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Sample records for common bean crop

  1. How weather during development of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) affects the crop's maximum attainable seed quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muasya, R.M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Muui, C.W.; Struik, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    NJAS wageningen journal of life sciences, Vol 56, No 1/2 (2008) Home About Log In Register Search Current Archives KLV Home > Vol 56, No 1/2 (2008) > Muasya Font Size: How weather during development of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) affects the crop¿s maximum attainable seed quality R.M.

  2. How weather during development of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) affects the crop's maximum attainable seed quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muasya, R.M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Muui, C.W.; Struik, P.C.

    2008-01-01

    NJAS wageningen journal of life sciences, Vol 56, No 1/2 (2008) Home About Log In Register Search Current Archives KLV Home > Vol 56, No 1/2 (2008) > Muasya Font Size: How weather during development of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) affects the crop¿s maximum attainable seed quality R.M.

  3. History of the common bean crop: its evolution beyond its areas of origin and domestication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Ron, Antonio M.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is the most important grain legume for direct human consumption on a global scale. Current bean germplasm collections show a wide variation of phenotypes, although genetic erosion is gradually affecting this species as in many countries local traditional varieties are being replaced by elite cultivars. This crop has spread to every continent over the past few centuries, which has resulted in a complex genetic structure of bean germplasm outside its areas of origin and domestication (South and Central America. Some evidence indicates that this germplasm is more complex than previously thought and contains additional, as yet unexplored, diversity. This is especially the case in southern Europe, particularly in the Iberian Peninsula, where it was introduced in the early sixteenth century and has been documented as a secondary focus of domestication of the species. The integration of omic data into bean germplasm documentation databases and its combination with genotypic, phenotypic and agro-ecological data is opening a new era for the enhancement and efficient use of common bean genetic resources as the main grain legume in Europe and worldwide.La judía común (Phaseolus vulgaris L. es la leguminosa de grano más relevante para el consumo humano directo en escala global. Las colecciones de germoplasma de judía actuales muestran una amplia variación de fenotipos, aunque en muchos países las variedades locales están siendo reemplazados por cultivares de élite, concentrando la producción agraria en un número cada vez más reducido de cultivares con la consecuente erosión genética o pérdida de biodiversidad. Este cultivo se ha extendido por todos los continentes durante los últimos siglos, lo que ha dado lugar a una compleja estructura genética fuera de sus áreas de origen y domesticación (Mesoamérica y Sudamérica. Diversas evidencias indican que el germoplasma europeo contiene una diversidad

  4. Productivity and profitability of the common bean crop with fertigation in Veracruz, Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of fertigation on bean crops in the central and southern areas of the state of Veracruz, Me xico. During the 2000 and 2002 Winter-Sp ring growing cycles, three treatments were evaluated: 1) Gravity irrigation and solid manual fertilization (regional treatment), with a 40N-40P-0K dosage (RR -40), 2) Drip irrigation and solid manual fertilization, with a 4N-40P-0K (RG -40); in both treatments the fertilizer was applied at 15 days after the ...

  5. Faba bean in cropping systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen Jensen, Erik; Peoples, Mark B.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    bean may prove to be a key component of future arable cropping systems where declining supplies and high prices of fossil energy are likely to constrain the affordability and use of fertilizers. This will help address the increasing demand by consumers and governments for agriculture to reduce its...... impact on the environment and climate through new, more sustainable approaches to food production. The aims of this paper are to review the role of faba bean in global plant production systems, the requirements for optimal faba bean production and to highlight the beneficial effects of faba bean...

  6. Weed management strategies for castor bean crops

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    Augusto Guerreiro Fontoura Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean crops are agriculturally relevant due to the quality and versatility of their oil, both for the chemical industry and for biodiesel production. Proper weed management is important for both the cultivation and the yield of castor bean crops; therefore, the intention of the present work is to review pertinent information regarding weed management, including the studies regarding weed interference periods, chemical controls for use in different crop production systems and herbicide selectivity, for castor bean crops. Weed science research for castor bean crops is scarce. One of the main weed management challenges for castor bean crops is the absence of herbicides registered with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MALFS. Research for viable herbicides for weed control in castor bean crops should be directed by research and/or rural extension institutions, associations and farmers cooperatives, as well as by manufactures, for the registration of these selective herbicides, which would be primarily used to control eudicotyledons in castor bean crops. New studies involving the integration of weed control methods in castor bean also may increase the efficiency of weed management, for both small farmers using traditional crop methods in the Brazilian Northeast region, as well as for areas with the potential for large scale production, using conservation tillage systems, such as the no-tillage crop production system.

  7. The influence of strip cropping on the state and degree of weed infestation in dent maize (Zea mays L., common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

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    Aleksandra Głowacka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted in the years 2008–2010 at the Experimental Station of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences in Zamość, University of Life Sciences in Lublin. The following factors were analysed in the experiment: I. Cultivation method – sole cropping and strip cropping, which consisted in the cultivation of three plants: dent maize, common bean, and spring barley, in adjacent strips with a width of 3.3 m; II. Weed control methods – mechanical and chemical. The subject of the research was weed infestation of the 'Celio' variety of dent maize, the 'Aura' variety of common bean, and the 'Start' variety of spring barley. Weed infestation of the crops was assessed two weeks before harvesting by determining the species composi- tion as well as the number and dry weight of weeds. The dominant weed species in maize, common bean and spring barley were Echinochloa crus-galli, Chenopodium album and Galinsoga parviflora, constituting from 58% to 70% of the total number of weeds. Strip cropping clearly reduced the number of weeds per unit area in all the cultivated species and dry weight of aboveground parts produced by them in common bean and maize crops. The limiting effect of strip cropping on the weed infestation parameters was particularly clear in combination with the mechanical weed control method.

  8. The Paleobiolinguistics of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

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    Cecil H. Brown

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Paleobiolinguistics is used to determine when and where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. developed significance for prehistoric groups of Native America. Dates and locations of proto-languages for which common bean terms reconstruct generally accord with crop-origin and dispersal information from plant genetics and archaeobotany. Paleobiolinguistic and other lines of evidence indicate that human interest in the common bean became significant primarily with the widespread development of a village‐farming way of life in the New World rather than earlier when squash and maize and a few other crops became important.

  9. Crop Water Stress Index and Yield Components for Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Greenhouse and Field Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods to detect and characterize the magnitude of drought stress are an area of active research. With the development and increased popularity of the infrared thermometer, a thermal stress index has been proposed and applied. One of the most popular and useful is the crop water stress index (CWS...

  10. Populational survey of arthropods on transgenic common bean expressing the rep gene from Bean golden mosaic virus

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Patrícia V; Quintela, Eliane D; Ana Maria R. Junqueira; Aragão, Francisco JL; Faria, Josias C

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops is considered the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. However, possible undesirable and unintended effects must be considered during the research steps toward development of a commercial product. In this report we evaluated effects of a common bean virus resistant line on arthropod populations, considered as non-target organisms. This GM bean line (named M1/4) was modified for resistance against Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) ...

  11. Outbreaks of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae in common bean and castor bean in São Paulo State, Brazil

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    Edson Luiz Lopes Baldin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, increasing populations of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae have been observed in cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and castor bean (Ricinus communis L. at the Lageado Experimental Farm, belonging to the FCA/UNESP, Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. Defoliations around 80% and 50% were observed in the common bean cv. Pérola and castor bean cv. IAC-2028, respectively. Samples of individuals (caterpillars and pupae were collected in the field, and kept in laboratory until adult emergence aiming to confirm the species. These are new observations for common bean in São Paulo State and, in the case of castor bean, unpublished in Brazil. It suggests that C. includens has adapted to attack other agricultural crops, demanding attention of common bean and castor bean producers.

  12. Competitive ability of black common bean genotypes with weeds

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    Gilcimar Adriano Vogt

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The morpho-physiologic characteristics of common bean plants can affect their competitive ability with weeds. The objective of this work was to evaluate the competitive ability of black bean genotypes with weeds. An experiment was carried out in the 2010/11 cropping season in Papanduva, SC, southern Brazil, in order to verify the variability of some plant characteristics among genotypes of common bean. The randomized block design was used, with four replications. Seven cultivars underwent the treatments: BRS Campeiro, CHP 01-238, CHP 01-239, Diamante Negro, BRS Supremo, BRS Valente, IPR Uirapuru, FTS Soberano, IPR Graúna, IPR Tiziu e IAC Diplomata. At 6, 14, 18, 25 and 32 days after emergence (DAE were evaluated plant height, ground cover by common bean plants, dry biomass of stems and leaves, and grain yield. In the 2011/12 cropping season the same cultivars were grown in the presence or absence of weeds, adopting similar methodology to the 2010/11. The losses of grain yield in black common bean genotypes due to weed interference ranged from 30.8% to 54.9%. There was a positive correlation between yield reduction promoted by the weed infestation and dry biomass produced by the weeds. In addition, there was a positive correlation between percentage of yield reduction due to the weed infestation and grain yield without weed interference. The characteristics evaluated did not estimate the competitive ability of black common bean genotypes with weeds.

  13. Application of in silico bulked segregant analysis for rapid development of markers linked to Bean common mosaic virus resistance in common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean was one of the first crops that benefited from the development and utilization of molecular markers in tagging major disease resistance genes for marker-assisted selection (MAS). Efficiency of MAS breeding in common bean is still hampered; however, due to the dominance, linkage phase, an...

  14. The transcriptome of common bean: nodules to beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. We performed next generation sequencing (RNAseq) on five...

  15. Virus-induced gene silencing in soybean and common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunquan; Whitham, Steven A; Hill, John H

    2013-01-01

    Plant viral vectors are useful for transient gene expression as well as for downregulation of gene expression via virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). When used in reverse genetics approaches, VIGS offers a convenient way of transforming genomic information into knowledge of gene function. Efforts to develop and improve plant viral vectors have expanded their applications and have led to substantial advances needed to facilitate gene function studies in major row crops. Here, we describe a DNA-based Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) vector system for both gene expression and VIGS in soybean and common bean.

  16. Diversification and population structure in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

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    Matthew W Blair

    Full Text Available Wild accessions of crops and landraces are valuable genetic resources for plant breeding and for conserving alleles and gene combinations in planta. The primary genepool of cultivated common beans includes wild accessions of Phaseolus vulgaris. These are of the same species as the domesticates and therefore are easily crossable with cultivated accessions. Molecular marker assessment of wild beans and landraces is important for the proper utilization and conservation of these important genetic resources. The goal of this research was to evaluate a collection of wild beans with fluorescent microsatellite or simple sequence repeat markers and to determine the population structure in combination with cultivated beans of all known races. Marker diversity in terms of average number of alleles per marker was high (13 for the combination of 36 markers and 104 wild genotypes that was similar to the average of 14 alleles per marker found for the 606 cultivated genotypes. Diversity in wild beans appears to be somewhat higher than in cultivated beans on a per genotype basis. Five populations or genepools were identified in structure analysis of the wild beans corresponding to segments of the geographical range, including Mesoamerican (Mexican, Guatemalan, Colombian, Ecuadorian-northern Peruvian and Andean (Argentina, Bolivia and Southern Peru. The combined analysis of wild and cultivated accessions showed that the first and last of these genepools were related to the cultivated genepools of the same names and the penultimate was found to be distinct but not ancestral to the others. The Guatemalan genepool was very novel and perhaps related to cultivars of race Guatemala, while the Colombian population was also distinct. Results suggest geographic isolation, founder effects or natural selection could have created the different semi-discrete populations of wild beans and that multiple domestications and introgression were involved in creating the diversity of

  17. An effective virus-based gene silencing method for functional genomics studies in common bean

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    Kachroo Aardra

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is a crop of economic and nutritious importance in many parts of the world. The lack of genomic resources have impeded the advancement of common bean genomics and thereby crop improvement. Although concerted efforts from the "Phaseomics" consortium have resulted in the development of several genomic resources, functional studies have continued to lag due to the recalcitrance of this crop for genetic transformation. Results Here we describe the use of a bean pod mottle virus (BPMV-based vector for silencing of endogenous genes in common bean as well as for protein expression. This BPMV-based vector was originally developed for use in soybean. It has been successfully employed for both protein expression and gene silencing in this species. We tested this vector for applications in common bean by targeting common bean genes encoding nodulin 22 and stearoyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase for silencing. Our results indicate that the BPMV vector can indeed be employed for reverse genetics studies of diverse biological processes in common bean. We also used the BPMV-based vector for expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP in common bean and demonstrate stable GFP expression in all common bean tissues where BPMV was detected. Conclusions The availability of this vector is an important advance for the common bean research community not only because it provides a rapid means for functional studies in common bean, but also because it does so without generating genetically modified plants. Here we describe the detailed methodology and provide essential guidelines for the use of this vector for both gene silencing and protein expression in common bean. The entire VIGS procedure can be completed in 4-5 weeks.

  18. Response of Andean and Mesoamerican common bean genotypes to inoculation with rhizobium strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In most common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production regions of Latin America, inoculants are rarely used by farmers in spite of several studies that demonstrate the importance of Rhizobium inoculation on commercial production of legume crops. This study investigated specific bean host plant-Rhizo...

  19. Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola isolated from weeds in bean crop fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Sanz, A M; Rodicio, M R; González, A J

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, the causative agent of halo blight in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), was isolated from weeds associated with bean crops in Spain. The bacterium was recovered from Fumaria sp, Mercurialis annua, Solanum nigrum and Sonchus oleraceus. Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola had previously been isolated from leguminous plants and S. nigrum, but to our knowledge, this is the first time it was recovered from the other three species. The isolates were phenotypically and genetically characterized, and they were compared with isolates recovered from common beans. Five different genotypic profiles were detected by PmeI-PFGE, two of them being of new description. Weed isolates were as pathogenic on bean plants as bean isolates, but they were not pathogenic on S. nigrum. Regarding the survival of the pathogen in weeds, Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola was isolated from So. oleraceus 11 weeks after the end of the bean crop. These results strongly support the idea of weeds as a potential source of inoculum for halo blight in bean. It has traditionally been considered that the main source of inoculum of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola causing halo blight disease in Phaseolus vulgaris are the bean seeds, and that the host range of the bacterium is almost restricted to leguminous plants. In this study, the bacterium was recovered from four nonleguminous weed species collected in bean fields, and its permanence in weeds for at least 11 weeks after the harvesting of the beans was demonstrated. We have also proved that the strains isolated from weeds were pathogenic on bean plants. Accordingly, the host range of Ps. s. pv. phaseolicola could be broader than previously thought and weeds appear to be acting as a reservoir of the pathogen until the next crop. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Phenotyping common beans for adaptation to drought

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    Stephen eBeebe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. originated in the New World and are the grain legume of greatest production for direct human consumption. Common bean production is subject to frequent droughts in highland Mexico, in the Pacific coast of Central America, in northeast Brazil, and in eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. This article reviews efforts to improve common bean for drought tolerance, referring to genetic diversity for drought response, the physiology of of drought tolerance mechanisms, and breeding strategies. Different races of common bean respond differently to drought, with race Durango of highland Mexico being a major source of genes. Sister species of P. vulgaris likewise have unique traits, especially P. acutifolius which is well adapted to dryland conditions. Diverse sources of tolerance may have different mechanisms of plant response, implying the need for different methods of phenotyping to recognize the relevant traits. Practical considerations of field management are discussed including: trial planning; water management; and field preparation.

  1. Common bean and cowpea improvement in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    During 2014 and 2015, the Instituto de Investigação Agronómica (IIA) evaluated the performance of common bean (Phaselolus vulgaris L.) breeding lines and improved cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) varieties. The field experiments were planted in the lowlands at Mazozo and in the highlands at Chian...

  2. Biochemical and metabolic profiles of Trichoderma strains isolated from common bean crops in the Brazilian Cerrado, and potential antagonism against Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Fabyano Alvares Cardoso; Steindorff, Andrei Stecca; Geraldine, Alaerson Maia; Brandão, Renata Silva; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Lobo, Murillo; Coelho, Alexandre Siqueira Guedes; Ulhoa, Cirano José; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2012-07-01

    Some species of Trichoderma have successfully been used in the commercial biological control of fungal pathogens, e.g., Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, an economically important pathogen of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The objectives of the present study were (1) to provide molecular characterization of Trichoderma strains isolated from the Brazilian Cerrado; (2) to assess the metabolic profile of each strain by means of Biolog FF Microplates; and (3) to evaluate the ability of each strain to antagonize S. sclerotiorum via the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs), volatile antibiotics, and dual-culture tests. Among 21 isolates, we identified 42.86% as Trichoderma asperellum, 33.33% as Trichoderma harzianum, 14.29% as Trichoderma tomentosum, 4.76% as Trichoderma koningiopsis, and 4.76% as Trichoderma erinaceum. Trichoderma asperellum showed the highest CWDE activity. However, no species secreted a specific group of CWDEs. Trichoderma asperellum 364/01, T. asperellum 483/02, and T. asperellum 356/02 exhibited high and medium specific activities for key enzymes in the mycoparasitic process, but a low capacity for antagonism. We observed no significant correlation between CWDE and antagonism, or between metabolic profile and antagonism. The diversity of Trichoderma species, and in particular of T. harzianum, was clearly reflected in their metabolic profiles. Our findings indicate that the selection of Trichoderma candidates for biological control should be based primarily on the environmental fitness of competitive isolates and the target pathogen.

  3. Intensity of angular leaf spot and anthracnose on pods of common beans cultivated in three cropping systems Intensidade da mancha-angular e da antracnose em vagens de feijão em três sistemas de cultivo

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    Rogério Faria Vieira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available With the purpose to evaluate the intensity of angular leaf spot (ALS and anthracnose (ANT on pods, nine genotypes of common bean were planted in three cropping systems: monocrop (MC, monocrop grown on trellises (MCT, and intercrop with maize (ICM. In MC, beans were planted 0.5 m apart. Trelisses were set up with 1.8 m high bamboos and beans were sown 0.65 m apart. In ICM, beans were planted simultaneously with maize and in its rows. This cereal was sown 1.0 m apart with four plants per meter. Each cropping system was an independent trial installed close to each other. Climbing genotypes of beans most susceptible to ALS had less diseased pods in ICM than in both MC and MCT, but the less susceptible genotypes, regardless of their growth type, as well as the susceptible bush and semiclimbing genotypes, were similarly attacked by ALS in the three systems. ANT on pods of the susceptible bean cv. Pérola was less intense in MCT than in MC, and less intense in ICM than in MCT. ANT seed transmission was 11 %, 9.1 %, and 4.4 % when seeds come from MC, MCT, and ICM, respectively.Com o objetivo de avaliar a intensidade da mancha-angular (MA e da antracnose (ANT em vagens, nove genótipos de feijão foram plantados em três sistemas de plantio: monocultivo (MC, monocultivo com tutoragem artificial (MCT e consórcio com milho (CCM. No MC, o feijão foi semeado no espaçamento entre fileiras de 0,50 m. Para o MCT, utilizaram-se varas de bambu formando "Vs" invertidos com 1,8 m de altura, nos quais foi mantido o espaçamento entre fileiras de 0,65 m na base. No CCM, o feijão foi plantado simultaneamente ao milho e em suas fileiras. Esse cereal foi semeado no espaçamento de 1,0 m, com quatro plantas por metro. Cada sistema de cultivo foi um ensaio independente, todos instalados na mesma área. Os genótipos trepadores mais suscetíveis à MA apresentaram menos vagens doentes no CCM que no MC e MCT, mas os genótipos menos atacados pela MA, independentemente

  4. Período crítico de interferência das plantas daninhas na cultura do feijoeiro-comum em sistema de semeadura direta Critical period of weed interference in the common bean crop under direct seeding system

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    L.A. Kozlowski

    2002-08-01

    interference in the common bean under direct seeding system, associated with the phenological stage of the common bean growth. The experimental design was a randomized complete block arranged in a 2 x 8 factorial, with four replications. The 16 treatments tested resulted from a combination of two groups of weed interference treatments : (a relative weedy period, and (b relative weed-free period, in seven physiological stages of bean growth: V2, V3, V4, R5, R6, R7 and R8, and a check plot with the crop in coexistence with the weeds. The experiment was carried out on an area 8 years under direct seeding system. Sowing, fertilization, and insect and disease control were performed according to the technology recommended for the crop. The weed interference critical period occurred between the V4 and R6 phenological stages of growth, and bean yield was reduced in 71% when the crop was maintained in coexistence with the weeds during all the crop cycle. Regarding weed composition, the dicotyledons class of weed represented 61.3%, being Bidens pilosa and Richardia brasiliensis the most prevalent, with 30.6% and 16.6%, respectively. Monocotyledons represented 38.7%, and Digitaria horizontalis and Brachiaria plantaginea, were the most prevalent, with 23.6% and 14.3%, respectively.

  5. Uréia em cobertura e via foliar em feijoeiro Foliar and surface dressing of urea for the common bean crop

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    Claudinei de Almeida

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de verificar a influência de diferentes concentrações de uréia (0, 40, 60, 80, 100 e 120 g kg-1 em solução, para fornecimento de N via foliar, em diferentes horários (08h, 16h e 20h, na presença e ausência de adubação nitrogenada em cobertura (via solo. O solo do local do ensaio é do tipo Latossolo Vermelho-Escuro álico. O delineamento experimental seguiu o esquema fatorial 6x3x2, com quatro repetições. A semeadura foi realizada mecanicamente no dia 24.06.1996, utilizando-se o cultivar IAC Carioca, conduzido em regime de irrigação. Aplicaram-se 200 L ha-1 de calda, em cada pulverização com uréia. A adubação nitrogenada em cobertura foi realizada aos 32 dias após a emergência (dae, aplicando-se 40 kg ha-1 de N. Foram realizadas as seguintes avaliações: teor de agua e grau de fitotoxicidade nas folhas, número de dias para o florescimento pleno, matéria seca de plantas, teor de N total em folhas, número de vagens/planta, número de grãos/vagem, peso médio de 100 grãos e rendimento de grãos. A adubação nitrogenada em cobertura, aumentou a produtividade, o mesmo não ocorrendo com a adubação foliar. É importante a época de aplicação e a concentração da uréia foliar, devido a fitotoxicidade.The objective was to determine common bean response to different urea concentrations (0, 40, 60, 80, 100, and 120 g kg-1. N was supplied through leaves at different hours of application (8:00 AM, 04:00 PM, and 08:00 PM, in either the presence or the absence of N (urea soil surface dressing at the rate of 40 kg ha-1 N. The soil used was a clayey Typic Haplustox . The experimental design consisted of randomized blocks in a factorial scheme 5x3 with five urea rates and three times of application, with four replicates. Plant characteristics and degree of fitotoxicity were measured. It is concluded that N applied to the soil increased grain yield. N applied to leaves did not

  6. Efeitos de geada no desenvolvimento do feijoeiro em sucessão a espécies vegetais e adubação nitrogenada Frust effect in the development of common bean, in succession cover crops and nitrogen fertilization

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    Rogério Farinelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar o efeito de geada no desenvolvimento do feijoeiro em experimentação de cultivo em sucessão a espécies de cobertura e adubação nitrogenada, em delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso em esquema de parcelas subdivididas, com quatro repetições. As parcelas foram constituídas pelas espécies Sorghum bicolor tipo guinea, Canavalia brasiliensis, Sorghum bicolor, Crotalaria juncea, Pennisetum glaucum e uma testemunha mantida no "limpo", enquanto as subparcelas por doses de nitrogênio em cobertura (0, 25, 50 e 75 kg ha-1 de N, utilizando-se como fonte a uréia. Menores danos e severidade da geada foram constatados em plantas de feijão cultivadas após as espécies Canavalia brasiliensis e Crotalaria juncea, devido à menor quantidade de massa seca residual em relação à das culturas de gramíneas. Produtividades superiores de grãos de feijoeiro após geada foram obtidas na sucessão com Crotalária juncea e C. brasiliensis e com a aplicação de doses entre 44,5 e 52,0 kg ha-1 de N, em cobertura.The objective this work was verify the effect of frost in development of common bean in experimentation succession cover crops and nitrogen fertilization. The experimental design used was the randomized blocks in split-plot design, with four replications. The plots were represented by species Sorghum bicolor guinea type, Canavalia brasiliensis, Sorghum bicolor, Crotalaria juncea, Pennisetum glaucum and witness maintained "clean"; the sub parcels by doses of nitrogen applied in topdressing (0, 25, 50, and 75 kg ha-1 of N, being used urea as source of N. Less damages and severity of the frost were observed in bean plants grown after the species Canavalia brasiliensis and Crotalaria juncea, due to the least amount of residual dry mass in relation to the grasses crop. Higher yields of common bean after the frost were obtained with Crotalaria juncea and Canavalia brasiliensis and with application of doses

  7. Successful introgression of abiotic stress tolerance from wild tepary bean to common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production is severely limited due to abiotic stresses, including drought and sub-zero temperatures. Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius Gray), a relative of common bean, has demonstrated tolerance to these stresses. Preliminary studies screening tepary accessions ...

  8. Effect of cover crops on common bean yield and soil physical properties under no-till system - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v34i4.11989

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    Edleusa Pereira Seidel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate dry matter production of cover crops (oats, turnip, vetch and spontaneous plants and their effect on bean yield and physical properties of soil after succession. The experimental design was randomized blocks, and treatments consisted of four species of cover crops: oat, turnip, vetch and spontaneous plants, with five replications. The cover crops were sown in winter; when in full bloom, they were cut close to the ground and left underground. The bean crop was then sown underneath this residue in a no-till system. The results show that the cover crop that yielded the most dry matter was oats with 4,900 kg ha-1, which did not differ statistically from turnip with a yield of 4,000 kg ha-1. The spontaneous plants produced the least amount of dry matter and differed from the other treatments. The development of vetch was hampered by the environmental conditions of Marechal Cândido Rondon, State of Paraná, with dry matter yield of 2,375 kg ha-1. The highest bean yield (1,204 kg ha-1 was found for the planting carried out in succession to oat, and the lowest after succession of vetch (697 kg ha-1 and spontaneous plants (575 kg ha-1. Cover crops had no effect on macroporosity and total porosity of soil depth from 0.05 to 0.20 m. There was a statistical difference in soil bulk density in the layer from 0.05 to 0.10 m, and bulk density (1.18 kg dm-3 was obtained in the treatment where the bean crop was cultivated after spontaneous plants.

  9. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kathleen; Singh, Jugpreet; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A; Cannon, Steven B

    2016-08-11

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. The molecular responses in Phaseolus to BCMV infection have not yet been well characterized. We report the transcriptional responses of a widely susceptible variety of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar 'Stringless green refugee') to two BCMV strains, in a time-course experiment. We also report the genome sequence of a previously unreported BCMV strain. The interaction with the known strain NL1-Iowa causes moderate symptoms and large transcriptional responses, and the newly identified strain (Strain 2 or S2) causes severe symptoms and moderate transcriptional responses. The transcriptional profiles of host plants infected with the two isolates are distinct, and involve numerous differences in splice forms in particular genes, and pathway specific expression patterns. We identified differential host transcriptome response after infection of two different strains of Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Virus infection initiated a suite of changes in gene expression level and patterns in the host plants. Pathways related to defense, gene regulation, metabolic processes, photosynthesis were specifically altered after virus infection. Results presented in this study can increase the understanding of host-pathogen interactions and provide resources for further investigations of the biological mechanisms in BCMV infection and defense.

  10. Use of Wild Relatives and Closely Related Species to Adapt Common Bean to Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Kelly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is an important legume crop worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stress limits bean yields to <600 kg ha−1 in low-income countries. Current low yields result in food insecurity, while demands for increased yields to match the rate of population growth combined with the threat of climate change are significant. Novel and significant advances in genetic improvement using untapped genetic diversity available in crop wild relatives and closely related species must be further explored. A meeting was organized by the Global Crop Diversity Trust to consider strategies for common bean improvement. This review resulted from that meeting and considers our current understanding of the genetic resources available for common bean improvement and the progress that has been achieved thus far through introgression of genetic diversity from wild relatives of common bean, and from closely related species, including: P. acutifolius, P. coccineus, P. costaricensis and P. dumosus. Newly developed genomic tools and their potential applications are presented. A broad outline of research for use of these genetic resources for common bean improvement in a ten-year multi-disciplinary effort is presented.

  11. Benefits of inoculation, P fertilizer and manure on yields of common bean and soybean also increase yield of subsequent maize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurangwa, Edouard; Vanlauwe, Bernard; Giller, Ken E.

    2017-01-01

    Common bean and soybean yield poorly on smallholder farms in Rwanda. We evaluated the benefits of inoculation combined with P fertilizer and manure on yields of common bean and soybean in three agro-ecological zones (AEZs), and their residual effects on a subsequent maize crop. In the first season,

  12. Variability of Colletotrichum spp in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, S F; Barcelos, Q L; Dias, M A; Souza, E A

    2016-04-07

    The Colletotrichum genus presents large genetic variability, as demonstrated by the occurrence of several pathogenic races and phenotypic traits. The objective of this study was to characterize 22 strains of C. lindemuthianum and Colletotrichum spp recovered from anthracnose lesions and bean scab, and to verify the relationship between species of the Colletotrichum genus, which inhabit anthracnose and scab lesions. Colony morphology, conidium size, the presence of septa, germination, sporulation, and mycelium growth rates, were analyzed in addition to the presence of mating-type genes, IRAP markers, and pathogenicity. Strains of Colletotrichum spp presented wide variation for all evaluated traits, indicating the presence of different species. Pathogenicity tests verified that the severity of the disease caused by strains of Colletotrichum spp must be evaluated 17 days after inoculation. Molecular analysis showed that only the C. lindemuthianum strains were grouped by the IRAP markers. For the physiological traits, we observed that C. lindemuthianum mycelium growth is slower than that of Colletotrichum spp strains. The information generated in this study confirms variability in the evaluated species of Colletotrichum and may direct future basic and applied studies aiming to control these diseases in common bean.

  13. Adubação nitrogenada no feijoeiro em sistema de semeadura direta e preparo convencional do solo = Nitrogen fertilization in common bean crops under no-tillage and conventional systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Guilhien Gomes Junior

    2008-12-01

    . The experiment was conducted over two years (2002 and 2003 in no-tillage onmillet crop residues and conventional plow system. It was concluded that N fertilizer at the V4 stadium of common bean promotes similar seed yields in no-tillage and conventional systems. Yield differences between no-tillage and conventional systems are inconsistent inthe same agricultural area.

  14. Resposta da cultura do feijoeiro à adubação nitrogenada e à inoculação com rizóbio Response of common bean crop to nitrogen fertilization and rhizobium inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Pelegrin

    2009-02-01

    -1 de N e superior ao tratamento com a adubação de 20 kg ha-1 de N sem inoculação, evidenciando a sua importância para obtenção de maior rentabilidade na cultura do feijoeiro.Adequate management of nitrogen fertilizer is one of the main difficulties on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop. However, the biological N2 fixation is an alternative source of N supply to this crop. This study had the purpose to evaluate the response of common bean to rhizobium inoculation and split application of N fertilizer in terms of plant nodulation and grain yield. Besides, this study aimed to evaluate the economic viability of using N fertilizer application and/or rhizobium inoculation on the plants. The experiment was carried out on a typic Haplustox in Dourados, Mato Grosso do Sul State. The experimental design was a completely randomized block with six replications. The seven treatments consisted of different levels of N fertilizer (0, 20, 40, 80, and 160 kg ha-1 N as urea applied to common bean, cultivar Pérola, and control treatments with R. tropici inoculation with or without application of 20 kg ha-1 N. In the economic analysis, the cost of urea, broadcast application, and cost of inoculant were taken into account. No other costs were considered since the treatments did not differ. Increases in grain yield, production cost, net and gross income, in relation to the control without inoculation and without nitrogen were obtained. The effect of inoculation of selected rhizobia on bean grain yield was similar to the application of 80 kg ha-1 N. When supplied with 20 kg ha-1 N at sowing, rhizobium inoculation increased grain yield and net income similarly to the application of 160 kg ha-1 N and more than the treatment of 20 kg ha-1 N without inoculant, which demonstrates the importance of the inoculant for an enhanced crop profitability.

  15. IRON, ZINC, AND FERRITIN ACCUMULATION IN COMMON BEANS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urbanski, Dorian Fabian; Sørensen, Kirsten; Jurkiewicz, Anna Malgorzata

      that the distribution of iron is dependant on the genotype. Using immunolocalization, we visualized the localization of  ferritin in mature common bean seeds.   This knowledge can contribute to the discovery of factors that affect the bioavailability of micronutrients and  can contribute to breeding common beans...

  16. Prediction of seed-yield potential of common bean populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela de Fátima Barbosa Abreu

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Earliest possible prediction of seed-yield potential of autogamous crop populations increases breeding program efficiency by saving time and resources. Alternatives for obtaining seed-yield predictions were compared by evaluating four common-bean populations in F1 and F2 generations together with the parents. Mean components (m + a' and d and variances were estimated. The potential of each population was predicted by using both these and the Jinks and Pooni (1976 procedure, which allows probability estimation of each population of originating lines surpassing a determined standard. Estimate efficiency was determined by evaluating performances of 62 F5:7 families from each population. Mean component m + a' estimates obtained for the F1 and F2 generations proved efficient in predicting seed yield of F7 generation lines as did d for estimate variance among F7 generation families. In addition, the Jinks and Pooni (1976 procedure proved efficient in early prediction of common bean population genetic potentials, especially when using the m + a' estimate.

  17. Manejo de irrigação e fertilização nitrogenada para o feijoeiro na região dos cerrados Irrigation timing and nitrogen fertilization for common bean crop in the cerrado region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANTÔNIO FERNANDO GUERRA

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi desenvolvido na área experimental da Embrapa-Centro de Pesquisa Agropecuária dos Cerrados (CPAC com o objetivo de estudar os efeitos de diferentes regimes hídricos e de diferentes doses de N sobre a produtividade e componentes de produção de feijão Pérola (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivado após o milho, na região de cerrado. As aplicações de água foram feitas quando a tensão de água no solo, medida a 10 cm de profundidade, atingia valores de 41, 55, 75 e 300 kPa. As doses de N testadas foram: 0, 40, 80 e 160 kg/ha. As doses foram parceladas em duas aplicações, a saber: a metade, aplicada por ocasião da emergência das plântulas, e o restante, no início do estádio de florescimento da cultura. A máxima produtividade foi obtida com as irrigações quando a tensão de água no solo era de 41 kPa, medida a 10 cm de profundidade. As doses de N que propiciaram as máximas produtividades variaram com a tensão de água no solo utilizada para o controle da irrigação. A quantidade de água aplicada para uma produtividade superior a 4.800 kg/ha foi em torno de 450 mm. O valor da relação entre a produtividade e a lâmina de água aplicada aumentou com o aumento da tensão de água no solo e das doses de N.This study was carried out in the experimental field of the Embrapa-Centro de Pesquisa Agropecuária dos Cerrados (CPAC to determine the irrigation timing and the nitrogen amounts for common bean crop (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivated after corn, in the cerrado region. Water was applied when soil-water tension, measured at a depth of 10 cm reached values of 41, 55, 75 and 300 kPa. The nitrogen doses were splited in two applications. Half doses was applied just after germination and the other half at the initial flowering stage. The highest yield was obtained with irrigation at 41 kPa, measured at a depth of 10 cm. In relation to nitrogen doses, maximum yield was attained with variable soil water tension value used

  18. Common bean: a legume model on the rise for unraveling responses and adaptations to iron, zinc and phosphate deficiencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma A Castro Guerrero

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris was domesticated ~8000 years ago in the Americas and today is a staple food worldwide. Besides caloric intake, common bean is also an important source of protein and micronutrients and it is widely appreciated in developing countries for their affordability (compared to animal protein and its long storage life. As a legume, common bean also has the economic and environmental benefit of associating with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, thus reducing the use of synthetic fertilizers, which is key for sustainable agriculture. Despite significant advances in the plant nutrition field, the mechanisms underlying the adaptation of common bean to low nutrient input remains largely unknown. The recent release of the common bean genome offers, for the first time, the possibility of applying techniques and approaches that have been exclusive to model plants to study the adaptive responses of common bean to challenging environments. In this review, we discuss the hallmarks of common bean domestication and subsequent distribution around the globe. We also discuss recent advances in phosphate, iron, and zinc homeostasis, as these nutrients often limit plant growth, development and yield. In addition, iron and zinc are major targets of crop biofortification to improve human nutrition. Developing common bean varieties able to thrive under nutrient limiting conditions will have a major impact on human nutrition, particularly in countries where dry beans are the main source of carbohydrates, protein and minerals.

  19. Drought tolerance in wild plant populations: the case of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés, Andrés J; Monserrate, Fredy A; Ramírez-Villegas, Julián; Madriñán, Santiago; Blair, Matthew W

    2013-01-01

    Reliable estimations of drought tolerance in wild plant populations have proved to be challenging and more accessible alternatives are desirable. With that in mind, an ecological diversity study was conducted based on the geographical origin of 104 wild common bean accessions to estimate drought tolerance in their natural habitats. Our wild population sample covered a range of mesic to very dry habitats from Mexico to Argentina. Two potential evapotranspiration models that considered the effects of temperature and radiation were coupled with the precipitation regimes of the last fifty years for each collection site based on geographical information system analysis. We found that wild accessions were distributed among different precipitation regimes following a latitudinal gradient and that habitat ecological diversity of the collection sites was associated with natural sub-populations. We also detected a broader geographic distribution of wild beans across ecologies compared to cultivated common beans in a reference collection of 297 cultivars. Habitat drought stress index based on the Thornthwaite potential evapotranspiration model was equivalent to the Hamon estimator. Both ecological drought stress indexes would be useful together with population structure for the genealogical analysis of gene families in common bean, for genome-wide genetic-environmental associations, and for postulating the evolutionary history and diversification processes that have occurred for the species. Finally, we propose that wild common bean should be taken into account to exploit variation for drought tolerance in cultivated common bean which is generally considered susceptible as a crop to drought stress.

  20. Drought tolerance in wild plant populations: the case of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés J Cortés

    Full Text Available Reliable estimations of drought tolerance in wild plant populations have proved to be challenging and more accessible alternatives are desirable. With that in mind, an ecological diversity study was conducted based on the geographical origin of 104 wild common bean accessions to estimate drought tolerance in their natural habitats. Our wild population sample covered a range of mesic to very dry habitats from Mexico to Argentina. Two potential evapotranspiration models that considered the effects of temperature and radiation were coupled with the precipitation regimes of the last fifty years for each collection site based on geographical information system analysis. We found that wild accessions were distributed among different precipitation regimes following a latitudinal gradient and that habitat ecological diversity of the collection sites was associated with natural sub-populations. We also detected a broader geographic distribution of wild beans across ecologies compared to cultivated common beans in a reference collection of 297 cultivars. Habitat drought stress index based on the Thornthwaite potential evapotranspiration model was equivalent to the Hamon estimator. Both ecological drought stress indexes would be useful together with population structure for the genealogical analysis of gene families in common bean, for genome-wide genetic-environmental associations, and for postulating the evolutionary history and diversification processes that have occurred for the species. Finally, we propose that wild common bean should be taken into account to exploit variation for drought tolerance in cultivated common bean which is generally considered susceptible as a crop to drought stress.

  1. Soybean rust resistance sources and inheritance in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, T L P O; Dessaune, S N; Moreira, M A; Barros, E G

    2014-07-25

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been reported in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars and elite lines that were infected under controlled and natural field conditions in South Africa, the United States, Argentina, and Brazil. Although SBR is currently not a top priority problem for the common bean crop, many bean breeders are concerned about this disease because of the high severity and virulence diversity of P. pachyrhizi and its broad host range. In this study, a set of 44 P. vulgaris genotypes were tested for resistance to P. pachyrhizi; these genotypes included resistance sources to several fungal common bean diseases, carioca-, black- and red-seeded Brazilian cultivars, and elite lines that were developed by the main common bean breeding programs in Brazil. Twenty-four SBR resistance sources were identified. They presented the reddish-brown (RB) lesion type, characterizing resistance reactions. In addition to the RB lesion type, the PI181996 line presented the lowest disease severity mean score, considering its associated standard error value. For this reason, it was crossed with susceptible lines to study the inheritance of resistance. The results support the hypothesis that resistance to SBR in PI181996 is monogenic and dominant. We propose that this SBR resistance gene, the first to be identified and characterized in common bean, might be designated as Pkp-1.

  2. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) response to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Gold. (Mph), is an endemic disease in the prevailing hot and dry conditions in southern Puerto Rico. This study evaluated the 120 bean genotypes that compose the BASE 120 panel under screenhouse conditio...

  3. Selection of common bean to broad environmental adaptation in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars in Haiti need adaptation to a broad range of environments and resistance to the most important diseases such as Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus. The Legume Breeding Program (LBP), a collaborative effort of the AREA project (USAID funded through IFAS/Univ...

  4. The genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-07-16

    Jul 16, 2014 ... variation and, hence, restricting the amount of adapted genetic diversity ... the phenotypic diversity of common bean in Uganda. The selection ... The place of collection/origin was also consi- dered in ..... Bean Research and Development Programs at NaCRRI and CIAT .... Evolution 92:1101-1104. Kami JA ...

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome sequence of the common bean anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Pablo; Alzate, Juan; Yepes, Mauricio Salazar; Marín, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is the causal agent of anthracnose in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), one of the most limiting factors for this crop in South and Central America. In this work, the mitochondrial sequence of a Colombian isolate of C. lindemuthianum obtained from a common bean plant (var. Cargamanto) with anthracnose symptoms is presented. The mtDNA codes for 13 proteins of the respiratory chain, 1 ribosomal protein, 2 homing endonucleases, 2 ribosomal RNAs and 28 tRNAs. This is the first report of a complete mtDNA genome sequence from C. lindemuthianum.

  6. Phenotypic Diversity among Croatian Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Landraces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Monika Vidak; Sara Malešević; Martina Grdiša; Zlatko Šatović; Boris Lazarević; Klaudija Carović-Stanko

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity among Croatian common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces was assessed by analysing 12 qualitative and six quantitative traits in 338 accessions collected from all production areas in Croatia...

  7. Breeding for culinary and nutritional quality of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in intercropping systems with maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodino A.P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is widely intercropped with maize (Zea mays L. in the North of Spain. Breeding beans for multiple cropping systems is important for the development of a productive and sustainable agriculture, and is mainly oriented to minimize intercrop competition and to stabilize complementarity with maize. Most agricultural research on intercropping to date has focused on the agronomic and overall yield effects of the different species, but characters related with socio-economic and food quality aspects are also important. The effect of intercropping beans with maize on food seed quality traits was studied for thirty-five bush bean varieties under different environments in Galicia (Northwestern Spain. Parameters determining Asturian (Northern Spain white bean commercial and culinary quality have also been evaluated in fifteen accessions. There are significant differences between varieties in the selected cropping systems (sole crop, intercrop with field maize and intercrop with sweet maize for dry and soaked seed weight, coat proportion, crude protein, crude fat and moisture. Different white bean accessions have been chosen according to their culinary quality. Under these environmental conditions it appears that intercropping systems with sweet maize give higher returns than sole cropping system. It is also suggested that the culinary and nutritional quality potential of some white bean accessions could be the base material in a breeding programme the objectives of which are to develop varieties giving seeds with high food quality.

