

  13. Worm Infections in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherhead, Jill E; Hotez, Peter J

    2015-08-01

    • On the basis of research evidence, worm infections are important global child health conditions causing chronic disability that lasts from childhood into adulthood (Table 1). (2)(3) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, the major worm infections found in developing countries include ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm infection, and schistosomiasis; toxocariasis, enterobiasis, and cysticercosis are also found in poor regions of North America and Europe. (4)(9)(13) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of expert consensus, children and adolescents are often vulnerable to acquiring large numbers of worms, ie, high-intensity infections (Fig 1)(21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: D • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, moderate and heavy worm burdens cause increased morbidity because of growth and intellectual stunting in children and adolescents. Many of these effects may result from helminth-induced malnutrition. (21)(22)(23) Evidence Quality: C • On the basis of expert consensus and research evidence, worm infections are also commonly associated with eosinophilia. (48) (49) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence as well as consensus, helminthes can cause inflammation in the lung (asthma), gastrointestinal tract (enteritis and colitis), liver (hepatitis and fibrosis), and urogenital tract. (7)(21)(22)(23)(27)(28)(40)(41)(43) Evidence Quality: B • On the basis of research evidence, microscopy techniques for diagnosis of worm infections in children often exhibit suboptimal sensitivities and specificities, necessitating new or improved diagnostic modalities such as polymerase chain reaction. (54)(55) Evidence Quality: A • On the basis of research evidence and expert consensus, mass drug administration (“preventive chemotherapy”) has becomea standard practice for ministries of health in low- and middle-income countries to control intestinal helminth infections and schistosomiasis. (67)(68) Evidence

  14. Common Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen Common Terms Below is a list of diabetes-related ... a skin condition characterized by darkened skin patches; common in people whose body is not responding correctly ...

  15. Environmental Enteric Dysfunction in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Sana; Ali, Asad; Duggan, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a major cause of childhood death in resource-poor countries, killing approximately 760,000 children younger than 5 years each year. Although deaths due to diarrhea have declined dramatically, high rates of stunting and malnutrition have persisted. Environmental enteric dysfunction (EED) is a subclinical condition caused by constant fecal-oral contamination with resultant intestinal inflammation and villous blunting. These histological changes were first described in the 1960s, but the clinical effect of EED is only just being recognized in the context of failure of nutritional interventions and oral vaccines in resource-poor countries. We review the existing literature regarding the underlying causes of and potential interventions for EED in children, highlighting the epidemiology, clinical and histologic classification of the entity, and discussing novel biomarkers and possible therapies. Future research priorities are also discussed.

  16. [Updating enteral feeding by catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, T; Planas, M

    2005-12-01

    Intestinal nutrition can be administered orally or by means of a catheter; the latter method is the focus of this article. The authors' objective is to provide up-to-date information in a succinct manner about the enteral feeding technique. The authors hope health professionals know the advantages as well as the inconveniences of the latest intestinal nutrition advances regarding access ways and the means to administer these. Intestinal nutrition formulas will not be dealt with in this article. However, a health professional should know that there is a wide variety of diets available depending on the complexity of macronutrients included in a diet, the quantity of proteins in a mixture, and that these are designed, in addition to feeding, to treat the specific pathological process a patient suffers from, such as diabetes of cancer.

  17. A Map Enters the Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    Over the past decade STS scholars have been engaged in a continuous dialogue about the performativity of their methods and the interventions of their research practices. A frequently posed question is how STS can make a difference to its fields of study, what John Law has called its different...... 'modes of mattering'. In this paper I explore what difference digital cartography can make to STS practice. I draw on three examples from my own work where digitally mediated maps have entered the conversation and made critical, often surprising, differences to the research process. In my first example...... the map is brought along as an ethnographic device on a piece of fieldwork, in my second example it serves as the central collaborative object in a participatory design project, and in my third example the map becomes the object of contestation as it finds itself centre stage in the controversy...

  18. Gatifloxacin versus ofloxacin for the treatment of uncomplicated enteric fever in Nepal: an open-label, randomized, controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Koirala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fluoroquinolones are the most commonly used group of antimicrobials for the treatment of enteric fever, but no direct comparison between two fluoroquinolones has been performed in a large randomised trial. An open-label randomized trial was conducted to investigate whether gatifloxacin is more effective than ofloxacin in the treatment of uncomplicated enteric fever caused by nalidixic acid-resistant Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Adults and children clinically diagnosed with uncomplicated enteric fever were enrolled in the study to receive gatifloxacin (10 mg/kg/day in a single dose or ofloxacin (20 mg/kg/day in two divided doses for 7 days. Patients were followed for six months. The primary outcome was treatment failure in patients infected with nalidixic acid resistant isolates. 627 patients with a median age of 17 (IQR 9-23 years were randomised. Of the 218 patients with culture confirmed enteric fever, 170 patients were infected with nalidixic acid-resistant isolates. In the ofloxacin group, 6 out of 83 patients had treatment failure compared to 5 out of 87 in the gatifloxacin group (hazard ratio [HR] of time to failure 0.81, 95% CI 0.25 to 2.65, p = 0.73. The median time to fever clearance was 4.70 days (IQR 2.98-5.90 in the ofloxacin group versus 3.31 days (IQR 2.29-4.75 in the gatifloxacin group (HR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.18, p = 0.004. The results in all blood culture-confirmed patients and all randomized patients were comparable. CONCLUSION: Gatifloxacin was not superior to ofloxacin in preventing failure, but use of gatifloxacin did result in more prompt fever clearance time compared to ofloxacin. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN 63006567 (www.controlled-trials.com.

  19. Enteral Nutrition and Care of Risky Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Kilicarslan Toruner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Making appropriate and effective enteral feeding is decreasing the morbidity and mortality rates of risky newborns. Most important problems during enteral feeding in risky newborns are realizing the enteral feeding needs late, not following enteral feeding protocols and errors in medical practices (misconnections etc.. The aim of this review article is to describe the gastrointestinal development, nutrition requirements, enteral nutrition, feeding intolerance and care of risky newborns. Increasing the awareness of health care professionals about this topic is promoted the quality of care in risky newborns. [J Contemp Med 2013; 3(3.000: 227-233

  20. [Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and gastrojejunostomy. Experience and its role in domiciliary enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, J L; Velloso, A; Parejo, J; Serrano, P; Fraile, J; Garrido, M; Pizarro, A; Romero, H; García-Luna, P P

    1998-01-01

    and the programming of At Home Enteral Nutrition in 30 patients. With respect to the evolution of the patients, 22 patients have died during the course of the study. 18 patients remain in follow up in an ambulatory Enteral Nutrition program, and in the two patients with pregnancy induced hyperemesis, the PEGJ was removed after the pregnancy was successfully ended. There were no complications of any kind in 21 patients. The most common complication was the infection of the gastrostomy, which occurred in 13 patients. There was an accidental removal of the gastrostomy tube in 3 patients. In 3 cases there was an eversion of the gastric mucosa through the ostomy within the first 24-hours, and 20 days after the PEG respectively. In 2 cases there was an incarceration of the gastrostomy tube in the abdominal wall. Only two patients showed an important reflux of the gastric contents. There were no deaths as a result of PEG complications. From our experience we can conclude the advantages of PEG as a long term nutritional support, showing a low incidence of complications, and the endoscopic technique has a zero mortality.

  1. BCSH/BSBMT/UK clinical virology network guideline: diagnosis and management of common respiratory viral infections in patients undergoing treatment for haematological malignancies or stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dignan, Fiona L; Clark, Andrew; Aitken, Celia; Gilleece, Maria; Jayakar, Vishal; Krishnamurthy, Pramila; Pagliuca, Antonio; Potter, Michael N; Shaw, Bronwen; Skinner, Roderick; Turner, Andrew; Wynn, Robert F; Coyle, Peter

    2016-05-01

    A joint working group established by the Haemato-oncology subgroup of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology, the British Society for Bone Marrow Transplantation and the UK Clinical Virology Network has reviewed the available literature and made recommendations for the diagnosis and management of respiratory viral infections in patients with haematological malignancies or those undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This guideline includes recommendations for the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of respiratory viral infections in adults and children. The suggestions and recommendations are primarily intended for physicians practising in the United Kingdom.

  2. Common Cold

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nose, coughing - everyone knows the symptoms of the common cold. It is probably the most common illness. In the course of a year, people ... avoid colds. There is no cure for the common cold. For relief, try Getting plenty of rest ...

  3. Marker-assisted molecular profiling and RNA-Seq reveal a disease resistance cluster associated with Uromyces appendiculatus infection in common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume, useful for its high protein and dietary fiber. The fungal pathogen Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers.) Unger can cause major loss in susceptible varieties of common bean. The Ur-3 locus provides race specific resistance to fungal rust along wit...