  8. Genome-wide identification and characterization of aquaporin gene family in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Andrea; Gepts, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Plant aquaporins are a large and diverse family of water channel proteins that are essential for several physiological processes in living organisms. Numerous studies have linked plant aquaporins with a plethora of processes, such as nutrient acquisition, CO2 transport, plant growth and development, and response to abiotic stresses. However, little is known about this protein family in common bean. Here, we present a genome-wide identification of the aquaporin gene family in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a legume crop essential for human nutrition. We identified 41 full-length coding aquaporin sequences in the common bean genome, divided by phylogenetic analysis into five sub-families (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, SIPs and XIPs). Residues determining substrate specificity of aquaporins (i.e., NPA motifs and ar/R selectivity filter) seem conserved between common bean and other plant species, allowing inference of substrate specificity for these proteins. Thanks to the availability of RNA-sequencing datasets, expression levels in different organs and in leaves of wild and domesticated bean accessions were evaluated. Three aquaporins (PvTIP1;1, PvPIP2;4 and PvPIP1;2) have the overall highest mean expressions, with PvTIP1;1 having the highest expression among all aquaporins. We performed an EST database mining to identify drought-responsive aquaporins in common bean. This analysis showed a significant increase in expression for PvTIP1;1 in drought stress conditions compared to well-watered environments. The pivotal role suggested for PvTIP1;1 in regulating water homeostasis and drought stress response in the common bean should be verified by further field experimentation under drought stress.

  9. Complete genome sequence of bean leaf crumple virus, a novel begomovirus infecting common bean in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Yepes, Monica; Zambrano, Leidy; Bueno, Juan M; Raatz, Bodo; Cuellar, Wilmer J

    2017-02-10

    A copy of the complete genome of a novel bipartite begomovirus infecting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia was obtained by rolling-circle amplification (RCA), cloned, and sequenced. The virus is associated with leaf crumple symptoms and significant yield losses in Andean and Mesoamerican beans. Such symptoms have been reported increasingly in Colombia since at least 2002, and we detected the virus in leaf material collected since 2008. Sequence analysis showed that the virus is a member of a distinct species, sharing 81% and 76% nucleotide (nt) sequence identity (in DNA-A and DNA-B, respectively) to other begomoviruses infecting common bean in the Americas. The data obtained support the taxonomic status of this virus (putatively named 'bean leaf crumple virus', BLCrV) as a member of a novel species in the genus Begomovirus.

  10. Populational survey of arthropods on transgenic common bean expressing the rep gene from Bean golden mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Patrícia V; Quintela, Eliane D; Junqueira, Ana Maria R; Aragão, Francisco J L; Faria, Josias C

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops is considered the fastest adopted crop technology in the history of modern agriculture. However, possible undesirable and unintended effects must be considered during the research steps toward development of a commercial product. In this report we evaluated effects of a common bean virus resistant line on arthropod populations, considered as non-target organisms. This GM bean line (named M1/4) was modified for resistance against Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV) by expressing a mutated REP protein, which is essential for virus replication. Biosafety studies were performed for a period of three years under field conditions. The abundance of some species was significantly higher in specific treatments in a particular year, but not consistently different in other years. A regular pattern was not observed in the distribution of insects between genetically modified and conventional treatments. Data analyses showed that minor differences observed can be attributed to random variation and were not consistent enough to conclude that the treatments were different. Therefore the present study indicates that the relative abundance of species are similar in transgenic and non-transgenic fields.

  11. Nutritional characteristics of biofortified common beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Brigide

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Iron and zinc deficiency can cause anemia and alterations in the immune response and impair work capacity. To minimize this problem, biofortification has been developed to improve and/or maintain the nutritional status of the population. Beans are an important source of carbohydrates, proteins, and minerals. The objective of this study is to characterize biofortified beans, quantify the minerals in different cultivars, and determine mineral dialysis. Grains of raw and cooked beans were analyzed for moisture, protein, lipids, fiber, minerals, and in vitro availability using four treatments and one control. The data were analyzed using ANOVA, and the Tukey test (p<0.05. The chemical composition of the raw and cooked treatments showed a moisture content ranging from 13.4 to 81.4%, protein from 22.24 to 31.59%, lipids from 1.66 to 2.22%, fiber from 16.81 to 40.63%, carbohydrates from 27.80 to 34.78%, and ash from 4.1 to 4.82%. Different varieties of beans showed statistically significant differences in iron and zinc content compared to the control cultivar (Pérola. The iron content differed significantly from that of the Pérola cultivar in the raw treatment, while in the cooked treatment, the control cultivar did not differ from the Piratã. The same behavior was observed for the zinc content in both treatments. There was no significant difference between the cultivars in the treatments in terms of the content of the dialysis of Calcium (Ca, Iron (Fe, Magnesium (Mg, and Zinc (Zn.

  12. Physical and chemical characteristics of common bean varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio de Barros

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is one of the most widely consumed legumes in the world, but nevertheless different varieties vary with respect to their physical and chemical aspects. This study evaluated the physical and chemical characteristics (color, hardness after cooking, water absorption capacity, cooking time, integrity of the beans after cooking, proximate composition and mineral composition of the following varieties of the common bean: Carioca, IAPAR 81, Saracura, Juriti, Pérola, Colibri and IAPAR 31, all destined for both the internal Brazilian and external markets. The varieties studied had different proximate compositions and contents of the following minerals: K, Ca, N, Mg, S, Cu, Fe and Mn; but identical contents of P, Zn and B. The beans were classified as small in size. The Carioca variety showed the lowest values for L* (41.29 and H* (57.22, and the highest values for a* (12.17, its beans being redder and darker than the others. The Saracura variety showed the lowest degree of hydration (95.70 g/100g, cooking time (22.67 min. and whole beans after cooking (30%, while the Pérola variety showed the highest values for these same parameters, 106.77 g/100g, 43.67 min. and 82.16%, respectively. No correlation was observed between the calcium and magnesium contents of the beans and the hardness of the raw bean, degree of hydration during maceration, cooking time and integrity of the cooked beans. According to the characteristics studied, the Saracura variety is a good option for both industrial and domestic use.

  13. Fertilization management in bean crop under organic production system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Barradas Pereira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the food production systems tend to include the sustainable management of soil and water. One of the main obstacles to the organic cultivation of common bean is the fertilization management. This study aimed to evaluate doses of organic fertilizer containing slaughterhouse residues (1.0 t ha-1, 1.5 t ha-1, 2.0 t ha-1 and 2.5 t ha-1. The experimental design was randomized blocks in a 4x2x2 factorial scheme, with 16 treatments and 4 replications. Plant dry weight; foliar diagnose; initial and final plant population; number of pods per plant, grains per plant and grains per pod; 1000-grain weight; and grain yield were evaluated. It was concluded that the methods and time of organic fertilizer application do not affect the production components and yield in common bean. The dose of 2.5 t ha-1 of organic fertilizer provided the highest common bean yield in 2012, but it did not express its maximum production capacity.

  14. Effect of swine residue rates on corn, common bean, soybean and wheat yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laércio Ricardo Sartor

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Swine residue (SR applied as nutrient source of crops such as corn, bean, soybean and wheat, besides representing an environmental-friendly way of disposing of organic waste resulting from swine production, may significantly increase grain yields, replacing mineral fertilizer. The objective was to evaluate the effect of SR rates on corn, common bean, soybean and wheat yields from 2002 to 2007, in comparison with mineral fertilizer. The experiment was carried out at the Instituto Agronômico do Paraná - IAPAR, Pato Branco, PR and consisted of increasing SR rates (0, 15, 30, 45, and 60 m³ ha-1 and one treatment with mineral fertilizer (NPK 4-30-10, using 250 kg ha-1 for bean and 300 kg ha-1 for corn, soybean and wheat. Also, in the treatment with mineral fertilizer, 60, 120 and 90 kg ha-1 N was applied as topdressing to bean, corn and wheat, respectively. There were significant increases of grain yield in all evaluated years and crops with increasing SR rates, especially in the grass species under study. Also, with increasing SR rates applied every six months, K, P, Ca and Mg were accumulated in the soil and the pH increased. The application of 60 m³ ha-1 SR increased yields and exceeded the yield obtained with the recommended mineral fertilizer, indicating this amount as adequate for these crops.

  15. Reaction of common bean lines and aggressiveness of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, P H; Santos, J B; Lima, I A; Lara, L A C; Alves, F C

    2014-11-07

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the reaction of common bean lines to white mold, the aggressiveness of different Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates from various common bean production areas in Brazil, and comparison of the diallel and GGE (genotype main effect plus genotype-by-environment interaction) biplot analysis procedures via study of the line-by-isolate interaction. Eleven common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lines derived from 3 backcross populations were used. Field experiments were performed in the experimental area of the Departamento de Biologia of the Universidade Federal de Lavras, Lavras, MG, Brazil, in the 2011 and 2012 dry crop season and 2011 winter crop season through a randomized block design with 3 replications. This study was also set up in a greenhouse. Inoculations were performed 28 days after sowing by means of the straw test method. The reaction of the bean lines to white mold was assessed according to a diagrammatic scale from 1 (plant without symptoms) to 9 (dead plant). Estimations of general reaction capacity (lines) and general aggressiveness capacity (isolates) indicated different horizontal levels of resistance in the lines and levels of aggressiveness in the isolates. Therefore, it was possible to select more resistant lines and foresee those crosses that are the most promising for increasing the level of resistance. It was also possible to identify the most aggressive isolates that were more efficient in distinguishing the lines. Both diallel and GGE biplot analyses were useful in identifying the genotypic values of lines and isolates.

  16. Biological control of white mold by Trichoderma harzianum in common bean under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Diego Costa Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The objective of this work was to evaluate Trichoderma harzianum isolates for biological control of white mold in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. Five isolates were evaluated for biocontrol of white mold in 'Perola' common bean under field conditions, in the 2009 and 2010 crop seasons. A commercial isolate (1306 and a control treatment were included. Foliar applications at 2x109 conidia mL-1 were performed at 42 and 52 days after sowing (DAS, in 2009, and at 52 DAS in 2010. The CEN287, CEN316, and 1306 isolates decreased the number of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum apothecia per square meter in comparison to the control, in both crop seasons. CEN287, CEN316, and 1306 decreased white mold severity during the experimental period, when compared to the control.

  17. Proteomic analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The modern cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) has evolved from wild common beans distributed in Central America, Mexico and the Andean region of South America. It has been reported that wild common bean accessions have higher levels of protein content than the domesticated dry bean cultiva...

  18. Capture and utilization of solar radiation by the soybean and common bean crops and by weeds; Captacao e aproveitamento da radiacao solar pelas culturas da soja e do feijao e por plantas daninhas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Jose Barbosa dos; Procopio, Sergio de Oliveira; Silva, Antonio Alberto da [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). FItotecnia; Costa, Luiz Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), 36571-000, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Agricola

    2003-07-01

    Aiming to develop techniques for the establishment of a Weed Integrated Management Program, the performance of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) and of weeds Bidens pilosa L., Euphorbia heterophylla L. (two biotypes), sensitive and resistant to ALS inhibitor - herbicides and [ Desmodium tortuosum (SW.) DC.], was evaluated in relation to their efficiency in capturing and utilizing solar radiation.The following indices were calculated: total dry biomass production rate (Ct), leaf dry biomass production rate (Cf), radiation efficient use (x), net assimilation rate (EA), specific leaf area (SA), leaf area index (L), leaf matter ratio (FW) and leaf area ratio (FA). No difference was observed for all characteristics evaluated among E. heterophylla biotypes. Soybean showed the highest rate of total dry biomass production along its cycle and also the highest leaf area index, indicating its greater capacity in capturing light and providing shade to competitive plants. Especially after flowering, common bean was the most efficient in draining its photoassimilates for leaf formation. Soybean showed greater efficiency in converting radiation intercepted in the biomass. (author)

  19. Potencial de uso dos herbicidas chlorimuron-ethyl, imazethapyr e cloransulam-methyl na cultura do feijão Potential use of chlorimuron-ethyl, imazethapyr and cloransulam-methyl in common bean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O. Procopio

    2009-06-01

    ão.This study aimed to evaluate the selectivity of the herbicides chlorimuron-ethyl, imazethapyr and cloransulam-methyl when applied in association with fomesafen on ten common bean cultivars. The experiment was carried out in Rio Verde-Goias during the growing season of 2005/2006, in a completely randomized block design, with three replicates, in split-plots. The herbicide treatments [fomesafen (225 g ha-1 , fomesafen (225 g ha-1 + chlorimuron-ethyl (7.5 g ha-1 , fomesafen (225 g ha-1 + imazethapyr (50 g ha-1 , fomesafen (225 g ha-1 + cloransulam-methyl (30.24 g ha-1 , and control without herbicide] were tested in the plots and the cultivars (BRS Grafite, BRS Horizonte, Pérola, BRS Pitanga, BRS Pontal, BRS Requinte, BRS Supremo, BRS Timbó, BRS Valente and BRS Vereda, in the split-plots. The plots were kept hoed to avoid weed interference. All treatments caused phytotoxicity to the cultivars, but the treatment with chlorimuron-ethyl showed more severe symptoms. This same treatment also resulted in greater reduction of plant height, shoot dry matter and an extended maturation cycle. The sole application of fomesafen caused a decrease in grain productivity of BRS Timbó, and BRS Vereda. When fomesafen was applied in a mixture with imazethapyr, a decrease in grain productivity was observed for the cultivars BRS Timbó, BRS Vereda, and BRS Supremo. Cloransulam-methyl addition led to a productivity reduction of these three cultivars and BRS Requinte, as well. The productivity of Pérola, BRS Pitanga, BRS Pontal, and BRS Valente cultivars was not affected by the application of chlorimuron-ethyl + fomesafen. Imazethapyr presented potential to be used in common bean crop.

  20. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes regi...

  1. Identification of Discriminant Factors after Exposure of Maize and Common Bean Plantlets to Abiotic Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro HERNÁNDEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adverse environmental conditions limit crop yield and better understanding of plant response to stress will assist the development of more tolerant cultivars. Maize and common bean plantlets were evaluated under salinity, high temperature, drought and waterlogged conditions to identify biochemical markers which could be useful for rapid identification of putative stress tolerant plants. The levels of phenolics (free, cell wall-linked, total, aldehydes including malondialdehyde and chlorophylls (a, b, total were measured on stressed plantlets.  Only two indicators were statistically non-significant:  chlorophyll b in maize plantlets stressed with sodium chloride and malondialdehyde content in drought stressed maize. The most remarkable effects of abiotic stresses can be summarized as follows: (i salinity increased levels of free phenolics in maize plantlets and chlorophylls (a, b, total in common bean; (ii high temperature (40 °C elevated levels of chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize but decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total and free phenolics in common bean; (iii drought increased phenolics and decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize and increased chlorophyll pigments (a, b, total in common bean; (iv waterlogging increased free phenolics and decreased chlorophylls (a, b, total in maize and increased chlorophyll (a, total in common bean. Free phenolics and chlorophylls, especially a, were the most responsive indicators to stress and can, therefore, be considered putative biochemical markers for abiotic stress tolerance in maize and common bean. The use of Fisher’s linear discriminant analysis to differentiate non-stressed and stressed plants in breeding programs is also a novel aspect of this report. Fisher’s linear discriminant functions classified correctly 100% of non-stressed or stressed originally grouped plants.

  2. Evaluation of the reaction oof interspecific hybrids of common bean and tepary bean to Bradyrhizobium y Rhizobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interspecific hybrids between common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., and tepary bean, Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray, have the potential to increase bean production in regions where rainfall is limited. In 2014, an experiment was initiated using a split-plot design. The treatments included inoculation, ...

  3. Establishing the Bases for Introducing the Unexplored Portuguese Common Bean Germplasm into the Breeding World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitão, Susana T; Dinis, Marco; Veloso, Maria M; Šatović, Zlatko; Vaz Patto, Maria C

    2017-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is among the most important grain legumes for human consumption worldwide. Portugal has a potentially promising common bean germplasm, resulting from more than five centuries of natural adaptation and farmers' selection. Nevertheless, limited characterization of this resource hampers its exploitation by breeding programs. To support a more efficient conservation of the national bean germplasm and promote its use in crop improvement, we performed, for the first time, a simultaneous molecular marker (21 microsatellites and a DNA marker for phaseolin-type diversity analysis) and seed and plant morphological characterization (14 traits) of 175 accessions from Portuguese mainland and islands traditional bean-growing regions. A total of 188 different alleles were identified and an average pairwise Cavalli-Sforza and Edwards' chord genetic distance of 0.193 was estimated among accessions. To relate the Portuguese germplasm with the global common bean diversity, 17 wild relatives and representative accessions from the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools were evaluated at the molecular level. No correlation was detected between the variability found and the geographic origin of accessions. Structure analysis divided the collection into three main clusters. Most of the Portuguese accessions grouped with the race representatives and wild relatives from the Andean region. One third of the national germplasm had admixed genetic origin and might represent putative hybrids among gene pools from the two original centers of domestication in the Andes and Mesoamerica. The molecular marker-based classification was largely congruent with the three most frequent phaseolin haplotype patterns observed in the accessions analyzed. Seed and plant morphological characterization of 150 Portuguese common bean accessions revealed a clear separation among genetic structure and phaseolin haplotype groups of accessions, with seed size and shape and the number of

  4. Yam bean oleoresin and seed quality of common bean infested by Acanthoscelides obtectus Say.

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel-Lucio, José Antonio; Juárez-Goiz, José Mayolo; García-Moya, Edmundo; Fernández-Andrés, María Dolores; Rodríguez-Hernández, Cesáreo; Alvarado-Bárcenas, Estéfana

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to evaluate the effect of yam bean oleoresin on common bean seed quality and bean weevil control. The oleoresin extract was obtained by the HPLC technique, the presence of rotenone was detected(15 mg/l). Three concentrations of oleoresin extract were tested (Ci, g/ml): C1 (5x10-7, 5x10-6, …5x10-2); C2 (1x10-2, 2x10-2,…6x10-2); C3 (5x10-1, 6x10-1,…9x10-1) and one control treatment per concentration, applied to recipients of 300 ml with 50 g of common bea...

  5. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-08-05

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability.

  6. Genetic diversity and population structure of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fire7-

    2016-12-28

    Dec 28, 2016 ... markers to assess the genetic diversity within and between common bean landraces, classifying them based on ... since the 1980's from continuous introduction of new ... control genotypes for the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools, ... http://biology.anu.edu.au/GenAlEx/) was used to calculate genetic.

  7. The transcriptome of common bean: more than nodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. We performed next generation sequencing (RNAseq) on five...

  8. A Nomadic Subtelomeric Disease Resistance Gene Cluster in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    The B4 resistance (R)-gene cluster, located in subtelomeric region of chromosome 4, is one of the largest clusters known in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Pv). We sequenced 650 kb spanning this locus and annotated 97 genes, 26 of which correspond to Coiled-coil-Nucleotide-Binding-Site-Leucine-Rich...

  9. Genetic variability for iron and zinc content in common bean lines and interaction with water availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, H S; Del Peloso, M J; Bassinello, P Z; Guimarães, C M; Melo, L C; Faria, L C

    2014-08-28

    The common bean is an important source of iron and zinc in humans. Increases in the contents of these minerals can combat mineral deficiencies, but these contents are influenced by environmental conditions. Thus, the objectives of this study were to investigate the interaction between common bean lines and water availability on iron and zinc contents (CFe and CZn, respectively), identify superior lines with stable CFe and CZn, and test for a genetic relationship between CFe and CZn. Six crop trials were performed using a randomized block design with three replications. The trials were performed during the winter sowing period for three different combinations of year and site in Brazil. For each combination, 53 lines were evaluated across two parallel trials; one trial was irrigated according to the crop requirements, and the other trial operated under a water deficit. Interaction was detected between lines and environments, and between lines and water availability for CFe and CZn. However, some lines exhibited high CFe and CZn in both conditions. Lines G 6492 and G 6490 exhibited high mean values, stability, and adaptability for both minerals. Other lines exhibited high CFe (Xamego) or CZn (Bambuí and Iapar 65). A moderate genetic correlation (0.62) between CFe and CZn was detected. Water availability during the common bean cycle had an effect on CFe and CZn; however, lines with high CFe and CZn in different conditions of water availability and environment were detected.

  10. Quantitative trait loci for rooting pattern traits of common beans grown under drought stress versus non-stress conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asfaw, A.; Blair, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Drought is the major abiotic constraint contributing to yield reduction in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. An increasing scarcity of water in the future will make improving adaptation to drought stress a major objective of most crop breeding efforts. Drought avoidance by increased

  11. Quantitative trait loci for rooting pattern traits of common beans grown under drought stress versus non-stress conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asfaw, A.; Blair, M.W.

    2012-01-01

    Drought is the major abiotic constraint contributing to yield reduction in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. An increasing scarcity of water in the future will make improving adaptation to drought stress a major objective of most crop breeding efforts. Drought avoidance by increased ext

  12. CONTROL OF ANGULAR LEAF SPOT BY USING PROTECTIVE MIXTURES IN IRRIGATED COMMON BEAN UNDER ORGANIC CROPPING SYSTEM CONTROLE DE MANCHA-ANGULAR UTILIZANDO-SE CALDAS FERTIPROTETORAS EM CULTIVO ORGÂNICO DE FEIJOEIRO IRRIGADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Martins de Oliveira

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available

    A field experiment was carried out with the Pérola and BRS Valente cultivars, aiming to evaluate the efficiency of protective mixtures, in two spraying periods, for controlling angular leaf spot caused by Phaeoisariopsis griseola in common bean, under organic cropping system, in the dry season and under irrigation. A randomized complete block design, in a 2x4 factorial scheme, with four replications, was used, in which the first factor was the spraying intervals (15 and 30 days, and the second the protective mixtures (bordeaux, lime sulfur, and a mixture with silicate Rocksil® and control without any mixture. To the Pérola cultivar, the bordeaux mixture provided an increase of 17,7% in grain yield, when compared to the non-sprayed control, reducing significantly the angular leaf spot severity, achieving a control efficiency of 75%, and propitiating a profit of R$ 386.40 ha-1, when applied at each 15 days. To the BRS Valente cultivar, the bordeaux mixture and lime sulfur provided an increase of 25% and 21,8% in grain yield, in comparison to the non-sprayed control, achieving a control efficiency of 62% and a profit of R$ 573.15 ha-1 and R$ 464.10 ha-1, respectively, when applied at each 15 days.

    KEY-WORDS: Phaeoisariopsis griseola; Phaseolus vulgaris; organic agriculture; bordeaux mixture; lime sulfur.

    Annotation and sequence diversity of transposable elements in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eJackson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris is an important legume crop grown and consumed worldwide. With the availability of the common bean genome sequence, the next challenge is to annotate the genome and characterize functional DNA elements. Transposable elements (TEs are the most abundant component of plant genomes and can dramatically affect genome evolution and genetic variation. Thus, it is pivotal to identify TEs in the common bean genome. In this study, we performed a genome-wide transposon annotation in common bean using a combination of homology and sequence structure-based methods. We developed a 2.12-Mb transposon database which includes 791 representative transposon sequences and is available upon request or from www.phytozome.org. Of note, nearly all transposons in the database are previously unrecognized TEs. More than 5,000 transposon-related expressed sequence tags (ESTs were detected which indicates that some transposons may be transcriptionally active. Two Ty1-copia retrotransposon families were found to encode the envelope-like protein which has rarely been identified in plant genomes. Also, we identified an extra open reading frame (ORF termed ORF2 from 15 Ty3-gypsy families that was located between the ORF encoding the retrotransposase and the 3’LTR. The ORF2 was in opposite transcriptional orientation to retrotransposase. Sequence homology searches and phylogenetic analysis suggested that the ORF2 may have an ancient origin, but its function is not clear. This transposon data provides a useful resource for understanding the genome organization and evolution and may be used to identify active TEs for developing transposon-tagging system in common bean and other related genomes.

  13. Economic Viability of Small Scale Organic Production of Rice, Common Bean and Maize in Goias State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcido Elenor Wander

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to assess the economic feasibility of small scale organic production of rice, common bean and maize in Goias State, Brazil. During 2004/05 and 2005/06 growing seasons, rice, common bean and maize were produced at the organic farm of Embrapa Rice and Beans in five mulching systems (fallow, Crotalaria juncea, Cajanus cajan, Mucuna aterrima and Sorghum bicolor , with and without tillage. Soil tillage consisted of heavy disc harrowing followed by light disc harrowing. All operations and used inputs were recorded. Based on those records, the production costs for each crop were estimated for each cropping season. The costs included operations like sowing, ploughing, harrowing, spraying, fertilizer broadcasting and harvesting, as well as inputs like seeds, inoculant strains of Rhizobium, neem oil and organic fertilizers. The benefits include the gross revenue obtained by multiplying the production amount with the market price for non-organic products. For the purpose of analysis of competitiveness of organic production in comparison to conventional farming the market prices assumed were those of conventional production. In the analysis, the costs of certification were not considered yet due to lack of certifiers in the region. For comparison between traits, net revenue, the benefit-cost-ratio (BCR and the break even point were used. In 2004/05 growing season the BCR varied from 0.27 for common bean on S. bicolor mulch system with tillage up to 4.05 for green harvested maize produced after C. juncea in no tillage system. Common bean and rice were not economically viable in this growing season. In 2005/06 growing season the BCR varied between 0.75 for common bean after S. bicolor in tillage system and 4.50 for green harvested maize produced after fallow in no tillage system. In this season common bean was economically viable in leguminous mulching systems and green harvested maize was viable in all mulching systems.

  14. Development and mapping of SSR markers linked to resistance-gene homologue clusters in common bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luz; Nayibe; Garzon; Matthew; Wohlgemuth; Blair

    2014-01-01

    Common bean is an important but often a disease-susceptible legume crop of temperate,subtropical and tropical regions worldwide. The crop is affected by bacterial, fungal and viral pathogens. The strategy of resistance-gene homologue(RGH) cloning has proven to be an efficient tool for identifying markers and R(resistance) genes associated with resistances to diseases. Microsatellite or SSR markers can be identified by physical association with RGH clones on large-insert DNA clones such as bacterial artificial chromosomes(BACs). Our objectives in this work were to identify RGH-SSR in a BAC library from the Andean genotype G19833 and to test and map any polymorphic markers to identify associations with known positions of disease resistance genes. We developed a set of specific probes designed for clades of common bean RGH genes and then identified positive BAC clones and developed microsatellites from BACs having SSR loci in their end sequences. A total of 629 new RGH-SSRs were identified and named BMr(bean microsatellite RGH-associated markers). A subset of these markers was screened for detecting polymorphism in the genetic mapping population DOR364 × G19833. A genetic map was constructed with a total of 264 markers,among which were 80 RGH loci anchored to single-copy RFLP and SSR markers. Clusters of RGH-SSRs were observed on most of the linkage groups of common bean and in positions associated with R-genes and QTL. The use of these new markers to select for disease resistance is discussed.

  15. Ecotoxicological study of insecticide effects on arthropods in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, Emerson Cristi; Ventura, Hudson Vaner; Gontijo, Pablo Costa; Pereira, Renata Ramos; Picanço, Marcelo Coutinho

    2015-01-01

    Arthropods are an important group of macroorganisms that work to maintain ecosystem health. Despite the agricultural benefits of chemical control against arthropod pests, insecticides can cause environmental damage. We examined the effects of one and two applications of the insecticides chlorfenapyr (0.18 liters a.i. ha-1) and methamidophos (0.45 liters a.i. ha-1), both independently and in combination, on arthropods in plots of common bean. The experiment was repeated for two growing seasons. Principal response curve, richness estimator, and Shannon-Wiener diversity index analyses were performed. The insecticides generally affected the frequency, richness, diversity, and relative abundance of the arthropods. In addition, the arthropods did not experience recovery after the insecticide applications. The results suggest that the insecticide impacts were sufficiently drastic to eliminate many taxa from the studied common bean plots. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  16. Italian Common Bean Landraces: History, Genetic Diversity and Seed Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Piergiovanni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The long tradition of common bean cultivation in Italy has allowed the evolution of many landraces adapted to restricted areas. Nowadays, in response to market demands, old landraces are gradually being replaced by improved cultivars. However, landraces still survive in marginal areas of several Italian regions. Most of them appear severely endangered with risk of extinction due to the advanced age of the farmers and the socio-cultural context where they are cultivated. The present contribution is an overview of the state of the art about the knowledge of Italian common bean germplasm, describing the most important and recent progresses made in its characterization, including genetic diversity and nutritional aspects.

  17. Limitations in controlling white mold on common beans with Trichoderma spp. at the fall-winter season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trazilbo José de Paula Júnior

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the effectiveness of application of Trichoderma spp. in controlling white mold on common beans at the fall-winter crop in the Zona da Mata region of the State of Minas Gerais, Brazil. There was no effect of the antagonist in reducing the disease severity, which could be explained by the low temperatures and the high inoculum pressure in the field. We concluded that Trichoderma applications are not recommended for control of white mold on common beans at the fall-winter season in regions with average temperature bellow 20 °C, since this condition favor more the pathogen than the antagonist.

  18. Response of Maize Crop to Spatial Arrangement and Staggered Interseeding of Haricot Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamiru Hirpa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Field studies conducted to determine the effects of intercrop row arrangements and staggered intercropping of haricot bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. on the performances of maize (Zea mays L. crop at Hallaba and Taba areas in 2013 cropping season, southern Ethiopia, revealed that there were significant effects of cropping patterns and staggered interseeding of the legume component on growth and yield components of maize crop. Significant interaction of row arrangement × intercropping time of haricot bean was observed with respect to leaf area index (LAI of the maize crop. Increasing trends of LAI of maize crop were observed as interseeding of haricot bean was delayed for 3 weeks after maize (WAM that stabilized during the 6 WAM interseeding time. Maize stover production was significantly high at 1:2 row ratio and delaying of the undersowing haricot bean in the already established maize crop for 6 weeks, 10.94 tha-1 and 11.39 t ha-1, respectively. Maize grain yield showed a significant variation with respect to the staggered sowing of haricot bean, whereby the highest (3.99 t ha-1 being recorded when haricot bean intercropping was delayed for 21 days after maize planting. The data of this study revealed that the larger maize plant canopy providing larger photosynthetic area, attained when haricot bean interseeding was delayed, probably resulted in higher grain yield of maize. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v3i3.11072 International Journal of Environment Vol.3(3 2014: 126-138

  19. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF WHOLE GRAINS IN COMMON BEANS LANDRACES AND BREEDING GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Antonio Peripolli Bevilaqua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The common bean has been object of breeding programs aiming the development of new cultivars adapted to varied production system and shown differentiated nutritional characteristics. Due a genetic diversity existent the landraces can be used directly for cropping, for present characteristics desirable. Little information exists about mineral content and other quality traits for those bean landraces. The aim of this paper was to verify the variability for grain nutricional caracters in breeding cultivars and landraces of bean from Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The experiment was conducted in 2009/2010 in Experimental Station Cascata, of Embrapa Temperate Agriculture. In whole grain of 54 bean genotypes with black and no black coat were determined macroelements (nitrogen, phosphorus, potash, calcium, magnesium and sulfur, oligoelements (iron, manganese, zinc and cuprum, protein and ash content, insoluble fiber, digestive nutrient and antioxidant astragalina. The results shown that the landraces varieties presents nutritional composition of macro and oligoelements, fibers, protein and ash contents in whole grain similar than that of breeding lines and cultivars. The black coat grain from breeding programs showed better nutritional quality for macro and oligoelements content than coloured grain, highlighting TB 02-04 e TB 01-01. The landraces with coloured grains TB 02-26, TB 02-24 and TB 03-13 showed the high levels of astragaline.

  1. Nodule senescence and biomass components in common bean cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Fabián Fernández Luqueño; David Espinosa Victoria; Antonio Munive; Langen Corlay Chee; Luis M. Serrano Covarrubias

    2008-01-01

    Most legumes establish mutualistic symbiotic relationships with atmospheric nitrogen-fixing bacteria (rhizobia), giving origin to nodules. Nodules exhibit natural or induced aging which coincides with the drop in nitrogenase activity at the flowering period or at the pod filling stage. In this research, the onset of nodule senescence (NS) was evaluated under greenhouse conditions in five common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars of two growth habits, determined (Type I) and indeterminate ...

  2. Trichoderma spp. decrease Fusarium root rot in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Teixeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of six Trichoderma-based commercial products (TCP in controlling Fusarium root rot (FRR in common bean was assessed under field conditions. Three TCP, used for seed treatment or applied in the furrow, increased seedling emergence as much as the fungicide fludioxonil. FRR incidence was not affected, but all TCP and fludioxonil reduced the disease severity, compared to control. Application of Trichoderma-based products was as effective as that of fludioxonil in FRR management.

  3. Soil physical and microbiological attributes cultivated with the common bean under two management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Adriana De Gennaro

    Full Text Available Agricultural management systems can alter the physical and biological soil quality, interfering with crop development. The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and microbiological attributes of a Red Latosol, and its relationship to the biometric parameters of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, irrigated and grown under two management systems (conventional tillage and direct seeding, in Campinas in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The experimental design was of randomised blocks, with a split-plot arrangement for the management system and soil depth, analysed during the 2006/7 and 2007/8 harvest seasons, with 4 replications. The soil physical and microbiological attributes were evaluated at depths of 0.00-0.05, 0.05-0.10, 0.10-0.20 and 0.20-0.40 m. The following were determined for the crop: density, number of pods per plant, number of beans per pod, thousand seed weight, total weight of the shoots and harvest index. Direct seeding resulted in a lower soil physical quality at a depth of 0.00-0.05 m compared to conventional tillage, while the opposite occurred at a depth of 0.05-0.10 m. The direct seeding showed higher soil biological quality, mainly indicated by the microbial biomass nitrogen, basal respiration and metabolic quotient. The biometric parameters in the bean were higher under the direct seeding compared to conventional tillage.

  4. Two Newly Described Begomoviruses of Macroptilium lathyroides and Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, A M; Hiebert, E; Bird, J; Brown, J K

    2003-07-01

    ABSTRACT Macroptilium lathyroides, a perennial weed in the Caribbean region and Central America, is a host of Macroptilium yellow mosaic Florida virus (MaYMFV) and Macroptilium mosaic Puerto Rico virus (MaMPRV). The genomes of MaYMFV and MaMPRV were cloned from M. lathyroides and/or field-infected bean and the DNA sequences were determined. Cloned A and B components for both viruses were infectious when inoculated to M. lathyroides and common bean. Comparison of the DNA sequences for cloned A and B components with well-studied begomovirus indicated that MaMPRV (bean and M. lathyroides) and MaYMFV (M. lathyroides) are unique, previously undescribed begomo-viruses from the Western Hemisphere. Phylogenetic analysis of viral A components indicated that the closest relative of MaYMFV are members of the Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) group, at 76 to 78% nucleotide identity, whereas the closest relative for the A component of MaMPRV was Rhynchosia golden mosaic virus at 78% nucleotide identity. In contrast, BGYMV is the closest relative for the B component of both MaYMFV and MaMPRV, with which they share approximately 68.0 and approximately 72% identity, respectively. The incongruent taxonomic placement for the bipartite components for MaMPRV indicates that they did not evolve entirely along a common path. MaYMFV and MaMPRV caused distinctive symptoms in bean and M. lathyroides and were transmissible by the whitefly vector and by grafting; however, only MaYMFV was mechanically transmissible. The experimental host range for the two viruses was similar and included species within the families Fabaceae and Malvaceae, but only MaYMFV infected Malva parviflora and soybean. These results collectively indicate that MaMPRV and MaYMFV are new, previously undescribed species of the BGYMV group, a clade previously known to contain only strains and isolates of BGYMV from the Caribbean region that infect Phaseolus spp. Both MaYMFV and MaMPRV may pose an economic threat to

  5. Severity of angular leaf spot and rust diseases on common beans in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    the incidence and severity of ALS in five bean agro-ecologies within Uganda was ... Key words: Common beans, disease management, Phaseolus vulgaris, ... plants has been shown to reduce pest and ... plant nutrition through organic soil.

  6. Characterization and Expression Analysis of Common Bean Histone Deacetylase 6 during Development and Cold Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligaba-Osena, Ayalew; Subramani, Mayavan; Brown, Adrianne; Melmaiee, Kalpalatha; Hossain, Khwaja

    2017-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are important regulators of gene transcription thus controlling multiple cellular processes. Despite its essential role in plants, HDA6 is yet to be validated in common bean. In this study, we show that HDA6 is involved in plant development and stress response. Differential expression of HDA6 was determined in various tissues and the expression was seen to be upregulated with plant age (seedling < flowering < maturity). Higher expression was observed in flowers and pods than in stem, leaf, and root. Upregulation of HDA6 gene during cold stress implies its prominent role in abiotic stress. Furthermore, the HDA6 gene was isolated from three common bean genotypes and sequence analyses revealed homology with functionally characterized homologs in model species. The 53 kDa translated product was detected using an HDA6 specific antibody and recombinant protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli showed HDAC activity in vitro. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the agriculturally important crop common bean describing the functional characterization and biological role of HDA6. PMID:28127547

  7. Classificação taxonômica das estirpes de rizóbio recomendadas para as culturas da soja e do feijoeiro baseada no seqüenciamento do gene 16S rRNA Taxonomic classification of rhizobial strains recommended for soybean and common bean crops in Brazil based on the sequencing of the 16s rRNA gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. O. Chueire

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available As culturas da soja [Glycine max (L. Merrill] e do feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L. são de grande importância econômica e social para o Brasil e ambas podem ter seu requerimento de nitrogênio suprido pela simbiose com bactérias da ordem Rhizobiales. Para garantir a maximização do processo biológico, deve-se proceder à inoculação de estirpes de rizóbio eficientes e competitivas, recomendadas pela pesquisa. No Brasil, foram comercializados, na safra 2001/2002, 14 milhões de doses de inoculantes, dos quais 99 % para as culturas da soja e do feijoeiro. Neste trabalho, determinou-se a posição taxonômica das estirpes utilizadas em inoculantes comerciais para as duas culturas, pelo seqüenciamento da região do DNA que codifica o gene 16S rRNA, que é suficientemente variável, mas carrega as informações necessárias para permitir a análise filogenética de bactérias. O seqüenciamento permitiu definir que duas das estirpes recomendadas para a cultura da soja, SEMIA 587 e SEMIA 5019 (= 29 w, pertencem à espécie Bradyrhizobium elkanii e as duas outras, SEMIA 5079 (=CPAC 15 e SEMIA 5080 (= CPAC 7, à espécie B. japonicum. Determinou-se, ainda, que a estirpe SEMIA 4080 (=PRF 81, recomendada para o cultura do feijoeiro, pertence à espécie Rhizobium tropici. As seqüências obtidas foram depositadas no banco mundial de genes do National Center for Biotechnology Information.Soybean [Glycine max (L. Merrill] and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crops are of economical and social importance in Brazil; their requirement for nitrogen can be supplied by the symbiosis with bacteria belonging to the order Rhizobiales. However, to guarantee the maximization of the biological nitrogen fixation, seeds must be inoculated with efficient and competitive strains of rhizobia recommended by research. In 2001/2002, 14 million doses of inoculant were sold in Brazil, 99 % of these for soybean and common bean crops. In this study the taxonomic

  8. Effects of extrusion cooking on the chemical composition and functional properties of dry common bean powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yongfeng; Cichy, Karen A; Harte, Janice B; Kelly, James D; Ng, Perry K W

    2016-11-15

    The impact of extrusion cooking on the chemical composition and functional properties of bean powders from four common bean varieties was investigated. The raw bean powders were extruded under eight different conditions, and the extrudates were then dried and ground (particle size⩽0.5mm). Compared with corresponding non-extruded (raw) bean powders (particle size⩽0.5mm), the extrusion treatments did not substantially change the protein and starch contents of the bean powders and showed inconsistent effects on the sucrose, raffinose and stachyose contents. The extrusion cooking did cause complete starch gelatinization and protein denaturation of the bean powders and thus changed their pasting properties and solvent-retention capacities. The starch digestibilities of the cooked non-extruded and cooked extruded bean powders were comparable. The extruded bean powders displayed functional properties similar to those of two commercial bean powders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Allelopathic effects of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L. on germination & growth of cucumber, alfalfa, common bean and bread wheat

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    Hamideh BAKHSHAYESHAN-AGDAM

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Allelopathy is one of the important interactions among plants. Weeds can reduce crops productions in farms by their allelopathic effects. Redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L. is the most common weed in Iran with well-known allelopathic potential. In the presented experiment, the allelopathic effects of redroot pigweed on germination and growth of four important crop species including cucumber (Cucumis sativus L., alfalfa (Medicago sativa L., common bean (Phaseulus vulgaris L. and bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. was studied. The effect of different concentrations of redroot pigweed leachate on seed germination and seedlings growth parameters of tested plants was significant, but not same in all studied species. Bread wheat and cucumber were more resistance in seed germination stage in comparison to common bean and alfalfa. Except alfalfa, all plant species showed certain rate of resistance in the most measured parameters. According to the obtained results, bread wheat and common bean were the most resistant species, cucumber was resistant at low concentration but sensitive at high concentration, and alfalfa was the most sensitive species to the redroot pigweed leachate treatments. Therefore, the cultivation of resistant plant species (such as bread wheat and common bean plants in the regions with redroot pigweed’s invasion is appropriate way in management of the farms.

  10. Metabolic engineering of folate and its precursors in Mexican common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Rivera, Naty G; García-Salinas, Carolina; Aragão, Francisco J L; Díaz de la Garza, Rocío Isabel

    2016-10-01

    Folate (vitamin B9) deficiency causes several health problems globally. However, folate biofortification of major staple crops is one alternative that can be used to improve vitamin intakes in populations at risk. We increased the folate levels in common bean by engineering the pteridine branch required for their biosynthesis. GTP cyclohydrolase I from Arabidopsis (AtGchI) was stably introduced into three common bean Pinto cultivars by particle bombardment. Seed-specific overexpression of AtGCHI caused significant increases of up to 150-fold in biosynthetic pteridines in the transformed lines. The pteridine boost enhanced folate levels in raw desiccated seeds by up to threefold (325 μg in a 100 g portion), which would represent 81% of the adult recommended daily allowance. Unexpectedly, the engineering also triggered a general increase in PABA levels, the other folate precursor. This was not observed in previous engineering studies and was probably caused by a feedforward mechanism that remains to be elucidated. Results from this work also show that common bean grains accumulate considerable amounts of oxidized pteridines that might represent products of folate degradation in desiccating seeds. Our study uncovers a probable different regulation of folate homoeostasis in these legume grains than that observed in other engineering works. Legumes are good sources of folates, and this work shows that they can be engineered to accumulate even greater amounts of folate that, when consumed, can improve folate status. Biofortification of common bean with folates and other micronutrients represents a promising strategy to improve the nutritional status of populations around the world. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Common bean breeding to improve red grain lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ângelo Nogueira de Menezes Júnior

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance potential of red bean lines, derived from populations ofthe first cycle of recurrent selection in the common bean breeding program of the Federal University of Viçosa, Minas Gerais. In theF3:5, F3:6 and F3:7 generations, 243 families from 18 segregating populations were evaluated. These families were conducted by thebulk-within-families method and from the best, 154 lines were obtained and evaluated in the dry season of 2006 (F7: 9 and of 2007(F7: 10, Coimbra - MG. The estimates of genetic and phenotypic parameters revealed variability among families. The method bulkwithin F3-derived families proved useful for bean breeding. The most promising lines that may be included in future tests of valuefor cultivation and use (VCU, and will possibly be recommended for planting in the state of Minas Gerais, were derived from thepopulations Vermelhinho/AN9022180//Vermelhinho/Vermelho2157, Vermelhinho//Vermelhinho/ IAPAR81,Vermelhinho/LR720982//Vermelhinho/AB136 and Vermelhinho/AB136//Vermelhinho/ Vermelho2157.