  4. Cheap and Easy PIN Entering Using Eye Gaze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasprowski Pawel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PINs are one of the most popular methods to perform simple and fast user authentication. PIN stands for Personal Identification Number, which may have any number of digits or even letters. Nevertheless, 4-digit PIN is the most common and is used for instance in ATMs or cellular phones. The main advantage of the PIN is that it is easy to remember and fast to enter. There are, however, some drawbacks. One of them - addressed in this paper - is a possibility to steal PIN by a technique called `shoulder surfing'. To avoid such problems a novel method of the PIN entering was proposed. Instead of using a numerical keyboard, the PIN may be entered by eye gazes, which is a hands-free, easy and robust technique. References:

  5. 浅析幽门螺杆菌感染途径以及常用的治疗方法%Ways of Helicobacter Pylori Infection and Commonly Used Treatment Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马红颖; 李志婷

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the Helicobacter pylori can cause disease, commonly used detection methods, and how to prevent the infection of Helicobacter pylori. Also introduced the method commonly used in the treatment of Helicobacter pylori.%本文详细的介绍了幽门螺杆菌容易引起的疾病、常用的检测方法、以及如何预防幽门螺杆的感染。另外介绍了常用的治疗幽门螺杆菌的方法。

  6. Assessment of genetic associations between common single nucleotide polymorphisms in RIG-I-like receptor and IL-4 signaling genes and severe respiratory syncytial virus infection in children: a candidate gene case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Marr

    Full Text Available The majority of cases of severe pediatric respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection occur in otherwise healthy infants who have no identifiable risk factors, suggesting that additional subclinical factors, such as population genetic variation, influence the course of RSV infection. The objective of this study was to test if common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genes encoding for immune signalling components of the RIG-I-like receptor (RLR and IL-4-signalling pathways affect the outcome of RSV infection in early life. We genotyped 8 SNPs using allele-specific probes combined with real-time PCR. Each of the SNPs tested had previously been established to have a functional impact on immune responsiveness and two of the SNPs in the IL4 and IL4R genes had previously been associated with severe RSV bronchiolitis. Association with susceptibility to severe RSV infection was tested by statistically comparing genotype and allele frequencies in infants and young children hospitalized with severe RSV bronchiolitis (n = 140 with two control groups-children who tested positive for RSV but did not require hospitalization (n = 100, and a general population control group (n = 285. Our study was designed with sufficient power (>80% to detect clinically-relevant associations with effect sizes ≥1.5. However, we detected no statistically significant differences in allele and genotype frequencies of the investigated SNPs between the inpatient and control groups. To conclude, we could not replicate the previously reported association with SNPs in the IL4 and IL4R genes in our independent cohort, nor did we find that common SNPs in genes encoding for RLRs and the downstream adapter MAVS were associated with susceptibility to severe RSV infections. Despite the existing evidence demonstrating a functional immunological impact of these SNPs, our data suggest that the biological effect of each individual SNP is unlikely to affect clinical outcomes

  7. Long-term effects on luminal and mucosal microbiota and commonly acquired taxa in faecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jalanka, Jonna; Mattila, Eero; Jouhten, Hanne; Hartman, Jorn; Vos, de Willem M.; Arkkila, Perttu; Satokari, Reetta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI). It restores the disrupted intestinal microbiota and subsequently suppresses C. difficile. The long-term stability of the intestinal microbiota and the recovery of mu

  8. Taenia solium metacestode viability in infected pork after preparation with salt pickling or cooking methods common in Yucatán, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Canul, R; Argaez-Rodriguez, F; de, la Gala D Pacheco; Villegas-Perez, S; Fraser, A; Craig, P S; Cob-Galera, L; Dominguez-Alpizar, J L

    2002-04-01

    The cestode parasite Taenia solium is an important cause of foodborne infection throughout tropical and subtropical regions. Ingestion of pork meat infected with T. solium larvae can lead to taeniasis infection in humans. With tourism and the consumption of native food increasing, it is important to investigate potential risks of transmission associated with food preparation methods. In this study, traditional Mexican salt pickling and two methods of pork preparation (as roast pork [cochinita pibil] and in pork and beans [frijol con puerco]) were evaluated in order to determine their effects on T. solium cyst viability in infected tissue. In the control groups, all metacestodes isolated were 100% viable, and only small changes in pH (from 6.0 to 5.9) and temperature (29 to 30 degrees C) were recorded. No viable cysts were detected after 12 and 24 h of salt pickling. The pH of the meat during salting dropped from 6.0 to 5.3. Osmotic changes and dehydration from the salting, rather than a change in pH, could be considered the main cause of cyst death. Temperatures of >65 degrees C damaged T. solium metacestodes in roast pork and in pork and beans. The results of this study indicate that if traditional pork dishes are prepared properly, T. solium cysts are destroyed. The criteria used in this study to evaluate the viability of tissue cysts are discussed.

  9. Mechanosensitivity in the enteric nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma eMazzuoli-Weber

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The enteric nervous system (ENS autonomously controls gut muscle activity. Mechanosensitive enteric neurons (MEN initiate reflex activity by responding to mechanical deformation of the gastrointestinal wall. MEN throughout the gut primarily respond to compression or stretch rather than to shear force. Some MEN are multimodal as they respond to compression and stretch. Depending on the region up to 60% of the entire ENS population responds to mechanical stress. MEN fire action potentials after mechanical stimulation of processes or soma although they are more sensitive to process deformation. There are at least two populations of MEN based on their sensitivity to different modalities of mechanical stress and on their firing pattern. 1 Rapidly, slowly and ultra-slowly adapting neurons which encode compressive forces. 2 Ultra-slowly adapting stretch-sensitive neurons encoding tensile forces. Rapid adaptation of firing is typically observed after compressive force while slow adaptation or ongoing spike discharge occurs often during tensile stress (stretch. All MEN have some common properties: they receive synaptic input, are low fidelity mechanoreceptors and are multifunctional in that some serve interneuronal others even motor functions. Consequently, MEN possess processes with mechanosensitive as well as efferent functions. This raises the intriguing hypothesis that MEN sense and control muscle activity at the same time as servo-feedback loop. The mechanosensitive channel(s or receptor(s expressed by the different MEN populations are unknown. Future concepts have to incorporate compressive and tensile-sensitive MEN into neural circuits that controls muscle activity. They may interact to control various forms of a particular motor pattern or regulate different motor patterns independently from each other.

  10. Avian rotavirus enteritis - an updated review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Saminathan, Mani; Karthik, Kumaragurubaran; Tiwari, Ruchi; Shabbir, Muhammad Zubair; Kumar, Naveen; Malik, Yashpal Singh; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are among the leading causes of enteritis and diarrhea in a number of mammalian and avian species, and impose colossal loss to livestock and poultry industry globally. Subsequent to detection of rotavirus in mammalian hosts in 1973, avian rotavirus (AvRV) was first reported in turkey poults in USA during 1977 and since then RVs of group A (RVA), D (RVD), F (RVF) and G (RVG) have been identified around the globe. Besides RVA, other AvRV groups (RVD, RVF and RVG) may also contribute to disease. However, their significance has yet to be unraveled. Under field conditions, co-infection of AvRVs occurs with other infectious agents such as astroviruses, enteroviruses, reoviruses, paramyxovirus, adenovirus, Salmonella, Escherichia coli, cryptosporidium and Eimeria species prospering severity of disease outcome. Birds surviving to RV disease predominantly succumb to secondary bacterial infections, mostly E. coli and Salmonella spp. Recent developments in molecular tools including state-of-the-art diagnostics and vaccine development have led to advances in our understanding towards AvRVs. Development of new generation vaccines using immunogenic antigens of AvRV has to be explored and given due importance. Till now, no effective vaccines are available. Although specific as well as sensitive approaches are available to identify and characterize AvRVs, there is still need to have point-of-care detection assays to review disease burden, contemplate new directions for adopting vaccination and follow improvements in public health measures. This review discusses AvRVs, their epidemiology, pathology and pathogenesis, immunity, recent trends in diagnostics, vaccines, therapeutics as well as appropriate prevention and control strategies.

  11. Safety of enteral rehabilitative therapy in rat small bowel transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小桥; 黎介寿; 李宁; 施鑫; 李幼生

    2003-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety of enteral rehabilitative therapy in rat small bowel transplantation. Methods Forty-eight rat recipients of allogeneic heterotopic small bowel transplantation (SD and Wistar) were randomly divided into 4 groups according to the application or not of enteral rehabilitative therapy and cyclosporine A (CsA). The pathological changes of the graft, IL-2 receptor expression in lamina propria lymphocytes, serum IL-2 concentrations, results of spleen lymphocytes transformation test and the IL-2 secretion capacity were determined and compared. Results Enteral rehabilitative therapy could promote the immune function of the recipient so as to augment the acute rejection. But such effects could be blocked by the commonly used immunosuppressant CsA. Under the immunosuppression of CsA (10 mg*kg-1*d-1, i.m.), application of enteral rehabilitative therapy did not induce or aggravate acute rejection.Conclusion Under effective immunosuppression, application of enteral rehabilitative therapy is safe in rat small bowel transplantation.

  12. Enteric Bacteria and Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Sun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal bacteria can contribute to cell proliferation and cancer development, particularly in chronic infectious diseases in which bacteria and/or bacterial components might interfere with cell function. The number of microbial cells within the gut lumen is estimated to be 100 trillion, which is about 10-times larger than the number of eukaryotic cells in the human body. Because of the complexity of the gut flora, identifying the specific microbial agents related to human diseases remains challenging. Recent studies have demonstrated that the stemness of colon cancer cells is, in part, orchestrated by the microenvironment and is defined by high Wnt activity. In this review article, we will discuss recent progress with respect to intestinal stem cells, cancer stem cells, and the molecular mechanisms of enteric bacteria in the activation of the Wnt pathway. We will also discuss the roles of other pathways, including JAK-STAT, JNK, and Notch, in regulating stem cell niches during bacterial infections using Drosophila models. Insights gained from understanding how host-bacterial interaction during inflammation and cancer may serve as a paradigm for understanding the nature of self-renewal signals.

  13. Effect of early enteral nutrition on prevention of postoperative pulmonary infections in lung cancer patients%早期肠内营养在预防肺癌患者术后肺部感染中的作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱磊; 季爱华; 张文剑

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore the effect of early enteral nutrition on prevention of postoperative pulmonary in‐fections so as to provide guidance for prevention of the postoperative pulmonary infections in lung cancer patients . METHODS A total of 130 lung cancer patients who were treated in the hospital from Jun 2011 to Jun 2013 were enrolled in the study and randomly divided into two groups according to the clinical trial ,with 65 cases in each ;the control group was treated with intravenous nutrition ,while the observation group was given the nasal drip feeding tube enteral nutrition nutrison within 1‐5 days after surgery ,500‐1000ml per day ;the incidence of postop‐erative pulmonary infections ,the levels of serum albumin ,hemoglobin ,alanine aminotransferase ,and aspartate aminotransferase ,and the change of IgA ,IgG ,IgM ,CD4 + cell ,NK cell ,and B lymphocytes on the first day and eighth day after the treatment were observed .RESULTS The pulmonary infections did not emerge in the observa‐tion group after the implementation of the early enteral nutrition but occurred in 6 cases in the control group with the infection rate of 9 .23% ,there was significant difference between the two groups (P<0 .05) .On the first day and fifth day after the treatment ,the levels of the serum albumin ,hemoglobin ,alanine aminotransferase ,and as‐partate aminotransferase of the observation group were significantly higher than those of the control group (P<0 .05) .As compared with the IgA ,IgG ,IgM ,CD4 + cell ,NK cell ,and B lymphocytes on the eighth and first day after the treatment ,they were elevated more significantly in the observation group than in the control group ,there was significant difference (P<0 .05) .CONCLUSION The early enteral nutrition can effectively improve the level of postoperative nutrition of the lung cancer patients and reduce the risk of pulmonary infections ,and it has the value of clinical application .%目的:探讨早期肠内营养在预防

  14. Dual infections with HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-I are more common in older women than in men in Guinea-Bissau

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgren, B; da Silva, Z; Larsen, Olav Ditlevsen

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between the three human retroviruses, HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV-I. DESIGN: Community-based follow-up studies of retrovirus infections in two cohorts. METHODS: A total of 2057 individuals aged 35 years and over were eligible for inclusion. Participants were...... interviewed and had a blood sample drawn. Samples were analysed for HIV-1, HIV-2 and HTLV infections. Uni- and multivariate analyses that included behavioural and socio-economic factors were performed using logistic regression and Poisson regression models. RESULTS: A total of 1686 individuals participated...... with a blood sample in the HIV prevalence analyses and 1581 individuals participated in the HTLV-I prevalence analyses. The overall prevalence was 2.1% for HIV-1, 13.5% for HIV-2 and 7.1% for HTLV-I. Comparing the

  15. CERN openlab enters new phase

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The newest phase of CERN’s openlab framework was inaugurated this week during a meeting of the openlab partners. This phase will last three years and will bring together existing openlab partners and a new contributor: Huawei.   Group picture taken at the first CERN openlab IV annual Board of Sponsors meeting, in the presence of the CERN Director-General, the partners and the openlab team members. © Fons Rademakers (CERN Photo Club). Eleven years ago, the creation of the CERN openlab created a long-term link between industrial partners and the Organization. Its framework has allowed industry to carry out large-scale IT research and development in an open atmosphere – an “Open Lab”, if you will. For CERN, openlab has contributed to giving the computing centre and, more broadly, the LHC community, the opportunity to ensure that the next generation of services and products is suitable to their needs. Now entering its fourth phase, openlab will ...

  16. Resistance to Antibiotics and Antifungal Medicinal Products: Can Complementary and Alternative Medicine Help Solve the Problem in Common Infection Diseases? The Introduction of a Dutch Research Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther T. Kok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The increase of antibiotic resistance worldwide, rising numbers of deaths and costs associated with this, and the fact that hardly any new antimicrobial drugs have been developed during the last decade have increased the interest in Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM therapeutic interventions, if proven safe and effective. Observational studies on clinical CAM practices demonstrate positive effects of treatment of infections with CAM therapies (clinical effects, patient satisfaction in combination with small percentages of antibiotics prescription. However, Cochrane reviews and other studies demonstrate that in most instances the quality of clinical trials on CAM treatment of infections is currently too low to provide sufficient evidence. Therefore a Dutch consortium on (in vitro and clinical scientific research on CAM and antibiotic resistance has been formed. The aim and objective of the consortium is to establish an enduring partnership and to develop expertise to further develop and investigate safe and effective CAM treatments for infectious diseases of humans (and animals. A first ongoing project on the development of safe and effective biobased CAM antimycotics in women with (recurrent vaginal candidiasis infection is introduced.

  17. Fluoroquinolones for treating typhoid and paratyphoid fever (enteric fever).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effa, Emmanuel E; Lassi, Zohra S; Critchley, Julia A; Garner, Paul; Sinclair, David; Olliaro, Piero L; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2011-10-05

    Typhoid and paratyphoid are febrile illnesses, due to a bacterial infection, which remain common in many low- and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization (WHO) currently recommends the fluoroquinolone antibiotics in areas with known resistance to the older first-line antibiotics. To evaluate fluoroquinolone antibiotics for treating children and adults with enteric fever. We searched The Cochrane Infectious Disease Group Specialized Register (February 2011); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), published in The Cochrane Library (2011, Issue 2); MEDLINE (1966 to February 2011); EMBASE (1974 to February 2011); and LILACS (1982 to February 2011). We also searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) in February 2011. Randomized controlled trials examining fluoroquinolone antibiotics, in people with blood, stool or bone marrow culture-confirmed enteric fever. Two authors independently assessed the trial's methodological quality and extracted data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) for dichotomous data and mean difference for continuous data with 95% confidence intervals (CI).Comparative effectiveness has been interpreted in the context of; length of treatment, dose, year of study, known levels of antibiotic resistance, or proxy measures of resistance such as the failure rate in the comparator arm. Twenty-six studies, involving 3033 patients, are included in this review.Fluoroquinolones versus older antibiotics (chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole, amoxicillin and ampicillin)In one study from Pakistan in 2003-04, high clinical failure rates were seen with both chloramphenicol and co-trimoxazole, although resistance was not confirmed microbiologically. A seven-day course of either ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin were found to be superior. Older studies of these comparisons failed to show a difference (six trials, 361 participants).In small studies conducted almost two decades ago, the fluoroquinolones were demonstrated to have fewer

  18. Enteric Pathogens and Coinfections in Foals with and without Diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Giovane; Lucas, Thays Mizuki; Borges, Alexandre Secorun; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Siqueira, Amanda Keller; da Silva Leite, Domingos; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; Gregori, Fábio; de Oliveira-Filho, José Paes; Takai, Shinji; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major clinical problem affecting foals up to 3 months of age. The aim of this study was to identify enteric microorganisms involved in monoinfections and coinfections and the associated virulence factors in healthy and diarrheic foals. Diarrheic (D) (n = 56) and nondiarrheic (ND) foals (n = 60) up to three months of age were studied. Fecal samples were analyzed for identification of infectious agents (microbiological culturing, molecular techniques, and microscopic analyses). Escherichia coli fimH (30% versus 25%), Salmonella spp. (25% versus 7%), Strongyloides westeri (25% versus 25%), Clostridium perfringens type A (21% versus 10%), E. coli ag43 (20% versus 35%), Strongylus (11% versus 18%), and vapA-positive Rhodococcus equi (5% versus 2%) were the most frequent enteric pathogens detected in D and ND foals, respectively. The frequency of toxin A-positive C. perfringens was significantly increased in the D (p = 0.033) compared with the ND animals. R. equi strains harboring virulent plasmids were also identified (VapA 85-kb type I and VapA 87-kb type I) in D and ND foals. Coinfections were observed in 46% of the D and 33% of the ND foals. Our results demonstrate the great diversity of enteric pathogens, virulence factors, and coinfections involved in enteric infections of foals.

  19. Enteric Pathogens and Coinfections in Foals with and without Diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivo, Giovane; Lucas, Thays Mizuki; Borges, Alexandre Secorun; Silva, Rodrigo Otávio Silveira; Lobato, Francisco Carlos Faria; Siqueira, Amanda Keller; da Silva Leite, Domingos; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; de Oliveira-Filho, José Paes

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a major clinical problem affecting foals up to 3 months of age. The aim of this study was to identify enteric microorganisms involved in monoinfections and coinfections and the associated virulence factors in healthy and diarrheic foals. Diarrheic (D) (n = 56) and nondiarrheic (ND) foals (n = 60) up to three months of age were studied. Fecal samples were analyzed for identification of infectious agents (microbiological culturing, molecular techniques, and microscopic analyses). Escherichia coli fimH (30% versus 25%), Salmonella spp. (25% versus 7%), Strongyloides westeri (25% versus 25%), Clostridium perfringens type A (21% versus 10%), E. coli ag43 (20% versus 35%), Strongylus (11% versus 18%), and vapA-positive Rhodococcus equi (5% versus 2%) were the most frequent enteric pathogens detected in D and ND foals, respectively. The frequency of toxin A-positive C. perfringens was significantly increased in the D (p = 0.033) compared with the ND animals. R. equi strains harboring virulent plasmids were also identified (VapA 85-kb type I and VapA 87-kb type I) in D and ND foals. Coinfections were observed in 46% of the D and 33% of the ND foals. Our results demonstrate the great diversity of enteric pathogens, virulence factors, and coinfections involved in enteric infections of foals. PMID:28116290

  20. Enteric Pathogens and Coinfections in Foals with and without Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovane Olivo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diarrhea is a major clinical problem affecting foals up to 3 months of age. The aim of this study was to identify enteric microorganisms involved in monoinfections and coinfections and the associated virulence factors in healthy and diarrheic foals. Diarrheic (D (n=56 and nondiarrheic (ND foals (n=60 up to three months of age were studied. Fecal samples were analyzed for identification of infectious agents (microbiological culturing, molecular techniques, and microscopic analyses. Escherichia coli fimH (30% versus 25%, Salmonella spp. (25% versus 7%, Strongyloides westeri (25% versus 25%, Clostridium perfringens type A (21% versus 10%, E. coli ag43 (20% versus 35%, Strongylus (11% versus 18%, and vapA-positive Rhodococcus equi (5% versus 2% were the most frequent enteric pathogens detected in D and ND foals, respectively. The frequency of toxin A-positive C. perfringens was significantly increased in the D (p=0.033 compared with the ND animals. R. equi strains harboring virulent plasmids were also identified (VapA 85-kb type I and VapA 87-kb type I in D and ND foals. Coinfections were observed in 46% of the D and 33% of the ND foals. Our results demonstrate the great diversity of enteric pathogens, virulence factors, and coinfections involved in enteric infections of foals.