  12. Nutritional composition and cooking characteristics of tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius Gray) in comparison with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepary bean is a highly abiotic stress tolerant orphan crop, however, there has been limited research on its nutritional value and cooking characteristics, key aspects when considering the potential for broader adoption globally. The goal of this study was to evaluate a large set of seed composition...

  13. Seedling Emergence and Phenotypic Response of Common Bean Germplasm to Different Temperatures under Controlled Conditions and in Open Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio M. DE RON

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and uniform seed germination and seedling emergence under diverse environmental conditions is a desirable characteristic for crops. Common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L. differ in their low temperature tolerance regarding growth and yield. Cultivars tolerant to low temperature during the germination and emergence stages and carriers of the grain quality standards demanded by consumers are needed for the success of the bean crop. The objectives of this study were i to screen the seedling emergence and the phenotypic response of bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled chamber and field conditions to display stress-tolerant genotypes with good agronomic performances and yield potential, and ii to compare the emergence of bean seedlings under controlled environment and in open field conditions to assess the efficiency of genebanks standard germination tests for predicting the performance of the seeds in the field. Three trials were conducted with 28 dry bean genotypes in open field and in growth chamber under low, moderate and warm temperature. Morpho-agronomic data were used to evaluate the phenotypic performance of the different genotypes. Cool temperatures resulted in a reduction of the rate of emergence in the bean genotypes, however, emergence and early growth of bean could be under different genetic control and these processes need further research to be suitably modeled. Nine groups arose from the Principal Component Analysis (PCA representing variation in emergence time and proportion of emergence in the controlled chamber and in the open field indicating a trend to lower emergence in large and extra-large seeded genotypes. Screening of seedling emergence and phenotypic response of the bean germplasm under a range of temperatures in controlled growth chambers and under field conditions showed several genotypes, as landraces 272, 501, 593 and the cultivar Borlotto, with stress-tolerance at emergence and high

  14. Triple-Layer Plastic Bags Protect Dry Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) Against Damage by Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) During Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutungi, C; Affognon, H D; Njoroge, A W; Manono, J; Baributsa, D; Murdock, L L

    2015-10-01

    Fumigated dry common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) that were artificially infested with Acanthoscelides obtectus Say, and others that were not artificially infested, were stored in hermetic triple-layer PICS (Lela Agro, Kano, Nigeria) or woven polypropylene (PP) bags for 6 mo at ambient laboratory temperature conditions of 22.6 ± 1.9°C and 60.1 ± 4.3% relative humidity. In an additional trial, beans contained in PP bags were treated with Actellic Super dust before introducing A. obtectus. Moisture content, number of live adult A. obtectus, seed damage, weight loss, and seed germination were determined at monthly intervals. At 6 mo, beans stored in PICS bags retained higher moisture than those stored in PP bags, but in all treatments the moisture level remained below that recommended for safe storage of beans. In the PICS bags, proliferation of A. obtectus did not proceed and at 6 mo, beans stored in these bags did not have insect-inflicted seed damage or weight loss. In contrast, seed damage and weight loss in PP bags exceeded economic threshold after 1 mo in the absence of Actellic Super dust (Syngenta Crop protection AG, Basle, Switzerland), and after 2 mo in the presence of it. Germination of beans stored in PP bags decreased greatly whereas the beans stored in PICS bags did not show reduced germination. Chemical free storage of common beans in PICS bags protects them against damage by A. obtectus.

  15. CULTIVAR RELEASE-IAC-Galante and IAC-Centauro: special common bean types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Morais Carbonell

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Common bean types with pinkish and light brown teguments were predominant in Brazil before 1970, until therelease of the Carioca common bean. To avoid that these common bean types sink into oblivion, the Instituto AgronômicoCampinas applied for the registration of two cultivars by the MAPA/RNC: IAC-Galante (pinkish and IAC-Centauro (lightbrown, with high yield and resistance to anthracnose and common mosaic.

  16. Altura de planta e acúmulo de matéria seca do feijoeiro cvs. BRS MG Talismã e Ouro Negro em plantio direto e convencional Plant height and dry matter acumulation by common bean cvs. BRS MG Talismã and Ouro Negro under no-tillage and conventional crop systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neiva Maria Batista Vieira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de estudar a curva de crescimento em altura de planta, taxa e acúmulo de matéria seca da parte aérea ao longo do ciclo cultural do feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L. foram conduzidos quatro experimentos de campo, com as cvs. Ouro Negro e BRS MG Talismã, em plantio direto e convencional, sendo um em Lavras (Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico típico, inverno primavera 2002 e os demais em Madre de Deus de Minas (Latossolo Vermelho Amarelo ácrico, seca 2005. O delineamento experimental foi feito com blocos casualizados com três repetições e 11 ou 12 tratamentos (épocas de coleta. De 7 em 7 dias foram amostradas 10 ou 20 plantas para determinação da altura, através do comprimento da haste principal, e outras 20 plantas para determinação do peso da matéria seca da parte aérea após secagem em estufa com circulação de ar a 65-70ºC até peso constante. Os dados foram submetidos a análises de variância e regressão, com ajuste de curvas representativas do comportamento das características avaliadas. Em plantio direto, a altura máxima foi alcançada aos 50 DAE, enquanto no plantio convencional o feijoeiro continuou crescendo até os 72-73 DAE, ocorrendo fechamento mais tardio da lavoura. As cvs. Ouro Negro e BRS MG Talismã mostraram padrões de acúmulo de matéria seca muito próximos, com pouco incremento até os 81 DAE, na BRS MG Talismã, e ambas alcançaram maiores acúmulos em plantio direto. Em geral, as maiores taxas de acúmulo de matéria seca foram verificadas entre 45-48 DAE.The aim of this research was to study the plant growth in height and the dry matter accumulation pattern along the bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop cycle. Four field experiments were carried out in Lavras (winter-spring 2002 and other were performed in Madre de Deus de Minas, MG (dry crop season 2005 with common bean, cvs. Ouro Negro and BRS MG Talismã, under no-tillage and conventional crop systems. Every seven days 10 or 20 plants

  17. Molybdenum mixed with glyphosate and alone via foliar spray in no-tillage common bean grown on corn stover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gessimar Nunes Camelo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of molybdenum (Mo on common bean grown in desiccated corn stover in a no-tillage system was evaluated under two application modes: Mo mixed with the desiccant glyphosate and Mo direct spray to the bean leaves. The treatments (four replicates were assigned to a completely randomized block design in a split-plot arrangement with the application of Mo (0, 100, 200, 400 and 800 g ha-1 mixed with glyphosate in the main plots and Mo foliar spray (0 and 100 g ha-1 in the sub-plots. The field experiments were carried out in 2009 and 2010 in the municipality of Coimbra, Minas Gerais State, with the common bean cultivar Ouro Vermelho. Mo mixed with glyphosate had neither an effect on common bean yield nor on the Mo and N contents in leaves, however it increased the Mo and N contents in seeds. Application of Mo via foliar spray increased Mo content in leaves and Mo and N contents in seeds. The reapplication of molybdenum with glyphosate for desiccation in subsequent crops caused a cumulative effect of Mo content in bean seeds.

  18. Infrared thermometry to schedule irrigation of common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lobo Francisco de Almeida

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the critical irrigation time for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Carioca using infrared thermometry. Five treatments were analyzed. Canopy temperature differences between plants and a well-watered control about 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5±0.5ºC were tested. Physiological variables and plant growth were analyzed to establish the best time to irrigate. There was a significant linear correlation between the index and stomatal resistance, transpiration rate, and leaf water potential. Although significant linear correlation between the index and mean values of total dry matter, absolute growth rate, and leaf area index was found, no correlation was found with other growth index like relative growth rate, net assimilation rate, and leaf area ratio. Plants irrigated when their canopy temperature was 3±0.5ºC above the control had their relative growth rate mean value increased up to 59.7%, yielding 2,260.2 kg ha-1, with a reduction of 38.0% in the amount of water used. Plants irrigated when their canopy temperature was 4±0.5ºC yielded 1,907.6 kg ha-1, although their relative growth rate mean value was 4.0% below the control. These results show that the best moment to irrigate common bean is when their canopy temperature is between 3ºC and 4±0.5ºC above the control.

  19. Are duplicated genes responsible for anthracnose resistance in common bean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Larissa Carvalho; Nalin, Rafael Storto; Ramalho, Magno Antonio Patto; de Souza, Elaine Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    The race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, etiologic agent of anthracnose in common bean, is distributed worldwide, having great importance in breeding programs for anthracnose resistance. Several resistance alleles have been identified promoting resistance to this race. However, the variability that has been detected within race has made it difficult to obtain cultivars with durable resistance, because cultivars may have different reactions to each strain of race 65. Thus, this work aimed at studying the resistance inheritance of common bean lines to different strains of C. lindemuthianum, race 65. We used six C. lindemuthianum strains previously characterized as belonging to the race 65 through the international set of differential cultivars of anthracnose and nine commercial cultivars, adapted to the Brazilian growing conditions and with potential ability to discriminate the variability within this race. To obtain information on the resistance inheritance related to nine commercial cultivars to six strains of race 65, these cultivars were crossed two by two in all possible combinations, resulting in 36 hybrids. Segregation in the F2 generations revealed that the resistance to each strain is conditioned by two independent genes with the same function, suggesting that they are duplicated genes, where the dominant allele promotes resistance. These results indicate that the specificity between host resistance genes and pathogen avirulence genes is not limited to races, it also occurs within strains of the same race. Further research may be carried out in order to establish if the alleles identified in these cultivars are different from those described in the literature.

  20. 7 CFR 457.150 - Dry bean crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...; (f) Earthquake; (g) Volcanic eruption; or (h) Failure of the irrigation water supply, if caused by an... hundredweight for the U.S. No. 2 grade of dry beans of the insured type offered by buyers in the area in which... the same percentage relationship to the maximum price offered by us for each type. For example, if you...

  1. Decomposição e liberação de nitrogênio, fósforo e potássio de resíduos da cultura do feijoeiro Decomposition and release of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium from residues of common bean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Chagas

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo mensurar a velocidade de decomposição e de liberação de nutrientes in situ de resíduos da cultura do feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Em condições de campo, foram coletadas as folhas senescentes durante o ciclo da cultura, bem como os caules e a palhada de vagens após trilhagem dos grãos, de cultivares de feijoeiro. Esses resíduos continham 2,3 Mg ha-1 de massa, 31 kg ha-1 de N e 2,4 kg ha-1 de P, que correspondiam a 63, 41 e 28 % do total de massa, N e P, respectivamente, acumulados durante o ciclo da cultura. Foram realizados dois ensaios, nos períodos de inverno-primavera e primavera-verão, quando os caules, as vagens e as folhas senescentes foram colocados separadamente em litterbags, dispostos sobre o solo, e coletados entre 2 e 120 dias. As quantidades de matéria seca e nutrientes remanescentes em cada tipo de resíduo foram ajustadas a um modelo exponencial simples. O tempo de meia-vida dos resíduos foi de, no primeiro e segundo ensaios, respectivamente, 133 e 179 dias para caules, 70 e 80 dias para folhas e 64 dias para vagens. A relativamente lenta decomposição dos resíduos pode ser associada à sua alta relação C:N - acima de 60 para caule e palhada de vagens. A liberação de N e P pelos resíduos foi similar à dinâmica de decomposição, enquanto a liberação de K foi mais rápida. Os resultados indicam que as folhas senescentes e os resíduos produzidos após trilhagem dos grãos podem restituir parte da demanda de nutrientes do feijoeiro, assumindo relevância para sistemas de agricultura sustentável.The objective of this study was to measure the speed of decomposition and nutrient release in situ from residues of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop. In field conditions, leaves of common bean cultivars senesced during the growth cycle and stems and podwalls after pod threshing were collected. These residues contained 2.3 Mg ha-1 of mass, 31 kg ha-1 of N and 2.4 kg ha-1 of

  2. Marker-based linkage map of Andean common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and mapping of QTLs underlying popping ability traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuste-Lisbona Fernando J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuña bean is a type of ancient common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. native to the Andean region of South America, whose seeds possess the unusual property of popping. The nutritional features of popped seeds make them a healthy low fat and high protein snack. However, flowering of nuña bean only takes place under short-day photoperiod conditions, which means a difficulty to extend production to areas where such conditions do not prevail. Therefore, breeding programs of adaptation traits will facilitate the diversification of the bean crops and the development of new varieties with enhanced healthy properties. Although the popping trait has been profusely studied in maize (popcorn, little is known about the biology and genetic basis of the popping ability in common bean. To obtain insights into the genetics of popping ability related traits of nuña bean, a comprehensive quantitative trait loci (QTL analysis was performed to detect single-locus and epistatic QTLs responsible for the phenotypic variance observed in these traits. Results A mapping population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RILs derived from a cross between two Andean common bean genotypes was evaluated for three popping related traits, popping dimension index (PDI, expansion coefficient (EC, and percentage of unpopped seeds (PUS, in five different environmental conditions. The genetic map constructed included 193 loci across 12 linkage groups (LGs, covering a genetic distance of 822.1 cM, with an average of 4.3 cM per marker. Individual and multi-environment QTL analyses detected a total of nineteen single-locus QTLs, highlighting among them the co-localized QTLs for the three popping ability traits placed on LGs 3, 5, 6, and 7, which together explained 24.9, 14.5, and 25.3% of the phenotypic variance for PDI, EC, and PUS, respectively. Interestingly, epistatic interactions among QTLs have been detected, which could have a key role in the genetic control of

  3. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Anthracnose and Angular Leaf Spot Resistance in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perseguini, Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso; Oblessuc, Paula Rodrigues; Rosa, João Ricardo Bachega Feijó; Gomes, Kleber Alves; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais; Garcia, Antonio Augusto Franco; Vianello, Rosana Pereira; Benchimol-Reis, Luciana Lasry

    2016-01-01

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the world's most important legume for human consumption. Anthracnose (ANT; Colletotrichum lindemuthianum) and angular leaf spot (ALS; Pseudocercospora griseola) are complex diseases that cause major yield losses in common bean. Depending on the cultivar and environmental conditions, anthracnose and angular leaf spot infections can reduce crop yield drastically. This study aimed to estimate linkage disequilibrium levels and identify quantitative resistance loci (QRL) controlling resistance to both ANT and ALS diseases of 180 accessions of common bean using genome-wide association analysis. A randomized complete block design with four replicates was performed for the ANT and ALS experiments, with four plants per genotype in each replicate. Association mapping analyses were performed for ANT and ALS using a mixed linear model approach implemented in TASSEL. A total of 17 and 11 significant statistically associations involving SSRs were detected for ANT and ALS resistance loci, respectively. Using SNPs, 21 and 17 significant statistically associations were obtained for ANT and angular ALS, respectively, providing more associations with this marker. The SSR-IAC167 and PvM95 markers, both located on chromosome Pv03, and the SNP scaffold00021_89379, were associated with both diseases. The other markers were distributed across the entire common bean genome, with chromosomes Pv03 and Pv08 showing the greatest number of loci associated with ANT resistance. The chromosome Pv04 was the most saturated one, with six markers associated with ALS resistance. The telomeric region of this chromosome showed four markers located between approximately 2.5 Mb and 4.4 Mb. Our results demonstrate the great potential of genome-wide association studies to identify QRLs related to ANT and ALS in common bean. The results indicate a quantitative and complex inheritance pattern for both diseases in common bean. Our findings will contribute to more

  4. Genome-Wide Association Studies of Anthracnose and Angular Leaf Spot Resistance in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    Full Text Available The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is the world's most important legume for human consumption. Anthracnose (ANT; Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and angular leaf spot (ALS; Pseudocercospora griseola are complex diseases that cause major yield losses in common bean. Depending on the cultivar and environmental conditions, anthracnose and angular leaf spot infections can reduce crop yield drastically. This study aimed to estimate linkage disequilibrium levels and identify quantitative resistance loci (QRL controlling resistance to both ANT and ALS diseases of 180 accessions of common bean using genome-wide association analysis. A randomized complete block design with four replicates was performed for the ANT and ALS experiments, with four plants per genotype in each replicate. Association mapping analyses were performed for ANT and ALS using a mixed linear model approach implemented in TASSEL. A total of 17 and 11 significant statistically associations involving SSRs were detected for ANT and ALS resistance loci, respectively. Using SNPs, 21 and 17 significant statistically associations were obtained for ANT and angular ALS, respectively, providing more associations with this marker. The SSR-IAC167 and PvM95 markers, both located on chromosome Pv03, and the SNP scaffold00021_89379, were associated with both diseases. The other markers were distributed across the entire common bean genome, with chromosomes Pv03 and Pv08 showing the greatest number of loci associated with ANT resistance. The chromosome Pv04 was the most saturated one, with six markers associated with ALS resistance. The telomeric region of this chromosome showed four markers located between approximately 2.5 Mb and 4.4 Mb. Our results demonstrate the great potential of genome-wide association studies to identify QRLs related to ANT and ALS in common bean. The results indicate a quantitative and complex inheritance pattern for both diseases in common bean. Our findings will

  5. Complete genome sequences of two novel bipartite begomoviruses infecting common bean in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang-Sidorchuk, Lidia; González-Alvarez, Heidy; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Martínez-Zubiaur, Yamila

    2017-05-01

    The common bean is a host for a large number of begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) in the New World. Based on the current taxonomic criteria established for the genus Begomovirus, two new members of this genus infecting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Cuba are herein reported. The cloned bipartite genomes, composed of DNA-A and DNA-B, showed the typical organization of the New World begomoviruses. We propose the names common bean severe mosaic virus and common bean mottle virus for the new begomovirus species.

  6. Breeding common bean populations for traits using selection index

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    Dayane Cristina Lima

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A common bean (Phaseolus vulgarisL. cultivar must combine desirable genotypes for several traits in order to be accepted by producers and consumers. This study aimed to evaluate selection efficiency when segregating bean populations for traits, by means of a selection index, in order to obtain superior progenies for traits considered. A total of 16 populations from the F4 and F5generations were evaluated in 2011 and 2012, respectively. The traits evaluated were plant architecture, plant disease, grain type and yield. Using standard scores (Z, the sum of the four traits (∑Z was obtained and, based on this information, the best populations were identified. The evaluation of selection effectiveness was performed on 31 progenies from each population. The 496 progenies plus eight controls were evaluated in the F5:6and F5:7 generations for the same traits in July and November 2012, respectively. The selection, using the index based on the sum of standardized variables (∑Z, was efficient for identifying populations with superior progenies for all the traits considered.

  7. Economic viability of common bean variety BRS Estilo

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    Osmira Fatima da Silva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate financially BRS Estilo, a variety of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., the carioca group, developed by “Embrapa Rice and Beans” and partners, estimating the regional economic benefit from the knowledge of the costs generation and transfer of technology and production system. The BRS Estilo variety was evaluated in four successive seasons: 2010/2011, 2011/2012, 2012/2013 and 2013/2014. The BRS Estilo technology contribution to the bean agribusiness in Brazil was R$ 239.431.760,83, about US$ 106 million during the period. The transfer process of the BRS Estilo to the productive sector represents 7,5% of the total cost on developing technology, which began in 2000. In addition to the economic benefit provided by the adoption of this technology, there has also been generating more jobs in its supply chain and also increasing the product offered in the market. JEL-Code | O13; Q16; R32.

  8. New Native Rhizobia Strains for Inoculation of Common Bean in the Brazilian Savanna

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    Fábio Martins Mercante

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Maximization of biological nitrogen fixation in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. crop depends on the genetic characteristics related to the plant, the symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia, and environmental factors. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of rhizobia selected beforehand from Cerrado (Brazilian tropical savanna soils in Mato Grosso do Sul. The experiments were conducted in 2007 in the municipalities of Aquidauana, Anaurilândia, Campo Grande, and Dourados, all located in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul. All procedures established followed the current recommendations of the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture (Ministério de Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento – MAPA, in accordance with the “official protocol for assessing the feasibility and agronomic efficiency of strains, and inoculant technologies linked to the process of biological nitrogen fixation in legumes”. The program for selection of rhizobia for inoculation in bean plants resulted in identification of different strains with high symbiotic efficiency, competitiveness, and genetic stability, based on the Embrapa Agropecuária Oeste collection of multifunctional microorganism cultures. In previous studies, 630 isolates of Rhizobium were evaluated. They were obtained from nodules of leucaena (380 or dry beans (250 from 87 locations, including 34 municipalities in Mato Grosso do Sul. Three of them stood out from the others: CPAO 12.5 L2, CPAO 17.5 L2, and CPAO 56.4 L2. Inoculation of these strains in bean plants demonstrated economic viability and high potential for obtaining a more effective inoculant suitable for trading purposes.

  9. Physicochemical properties and digestibility of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shuang-Kui; Jiang, Hongxin; Ai, Yongfeng; Jane, Jay-Lin

    2014-08-08

    Physicochemical properties and digestibility of pinto bean, red kidney bean, black bean and navy bean starches were analyzed. All the common bean starches had oval and spherical granules with average diameter of 25.3-27.4 μm. Amylose contents were 32.0-45.4%. Black bean starch showed the highest peak viscosity, breakdown, final viscosity and setback, whereas red kidney bean starch showed the lowest pasting temperature, peak viscosity, breakdown, and setback. Pinto bean starch showed the highest onset and peak gelatinization temperatures, and the lowest gelatinization temperature range; whereas navy bean starch exhibited the lowest values. Amylopectin of red kidney bean had the highest molecular weight (Mw) and z-average gyration radius (Rz), whereas black bean amylopectin had the lowest values of Mw and Rz. The proportions of DP 6-12, DP 13-24, DP 25-36, and DP ≥ 37 and average branch-chain lengths were 23.30-35.21%, 47.79-53.53%, 8.99-12.65%, 6.39-13.49%, and 17.91-21.56, respectively. All the native bean starches were highly resistant to enzyme digestion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Absorção e utilização do fósforo pelas culturas da soja e do feijão e por plantas daninhas Absorption and use of phosphorus by soybean and common bean crops and by weeds

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    Sergio de Oliveira Procópio

    2005-12-01

    , independente do teor de P do solo. A eficiência na utilização do P absorvido, observado para D. tortuosum, soja e feijão, diminuiu com o aumento da dose. Nos biótipos de E. heterophylla e no feijão, foi verificado baixo desempenho quanto ao uso eficiente do P disponível no solo. A maior porcentagem de recuperação do P aplicado até à fase de formação de propágulos foi constatada nas plantas de D. tortuosum.This work aimed to evaluate the absorption and use of phosphorus (P by soybean and common bean crops and by weeds. The experiment was carried out in a greenhouse from August to November 2002. I was adopted a randomized block design with three replications, in a 6 x 4 factorial scheme. Six vegetal species (soybean (Glycine max, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, two Euphorbia heterophylla biotypes (susceptible and resistant to ALS inhibitor herbicides, Bidens pilosa and Desmodium tortuosum and four doses of P (0.00 12.00; 24.00 and 48.00 mg dm-3, applied at sowing in the form of single super phosphate, were evaluated. The soybean root biomass was increased by the higher P supply and soybean, D. tortuosum, and B. pilosa accumulated more biomass in response to the increasing P doses. The highest P concentration was observed in the bean plants, independent of the applied P level, while D. tortuosum was the only specie in which the P content nearly tripled when cultivated with a P dose (48.00 mg dm-3 that was twice as high as that recommended for common bean. The highest P content in the plant tissues was accumulated by soybean and D. tortuosum until the beginning of flowering, and by D. tortuosum during the reproductive phase. In relation to the P uptake efficiency of roots, D. tortuosum and common bean presented variations according to the applied P level. The other species maintained the same root efficiency, independent of the P availability in the soil. The efficiency in the use of absorbed P by D. tortuosum, soybean and common bean decreased with the increase of

  11. Inheritance of resistance to the bean-pod weevil (Apion godmani Wagner) in common beans from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza, R; Cardona, C; Singh, S P

    1996-03-01

    The bean-pod weevil (BPW), Apion godmani Wagner, often causes heavy losses in crops of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Farmers need resistant bean cultivars to minimize losses, cut production costs, stabilize seed yield, and reduce pesticide use and consequent health hazards. To design effective breeding methods, breeders need new and better sources of resistance and increased knowledge of their modes of inheritance. We therefore: (1) compared sources of resistance to BPW, (2) studied the inheritance of resistance, and (3) determined whether the sources possess similar or different genes for BPW resistance. The following sources of resistance, originating from the Mexican highlands, were evaluated for 3 years at INIFAP-Santa Lucía de Prias, Texcoco, Mexico: 'Amarillo 153', 'Amarillo 169', 'Hidalgo 58', 'J 117', 'Pinto Texcoco', 'Pinto 168', and 'Puebla 36'. All except 'Puebla 36' were crossed with the susceptible cultivar 'Jamapa'. 'Amarillo 153' and 'Puebla 36' were crossed with another susceptible cultivar, 'Bayo Mex'. The parents, F1 hybrids, and F2 populations were evaluated for BPW damage in 1992. Backcrosses of the F1 of Jamapa/Pinto 168 to the respective susceptible and resistant parents were also evaluated in 1992. All seven resistant accessions were crossed in all possible combinations, excluding reciprocals. The resulting 21 F1 hybrids and 21 F2 populations were evaluated for BPW damage in 1994. 'J 117' had the highest level of resistance to BPW. 'Pinto Texcoco' and 'Puebla 36' had the highest mean damage score of all seven sources of resistance. The F1 hybrids between susceptible parents and resistant sources were generally intermediate. Two genes segregating independently controlled the BPW resistance in each accession. One gene, Agm, has no effect when present alone, whereas the other gene, Agr, alone conferred intermediate resistance. When both genes were present, resistance to BPW was higher. Based on mean BPW damage scores, all 21 F1 hybrids

  12. The introduction of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) into Western Europe and the phenotypic variation of dry beans collected in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeven, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    The first introduction of common bean from Central/South America into Western Europe most likely took place around 1500. The attractive bean seeds and their easy transportation warranted numerous additional introductions, not only from the Americas, but also from other areas where the common bean ha

  13. The introduction of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) into Western Europe and the phenotypic variation of dry beans collected in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeven, A.C.

    1997-01-01

    The first introduction of common bean from Central/South America into Western Europe most likely took place around 1500. The attractive bean seeds and their easy transportation warranted numerous additional introductions, not only from the Americas, but also from other areas where the common bean ha

  14. Transcriptome analysis of salt tolerant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiz, Mahmut Can; Canher, Balkan; Niron, Harun; Turet, Muge

    2014-01-01

    Salinity is one of the important abiotic stress factors that limit crop production. Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., a major protein source in developing countries, is highly affected by soil salinity and the information on genes that play a role in salt tolerance is scarce. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and related pathways by comprehensive analysis of transcriptomes of both root and leaf tissues of the tolerant genotype grown under saline and control conditions in hydroponic system. We have generated a total of 158 million high-quality reads which were assembled into 83,774 all-unigenes with a mean length of 813 bp and N50 of 1,449 bp. Among the all-unigenes, 58,171 were assigned with Nr annotations after homology analyses. It was revealed that 6,422 and 4,555 all-unigenes were differentially expressed upon salt stress in leaf and root tissues respectively. Validation of the RNA-seq quantifications (RPKM values) was performed by qRT-PCR (Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR) analyses. Enrichment analyses of DEGs based on GO and KEGG databases have shown that both leaf and root tissues regulate energy metabolism, transmembrane transport activity, and secondary metabolites to cope with salinity. A total of 2,678 putative common bean transcription factors were identified and classified under 59 transcription factor families; among them 441 were salt responsive. The data generated in this study will help in understanding the fundamentals of salt tolerance in common bean and will provide resources for functional genomic studies.

  15. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R; Muruaga-Martínez, José S; Vargas-Vázquez, M L Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-10-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  16. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

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    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  17. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill-Langarica, Homar R.; Muruaga-Martínez, José S.; Vargas-Vázquez, M.L. Patricia; Rosales-Serna, Rigoberto; Mayek-Pérez, Netzahualcoyotl

    2011-01-01

    A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation. PMID:22215964

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  19. Parameterization of almanac crop simulation model for non-irrigated dry bean in semi-arid temperate areas in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Alma Delia Baez-Gonzalez; James R. Kiniry; Jose Saul Padilla Ramirez; Guillermo Medina Garcia; Jose Luis Ramos Gonzalez; Esteban Salvador Osuna Ceja

    2015-01-01

    Dry bean simulation models can be used to make management decisions when properly parameterized. This study aimed to parameterize the ALMANAC (Agricultural Land Management Alternatives with Numerical Assessment Criteria) crop simulation model for dry bean in the semi-arid temperate areas of Mexico. The parameterization process was based on data from two important non-irrigated dry bean fields in Mexico. The parameters were potential heat units (PHU), leaf area index (LAI) and harvest index (H...

  20. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) collection for agromorphological and seed mineral concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    A collection of common bean comprising totally 223 genotypes of which 176 genotypes from the USDA, 37 common bean landraces and 10 commercial cultivars from Turkey, evaluated for several agromorphological plant characters and mineral concentrations in seeds. There were wide range of variations for t...

  1. Transcriptome analysis of two recombinant inbred lines of common bean contrasting for symbiotic nitrogen fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is able to fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2) through symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). Effective utilization of existing variability for SNF in common bean for genetic improvement requires an understanding of underlying genes and molecular mechanisms. The utility of ...

  2. Common bean cultivars and lines interactions with environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbonell Sérgio Augusto Morais

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of bean lines brought forth in breeding programs or of cultivars in use can be affected by environmental variability. The adaptability and stability of grain yield of 18 common bean cultivars and lines in 23 environments (combinations of seasons, years and locations were evaluated in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. 'IAC-Carioca' and 'IAC-Carioca Eté' were used as standard cultivars for the carioca grain type, while 'FT-Nobre' and 'IAC-Una' represented the standard for black grains. The experiment was set up in a randomized complete block design with four replications and plots consisting of two, two central five meters rows flanked by border rows. Stability parameters were estimated by the methods Maximum Yield Deviations (MYD and by the Additive Main Effects and Multiplicative Interaction Analysis (AMMI. For the identification of the most stable cultivars, the two methods led to consistent results, although by MYD the highest stability was always associated to the highest yield. 'MAC-733327' and 'LP 9637' were the most suitable cultivars and lines for the joint seasons, while 'LP 9637' and 'FT-Nobre' were the most suitable for the dry season. The MYD method combined a simple procedure, easiness of result interpretation, uniqueness of parameters, and association between stability and yield. On the other hand, the AMMI method simplified the identification of stable cultivars by visual inspection, also providing information on the environments. However, the complex nature which combines uni-and multivariate techniques hampers its widespread use in breeding programs.

  3. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Efficiency of Indigenous Common Bean Rhizobia in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohajda, Ines; Babić, Katarina Huić; Rajnović, Ivana; Kajić, Sanja; Sikora, Sanja

    2016-12-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) in symbiotic associations with legumes enable considerable entries of biologically fixed nitrogen into soil. Efforts are therefore made to intensify the natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume inoculation. Studies of field populations of rhizobia open up the possibility to preserve and probably exploit some indigenous strains with hidden symbiotic or ecological potentials. The main aim of the present study is to determine genetic diversity of common bean rhizobia isolated from different field sites in central Croatia and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency and compatibility with host plants. The isolation procedure revealed that most soil samples contained no indigenous common bean rhizobia. The results indicate that the cropping history had a significant impact on the presence of indigenous strains. Although all isolates were found to belong to species Rhizobium leguminosarum, significant genetic diversity at the strain level was determined. Application of both random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-polymerase chain reaction (ERIC- -PCR) methods resulted in similar grouping of strains. Symbiotic efficiency of indigenous rhizobia as well as their compatibility with two commonly grown bean varieties were tested in field experiments. Application of indigenous rhizobial strains as inoculants resulted in significantly different values of nodulation, seed yield as well as plant nitrogen and seed protein contents. The most abundant nodulation and the highest plant nitrogen and protein contents were determined in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum strains S17/2 and S21/6. Although, in general, the inoculation had a positive impact on seed yield, differences depending on the applied strain were not determined. The overall results show the high degree of symbiotic efficiency of the specific indigenous strain S21/6. These results indicate different symbiotic

  4. Genetic Diversity and Symbiotic Efficiency of Indigenous Common Bean Rhizobia in Croatia

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    Ines Pohajda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nodule bacteria (rhizobia in symbiotic associations with legumes enable considerable entries of biologically fixed nitrogen into soil. Efforts are therefore made to intensify the natural process of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by legume inoculation. Studies of field populationsof rhizobia open up the possibility to preserve and probably exploit some indigenous strains with hidden symbiotic or ecological potentials. The main aim of the present study is to determine genetic diversity of common bean rhizobia isolated from different field sites in central Croatia and to evaluate their symbiotic efficiency and compatibility with host plants. The isolation procedure revealed that most soil samples contained no indigenous common bean rhizobia. The results indicate that the cropping history had a significant impact on the presence of indigenous strains. Although all isolates were found to belong to species Rhizobium leguminosarum, significant genetic diversity at the strain level was determined. Application of both random amplifi cation of polymorphic DNA (RAPD and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus–polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR methods resulted in similar grouping of strains. Symbiotic efficiency of indigenous rhizobia as well as their compatibility with two commonly grown bean varieties were tested in field experiments. Application of indigenous rhizobial strains as inoculants resulted in significantly different values of nodulation, seed yield as well as plant nitrogen and seed protein contents. The most abundant nodulation and the highest plant nitrogen and protein contents were determined in plants inoculated with R. leguminosarum strains S17/2 and S21/6. Although, in general, the inoculation had a positive impact on seed yield, differences depending on the applied strain were not determined. The overall results show the high degree of symbiotic efficiency of the specific indigenous strain S21/6. These results indicate different

  5. Yield and drougth tolerance of six varieties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. under field condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanitza Meriño Hernandez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In two moisture conditions (drought and irrigation were evaluated six varieties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., with a factorial randomized complete blocks. The objectives of the study was to evaluate the effect caused by drought conditions crop varieties, identify high performance and features that enable them to adapt to varying conditions of soil moisture. With the data in yields between the two humidity conditions intensity indices of drought (IIS, susceptibility to drought (ISS, relative efficiency (IER, geometric mean (GM and percent yield losses were calculated . The results were statistically processed using the Statistica software version 8.0 for Windows, if significant differences Tukey test was applied to p<0.05. The selection based on levels ISS, MG, IER and PPR identified high yielding varieties adapted to drought and favorable moisture conditions.

  6. Iron and zinc retention in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. after home cooking

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    Lucia M. J. Carvalho

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background : According to the World Health Organization (WHO, iron, iodine, and Vitamin A deficiencies are the most common forms of malnutrition, leading to severe public health consequences. The importance of iron and zinc in human nutrition and the number of children found to be deficient in these nutrients make further studies on retention in cooked grains and cooked bean broth important. Objectives : This work aimed to evaluate iron and zinc retention in six common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivars under the following conditions: raw beans, regular pot cooking, pressure cooking, with and without previous water soaking, and broth. Design : Determination of iron and zinc content in the raw, cooked bean grains and broth samples was carried out by Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP Optical Emission Spectrometry (Spectro Analytical Instrument – Spectroflame P. All experiments and analyses were carried out in triplicate. Results : Overall, regardless of the cooking method, with or without previous water soaking, the highest zinc concentration was found in the cooked bean grains. However, pressure cooking and previous water soaking diminished iron retention in the cooked grains, while increasing it in the bean broth. Conclusion : The common bean was confirmed to be an excellent source of iron and zinc for human consumption, and it was suggested that beans should be consumed in a combined form, i.e. grain with bean broth.

  7. Determination of the capability of common bean “amachamiento” (Aphelenchoides besseyi Christie of being seed-transmitted.

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    Néstor Felipe Chaves-Barrantes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to determine the capability of Aphelenchoides besseyi of being seed-transmitted in common bean. During 2007 and 2008, seeds were collected from nematode-infested common bean plants (cv. Cabécar previously showing characteristic symptoms, in commercial plantations of the Brunca region of Costa Rica (southeastern area of the country. Between September 2008 and September 2009 the seeds were sowed in plastic pots in a greenhouse located in Veracruz, Pérez Zeledón, Costa Rica. Once seeds germinated, plants were observed weekly to determine the appearance of “amachamiento” symptoms and detect the cases of disease transmission by seed. To support the previous work, seeds from “amachamiento” diseased plants (cv. Cabécar were collected in commercial common bean plantations in five localities of the Brunca region of Costa Rica in 2014. The seeds were carried to Estación Experimental Agrícola Fabio Baudrit Moreno of Universidad de Costa Rica located in Alajuela, where they were examined in a laboratory to determine the presence of A. besseyi specimens. Contrary to indicated for A. besseyi in rice and pastures, crops in which this pathogen is seed-transmitted, in common bean it was not possible find specimens of this nematode nor diseased plants from seeds of infested plants. The results obtained indicate that, under these experimental conditions, seeds are not an effective way for the transmission and dissemination of the “amachamiento” disease in common bean.

  8. Trait associations in common bean genotypes grown under drought stress and field infestation by BSM bean fly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel Ambachew; Firew Mekbib; Asrat Asfaw; Stephen E. Beebe; Matthew W. Blaird

    2015-01-01

    Understanding functional relations among plant traits and their modulation by growing conditions is imperative in designing selection strategies for breeding programs. This study assessed trait relationships among 196 common bean genotypes exposed to stresses for drought and field infestation of bean fly or bean stem maggot (BSM). The study was carried out at two locations and data was analyzed with linear correlation, path coefficient and genotype × trait biplot analyses. Multiple trait data related to mechanisms of drought and bean fly tolerance were collected on 196 genotypes grown under i) water deficit at mid-pod fill, or ii) unprotected against bean fly;iii) irrigated, well watered conditions, or iv) bean fly protection with chemicals. Seed yield exhibited positive and significant correlations with leaf chlorophyll content, vertical root pulling resistance, pod harvest index, pods per plant and seeds per pod at both phenotypic and genotypic levels under stress and non-stress conditions. Genotypic correlations of traits with seed yield were greater than their respective phenotypic correlations across environments indicating the greater contribution of genotypic factors to the trait correlation. Pods per plant and seeds per pod had high positive direct effects on seed yield both under stress and non-stress whereas pods per plant had the highest indirect effect on seed yield through pod harvest index under stress. In general, our results suggest that vertical root pulling resistance and pod harvest index are important selection objectives for improving seed yield in common beans under non-stress and stress conditions, and particularly useful for drought and BSM tolerance evaluation.

  9. Trait associations in common bean genotypes grown under drought stress and field infestation by BSM bean fly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniel; Ambachew; Firew; Mekbib; Asrat; Asfaw; Stephen; E.Beebe; Matthew; W.Blair

    2015-01-01

    Understanding functional relations among plant traits and their modulation by growing conditions is imperative in designing selection strategies for breeding programs. This study assessed trait relationships among 196 common bean genotypes exposed to stresses for drought and field infestation of bean fly or bean stem maggot(BSM). The study was carried out at two locations and data was analyzed with linear correlation, path coefficient and genotype × trait biplot analyses. Multiple trait data related to mechanisms of drought and bean fly tolerance were collected on 196 genotypes grown under i) water deficit at mid-pod fill, or ii) unprotected against bean fly; iii) irrigated, well watered conditions, or iv) bean fly protection with chemicals. Seed yield exhibited positive and significant correlations with leaf chlorophyll content, vertical root pulling resistance, pod harvest index, pods per plant and seeds per pod at both phenotypic and genotypic levels under stress and non-stress conditions. Genotypic correlations of traits with seed yield were greater than their respective phenotypic correlations across environments indicating the greater contribution of genotypic factors to the trait correlation. Pods per plant and seeds per pod had high positive direct effects on seed yield both under stress and non-stress whereas pods per plant had the highest indirect effect on seed yield through pod harvest index under stress.In general, our results suggest that vertical root pulling resistance and pod harvest index are important selection objectives for improving seed yield in common beans under non-stress and stress conditions, and particularly useful for drought and BSM tolerance evaluation.

  10. Trait associations in common bean genotypes grown under drought stress and field infestation by BSM bean fly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ambachew

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding functional relations among plant traits and their modulation by growing conditions is imperative in designing selection strategies for breeding programs. This study assessed trait relationships among 196 common bean genotypes exposed to stresses for drought and field infestation of bean fly or bean stem maggot (BSM. The study was carried out at two locations and data was analyzed with linear correlation, path coefficient and genotype × trait biplot analyses. Multiple trait data related to mechanisms of drought and bean fly tolerance were collected on 196 genotypes grown under i water deficit at mid-pod fill, or ii unprotected against bean fly; iii irrigated, well watered conditions, or iv bean fly protection with chemicals. Seed yield exhibited positive and significant correlations with leaf chlorophyll content, vertical root pulling resistance, pod harvest index, pods per plant and seeds per pod at both phenotypic and genotypic levels under stress and non-stress conditions. Genotypic correlations of traits with seed yield were greater than their respective phenotypic correlations across environments indicating the greater contribution of genotypic factors to the trait correlation. Pods per plant and seeds per pod had high positive direct effects on seed yield both under stress and non-stress whereas pods per plant had the highest indirect effect on seed yield through pod harvest index under stress. In general, our results suggest that vertical root pulling resistance and pod harvest index are important selection objectives for improving seed yield in common beans under non-stress and stress conditions, and particularly useful for drought and BSM tolerance evaluation.

  11. Mapping of angular leaf spot resistance QTL in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. under different environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oblessuc Paula

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is the most important grain legume for human diet worldwide and the angular leaf spot (ALS is one of the most devastating diseases of this crop, leading to yield losses as high as 80%. In an attempt to breed resistant cultivars, it is important to first understand the inheritance mode of resistance and to develop tools that could be used in assisted breeding. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL controlling resistance to ALS under natural infection conditions in the field and under inoculated conditions in the greenhouse. Results QTL analyses were made using phenotypic data from 346 recombinant inbreed lines from the IAC-UNA x CAL 143 cross, gathered in three experiments, two of which were conducted in the field in different seasons and one in the greenhouse. Joint composite interval mapping analysis of QTL x environment interaction was performed. In all, seven QTLs were mapped on five linkage groups. Most of them, with the exception of two, were significant in all experiments. Among these, ALS10.1DG,UC presented major effects (R2 between 16% - 22%. This QTL was found linked to the GATS11b marker of linkage group B10, which was consistently amplified across a set of common bean lines and was associated with the resistance. Four new QTLs were identified. Between them the ALS5.2 showed an important effect (9.4% under inoculated conditions in the greenhouse. ALS4.2 was another major QTL, under natural infection in the field, explaining 10.8% of the variability for resistance reaction. The other QTLs showed minor effects on resistance. Conclusions The results indicated a quantitative inheritance pattern of ALS resistance in the common bean line CAL 143. QTL x environment interactions were observed. Moreover, the major QTL identified on linkage group B10 could be important for bean breeding, as it was stable in all the environments. Thereby, the GATS11b

  12. Common bean-Rhizobium symbiosis: functional genomics of legume response to abiotic stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the world's most important grain legume for direct human consumption and a main source of proteins in Latin America and Africa. Environmental factors such as nutrient deficiency, soil acidity, and metal toxicity are important constraints for bean symbiotic nitroge...