  1. Student Commons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Douglas

    2010-01-01

    Student commons are no longer simply congregation spaces for students with time on their hands. They are integral to providing a welcoming environment and effective learning space for students. Many student commons have been transformed into spaces for socialization, an environment for alternative teaching methods, a forum for large group meetings…

  2. Enteral nutrition: past and future Nutrición enteral: pasado y futuro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bengmark

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Perioperative nutrition has during the last century been transformed from a tool to provide calorie and nitrogen support to a tool to boost the immune system and increase resistance to complications. Despite all progress in medicine and surgery has perioperative morbidity, rate of infections, thrombosis and development of serosal adhesions remained the same as long as can be judged or at least during the last eighty years. Most prone to develop complications are persons above the age of 65 and persons with depressed immunity. About cighty percent of the immune system is localised in the gastrointestinal tract, which offers great opportunities for modulation through enterar nutrition. As the stomach has a tendency to develop postoperative paralysis, tube feeding is often necessary. Andresen demonstrated already in 1918 the advantages of enteral nutrition, which starts already on the table. Mulholland et al and Rhoads and co-workers demonstrated during the 1940s certain advantages of enteral tube feeding. Also works by Alexander, Fischer, Ryan and their co-workers supported the value of early enteral feeding, and suggested enteral feeding as an effective tool to boost the immune system. it was, however, works published in the early nineties by Moore et al and by Kudsk et al, which made surgeons more aware of the advantages of early enteral nutrition. Major surgery is known to have a high rate of complications. Uninterrupted perioperative nutrition, eg nutrition during the night before, during surgery and immediately after offers a strong tool to prevent complications. lt is essential that the nutrition provides food also for the colon, e.g. fibres and healthy bacteria (probiotics to ferment the fibre and boost the immune system.Durante el último siglo la nutrición perioperatoria ha pasado de ser un mero instrumento para proporcionar calorías y soporte nitrogenado a una herramienta reforzadora del sistema inmunológico aumentando la resistencia

  3. Twelve messages from enteric infections for science and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrant, R L

    1994-07-01

    Diarrheal diseases hold profound messages as well as opportunities that range from public health to basic science. From the spread of cholera around the world, we are reminded of the global impact of tropical diseases, that disease may provide a litmus test for poverty to drive a sanitary revolution, that disease spread may be worsened by political denial, and that many ecologic and epidemiologic secrets such as interepidemic microbial niches remain poorly understood. Diarrheal diseases other than cholera teach us that heavy disease burdens do not control population growth but are associated with population overgrowth (i.e., improved health is key to controlling the population explosion), the societal impact of diarrhea morbidity may exceed even that of its mortality, that new agents continue to emerge, and that nosocomial diarrhea is an underrecognized threat in our hospitals. Finally, from the laboratory of the developing world also come messages for basic science. Microbial toxins continue to elucidate a new understanding of cell signaling, and mechanisms once thought to be clear (such as that of cholera toxin) now appear much more complex. Traditional remedies hold new pharmacologic secrets, e.g., such as gingko extracts that inhibit platelet-activating factor. Finally, from basic physiology can come widely applicable practical solutions such as oral rehydration therapy and simplified diagnostics for inflammatory diarrhea. Health problems such as diarrheal diseases that plague the disadvantaged are linked to population overgrowth and provide some of the greatest challenges to modern science and the industrialized world.

  4. [WASTE WATERS AS THE RESERVOIR OF INTESTINAL ENTERIC VIRAL INFECTIONS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedachin, A E; Dmitrieva, R A; Doskina, T V; Dolgin, V A; Chulanov, V P; Pimenov, N N

    2015-01-01

    In the paper there are presented data of field observations of the spectrum of viruses, contained in the waste waters. The studies were performed on the territory of the city and the territory unfavorable for hepatitis A. In the territory of the big city by RT-PCR in the waste liquid the enterovirus RNA was detected in 45% of samples; astroviruses--90%; noroviruses--80% and 15% of rotaviruses. Samples from 2 wells were slightly positive for the presence of HCV RNA A. In the waste liquid on the territory, unfavorable for viral hepatitis A, in 100% of the samples there were determined noro- and astroviruses RNA and adenovirus DNA, in 75%--enterovirus RNA; 50%--HAV RNA and a 25%--rotavirus RNA.

  5. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  6. Common Courses for Common Purposes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John

    2014-01-01

    (PME)? I suggest three alternative paths that increased cooperation in PME at the level of the command and staff course could take: a Nordic Defence College, standardized national command and staff courses, and a core curriculum of common courses for common purposes. I conclude with a discussion of how...

  7. QCI Common

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-11-18

    There are many common software patterns and utilities for the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute that can and should be shared across projects. Otherwise we find duplication of code which adds unwanted complexity. This is a software product seeks to alleviate this by providing common utilities such as object factories, graph data structures, parameter input mechanisms, etc., for other software products within the ORNL Quantum Computing Institute. This work enables pure basic research, has no export controlled utilities, and has no real commercial value.

  8. Cytomegalovirus enteritis in immunocompetent subjects: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karigane, Daiki; Takaya, Saho; Seki, Yuki; Mastumoto, Yuka; Onose, Akira; Kosakai, Arifumi; Sugaya, Norio; Mori, Takehiko

    2014-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis (or colitis) is generally diagnosed in immunocompromised patients in association with human immunodeficiency virus infection as well as in recipients of solid organ or hematopoietic stem cell transplant. CMV enteritis has been reported only sporadically in immunocompetent individuals. We encountered a 76-year-old woman who developed CMV enteritis without any previously identified immunocompromised states. An extensive literature review of 33 cases of CMV enteritis or colitis diagnosed in immunocompetent individuals, including the present case, revealed that the median age of the patients was 68, the accompanying symptoms were diarrhea (76%), abdominal pain (52%), and hematochezia or melena (27%), and that the outcome was generally favorable, including resolution without any treatment in 24% of the patients. CMV enteritis should be recognized more widely as a disease entity not only in immunocompromised patients but also in immunocompetent individuals, especially in elderly populations.

  9. Complications in pediatric enteral and vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrelly, James S; Stitelman, David H

    2016-12-01

    Obtaining reliable enteral and vascular access constitutes a significant fraction of a pediatric surgeon׳s job. Multiple approaches are available. Given the complicated nature of this patient population multiple complications can also occur. This article discusses the various techniques and potential complications associated with short- and long-term enteral and vascular access. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanier, B.W.M.; Bruno, M.J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  11. Enteral nutrition and acute pancreatitis: A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.M. Spanier (Marcel); M.J. Bruno (Marco); E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen (Elisabeth)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of

  12. Enteral Nutrition and Acute Pancreatitis: A Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.W.M. Spanier; M.J. Bruno; E.M.H. Mathus-Vliegen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. In patients with acute pancreatitis (AP), nutritional support is required if normal food cannot be tolerated within several days. Enteral nutrition is preferred over parenteral nutrition. We reviewed the literature about enteral nutrition in AP. Methods. A MEDLINE search of the English

  13. Effects of various antimicrobial stewardship programs on antimicrobial usage and resistance among common gram-negative bacilli causing health care-associated infections: A multicenter comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chung-Chih; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Wang, Fu-Der

    2016-02-01

    The effects of various antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) on both antibiotic consumption and resistance among different hospitals within the same insurance system have rarely been investigated. This 6-year retrospective study included three medical centers with similar facilities and infection control measures in Taiwan. These hospitals used different types of ASPs: one had a hospital-wide preauthorization requirement by infectious diseases physicians for all broad-spectrum antibiotics, covering all intensive care units; the second used the same program, but excluded all intensive care units; and the third used postprescription review only. The nonsusceptibility of unduplicated isolates of gram-negative bacilli causing health care-associated infections and consumption of broad-spectrum antibiotics were analyzed. Overall, the usage of broad-spectrum antibiotics of all classes escalated significantly over time in all three hospitals, but consumption was lowest under the hospital-wide preauthorization program. Under this ASP, despite a 2-fold increase in the total broad-spectrum antibiotic consumption during study period, some declining trends of resistance were found, including ciprofloxacin-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii, and carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa. By contrast, the other two hospitals with preauthorization program excluding all intensive care units and postprescription review had similar high broad-spectrum antibiotic consumption, comparable growing trends of resistant strains in general, and the correlations of antibiotic consumption and resistance were basically positive. Carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii increased significantly over time in all three hospitals. This interhospital comparison suggested that hospital-wide preauthorization program is the most effective to reduce key gram-negative bacilli resistance, with the exception of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Alexandre; Martinez-Vinson, Christine; Goulet, Olivier; Badens, Catherine

    2013-01-09

    Syndromic diarrhea/Tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare and severe bowel disorder caused by mutation in SKIV2L or in TTC37, 2 genes encoding subunits of the putative human SKI complex. The estimated prevalence is 1/1,000,000 births and the transmission is autosomal recessive. The classical form is characterized by 5 clinical signs: intractable diarrhea of infancy beginning in the first month of life, usually leading to failure to thrive and requiring parenteral nutrition; facial dysmorphism characterised by prominent forehead and cheeks, broad nasal root and hypertelorism; hair abnormalities described as woolly and easily removable; immune disorders resulting from defective antibody production; intrauterine growth restriction. The aetiology is a defect in TTC37, a TPR containing protein, or in the RNA helicase SKIV2L, both constituting the putative human ski complex. The ski complex is a heterotetrameric cofactor of the cytoplasmic RNA exosome which ensures aberrants mRNAs decay. The diagnosis SD/THE is initially based on clinical findings and confirmed by direct sequencing of TTC37 and SKIV2L. Differential diagnosis with the other causes of intractable diarrhea is easily performed by pathologic investigations. During their clinical course, most of the children require parenteral nutrition and often immunoglobulin supplementation. With time, some of them can be weaned off parenteral nutrition and immunoglobulin supplementation. The prognosis depends on the management and is largely related to the occurrence of parenteral nutrition complications or infections. Even with optimal management, most of the children seem to experience failure to thrive and final short stature. Mild mental retardation is observed in half of the cases.

  15. Spinal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Bobby K-B; Deckey, Jeffrey; Hu, Serena S

    2002-01-01

    Spinal infections can occur in a variety of clinical situations. Their presentation ranges from the infant with diskitis who is unwilling to crawl or walk to the adult who develops an infection after a spinal procedure. The most common types of spinal infections are hematogenous bacterial or fungal infections, pediatric diskitis, epidural abscess, and postoperative infections. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of spinal infections, the cornerstone of treatment, requires a high index of suspicion in at-risk patients and the appropriate evaluation to identify the organism and determine the extent of infection. Neurologic function and spinal stability also should be carefully evaluated. The goals of therapy should include eradicating the infection, relieving pain, preserving or restoring neurologic function, improving nutrition, and maintaining spinal stability.

  16. Water quality indicators: bacteria, coliphages, enteric viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Johnson; Ganesh, Atheesha

    2013-12-01

    Water quality through the presence of pathogenic enteric microorganisms may affect human health. Coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and coliphages are normally used as indicators of water quality. However, the presence of above-mentioned indicators do not always suggest the presence of human enteric viruses. It is important to study human enteric viruses in water. Human enteric viruses can tolerate fluctuating environmental conditions and survive in the environment for long periods of time becoming causal agents of diarrhoeal diseases. Therefore, the potential of human pathogenic viruses as significant indicators of water quality is emerging. Human Adenoviruses and other viruses have been proposed as suitable indices for the effective identification of such organisms of human origin contaminating water systems. This article reports on the recent developments in the management of water quality specifically focusing on human enteric viruses as indicators.

  17. Enhanced enteric virus detection in sporadic gastroenteritis using a multi-target real-time PCR panel: a one-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoli L; Preiksaitis, Jutta K; Lee, Bonita E

    2014-09-01

    Viral gastroenteritis causes significant mortality and morbidity worldwide. Identifying the etiology of viral gastroenteritis is a challenge as most enteric viruses (EVs) are non-culturable. This study is to develop an EV testing panel using real-time PCR (EVPrtPCR) to simultaneously detect rotavirus, norovirus, sapovirus, astrovirus, and enteric adenovirus in stool samples. EVPrtPCR using universal amplification conditions was run in a single instrument run. EVPrtPCR was used to test 2,486 sporadic gastroenteritis samples submitted for EV testing using electron microscopy (EM) between July 2008 and July 2009. Retesting spiked negative stool samples and Salmon DNA as internal control were used to evaluate inhibition. EVPrtPCR detected viruses in significantly more samples: 748 (34%) as compared to 94 (3.8%) by EM. EM did not detect any norovirus, sapovirus, and mixed infection, and detected only 39% of rotavirus and 38.2% of enteric adenovirus positive samples. Four samples that tested positive for rotavirus and two for adenovirus and for small-round-structured viruses by EM were negative by EVPrtPCR. Norovirus was the most common virus detected (17.6%) with 92.4% as genogroup II, followed by rotavirus (6.8%), sapovirus (4.2%), astrovirus (2.0%), and enteric adenovirus (1.4%) with 9% samples positive for mixed infection. Overall, EV identification followed a U-shaped age distribution; positive samples were more common in children ≤5 years old and adults >60 years old. Norovirus, sapovirus and astrovirus showed winter predominance and rotavirus peaked in the spring. No inhibition was observed. Molecular technology significantly enhanced the identification of EV causing sporadic gastroenteritis in Alberta.

  18. Instituting Commoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . STEALTH.unlimited

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the origins of the notion of management, this paper explores how commons governance is constituted by the earlier influential research of Elinor Ostrom, and pursues this with reference to scholars such as Saki Bailey, who emphasises that the choice of regulatory frame is ultimately a political one. We then argue that commons have to be ‘instituted’ in an open manner in order to remain accessible. This demands a set of scripts, rules or agreements that keep the process of commoning in place, and, simultaneously, keep commoning in a constant process of reproduction. We examine this tension and look at the shift in understanding about what ‘institutions of the commons’ have entailed in practice over the course of the last century and a half. Finally, we return to the political dimension to touch upon the question of whether, with the disappearance of the welfare state, a coherent concept of society can emerge from the current upsurge of commons initiatives.

  19. Impact of Enteral Nutrition Suspension on Nutritional Status and Infection in Acute Cerebral Hemorrhage Patients Com­ plicated with Dysphagia%肠内营养混悬液对急性脑出血并吞咽障碍患者营养状况及感染的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文斌; 黄翼

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the impact of enteral nutrition suspension on nutritional status and infection in a­ cute cerebral hemorrhage patients complicated with dysphagia. Methods From February 2013 to February 2014,78 acute cere­ bral hemorrhage patients complicated with dysphagia were selected in the Second People's Hospital of Baoan District,Shenz­ hen. According to random,parallel,control principle,all patients were divided into control group and observation group,each of 39 cases. Based on conventional therapy,control group given self - made ordinary liquid diet,observation group given enteral nutrition suspension. Nutritional status after 6 weeks of treatment,nutrition index(including serum levels of Hb,ALB,IgG, IgA,IgM)before treatment and after 6 weeks of treatment,and incidence of infection during hospitalization between the two groups were compared. Results Nutritional status of observation group after 6 weeks of treatment was better than that of control group,and severity of poor nutrition was slighter than that of control group(P 0. 05),while serum levels of Hb, ALB,IgG,IgA,IgM of observation group after 6 weeks of treatment were higher than those of control group(P < 0. 05). The incidence of infection of observation group during hospitalization was 38. 5% ,was lower than that of observation group( P <0. 05). Conclusion Enteral nutrition suspension can certainly improve the nutritional status and immunity of acute cerebral hemorrhage patients complicated with dysphagia,reduce the severity of poor nutrition and incidence of infection during hospitali­ zation.%目的:探讨肠内营养混悬液对急性脑出血并吞咽障碍患者营养状况及感染的影响。方法选择深圳市宝安区第二人民医院2013年2月—2014年2月收治的急性脑出血并吞咽障碍患者78例,按照随机、平行、对照原则分为对照组和观察组,每组39例。对照组患者在常规治疗基础上给予家属自制的普通流质饮食,

  20. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  1. Science commons

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    SCP: Creative Commons licensing for open access publishing, Open Access Law journal-author agreements for converting journals to open access, and the Scholar's Copyright Addendum Engine for retaining rights to self-archive in meaningful formats and locations for future re-use. More than 250 science and technology journals already publish under Creative Commons licensing while 35 law journals utilize the Open Access Law agreements. The Addendum Engine is a new tool created in partnership with SPARC and U.S. universities. View John Wilbanks's biography

  2. Creative Commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone

    2006-01-01

    En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"......En Creative Commons licens giver en forfatter mulighed for at udbyde sit værk i en alternativ licensløsning, som befinder sig på forskellige trin på en skala mellem yderpunkterne "All rights reserved" og "No rights reserved". Derved opnås licensen "Some rights reserved"...

  3. Chlamydia prevalence among women and men entering the National Job Training Program: United States, 2003-2007

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Satterwhite, Catherine Lindsey; Tian, Lin H; Braxton, Jimmy; Weinstock, Hillard

    2010-01-01

    To analyze 5-year prevalence trends in Chlamydia trachomatis infections among high-risk young men and women aged 16 to 24 years entering the National Job Training Program, where universal screening is required...