  13. A differential nursery for testing nodulation effectiveness of rhizobium strains in common beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Central America are produced on soils having low nitrogen (N) and phosphorous content. The small-scale farmers do not have resources to use fertilizers or implement soil management practices. Strategies to improve the adaptation of beans to low N soils in...

  14. Nodulation ability of the common bean genotypes composing the BASE 120 trial after inoculation with Rhizobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the nodulation characteristics of the BASE 120 genotypes in a trial of 118 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and two tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) lines. Inoculation with Rhizobium tropici strain CIAT 899 and Rhizobium etli strain CIAT 632 was carried out in a screenhouse...

  15. Further characerization of the broad-spectrum anthraconse resistance in Andea common bean Amendoim Cavalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthracnose is one of the most significant diseases of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in temperate and subtropical bean production areas of the world. This disease is caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, known for its extensive virulence diversity. Dozens of races of this pathogen have been ch...

  16. Selection of carioca common bean progenies resistant to white mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Sérgio Batista Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A backcross breeding program between commercial common bean cultivars (VC3 and M20 and sources of resistance(Ex-Rico 23 and G122 was conducted with a view toward selecting carioca (beige with brown stripes progenies resistant to whitemold. Forty-eight progenies (27 F2:6 BC1 and 21 F1:5 BC2 were evaluated for yield, growth habit, grain type and pathogen responseby two methodologies for assessment (“straw test” and “oxalic acid”. The methods were effective in discriminating the progenies,showing differing results, for they may assess different resistance mechanisms. Thus, they should be used together. Simultaneousselection for yield, growth habit, grain type and white mold resistance proved to be viable. The most appropriate strategy was to uselower intensities of selection and prioritize traits such as resistance and grain type, which are essential for commercial acceptance.Two progenies proved their superiority for the breeding program for they combine the traits of resistance and favorable grain type.

  17. Variability within the common bean phaseolus vulgaris germ plasm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uganda Journal of Agricultural Sciences. 2000 ... culinary and economic characteristics are taken into ... improved varieties ru·e inferior in taste and other culinary .... of the different bean landraces/ varieties though in some this technology was ...

  18. Responses of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing common bean to aluminum toxicity and delineation of nodule responsive microRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén Mendoza-Soto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum (Al toxicity is widespread in acidic soils where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, the most important legume for human consumption, is produced and it is a limiting factor for crop production and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. We characterized the nodule responses of common bean plants inoculated with Rhizobioum tropici CIAT899 and the root responses of nitrate-fertilized plants exposed to excess Al in low pH, for long or short periods. A 43 - 50% reduction in nitrogenase activity indicates that Al toxicity highly affected nitrogen fixation in common bean. Bean roots and nodules showed characteristic symptoms for Al toxicity. In mature nodules Al accumulation and lipoperoxidation were observed in the infected zone, while callose deposition and cell death occurred mainly in the nodule cortex. Regulatory mechanisms of plant responses to metal toxicity involve microRNAs (miRNAs along other regulators. Using a miRNA-macroarray hybridization approach we identified 28 (14 up-regulated Al toxicity nodule-responsive miRNAs. We validated (qRT-PCR the expression of eight nodule responsive miRNAs in roots and in nodules exposed to high Al for long or short periods. The inverse correlation between the target and miRNA expression ratio (stress:control was observed in every case. Generally, miRNAs showed a higher earlier response in roots than in nodules. Some of the common bean Alt responsive miRNAs identified have also been reported as differentially expressed in other plant species subjected to similar stress condition. miRNA/target nodes analyzed in this work are known to be involved in relevant signaling pathways, thus we propose that the participation of miR164/NAC1 and miR393/TIR1 in auxin and of miR170/SCL in gibberellin signaling is relevant for common bean response/adaptation to Al stress. Our data provide a foundation for evaluating the individual roles of miRNAs in the response of common bean nodules to Al toxicity.

  19. Responses of symbiotic nitrogen-fixing common bean to aluminum toxicity and delineation of nodule responsive microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Soto, Ana B; Naya, Loreto; Leija, Alfonso; Hernández, Georgina

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is widespread in acidic soils where the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), the most important legume for human consumption, is produced and it is a limiting factor for crop production and symbiotic nitrogen fixation. We characterized the nodule responses of common bean plants inoculated with Rhizobioum tropici CIAT899 and the root responses of nitrate-fertilized plants exposed to excess Al in low pH, for long or short periods. A 43-50% reduction in nitrogenase activity indicates that Al toxicity (Alt) highly affected nitrogen fixation in common bean. Bean roots and nodules showed characteristic symptoms for Alt. In mature nodules Al accumulation and lipoperoxidation were observed in the infected zone, while callose deposition and cell death occurred mainly in the nodule cortex. Regulatory mechanisms of plant responses to metal toxicity involve microRNAs (miRNAs) along other regulators. Using a miRNA-macroarray hybridization approach we identified 28 (14 up-regulated) Alt nodule-responsive miRNAs. We validated (quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR) the expression of eight nodule responsive miRNAs in roots and in nodules exposed to high Al for long or short periods. The inverse correlation between the target and miRNA expression ratio (stress:control) was observed in every case. Generally, miRNAs showed a higher earlier response in roots than in nodules. Some of the common bean Alt-responsive miRNAs identified has also been reported as differentially expressed in other plant species subjected to similar stress condition. miRNA/target nodes analyzed in this work are known to be involved in relevant signaling pathways, thus we propose that the participation of miR164/NAC1 (NAM/ATAF/CUC transcription factor) and miR393/TIR1 (TRANSPORT INHIBITOR RESPONSE 1-like protein) in auxin and of miR170/SCL (SCARECROW-like protein transcription factor) in gibberellin signaling is relevant for common bean response/adaptation to Al stress. Our data provide a

  20. 75 FR 44709 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Stonefruit Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-29

    ... producers; and to reduce vulnerability to program fraud, waste, and abuse to the Federal crop Insurance... / Thursday, July 29, 2010 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Federal Crop Insurance Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC21 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Stonefruit Crop Insurance...

  1. 78 FR 22411 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC39 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop... Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions that published on Friday, December 21, 2012, (74 FR 75509... Subjects in 7 CFR Part 457 Crop insurance, Florida citrus fruit, Reporting and recordkeeping requirements...

  2. Características fisiológicas das culturas de soja e feijão e de três espécies de plantas daninhas Physiological caracteristics of soybean and common bean crops and three weed species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.O. Procópio

    2004-06-01

    -yellow Clayoil, in a randomized complete block arrangement, with four replications, in a split-plot design. The species were the plots and the evaluation times the split-plots. Higher Wt of soybean was observed in relation to the weeds. The soybean and common bean crops showed higher L than the weeds. E. heterophylla biotypes presented the largest A and gs values. Except for D. tortuosum, the weeds presented larger WUE at the initial stage of crops development. No differences were observed between E. heterophylla biotypes.

  3. NOTE-Management system of an active genebank of common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Mathias Dacal Coan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic resources are conserved ex situ in genebanks, which are used as a source of useful alleles. Theinformation generated by the Active Common Bean Genebank (ACBG is stored in a Database Management system whichensures a quick and safe data recovery. Using Microsoft Access, a database system was developed to store and search basesof accession combinations or directly among morphological, physiological and yield descriptors of common bean. The systemcalled Common Bean Genebank (CBGB provides a graphical interface for the operation in the database, facilitating andoptimizing the search time in germplasm catalogues.

  4. Seedborne Pathogenic Fungi in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris cv. INTA Rojo) in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcenaro, Delfia; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume with high nutritional value. In Nicaragua, certified healthy seeds of local bean varieties are not available, and seedborne fungi have gained little attention. Here, were surveyed seedborne pathogenic fungi in an important local bean cultivar, 'INTA Rojo'. Beans grown in the four main production areas in Nicaragua (Boaco, Carazo, Estelí, Matagalpa) for future use as seed stock were sampled from four seed storehouses and six seed lots. A total of 133 fungal strains were isolated from surface-sterilized beans and inoculated to healthy lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) under controlled conditions. Eighty-seven isolates caused symptoms of varying severity in the seedlings, including discoloration, necrotic lesions, cankers, rot, and lethal necrosis. Pathogenic isolates were divided into eight phenotypically distinguishable groups based on morphology and growth characteristics on artificial growth medium, and further identified by analysis of the internal transcribed spacer sequences (ITS1 and ITS2) of the ribosomal RNA genes. The pathogenic isolates belonged to eight genera. Fusarium spp. (F. chlamydosporum, F. equiseti, F. incarnatum), Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Macrophomina phaseolina, and Penicillium citrinum were the most damaging and common fungi found in the seed lots. Furthermore, Corynespora cassiicola, Colletotrichum capsisi, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Aspergillus flavus, and Diaporthe sp. (Phomopsis) were seedborne in cultivar 'INTA Rojo' and found to be pathogenic to bean seedlings. This study reveals, for the first time, many seedborne pathogenic fungi in beans in Nicaragua; furthermore, prior to this study, little information was available concerning F. equiseti, F. incarnatum, L. theobromae, C. cassiicola, and Diaporthe spp. as seedborne pathogens of common bean. Our results lay the basis for developing diagnostic tools for seed health inspection and for further study of the epidemiology

  5. Biocontrol potential and polyphasic characterization of novel native Trichoderma strains against Macrophomina phaseolina isolated from sorghum and common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larralde-Corona, C P; Santiago-Mena, M R; Sifuentes-Rincón, A M; Rodríguez-Luna, I C; Rodríguez-Pérez, M A; Shirai, K; Narváez-Zapata, J A

    2008-08-01

    Native strains of Trichoderma isolated from sorghum and common bean crop soils were investigated to assess their biocontrol potential over the phytopathogenic fungus Macrophomina phaseolina, isolated from diseased plants. The Trichoderma strains were characterized with a polyphasic approach, which combined the analysis of their morphological characteristics, enzymatic activity, macro- and microculture test results, rDNA restriction patterns (AFLP), ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 rDNA sequences, and protein profiles. The integration of these data sets can be used to select new isolates as biological control agents against native fungal phytopathogens. In general, we observed a positive correlation between the secretion of beta-1,3-glucanase and N-acetylhexosaminidase, and the biocontrol capacities of all the Trichoderma isolates. Strains with the best hyperparasitic behavior against M. phaseolina isolated from diseased bean and sorghum were Trichoderma sp. (TCBG-2) and Trichoderma koningiopsis (TCBG-8), respectively.

  6. Choice of common bean parents based on combining ability estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Machado Cristina de Fátima

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The obtention of genetically improved cultivars is the main objective of breeding programs, whose efficiency is increased by a careful choice of parents. Based on both general (GCA and specific (SCA combining abilities for grain yield, the purpose of this research was to choose the most promising populations of common beans, for line selection. GCA and SCA were measured by means of a complete diallel without reciprocals, using twelve cultivars/lines. Parents and corresponding F2 segregating populations were evaluated for grain yield by a 9 x 9 triple square lattice design. It was found that the segregating populations differed in grain yield, with predominant SCA effects, but with significant GCA effects as well. Among the populations derived from parents with positive GCA values, Aporé x CI-128, CI-128 x Pérola, PF-9029975 x Ouro Negro, and CI-128 x Ouro Negro also showed positive SCA values and high grain yields, therefore being the most promising populations for grain yield improvement. The highest values of specific combining ability were observed in populations H-4-7 x ESAL 693, CI-128 x Pérola, and A-285 Rudá x IAC Carioca Aruã, which must be the most segregating ones. Hybrid combinations with a high SCA deriving from at least one parent with high GCA were: Pérola x CI-128 and Ouro Negro x Pérola. Although line ESAL 693 presented the lowest GCA value, one of its derived populations, ESAL 693 x H-4-7, had the highest SCA and heterosis values. The high correlation between heterosis and SCA indicates that heterosis can be useful when SCA is not available.

  7. A Comprehensive Phenotypic Investigation of the "Pod-Shattering Syndrome" in Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Maria L; Attene, Giovanna; Rodriguez, Monica; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Fois, Davide; Nanni, Laura; Gioia, Tania; Albani, Diego M; Papa, Roberto; Rau, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Seed shattering in crops is a key domestication trait due to its relevance for seed dispersal, yield, and fundamental questions in evolution (e.g., convergent evolution). Here, we focused on pod shattering in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), the most important legume crop for human consuption in the world. With this main aim, we developed a methodological pipeline that comprises a thorough characterization under field conditions, including also the chemical composition and histological analysis of the pod valves. The pipeline was developed based on the assumption that the shattering trait itself can be treated in principle as a "syndrome" (i.e., a set of correlated different traits) at the pod level. We characterized a population of 267 introgression lines that were developed ad-hoc to study shattering in common bean. Three main objectives were sought: (1) to dissect the shattering trait into its "components," of level (percentage of shattering pods per plant) and mode (percentage of pods with twisting or non-twisting valves); (2) to test whether shattering is associated to the chemical composition and/or the histological characteristics of the pod valves; and (3) to test the associations between shattering and other plant traits. We can conclude the following: Very high shattering levels can be achieved in different modes; shattering resistance is mainly a qualitative trait; and high shattering levels is correlated with high carbon and lignin contents of the pod valves and with specific histological charaterstics of the ventral sheath and the inner fibrous layer of the pod wall. Our data also suggest that shattering comes with a "cost," as it is associated with low pod size, low seed weight per pod, high pod weight, and low seed to pod-valves ratio; indeed, it can be more exaustively described as a syndrome at the pod level. Our work suggests that the valve chemical composition (i.e., carbon and lignin content) can be used for a high troughput phenotyping

  8. A Comprehensive Phenotypic Investigation of the “Pod-Shattering Syndrome” in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, Maria L.; Attene, Giovanna; Rodriguez, Monica; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Fois, Davide; Nanni, Laura; Gioia, Tania; Albani, Diego M.; Papa, Roberto; Rau, Domenico

    2017-01-01

    Seed shattering in crops is a key domestication trait due to its relevance for seed dispersal, yield, and fundamental questions in evolution (e.g., convergent evolution). Here, we focused on pod shattering in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), the most important legume crop for human consuption in the world. With this main aim, we developed a methodological pipeline that comprises a thorough characterization under field conditions, including also the chemical composition and histological analysis of the pod valves. The pipeline was developed based on the assumption that the shattering trait itself can be treated in principle as a “syndrome” (i.e., a set of correlated different traits) at the pod level. We characterized a population of 267 introgression lines that were developed ad-hoc to study shattering in common bean. Three main objectives were sought: (1) to dissect the shattering trait into its “components,” of level (percentage of shattering pods per plant) and mode (percentage of pods with twisting or non-twisting valves); (2) to test whether shattering is associated to the chemical composition and/or the histological characteristics of the pod valves; and (3) to test the associations between shattering and other plant traits. We can conclude the following: Very high shattering levels can be achieved in different modes; shattering resistance is mainly a qualitative trait; and high shattering levels is correlated with high carbon and lignin contents of the pod valves and with specific histological charaterstics of the ventral sheath and the inner fibrous layer of the pod wall. Our data also suggest that shattering comes with a “cost,” as it is associated with low pod size, low seed weight per pod, high pod weight, and low seed to pod-valves ratio; indeed, it can be more exaustively described as a syndrome at the pod level. Our work suggests that the valve chemical composition (i.e., carbon and lignin content) can be used for a high troughput

  9. Transcriptome analysis of salt tolerant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under saline conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hiz, Mahmut Can; Canher, Balkan; Niron, Harun; Turet, Muge

    2014-01-01

    .... Common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., a major protein source in developing countries, is highly affected by soil salinity and the information on genes that play a role in salt tolerance is scarce...

  10. Beans (Phaseolus ssp.) as a Model for Understanding Crop Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitocchi, Elena; Rau, Domenico; Bellucci, Elisa; Rodriguez, Monica; Murgia, Maria L.; Gioia, Tania; Santo, Debora; Nanni, Laura; Attene, Giovanna; Papa, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Here, we aim to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of the most significant outcomes in the literature regarding the origin of Phaseolus genus, the geographical distribution of the wild species, the domestication process, and the wide spread out of the centers of origin. Phaseolus can be considered as a unique model for the study of crop evolution, and in particular, for an understanding of the convergent phenotypic evolution that occurred under domestication. The almost unique situation that characterizes the Phaseolus genus is that five of its ∼70 species have been domesticated (i.e., Phaseolus vulgaris, P. coccineus, P. dumosus, P. acutifolius, and P. lunatus), and in addition, for P. vulgaris and P. lunatus, the wild forms are distributed in both Mesoamerica and South America, where at least two independent and isolated episodes of domestication occurred. Thus, at least seven independent domestication events occurred, which provides the possibility to unravel the genetic basis of the domestication process not only among species of the same genus, but also between gene pools within the same species. Along with this, other interesting features makes Phaseolus crops very useful in the study of evolution, including: (i) their recent divergence, and the high level of collinearity and synteny among their genomes; (ii) their different breeding systems and life history traits, from annual and autogamous, to perennial and allogamous; and (iii) their adaptation to different environments, not only in their centers of origin, but also out of the Americas, following their introduction and wide spread through different countries. In particular for P. vulgaris this resulted in the breaking of the spatial isolation of the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools, which allowed spontaneous hybridization, thus increasing of the possibility of novel genotypes and phenotypes. This knowledge that is associated to the genetic resources that have been conserved ex situ and in

  11. Agronomic performance of common bean in straw mulch systems and topdressing nitrogen rates in no-tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Pagan Loeiro da Cunha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTIn no-tillage systems, straw coverage on soil surface is the key to success, and the choice of crops for rotation is crucial to achieve the sustainability and quality that conservation agriculture requires. The objective of this study was to evaluate the agronomic performance of the common bean cultivar IAC Formoso sown in succession to three straw mulch systems (corn alone, corn/Urochloa ruziziensisintercrop and U. ruziziensisalone and topdress nitrogen rates (0; 40; 80; 120 and 160 kg ha-1N, at the four-leaf stage, three years after the implementation of no-tillage. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block split plot design, with three replications. Common bean highest yields were achieved in succession to U. ruziziensisalone and intercropped with corn. The corn/U. ruziziensisintercrop provided both straw and seed production, allowing for quality no-tillage. Topdressed nitrogen influenced the common bean yield when in succession to corn alone, U. ruziziensisalone and corn/U. ruziziensisintercrop in no-tillage.

  12. Identification of 14-3-3 Family in Common Bean and Their Response to Abiotic Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihua Li

    Full Text Available 14-3-3s are a class of conserved regulatory proteins ubiquitously found in eukaryotes, which play important roles in a variety of cellular processes including response to diverse stresses. Although much has been learned about 14-3-3s in several plant species, it remains unknown in common bean. In this study, 9 common bean 14-3-3s (PvGF14s were identified by exhaustive data mining against the publicly available common bean genomic database. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that each predicted PvGF14 was clustered with two GmSGF14 paralogs from soybean. Both epsilon-like and non-epsilon classes of PvGF14s were found in common bean, and the PvGF14s belonging to each class exhibited similar gene structure. Among 9 PvGF14s, only 8 are transcribed in common bean. Expression patterns of PvGF14s varied depending on tissue type, developmental stage and exposure of plants to stress. A protein-protein interaction study revealed that PvGF14a forms dimer with itself and with other PvGF14 isoforms. This study provides a first comprehensive look at common bean 14-3-3 proteins, a family of proteins with diverse functions in many cellular processes, especially in response to stresses.

  13. The Nutrient Uptake Efficiency, Crop Productivity and Quality of Rice Bean in Dry Land

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lolita Endang Susilowati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice bean is a group of beans that are rich in carbohydrates, proteins and fats. This plant is resistant to pests and diseases, as well as the broad adaptability. This study aims to obtain an efficient fertilization pattern on rice bean cultivation in dry land. The treatments consisted of 9 fertilization patterns which were RP0: no fertilizer (control; RP1: 100% recommendation fertilizer (50 kg Urea and 100 kg SP-36 ha-1; RP2: 5 Mg ha-1 manure plus 50% recommendation fertilizer; RP3: RP2 plus MVA; RP4: 5 Mg ha-1 Crotalaria sp compost plus 50% recommendation fertilizer; RP5: RP4 plus VAM; RP6: 2.5 t ha-1 manure, 2.5 Mg ha-1 Crotalaria sp compost plus 50% recommendation fertilizer; RP7: 1.5 Mg ha-1 manure, 1 Mg ha-1 Crotalaria sp compost plus 50% recommendation fertilizer; RP8: RP7 plus MVA. Fertilization treatments were arranged in RCBD and each treatment was repeated 3 times. The fertilization treatments had no significant effect on NUE. Productivity of rice bean in RP3 and RP5 reached 3.75 Mg ha-1, in RP2 and RP4 achieved 2.64 Mg ha-1, and in the control treatment reached 1.94 Mg ha-1. Carbohydrate content in seeds increased by 20% in the fertilization treatments compared to the control. Protein and anthocyanin content in all treatments were not significantly different. The combination of 5 Mg organic fertilizer (manure and / or Crotalaria compost, 50% recommendation fertilizer plus MVA was an efficient fertilization pattern to improve P fertilizer uptake efficiency (PUE, productivity and quality of rice bean crop in dry land.

  14. A high-throughput SNP marker system for parental polymorphism screening, and diversity analysis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; Cortés, Andrés J; Penmetsa, R Varma; Farmer, Andrew; Carrasquilla-Garcia, Noelia; Cook, Doug R

    2013-02-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection has become a marker system of choice, because of the high abundance of source polymorphisms and the ease with which allele calls are automated. Various technologies exist for the evaluation of SNP loci and previously we validated two medium throughput technologies. In this study, our goal was to utilize a 768 feature, Illumina GoldenGate assay for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) developed from conserved legume gene sequences and to use the new technology for (1) the evaluation of parental polymorphisms in a mini-core set of common bean accessions and (2) the analysis of genetic diversity in the crop. A total of 736 SNPs were scored on 236 diverse common bean genotypes with the GoldenGate array. Missing data and heterozygosity levels were low and 94 % of the SNPs were scorable. With the evaluation of the parental polymorphism genotypes, we estimated the utility of the SNP markers in mapping for inter-genepool and intra-genepool populations, the latter being of lower polymorphism than the former. When we performed the diversity analysis with the diverse genotypes, we found Illumina GoldenGate SNPs to provide equivalent evaluations as previous gene-based SNP markers, but less fine-distinctions than with previous microsatellite marker analysis. We did find, however, that the gene-based SNPs in the GoldenGate array had some utility in race structure analysis despite the low polymorphism. Furthermore the SNPs detected high heterozygosity in wild accessions which was probably a reflection of ascertainment bias. The Illumina SNPs were shown to be effective in distinguishing between the genepools, and therefore were most useful in saturation of inter-genepool genetic maps. The implications of these results for breeding in common bean are discussed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the GoldenGate system for SNP detection.

  15. Co-inoculation of Rhizobium tropici and Azospirillum brasilense in common beans grown under two irrigation depths

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    Amanda Ribeiro Peres²*

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The alternative technique of co-inoculation or mixed inoculation with symbiotic and non-symbiotic bacteria has been studied in leguminous plants. However, there are few field studies with common beans and under the influence of the amount of irrigated water. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of inoculation and co-inoculation of common beans with Rhizobium tropici and Azospirillum brasilense under two irrigation depths. The experiment was carried out in the winter of 2012 and 2013, in Selvíria, state of Mato Grosso do Sul. The experimental design was composed of randomized blocks in split-plot scheme with two irrigation depths in the plots (recommended for common beans and 75% of the recommended and five forms of nitrogen (N supply in the split-plots (control non-inoculated with 40 kg ha- 1 of N in topdressing, 80 kg ha- 1 of N in topdressing, A. brasilense inoculation with 40 kg ha-1 of N in topdressing, R. tropici inoculation with 40 kg ha-1 of N in topdressing, and co-inoculation of A. brasilense and R. tropici with 40 kg ha- 1 of N in topdressing with four repetitions. Co-inoculation increased nodulation in the second year of cultivation. None of the evaluated treatments increased the grain yield in relation to non-inoculated control with 40 kg ha-1 of nitrogen in topdressing, which presented average yield of 2,200 kg ha-1. The use of 75% of the recommended irrigation depth provides similar grain yield to the recommended irrigation depth in common beans cropped in winter.

  16. RESPONSE OF THE JAMAICA-BEAN-CORN POLYCULTURE CROPPING SYSTEM TO THREE TREATMENTS OF FERTILIZATION IN VILLAFLORES, CHIAPAS, MEXICO

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    Rosey Obet Ruiz-González

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The corn (Zeamays Linneo and bean (Phaseolusvulgaris Linneo are the economic basis to meet the basic needs of rural families, but these crops are no longer economically viable for various reasons and jeopardize the family livelihood and productive alternatives are needed to improve the rural economy. The research was conducted during the spring-summer cycle from 1999 to 2000 in Villaflores , Chiapas, in order to evaluate the response of polyculturejamaica-bean-corn three fertilization treatments ( 00-00-00 , 60-60-60 and 120-60-60 . The experimental design was random blocks with three fertilization treatments, seven patterns of crops, and three replications and performance in the three plant species and vegetative variables were evaluated. With the data an ANOVA was performed and the treatment means were compared with the test of Tukey (p ≤ 0.05. The best vegetative response of the jamaica was to associate it with beans and corn with 60-60 fertilization treatment - 60, getting as much of: foliage (170 hojasplanta-1, branches (31 ramasplanta-1, acorns (54 bellotasplanta-1 and increased performance of dried calyxes (698 kgha-1.The beans associated with maize without fertilizations showed increase in foliage (62 hojasplanta-1 and in monoculture with fertilization 60-60 - 60 had the best performance (1,565 kgha-1of beans. Corn had the best vegetative response (18 hojasplanta-1 associated with beans and fertilization 120 - 60-60, and the best performance was when teamed with the beans and the jamaica (7,667 kgha-1. The best equivalent land-use was 3.31 in jamaica-bean-corn crop pattern. The analysis of the results indicates that the jamaica by associating it with corn and beans represents a biological and economic production alternative to improve the economy of rural families in Mexican soils which are acidified.

  17. Genetic diversity, inter-gene pool introgression and nutritional quality of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Central Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; González, Laura F; Kimani, Paul M; Butare, Louis

    2010-07-01

    The Great Lakes region of Central Africa is a major producer of common beans in Africa. The region is known for high population density and small average farm size. The common bean represents the most important legume crop of the region, grown on over a third of the cultivated land area, and the per capita consumption is among the highest in the world for the food crop. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity in a collection of 365 genotypes from the Great Lakes region of Central Africa, including a large group of landraces from Rwanda as well as varieties from primary centers of diversity and from neighboring countries of Central Africa, such as the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, using 30 fluorescently labeled microsatellite markers and automated allele detection. In addition, the landraces were evaluated for their seed iron and zinc concentration to determine if genetic diversity influenced nutritional quality. Principal coordinate and neighbor-joining analyses allowed the separation of the landraces into 132 Andean and 195 Mesoamerican (or Middle American) genotypes with 32 landraces and 6 varieties intermediate between the gene pools and representing inter-gene pool introgression in terms of seed characteristics and alleles. Genetic diversity and the number of alleles were high for the collection, reflecting the preference for a wide range of seed types in the region and no strong commercial class preference, although red, red mottled and brown seeded beans were common. Observed heterozygosity was also high and may be explained by the common practice of maintaining seed and plant mixtures, a coping strategy practiced by Central African farmers to reduce the effects of abiotic and biotic stresses. Finally, nutritional quality differed between the gene pools with respect to seed iron and zinc concentration, while genotypes from the intermediate group were notably high in both minerals. In conclusion, this study has shown that

  18. 78 FR 4305 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... Fruit. DATES: Effective Date: January 22, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Tim Hoffmann, Director... Corporation 7 CFR Part 457 RIN 0563-AC39 Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop... corrections revised the Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions that published on Friday, December...

  19. Comparative bioinformatic analysis of genes expressed in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melotto, Maeli; Monteiro-Vitorello, Claudia B; Bruschi, Adriano G; Camargo, Luis E A

    2005-06-01

    To rapidly and cost-effectively generate gene expression data, we developed an annotated unigene database of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). In this study, 3 cDNA libraries were constructed from the bean breeding line SEL1308, 1 from young leaf and 2 from seedlings inoculated or not inoculated with the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magnus) Briosi & Cavara, which causes anthracnose in common bean. To this date, 5255 single-pass sequences have been included in the database after selection based on sequence quality. These ESTs were trimmed and clustered using the computer programs Phred and CAP3 to form a unigene collection of 3126 unique sequences. Within clusters, 318 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 68 insertions-deletions (indels) were found, indicating the presence of paralogous gene families in our database. Each unigene sequence was analyzed for possible function using their similarity to known genes represented in the GenBank database and classified into 14 categories. Only 314 unigenes showed significant similarities to Phaseolus genomic sequences and P. vulgaris ESTs, which indicates that 90% (2818 unigenes) of our database represent newly discovered common bean genes. In addition, 12% (387 unigenes) were shown to be specific to common bean. This study represents a first step towards the discovery of novel genes in beans and a valuable source of molecular markers for expressed gene tagging and mapping.

  20. Effect of silver reflective mulch and a summer squash trap crop on densities of immature Bemisia argentifolii (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) on organic bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H A; Koenig, R L; McAuslane, H J; McSorley, R

    2000-06-01

    Polyethylene mulch with a reflective silver stripe and a yellow summer squash, Cucurbita pepo L., trap crop were tested alone and in combination as tactics to reduce densities of Bemisia argentifolii Bellows & Perring eggs and nymphs, and incidence of bean golden mosaic geminivirus on snap bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L. Egg densities were consistently higher on squash than on bean, but egg densities and virus incidence were not lower on bean grown with squash than on bean grown in monoculture. Silver reflective mulch reduced egg densities compared with bean grown on bare ground during the first week after crop emergence for 2 of the 3 yr that the study was conducted. However, egg suppression by silver mulch was not enhanced by the presence of a squash trap crop when both tactics were combined. The obstacles to suppressing B. argentifolii through the use of trap crops are discussed.

  1. The morama bean (Tylosema esculentum): a potential crop for southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Jose C; Duodu, Kwaku G; Holse, Mette; Lima de Faria, Margarida D; Jordaan, Danie; Chingwaru, Walter; Hansen, Aase; Cencic, Avrelija; Kandawa-Schultz, Martha; Mpotokwane, Selalelo M; Chimwamurombe, Percy; de Kock, Henrietta L; Minnaar, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The morama bean is an underutilized leguminous oilseed native to the Kalahari Desert and neighboring sandy regions of Botswana, Namibia, and South Africa (Limpopo, North-West, Gauteng, and Northern Cape provinces), and forms part of the diet of the indigenous population in these countries. It is also known as gemsbok bean, moramaboontjie, elandboontjie, braaiboonjie, marama, marumana, tsi, tsin, gami, and ombanui. It is reported as an excellent source of good quality protein (29-39%); its oil (24-48%) is rich in mono- and di-unsaturated fatty acids and contains no cholesterol. Morama is a good source of micronutrients such as calcium, iron, zinc, phosphate, magnesium, and B vitamins including folate. It is also reported to be a potential source of phytonutrients including phenolic compounds (e.g., tannins), trypsin inhibitors, phytates, and oligosaccharides, components which have been shown in other foods to contribute to health in particular, prevention of noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and some cancers. From a nutritional and health perspective, the morama bean has potential commercial value as a cash crop and value-added products, particularly in the communities where it is found.

  2. Use of BABA and INA as activators of a primed state in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

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    Keren eMartínez-Aguilar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available To survive in adverse conditions, plants have evolved complex mechanisms that prime their defense system to respond and adapt to stresses. Their competence to respond to such stresses fundamentally depends on its capacity to modulate the transcriptome rapidly and specifically. Thus, chromatin dynamics is a mechanism linked to transcriptional regulation and enhanced defense in plants. For example, in Arabidopsis, priming of the SA-dependent defense pathway is linked to histone lysine methylation. Such modifications could create a memory of the primary infection that is associated with an amplified gene response upon exposure to a second stress-stimulus. In addition, the priming status of a plant for induced resistance can be inherited to its offspring. However, analyses on the molecular mechanisms of generational and transgenerational priming in the common bean (Phaseolus vulagris L., an economically important crop, are absent.Here, we provide evidence that resistance to P. syringae pv. phaseolicola infection was induced in the common bean with the synthetic priming activators BABA and INA. Resistance was assessed by evaluating symptom appearance, pathogen accumulation, changes in gene expression of defense genes, as well as changes in the H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks at the promoter-exon regions of defense-associated genes. We conclude that defense priming in the common bean occurred in response to BABA and INA and that these synthetic activators primed distinct genes for enhanced disease resistance.We hope that an understanding of the molecular changes leading to defense priming and pathogen resistance will provide valuable knowledge for producing disease-resistant crop varieties by exposing parental plants to priming activators, as well as to the development of novel plant protection chemicals that stimulate the plant's inherent disease resistance mechanisms.

  3. White mould of common bean incited by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Lib. de Bary in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, M A; Abou-el-Seoud, I; Rasmy, M R; Khater, Manar M

    2009-01-01

    White mould, caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a destructive yield-limiting disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Egypt. Forty eight isolate of S. sclerotiorum were isolated from diseased bean tissues taken from 9 geographical regions (Al-Behaira, Alexandria and Assiut governorates) during winter season in 2008. The pathogenicity studies showed that the tested bean cultivars (Bronco, Contender, Giza 6 and Nebraska) varied in disease incidence. Contender bean cultivar was more resistant than other cultivars. Whereas, the more virulent isolates were S5 and S6. Histology investigation of seedlings bean hypocotyls inoculated with S. sclerotiorum after 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after inoculation indicated that penetration of bean seedlings occurred, during the first 48 hours after inoculation, through the epidermis and the outer layer of the cortex. 72 hours after inoculation, damage extended deeper into the cortical cells. Infection took place inter-and interacellularly after 96 hours more damage occurred. In addition, the invasion of the fungal hyphae through the cortical cells occurred both inter-, and intracellularly. Moreover, the observed of electron microscope both transmission and scanning investigations concluded that penetrating hyphae progressed through bean seedlings tissues leading to complete destruction of epidermis, fully colonization and death of cortical cells, partial invasion of vascular tissues. However, presence of the fungal structures in pith cells was observed.

  4. Common Beans and Their Non-Digestible Fraction: Cancer Inhibitory Activity-An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Vega, Rocio; Oomah, B Dave; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Vergara-Castañeda, Haydé Azeneth

    2013-08-02

    The US Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid guidelines introduced a near doubling of the dietary recommendations for vegetables including dry beans-an important food staple in many traditional diets that can improve public health and nutrition. Populations with high legume (peas, beans, lentils) consumption have a low risk of cancer and chronic degenerative diseases. Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are known as a rich, reliable source of non-digested compounds like fiber, phenolics, peptides and phytochemicals that are associated with health benefits. Emerging evidence indicates that common bean consumption is associated with reduced cancer risk in human populations, inhibiting carcinogenesis in animal models and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cell cultures. Fiber may reduce the risk of premature death from all causes, whereas the whole non-digestible fraction from common beans exhibits anti-proliferative activity and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo colon cancer. The mechanisms responsible for this apparently protective role may include gene-nutrient interactions and modulation of proteins' expression. This review investigates the potential health benefits and bioactivity of beans on tumor inhibition, highlighting studies involving functional compounds, mainly non-digestible fractions that modulate genes and proteins, thereby, unraveling their preventive role against the development of cancer.

  5. Identification of common bean alleles resistant to anthracnose using RAPD

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    Ana L.M. Castanheira

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available RAPD markers were identified close to common bean alleles responsible for resistance to the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and may be useful in selecting plants resistant to this pathogen. DNA from F2 plants of the crosses Carioca 300V x P45, Carioca 300V x Ouro and P24 x Ouro was amplified by RAPD. Line P45 has the Co.4 allele for resistance, and the Ouro cultivar has the Co.5 allele. The primer OPC08 amplified a DNA fragment of about 1059 bp linked to the Co.4 allele. The recombination frequency was 0.133 (SE = 0.039; 95% CI = 0.056-0.211. Using the primer OPF10 a DNA fragment of about 912 bp was amplified and found to be associated with the Co.5 allele. The recombination frequency was 0.115 (SE = 0.038; 95% CI = 0.041-0.189. A second marker (1122 pb amplified by the OPR03 primer was identified in the population P24 x Ouro. The recombination frequency for this marker was 0.363 (SE = 0.081; 95% CI = 0.205-0.522. Both these markers flanked the Co.5 allele. The markers identified in this study may be useful in identifying lines with the Co.4 and Co.5 alleles.Marcadores RAPD foram identificados próximos de alelos do feijão responsáveis pela resistência ao Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, visando auxiliar na seleção de plantas resistentes ao patógeno. Empregou-se o método dos bulks segregantes de DNA extraídos de plantas F2 dos seguintes cruzamentos: Carioca 300V x P45, Carioca 300V x Ouro e P24 x Ouro. A linhagem P45 é portadora do alelo Co.4 de resistência e o cultivar Ouro é portador do alelo Co.5, os quais foram marcados. Procedeu-se à reação RAPD dos bulks e foi identificado o iniciador OPC08 que amplificou um fragmento de DNA com cerca de 1059 pb, ligado ao alelo Co.4. A freqüência de recombinação foi de 0,133 (erro padrão 0,039 e o intervalo de confiança foi 0,056 e 0,211, com 95% de probabilidade. Em relação ao alelo Co.5 foi identificado um fragmento de DNA amplificado pelo iniciador OPF10 com cerca de 912 pb, na

  6. Remote sensing monitoring of bean crop cultivated in the Boi Branco watershed (Brazil)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares da Silva, Natália; Sánchez-Román, Rodrigo; Marchamalo Sacristán, Miguel; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the concern of the effect of climate change on water availability on a global scale is getting bigger and bigger. In average, about 65 % of the world water consumption is devoted to irrigated agriculture. In countries such as Brazil, water scarcity has been a main issue in populated areas (i.e. São Paulo) in the last two years. This has affected not only water availability for the population but also irrigation water to maintain crop yield and Brazilian economy. Remote sensing is a tool broadly used in multiple fields of science such as water management in irrigated agriculture. Actually, there are several satellites moving around the earth, and they take images of every place in a weekly or biweekly basis. The images can be downloaded from the internet site at no cost by the users. Then, they are used to determine the vegetation index NDVI which is based in the energy reflected in red and infrared spectrum and it depends on the vegetation photosynthetic activity. Within the above context, this study focus on remote sensing monitoring of a bean crop located in the basin of Boi Branco, São Paulo - Brazil, which is irrigated by pivot center. The images from the Landsat and Modis satellites were downloaded throughout the bean growing period and then, they were processed and analyzed with the Qgis software. In addition, soil moisture was measured by several TDR probe sensors deployed in the irrigated area, and the leaf area index was measured as well in the field. Both variables were used to estimate the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for each bean phenology state.

  7. Reduction of antiproliferative capacities, cell-based antioxidant capacities and phytochemical contents of common beans and soybeans upon thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baojun; Chang, Sam K C

    2011-12-01

    The effects of boiling and steaming processes on the antiproliferative and cellular antioxidant properties, as well as phytochemicals, of two types of common beans (pinto and black beans) and two types of soybeans (yellow and black) were investigated. All thermal-processing methods caused significant (pphytic acid content (PAC) values in all bean types (except for TPC values in pressure-steamed yellow soybeans) as compared to those of the raw beans. All types of uncooked raw beans exhibited cellular antioxidant activities (CAA) in dose-dependent manners. Black soybeans exhibited the greatest CAA, followed by black beans, pinto beans and yellow soybeans. The CAA of cooked beans were generally diminished or eliminated by thermal processing. The hydrophilic extracts from raw pinto beans, black beans and black soybeans exhibited antiproliferation capacities against human gastric (AGS) and colorectal (SW480) cancer cells in dose-dependent manners. The raw yellow soybeans exhibited dose-dependent antiproliferation activities against the SW480 cells. Most of the cooked beans lost their antiproliferation capacities as observed in the raw beans. These results indicate that different processing methods may have various effects on phytochemical profiles and bioactivities. Overall, thermal processing caused a significant reduction of the health-promotion effects of beans.

  8. Implications of mitotic and meiotic irregularities in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, D C; Braz, G T; Dos Reis, G B; Techio, V H; Davide, L C; de F B Abreu, A

    2016-05-23

    The common bean has great social and economic importance in Brazil and is the subject of a high number of publications, especially in the fields of genetics and breeding. Breeding programs aim to increase grain yield; however, mitosis and meiosis represent under explored research areas that have a direct impact on grain yield. Therefore, the study of cell division could be another tool available to bean geneticists and breeders. The aim of this study was to investigate irregularities occurring during the cell cycle and meiosis in common bean. The common bean cultivar used was BRSMG Talismã, which owing to its high yield and grain quality is recommended for cultivation in Brazil. We classified the interphase nuclei, estimated the mitotic and meiotic index, grain pollen viability, and percentage of abnormalities in both processes. The mitotic index was 4.1%, the interphase nucleus was non-reticulated, and 19% of dividing somatic cells showed abnormal behavior. Meiosis also presented irregularities resulting in a meiotic index of 44.6%. Viability of pollen grains was 94.3%. These results indicate that the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã possesses repair mechanisms that compensate for changes by producing a large number of pollen grains. Another important strategy adopted by bean plants to ensure stability is the elimination of abnormal cells by apoptosis. As the common bean cultivar BRSMG Talismã is recommended for cultivation because of its good agronomic performance, it can be concluded that mitotic and meiotic irregularities have no negative influence on its grain quality and yield.