  4. Quantification of enteric viruses, pathogen indicators, and Salmonella bacteria in class B anaerobically digested biosolids by culture and molecular methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kelvin; Onan, Brandon M; Xagoraraki, Irene

    2010-10-01

    The most common class B biosolids in the United States are generated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion (MAD), and MAD biosolids have been used for land application. However, the pathogen levels in MAD biosolids are still unclear, especially with respect to enteric viruses. In this study, we determined the occurrence and the quantitative levels of enteric viruses and indicators in 12 MAD biosolid samples and of Salmonella enterica in 6 MAD biosolid samples. Three dewatered biosolid samples were also included in this study for purposes of comparison. Human adenoviruses (HAdV) had the highest gene levels and were detected more frequently than other enteric viruses. The gene levels of noroviruses (NV) reported were comparable to those of enteroviruses (EV) and human polyomaviruses (HPyV). The occurrence percentages of HAdV, HAdV species F, EV, NV GI, NV GII, and HPyV in MAD samples were 83, 83, 42, 50, 75, and 58%, respectively. No hepatitis A virus was detected. Infectious HAdV was detected more frequently than infectious EV, and all infectious HAdV were detected when samples were propagated in A549 cells. Based on most-probable-number (MPN) analysis, A549 cells were more susceptible to biosolid-associated viruses than BGM cells. All indicator levels in MAD biosolids were approximately 10(4) MPN or PFU per gram (dry), and the dewatered biosolids had significantly higher indicator levels than the MAD biosolids. Only two MAD samples tested positive for Salmonella enterica, where the concentration was below 1.0 MPN/4 g. This study provides a broad comparison of the prevalence of different enteric viruses in MAD biosolids and reports the first detection of noroviruses in class B biosolids. The observed high quantitative and infectivity levels of adenoviruses in MAD biosolids indicate that adenovirus is a good indicator for the evaluation of sludge treatment efficiency.

  5. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol predisposes for the development of Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Antonissen

    Full Text Available Both mycotoxin contamination of feed and Clostridium perfringens-induced necrotic enteritis have an increasing global economic impact on poultry production. Especially the Fusarium mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON is a common feed contaminant. This study aimed at examining the predisposing effect of DON on the development of necrotic enteritis in broiler chickens. An experimental Clostridium perfringens infection study revealed that DON, at a contamination level of 3,000 to 4,000 µg/kg feed, increased the percentage of birds with subclinical necrotic enteritis from 20±2.6% to 47±3.0% (P<0.001. DON significantly reduced the transepithelial electrical resistance in duodenal segments (P<0.001 and decreased duodenal villus height (P = 0.014 indicating intestinal barrier disruption and intestinal epithelial damage, respectively. This may lead to an increased permeability of the intestinal epithelium and decreased absorption of dietary proteins. Protein analysis of duodenal content indeed showed that DON contamination resulted in a significant increase in total protein concentration (P = 0.023. Furthermore, DON had no effect on in vitro growth, alpha toxin production and netB toxin transcription of Clostridium perfringens. In conclusion, feed contamination with DON at concentrations below the European maximum guidance level of 5,000 µg/kg feed, is a predisposing factor for the development of necrotic enteritis in broilers. These results are associated with a negative effect of DON on the intestinal barrier function and increased intestinal protein availability, which may stimulate growth and toxin production of Clostridium perfringens.

  6. Fungal infections in severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochhar, Rakesh; Noor, Mohd Talha; Wig, Jaidev

    2011-06-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The majority of deaths related to SAP are the result of infectious complications. Although bacterial infections are most commonly encountered, fungal infections are increasingly being recognized. Candida is the most common fungal infection. The occurrence of fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis adversely affects the clinical course, leading to a higher incidence of systemic complications, and possibly mortality as well. Important risk factors for fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis include broad-spectrum antibiotics, prolonged hospitalization and surgical/endoscopic interventions, use of total parenteral nutrition, and mechanical ventilation. Patients with higher severity of pancreatitis are at a greater risk. The pathogenesis of fungal infection in patients with acute pancreatitis is multifactorial. Translocation of microorganisms across the gut epithelium, lymphocyte dysfunction, and the virulence of the invading microorganisms play important roles. Histological demonstration of fungi remains the gold standard of diagnosis, but a positive biopsy is rarely obtained. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis is being investigated. As early diagnosis and treatment can lead to improved outcome, a high index of suspicion is required for prompt diagnosis. Limiting the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, early introduction of enteral nutrition, and timely change of vascular catheters are important preventive strategies. The role of antifungal prophylaxis remains controversial. Surgical necrosectomy with antifungal therapy is the most widely used treatment approach. Clinical trials on antifungal prophylaxis are needed, and indications for surgical intervention need to be clearly defined.

  7. Common Nosocomial Infections and Intervention Strategies for Inpatients in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology%妇产科住院患者常见院内感染及干预对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马峭屹

    2014-01-01

    目的分析基层医院妇产科住院患者常见院内感染,制订有效的干预对策,提高护理质量。方法针对妇产科住院患者的特殊性和我科存在的薄弱环节,结合实际工作,在患者住院全过程实施流程管理,制定并全面落实各项干预对策。结果有效地防范了呼吸道感染、泌尿道感染、手术切口感染等院内感染发生。结论医护人员思想上要重视院内感染,把各项规章制度落到实处,加强健康宣教和病房管理,做好手部卫生和消毒隔离工作,从严执行无菌操作,合理使用抗菌素,并采用针对性的预防措施对易感因素进行控制和预防,就可以降低院内感染率。%Objective Analyze common nosocomial infections in department of obstetrics and gynecology in grass-roots hospitals and formulate effective intervention strategies to improve nursing quality. Methods On the basis of the particularity of inpatients in department of obstetrics and gynecology, implemented overall process management on inpatients by combining practical work, formulated and implemented all intervention strategies. Results Nosocomial infections like respiratory tract infection, urinary tract infection and surgical incision infection were effectively prevented. Conclusion Medical workers should pay attention to nosocomial infections and implement all rules and regulations, including strenghtening health education and ward management, keeping hand hygiene and disinfection and isolation, well conducting sterile operation, fair use of antibiotics and take corresponding preventive measures on predisposing factors so as to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections.

  8. Redox proteomics of the inflammatory secretome identifies a common set of redoxins and other glutathionylated proteins released in inflammation, influenza virus infection and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Checconi

    Full Text Available Protein cysteines can form transient disulfides with glutathione (GSH, resulting in the production of glutathionylated proteins, and this process is regarded as a mechanism by which the redox state of the cell can regulate protein function. Most studies on redox regulation of immunity have focused on intracellular proteins. In this study we have used redox proteomics to identify those proteins released in glutathionylated form by macrophages stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS after pre-loading the cells with biotinylated GSH. Of the several proteins identified in the redox secretome, we have selected a number for validation. Proteomic analysis indicated that LPS stimulated the release of peroxiredoxin (PRDX 1, PRDX2, vimentin (VIM, profilin1 (PFN1 and thioredoxin 1 (TXN1. For PRDX1 and TXN1, we were able to confirm that the released protein is glutathionylated. PRDX1, PRDX2 and TXN1 were also released by the human pulmonary epithelial cell line, A549, infected with influenza virus. The release of the proteins identified was inhibited by the anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX, which also inhibited tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α release, and by thiol antioxidants (N-butanoyl GSH derivative, GSH-C4, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC, which did not affect TNF-α production. The proteins identified could be useful as biomarkers of oxidative stress associated with inflammation, and further studies will be required to investigate if the extracellular forms of these proteins has immunoregulatory functions.

  9. Clinicopathological Profile of Salmonella Typhi and Paratyphi Infections Presenting as Fever of Unknown Origin in a Tropical Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Nayyar; Basheer, Aneesh; Mookkappan, Sudhagar; Ramdas, Anita; Varghese, Renu G’Boy; Padhi, Somanath; Shrimanth, Bhairappa; Chidambaram, Saranya; Anandhalakshmi, S.; Kanungo, Reba

    2015-01-01

    Background Enteric fever, a common infection in the tropics and endemic to India, often manifests as an acute febrile illness. However, presentation as fever of unknown origin (FUO) is not uncommon in tropical countries. Methods We aim to describe the clinical, laboratory and pathological features of patients hospitalized with fever of unknown origin and diagnosed as enteric fever. All culture proven cases of enteric fever were analyzed retrospectively over a period of three years from January 2011 to December 2013. Results Seven of 88 (8%) cases with enteric fever presented as FUO. Abdominal pain was the most common symptom besides fever. Relative bradycardia and splenomegaly were uncommon. Thrombocytopenia was the most common haematological abnormality while leucopenia was rare. Transaminase elevation was almost universal. S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A were isolated from six cases and one case respectively. Yield of organisms from blood culture was superior to that of bone marrow aspirate. Multiple granulomas were identified in 4 out of 6 (67%) of the bone marrows studied, including that due to S. Paratyphi A and histiocytic hemophagocytosis was noted in two cases. Conclusion FUO is a relatively common manifestation of enteric fever in the tropics. Clinical and laboratory features may be atypical in such cases, including absence of relative bradycardia, leucopenia, and presence of thrombocytopenia, bicytopenia or pancytopenia. In addition, in endemic countries, enteric fever should be considered as a differential diagnosis, next to tuberculosis, in the evaluation of bone marrow granulomas in cases with FUO and culture correlation should be mandatory. PMID:25745548

  10. Enteric pathogens, immune status and therapeutic response in diarrhea in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from north India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Arun Kumar; Uppal, Beena; Chadha, Sanjim; Aggarwal, Prabhav; Ghosh, Roumi; Dewan, Richa

    2013-06-01

    Intestinal infection causing diarrheal disease is a dominant contributor to high morbidity and mortality in developing countries. This intervention study aimed to assess the response of specific anti-microbial and anti-retroviral therapy (ART) on enteropathogens identified in HIV/AIDS adult subjects from northern India. Seventy five ART naive (group 1) and seventy five ART adherent (group 2) HIV/AIDS adult subjects with diarrhea were enrolled. Stool samples from all subjects were examined for enteropathogens by wet mount, staining methods, culture and ELISA. Subjects with enteropathogens were started on specific therapy as per National AIDS Control Organisation, Government of India's guidelines. Follow-up stool samples were examined after 2-4 weeks of completion of therapy for persistence/clearing of enteropathogens. CD4+ T lymphocyte count was done for all subjects. At enrollment, group 1 had 26.13% bacterial, 57.66% parasitic & 16.22% fungal pathogens while group 2 had 11.9%, 69.05% & 19.05% pathogens, respectively. Parasitic diarrhea was more common than bacterial diarrhea. The coccidian parasites (Cryptosporidium spp. & Isospora belli) were the common parasites identified. Clearance of enteric pathogens was significant after specific anti-microbial therapy (p = 0.0001). Persistence of enteropathogens was seen primarily for coccidian parasites. Clearance of enteropathogens after specific therapy and the diagnostic yield of stool specimens were influenced by the CD4+ counts. Immune competence coupled with specific anti-microbial therapy displays the best response against enteric pathogens.