  9. Regulation of Copper Homeostasis and Biotic Interactions by MicroRNA 398b in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-López, Oswaldo; Mendoza-Soto, Ana B.; Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Sosa-Valencia, Guadalupe; Reyes, José L.; Hernández, Georgina

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are recognized as important post-transcriptional regulators in plants. Information about the roles of miRNAs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), an agronomically important legume, is yet scant. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the conserved miRNA: miR398b and its target Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase 1 (CSD1) in common bean. We experimentally validated a novel miR398 target: the stress up-regulated Nodulin 19 (Nod19). Expression analysis of miR398b and target genes –CSD1 and Nod19- in bean roots, nodules and leaves, indicated their role in copper (Cu) homeostasis. In bean plants under Cu toxicity miR398b was decreased and Nod19 and CSD1, that participates in reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification, were up-regulated. The opposite regulation was observed in Cu deficient bean plants; lower levels of CSD1 would allow Cu delivery to essential Cu-containing proteins. Composite common bean plants with transgenic roots over-expressing miR398 showed ca. 20-fold higher mature miR398b and almost negligible target transcript levels as well as increased anthocyanin content and expression of Cu-stress responsive genes, when subjected to Cu deficiency. The down-regulation of miR398b with the consequent up-regulation of its targets was observed in common bean roots during the oxidative burst resulting from short-time exposure to high Cu. A similar response occurred at early stage of bean roots inoculated with Rhizobium tropici, where an increase in ROS was observed. In addition, the miR398b down-regulation and an increase in CSD1 and Nod19 were observed in bean leaves challenged with Sclerotinia scleortiorum fungal pathogen. Transient over-expression of miR398b in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves infected with S. sclerotiorum resulted in enhanced fungal lesions. We conclude that the miR398b-mediated up-regulation of CSD and Nod19 is relevant for common bean plants to cope with oxidative stress generated in abiotic and biotic stresses. PMID

  10. Regulation of copper homeostasis and biotic interactions by microRNA 398b in common bean.

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    Loreto Naya

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs are recognized as important post-transcriptional regulators in plants. Information about the roles of miRNAs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., an agronomically important legume, is yet scant. The objective of this work was to functionally characterize the conserved miRNA: miR398b and its target Cu/Zn Superoxide Dismutase 1 (CSD1 in common bean. We experimentally validated a novel miR398 target: the stress up-regulated Nodulin 19 (Nod19. Expression analysis of miR398b and target genes -CSD1 and Nod19- in bean roots, nodules and leaves, indicated their role in copper (Cu homeostasis. In bean plants under Cu toxicity miR398b was decreased and Nod19 and CSD1, that participates in reactive oxygen species (ROS detoxification, were up-regulated. The opposite regulation was observed in Cu deficient bean plants; lower levels of CSD1 would allow Cu delivery to essential Cu-containing proteins. Composite common bean plants with transgenic roots over-expressing miR398 showed ca. 20-fold higher mature miR398b and almost negligible target transcript levels as well as increased anthocyanin content and expression of Cu-stress responsive genes, when subjected to Cu deficiency. The down-regulation of miR398b with the consequent up-regulation of its targets was observed in common bean roots during the oxidative burst resulting from short-time exposure to high Cu. A similar response occurred at early stage of bean roots inoculated with Rhizobium tropici, where an increase in ROS was observed. In addition, the miR398b down-regulation and an increase in CSD1 and Nod19 were observed in bean leaves challenged with Sclerotinia scleortiorum fungal pathogen. Transient over-expression of miR398b in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves infected with S. sclerotiorum resulted in enhanced fungal lesions. We conclude that the miR398b-mediated up-regulation of CSD and Nod19 is relevant for common bean plants to cope with oxidative stress generated in abiotic and biotic

  11. Consideraciones e importancia social en torno al cultivo del frijol en el centro de México Considerations and social importance of the bean crop in central Mexico

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    Dora Ma. Sangerman-Jarquín

    in national importance after maize. The production of pulses, mainly of dry beans, has dropped to a 3.2% rate, whereas population growth is higher than dry bean production. The dry bean seed is a natural source of protein and carbohydrates, is also rich in vitamin B such as niacin, folic acid and thiamine, provides iron, copper, zinc, phosphorus, potassium, magnesium and calcium, and contains high fiber content. There exist many classes of beans that are characterized by their seed size, color, shape and the type of plant growth. It is considered that in total there are 70 species in the genus, and at least 50 in Mexico; five species have been domesticated Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean, Phaseolus coccineus L. (runner bean, Phaseolus lunatus L. (lima bean, Phaseolus dumosus L. (fat kidney bean and Phaseolus acutifolius Gray (tepari bean. In Mexico, around 70 cultivars are grown, according to the standard seed classification they are: black, pinto, brown, yellow and pink. The bean crop possesses particular characteristics that are important in the context of food sovereignty, considering it as a staple food for rural and urban poor. The bean breeding program of the National Research Institute, Forestry, Agriculture and Livestock (INIFAP, at the Campo Experimental Valle de Mexico (CEVAMEX, has contributed in the development of the technology required for the country to achieve self-sufficiency in this crop. This technology includes improved varieties with higher yielding ability and better seed nutritive and cooking quality.

  12. Speed of nodulation of UMR 1899 and UMR 1597 in common bean breeding lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    The speed of nodulation of Rhizobium tropici UMR 1899 syn. CIAT 899 and Rhizobium etli UMR 1597 syn. CIAT 161 were examined with thirteen different common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes and breeding lines. Using a growth pouch assay, strains UMR 1899 and UMR 1597 were inoculated using common be...

  13. Repeatability of adaptability and stability parameters of common bean in unpredictable environments

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    Lidiane Kely de Lima

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the repeatability of adaptability and stability parameters of common bean between years, within each biennium from 2003 to 2012, in Minas Gerais state, Brazil. Grain yield data from trials of value for cultivation and use common bean were analyzed. Grain yield, ecovalence, regression coefficient, and coefficient of determination were estimated considering location and sowing season per year, within each biennium. Subsequently, a analysis of variance these estimates was carried out, and repeatability was estimated in the biennia. Repeatability estimate for grain yield in most of the biennia was relatively high, but for ecovalence and regression coefficient it was null or of small magnitude, which indicates that confidence on identification of common bean lines for recommendation is greater when using means of yield, instead of stability parameters.

  14. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

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    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  15. Common Beans and Their Non-Digestible Fraction: Cancer Inhibitory Activity—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Campos-Vega

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The US Department of Agriculture’s MyPyramid guidelines introduced a near doubling of the dietary recommendations for vegetables including dry beans—an important food staple in many traditional diets that can improve public health and nutrition. Populations with high legume (peas, beans, lentils consumption have a low risk of cancer and chronic degenerative diseases. Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. are known as a rich, reliable source of non-digested compounds like fiber, phenolics, peptides and phytochemicals that are associated with health benefits. Emerging evidence indicates that common bean consumption is associated with reduced cancer risk in human populations, inhibiting carcinogenesis in animal models and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cell cultures. Fiber may reduce the risk of premature death from all causes, whereas the whole non-digestible fraction from common beans exhibits anti-proliferative activity and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo colon cancer. The mechanisms responsible for this apparently protective role may include gene-nutrient interactions and modulation of proteins’ expression. This review investigates the potential health benefits and bioactivity of beans on tumor inhibition, highlighting studies involving functional compounds, mainly non-digestible fractions that modulate genes and proteins, thereby, unraveling their preventive role against the development of cancer.

  16. Symbiotic Efficiency of Native Rhizobia Nodulating Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Soils of Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaka, Fanuel; Dida, Mathews M; Opala, Peter A; Ombori, Omwoyo; Maingi, John; Osoro, Newton; Muthini, Morris; Amoding, Alice; Mukaminega, Dative; Muoma, John

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the abundance and symbiotic efficiency of native rhizobia nodulating common bean in Kisumu and Kakamega, Kenya. Soil sampling was carried out in three farms that had been used for growing common bean for at least two seasons and one fallow land with no known history of growing common bean or inoculation. Abundance of soil rhizobia and symbiotic efficiency (SE) were determined in a greenhouse experiment. Native rhizobia populations ranged from 3.2 × 10(1) to 3.5 × 10(4) cells per gram of soil. Pure bacterial cultures isolated from fresh and healthy root nodules exhibited typical characteristics of Rhizobium sp. on yeast extract mannitol agar media supplemented with Congo red. Bean inoculation with the isolates significantly (p rhizobia were higher when compared to a reference strain, CIAT 899 (67%), and ranged from 74% to 170%. Four isolates had SE above a second reference strain, Strain 446 (110%). Our results demonstrate the presence of native rhizobia that are potentially superior to the commercial inoculants. These can be exploited to enhance bean inoculation programmes in the region.

  17. Common Beans and Their Non-Digestible Fraction: Cancer Inhibitory Activity—An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Vega, Rocio; Oomah, B Dave; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Vergara-Castañeda, Haydé Azeneth

    2013-01-01

    The US Department of Agriculture’s MyPyramid guidelines introduced a near doubling of the dietary recommendations for vegetables including dry beans—an important food staple in many traditional diets that can improve public health and nutrition. Populations with high legume (peas, beans, lentils) consumption have a low risk of cancer and chronic degenerative diseases. Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are known as a rich, reliable source of non-digested compounds like fiber, phenolics, peptides and phytochemicals that are associated with health benefits. Emerging evidence indicates that common bean consumption is associated with reduced cancer risk in human populations, inhibiting carcinogenesis in animal models and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cell cultures. Fiber may reduce the risk of premature death from all causes, whereas the whole non-digestible fraction from common beans exhibits anti-proliferative activity and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo colon cancer. The mechanisms responsible for this apparently protective role may include gene-nutrient interactions and modulation of proteins’ expression. This review investigates the potential health benefits and bioactivity of beans on tumor inhibition, highlighting studies involving functional compounds, mainly non-digestible fractions that modulate genes and proteins, thereby, unraveling their preventive role against the development of cancer. PMID:28239123

  18. The effect of herbicides on Chenopodium album L. phenology in fodder beet, spring wheat and faba bean crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Wesołowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the time of occurrence of the emergence, budding, fruiting and seed shedding stages, as well as the degree of advancement of the white goosefoot fruiting and diaspores shedding stages in fodder beet, spring wheat and faba bean crops under mechanical and chemical weed control. Phenological observations were conducted in the years 2000-2002 at 10-day intervals, starting from the day of crop sowing on alluvial soil made of light loam. Chemically weed controlled objects were treated with herbicides: fodder beet - lenacil 80%; spring wheat - MCPA 30% + dicamba 4%; faba bean - linuron 50%. It was proven that the times of occurrence and the scale of the studied phenological stages of white goosefoot depended on the crop species, the in-crop weed control method and the pattern of weather conditions in the study years. White goosefoot had the most favourable conditions of growth in the fodder beet crop. The herbicides in the fodder beet and faba bean crops delayed the emergence and the time of occurrence of successive white goosefoot growth stages. These agents also decreased the degree of diaspores shedding by the weed species studied. The most white goosefoot specimens shed fruits on the mechanically weed controlled plots. The diaspores dissemination was promoted by a warm and moist growing season.

  19. Nutrient extraction and exportation by common bean cultivars under different fertilization levels: I - macronutrients

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    Rogério Peres Soratto

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of cultivars with a higher yield potential and the adoption of new technology have achieved high grain yields in common bean, which probably changed the demand for nutrients in this crop. However, there is almost no information about the periods of the cycle in which nutrients are most demanded at which quantities by the main cultivars. The objective of this study was to evaluate the macronutrient extraction and exportation by the common bean cultivars Pérola and IAC Alvorada, under different levels of NPK fertilization, on a dystroferric Red Nitosol, in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. The experiment was arranged in a randomized complete block (split plot design with four replications. The plots consisted of six treatments based on a 2 x 3 factorial model, represented by two cultivars and three NPK levels (PD0 - 'Pérola' without fertilization, PD1 - 'Pérola' with 50 % of recommended fertilization, PD2 - 'Pérola' with 100 % of recommended fertilization, AD0 - 'IAC Alvorada' without fertilization, AD1 - 'IAC Alvorada' with 50 % of recommended fertilization, and AD2 - 'IAC Alvorada' with 100 % of recommended fertilization and subplots sampled seven times during the cycle. At higher levels of NPK fertilization, the grain yield and macronutrient extraction and exportation of both cultivars were higher, but without statistical differences. Macronutrient absorption was higher in the treatments with 100 % of recommended NPK fertilization (average amounts per hectare: 140 kg N, 16.5 kg P, 120 kg K, 69 kg Ca, 17.9 kg Mg, and 16.3 kg S. Regardless of the treatment, the demand for N, P, K, Ca, and Mg was highest from 45 to 55 days after emergence (DAE, i.e., in the R7 stage (pod formation, while the highest S absorption rates were concentrated between 55 and 65 DAE. More than 70 % of P, between 58 and 69 % of N, 40 and 52 % of S, 40 and 48 % of K, and 35 and 45 % of Mg absorbed during the cycle was exported with grains, whereas less than 15

  20. Seed quality of common bean accessions under organic and conventional farming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Medeiros Gindri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Agrobiodiversity is essential for a sustainable food production, and the knowledge of the potential characteristics of landrace seeds may prompt farmers to adopt the habit of seed conservation for this species. This study aimed at categorizing landrace and commercial common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. accessions, according to the physiological quality (viability and vigor of seeds produced in the field, during two growing seasons, under organic and conventional farming systems. Germination percentage, field emergence, electrical conductivity, accelerated aging, cold test and seedling length were assessed. The landrace bean accessions exhibit diversity in the physiological seed quality, in terms of their viability and vigor. No differences were observed between the farming systems, in relation to the physiological quality of the seeds produced. The categorization of landrace common bean accessions allows to identify those with superior physiological seed quality.

  1. Management of the broad bean weevil (Bruchus rufimanus Boh.) in faba bean (Vicia faba L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Roubinet, Eve

    2016-01-01

    Summary Bruchus rufimanus Boh. is a common pest on faba beans (Vicia faba L.) all over Europe and worldwide. The area of faba bean production is increasing in Sweden and in Europe, partly encouraged by the CAP subsidies for legume crops and diversified crop rotations. At the same time, number of the insecticides commonly used against B. rufimanus have been removed from the market as pollinators risk to be harmed as the treatment timing corresponds to crop flowering. In Sweden, only one ins...

  2. Cooked common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) modulate renal genes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas-Soria, Consuelo; Pérez-Ramírez, Iza F; Caballero-Pérez, Juan; Guevara-Gonzalez, Ramón G; Guevara-Olvera, Lorenzo; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Guzman-Maldonado, Horacio S; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalía

    2015-07-01

    Food consumption with different bioactive compounds could reduce the risk of diabetic complications. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of cooked common beans on differentially expressed genes in whole kidney homogenates of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. After 4weeks of treatment with a cooked bean supplemented (10%) diet, animals fed with Flor de Mayo bean (FMB) exerted the greatest protective effect, since they presented the lowest blood glucose levels, consistent with an increase in blood insulin levels, a decrease in urine albumin and urea levels and an increase in creatinine clearance (P≤.05). Regarding the gene expression of kidneys evaluated using expressed sequence tag, consumption of cooked beans improved the expression of Glu1, Cps1, Ipmk, Cacna1c, Camk1, Pdhb, Ptbp3 and Pim1, which are related to the elimination of ammonium groups, the regulation of inflammatory and oxidative response, as well as cell signaling and apoptosis. In addition, the beneficial effects observed were not related to their polyphenolic and saponin profile, suggesting the activity of other bioactive compounds or the synergistic interaction of these compounds. These results suggest that the consumption of cooked common beans (FMB) might be used as an alternative for the regulation of genes related to renal alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Unraveling the efficiency of RAPD and SSR markers in diversity analysis and population structure estimation in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargar, Sajad Majeed; Farhat, Sufia; Mahajan, Reetika; Bhakhri, Ayushi; Sharma, Arjun

    2016-01-01

    Increase in food production viz-a-viz quality of food is important to feed the growing human population to attain food as well as nutritional security. The availability of diverse germplasm of any crop is an important genetic resource to mine the genes that may assist in attaining food as well as nutritional security. Here we used 15 RAPD and 23 SSR markers to elucidate diversity among 51 common bean genotypes mostly landraces collected from the Himalayan region of Jammu and Kashmir, India. We observed that both the markers are highly polymorphic. The discriminatory power of these markers was determined using various parameters like; percent polymorphism, PIC, resolving power and marker index. 15 RAPDs produced 171 polymorphic bands, while 23 SSRs produced 268 polymorphic bands. SSRs showed a higher PIC value (0.300) compared to RAPDs (0.243). Further the resolving power of SSRs was 5.241 compared to 3.86 for RAPDs. However, RAPDs showed a higher marker index (2.69) compared to SSRs (1.279) that may be attributed to their higher multiplex ratio. The dendrograms generated with hierarchical UPGMA cluster analysis grouped genotypes into two main clusters with various degrees of sub clustering within the cluster. Here we observed that both the marker systems showed comparable accuracy in grouping genotypes of common bean according to their area of cultivation. The model based STRUCTURE analysis using 15 RAPD and 23 SSR markers identified a population with 3 sub-populations which corresponds to distance based groupings. High level of genetic diversity was observed within the population. These findings have further implications in common bean breeding as well as conservation programs.

  4. Evapotranspiration and crop coefficients of corn in monoculture and intercropped with jack bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário S. P. de Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was carried out to determine the evapotranspiration (ETc and crop coefficients (Kc for four stages of “Caatingueiro” corn under the climate condition of Seropédica, RJ, Brazil, using weighing lysimeters. The field trial occurred in 2015, from March 18 to June 25, in two areas cultivated with “Caatingueiro’ corn intercropped with jack bean and in monoculture. The reference evapotranspiration (ETo was estimated by the FAO-56 Penman-Monteith model and the Kc values were determined by the ratio between ETc and ETo. The Kc values obtained for the intercropping and monoculture systems, were respectively: 0.78 (I; 1.01 (II; 1.10 (III and 1.01 (IV, and 0.62 (I; 0.92 (II; 1.27 (III and 0.81 (IV, and they were different from the values presented by FAO.

  5. Using deficit irrigation with treated wastewater to improve crop water productivity of sweet corn, chickpea, faba bean and quinoa

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    Abdelaziz HIRICH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Several experiments were conducted in the south of Morocco (IAV-CHA, Agadir during two seasons 2010 and 2011 in order to evaluate the effect of deficit irrigation with treated wastewater on several crops (quinoa, sweet corn, faba bean and chickpeas. During the first season (2010 three crops were tested, quinoa, chickpeas and sweet corn applying 6 deficit irrigation treatments during all crop stages alternating 100% of full irrigation as non-stress condition and 50% of full irrigation as water deficit condition applied during vegetative growth, flowering and grain filling stage. For all crops, the highest water productivity and yield were obtained when deficit irrigation was applied during the vegetative growth stage. During the second season (2011 two cultivars of quinoa, faba bean and sweet corn have been cultivated applying 6 deficit irrigation treatments (rainfed, 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of full irrigation only during the vegetative growth stage, while in the rest of crop cycle full irrigation was provided except for rainfed treatment. For quinoa and faba bean, treatment receiving 50% of full irrigation during vegetative growth stage recorded the highest yield and water productivity, while for sweet corn applying 75% of full irrigation was the optimal treatment in terms of yield and water productivity.

  6. Genetic diversity of indigenous common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. rhizobia from the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

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    Adalgisa Ribeiro Torres

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We characterized indigenous common bean rhizobia from five districts of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The isolates were trapped by two common bean varieties, the Mineiro Precoce (Andean origin and Ouro Negro (Mesoamerican origin. Analysis by BOX-PCR of selected isolates detected a high level of genetic diversity.

  7. Identification of soil-borne pathogens in a common bean root rot nursery in Isabela, Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limited research has been completed on the root rot complex of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the Caribbean, while yield losses of over 50% due to root rot disease have been reported worldwide. In this study, the predominant root rot pathogens in a 40-year old common bean root rot nurser...

  8. Genetic diversity of indigenous common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) rhizobia from the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Adalgisa Ribeiro; Cursino, Luciana; Muro-Abad, Júpiter Israel; Gomes, Eliane Aparecida; de Araújo, Elza Fernandes; Hungria, Mariangela; Cassini, Sérvio Túlio Alves

    2009-01-01

    We characterized indigenous common bean rhizobia from five districts of the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The isolates were trapped by two common bean varieties, the Mineiro Precoce (Andean origin) and Ouro Negro (Mesoamerican origin). Analysis by BOX-PCR of selected isolates detected a high level of genetic diversity. PMID:24031433

  9. Root environment is a key determinant of fungal entomopathogen endophytism following seed treatment in the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common bean is the most important food legume in the world. We examined the potential of the fungal entomopathogens Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae applied as seed treatments for their endophytic establishment in the common bean. Endophytic colonization in sterile sand:peat average...

  10. Can the critical temperature for photochemical damage in common bean plants be changed after a drought event?

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    Rafael Vasconcelos Ribeiro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Low water availability and high temperatures occur under field conditions and we hypothesize that the critical temperature for photochemical damage (TC in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. plants is increased by the occurrence of previous water deficit in a genotype-dependent manner. Five common bean cultivars A320, A222, Carioca, BAT477 and Ouro Negro were evaluated. Thirty days after seedlings emergence, one group of plants was exposed to water deficit for ten days and rehydrated and another one was maintained well hydrated during the experimental period. The minimum chlorophyll fluorescence (FO was monitored in leaf discs exposed to temperatures ranging from 25 to 45 oC and the TC values estimated. The previous water deficit did not affect TC, which varied between 38.8 and 43.8 oC when considering all cultivars and water regimes. Under well-watered conditions, BAT477 (41.9 oC and Carioca (43.8 oC presented higher TCthan Ouro Negro (38.8 oC. Our findings indicate a significant genotypic variation in thermal tolerance in Phaseolus vulgaris, an important crop trait to be considered in breeding programs.

  11. Molecular analysis of the parallel domestication of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in Mesoamerica and the Andes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Giardini, Alessandro; Rau, Domenico; Rodriguez, Monica; Biagetti, Eleonora; Santilocchi, Rodolfo; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi; Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the nucleotide diversity of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris, which is characterized by two independent domestications in two geographically distinct areas: Mesoamerica and the Andes. This provides an important model, as domestication can be studied as a replicate experiment. We used nucleotide data from five gene fragments characterized by large introns to analyse 214 accessions (102 wild and 112 domesticated). The wild accessions represent a cross-section of the entire geographical distribution of P. vulgaris. A reduction in genetic diversity in both of these gene pools was found, which was three-fold greater in Mesoamerica compared with the Andes. This appears to be a result of a bottleneck that occurred before domestication in the Andes, which strongly impoverished this wild germplasm, leading to the minor effect of the subsequent domestication bottleneck (i.e. sequential bottleneck). These findings show the importance of considering the evolutionary history of crop species as a major factor that influences their current level and structure of genetic diversity. Furthermore, these data highlight a single domestication event within each gene pool. Although the findings should be interpreted with caution, this evidence indicates the Oaxaca valley in Mesoamerica, and southern Bolivia and northern Argentina in South America, as the origins of common bean domestication. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Differences in common bean rhizobial populations associated with soil tillage management in southern Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaschuk, G.; Hungria, M.; Santos, J.C.P.; Berton-Junior, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Progressive adoption of no-tillage (NT) agriculture in the tropics is finally reversing physical, chemical, and biological erosion of soil and in Brazil, an estimated 19 Mha are now devoted to NT. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a main component of Brazilian agriculture, and enhancement of yi

  13. Dynamics of a Novel Highly Repetitive CACTA Family in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dongying; Zhao, Dongyan; Abernathy, Brian; Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo; Jiang, Ning; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-07-07

    Transposons are ubiquitous genomic components that play pivotal roles in plant gene and genome evolution. We analyzed two genome sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and identified a new CACTA transposon family named pvCACTA1. The family is extremely abundant, as more than 12,000 pvCACTA1 elements were found. To our knowledge, this is the most abundant CACTA family reported thus far. The computational and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses indicated that the pvCACTA1 elements were concentrated in terminal regions of chromosomes and frequently generated AT-rich 3 bp target site duplications (TSD, WWW, W is A or T). Comparative analysis of the common bean genomes from two domesticated genetic pools revealed that new insertions or excisions of pvCACTA1 elements occurred after the divergence of the two common beans, and some of the polymorphic elements likely resulted in variation in gene sequences. pvCACTA1 elements were detected in related species but not outside the Phaseolus genus. We calculated the molecular evolutionary rate of pvCACTA1 transposons using orthologous elements that indicated that most transposition events likely occurred before the divergence of the two gene pools. These results reveal unique features and evolution of this new transposon family in the common bean genome.

  14. Response of different common bean lines to Phaeoisariopsis griseola in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angular leaf spot (ALS), caused by Phaeoisariopsis griseola (Sacc.) Ferraris sin. Pseudocercospora griseola (Sacc.) Crous & U. Braun., is an important disease in common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. in the Caribbean and Central America. The wide pathogen variability makes it necessary to continuously m...

  15. Fungal endophytes in germinated seeds of the common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important food legume in the world, but its production is severely limited by several biotic and abiotic stressors. In search of a sustainable solution to this problem, we conducted a survey of fungal endophytes in 582 germinated seeds belonging to 11...

  16. Virulence of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Goid, is an important disease in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) in the dry and warmer areas of Puerto Rico and in much of the tropics and subtropics worldwide. The virulence of three isolates from Isabela (Mph-ISA-TARS), Juana Diaz (Mph-JD) a...

  17. Evaluation of common bean lines for adaptation to high temperatures in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    As in other regions worldwide, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in Central America and the Caribbean (CA/C) region is threatened by effects of climate change including increasing temperatures and drought due to variable rainfall patterns. One of the main alternatives for increasing ada...

  18. Molybdenum supply and biological fixation of nitrogen by two Brazilian common bean cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alinne da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The common bean has been considered to have low biological nitrogen fixation capacity; however, this process can be made more effective with molybdenum (Mo supplementation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of Mo rates on the growth and biological nitrogen fixation by two Brazilian common bean cultivars using the 15N isotope dilution technique. The experiment was performed in 2014 in a completely randomized design arranged in a 5 x 3 factorial scheme, corresponding to 5 rates of Mo (control, 40, 80, 120 and 240 g ha-1, the common bean cultivars Aporé, Ouro Negro and NORH-54 (a non-nodulating common bean cultivar, and three replicates. The application of Mo and the inoculation with rhizobia strains contributed to improving nitrogen fixation and grain weight. The cultivar Ouro Negro showed a higher number and weight of nodules and a higher amount of nitrogen derived from the atmosphere than the cultivar Aporé. The biological nitrogen fixation of Aporé was more dependent on the application of Mo. These results indicated that inoculation with Rhizobium strains and Mo supply effectively contributed to biological nitrogen fixation and improving grain production.

  19. Genetics and mapping of a new anthracnose resistance Locus in Andean common bean Paloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean cultivar Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican and Andean races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the fungal pathogen that causes the destructive anthracnose disease of common bean. Remarkably, Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican races 2047 and 3481, which are among the most virulent races ...

  20. Physiological analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars uncovers characteristics related to terminal drought resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales, Miguel A; Ocampo, Edilia; Rodríguez-Valentín, Rocío; Olvera-Carrillo, Yadira; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge; Covarrubias, Alejandra A

    2012-07-01

    Terminal drought is a major problem for common bean production because it occurs during the reproductive stage, importantly affecting seed yield. Diverse common bean cultivars with different drought susceptibility have been selected from different gene pools in several drought environments. To better understand the mechanisms associated with terminal drought resistance in a particular common bean race (Durango) and growth habit (type-III), we evaluated several metabolic and physiological parameters using two cultivars, Bayo Madero and Pinto Saltillo, with contrasting drought susceptibility. The common bean cultivars were submitted to moderate and severe terminal drought treatments under greenhouse conditions. We analyzed the following traits: relative growth rate, photosynthesis and transpiration rates, stomatal conductance, water-use efficiency, relative water content, proline accumulation, glycolate oxidase activity and their antioxidant response. Our results indicate that the competence of the drought-resistant cultivar (Pinto Saltillo) to maintain seed production upon terminal drought relies on an early response and fine-tuning of stomatal conductance, CO₂ diffusion and fixation, and by an increased water use and avoidance of ROS accumulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. ‘IAC Milênio’ – Common bean cultivar with high grain quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Morais Carbonell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Instituto Agronômico de Campinas – IAC registered the carioca type common bean cultivar IAC Milênio. The cultivar has a mean yield of 2831 kg ha-1, high grain quality with tolerance to darkening, and resistance to Fusarium oxysporum and physiological races 81, 89, and 95 of the anthracnose pathogen (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum.

  2. Dynamics of a Novel Highly Repetitive CACTA Family in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongying Gao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Transposons are ubiquitous genomic components that play pivotal roles in plant gene and genome evolution. We analyzed two genome sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and identified a new CACTA transposon family named pvCACTA1. The family is extremely abundant, as more than 12,000 pvCACTA1 elements were found. To our knowledge, this is the most abundant CACTA family reported thus far. The computational and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analyses indicated that the pvCACTA1 elements were concentrated in terminal regions of chromosomes and frequently generated AT-rich 3 bp target site duplications (TSD, WWW, W is A or T. Comparative analysis of the common bean genomes from two domesticated genetic pools revealed that new insertions or excisions of pvCACTA1 elements occurred after the divergence of the two common beans, and some of the polymorphic elements likely resulted in variation in gene sequences. pvCACTA1 elements were detected in related species but not outside the Phaseolus genus. We calculated the molecular evolutionary rate of pvCACTA1 transposons using orthologous elements that indicated that most transposition events likely occurred before the divergence of the two gene pools. These results reveal unique features and evolution of this new transposon family in the common bean genome.

  3. Sequence-based introgression mapping identifies candidate white mold tolerance genes in common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    White mold disease, caused by the necrotrophic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a major pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). More than 20 QTL were reported using multiple bi-parental populations. To study the disease in more detail, advanced back-cross populations seg...

  4. Genetic assessment of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions by peroxidase gene-based markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemli, Seda; Kaya, Hilal Betul; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2014-06-01

    Peroxidase, a plant-specific oxidoreductase, is a heme-containing glycoprotein encoded by a large multigenic family in plants. Plant peroxidases (POXs, EC 1.11.1.7) play important roles in many self-defense interactions in plants. Here, 67 common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes were studied using a POX gene-based marker method. Comparison of POX genes could resolve evolutionary relationships in common bean. Eighty fragments were obtained with 20 primer pairs that amplified one (POX8c) to eight (ATP29) bands, with a mean of four bands per primer pair. The average (polymorphic information content) PIC value for the POX products was 0.40. The maximum variation (93%) was found between Turkey (#33) and India (#52) and between Antalya (#33) and India (#53). The minimum variation (0%) was found among four pairs: Bozdag (#2) and Karadeniz (#38), Kirklareli (#11) and Turkey (#15, 16, 43), Bandirma (#13) and Turkey (#15, 16, 43), and Kirklareli (#10) and Bandirma (#22). UPGMA was used to discriminate the common bean genotypes into five clusters, while STRUCTURE software was used to investigate the genetic population structure. The results showed that POX gene family markers can be used to study genotypic diversity and provide new information for breeding programs and common bean improvement practices. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Transcriptome of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) through RNA-seq: nodulation, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean) is one of the most important grain legumes for direct human consumption. It comprises 50% of the grain legumes consumed worldwide and is important as a primary source of dietary protein in developing countries. We have performed next generation sequencing (RNA-seq) o...

  6. Treatment of sugar beet extraction juice stillage by natural coagulants extracted from common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prodanović Jelena M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distillery wastewaters have a great pollution potential, and pollution caused by them is one of the most critical environmental issues. This study is concerned with the coagulation efficiency of a new, environmental friendly, natural coagulant extracted from common bean seeds in the primary treatment of distillery wastewater in the bioethanol production from sugar beet juice. Active coagulation components were extracted from ground seeds of common bean with 0.5 mol/L NaCl. The obtained raw extract was used as a coagulant. The coagulation efficiency was measured by jar test at different pH values of wastewater, and a decrease in organic matter content was determined. The experiments confirmed that natural coagulant from common bean could be successfully used for the treatment of extraction juice distillery wastewater. The highest coagulation efficiencies were achieved at the pH 5.2 with a coagulant dose of 30 mL/L, and at the pH 8.5 with a coagulant dose of 5 mL/L, and they were 64.71% and 68.75% respectively. These encouraging results indicate that natural coagulant from common bean seeds is a potential alternative to conventional chemical coagulant/flocculant agents for treatment of wastewaters.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 43005

  7. BRSMG Uai: common bean cultivar with carioca grain type and upright plant architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Antonio Patto Ramalho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The common bean cultivar with carioca grain type, BRSMG Uai, is recommended for cultivation in Minas Gerais and stands out for its upright plant architecture, which facilitates cultivation and mechanical harvesting. This cultivar has high yield potential and is resistant to the major races of anthracnose that occur in region.

  8. Phenotypic variation in a core collection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeven, A.C.; Waninge, J.; Hintum, van Th.J.L.; Singh, S.P.

    1999-01-01

    Forty accessions, forming a core collection of mainly bush type of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm in the Netherlands, were evaluated for 14 qualitative and quantitative traits at the Agricultural University, Wageningen (WAU), the Netherlands in 1992. These and an additional 117 Du

  9. Visualization of resistance responses in Phaseolus vulgaris using reporter tagged clones of Bean common mosaic virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naderpour, Masoud; Johansen, Ida Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    Reporter tagged virus clones can provide detailed information on virus–host interactions. In Phaseolus vulgaris (bean), four recessive and one dominant gene are known to control infection by strains of the potyvirus species Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV). To study the interactions between BCMV...... breaking strains for further studies, BCMV RU1 was tagged with the sequence encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), which was visualized directly without destruction of the tissue. In this paper we present details of the construction of the infectious clone and discuss its application in studies of BCMV...

  10. Review: The Potential of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris as a Vehicle for Iron Biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolai Petry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Common beans are a staple food and the major source of iron for populations in Eastern Africa and Latin America. Bean iron concentration is high and can be further increased by biofortification. A major constraint to bean iron biofortification is low iron absorption, attributed to inhibitory compounds such as phytic acid (PA and polyphenol(s (PP. We have evaluated the usefulness of the common bean as a vehicle for iron biofortification. High iron concentrations and wide genetic variability have enabled plant breeders to develop high iron bean varieties (up to 10 mg/100 g. PA concentrations in beans are high and tend to increase with iron biofortification. Short-term human isotope studies indicate that iron absorption from beans is low, PA is the major inhibitor, and bean PP play a minor role. Multiple composite meal studies indicate that decreasing the PA level in the biofortified varieties substantially increases iron absorption. Fractional iron absorption from composite meals was 4%–7% in iron deficient women; thus the consumption of 100 g biofortified beans/day would provide about 30%–50% of their daily iron requirement. Beans are a good vehicle for iron biofortification, and regular high consumption would be expected to help combat iron deficiency (ID.

  11. Cowpeas and pinto beans: yields and light efficiency of candidate space crops in the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M.; Dempster, W. F.; Silverstone, S.; Alling, A.; Allen, J. P.; van Thillo, M.

    An experiment utilizing cowpeas Vigna unguiculata pinto beans Phaseolus vulgaris L and Apogee ultra-dwarf wheat was conducted in the soil-based closed ecological facility Laboratory Biosphere from February to May 2005 The lighting regime was 13 hours light 11 hours dark at a light intensity of 960 mu mol m -2 s -1 45 moles m -2 day -1 supplied by high-pressure sodium lamps The pinto beans and cowpeas were grown at two different plant densities The pinto bean produced 710 g m -2 total aboveground biomass and 341 g m -2 at 33 5 plants per m 2 and at 37 5 plants per m 2 produced 1092 g m -2 total biomass and 537 g m -2 of dry seed an increase of almost 50 Cowpeas at 28 plants m -2 yielded 1060 g m -2 of total biomass and 387 g seed m -2 outproducing the less dense planting by more than double 209 in biomass and 86 more seed as the planting of 21 plants m -2 produced 508 g m-2 of total biomass and 209 g m-2 of seed Edible yield rate EYR for the denser cowpea bean was 4 6 g m -2 day -1 vs 2 5 g m -2 day -1 for the less dense stand average yield was 3 5 g m -2 day -1 EYR for the denser pinto bean was 8 5 g m -2 day -1 vs 5 3 g m -2 day -1 average EYR for the pinto beans was 7 0 g m -2 day -1 Yield efficiency rate YER the ratio of edible to non-edible biomass was 0 97 for the dense pinto bean 0 92 for the less dense pinto bean and average 0 94 for the entire crop The cowpeas

  12. Development of an event-specific hydrolysis probe quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treml, Diana; Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-12-10

    A genetically modified (GM) common bean event, namely Embrapa 5.1, resistant to the bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV), was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Brazilian regulation for genetically modified organism (GMO) labeling requires that any food containing more than 1% GMO be labeled. The event-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method has been the primary trend for GMO identification and quantitation because of its high specificity based on the flanking sequence. This work reports the development of an event-specific assay, named FGM, for Embrapa 5.1 detection and quantitation by use of SYBR Green or hydrolysis probe. The FGM assay specificity was tested for Embrapa 2.3 event (a noncommercial GM common bean also resistant to BGMV), 46 non-GM common bean varieties, and other crop species including maize, GM maize, soybean, and GM soybean. The FGM assay showed high specificity to detect the Embrapa 5.1 event. Standard curves for the FGM assay presented a mean efficiency of 95% and a limit of detection (LOD) of 100 genome copies in the presence of background DNA. The primers and probe developed are suitable for the detection and quantitation of Embrapa 5.1.

  13. 75 FR 59057 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions and Macadamia Nut Crop...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... March 30, 2010 (75 FR 15778-15891). Need for Correction As published, the final regulation contained... Provisions and Macadamia Nut Crop Insurance Provisions; Correction AGENCY: Federal Crop Insurance Corporation... make corrections relating to the insurance of cotton and macadamia nuts that published March 30,...

  14. Identifying resistance gene analogs associated with resistances to different pathogens in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Camilo E; Acosta, Iván F; Jara, Carlos; Pedraza, Fabio; Gaitán-Solís, Eliana; Gallego, Gerardo; Beebe, Steve; Tohme, Joe

    2003-01-01

    ABSTRACT A polymerase chain reaction approach using degenerate primers that targeted the conserved domains of cloned plant disease resistance genes (R genes) was used to isolate a set of 15 resistance gene analogs (RGAs) from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Eight different classes of RGAs were obtained from nucleotide binding site (NBS)-based primers and seven from not previously described Toll/Interleukin-1 receptor-like (TIR)-based primers. Putative amino acid sequences of RGAs were significantly similar to R genes and contained additional conserved motifs. The NBS-type RGAs were classified in two subgroups according to the expected final residue in the kinase-2 motif. Eleven RGAs were mapped at 19 loci on eight linkage groups of the common bean genetic map constructed at Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical. Genetic linkage was shown for eight RGAs with partial resistance to anthracnose, angular leaf spot (ALS) and Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). RGA1 and RGA2 were associated with resistance loci to anthracnose and BGYMV and were part of two clusters of R genes previously described. A new major cluster was detected by RGA7 and explained up to 63.9% of resistance to ALS and has a putative contribution to anthracnose resistance. These results show the usefulness of RGAs as candidate genes to detect and eventually isolate numerous R genes in common bean.

  15. Elucidating the Potential of Native Rhizobial Isolates to Improve Biological Nitrogen Fixation and Growth of Common Bean and Soybean in Smallholder Farming Systems of Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Wandera Ouma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Identification of effective indigenous rhizobia isolates would lead to development of efficient and affordable rhizobia inoculants. These can promote nitrogen fixation in smallholder farming systems of Kenya. To realize this purpose, two experiments were conducted under greenhouse conditions using two common bean cultivars; Mwezi moja (bush type and Mwitemania (climbing type along with soybean cultivar SB 8. In the first experiment, the common bean cultivars were treated with rhizobia inoculants including a consortium of native isolates, commercial isolate (CIAT 899, a mixture of native isolates and CIAT 899, and a control with no inoculation. After 30 days, the crop was assessed for nodulation, shoot and root dry weights, and morphological features. In the second experiment, soybean was inoculated with a consortium of native isolates, commercial inoculant (USDA 110, and a mixture of commercial and native isolates. Remarkably, the native isolates significantly (p<0.001 increased nodulation and shoot dry weight across the two common bean varieties compared to the commercial inoculant, CIAT 899. Mixing of the native rhizobia species and commercial inoculant did not show any further increase in nodulation and shoot performance in both crops. Further field studies will ascertain the effectiveness and efficiency of the tested indigenous isolates.

  16. The effect of different crop plant densities on radiation absorption and use efficiency by corn (Zea mays L. and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. intercropped canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Rostami

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to determinate the effects of plant densities in intercropped corn (Zea mays L. and bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. on radiation absorption and use efficiency, an experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran during growing season of 2007-2008. This experiment was conducted in low input system. A randomized complete block design with three replications was used. Treatments were included bean intercropping with corn in normal density of bean plus 10%, 20% and 30% excess bean C (B+10%, C (B+20%, C (B+30%, increasing in density bean intercropping with corn in normal density of corn plus 10%, 20% and 30% excess corn B (C+10%, B (C+20%, B (C+30% and sole crops of corn (C and bean (B. Results indicated that leaf area index, radiation absorption, total dry matter and radiation use efficiency of corn increased in all intercropped treatments compared to sole cropping, but it reversed for bean. It seems that complementary and facilitative effects of intercropping were more for corn. Range of corn and bean radiation use efficiency was from 1.92 g.MJ-1 (in sole cropping and 0.72 g.MJ-1 {in (C+30% (B+30%} to 2.30 g.MJ-1 {in C (B+30%} and 1.45 g.MJ-1 (in sole cropping, respectively.

  17. Influence of different doses of FitoMas-E on common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelio Guevara Tejeda

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This work was developed in the Agricultural Enterprise “Omar Rivero Fonseca”, located in Manzanillo municipality, Granma province, in order to determine the effect of different doses of Fitomas-E on the vegetative growth variables in bean crop. Results showed differential responses in the evaluated variables: stem diameter, fruit length, number of leaves per plant, number of pod and seed number per fruit, depending on the different concentrations of Fitomas-E that were applied. The treatment with 60 mL was the most effective one.

  18. Characterization of Glomerella strains recovered from anthracnose lesions on common bean plants in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcelos, Quélen L; Pinto, Joyce M A; Vaillancourt, Lisa J; Souza, Elaine A

    2014-01-01

    Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is an important disease of common bean, resulting in major economic losses worldwide. Genetic diversity of the C. lindemuthianum population contributes to its ability to adapt rapidly to new sources of host resistance. The origin of this diversity is unknown, but sexual recombination, via the Glomerella teleomorph, is one possibility. This study tested the hypothesis that Glomerella strains that are frequently recovered from bean anthracnose lesions represent the teleomorph of C. lindemuthianum. A large collection of Glomerella isolates could be separated into two groups based on phylogenetic analysis, morphology, and pathogenicity to beans. Both groups were unrelated to C. lindemuthianum. One group clustered with the C. gloeosporioides species complex and produced mild symptoms on bean tissues. The other group, which belonged to a clade that included the cucurbit anthracnose pathogen C. magna, caused no symptoms. Individual ascospores recovered from Glomerella perithecia gave rise to either fertile (perithecial) or infertile (conidial) colonies. Some pairings of perithecial and conidial strains resulted in induced homothallism in the conidial partner, while others led to apparent heterothallic matings. Pairings involving two perithecial, or two conidial, colonies produced neither outcome. Conidia efficiently formed conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs), but ascospores never formed CATs. The Glomerella strains formed appressoria and hyphae on the plant surface, but did not penetrate or form infection structures within the tissues. Their behavior was similar whether the beans were susceptible or resistant to anthracnose. These same Glomerella strains produced thick intracellular hyphae, and eventually acervuli, if host cell death was induced. When Glomerella was co-inoculated with C. lindemuthianum, it readily invaded anthracnose lesions. Thus, the hypothesis was not supported: Glomerella strains from anthracnose

  19. Characterization of Glomerella strains recovered from anthracnose lesions on common bean plants in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quélen L Barcelos

    Full Text Available Anthracnose caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is an important disease of common bean, resulting in major economic losses worldwide. Genetic diversity of the C. lindemuthianum population contributes to its ability to adapt rapidly to new sources of host resistance. The origin of this diversity is unknown, but sexual recombination, via the Glomerella teleomorph, is one possibility. This study tested the hypothesis that Glomerella strains that are frequently recovered from bean anthracnose lesions represent the teleomorph of C. lindemuthianum. A large collection of Glomerella isolates could be separated into two groups based on phylogenetic analysis, morphology, and pathogenicity to beans. Both groups were unrelated to C. lindemuthianum. One group clustered with the C. gloeosporioides species complex and produced mild symptoms on bean tissues. The other group, which belonged to a clade that included the cucurbit anthracnose pathogen C. magna, caused no symptoms. Individual ascospores recovered from Glomerella perithecia gave rise to either fertile (perithecial or infertile (conidial colonies. Some pairings of perithecial and conidial strains resulted in induced homothallism in the conidial partner, while others led to apparent heterothallic matings. Pairings involving two perithecial, or two conidial, colonies produced neither outcome. Conidia efficiently formed conidial anastomosis tubes (CATs, but ascospores never formed CATs. The Glomerella strains formed appressoria and hyphae on the plant surface, but did not penetrate or form infection structures within the tissues. Their behavior was similar whether the beans were susceptible or resistant to anthracnose. These same Glomerella strains produced thick intracellular hyphae, and eventually acervuli, if host cell death was induced. When Glomerella was co-inoculated with C. lindemuthianum, it readily invaded anthracnose lesions. Thus, the hypothesis was not supported: Glomerella strains from

  20. Biocontrol of seed pathogens and growth promotion of common bean seedlings by Trichoderma harzianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Diego Costa Carvalho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate isolates of Trichoderma harzianum regarding biocontrol of common bean seed-borne pathogens, plant growth promotion, and rhizosphere competence. Five isolates of T. harzianum were evaluated and compared with commercial isolate (Ecotrich, Carboxin+Thiram, and an absolute control. Bean seeds of the cultivar Jalo Precoce, contaminated with Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, were microbiolized with antagonists, and seed health tests were carried out. Isolates were evaluated on autoclaved substrate and in field conditions. Ten days after sowing (DAS, plant length was measured. To test rhizosphere competence, isolates were applied in boxes containing autoclaved washed sand, and root colonization was evaluated at 10 DAS, using five plants per box. The most effective isolates in the seed health tests were: CEN287 and CEN289 to control Aspergillus; the commercial isolate to control Cladosporium; and CEN287 and CEN316 to control S. sclerotiorum. Isolates CEN289 and CEN290 promoted bean growth in greenhouse and field. Seed treatment with T. harzianum reduces the incidence of Aspergillus, Cladosporium, and S. sclerotiorum in 'Jalo Precoce' common bean seeds.

  1. Changes in weed infestation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. under conditions of strip intercropping and different weed control methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Głowacka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted in the years 2004-2006 in a private farm in the village of Frankamionka in Zamość district. There were two experimental factors: I. Cultivation methods - sole cropping and strip intercropping; and II. Tending methods - mechanical, mechanical-chemical, and chemical weed control. The subject of the study was weed infestation of the Mela variety of common bean. Beans were sown between 30 April and 5 May. Weed infestation was assessed in the last week before harvesting by determining its floristic composition and the frequency of occurrence of particular weed species, as well as the air-dry weight of weeds. The dominant weed species were Galinsoga parviflora, Echinochloa crus-galli, Chenopodium album, and Amaranthus retroflexus, which comprised 84.7% of the total number of weeds. Strip intercropping markedly reduced the number of weeds per unit area (by 50%, as well as the dry weight of their aerial parts. The most effective method of weed control was the mechanical-chemical method, which resulted in the lowest occurrence of weeds. It also significantly reduced the weight of weeds.

  2. Interferência e nível de dano econômico de Brachiaria plantaginea e Ipomoea nil na cultura do feijão comum Interference and economic threshold of Brachiaria plantaginea and Ipomoea nil in the common bean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribas Antonio Vidal

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available As pesquisas acerca do impacto da interferência das plantas daninhas sobre as culturas normalmente são realizadas com uma única espécie infestante, quando na realidade podem ocorrer diversas. Os objetivos deste trabalho foram avaliar a interferência de Brachiaria plantaginea e Ipomoea nil sobre o rendimento de grãos do feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris e determinar o nível de dano econômico (NDE de cada espécie na cultura. Foram realizados dois experimentos a campo com as cultivares de feijão 'IPR Graúna' (Grupo Preto e 'UTF-06' (Grupo Carioca em convivência com infestações mistas em diferentes proporções aleatórias das espécies B. plantaginea e I. nil. Modelos de regressão múltiplos foram utilizados para determinar a capacidade de interferência de cada espécie daninha sobre a produtividade da cultura. O impacto de interferência de cada planta de I. nil correspondeu a 2,6 e 0,25 quando comparada a cada planta de B. plantaginea, dependente das proporções relativas na comunidade infestante e das condições de cada experimento. A cultivar 'IPR Graúna' apresentou maior habilidade competitiva do que 'UTF-06'. O NDE foi dependente da proporção relativa de cada espécie daninha na comunidade e foi obtido sob baixas infestações (The researches about the impact of weed interference on crops are usually performed with a single weed species, when in reality there are numerous. The objective of this study was to evaluate the interference of Brachiaria plantaginea and Ipomoea nil on the grain yield of French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris and to determine the economic weed threshold (EWT of each species on the crop. Two field experiments were conducted with bean cultivars 'IPR Graúna' (Black group and 'UTF-06' (Carioca group in coexistence with random proportions of mixed infestations of B. plantaginea and I. nil. Multiple regression models were used to determine the interference abi1lity of each weed species on crop productivity. The

  3. Single strand conformation polymorphism based SNP and Indel markers for genetic mapping and synteny analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Marcela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Expressed sequence tags (ESTs are an important source of gene-based markers such as those based on insertion-deletions (Indels or single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Several gel based methods have been reported for the detection of sequence variants, however they have not been widely exploited in common bean, an important legume crop of the developing world. The objectives of this project were to develop and map EST based markers using analysis of single strand conformation polymorphisms (SSCPs, to create a transcript map for common bean and to compare synteny of the common bean map with sequenced chromosomes of other legumes. Results A set of 418 EST based amplicons were evaluated for parental polymorphisms using the SSCP technique and 26% of these presented a clear conformational or size polymorphism between Andean and Mesoamerican genotypes. The amplicon based markers were then used for genetic mapping with segregation analysis performed in the DOR364 × G19833 recombinant inbred line (RIL population. A total of 118 new marker loci were placed into an integrated molecular map for common bean consisting of 288 markers. Of these, 218 were used for synteny analysis and 186 presented homology with segments of the soybean genome with an e-value lower than 7 × 10-12. The synteny analysis with soybean showed a mosaic pattern of syntenic blocks with most segments of any one common bean linkage group associated with two soybean chromosomes. The analysis with Medicago truncatula and Lotus japonicus presented fewer syntenic regions consistent with the more distant phylogenetic relationship between the galegoid and phaseoloid legumes. Conclusion The SSCP technique is a useful and inexpensive alternative to other SNP or Indel detection techniques for saturating the common bean genetic map with functional markers that may be useful in marker assisted selection. In addition, the genetic markers based on ESTs allowed the construction

  4. Pathogenic variability within race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and its implications for common bean breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Chamma Davide

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide pathogenic variability among and within races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum has complicated theprocess of obtaining cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris that are resistant to anthracnose. Six isolates were inoculated into twelvedifferential cultivars and seven commercial cultivars of the common bean at concentrations in the range 102 to 106 sporesmL-1. Information concerning the vertical and horizontal resistance of hosts and the virulence of isolates was obtained fromdiallel analysis. It was clear that the set of differential cultivars recommended for the determination of races of C. lindemuthianumis inefficient in detecting differences within race 65, and it is suggested that new sources of resistance should be identified andadded to the cultivar set. There were significant differences in the virulence of isolates from race 65, with isolates CL 837 and CL844 being the most virulence. No horizontal resistance was detected in the C. lindemuthianum-common bean system.

  5. Influence of the composition of common bean extracts on their coagulation ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukić Dragana V.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation and flocculation are the most used methods for removal of turbidity of water. Recently, many studies have focused on the investigation of natural coagulants for this purpose. In view of the fact that extracts of common bean have coagulation activity, this study is concerned with the chemical composition of these extracts and their influence on the coagulation activity. Extraction was conducted with distilled water, 0.5M NaCl and 1M NaCl and total sugars content, proteins, phytic acid and total phenolics content and their coagulation activity were determined in the obtained extracts. These experiments confirmed that an extraction time of 10 minutes is sufficient for the extraction of active coagulant components from common bean seeds and that water is satisfactorily efficient and most economical solvent.

  6. Occurrence of isoflavonoids in Brazilian common bean germplasm (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Paula Feliciano; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Yamaguchi, Lydia Fumiko; Kato, Massuo Jorge; Carbonell, Sérgio Augusto Morais

    2014-10-08

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is present in the daily diet of various countries and, as for other legumes, has been investigated for its nutraceutical potential. Thus, 16 genotypes from different gene pools, representing seven types of seed coats and different responses to pathogens and pests, were selected to verify their isoflavone contents. The isoflavonoids daidzein and genistein and the flavonols kaempferol, myricetin, and quercetin were found. Grains of the black type showed the highest concentrations of isoflavonoids and were the only ones to exhibit daidzein. IAC Formoso, with high protein content and source of resistance to anthracnose, showed the greatest concentration of genistein, representing around 11% of the content present in soybean, as well as high levels of kaempferol. Arc 1, Raz 55, and IAC Una genotypes showed high content of coumestrol. The results suggest the use of IAC Formoso to increase the nutraceutical characteristics in common bean.

  7. Novel players in the AP2-miR172 regulatory network for common bean nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Íñiguez, Luis P; Nova-Franco, Bárbara; Hernández, Georgina

    2015-01-01

    The intricate regulatory network for floral organogenesis in plants that includes AP2/ERF, SPL and AGL transcription factors, miR172 and miR156 along with other components is well documented, though its complexity and size keep increasing. The miR172/AP2 node was recently proposed as essential regulator in the legume-rhizobia nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Research from our group contributed to demonstrate the control of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) nodulation by miR172c/AP2-1, however no other components of such regulatory network have been reported. Here we propose AGLs as new protagonists in the regulation of common bean nodulation and discuss the relevance of future deeper analysis of the complex AP2 regulatory network for nodule organogenesis in legumes.

  8. Common bean breeding for resistance to anthracnose and angular leaf spot assisted by SCAR molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmar Silvério da Rocha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to assess the genetic potential of inbred carioca common bean families from five populations derived from crossings involving elite lines and a disease-resistant line (Rudá- R, and to assess the efficiency of SCAR molecular markers in selecting plants resistant to anthracnose and angular leaf spot, at the time of bulk formation. Plant architecture, yield and grain type were assessed. Significant effect among families within population was observed, suggesting wide genetic variability for the characters assessed. Twenty-six superior families were selected. The families contained the greatest number of markers, identified by SCAR molecular markers in the F4 generation. Eighteen of these families were resistant to the races 65 and 453 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and five were resistant to the race 63.23 of Pseudocercospora griseola. Thus selection assisted by SCAR markers, in the F4 generation, was an important tool in common bean br e eding.

  9. SOWING DENSITIES AND NPK AND LIMING LEVELS ON COMMON BEAN YIELD, IN CONVENTIONAL CROPPING SYSTEM, IN PONTA GROSSA, PARANÁ STATE, BRAZIL DENSIDADES DE SEMEADURA E NÍVEIS DE NPK E CALAGEM NA PRODUÇÃO DO FEIJOEIRO SOB PLANTIO CONVENCIONAL, EM PONTA GROSSA, PARANÁ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando de Albuquerque

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available

    The objective of this study was to identify the most appropriate plant populations and fertilizer-liming levels for the conventional crop system, with the Iapar 81 cultivar, a type II common bean, on a heavy clay soil in Ponta Grossa, Paraná State, Brazil. An experiment was carried out in the 2003/2004 summer rainy growing season. The experimental design was a randomized block with four replications, and treatments in a 4 x 4 factorial scheme, with four populations (100 thousand, 200 thousand, 300 thousand, and 400 thousand plants ha-1 and four NPK-liming levels (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 times the recommended doses of NPK and lime. Plant height and grain yield, with their primary components (pod number per plant, grain number per pod and one hundred grains weight, were evaluated. Results allowed concluding that the increase of NPK-lime levels improved the plant height by 48%, the pod number per plant by 66%, and the grain yield by 88%, while the increase of plant population resulted in a decrease of 18% for plant height and 65% for pod number per plant, with no effect on the grain yield.

    KEY-WORDS: Phaseolus vulgaris; plant population; fertilization; soil liming.

    O presente estudo teve como objetivo identificar populações de plantas e níveis de adubação e calagem mais adequados para o plantio convencional da cultivar de

  10. BRS Ártico - Common bean cultivar with exportstandard white grain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helton Santos Pereira

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BRS Ártico is a common bean cultivar with white grains with international standard size (62 g per 100 seeds, appropriate for cultivation in the Central region of Brazil and the state of Paraná. The cycle is semi-early, the yield potential 2677 kg ha-1 and BRS Ártico has moderate resistance to rust and curtobacterium wilt.

  11. Characterization of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum isolates using differential cultivars of common bean in Santa Catarina State, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Celeste Gonçalves-Vidigal; Claudia Thomazella; Pedro Soares Vidigal Filho; Marcus Vinícius Kvitschal; Haroldo Tavares Elias

    2008-01-01

    In 2003 and 2004, 32 isolates of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum obtained from the infected plants of field-grown common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Santa Catarina state, Brazil were analyzed based on the virulence to 12 differential cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Thirteen distinct races were identified, six of which had not been reported previously in Santa Catarina. This is the first report of the occurrence of 67, 83,101,103,105, and 581 races of C. lindemuthianum. Race 65 was most ...

  12. Agronomic performance of common bean third crop under irrigation in the northwestern region of Paraná StateDesempenho agronômico do feijoeiro comum de terceira safra sob irrigação na região Noroeste do Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Viana Vieira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This research was done to evaluate the yield and yield components of bean third crop under irrigation depths in the northwestern region of Paraná State. The experiment was conducted in Arenito Campus of the State University of Maringa, Cidade Gaúcha city. The research was implanted with six irrigation depths (0, 104.1, 171.8, 192.4, 222.9 and 333 mm and four replicates with a randomized block design and plot banded. The plants number per meter (NPM, pods per plant number (NVP, grains per pod number (NGV, hundred grains weight (MCG, crop height (AP and height of first pod (AIPV were evaluated. The yield (PROD, pods per plant number (NVP, grains per pod number (NGV and hundred grains weight (MCG responded signicantly to irrigation depths. The highest yield, 2224 kg ha-1 was obtained with application of greater depth, equal to 333 mm.O objetivo do trabalho foi avaliar a produtividade e os componentes de produção da cultura do feijoeiro de terceira safra sob diferentes lâminas de irrigação na região Noroeste do Paraná. O experimento foi em área experimental da Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Campus do Arenito, em Cidade Gaúcha – PR. O trabalho foi implantado com seis lâminas de irrigação (0, 104,1, 171,8, 192,4, 222,9 e 333 mm e quatro repetições, com delineamento de blocos ao acaso e esquema de parcelas em faixas. Foram avaliados o número de plantas por metro (NPM, número de vagens por planta (NVP, número de grãos por vagem (NGV, massa de cem grãos (MCG, altura das plantas (AP e altura de inserção da primeira vagem (AIPV. A produtividade (PROD e os componentes número de vagens por planta (NVP, número de grãos por vagem (NGV e massa de cem grãos (MCG responderam de forma linear e crescente às lâminas de irrigação. A maior produtividade, 2224 kg ha-1, foi obtida com aplicação da maior lâmina, igual a 333 mm

  13. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. genotypes for drought stress adaptation in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena Darkwa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress linked with climate change is one of the major constraints faced by common bean farmers in Africa and elsewhere. Mitigating this constraint requires the selection of resilient varieties that withstand drought threats to common bean production. This study assessed the drought response of 64 small red-seeded genotypes of common bean grown in a lattice design replicated twice under contrasting moisture regimes, terminal drought stress and non-stress, in Ethiopia during the dry season from November 2014 to March 2015. Multiple plant traits associated with drought were assessed for their contribution to drought adaptation of the genotypes. Drought stress determined by a drought intensity index was moderate (0.3. All the assessed traits showed significantly different genotypic responses under drought stress and non-stress conditions. Eleven genotypes significantly (P ≤ 0.05 outperformed the drought check cultivar under both drought stress and non-stress conditions in seed yielding potential. Seed yield showed positive and significant correlations with chlorophyll meter reading, vertical root pulling resistance force, number of pods per plant, and seeds per pod under both soil moisture regimes, indicating their potential use in selection of genotypes yielding well under drought stress and non-stress conditions. Clustering analysis using Mahalanobis distance grouped the genotypes into four groups showing high and significant inter-cluster distance, suggesting that hybridization between drought-adapted parents from the groups will provide the maximum genetic recombination for drought tolerance in subsequent generations.

  14. Epistasis in intra- and inter-gene pool crosses of the common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, J C; Ramalho, M A P; Abreu, A F B

    2016-02-26

    Epistasis has been shown to have an important role in the genetic control of several quantitative traits in the common bean. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of epistasis in intra- and inter-pool gene crosses of the common bean. Four elite lines adapted to Brazilian conditions were used as parents, two from the Andean gene pool (ESAL 686; BRS Radiante) and two from the Mesoamerican gene pool (BRSMG Majestoso; BRS Valente). Four F2 populations were obtained: "A" (ESAL 686 x BRS Radiante), "B" (BRSMG Majestoso x BRS Valente), "C" (BRS Radiante x BRSMG Majestoso), and "D" (BRS Valente x ESAL 686). A random sample of F2 plants from each population was backcrossed to parents and F1 individuals, according to the triple test cross. Three types of progenies from each population were evaluated in contiguous trials. Seed yield and 100-seed weight were evaluated. Dominance genetic variance was predominant in most cases. However, the estimates of genetic variance may be biased by the occurrence of linkage disequilibrium and epistasis. Epistasis was detected for both traits; however, the occurrence differed among the populations and between the two traits. The results of this study reinforce the hypothesis that epistasis is present in the genetic control of traits in the common bean and suggest that the phenomenon is more frequent in inter-gene pool crosses than in intra-gene pool crosses.

  15. Selection of common bean lines with high grain yield and high grain calcium and iron concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerinéia Dalfollo Ribeiro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic improvement of common bean nutritional quality has advantages in marketing and can contribute to society as a food source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability for grain yield, calcium and iron concentrations in grains of inbred common bean lines obtained by different breeding methods. For this, 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Pedigree method and 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Single-Seed Descent (SSD method. The lines showed genetic variability for grain yield, and concentrations of calcium and iron independently of the method of advancing segregating populations. The Pedigree method allows obtaining a greater number of lines with high grain yield. Selection using the SSD method allows the identification of a larger number of lines with high concentrations of calcium and iron in grains. Weak negative correlations were found between grain yield and calcium concentration (r = -0.0994 and grain yield and iron concentration (r = -0.3926. Several lines show genetic superiority for grain yield and concentrations of calcium and iron in grains and their selection can result in new common bean cultivars with high nutritional quality.

  16. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes for drought stress adaptation in Ethiopia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwabena Darkwa; Daniel Ambachewa; Hussein Mohammed; Asrat Asfaw; Matthew W. Blairc

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress linked with climate change is one of the major constraints faced by common bean farmers in Africa and elsewhere. Mitigating this constraint requires the selection of resilient varieties that withstand drought threats to common bean production. This study assessed the drought response of 64 small red-seeded genotypes of common bean grown in a lattice design replicated twice under contrasting moisture regimes, terminal drought stress and non-stress, in Ethiopia during the dry season from November 2014 to March 2015. Multiple plant traits associated with drought were assessed for their contribution to drought adaptation of the genotypes. Drought stress determined by a drought intensity index was moderate (0.3). All the assessed traits showed significantly different genotypic responses under drought stress and non-stress conditions. Eleven genotypes significantly (P ≤0.05) outperformed the drought check cultivar under both drought stress and non-stress conditions in seed yielding potential. Seed yield showed positive and significant correlations with chlorophyll meter reading, vertical root pulling resistance force, number of pods per plant, and seeds per pod under both soil moisture regimes, indicating their potential use in selection of genotypes yielding well under drought stress and non-stress conditions. Clustering analysis using Mahalanobis distance grouped the genotypes into four groups showing high and significant inter-cluster distance, suggesting that hybridization between drought-adapted parents from the groups will provide the maximum genetic recombination for drought tolerance in subsequent generations.

  17. Stress induced acquisition of somatic embryogenesis in common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Ponce, José Luis; López, Liliana; León-Ramírez, Claudia G; Jofre-Garfias, Alba E; Verver-y-Vargas, Aurora

    2015-03-01

    Common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L. has been shown to be a recalcitrant plant to induce somatic embryogenesis (SE) under in vitro conditions. We used an alternative strategy to induce SE in common bean based upon the use of a cytokinin (BAP) coupled with osmotic stress adaptation instead of SE response that is induced by auxins. Explants derived from zygotic embryos of common bean were subjected to osmotic stress (sucrose 12 % w/v, 0.5 M) in the presence of BAP 10 mg/L and adenine free base 40 mg/L to induce somatic embryos from specific competent cells of the apical meristem and cotyledonary node. Somatic embryos were obtained from the competent cells in a direct response (direct SE). In a secondary response (secondary SE), those somatic embryos formed proembryogenic masses (PEM) that originated/developed into secondary somatic embryos and showed the SE ontogeny. Maturation of somatic embryos was achieved by using different osmolality media and converted to plants. Full-visible light spectrum was necessary to achieve efficient plant regeneration. Long-term recurrent SE was demonstrated by propagation of PEM at early stages of SE. This protocol is currently being applied for stable genetic transformation by means of Agrobacterium tumefaciens and bioballistics as well as for basic biochemical and molecular biology experiments.

  18. Selection of anthracnose resistant common beans using detached leaves in partially controlled environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Campos Pereira

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to evaluate the possibility of selecting anthracnose resistant common bean plants using detached primary leaves in partially controlled environment of a greenhouse and identify differences in the reaction of genotypes to anthracnose. The common bean cultivars Ouro Negro, OuroVermelho, ManteigãoFosco 11, Rudá, Rudá-R, VP8, BRSMG Madrepérola, Pérola, MeiaNoite and BRSMG Talismãwere characterizedfor resistance to the races 65, 81 and 453 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum and the method of detached primary leaves was compared to the method with the traditional inoculation of plants at the phenological stage V2. The lines Rudá, Rudá-R and Pérola were inoculated with the races 65 and 453 of C. lindemuthianum, aiming to assess the rate of coincidence of anthracnose severity by both inoculation methods. In general, the two methods presented similar results for the reaction of the cultivars. The use of detached primary leaves of common bean plants in the partially controlled environment was feasible for selection of plants resistant to anthracnose and has the advantages of low-needed infrastructure and reduction of resources, space and time.

  19. Common bean genotypes for agronomic and market-related traits in VCU trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Fernando Chiorato

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Value for Cultivation and Use (VCU trials are undertaken when evaluating improved common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. lines, and knowledge of agronomic and market-related traits and disease reaction is instrumental in making cultivar recommendations. This study evaluates the yield, cooking time, grain color and reaction to anthracnose (Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, Fusarium wilt (Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli and Curtobacterium wilt (Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens pv. flaccumfaciens of 25 common bean genotypes derived from the main common bean breeding programs in Brazil. Seventeen VCU trials were carried out in the rainy season, dry season and winter season from 2009 to 2011 in the state of São Paulo. Analyses of grain color and cooking time were initiated 60 days after harvest, and disease reaction analyses were performed in the laboratory under controlled conditions. In terms of yield, no genotype superior to the controls was observed for any of the seasons under consideration. Grains from the dry season exhibited better color, while the rainy season led to the shortest cooking times. The following genotypes BRS Esteio, BRS Esplendor and IAC Imperador were resistant to anthracnose, Fusarium wilt and Curtobacterium wilt and, in general, genotypes with lighter-colored grains were more susceptible to anthracnose and Fusarium wilt.

  20. Induction of ferritin synthesis by water deficit and iron excess in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, Daiane Mariele; Colombo, Carlos Augusto; Chiorato, Alisson Fernando; Carbonell, Sergio Augusto Morais

    2014-03-01

    Ferritins are molecules for iron storage present in most living beings. In plants, ferritin is an essential iron homeostasis regulator and therefore plays a fundamental role in control of iron induced by oxidative stress or by excess of iron ions. Ferritin gene expression is modulated by various environmental factors, including the intensity of drought, cold, light and pathogenic attack. Common bean, one of the most important species in the Brazilian diet, is also affected by insufficiency or lack of water. Thus, the present study was conducted for the purpose of determining the levels of expression of ferritins transcripts in leaf tissues of three common bean cultivars (BAT 477, Carioca Comum and IAC-Diplomata) under osmotic shock caused by polyethylene glycol 6000 and by iron excess. The expression of three ferritins genes (PvFer1, PvFer2 and PvFer3), determined by quantitative PCR, indicated a difference in the expression kinetics among the cultivars. All the ferritin genes were actively transcribed under iron excess and water deficit conditions. The cultivars most responsive to treatments were BAT 477 and IAC-Diplomata. All the cultivars responded to treatments. Nevertheless, the ferritin genes were differentially regulated according to the cultivars. Analysis of variance indicated differences among cultivars in expression of the genes PvFer1 and PvFer3. Both genes were most responsive to treatments. This result suggests that ferritin genes may be functionally important in acclimatization of common bean under iron excess or water deficit conditions.

  1. Potential of sunflower, castor bean, common buckwheat and vetiver as lead phytoaccumulators

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    Jailson do C. Alves

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Studies concerning the tolerance, absorption and distribution of heavy metals in plants are essential for the success of phytoremediation programs. The present study was carried out in order to evaluate the potential of the sunflower, castor bean, common buckwheat and vetiver as lead phytoaccumulators. The species were grown in nutrient solution containing increasing doses of Pb (0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg L-1 during a 30-day exposure period. A completely randomized split-plot design was used, with a 4 x 5 factorial and three replicates. Significant reductions of dry matter of the root, shoot and whole plant were found in the all species under study as a function of the increased Pb doses. Vetiver showed higher tolerance to Pb contamination; sunflower and castor bean had intermediate tolerance and the common buckwheat proved to be the most sensitive species. The concentration and total content of Pb in plant compartments were significantly affected by the increased Pb doses in solution, and higher accumulation of this element was observed, in general, in the roots of the studied species. Common buckwheat proved to be not much promising for Pb-phytoremediation programs; sunflower showed potential for Pb phytoextraction and castor bean and vetiver were the most appropriate for Pb phytostabilization.

  2. Artificial intelligence in the selection of common bean genotypes with high phenotypic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Barroso, L M A; Nascimento, M; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-04-28

    Artificial neural networks have been used for various purposes in plant breeding, including use in the investigation of genotype x environment interactions. The aim of this study was to use artificial neural networks in the selection of common bean genotypes with high phenotypic adaptability and stability, and to verify their consistency with the Eberhart and Russell method. Six trials were conducted using 13 genotypes of common bean between 2002 and 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados. The experimental design was a randomized block with three replicates. Grain yield data were submitted to individual and joint variance analyses. The data were then submitted to analysis of adaptability and stability through the Eberhart and Russell and artificial neural network methods. There was high concordance between the methodologies evaluated for discrimination of phenotypic adaptability of common bean genotypes, indicating that artificial neural networks can be used in breeding programs. Based on both approaches, the genotypes Aporé, Rudá, and CNFv 8025 are recommended for use in unfavorable, general and favorable environments, respectively by the grain yield above the overall average of environments and high phenotypic stability.

  3. Short-Term Local Adaptation of Historical Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Varieties and Implications for In Situ Management of Bean Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Klaedtke

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing both the stakes of traditional European common bean diversity and the role farmers’ and gardeners’ networks play in maintaining this diversity, the present study examines the role that local adaptation plays for the management of common bean diversity in situ. To the purpose, four historical bean varieties and one modern control were multiplied on two organic farms for three growing seasons. The fifteen resulting populations, the initial ones and two populations of each variety obtained after the three years of multiplication, were then grown in a common garden. Twenty-two Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR markers and 13 phenotypic traits were assessed. In total, 68.2% of tested markers were polymorphic and a total of 66 different alleles were identified. FST analysis showed that the genetic composition of two varieties multiplied in different environments changed. At the phenotypic level, differences were observed in flowering date and leaf length. Results indicate that three years of multiplication suffice for local adaptation to occur. The spatial dynamics of genetic and phenotypic bean diversity imply that the maintenance of diversity should be considered at the scale of the network, rather than individual farms and gardens. The microevolution of bean populations within networks of gardens and farms emerges as a research perspective.

  4. Short-Term Local Adaptation of Historical Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Varieties and Implications for In Situ Management of Bean Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaedtke, Stephanie M; Caproni, Leonardo; Klauck, Julia; de la Grandville, Paul; Dutartre, Martin; Stassart, Pierre M; Chable, Véronique; Negri, Valeria; Raggi, Lorenzo

    2017-02-28

    Recognizing both the stakes of traditional European common bean diversity and the role farmers' and gardeners' networks play in maintaining this diversity, the present study examines the role that local adaptation plays for the management of common bean diversity in situ. To the purpose, four historical bean varieties and one modern control were multiplied on two organic farms for three growing seasons. The fifteen resulting populations, the initial ones and two populations of each variety obtained after the three years of multiplication, were then grown in a common garden. Twenty-two Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) markers and 13 phenotypic traits were assessed. In total, 68.2% of tested markers were polymorphic and a total of 66 different alleles were identified. FST analysis showed that the genetic composition of two varieties multiplied in different environments changed. At the phenotypic level, differences were observed in flowering date and leaf length. Results indicate that three years of multiplication suffice for local adaptation to occur. The spatial dynamics of genetic and phenotypic bean diversity imply that the maintenance of diversity should be considered at the scale of the network, rather than individual farms and gardens. The microevolution of bean populations within networks of gardens and farms emerges as a research perspective.

  5. Common bacterial blight resistance QTL BC420 and SU91 effect on seed yield, seed weight and canning quality in Dry Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic resistance is useful for integrated control of common bacterial blight (CBB) disease which limits dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production worldwide. Resistance QTL from tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) and other sources have been used to develop common bean lines with high lev...

  6. Effective Use of Water and Increased Dry Matter Partitioned to Grain Contribute to Yield of Common Bean Improved for Drought Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Polania

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is the most important food legume in the diet of poor people in the tropics. Drought causes severe yield loss in this crop. Identification of traits associated with drought resistance contributes to improving the process of generating bean genotypes adapted to these conditions. Field studies were conducted at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT, Palmira, Colombia, to determine the relationship between grain yield and different parameters such as effective use of water (EUW, canopy biomass and dry partitioning indices (pod partitioning index, harvest index and pod harvest index in elite lines selected for drought resistance over the past decade. Carbon isotope discrimination (CID was used for estimation of water use efficiency (WUE. The main objectives were: (i to identify specific morpho-physiological traits that contribute to improved resistance to drought in lines developed over several cycles of breeding and that could be useful as selection criteria in breeding; and (ii to identify genotypes with desirable traits that could serve as parents in the corresponding breeding programs. A set of 36 bean genotypes belonging to the Middle American gene pool were evaluated under field conditions with two levels of water supply (irrigated and drought over two seasons. Eight bean lines (NCB 280, NCB 226, SEN 56, SCR 2, SCR 16, SMC 141, RCB 593 and BFS 67 were identified as resistant to drought stress. Resistance to terminal drought stress was positively associated with EUW combined with increased dry matter partitioned to pod and seed production and negatively associated with days to flowering and days to physiological maturity. Differences in genotypic response were observed between grain CID and grain yield under irrigated and drought stress. Based on phenotypic differences in CID, leaf stomatal conductance, canopy biomass and grain yield under drought stress, the lines tested were classified into

  7. Effective Use of Water and Increased Dry Matter Partitioned to Grain Contribute to Yield of Common Bean Improved for Drought Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polania, Jose A.; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Beebe, Stephen; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume in the diet of poor people in the tropics. Drought causes severe yield loss in this crop. Identification of traits associated with drought resistance contributes to improving the process of generating bean genotypes adapted to these conditions. Field studies were conducted at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Palmira, Colombia, to determine the relationship between grain yield and different parameters such as effective use of water (EUW), canopy biomass, and dry partitioning indices (pod partitioning index, harvest index, and pod harvest index) in elite lines selected for drought resistance over the past decade. Carbon isotope discrimination (CID) was used for estimation of water use efficiency (WUE). The main objectives were: (i) to identify specific morpho-physiological traits that contribute to improved resistance to drought in lines developed over several cycles of breeding and that could be useful as selection criteria in breeding; and (ii) to identify genotypes with desirable traits that could serve as parents in the corresponding breeding programs. A set of 36 bean genotypes belonging to the Middle American gene pool were evaluated under field conditions with two levels of water supply (irrigated and drought) over two seasons. Eight bean lines (NCB 280, NCB 226, SEN 56, SCR 2, SCR 16, SMC 141, RCB 593, and BFS 67) were identified as resistant to drought stress. Resistance to terminal drought stress was positively associated with EUW combined with increased dry matter partitioned to pod and seed production and negatively associated with days to flowering and days to physiological maturity. Differences in genotypic response were observed between grain CID and grain yield under irrigated and drought stress. Based on phenotypic differences in CID, leaf stomatal conductance, canopy biomass, and grain yield under drought stress, the lines tested were classified into two

  8. EFFECTS OF PLANTING DATE AND SPATIAL ARRANGEMENT ON COMMON BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris) YIELD UNDER WEED-FREE AND WEEDY CONDITIONS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ESMAEILZADEH, S; AMINPANAH, H

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACTTo evaluate the effect of planting date and spatial pattern on common bean yield under weed-free and weed-infested conditions, an experiment was conducted in Kelachay, Northern Iran, in 2013...

  9. Plantio direto de mamona 'IAC 80' com culturas alimentares No tillage of castor bean 'IAC 80' with food crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Pries Devide

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o desempenho da mamona 'IAC 80' cultivada em fileiras duplas, no espaçamento 4,0 x (1,0 x 1,0 m em plantio direto na palha da aveia branca; consorciada com culturas alimentares. O cereal foi utilizado para a produção de grãos (1.375 kg ha-1 e cobertura do solo (1.593 kg ha-1 MS; ciclagem de 35 kg K ha-1. Os consortes foram semeados nas entrelinhas duplas de mamona (Ma: Ma + milho; Ma + feijão; Ma + milho + feijão e Ma + milho + abóbora. Apesar de suscetível ao mofo cinzento, a IAC 80 produziu 1.060 kg ha-1 de grãos; do milho foram colhidas 22.542 espigas verdes ha-1 (5.333 kg ha-1 significando um aporte de 3,15 t ha-1 MS (39 kg N ha-1; 58 kg K ha-1. A abóbora e o feijão não produziram colheitas comerciais. O sistema contendo aveia, mamona e milho, apresentou produtividade satisfatória, contribuindo para a produção de bioenergia com segurança alimentar e conservação ambiental.The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of castor bean 'IAC 80' grown in double rows spaced at 4.0 x (1.0 x 1.0 m in no-tillage in the white oat straw, intercropped with food crops. The cereal was used for grain production (1375 kg ha-1 and soil coverage (1593 kg ha-1 MS; cycling of 35 kg K ha-1. The associated cultivation was double seeded between the lines of castor beans (Ma: Ma + corn, beans + Ma, Ma + beans and maize corn Ma + pumpkin. The cv. IAC 80, though susceptible to gray mold, produced 1060 kg ha-1 grain; corn ears were harvested with 22.542 ha-1 (5.333 kg ha-1, meaning an input of 3.15 t ha-1 MS (39 kg N ha-1, 58 kg K ha-1. Pumpkin and bean crops did not yield commercial crops. The system containing oats, castor beans, and corn yielded satisfactory and contributed to the production of bioenergy with food security and environmental conservation.

  10. Evaluation of indigenous Trichoderma isolates from Manipur as biocontrol agent against Pythium aphanidermatum on common beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamala, Th; Indira, S

    2011-12-01

    Pythium aphanidermatum is one of the common causal pathogen of damping-off disease of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in Manipur. A total of 110 indigenous Trichoderma isolates obtained from North east India were screened for their biocontrol activity which can inhibit the mycelial growth of P. aphanidermatum, the causal organism of damping-off in beans. Out of the total isolates, 32% of them showed strong antagonistic activity against P. aphanidermatum under in vitro condition and subsequently 20 best isolates were selected based on their mycelial inhibition capacity against P. aphanidermatum for further analysis. Different biocontrol mechanisms such as protease, chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase activity, cellulase and production of volatile and non-volatile compounds were also assayed. Based on their relative biocontrol potency, only three indigenous Trichoderma isolates (T73, T80 and T105) were selected for pot culture experiment against damping-off diseases in common beans. In greenhouse experiment, Trichoderma isolates T-105 significantly reduced the pre- and post-emergence damping-off disease incidence under artificial infection with P. aphanidermatum and showed highest disease control percentage.

  11. Genetic Improvement of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Common Bean Genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Reza Golparvar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fifty common bean genotypes were cultivated in two separately field trials at the research station of Islamic Azad University, Khorasgan Branch during 2008-2009. The experimental design was randomized complete block. Bean seeds were inoculated by Rhizobium legominosarum biovar Phaseoli isolate L-109 in one of the experiments before sowing. The dose of Rhizobium for seed inoculation was 7 miligrams of bacteria for 1 kilogram of seed. The second experiment was control. The second experiment was analyzed in the same way as the first except for biological nitrogen fixation. The results showed definite positive and significant correlation in percentage of nitrogen fixation with some other been characters. Step-wise regression designated that total nitrogen percentage in shoot, number of nodules per plant and biomass yield accounted for 93.8% of variation expect for nitrogen fixation percent. Path analysis indicated that total nitrogen percentage in shoot, number of nodules per plant and biomass yield have direct and positive effect on nitrogen fixation index. Hence, total nitrogen percentage in shoot, number of nodules per plant and biomass yield are promising indirect selection criteria for genetic improvement of nitrogen fixation capability in common bean genotypes.

  12. Relationship among antimutagenic, antioxidant and enzymatic activities of methanolic extract from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardador-Martínez, Anaberta; Albores, Arnulfo; Bah, Moustapha; Calderón-Salinas, Victor; Castaño-Tostado, Eduardo; Guevara-González, Ramón; Shimada-Miyasaka, Armando; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe

    2006-12-01

    Common beans are rich in phenolic compounds, which can provide health benefits to the consumer. The objective of this work was to study the relationship among antimutagenicity, antioxidant and enzymatic activities of methanolic extract and trolox by principal components multivariate analysis. Antimutagenicity of phenolic compounds present in methanolic extract from the seed coat of common beans (P. vulgaris, Flor de Mayo Bajío cultivar) and trolox against AFB1 mutagenicity were evaluated in the Salmonella typhimurium microsuspension assay. Antioxidant capacity of methanolic extract and trolox were evaluated using beta-carotene and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryhydrazyl (DPPH) in vitro model assays. Cythrome P450 activity was measured by fluorometric assay. For phenolic extract, trolox and phenolic extract+trolox, the inhibition on AFB1 mutagenicity in tester strain TA100 was 47, 59 and 69%, respectively. While in TA98 was 39, 48 and 68%. The inhibition of phenolic compounds, trolox and phenolic compounds+trolox on cytochrome P450 (CYP450) activity was 48, 59 and 88%, respectively. Correlation analysis showed that phenolic extract and trolox have high antimutagenic and antioxidant activity and also inhibited enzymatic activity. The results suggest that the primary mechanism of action of phenolic compounds in beans against AFB1 mutagenicity may be extra-cellular in the microsuspension assay.

  13. Genetic progress and potential of common bean families obtained by recurrent selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatércia Ferreira Alves

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate the genetic gain of two recurrent selection cycles in common bean breeding and identify families with the potential to generate superior lines. The base population, cycle zero (C0, was obtained by combining 20 carioca bean parents, populations with favorable phenotypes for several agronomically important traits. The parents were recombined in a circulant diallel scheme, in which each parent participated in two crosses, generating 20 populations. From these populations, families were derived and evaluated for three seasons in the generations F2:3, F2:4 and F2:5. The same procedures of recombination and evaluation in C0 were performed in cycle one (CI. The genetic gain for yield, estimated from the simultaneous evaluation of the 40 best families of each cycle, was 8.6%. Families with potential to generate superior lines to cultivar Pérola were identified, especially among the CI families.

  14. Rhizobium paranaense sp. nov., an effective N2-fixing symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with broad geographical distribution in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Andrade, Diva Souza; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N), the nutrient most required for plant growth, is key for good yield of agriculturally important crops. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can benefit from bacteria collectively called rhizobia, which are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen (N2) in root nodules and supplying it to the plant. Common bean is amongst the most promiscuous legume hosts; several described species, in addition to putative novel ones have been reported as able to nodulate this legume, although not always effectively in terms of fixing N2. In this study, we present data indicating that Brazilian strains PRF 35(T), PRF 54, CPAO 1135 and H 52, currently classified as Rhizobium tropici, represent a novel species symbiont of common bean. Morphological, physiological and biochemical properties differentiate these strains from other species of the genus Rhizobium, as do BOX-PCR profiles (less than 60 % similarity), multilocus sequence analysis with recA, gyrB and rpoA (less than 96.4 % sequence similarity), DNA-DNA hybridization (less than 50 % DNA-DNA relatedness), and average nucleotide identity of whole genomes (less than 92.8.%). The novel species is effective in nodulating and fixing N2 with P. vulgaris, Leucaena leucocephala and Leucaena esculenta. We propose the name Rhizobium paranaense sp. nov. for this novel taxon, with strain PRF 35(T) ( = CNPSo 120(T) = LMG 27577(T) = IPR-Pv 1249(T)) as the type strain.