  11. Ipilimumab-Induced Enteritis without Colitis: A New Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Messmer

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ipilimumab is an immune checkpoint inhibitor targeting cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen 4 (CTLA4, approved to treat metastatic melanoma. It was the first therapy shown to prolong survival in a large, randomized clinical trial. However, immune-related adverse events are common and can be severe. Enterocolitis is a common adverse event with ipilimumab, but enteritis without colitis has not been previously described. Case Report: An 83-year-old man presented to our hospital with grade 3 diarrhea for 5 days. One month prior, he had started treatment with ipilimumab for metastatic melanoma. On presentation, he was found to have severe electrolyte disturbances, including hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and acute kidney injury. Causes of infectious diarrhea were excluded, and he was treated with corticosteroids for presumed ipilimumab-associated enterocolitis. However, colonoscopy revealed normal mucosa, both grossly and on pathology of random biopsies. Steroids were weaned but his symptoms recurred. He then underwent upper endoscopy with enteroscopy. Biopsy of the duodenum was notable for acute inflammation, villous blunting, and other changes consistent with ipilimumab-associated injury. He was restarted on high-dose steroids and his symptoms resolved. Discussion: Ipilimumab-induced enteritis is a serious and potentially life-threatening immune related adverse event that warrants prompt recognition and aggressive management. As in cases of ipilimumab-associated enterocolitis, steroids are an effective therapy. Enteritis without colitis should be suspected in patients on ipilimumab who present with severe diarrhea but have a normal colonoscopy.

  12. Leaky enteric coating on ranitidine hydrochloride beads: dissolution and prediction of plasma data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendas, Ehab R; Ayres, James W

    2008-08-01

    The present research is based on the hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are able to provide sustained input for drugs that have an absorption window, such as ranitidine hydrochloride, without jeopardizing their bioavailability. Leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations are defined as enteric-coated pellets that allow some of the drug to be released from the formulation in gastric fluid. Different approaches to making leaky enteric-coated pellets were investigated using extrusion-spheronization followed by spray coating. Leaky enteric coats were formulated using a commonly used enteric polymer, Eudragit L 30 D-55, combined with soluble compounds including lactose, PEG 8000 and surfactants (Span 60 (hydrophobic) or Tween 80 (hydrophilic)). The rate of drug release from the formulations in simulated gastric fluid can be tailored by varying the additive's amount or type. All leaky enteric-coated formulations studied completely released the drugs within 30 min after changing dissolution medium to phosphate buffer, pH 6. Predictions of plasma concentration-time profiles of the model drug ranitidine hydrochloride from leaky enteric-coated pellets in fasted conditions and from immediate-release formulations were performed using computer simulations. Simulation results are consistent with a hypothesis that leaky enteric-coated pellets formulations provide sustained input for drugs shown to have an absorption window without decreasing bioavailability. The sustained input results from the combined effects of the formulation and GI transit effects on pellets. The present research demonstrates a new application of knowledge about gastrointestinal transit effects on drug formulations. It also shows that enteric-coating polymers have new applications in areas other than the usual enteric-coated formulations. The hypothesis that a leaky enteric-coated pellets formulation may maintain or increase the bioavailability of drugs that have a window of absorption

  13. Clinical Evaluation of a Single-Tube Multiple RT-PCR Assay for the Detection of 13 Common Virus Types/Subtypes Associated with Acute Respiratory Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    Full Text Available Respiratory viruses are among the most important causes of human morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially for infants and young children. In the past years, a few commercial multiplex RT-PCR assays have been used to detect respiratory viruses in spite of the high cost. In the present study, an improved single-tube multiplex reverse transcription PCR assay for simultaneous detection of 13 respiratory viruses was evaluated and compared with a previously reported two-tube assay as the reference method using clinical nasopharyngeal aspirates samples. Of 310 prospectively tested respiratory specimens selected from children hospitalized with acute respiratory illness, 226 (72.90%, 226/310 and 214 (69.03%, 214/310 positive for one or more viruses were identified by the single-tube and the two-tube assays, respectively, with combined test results showing good concordance (Kappa value = 0.874. Individually, the single-tube assay for adenovirus (Adv, human metapneumovirus (HMPV, human rhinovirus (HRV, parainfluenza virus type 1 (PIV1, parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 and parainfluenza virus type 4 (PIV4 showed the significantly superior sensitivities to those of the two-tube assay. No false positives were found. In conclusion, our results demonstrates the one-tube assay revealed significant improvements over the two-tube assay in terms of the better sensitivity, more accurate quality control, less nonspecific amplification, more cost-effective and shorter turn-around time and will be a valuable tool for routine surveillance of respiratory virus infection in China.

  14. Rapid diagnostic tests for typhoid and paratyphoid (enteric) fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijedoru, Lalith; Mallett, Sue; Parry, Christopher M

    2017-05-26

    Differentiating both typhoid (Salmonella Typhi) and paratyphoid (Salmonella Paratyphi A) infection from other causes of fever in endemic areas is a diagnostic challenge. Although commercial point-of-care rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for enteric fever are available as alternatives to the current reference standard test of blood or bone marrow culture, or to the widely used Widal Test, their diagnostic accuracy is unclear. If accurate, they could potentially replace blood culture as the World Health Organization (WHO)-recommended main diagnostic test for enteric fever. To assess the diagnostic accuracy of commercially available rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and prototypes for detecting Salmonella Typhi or Paratyphi A infection in symptomatic persons living in endemic areas. We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group Specialized Register, MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index, IndMED, African Index Medicus, LILACS, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) up to 4 March 2016. We manually searched WHO reports, and papers from international conferences on Salmonella infections. We also contacted test manufacturers to identify studies. We included diagnostic accuracy studies of enteric fever RDTs in patients with fever or with symptoms suggestive of enteric fever living in endemic areas. We classified the reference standard used as either Grade 1 (result from a blood culture and a bone marrow culture) or Grade 2 (result from blood culture and blood polymerase chain reaction, or from blood culture alone). Two review authors independently extracted the test result data. We used a modified QUADAS-2 extraction form to assess methodological quality. We performed a meta-analysis when there were sufficient studies for the test and heterogeneity was reasonable. Thirty-seven studies met the inclusion criteria and included a total of 5080 participants (range 50 to 1732). Enteric fever prevalence

  15. Enteric listeriosis in grazing steers supplemented with spoiled silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Juan A; Micheloud, Juan F; Campero, Carlos M; Morrell, Eleonora L; Odriozola, Ernesto R; Moreira, Ana R

    2016-01-01

    An outbreak of enteric listeriosis in steers that were fed spoiled silage is reported. The outbreak started 2 days after ~200 animals in a single paddock were given a supplement of spoiled silage. Forty animals (20%) were affected, and 13 (6.5%) died over a period of 10 days. Affected animals were recumbent, depressed, and had diarrhea with mucus and fibrin. Gross and microscopic findings in 3 animals that were subjected to autopsy included excess peritoneal fluid, congestion and edema of abomasum, suppurative enteritis and colitis, and suppurative mesenteric lymphadenitis. Two strains of Listeria monocytogenes were isolated, one of serotype 1/2c from the gallbladder and one of serotype 1/2b from the spoiled silage. Listeria monocytogenes was detected in the mesenteric lymph nodes and intestinal wall of 1 animal by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Clinical history and signs, gross and microscopic findings, bacterial isolation, and IHC results confirmed a diagnosis of enteric listeriosis. The source of infection was likely the spoiled silage.

  16. NetB and necrotic enteritis: the hole movable story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Julian I; Keyburn, Anthony L; Moore, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    Clostridium perfringens is the primary causative agent of avian necrotic enteritis. Our understanding of the pathogenesis of this economically important disease has been enhanced by the discovery of C. perfringens NetB toxin, which belongs to the α-haemolysin family of β-pore-forming toxins. In a chicken disease model, the analysis of an isogenic set of strains comprising the wild type, a netB mutant, and its complemented derivative, fulfilled molecular Koch's postulates and revealed that NetB was essential for disease. These results were consistent with epidemiological surveys, which generally found that there was a higher prevalence of netB carriage in C. perfringens isolates from diseased poultry compared to healthy birds. The netB gene has been shown to be located on large conjugative plasmids that are closely related to other toxin plasmids from C. perfringens, which has potential implications for the epidemiology of necrotic enteritis infections. The crystal structures of both monomeric NetB and the heptameric NetB pore have been determined, the latter revealed a central pore diameter of approximately 26 Å. Finally, it has been shown that vaccine preparations that include NetB can protect chickens against disease and a series of single amino acid substitution derivatives of NetB that have potential value for vaccine formulations have been isolated and analysed. It is likely that NetB will be an important antigen to include in an effective, commercially viable, necrotic enteritis vaccine.