  15. Effects of altitude above sea level on the cooking time and nutritional value of common beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressani, R; Chon, C

    1996-01-01

    The present study was conducted with the objective to determine the effects of altitude above sea level, on the cooking time and nutritional value of common black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Three 100 g samples of the Ostua variety were cooked at 8 individual locations, ranging in altitude from 0 to 2256 meters, in Guatemala, to establish water uptake and cooking time. The cooked samples were separated into cooked beans and cooking broth for chemical analysis. This included moisture, protein, lysine, tannins, total and enzyme susceptible starch, and fiber fractionation. The cooking liquor was analyzed for total solids, moisture, protein, ash and K. A 1200 g sample was cooked for the cooking time established previously, for biological testing of nutritional value, which included Net Protein Ratio (NPR), Protein Efficiency Ratio (PER), and protein digestibility. Altitude influenced cooking time which increased from 78 min at 0 m, to 264 min at 2256 m. Final moisture content in the cooked bean was similar at all altitudes and there was a tendency to yield smaller amounts of solids in the cooking broth at higher altitudes. The increase in cooking time was significant. Bean water uptake at all times was significantly slower and smaller at ambient as compared to water uptake at boiling T, at all altitudes. Protein and lysine content were not affected by altitude, however, tannin and catechin were lower in cooked samples, as compared to the raw material. Altitude did not affect the content of these substances. Total starch and total sugars were higher in the raw sample, as compared to the cooked samples, but there was no effect of altitude. Enzyme susceptible starch (ESS) was lower in the raw sample as compared to the cooked samples, which contained similar amounts with respect to altitude. No change was observed in fiber fractions of the cooked beans. Likewise, the composition of the cooking broth was very similar between cooking locations. There was a small tendency to

  16. Linkage disequilibrium at the APA insecticidal seed protein locus of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Matthew W; Prieto, Sergio; Díaz, Lucy M; Buendía, Héctor F; Cardona, César

    2010-04-29

    An interesting seed protein family with a role in preventing insect herbivory is the multi-gene, APA family encoding the alpha-amylase inhibitor, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin proteins of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Variability for this gene family exists and has been exploited to breed for insect resistance. For example, the arcelin locus has been successfully transferred from wild to cultivated common bean genotypes to provide resistance against the bruchid species Zabrotes subfasciatus although the process has been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for and understanding about the locus. In this study, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium (LD) between microsatellite markers at the APA locus and bruchid resistance in a germplasm survey of 105 resistant and susceptible genotypes and compared this with LD in other parts of the genome. Microsatellite allele diversity was found to vary with each of the eight APA-linked markers analyzed, and two markers within the APA locus were found to be diagnostic for bruchid resistance or susceptibility and for the different arcelin alleles inherited from the wild accessions. Arc1 was found to provide higher levels of resistance than Arc5 and the markers in the APA locus were highly associated with resistance showing that introgression of this gene-family from wild beans provides resistance in cultivated beans. LD around the APA locus was found to be intermediate compared to other regions of the genome and the highest LD was found within the APA locus itself for example between the markers PV-atct001 and PV-ag004. We found the APA locus to be an important genetic determinant of bruchid resistance and also found that LD existed mostly within the APA locus but not beyond it. Moderate LD was also found for some other regions of the genome perhaps related to domestication genes. The LD pattern may reflect the introgression of arcelin from the wild into the cultivated background through breeding. LD and association studies for

  17. Linkage disequilibrium at the APA insecticidal seed protein locus of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buendía Héctor F

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An interesting seed protein family with a role in preventing insect herbivory is the multi-gene, APA family encoding the α-amylase inhibitor, phytohemagglutinin and arcelin proteins of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. Variability for this gene family exists and has been exploited to breed for insect resistance. For example, the arcelin locus has been successfully transferred from wild to cultivated common bean genotypes to provide resistance against the bruchid species Zabrotes subfasciatus although the process has been hampered by a lack of genetic tools for and understanding about the locus. In this study, we analyzed linkage disequilibrium (LD between microsatellite markers at the APA locus and bruchid resistance in a germplasm survey of 105 resistant and susceptible genotypes and compared this with LD in other parts of the genome. Results Microsatellite allele diversity was found to vary with each of the eight APA-linked markers analyzed, and two markers within the APA locus were found to be diagnostic for bruchid resistance or susceptibility and for the different arcelin alleles inherited from the wild accessions. Arc1 was found to provide higher levels of resistance than Arc5 and the markers in the APA locus were highly associated with resistance showing that introgression of this gene-family from wild beans provides resistance in cultivated beans. LD around the APA locus was found to be intermediate compared to other regions of the genome and the highest LD was found within the APA locus itself for example between the markers PV-atct001 and PV-ag004. Conclusions We found the APA locus to be an important genetic determinant of bruchid resistance and also found that LD existed mostly within the APA locus but not beyond it. Moderate LD was also found for some other regions of the genome perhaps related to domestication genes. The LD pattern may reflect the introgression of arcelin from the wild into the cultivated

  18. Development of the yellow common bean germplasm PR1146-138

    Science.gov (United States)

    The yellow bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important market class in Haiti. There have been, however, no previous attempts to genetically improve this seed type for the Caribbean. Landrace varieties of yellow beans in Haiti are susceptible to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) and bean commo...

  19. Implications of selection in common bean lines in contrasting environments concerning nitrogen levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Volpi Furtini

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Grain productivities of 100 bean lines were evaluated in the presence and absence of nitrogen fertilizer in order to identify those with high nitrogen use efficiency (NUE and to determine the correlated response observed in a stressed environment following selection in a non-stressed environment. The genetic and phenotypic characteristics of the lines, as well as the response index to applied nitrogen, were determined. The average grain productivities at both locations were 39.5% higher in the presence of nitrogen fertilizer, with 8.3 kg of grain being produced per kg of nitrogen applied. NUE varied greatly between lines. Lines BP-16, CVII-85-11, BP-24, Ouro Negro and MA-IV-15-203 were the most efficient and responsive. The results showed that it is possible to select bean lines in stressed and non-stressed environments. It was inferred that common bean lines for environments with low nitrogen availability should preferably be selected under nitrogen stress.

  20. Gamma radiosensitivity in common bean plant and cowpea; Gama radiossensitividade em feijoeiro comum e caupi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Sandra da Silva; Colaco, Waldeciro [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    An indispensable step in mutation induction experiments is the determination of the sensitivity to mutagens to be used. Taking this into consideration the radiosensitivity of bean cultivars Carioca, Princesa (P. vulgaris L.), and IPA-206 [V. unguiculata (L.) Walp] to gamma rays from a {sup 60} Co source was evaluated. Sets of seeds (40 seeds/sample) were irradiated with 100, 150, 200, 250 Gy, and compared to a control without irradiation (0 Gy), under greenhouse conditions. Bean and cowpea seeds were respectively inoculated with a suspension of Rhizobium (SEMIA-4077) and Bradyrhizobium (SEMIA-6145) strains. The radiosensitivity was evaluated through seedling height reduction determined at 15 days after emergence (15-DAE), and also through dry matter yield of above-ground part and root nodules at 40-DAE. Seedling height was significantly reduced with increased dose of radiation in relation to the control. The dose causing reduction of 50% seedling height for P. vulgaris cultivar Princesa was set up between 150-250 Gy. Cowpea (IPA-206) was less sensitive to radiation than common bean cultivars, considering the dose range of radiation studied, and a 75% seedling height reduction was reached in the range of 150-250 Gy. Dry mater yield of the above-ground part, root and nodule, were inversely related to the doses. It is recommended a dose range of 300-350 Gy for mutation breeding purposes using the cowpea cultivar (IPA-206). (author)

  1. Introgression and pyramiding into common bean market class fabada of genes conferring resistance to anthracnose and potyvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juan José; Campa, Ana; Pérez-Vega, Elena; Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Giraldez, Ramón

    2012-03-01

    Anthracnose and bean common mosaic (BCM) are considered major diseases in common bean crop causing severe yield losses worldwide. This work describes the introgression and pyramiding of genes conferring genetic resistance to BCM and anthracnose local races into line A25, a bean genotype classified as market class fabada. Resistant plants were selected using resistance tests or combining resistance tests and marker-assisted selection. Lines A252, A321, A493, Sanilac BC6-Are, and BRB130 were used as resistance sources. Resistance genes to anthracnose (Co-2 ( C ), Co-2 ( A252 ) and Co-3/9) and/or BCM (I and bc-3) were introgressed in line A25 through six parallel backcrossing programs, and six breeding lines showing a fabada seed phenotype were obtained after six backcross generations: line A1258 from A252; A1231 from A321; A1220 from A493; A1183 and A1878 from Sanilac BC6-Are; and line A2418 from BRB130. Pyramiding of different genes were developed using the pedigree method from a single cross between lines obtained in the introgression step: line A1699 (derived from cross A1258 × A1220), A2438 (A1220 × A1183), A2806 (A1878 × A2418), and A3308 (A1699 × A2806). A characterization based on eight morpho-agronomic traits revealed a limited differentiation among the obtained breeding lines and the recurrent line A25. However, using a set of seven molecular markers linked to the loci used in the breeding programs it was possible to differentiate the 11 fabada lines. Considering the genetic control of the resistance in resistant donor lines, the observed segregations in the last backcrossing generation, the reaction against the pathogens, and the expression of the molecular markers it was also possible to infer the genotype conferring resistance in the ten fabada breeding lines obtained. As a result of these breeding programs, genetic resistance to three anthracnose races controlled by genes included in clusters Co-2 and Co-3/9, and genetic resistance to BCM controlled

  2. Rendimento do feijoeiro influenciado por sistemas de manejo em um Latossolo Vermelho de cerrado = Influence of management systems in Oxisol on common bean yield

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    Luis Gustavo Akihiro Sanches Suzuki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se avaliar a influência de sistemas de manejo no rendimento de grãos de feijão em um Latossolo Vermelho de cerrado. A pesquisa iniciou-se em 1997 e a avaliação do rendimento de grãos foi realizada no inverno de 2002. Utilizou-se o delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso no esquema em faixas com parcelas subsubdivididas. Os tratamentos foram constituídos nas faixas pela combinação de 5 plantasde cobertura (Mucuna aterrima, Pennisetum americanum, Crotalaria juncea, Cajanus cajan e pousio; no outro sentido, as faixas foram subdivididas e constituídas pelo sistema de semeadura direta e convencional (preparo do solo com grade aradora e grade niveladora, as quais, por sua vez, foram subsubdivididas com as culturas de verão milho, soja e algodão. Concluiu-se que as plantas de cobertura, após cinco anos, não influenciaram o rendimento de grãos; a massa de 100 grãos de feijão foi maior na semeadura convencional, porém, orendimento não diferiu entre os preparos; na semeadura convencional, a sucessão com algodão, nos dois primeiros anos agrícolas, proporcionou grãos de feijão mais pesados e maior rendimento; na semeadura direta, a sucessão que incluía algodão ou soja nos doisprimeiros anos agrícolas proporcionou maiores rendimentos ao feijoeiro.This study aimed to evaluate the influence of management on common bean in Oxisol. The research began in 1997 and the yield evaluation was carried out in the winter of 2002. The experimental design was randomized blocks with split split-plot design. The treatments were constituted by the combination of five cover plants, two soil tillages and three crop successions. It was concluded that cover plants, after five years, did not influence the common bean; the 100-grain weight of bean was higher in conventional tillage, but theyield did not show any difference between the tillages; in conventional tillage, cotton crop sucession in the first two years provided larger common

  3. Increasing the resistance of common bean to white mold through recurrent selection

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    Monik Evelin Leite

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT White mold, caused by Sclerotinea sclerotiorum (Lib. de Bary is one of the most important diseases of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. worldwide. Physiological resistance and traits related to disease avoidance such as architecture contribute to field resistance. The aim of this study was to verify the efficiency of recurrent selection in physiological resistance to white mold, “Carioca” grain type and upright habit in common bean. Thirteen common bean lines with partial resistance to white mold were intercrossed by means of a circulant diallel table, and seven recurrent selection cycles were obtained. Of these cycles, progenies of the S0:1, S0:2 and S0:3 generations of cycles III, IV, V and VI were evaluated. The best (8 to 10 progenies of the seven cycles were also evaluated, in two experiments, one in the greenhouse and one in the field. Lattice and/or randomized block experimental designs were used. The traits evaluated were: resistance to white mold by the straw test method, growth habit and grain type. The most resistant progenies were selected based on the average score of resistance to white mold. Subsequently, they were evaluated with regard to grain type and growth habit. Recurrent selection allowed for genetic progress of about 11 % per year for white mold resistance and about 15 % per year for the plant architecture. There was no gain among cycles for grain type. Progeny selection and recurrent selection were efficient for obtaining progenies with a high level of resistance to white mold with “Carioca” grain type and upright habit.

  4. Development of a QTL-environment-based predictive model for node addition rate in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Gezan, Salvador A; Eduardo Vallejos, C; Jones, James W; Boote, Kenneth J; Clavijo-Michelangeli, Jose A; Bhakta, Mehul; Osorno, Juan M; Rao, Idupulapati; Beebe, Stephen; Roman-Paoli, Elvin; Gonzalez, Abiezer; Beaver, James; Ricaurte, Jaumer; Colbert, Raphael; Correll, Melanie J

    2017-05-01

    This work reports the effects of the genetic makeup, the environment and the genotype by environment interactions for node addition rate in an RIL population of common bean. This information was used to build a predictive model for node addition rate. To select a plant genotype that will thrive in targeted environments it is critical to understand the genotype by environment interaction (GEI). In this study, multi-environment QTL analysis was used to characterize node addition rate (NAR, node day(- 1)) on the main stem of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L). This analysis was carried out with field data of 171 recombinant inbred lines that were grown at five sites (Florida, Puerto Rico, 2 sites in Colombia, and North Dakota). Four QTLs (Nar1, Nar2, Nar3 and Nar4) were identified, one of which had significant QTL by environment interactions (QEI), that is, Nar2 with temperature. Temperature was identified as the main environmental factor affecting NAR while day length and solar radiation played a minor role. Integration of sites as covariates into a QTL mixed site-effect model, and further replacing the site component with explanatory environmental covariates (i.e., temperature, day length and solar radiation) yielded a model that explained 73% of the phenotypic variation for NAR with root mean square error of 16.25% of the mean. The QTL consistency and stability was examined through a tenfold cross validation with different sets of genotypes and these four QTLs were always detected with 50-90% probability. The final model was evaluated using leave-one-site-out method to assess the influence of site on node addition rate. These analyses provided a quantitative measure of the effects on NAR of common beans exerted by the genetic makeup, the environment and their interactions.

  5. Selection of common bean land cultivars based on agronomic performance, cooking time, and mineral concentration

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    Narielen Moreira de Morais

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential use of common bean land cultivars with respect to their agronomic performance, cooking time and nutritional quality has scarcely been evaluated in breeding programs. The objective of the present study was to evaluate 19 common bean land cultivars for their agronomic traits, cooking time, and mineral concentration in grains to identify cultivars for potential use by a higher number of farmers or even breeding programs. Two field experiments were conducted in Alegrete and Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul (RS, Brazil, in the 2012/2013 season. The experimental design consisted of randomized blocks with three replications. A total of 23 cultivars were evaluated; 19 land cultivars were obtained from smallholder farmers from RS, and there were four control cultivars (Carioca, Pérola, Valente, and Guapo Brilhante. The traits evaluated included the cycle, insertion of the first pod, grain yield, cooking time, and concentrations of calcium, iron, zinc, and copper in the grains. The data were subjected to joint variance analysis, Pearson correlation analysis, and the Z index. The common bean cultivars showed differences in the cycle, insertion of the first pod, grain yield, cooking time, calcium, iron, zinc, and copper concentrations in grains, and the Z index. The cultivars Preto Miúdo and Cavalo Rajado had a high grain yield, i.e., greater than 2,900 kg ha-1. The land cultivars were classified as having early and intermediate cycles, and all had cooking times less than 30 min. Palha Roxa, Carioca Vermelho, and Perdiz had high concentrations of calcium, iron, zinc, and copper in the grains, an intermediate cycle, and low grain yield. Positive correlations of moderate magnitude were observed between the calcium and iron (r= 0.597, iron and zinc (r= 0.570, and zinc and copper (r= 0.548 concentrations. Indirect selection for high iron or zinc concentrations in grains will be effective for obtaining common bean cultivars with a higher

  6. CULTIVAR RELEASE-IAC-Alvorada and IAC-Diplomata: new common bean cultivars

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    Sérgio Augusto Morais Carbonell

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of common bean breeding programs is the development of high-yielding cultivars, with multipledisease resistance and high technological and nutritional grain quality. Two cultivars, IAC-Alvorada with carioca grain, andIAC-Diplomata with black grain, meet these standards, according to the results of trials of Value for Cultivation and Use(VCU 2005/2006/2007 in São Paulo. The cultivars, developed by the Instituto Agronômico de Campinas, were registered bythe MAPA/RNC.

  7. Extraction and partial purification of coagulation active components from common bean seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šćiban Marina B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An active coagulation component was extracted from common bean seed by NaCl solution and the obtained crude extract was partially purified through a sequence of steps that included precipitation of protein by ammonium sulphate, desalting by dialysis and anion exchange. A turbid water was treated by protein fractions obtained in the anion- exchange elution process by stepwise increase in NaCl concentration. The jar tests were conducted at various dosages of eluates. Different mode of relation between coagulation activity and applied coagulant dose for each protein fraction indicated the existence of different mechanisms of coagulation/flocculation, depending of characteristics of different proteins in the fractions.

  8. Magnesium sulphate and the development of the common bean cultivated in an ultisol of Northeast Australia.

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVEIRA, I. P. de; ASHER, C. J.; Edwards, D.G.; SANTOS, R. S. M. dos

    2000-01-01

    Magnesium applications (MgS0(4).7H(2)0) to achieve 8 and 16 mmol c/cm3 of Mg (324 and 1284 kg of MgS0(4) ha-1) were made on one Ultisol from Australia Northeast to correct Mg deficiency in plants and to verify the optimum level of Mg to grow common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L). Magnesium was applied together with lime, N, K, Cu, Zn, B, and Mo as calcium carbonate, ammonium nitrate, potassium phosphate, cupric and zinc sulphate, boric acid and sodium molybdate respectively a month before planti...

  9. Cowpeas and pinto beans: Performance and yields of candidate space crops in the laboratory biosphere closed ecological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M.; Dempster, W. F.; Allen, J. P.; Silverstone, S.; Alling, A.; Thillo, M. van

    An experiment utilizing cowpeas ( Vigna unguiculata L.), pinto beans ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and Apogee ultra-dwarf wheat ( Triticum sativa L.) was conducted in the soil-based closed ecological facility, Laboratory Biosphere, from February to May 2005. The lighting regime was 13 h light/11 h dark at a light intensity of 960 μmol m -2 s -1, 45 mol m -2 day -1 supplied by high-pressure sodium lamps. The pinto beans and cowpeas were grown at two different planting densities. Pinto bean production was 341.5 g dry seed m -2 (5.42 g m -2 day -1) and 579.5 dry seed m -2 (9.20 g m -2 day -1) at planted densities of 32.5 plants m -2 and 37.5 plants m -2, respectively. Cowpea yielded 187.9 g dry seed m -2 (2.21 g m -2 day -1) and 348.8 dry seed m -2 (4.10 g m -2 day -1) at planted densities of 20.8 plants m -2 and 27.7 plants m -2, respectively. The crop was grown at elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, with levels ranging from 300-3000 ppm daily during the majority of the crop cycle. During early stages (first 10 days) of the crop, CO 2 was allowed to rise to 7860 ppm while soil respiration dominated, and then was brought down by plant photosynthesis. CO 2 was injected 27 times during days 29-71 to replenish CO 2 used by the crop during photosynthesis. Temperature regime was 24-28 °C day/deg 20-24 °C night. Pinto bean matured and was harvested 20 days earlier than is typical for this variety, while the cowpea, which had trouble establishing, took 25 days more for harvest than typical for this variety. Productivity and atmospheric dynamic results of these studies contribute toward the design of an envisioned ground-based test bed prototype Mars base.

  10. Exploitation of Common Bean Flours with Low Antinutrient Content for Making Nutritionally Enhanced Biscuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparvoli, Francesca; Laureati, Monica; Pilu, Roberto; Pagliarini, Ella; Toschi, Ivan; Giuberti, Gianluca; Fortunati, Paola; Daminati, Maria G.; Cominelli, Eleonora; Bollini, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of legumes is associated with a number of physiological and health benefits. Legume proteins complement very well those of cereals and are often used to produce gluten-free products. However, legume seeds often contain antinutritional compounds, such as phytate, galactooligosaccharides, phenolic compounds, lectins, enzyme inhibitors, whose presence could affect their nutritional value. Screening natural and induced biodiversity for useful traits, followed by breeding, is a way to remove undesirable components. We used the common bean cv. Lady Joy and the lpa1 mutant line, having different seed composition for absence/presence of lectins,α-amylase inhibitor, (α-AI) and phytic acid, to verify the advantage of their use to make biscuits with improved nutritional properties. We showed that use of unprocessed flour from normal beans (Taylor's Horticulture and Billò) must be avoided, since lectin activity is still present after baking, and demonstrated the advantage of using the cv. Lady Joy, lacking active lectins and having active α-AI. To assess the contribution of bean flour to biscuit quality traits, different formulations of composite flours (B12, B14, B22, B24, B29) were used in combinations with wheat (B14), maize (gluten-free B22 and B29), or with both (B12 and B24). These biscuits were nutritionally better than the control, having a better amino acid score, higher fiber amount, lower predicted glycemic index (pGI) and starch content. Replacement of cv. Lady Joy bean flour with that of lpa1, having a 90% reduction of phytic acid and devoid of α-AI, contributed to about a 50% reduction of phytic acid content. We also showed that baking did not fully inactivate α-AI, further contributing to lowering the pGI of the biscuits. Finally, data from a blind taste test using consumers indicated that the B14 biscuit was accepted by consumers and comparable in terms of liking to the control biscuit, although the acceptability of these products decreased

  11. 75 FR 15777 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations, Basic Provisions; and Various Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-30

    ... Provisions, Small Grains Crop Insurance Provisions, Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions, Sunflower Seed Crop... previous rules implementing the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (2008 Farm Bill). DATES..., Cotton Crop Insurance Provisions, Sunflower Seed Crop Insurance Provisions, Coarse Grains Crop Insurance...

  12. Differential response to sulfur nutrition of two common bean genotypes differing in storage protein composition

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    Sudhakar ePandurangan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that the relatively low concentration of sulfur amino acids in legume seeds might be an ecological adaptation to nutrient poor, marginal soils. SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 are genetically related lines of common bean (dry bean, Phaseolus vulgaris differing in seed storage protein composition. In SMARC1N-PN1, the lack of phaseolin and major lectins is compensated by increased levels of sulfur-rich proteins, resulting in an enhanced concentration of cysteine and methionine, mostly at the expense of the abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methylcysteine. To identify potential effects associated with an increased concentration of sulfur amino acids in the protein pool, the response of the two genotypes to low and high sulfur nutrition was evaluated under controlled conditions. Seed yield was increased by the high sulfate treatment in SMARC1N-PN1. The seed concentrations of sulfur, sulfate and S-methylcysteine were altered by the sulfur treatment in both genotypes. The concentration of total cysteine and extractible globulins was increased specifically in SMARC1N-PN1. Proteomic analysis identified arcelin-like protein 4, lipoxygenase-3, albumin-2 and alpha amylase inhibitor beta chain as having increased levels under high sulfur conditions. Lipoxygenase-3 accumulation was sensitive to sulfur nutrition only in SMARC1N-PN1. Under field conditions, both SARC1 and SMARC1N-PN1 exhibited a slight increase in yield in response to sulfur treatment, typical for common bean.

  13. Technological quality of common bean grains obtained in different growing seasons

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    Eliana Francischinelli Perina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The traits that provide technological quality to common bean grains exhibit genetic and environmental variation and variation in the genotype x environment interaction. In this context, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of different periods of the growing season on the technological quality of common bean grains. The experiment was conducted with 25 bean genotypes (carioca [beige with brown stripes] and black commercial group that are part of the Value for Cultivation and Use (Valor de Cultivo e Uso - VCU trials in three growing seasons, namely, the 2009/2010 rainy season, the 2010/2011 dry season and the 2010/2011 winter season, in a randomized block experimental design with three replications in which the following items were assessed: cooking time (CT, water absorption capacity before cooking (Peanc and after cooking (Peapc, percentage of whole grains (PWG, total soluble solids in the broth (TSSb, volume expansion before cooking (EXPVbc and after cooking (EXPVac, and dry grain density (DD, grain density after maceration (SD and grain density after cooking (CD. Assessments showed that the different growing seasons for obtaining grains for the purpose of analysis of technological quality have an effect on the results and on differentiation among genotypes, indicating genotype x environment interaction. They also showed that the genotypes C2-1-6-1, C4-8-1-1, LP04-03, IAC-Imperador, P5-4-4-1 and Pr11-6-4-1-2 had the best results in relation to cooking time in the mean values of the three growing seasons. The use of early selection based on phenotypic correlations that exist among the technological features is not expressive, due to the variation of magnitude among the different growing seasons.

  14. Residual phosphate fertilization and Azospirillum brasilense in the common bean in succession to maize intercropped with Marandu grass

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    Lourdes Dickmann

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT One of the alternatives for achieving sustainable agriculture and a reduction in production costs, especially with phosphate fertilisers, is to inoculate seeds with bacteria of the genus Azospirillum. The aim of this study therefore, was to evaluate residual phosphate fertilisation and Azospirillum brasilense, together with the contribution of straw from maize intercropped with Marandu grass, on leaf nutritional content, yield components and winter bean yield. The experiment was carried out on the Teaching and Research Farm, of the School of Engineering at UNESP, located in Selvíria in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, in a typic clayey dystrophic Red Latosol. The experimental design was of randomised blocks with four replications in a 5 x 2 factorial scheme. The treatments consisted of beans sown on straw from maize intercropped with Marandu grass on areas that had received five levels of P2O5 in the form of MAP, applied during an initial cultivation of black oats (0, 30, 60, 120 and 240 kg ha-1, both with and without inoculation of the oat and maize which preceded the beans with Azospirillum brasilense. Leaf nutrient content, leaf chlorophyll index (ICF, yield components and bean productivity were all evaluated. Inoculation with Azospirillum brasilense of the black oat and maize seeds improved the nutritional status of the plants, but had a negative effect on grain yield. Fertilisation of the oat crop with phosphorus had a positive residual effect on the beans, with increases in yield components and grain yield.

  15. Classification of physiological races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli in common bean

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    Francisco Humberto Henrique

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht. f. phaseoli Kendrick and Snyder (FOP, is a major disease of common bean, causing large economic losses. Genetic resistance is one of the main mechanisms of pathogen control, and knowledge of the physiological variability is fundamental in breeding for resistant cultivars. Thus, a method of pathogen classification that describes the variability and is useful in plant breeding of isolates from different sources was evaluated by different methodologies. Common bean plants of different sets of differentiating cultivars were inoculated with 25 FOP isolates and 3 controls, totaling 28 isolates evaluated 30 days after inoculation. The variability in the isolates found in this study differs from the results of other authors, who reported a small number of physiological races of the pathogen and disagrees with their evaluation of the races and the evaluation methodology. The proposed approach for binary classification based on a group of 12 differentiating cultivars demonstrated that the variability in pathogenicity of FOP is greater than reported so far. By this methodology, 27 different physiological races of the pathogen were obtained. The methods led to contrasting results, with double race classification in the same isolate. The physiological variability found indicates that the physiological races of the pathogen are not limited to 7 as previously mentioned.

  16. Agronomic performance and stability of andean common bean lines with white grains in Brazil

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    Helton Santos Pereira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluated the effect of genotype by environment interaction in Andean common bean lines with white grains, in Central Southern Brazil, to identify lines with high agronomic performance, stability and adaptability, aiming to meet domestic demand and to increase the Brazilian participation in the foreign market of common bean. Nineteen trials with twelve Andean lines were conducted in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in Central Southern Brazil. Grain yield and other agronomic traits were evaluated. Data were subjected to analysis of variance and of adaptability/stability using Annicchiarico and modified AMMI methods. Significant differences were found between lines for all traits evaluated. Genotype by environment interaction was important for lines with Andean origin and white seed. The utilization of weighted mean of absolute scores and yield with the AMMI results enabled the identification of the most stable and adapted lines. Lines Poroto Alubia, CNFB 16211, Ouro Branco and WAF 160 were stable and adapted, using both methods. CNFB 16211 line presented high agronomic performance, stability and adaptability and therefore this line may be a new cultivar. USWA 70 and WAF 75 lines presented grain size similar to that required by the foreign market and superior to the Brazilian cultivars, besides favorable agronomic traits, and thus these lines may be indicated as new cultivars.

  17. Implications of early selection for resistance to anthracnose in genetic breeding of common bean

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    José Maria Villela Pádua

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is questionable if early selection for resistance to Colletotrichum lindemuthianum reduces the efficiency of selection for grain yield in common beans. For this, it was used the segregating population of the cross between two common bean lines: CI107 (susceptible x BRSMG Madrepérola (resistant. Selection for resistance was carried out in F2 and F3 , obtaining three types of progenies: not selected (A, selected only in F2 (B, and selected in F2 andF3 (C. The progenies obtained were evaluated for grain yield and pathogen occurrence in experiments. In F3:5, it was used 289 treatments (96 progenies A, 96 B, 95 C and 2 checks (T; in F3:6, 196 treatments (64 A, 64 B, 64 C and 4 T; in F3:7, 81 treatments (26 A, 26 B, 26 C and 3 T. Selection of plants resistant to anthracnose in early generations increases the successful selection for grain yield in later generations.

  18. Comparisons of phaseolin type andα-amylase inhibitor in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yao; Yibo Hu; Yingying; Zhu Yue Gao; Guixing Ren

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the phaseolin type andα-amylase (αAI) level in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) accessions deposited in the Chinese National Genebank. The 40 accessions sampled were common varieties originating in Asia, North America, South America, Europe, and Africa. No Inca (I-) phaseolin was observed in the accessions. Only four accessions contained Tendergreen (T-) phaseolin and the remaining 36 contained Sanilac (S-) phaseolin. αAI proteins extracted from nine accessions showed higher α-amylase inhibitory activity than the control (Phase 2, IC50=0.65μg). These common bean accessions have potential use as nutraceutical ingredients.

  19. Adaptation to High Temperature and Water Deficit in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. during the Reproductive Period

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    Hide Omae

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the adaption to heat and drought stresses in Phaseolus vulgaris, a grain and vegetable crop widely grown in both the Old and New World. Substantial genotypic differences are found in morphophysiological characteristics such as phenology, partitioning, plant-water relations, photosynthetic parameters, and shoot growth, which are related to reproductive responses. The associations between (a days to podding and leaf water content and (b the number of pods per plant and seed yield are consistent across different environments and experiments. Leaf water content is maintained by reductions in leaf water potential and shoot extension in response to heat and drought stress. Heat-tolerant cultivars have higher biomass allocation to pods and higher pod set in branches. These traits can be used as a marker to screen germplasm for heat and drought tolerance. In this paper, we briefly review the results of our studies carried out on heat and drought tolerance in the common bean at the Tropical Agriculture Research Front, Ishigaki, Japan.

  20. Interferencia de malezas en el cultivo de frijol en dos sistemas de labranzas Weeds influence in bean crop in two tillage systems

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    M.C. Parreira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Con este trabajo, se busco determinar el período anterior a la interferencia de las malezas que conviven con el cultivo de frijol, en ausencia o presencia de residuos vegetales de Crotalaria juncea. Los tratamientos estaban constituidos de siete períodos de convivencia del cultivo con las malezas: 0-10, 0-20, 0-30, 0-40, 0-50, 0-60 y 0-70 días después de la emergencia y también de un testigo sin presencia de las malezas en ausencia o presencia de crotalaria. El diseño experimental utilizado fue de bloques completos seleccionados al azar, con cuatro repeticiones por tratamiento. Hubo reducciones de 40,6% y 55,1% en la productividad de granos de frijol en convivencia con malezas durante todo el ciclo del cultivo, en ausencia y presencia de los residuos vegetales, respectivamente. Se concluyó que la productividad de granos fue afectada negativamente a partir de 29 y 38 días después de la emergencia, sin y con residuos, respectivamente, y eso constituyó los períodos anteriores a la interferencia.The research aim to determine the period prior to weed interference on common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris. The treatments had been made out of seven periods of coexisting by the culture with the weed 0-10, 0-20, 0-30, 0-40, 0-50, 0-60, and 0 70 days after crop emergence in absence and presence crop residue. It had reduction of 40.56% and 55.12%, the productivity of grains in the culture of the common bean when the coexistence with the weed was during all the cycle of the culture, in absence and presence crop residue, respectively. It was concluded that grain yield was negatively affected from the 29th and 38th days after emergence, in the absence and presence of crop residue, respectively.

  1. NOTE - Minimum number of common bean plants per plot to assess field resistance to white mold

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    uliana Andrade Dias

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the minimum number of plants per plot to assess the field resistance in common beanto white mold. Thirteen cultivars were inoculated with six isolates of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum and evaluated in a randomized blockdesign with three replications and plots consisting of 1-m rows with 15 plants. Plants were inoculated by the straw test as proposedby Petzoldt and Dickson (1996, to evaluate partial resistance in a greenhouse. Eight days after inoculation the disease severity wasevaluated on a 1-9 diagrammatic scale, where 1 = asymptomatic plants to 9 = plant death. To determine the minimum number ofplants per plot, the following methods were used: maximum curvature, segmented linear model, quadratic segmented model and therelative CV model. There were significant differences among cultivars and isolates and no significant cultivar - isolate interaction.It was observed that eight plants per plot is an adequate number to assess the reaction of common bean to white mold.

  2. Identification of novel drought-tolerant-associated SNPs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villordo-Pineda, Emiliano; González-Chavira, Mario M; Giraldo-Carbajo, Patricia; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A; Caballero-Pérez, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a leguminous in high demand for human nutrition and a very important agricultural product. Production of common bean is constrained by environmental stresses such as drought. Although conventional plant selection has been used to increase production yield and stress tolerance, drought tolerance selection based on phenotype is complicated by associated physiological, anatomical, cellular, biochemical, and molecular changes. These changes are modulated by differential gene expression. A common method to identify genes associated with phenotypes of interest is the characterization of Single Nucleotide Polymorphims (SNPs) to link them to specific functions. In this work, we selected two drought-tolerant parental lines from Mesoamerica, Pinto Villa, and Pinto Saltillo. The parental lines were used to generate a population of 282 families (F3:5) and characterized by 169 SNPs. We associated the segregation of the molecular markers in our population with phenotypes including flowering time, physiological maturity, reproductive period, plant, seed and total biomass, reuse index, seed yield, weight of 100 seeds, and harvest index in three cultivation cycles. We observed 83 SNPs with significant association (p < 0.0003 after Bonferroni correction) with our quantified phenotypes. Phenotypes most associated were days to flowering and seed biomass with 58 and 44 associated SNPs, respectively. Thirty-seven out of the 83 SNPs were annotated to a gene with a potential function related to drought tolerance or relevant molecular/biochemical functions. Some SNPs such as SNP28 and SNP128 are related to starch biosynthesis, a common osmotic protector; and SNP18 is related to proline biosynthesis, another well-known osmotic protector.

  3. Identification of novel drought-tolerant-associated SNPs in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris

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    Emiliano eVillordo-Pineda

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is a leguminous in high demand for human nutrition and a veryimportant agricultural product. Production of common bean is constrained by environmental stressessuch as drought. Although conventional plant selection has been used to increase production yield andstress tolerance, drought tolerance selection based on phenotype is complicated by associatedphysiological, anatomical, cellular, biochemical and molecular changes. These changes are modulatedby differential gene expression. A common method to identify genes associated with phenotypes ofinterest is the characterization of Single Nucleotide Polymorphims (SNPs to link them to specificfunctions.In this work, we selected two drought-tolerant parental lines from Mesoamerica, Pinto Villa and PintoSaltillo. The parental lines were used to generate a population of 282 families (F 3:5 and characterizedby 169 SNPs . We associated the segregation of the molecular markers in our population withphenotypes including flowering time, physiological maturity, reproductive period, plant, seed and totalbiomass, reuse index, seed yield, weight of 100 seeds and harvest index in three cultivation cycles.We observed 83 SNPs with significant association (p < 0.0003 after Bonferroni correction with ourquantified phenotypes. Phenotypes most associated were days to flowering and seed biomass with 58and 44 associated SNPs respectively. Thirty-seven out of the 83 SNPs were annotated to a gene with apotential function related to drought tolerance or relevant molecular/biochemical functions. Some SNPssuch as SNP28 and SNP128 are related to starch biosynthesis, a common osmotic protector; andSNP18 is related to proline biosynthesis, another well-known osmotic protector.

  4. Genetic control of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris resistance to powdery mildew (Erysiphe polygoni

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    Rezende Viviane Ferreira

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic control of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris resistance to powdery mildew (Erysiphe polygoni was studied using segregating populations from the bean variety crosses Jalo x ESAL 686 and ESAL 550 x ESAL 686. F2 plants, together with the parents, were inoculated and evaluated using a scale of values from one (plant without symptoms to nine (completely infected plant. F2 plants were harvested individually, and F2:3 families were obtained. These families were evaluated in an 11 x 11 and 12 x 12 simple lattice statistical design for the Jalo x ESAL 686 and ESAL 550 x ESAL 686 crosses, respectively, using the same value scale as the F2 generation. The segregation observed in F2 plants and F2:3 families indicated that two genes are involved in genetic control, due to a double recessive epistasis. The high linear regression coefficient (b between F2 plants and their F2:3 family, 0.66 for ESAL 550 x ESAL 686 cross, and 0.71 for Jalo x ESAL 686 cross, showed that the trait is highly heritable.

  5. IAC Jabola and IAC Esperança: common bean cultivars for market niches

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    Alisson Fernando Chiorato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, the trade of common beans with specialty grains such as Jalo, Bolinha, Jabola, Vermelho, Rajado,Branco, Pintado and Canário is still considered a niche market when compared to the carioca and black grain types.However, the cultivation of these beans has proved promising as an alternative income source for farmers, since it offers adifferentiated and more valuable product. IAC-Jabola and IAC-Esperança were developed by the Instituto AgronômicoCampinas (IAC in view of their excellent grain type, plant size and higher mean yield than the standard control Jalo Precoce.The IAC had these cultivars registered in MAPA/RNC based on results of 24 VCU trials in 2005/2006/2007, in the state of SãoPaulo. The yield of IAC Jabola was 2124 kg ha-1, 2336 kg ha-1, and 2558 kg ha-1, in the rainy, dry and winter seasons,respectively. The IAC- Esperança produced 1718 kg ha-1, 1545 kg ha-1, and 2263 kg ha-1 in the rainy, dry and winter seasons,respectively.

  6. Biochar from different residues on soil properties and common bean production

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    Isley Cristiellem Bicalho da Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The production of biochar from organic residues promises to be an interesting strategy for the management of organic waste. To assess the effect of biochar on soil properties and the production and nutrition of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., three simultaneous experiments were conducted in a greenhouse with different biochar from organic residues (rice husk, sawdust, and sorghum silage used as filtration material for swine biofertilizer. In each experiment the treatments consisted of five different biochar concentrations (0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 L m−3, arranged in a completely randomized design, with four repetitions. In the experiments, the use of biochar increased soil pH, cation exchange capacity, nutrient availability in the soil, and nutrient accumulation in grains. The biochar concentrations corresponding to the maximum production of grain dry matter of bean plants were 100, 68, and 71 L m−3 for biochar from rice husk filter (BRHF, biochar from sawdust filter (BSF, and biochar from sorghum silage filter (BSSF, respectively.

  7. Genetic analysis of the resistance to eight anthracnose races in the common bean differential cultivar Kaboon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Ana; Giraldez, Ramón; Ferreira, Juan José

    2011-06-01

    Resistance to the eight races (3, 7, 19, 31, 81, 449, 453, and 1545) of the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (anthracnose) was evaluated in F(3) families derived from the cross between the anthracnose differential bean cultivars Kaboon and Michelite. Molecular marker analyses were carried out in the F(2) individuals in order to map and characterize the anthracnose resistance genes or gene clusters present in Kaboon. The analysis of the combined segregations indicates that the resistance present in Kaboon against these eight anthracnose races is determined by 13 different race-specific genes grouped in three clusters. One of these clusters, corresponding to locus Co-1 in linkage group (LG) 1, carries two dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 81 and 1545, respectively, and a gene necessary (dominant complementary gene) for the specific resistance to race 31. A second cluster, corresponding to locus Co-3/9 in LG 4, carries six dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 3, 7, 19, 449, 453, and 1545, respectively, and the second dominant complementary gene for the specific resistance to race 31. A third cluster of unknown location carries three dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 449, 453, and 1545, respectively. This is the first time that two anthracnose resistance genes with a complementary mode of action have been mapped in common bean and their relationship with previously known Co- resistance genes established.

  8. No-till Snap Bean performance and weed response following Cereal Rye and Vetch cover crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-planted cover crops offer many benefits including weed suppressive residues in spring sown crops when controlled and left on the soil surface. However, vegetable growers have been slow to adapt direct seeding (no-till) into cover crop residues. Field studies were conducted in 2009 and 2010 near...

  9. Toxicity Assessment of Common Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Widely Consumed by Tunisian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nciri, Nader; Cho, Namjun; El Mhamdi, Faiçal; Ben Ismail, Hanen; Ben Mansour, Abderraouf; Sassi, Fayçal Haj; Ben Aissa-Fennira, Fatma

    2015-09-01

    This research aimed at assessing the content and the functional properties of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in different varieties of beans widely consumed in Tunisia through soaking, cooking, autoclaving, germination, and their combinations. This study was carried out on three varieties of white beans grown in different localities of Tunisia, namely Twila, Coco, and Beldia, as well as on imported and local canned beans. All bean samples underwent biochemical and immunological evaluation by employing several techniques such as indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), hemagglutinating assay, Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion, and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Biochemical and immunological analyses indicated that raw dry beans contained a considerable amount of proteins and PHAs. ELISA demonstrated that soaking, either in plain water or in alkaline solution, caused an increase in the concentration of PHA. A slight increase of PHA was produced equally by germination during 4 days in all bean varieties. Cooking or autoclaving of presoaked beans resulted in a complete disappearance of PHA. ELISA test also proved that both imported and local canned beans contained fingerprints of PHA. Hemagglutination assays showed that not only cooked and autoclaved presoaked beans lacked the ability to agglutinate red blood cells but also autoclaved unsoaked beans did. In agar gel immunodiffusion using rabbit anti-PHA serum, raw, soaked, cooked unsoaked, and sprouted beans gave precipitin arc reactions, indicating that PHA existed in immunoreactive form in the tested seeds. SDS-PAGE electrophoretograms showed protein isolates of Twila and Beldia beans to have different profiles through soaking, cooking, and autoclaving processes. This work revealed that the combination of soaking and cooking/autoclaving was the best way in reducing PHA content and its activity in all bean varieties when compared with germination.

  10. Effect of Aging and Priming on Physiological and Biochemical Traits of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

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    Bahman AMANPOUR-BALANEJI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging and deterioration (artificial aging are the most effective factors on the seed vigour. In order to study the changes in physiological and biochemical characteristics of common bean under aging and priming treatments a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design conducted with three replications. Seed aging (control, 90 and 80% of control germination and seed invigoration with priming including control, hydro (distilled water, osmo (PEG 6000, hormone (gibberellic acid and halo (NaCl priming were considered as experimental factors. Results showed that osmo-priming had the ability to relatively ameliorate the aging effect and recover some of the seed aspects like germination rate, protein and phytin content for invigorate germination and seedling establishment. Priming indirectly increased seed vigour via germination rate and it can provide homogeny of emergence in the field and obtaining appropriate plant population.