  17. [Acute abdomen caused by eosinophilic enteritis: six observations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ubieto, Fernando; Bueno-Delgado, Alvaro; Jiménez-Bernadó, Teresa; Santero Ramírez, María Pilar; Arribas-Del Amo, Dolores; Martínez-Ubieto, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophilic enteritis is a rather rare condition characterized by infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract by eosinophils; as a casue of acute abdomen it is really exceptional. The etiology is unclear and its description in the literature is sparse, but associations have been made with collagen vascular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, food allergy and parasitic infections as it was confirmed in one of our pathologic studies. From 1997 to 2011 six cases of eosinophilic enteritis that involved a small bowel segment were diagnosed. A partial resection by an irreversible necrosis was necessary in three of them; in the other three only a biopsy was necessary due to the inflammatory aspect of the affected loop causing the acute abdomen. Eosinophilic enteritis can originate acute abdomen processes where an urgent surgical treatment is necessary. The intraoperative aspect can be from a segment of small bowel with inflammatory signs up to a completely irrecoverable loop, where removing of the affected segment is the correct treatment, which can be done laparoscopically.

  18. Young Children's Understanding of Cultural Common Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebal, Kristin; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Human social interaction depends on individuals identifying the common ground they have with others, based both on personally shared experiences and on cultural common ground that all members of the group share. We introduced 3- and 5-year-old children to a culturally well-known object and a novel object. An experimenter then entered and asked,…

  19. Assessment of Efficacy and Quality of Two Albendazole Brands Commonly Used against Soil-Transmitted Helminth Infections in School Children in Jimma Town, Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sileshi Belew

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a worldwide upscale in mass drug administration (MDA programs to control the morbidity caused by soil-transmitted helminths (STHs: Ascaris lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura and hookworm. Although anthelminthic drugs which are used for MDA are supplied by two pharmaceutical companies through donation, there is a wide range of brands available on local markets for which the efficacy against STHs and quality remain poorly explored. In the present study, we evaluated the drug efficacy and quality of two albendazole brands (Bendex and Ovis available on the local market in Ethiopia.A randomized clinical trial was conducted according to the World Health Organization (WHO guidelines to assess drug efficacy, by means of egg reduction rate (ERR, of Bendex and Ovis against STH infections in school children in Jimma, Ethiopia. In addition, the chemical and physicochemical quality of the drugs was assessed according to the United States and European Pharmacopoeia, encompassing mass uniformity of the tablets, amount of active compound and dissolution profile. Both drugs were highly efficacious against A. lumbricoides (>97%, but showed poor efficacy against T. trichiura (~20%. For hookworms, Ovis was significantly (p < 0.05 more efficacious compared to Bendex (98.1% vs. 88.7%. Assessment of the physicochemical quality of the drugs revealed a significant difference in dissolution profile, with Bendex having a slower dissolution than Ovis.The study revealed that differences in efficacy between the two brands of albendazole (ABZ tablets against hookworm are linked to the differences in the in-vitro drug release profile. Differences in uptake and metabolism of this benzimidazole drug among different helminth species may explain that this efficacy difference was only observed in hookworms and not in the two other species. The results of the present study underscore the importance of assessing the chemical and physicochemical quality of drugs before

  20. Comparative Genomic Analyses of Multiple Pseudomonas Strains Infecting Corylus avellana Trees Reveal the Occurrence of Two Genetic Clusters with Both Common and Distinctive Virulence and Fitness Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Marcelletti

    Full Text Available The European hazelnut (Corylus avellana is threatened in Europe by several pseudomonads which cause symptoms ranging from twig dieback to tree death. A comparison of the draft genomes of nine Pseudomonas strains isolated from symptomatic C. avellana trees was performed to identify common and distinctive genomic traits. The thorough assessment of genetic relationships among the strains revealed two clearly distinct clusters: P. avellanae and P. syringae. The latter including the pathovars avellanae, coryli and syringae. Between these two clusters, no recombination event was found. A genomic island of approximately 20 kb, containing the hrp/hrc type III secretion system gene cluster, was found to be present without any genomic difference in all nine pseudomonads. The type III secretion system effector repertoires were remarkably different in the two groups, with P. avellanae showing a higher number of effectors. Homologue genes of the antimetabolite mangotoxin and ice nucleation activity clusters were found solely in all P. syringae pathovar strains, whereas the siderophore yersiniabactin was only present in P. avellanae. All nine strains have genes coding for pectic enzymes and sucrose metabolism. By contrast, they do not have genes coding for indolacetic acid and anti-insect toxin. Collectively, this study reveals that genomically different Pseudomonas can converge on the same host plant by suppressing the host defence mechanisms with the use of different virulence weapons. The integration into their genomes of a horizontally acquired genomic island could play a fundamental role in their evolution, perhaps giving them the ability to exploit new ecological niches.

  1. Identification and characterization of genes differentially expressed in the resistance reaction in wheat infected with Tilletia tritici, the common bunt pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhen-Xiang; Gaudet, Denis A; Frick, Michele; Puchalski, Byron; Genswein, Bernie; Laroche, Andre

    2005-07-31

    The differentially virulent race T1 of common bunt (Tilletia tritici) was used to inoculate the wheat lines Neepawa (compatible) and its sib BW553 (incompatible) that are nearly isogenic for the Bt-10 resistance gene. Inoculated crown tissues were used to construct a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library. Of the 1920 clones arrayed from the SSH cDNA library, approximately 10 % were differentially regulated. A total of 168 differentially up-regulated and 25 downregulated genes were identified and sequenced; 71 % sequences had significant homology to genes of known function, of which 59 % appeared to have roles in cellular metabolism and development, 24 % in abiotic/biotic stress responses, 3 % involved in transcription and signal transduction responses. Two putative resistance genes and a transcription factor were identified among the upregulated sequences. The expression of several candidate genes including a lipase, two non-specific lipid transfer proteins (ns-LTPs), and several wheat pathogenesis-related (PR)-proteins, was evaluated following 4 to 32 days postinoculation in compatible and incompatible interactions. Results confirmed the higher overall expression of these genes in resistant BW553 compared to susceptible Neepawa, and the differential up-regulation of wheat lipase, chitinase and PR-1 proteins in the expression of the incompatible interaction.

  2. A novel immunodominant CD8+ T cell response restricted by a common HLA-C allele targets a conserved region of Gag HIV-1 clade CRF01_AE infected Thais.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supranee Buranapraditkun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD8+ T cell responses play an important role in the control of HIV-1. The extensive sequence diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical hurdle to developing an effective HIV-1 vaccine, and it is likely that regional-specific vaccine strains will be required to overcome the diversity of the different HIV-1 clades distributed world-wide. Unfortunately, little is known about the CD8+ T cell responses against CRF01_AE, which is responsible for the majority of infections in Southeast Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify dominant CD8+ T cell responses recognized in HIV-1 clade CRF01_AE infected subjects we drew upon data from an immunological screen of 100 HIV-1 clade CRF01_AE infected subjects using IFN-gamma ELISpot to characterize a novel immunodominant CD8+ T cell response in HIV-1 Gag restricted by HLA-Cw*0102 (p24, (277YSPVSILDI(285, YI9. Over 75% of Cw*0102+ve subjects targeted this epitope, representing the strongest response in more than a third of these individuals. This novel CD8 epitope was located in a highly conserved region of HIV-1 Gag known to contain immunodominant CD8 epitopes, which are restricted by HLA-B*57 and -B*27 in clade B infection. Nonetheless, viral escape in this epitope was frequently observed in Cw*0102+ve subjects, suggestive of strong selection pressure being exerted by this common CD8+ T cell response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As HLA-Cw*0102 is frequently expressed in the Thai population (allelic frequency of 16.8%, this immunodominant Cw*0102-restricted Gag epitope may represent an attractive candidate for vaccines specific to CRF01_AE and may help facilitate further studies of immunopathogenesis in this understudied HIV-1 clade.

  3. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN SURFACE WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Human enteric viruses cause a number of diseases when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking & recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet. Other members of enterovirus group cause numerous diseases. Hepatit...

  4. OCCURRENCE OF ENTERIC VIRUSES IN WATERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of different types of human enteric viruses cause waterborne outbreaks when individuals are exposed to contaminated drinking and recreational waters. Vaccination against poliovirus has virtually eliminated poliomyelitis from the planet, but other members of the enterovi...

  5. Enteric neuropathies: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgio, Roberto; Bianco, Francesca; Latorre, Rocco; Caio, Giacomo; Clavenzani, Paolo; Bonora, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Enteric neuropathy is a term indicating an impairment of the innervation supplying the gastrointestinal tract. The clinical phenotypes of the enteric neuropathies are the 'tip of the iceberg' of severe functional digestive diseases, such as intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndromes (e.g., chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction). Despite progress acquired over the years, the pathogenetic mechanisms leading to enteric neuropathies are still far from being elucidated and the therapeutic approaches to these patients are mainly supportive, rather than curative.The purpose of this chapter is to review the advancements that have been done in the knowledge of enteric neuropathies identified in adult patients ('tomorrow'), going through where we currently are ('today') following a brief history of the major milestones on the pioneering discoveries in the field ('yesterday').

  6. Nutricion enteral en el paciente critico

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jairo Botello Jaimes, Jhon; Gonzalez Rincon, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    ... entre otros. Se debe garantizar un soporte nutricional a todos los pacientes criticos idealmente por via enteral por ia disminucion de la traslocacion bacteriana y la estimulacion de la funcion de las vellosidades intestinales...

  7. Duck Virus Enteritis - A Contingency Plan