  11. Introgression of resistance to pathogens in common bean lines with the aid of molecular markers

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    Alisson Campos Pereira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to incorporate resistance to the anthracnose and angular leaf spot pathogens in the common bean lines BRSMG Talismã, VC8 and VC9, crosses were made between these lines and the line Rudá-R, donor of the alleles Phg1, Co-4, Co-10, which confer resistance to Pseudocercospora griseola and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum. After the crosses, the backcross populations were obtained, and the RC1F1 plants were inoculated with race 65 of C. lindemuthianum. The resistant plants were genotyped with the markers SCARH13, SCARY20 and SCARF10, linked to the alleles Phg1, Co-4 and Co-10, respectively. Based on the molecular data, 44 plants were selected. The progenies originating from multiplication of these plants were evaluated over three seasons for grain yield, plant architecture and grain aspects. Based on these considerations and molecular data, 13 promising progenies were selected for developing inbreds.

  12. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Andrew J; William, H Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K Peter; Kelly, James D; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co-4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co-4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co-4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK-4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co-4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases.

  13. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

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    Renfeng Xue

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop, is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9% displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22, signal transduction (21, protein synthesis and processing (20, development and cytoskeletal organization (12, transport of proteins (7, gene expression and RNA metabolism (4, redox reactions (4, defense and stress responses (3, energy metabolism (3, and hormone responses (2. Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as

  14. Differentially Expressed Genes in Resistant and Susceptible Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Genotypes in Response to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. phaseoli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Renfeng; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Xiaoming; Wang, Shumin; Blair, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Fusarium wilt of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Fusarium oxysporum Schlechtend.:Fr. f.sp. phaseoli (Fop), is one of the most important diseases of common beans worldwide. Few natural sources of resistance to Fop exist and provide only moderate or partial levels of protection. Despite the economic importance of the disease across multiple crops, only a few of Fop induced genes have been analyzed in legumes. Therefore, our goal was to identify transcriptionally regulated genes during an incompatible interaction between common bean and the Fop pathogen using the cDNA amplified fragment length polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP) technique. We generated a total of 8,730 transcript-derived fragments (TDFs) with 768 primer pairs based on the comparison of a moderately resistant and a susceptible genotype. In total, 423 TDFs (4.9%) displayed altered expression patterns after inoculation with Fop inoculum. We obtained full amplicon sequences for 122 selected TDFs, of which 98 were identified as annotated known genes in different functional categories based on their putative functions, 10 were predicted but non-annotated genes and 14 were not homologous to any known genes. The 98 TDFs encoding genes of known putative function were classified as related to metabolism (22), signal transduction (21), protein synthesis and processing (20), development and cytoskeletal organization (12), transport of proteins (7), gene expression and RNA metabolism (4), redox reactions (4), defense and stress responses (3), energy metabolism (3), and hormone responses (2). Based on the analyses of homology, 19 TDFs from different functional categories were chosen for expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. The genes found to be important here were implicated at various steps of pathogen infection and will allow a better understanding of the mechanisms of defense and resistance to Fop and similar pathogens. The differential response genes discovered here could also be used as molecular

  15. Genotypic variability in seed accumulation of foliar-applied molybdenum to common bean

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    Rogério Faria Vieira

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The genotypic variability in molybdenum (Mo accumulation in common bean seeds has been demonstrated in cases in which soil is the main Mo source, but this variability is yet unknown when Mo is foliar-applied. Therefore, seed Mo concentrations (SMoCc and seed Mo contents (SMoCt of 12 genotypes were determined in four experiments in the Zona da Mata, Minas Gerais, Brazil, in which plants were sprayed with 600 g ha-1 Mo. For comparison, two additional experiments without external Mo were conducted. Without Mo application, the average SMoCc was undetectable or 2.83 µg g-1, without significant differences among genotypes. On average, with Mo applications, SMoCc ranged from 14.7 to 25.0 µg g-1 and SMoCt, from 3.94 to 6.84 µg. 'Majestoso' was among the genotypes with the highest SMoCc in the four experiments. However, the large-seeded 'Jalo MG-65' and 'Carnaval' generally had higher SMoCt than the small-seeded 'Majestoso'. 'Ouro Negro' and especially 'Valente' were among the genotypes with the lowest SMoCc and SMoCt. The values of these variables were 61 and 90 %, respectively, higher for 'Majestoso' than those for 'Valente'. Our results suggest that common bean genotypes differ in their capacity to accumulate foliar-applied Mo in the seeds. Mo-rich seeds of large-seeded genotypes or of small-seeded of small-seeded genotypes with good capacity to accumulate Mo in seeds can be produced with relatively less Mo fertilizer.

  16. Characterization of rhizobia isolates obtained from nodules of wild genotypes of common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Aline Assis; Andraus, Michel de Paula; Borba, Tereza Cristina de Oliveira; Martin-Didonet, Claudia Cristina Garcia; Ferreira, Enderson Petrônio de Brito

    This study aimed to evaluate the tolerance to salinity and temperature, the genetic diversity and the symbiotic efficiency of rhizobia isolates obtained from wild genotypes of common bean cultivated in soil samples from the States of Goiás, Minas Gerais and Paraná. The isolates were subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0%, 1%, 2%, 4% and 6%) at different temperatures (28°C, 33°C, 38°C, 43°C and 48°C). Genotypic characterization was performed based on BOX-PCR, REP-PCR markers and 16S rRNA sequencing. An evaluation of symbiotic efficiency was carried out under greenhouse conditions in autoclaved Leonard jars. Among 98 isolates about 45% of them and Rhizobium freirei PRF81 showed a high tolerance to temperature, while 24 isolates and Rhizobium tropici CIAT899 were able to use all of the carbon sources studied. Clustering analysis based on the ability to use carbon sources and on the tolerance to salinity and temperature grouped 49 isolates, R. tropici CIAT899 and R. tropici H12 with a similarity level of 76%. Based on genotypic characterization, 65% of the isolates showed an approximately 66% similarity with R. tropici CIAT899 and R. tropici H12. About 20% of the isolates showed symbiotic efficiency similar to or better than the best Rhizobium reference strain (R. tropici CIAT899). Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA revealed that two efficient isolates (ALSG5A1 and JPrG6A8) belong to the group of strains used as commercial inoculant for common bean in Brazil and must be assayed in field experiments.

  17. Meta-QTL for resistance to white mold in common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcellos, Renato C. C.; Oraguzie, O. Blessing; Soler, Alvaro; Arkwazee, Haidar; Myers, James R.; Ferreira, Juan J.; Song, Qijian; McClean, Phil; Miklas, Phillip N.

    2017-01-01

    White mold, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a major disease that limits common bean production and quality worldwide. The host-pathogen interaction is complex, with partial resistance in the host inherited as a quantitative trait with low to moderate heritability. Our objective was to identify meta-QTL conditioning partial resistance to white mold from individual QTL identified across multiple populations and environments. The physical positions for 37 individual QTL were identified across 14 recombinant inbred bi-parental populations (six new, three re-genotyped, and five from the literature). A meta-QTL analysis of the 37 QTL was conducted using the genetic linkage map of Stampede x Red Hawk population as the reference. The 37 QTL condensed into 17 named loci (12 previously named and five new) of which nine were defined as meta-QTL WM1.1, WM2.2, WM3.1, WM5.4, WM6.2, WM7.1, WM7.4, WM7.5, and WM8.3. The nine meta-QTL had confidence intervals ranging from 0.65 to 9.41 Mb. Candidate genes shown to express under S. sclerotiorum infection in other studies, including cell wall receptor kinase, COI1, ethylene responsive transcription factor, peroxidase, and MYB transcription factor, were found within the confidence interval for five of the meta-QTL. The nine meta-QTL are recommended as potential targets for MAS for partial resistance to white mold in common bean. PMID:28199342

  18. Sequence-Based Introgression Mapping Identifies Candidate White Mold Tolerance Genes in Common Bean

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    Sujan Mamidi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available White mold, caused by the necrotrophic fungus (Lib. de Bary, is a major disease of common bean ( L.. WM7.1 and WM8.3 are two quantitative trait loci (QTL with major effects on tolerance to the pathogen. Advanced backcross populations segregating individually for either of the two QTL, and a recombinant inbred (RI population segregating for both QTL were used to fine map and confirm the genetic location of the QTL. The QTL intervals were physically mapped using the reference common bean genome sequence, and the physical intervals for each QTL were further confirmed by sequence-based introgression mapping. Using whole-genome sequence data from susceptible and tolerant DNA pools, introgressed regions were identified as those with significantly higher numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs relative to the whole genome. By combining the QTL and SNP data, WM7.1 was located to a 660-kb region that contained 41 gene models on the proximal end of chromosome Pv07, while the WM8.3 introgression was narrowed to a 1.36-Mb region containing 70 gene models. The most polymorphic candidate gene in the WM7.1 region encodes a BEACH-domain protein associated with apoptosis. Within the WM8.3 interval, a receptor-like protein with the potential to recognize pathogen effectors was the most polymorphic gene. The use of gene and sequence-based mapping identified two candidate genes whose putative functions are consistent with the current model of pathogenicity.

  19. Variation in phytate accumulation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. fruit explants

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    Cileide Maria Medeiros Coelho

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro synthesis of phytate was studied in common bean fruit explants. Different concentrations of sucrose; phosphorus (P; myo-inositol; abscisic acid (ABA; glutamine and methionine, were tested. Fixed concentrations of these compounds were tested at different periods (0, 3, 6 and 9 days. Variation in phytate coincided with different concentrations of sucrose, myo-inositol, P and ABA for the duration tested. These compounds caused an accumulation of phytate and were more effective in the presence of myo-inositol and P. The accumulation of P varied less than phytate for the different treatments tested in vitro. In conclusion, P, sucrose, ABA, and myo-inositol caused an increase in the phytate of bean seed, showing that it could be possible to alter its content by culturing bean fruit explants in vitro.O fósforo é armazenado na forma de fitato nas sementes, o qual forma complexos estáveis e insolúveis com minerais e proteínas, conferindo efeito antinutriente. A síntese de fitato foi estudada em cultivo de explantes de fruto de feijão in vitro sob diferentes concentrações de sacarose, fósforo (P, mio-inositol, ácido abscísico (ABA, glutamina e metionina. Fixada a concentração destes compostos, testou-se os diferentes tempos de cultivo (0, 3, 6 e 9 dias. A variação no acúmulo de fitato ocorreu na presença de sacarose, mio-inositol, P e ABA nas diferentes concentrações e tempos testados. O acúmulo mais efetivo de fitato ocorreu na presença de mio-inositol e P. O acúmulo de P variou menos do que fitato em todos os tratamentos. Em conclusão, P, sacarose, ABA e mio-inositol causaram aumento no fitato acumulado nas sementes, mostrando que foi possível alterar a síntese de fitato em cultivo de explantes de fruto de feijão.

  20. Effect of the addition of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) flour on the in vitro digestibility of starch and undigestible carbohydrates in spaghetti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos-Infante, Jose-Alberto; Bello-Perez, Luis Arturo; Rocha-Guzman, Nuria Elizabeth; Gonzalez-Laredo, Ruben Francisco; Avila-Ontiveros, Martha

    2010-06-01

    Spaghetti is considered to be a slowly digestible starch food, a feature ruled by the particular physical properties of the product. Several studies have been reported to increase nutritional value of spaghetti, using legumes. We have studied the addition of common bean flour on the starch in vitro digestibility. Spaghetti was prepared with semolina and different concentrations of common bean flour (0%, 15%, 30%, and 45%, w/w). Proximate analysis, optimal cooking time, and cooking loss were estimated in crude spaghetti. Total, available, and resistant starches, indigestible fractions, and in vitro starch hydrolysis kinetics were accomplished in cooked spaghetti. Pasta with 30% and 45% of common bean flour showed higher values of protein. Particularly, the lowest cooking time was observed for composite spaghetti with 45% of common bean flour. There was a significant increase in cooking loss when common bean flour in the composite was added. Composite spaghetti samples with increasing common bean flour showed decreasing values of total starch but an important increase in the resistant starch (RS) level and indigestible insoluble fraction values. Plain pasta made with semolina showed the highest enzymatic hydrolysis rate, which decreased when common bean flour was added to the spaghetti. Spaghetti with a higher level of common bean flour was more slowly available, which may have positive implications for human health.

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies candidate loci underlying seven agronomic traits in Middle American diversity panel in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) breeding programs aim to improve both agronomic and seed characteristics traits. However, the genetic architecture of the many traits that affect common bean production are not completely understood. Genome-wide associate studies (GWAS) provide an experimental ap...

  2. Marker-assisted molecular profiling and RNA-Seq reveal a disease resistance cluster associated with Uromyces appendiculatus infection in common bean Phaseolus vulgaris L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important legume, useful for its high protein and dietary fiber. The fungal pathogen Uromyces appendiculatus (Pers.) Unger can cause major loss in susceptible varieties of common bean. The Ur-3 locus provides race specific resistance to fungal rust along wit...

  3. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding the proline transporter protein in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

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    Jibao Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available As a typical compatible solute, proline is accumulated in plants under environmental stresses. Proline transporter (ProT plays an important role in proline distribution between plant organs. Using a candidate gene approach, we cloned a cDNA sequence for ProT from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and designated the gene PvProT. The deduced amino acid sequence of PvProT showed high similarity to Bet/ProT proteins from other leguminous plants, and the highest similarity was observed with mothbean (Vigna aconitifolia L. VuProT. Relative quantification of the mRNA level of PvProT using real-time PCR analysis showed that the PvProT transcript level was higher in leaves than in stems and roots of common bean plants subjected to drought and salt stress. Under 20% (w/w PEG-6000 treatment, drought-resistant plants expressed a higher level of PvProT transcripts than drought-sensitive plants. Although heterologous expression of PvProT in the Escherichia coli mutant mkh13 showed that PvProT exhibited uptake activities for proline and betaine, no betaine content was detected in the common bean. These findings suggest that PvProT plays an important role in the transportation of proline in common bean plants exposed to drought and salt stress.

  4. Relationship between variation in quality of individual seeds and bulk seed quality in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seed lots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muasya, R.M.; Lommen, W.J.M.; Auma, E.O.; Struik, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    The variation in individual seed electrical conductivity (EC) (µS cm¿¹ g¿¹) of 24 seed lots of two common bean cultivars produced at two locations was quantified using the parameters mean ¿ median, standard deviation (SD), and the range 0¿75%. Also coefficient of variation (CV) was tested, which was

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a gene encoding the proline transporter protein in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jibao Chen; Jing Wu; Yunfeng Lu; Yuannan Cao; Hui Zeng; Zhaoyuan Zhang; Lanfen Wang; Shumin Wang

    2016-01-01

    As a typical compatible solute, proline is accumulated in plants under environmental stresses. Proline transporter (ProT) plays an important role in proline distribution between plant organs. Using a candidate gene approach, we cloned a cDNA sequence for ProT from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and designated the gene PvProT. The deduced amino acid sequence of PvProT showed high similarity to Bet/ProT proteins from other leguminous plants, and the highest similarity was observed with mothbean (Vigna aconitifolia L.) VuProT. Relative quantification of the mRNA level of PvProT using real-time PCR analysis showed that the PvProT transcript level was higher in leaves than in stems and roots of common bean plants subjected to drought and salt stress. Under 20% (w/w) PEG-6000 treatment, drought-resistant plants expressed a higher level of PvProT transcripts than drought-sensitive plants. Although heterologous expression of PvProT in the Escherichia coli mutant mkh13 showed that PvProT exhibited uptake activities for proline and betaine, no betaine content was detected in the common bean. These findings suggest that PvProT plays an important role in the transportation of proline in common bean plants exposed to drought and salt stress.

  6. Isolates of Rhizoctonia solani can produce both web blight and root rot symptoms in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhizoctonia solani Kühn (Rs) is an important pathogen in the tropics, causing web blight (WB), and a widespread soil-borne root rot (RR) pathogen of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) worldwide. This pathogen is a species complex classified into 14 anastomosis groups (AG). Some AGs have been report...

  7. A non-destructive selection method for faster growth at suboptimal temperature in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, E.; Oeveren, J.C. van; Jansen, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    A non-destructive method has been developed to select common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants whose growth is less effected at a suboptimal temperature. Shoot weight was determined at a suboptimal (14°C) and optimal temperature (20°C), 38 days after sowing and accessions identified with a signifi

  8. BRS FC402: high-yielding common bean cultivar with carioca grain, resistance to anthracnose and fusarium wilt

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    Leonardo Cunha Melo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BRS FC402 is a common bean cultivar of the carioca-grain group with commercial grain quality, suitable for cultivation in 21 Brazilian states. Cultivar has a normal cycle (85-94 days, high yield potential (4479 kg ha-1, 10.1% higher mean yield than the controls (2462 kg ha-1 and resistance to fusarium wilt and anthracnose.

  9. MicroRNAs Expression Profile in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) under Nutrient Deficiency Stresses and Manganese Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play a pivotal role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression in plants. The information on miRNAs in legumes is scarce. This work analyzes miRNAs in the agronomically important legume common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. A hybridization approach of miRNAs-macroarrays prin...

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies NBS-LRR-Encoding Genes Related with Anthracnose and Common Bacterial Blight in the Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Zhu, Jifeng; Wang, Lanfen; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) genes represent the largest and most important disease resistance genes in plants. The genome sequence of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) provides valuable data for determining the genomic organization of NBS-LRR genes. However, data on the NBS-LRR genes in the common bean are limited. In total, 178 NBS-LRR-type genes and 145 partial genes (with or without a NBS) located on 11 common bean chromosomes were identified from genome sequences database. Furthermore, 30 NBS-LRR genes were classified into Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR)-NBS-LRR (TNL) types, and 148 NBS-LRR genes were classified into coiled-coil (CC)-NBS-LRR (CNL) types. Moreover, the phylogenetic tree supported the division of these PvNBS genes into two obvious groups, TNL types and CNL types. We also built expression profiles of NBS genes in response to anthracnose and common bacterial blight using qRT-PCR. Finally, we detected nine disease resistance loci for anthracnose (ANT) and seven for common bacterial blight (CBB) using the developed NBS-SSR markers. Among these loci, NSSR24, NSSR73, and NSSR265 may be located at new regions for ANT resistance, while NSSR65 and NSSR260 may be located at new regions for CBB resistance. Furthermore, we validated NSSR24, NSSR65, NSSR73, NSSR260, and NSSR265 using a new natural population. Our results provide useful information regarding the function of the NBS-LRR proteins and will accelerate the functional genomics and evolutionary studies of NBS-LRR genes in food legumes. NBS-SSR markers represent a wide-reaching resource for molecular breeding in the common bean and other food legumes. Collectively, our results should be of broad interest to bean scientists and breeders.

  11. Resistance of common bean breeding lines to Phaeoisariopsis griseola isolates from Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angular leaf spot (ALS) disease caused by Phaeoisariopsis griseola Sacc. Ferraris, is currently one of the most important factors limiting bean productivity in Central America. The development of breeding lines which combine resistance to ALS and Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus (BGYMV) and tolerance...

  12. Estimation of phenotypic variability in symbiotic nitrogen fixation ability of common bean under drought stress using 15N natural abundance in grain

    OpenAIRE

    Polania, Jose; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Rao, Idupulapati; Beebe, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume, cultivated by small farmers and is usually exposed to unfavorable conditions with minimum use of inputs. Drought and low soil fertility, especially phosphorus and nitrogen (N) deficiencies, are major limitations to bean yield in smallholder systems. Beans can derive part of their required N from the atmosphere through symbiotic nitrogen fixation (SNF). Drought stress severely limits SNF ability of plants. The main objectiv...

  13. Characterization of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum isolates using differential cultivars of common bean in Santa Catarina State, Brazil

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    Maria Celeste Gonçalves-Vidigal

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In 2003 and 2004, 32 isolates of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum obtained from the infected plants of field-grown common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Santa Catarina state, Brazil were analyzed based on the virulence to 12 differential cultivars of Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Thirteen distinct races were identified, six of which had not been reported previously in Santa Catarina. This is the first report of the occurrence of 67, 83,101,103,105, and 581 races of C. lindemuthianum. Race 65 was most common (34%. All the isolates were compatible to the cultivars Michelite and Mexico 222. Some isolates infected not only differential cultivar of Mesoamerican origin, but also the ones of Andean origin.Em 2003 e 2004, isolados de Colletotrichum lindemuthianum obtidas de plantas infectadas de feijoeiro comum (Phaseolus vulgaris L. no Estado de Santa Catarina, Brasil foram analisadas baseando-se na virulência em 12 cultivares diferenciadoras de Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Treze raças distintas foram identificadas, sendo que seis delas não haviam sido reportadas anteriormente em Santa Catarina. Este é o primeiro registro de ocorrência das raças 67, 83, 101,103,105, e 581 do C. lindemuthianum. A raça mais comum foi a 65 (34%. Todos os isolados foram compatíveis com as cultivares Michelite e México 222. Alguns dos isolados infectaram tanto cultivares diferenciadoras de origem Mesoamericana como de origem Andina.

  14. Characterization and Comparison of Protein and Peptide Profiles and their Biological Activities of Improved Common Bean Cultivars (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) from Mexico and Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Luis; de Mejía, Elvira González

    2015-06-01

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is a good source of protein, vitamins, minerals and complex carbohydrates. The objective was to compare protein profile, including anti-nutrient proteins, and potential bioactive peptides of improved common bean cultivars grown in Mexico and Brazil. Bean protein isolates (BPI) were prepared from 15 common bean cultivars and hydrolyzed using pepsin/pancreatin. Thirteen proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE and protein in-gel tryptic-digestion-LC/MS. Protein profile was similar among common bean cultivars with high concentrations of defense-related proteins. Major identified proteins were phaseolin, lectin, protease and α-amylase inhibitors. Lectin (159.2 to 357.9 mg lectin/g BPI), Kunitz trypsin inhibitor (inh) (4.3 to 75.5 mg trypsin inh/g BPI), Bowman-Birk inhibitor (5.4 to 14.3 μg trypsin-chymotrypsin inh/g BPI) and α-amylase inhibitor activity (2.5 to 14.9% inhibition relative to acarbose/mg BPI) were higher in Mexican beans compared to Brazilian beans. Abundant peptides were identified by HPLC-MS/MS with molecular masses ranging from 300 to 1500 Da and significant sequences were SGAM, DSSG, LLAH, YVAT, EPTE and KPKL. Potential bioactivities of sequenced peptides were angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE), dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitor (DPP-IV) and antioxidant capacity. Peptides from common bean proteins presented potential biological activities related to control of hypertension and type-2 diabetes.

  15. Genomic Analysis of Storage Protein Deficiency in Genetically Related Lines of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Sudhakar; Diapari, Marwan; Yin, Fuqiang; Munholland, Seth; Perry, Gregory E.; Chapman, B. Patrick; Huang, Shangzhi; Sparvoli, Francesca; Bollini, Roberto; Crosby, William L.; Pauls, Karl P.; Marsolais, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E) but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome rebalancing might

  16. Genetics and mapping of a new anthracnose resistance locus in Andean common bean Paloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Castro, Sandra Aparecida; Gonçalves-Vidigal, Maria Celeste; Gilio, Thiago Alexandre Santana; Lacanallo, Giselly Figueiredo; Valentini, Giseli; da Silva Ramos Martins, Vanusa; Song, Qijian; Galván, Marta Zulema; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P; Pastor-Corrales, Marcial Antonio

    2017-04-18

    The Andean cultivar Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican and Andean races of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the fungal pathogen that causes the destructive anthracnose disease in common bean. Remarkably, Paloma is resistant to Mesoamerican races 2047 and 3481, which are among the most virulent races of the anthracnose pathogen. Most genes conferring anthracnose resistance in common bean are overcome by these races. The genetic mapping and the relationship between the resistant Co-Pa gene of Paloma and previously characterized anthracnose resistance genes can be a great contribution for breeding programs. The inheritance of resistance studies for Paloma was performed in F2 population from the cross Paloma (resistant) × Cornell 49-242 (susceptible) inoculated with race 2047, and in F2 and F2:3 generations from the cross Paloma (resistant) × PI 207262 (susceptible) inoculated with race 3481. The results of these studies demonstrated that a single dominant gene confers the resistance in Paloma. Allelism tests performed with multiple races of C. lindemuthianum showed that the resistance gene in Paloma, provisionally named Co-Pa, is independent from the anthracnose resistance genes Co-1, Co-2, Co-3, Co-4, Co-5, Co-6, Co-12, Co-13, Co-14, Co-15 and Co-16. Bulk segregant analysis using the SNP chip BARCBean6K_3 positioned the approximate location of Co-Pa in the lower arm of chromosome Pv01. Further mapping analysis located the Co-Pa gene at a 390 kb region of Pv01 flanked by SNP markers SS82 and SS83 at a distance of 1.3 and 2.1 cM, respectively. The results presented here showed that Paloma cultivar has a new dominant gene conferring resistance to anthracnose, which is independent from those genes previously described. The linkage between the Co-Pa gene and the SS82 and SS83 SNP markers will be extremely important for marker-assisted introgression of the gene into elite cultivars in order to enhance resistance.

  17. Genomic analysis of storage protein deficiency in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar ePandurangan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. integrate a progressive deficiency in major storage proteins, the 7S globulin phaseolin and lectins. SARC1 integrates a lectin-like protein, arcelin-1 from a wild common bean accession. SMARC1N-PN1 is deficient in major lectins, including erythroagglutinating phytohemagglutinin (PHA-E but not α-amylase inhibitor, and incorporates also a deficiency in phaseolin. SMARC1-PN1 is intermediate and shares the phaseolin deficiency. Sanilac is the parental background. To understand the genomic basis for variations in protein profiles previously determined by proteomics, the genotypes were submitted to short-fragment genome sequencing using an Illumina HiSeq 2000/2500 platform. Reads were aligned to reference sequences and subjected to de novo assembly. The results of the analyses identified polymorphisms responsible for the lack of specific storage proteins, as well as those associated with large differences in storage protein expression. SMARC1N-PN1 lacks the lectin genes pha-E and lec4-B17, and has the pseudogene pdlec1 in place of the functional pha-L gene. While the α-phaseolin gene appears absent, an approximately 20-fold decrease in β-phaseolin accumulation is associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism converting a G-box to an ACGT motif in the proximal promoter. Among residual lectins compensating for storage protein deficiency, mannose lectin FRIL and α-amylase inhibitor 1 genes are uniquely present in SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 50-fold increase in α-amylase inhibitor like protein accumulation is associated with multiple polymorphisms introducing up to eight potential positive cis-regulatory elements in the proximal promoter specific to SMARC1N-PN1. An approximately 7-fold increase in accumulation of 11S globulin legumin is not associated with variation in proximal promoter sequence, suggesting that the identity of individual proteins involved in proteome

  18. Novel Rhizobium lineages isolated from root nodules of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Andean and Mesoamerican areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Graham, Peter H; Martinez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2013-09-01

    The taxonomic affiliations of nineteen root-nodule bacteria isolated from the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil were investigated by analyses of 16S rRNA and of four protein-coding housekeeping genes. One strain from Mexico could be assigned to Rhizobium etli and two from Brazil to Rhizobium leucaenae, whereas another from Mexico corresponded to a recently described bean-nodulating species-level lineage related to R. etli and Rhizobium phaseoli. Ten strains isolated in Ecuador and Mexico corresponded to three novel Rhizobium lineages that fall into the R. phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade. One of those lineages, with representatives isolated mostly from Ecuador, seems to be dominant in beans from that Andean region. Only one of the Mexican strains clustered within the Rhizobium tropici clade, but as an independent lineage. Interestingly, four strains were affiliated with species within the Rhizobium radiobacter clade. The existence of yet non-described native Rhizobium lineages in both the Andean and Mesoamerican areas is discussed in relation to common-bean diversity and environmental conditions.

  19. Cotyledon thermal behavior and pectic solubility as related to cooking quality in common beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Lugo, I; Parra, C; Portilla, M; Peña-Valdivia, C B; Moreno, E

    1997-01-01

    The characteristic of proteins, starch and pectic substances in cotyledons of two bean cultivars varying in cooking time were determined to investigate their possible contribution to bean cooking quality. Both cultivars showed the same enthalpies of starch gelatinization but different protein denaturation enthalpies. The proportion of hot water soluble pectins was higher in Michigan, the cultivar with the lower cooking time, than in Ojo de Cabra, the cultivar with the higher cooking time. These results were not due to differences in pectin methylation or in the ratio of monovalent to divalent cations in the tissue, suggesting that in fresh beans the beta-elimination reaction is not the sole or predominant route of thermal pectin degradation. Overall, this study indicates that varietal differences in bean cooking quality may be reflections of the rate of pectin loss during soaking/heating and that the thermal properties of starch and protein fractions seem to have a minor contribution. Researchers involved in this study propose that in fresh beans, the thermal pectin loss results from a two step mechanism: pectin enzymic breakdown during the bean soaking followed by thermal solubilization rather than beta-elimination during the bean heating.

  20. Atmospheric dynamics of combined crops of wheat, cowpea, pinto beans in the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, W.; Nelson, M.; Silverstone, S.; Allen, J.; Alling, A.; van Thillo, M.

    A mixed crop consisting of cowpeas pinto beans and Apogee ultra-dwarf wheat was grown in Laboratory Biosphere a 40 m 3 closed life system equipped with 12000 watts of high pressure sodium lamps over planting beds with 5 37 m 2 of soil Similar to earlier reported experiments the concentration of carbon dioxide initially increased to 7860 ppm at 10 days after planting due to soil respiration plus CO 2 contributed from researchers breathing while in the chamber for brief periods before plant growth became substantial fell rapidly as plant growth increased up to 29 days after planting and then was maintained mostly in the range of about 200 -- 3000 ppm with a few excursions by CO 2 injections to feed plant growth Numerous analyses of rate of change of CO 2 concentration at many different concentrations and at many different days after planting reveals a strong dependence of fixation rates on CO 2 concentration In the middle period of growth days 31 -- 61 fixation rates doubled for CO 2 at 450 ppm compared to 270 ppm doubled again at 1000 ppm and increased a further 50 at 2040 ppm High productivity from these crops and the increase of fixation rates with elevated CO 2 concentration supports the concept that enhanced CO2 can be a useful strategy for remote life support systems

  1. Impact of Wheat/Faba Bean Mixed Cropping or Rotation Systems on Soil Microbial Functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahbi, Sanâa; Prin, Yves; Thioulouse, Jean; Sanguin, Hervé; Baudoin, Ezékiel; Maghraoui, Tasnime; Oufdou, Khalid; Le Roux, Christine; Galiana, Antoine; Hafidi, Mohamed; Duponnois, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Cropping systems based on carefully designed species mixtures reveal many potential advantages in terms of enhancing crop productivity, reducing pest and diseases, and enhancing ecological services. Associating cereals and legume production either through intercropping or rotations might be a relevant strategy of producing both type of culture, while benefiting from combined nitrogen fixed by the legume through its symbiotic association with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and from a better use of P and water through mycorrhizal associations. These practices also participate to the diversification of agricultural productions, enabling to secure the regularity of income returns across the seasonal and climatic uncertainties. In this context, we designed a field experiment aiming to estimate the 2 years impact of these practices on wheat yield and on soil microbial activities as estimated through Substrate Induced Respiration method and mycorrhizal soil infectivity (MSI) measurement. It is expected that understanding soil microbial functionalities in response to these agricultural practices might allows to target the best type of combination, in regard to crop productivity. We found that the tested cropping systems largely impacted soil microbial functionalities and MSI. Intercropping gave better results in terms of crop productivity than the rotation practice after two cropping seasons. Benefits resulting from intercrop should be highly linked with changes recorded on soil microbial functionalities. PMID:27695462

  2. Impact of wheat / faba bean mixed cropping or rotation systems on soil microbial functionalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanâa Wahbi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cropping systems based on carefully designed species mixtures reveal many potential advantages in terms of enhancing crop productivity, reducing pest and diseases and enhacing ecological serices. Associating cereals and legume production either through intercropping or rotations might be a relevant strategy of producing both type of culture, while benefiting from combined nitrogen fixed by the legume through its symbiotic association with nitrogen-fixing bacteria, and from a better use of P and water through mycorrhizal associations. These practices also participate to the diversification of agricultural productions, enabling to secure the regularity of income returns across the seasonal and climatic uncertainties. In this context, we designed a field experiment aiming to estimate the two years impact of these practices on wheat yield and on soil microbial activities as estimated through Substrate Induced Respiration (SIR method and mycorrhizal soil infectivity (MSI measurement. It is expected that understanding soil microbial functionalities in response to these agricultural practices might allows to target the best type of combination, in regard to crop productivity. We found that the tested cropping systems largely impacted soil microbial functionalities and mycorrhizal soil infectivity. Intercropping gave better results in terms of crop productivity than the rotation practice after 2 cropping seasons. Benefits resulting from intercrop should be highly linked with changes recorded on soil microbial functionalities.

  3. Comparative analysis of PvPAP gene family and their functions in response to phosphorus deficiency in common bean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiyue Liang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Purple acid phosphatases (PAPs play a vital role in adaptive strategies of plants to phosphorus (P deficiency. However, their functions in relation to P efficiency are fragmentary in common bean. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five PvPAPs were isolated and sequenced in common bean. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PvPAPs could be classified into two groups, including a small group with low molecular mass, and a large group with high molecular mass. Among them, PvPAP3, PvPAP4 and PvPAP5 belong to the small group, while the other two belong to the large group. Transient expression of 35S:PvPAPs-GFP on onion epidermal cells verified the variations of subcellular localization among PvPAPs, suggesting functional diversities of PvPAPs in common bean. Quantitative PCR results showed that most PvPAPs were up-regulated by phosphate (Pi starvation. Among them, the expression of the small group PvPAPs responded more to Pi starvation, especially in the roots of G19833, the P-efficient genotype. However, only overexpressing PvPAP1 and PvPAP3 could result in significantly increased utilization of extracellular dNTPs in the transgenic bean hairy roots. Furthermore, overexpressing PvPAP3 in Arabidopsis enhanced both plant growth and total P content when dNTPs were supplied as the sole external P source. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that PvPAPs in bean varied in protein structure, response to P deficiency and subcellular localization. Among them, both PvPAP1 and PvPAP3 might function as utilization of extracellular dNTPs.

  4. Copper and zinc forms in soil fertilized with pig slurry in the bean crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. Grohskopf

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The application of pig slurry may have different influence on copper (Cu and zinc (Zn dynamics in the soil compared with mineral fertilization. The aim of this research was to determine the different forms of Cu and Zn in soil and their uptake by bean plants in response to the application of mineral fertilizer and pig slurry (PS. The treatments were: mineral fertilizer (Cu and Zn oxides and liquid pig slurry, at increasing rates (0/0, 1.7/6.0, 3.4/12.0 and 6.8/24.0 kg ha-1 Cu/Zn, respectively applied in a Rhodic Kandiudox. PS increased the Cu content in soil in the exchangeable form, Fe oxides and residual, while the mineral fertilizer increased Cu contents in the fraction associated with soil organic matter. Soil Zn contents in the fractions available, exchangeable and SOM were highest under mineral fertilization, while in the soluble fraction the contents were highest under PS. The fertilizers had not impact on Cu and Zn contents associated with Al oxides, and these elements were mostly associated with Fe oxides in the soil. PS promoted the highest biomass production in shoots and roots of the bean plants, reflecting in the highest accumulation of Cu and Zn.

  5. Symbiotic N2 fixation in pea and field bean estimated by 15N fertilizer dilution in field experiments with barley as a reference crop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen

    1986-01-01

    years. At the full bloom/flat pod growth stage from 30 to 59 per cent of total N2 fixation had taken place. The proportion of total N derived from N2 fixation at maturity was higher in seeds than in vegetative plant parts and amounted to 59.5, 51.3 and 66.3 per cent of total above-ground plant N...... in the two pea cultivars and field bean, respectively (three-year means). The recovery of fertilizer N was 62.2, 70.2, 52.1, and 69.5 per cent in the two pea cultivars, field bean and barley, respectively. Growth analysis indicated that barley did not meet the claims for an ideal reference crop in the15N...... fertilizer dilution technique for estimating N2 fixation in pea and field bean. ‘Starter’-N neither increased the seed yield nor the N content of the grain legumes....

  6. Assesing potential effects of inulin and probiotic bacteria on Fe bioavailability from common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) to Caco-2 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inulin, a prebiotic, may enhance intestinal Fe absorption. Our objective was to assess the effects of supplemental inulin and two probiotic bacteria (B. infantis and L.acidophillus) on Fe availability to Caco-2 cells from common white and red beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Cooked beans were mixed o...

  7. SNP discovery in common bean by restriction-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing for genetic diversity and population structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdisser, Paula Arielle M R; Pappas, Georgios J; de Menezes, Ivandilson P P; Müller, Bárbara S F; Pereira, Wendell J; Narciso, Marcelo G; Brondani, Claudio; Souza, Thiago L P O; Borba, Tereza C O; Vianello, Rosana P

    2016-06-01

    Researchers have made great advances into the development and application of genomic approaches for common beans, creating opportunities to driving more real and applicable strategies for sustainable management of the genetic resource towards plant breeding. This work provides useful polymorphic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for high-throughput common bean genotyping developed by RAD (restriction site-associated DNA) sequencing. The RAD tags were generated from DNA pooled from 12 common bean genotypes, including breeding lines of different gene pools and market classes. The aligned sequences identified 23,748 putative RAD-SNPs, of which 3357 were adequate for genotyping; 1032 RAD-SNPs with the highest ADT (assay design tool) score are presented in this article. The RAD-SNPs were structurally annotated in different coding (47.00 %) and non-coding (53.00 %) sequence components of genes. A subset of 384 RAD-SNPs with broad genome distribution was used to genotype a diverse panel of 95 common bean germplasms and revealed a successful amplification rate of 96.6 %, showing 73 % of polymorphic SNPs within the Andean group and 83 % in the Mesoamerican group. A slightly increased He (0.161, n = 21) value was estimated for the Andean gene pool, compared to the Mesoamerican group (0.156, n = 74). For the linkage disequilibrium (LD) analysis, from a group of 580 SNPs (289 RAD-SNPs and 291 BARC-SNPs) genotyped for the same set of genotypes, 70.2 % were in LD, decreasing to 0.10 %in the Andean group and 0.77 % in the Mesoamerican group. Haplotype patterns spanning 310 Mb of the genome (60 %) were characterized in samples from different origins. However, the haplotype frameworks were under-represented for the Andean (7.85 %) and Mesoamerican (5.55 %) gene pools separately. In conclusion, RAD sequencing allowed the discovery of hundreds of useful SNPs for broad genetic analysis of common bean germplasm. From now, this approach provides an excellent panel

  8. Assessment of Insecticidal Efficacy of Diatomaceous Earth and Powders of Common Lavender and Field Horsetail against Bean Weevil Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohinc, T; Vayias, B; Bartol, T; Trdan, S

    2013-12-01

    In the search for an effective and sustainable control method against the bean weevil Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say), an important insect pest affecting stored common beans and other legumes, three different powders were tested against adult been weevils under laboratory conditions. The three powders were diatomaceous earth (DE) (commercial product SilicoSec®), common lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) powder and field horsetail (Equisetum arvense) powder. The substances were tested at five temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, and 35°C), two relative humidity levels (RH) (55 and 75%), and four concentrations (100, 300, 500, and 900 ppm). The mortality of adults was measured after the 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 7th days of exposure. The efficacy of the powders increased with the temperature, whereas in general, RH did not have a significant effect on the adults' survival. According to common practice of storing common beans, we recommend the use of DE against the pest in question, as this inert powder showed the highest efficacy at lower temperatures and concentrations. Concerning the wider use of common lavender and field horsetail powders, we suggest studying their combined use with other environmentally friendly methods with the aim of achieving the highest synergistic effect possible.

  9. Occurrence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli, the causal agent of common bacterial blight disease, on seeds of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in upper Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-Alla, M H; Bashandy, S R; Schnell, S

    2010-01-01

    Common bean seed lots collected from different seed dealers and Malawii agriculture station were screened for the presence of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli. In the laboratory the pathogen was isolated following the routine laboratory assay method, i.e. direct plating method using yeast extract-dextrose-calcium carbonate agar medium (YDC). Yellow, convex, mucoid colonies of Xanthomonas were consistently isolated on YDC from seed samples. The presumptive pathogen was confirmed by isolation on semiselective medium, such as mTBM and MD5A. Further, the pathogen was confirmed by biochemical, physiological and, finally, the pathogenicity tests. Five samples out of seven were positive for Xanthomonas. The isolates were found to cause common blight of 3-week-old common bean plants by 7 d after inoculation. Bacteria with the same characteristics as those inoculated were re-isolated from the infected plants.

  10. Nitrate regulates rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kalpana Nanjareddy; Lourdes Blanco; Manoj-Kumar Arthikala; Xochitl Alvarado Affantrange; Federico Snchez; Miguel Lara

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen-limited conditions are considered to be a prerequisite for legume-rhizobial symbiosis, but the effects of nitrate-rich conditions on symbiotic status remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by examining rhizobial (Rhizobim tropici) and arbusclar mycorrhizal (Glomus intraradices) symbiosis in Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Negro Jamapa under nitrate pre-incubation and continuous nitrate conditions. Our results indicate that nitrate pre-incubation, independent of the concentration, did not affect nodule development. However, the continuous supply of nitrate at high concentrations impaired nodule maturation and nodule numbers. Low nitrate conditions, in addition to positively regulating nodule number, biomass, and nitrogenase activity, also extended the span of nitrogen-fixing activity. By contrast, for arbuscular mycorrhizae, continuous 10 and 50 mmol/L nitrate increased the percent root length colonization, concomitantly reduced arbuscule size, and en-hanced ammonia transport without affecting phosphate transport. Therefore, in this manuscript, we have proposed the importance of nitrate as a positive regulator in promoting both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in the common bean.

  11. Decreased Nucleotide and Expression Diversity and Modified Coexpression Patterns Characterize Domestication in the Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Elisa; Bitocchi, Elena; Ferrarini, Alberto; Benazzo, Andrea; Biagetti, Eleonora; Klie, Sebastian; Minio, Andrea; Rau, Domenico; Rodriguez, Monica; Panziera, Alex; Venturini, Luca; Attene, Giovanna; Albertini, Emidio; Jackson, Scott A; Nanni, Laura; Fernie, Alisdair R; Nikoloski, Zoran; Bertorelle, Giorgio; Delledonne, Massimo; Papa, Roberto

    2014-05-21

    Using RNA sequencing technology and de novo transcriptome assembly, we compared representative sets of wild and domesticated accessions of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) from Mesoamerica. RNA was extracted at the first true-leaf stage, and de novo assembly was used to develop a reference transcriptome; the final data set consists of ∼190,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms from 27,243 contigs in expressed genomic regions. A drastic reduction in nucleotide diversity (∼60%) is evident for the domesticated form, compared with the wild form, and almost 50% of the contigs that are polymorphic were brought to fixation by domestication. In parallel, the effects of domestication decreased the diversity of gene expression (18%). While the coexpression networks for the wild and domesticated accessions demonstrate similar seminal network properties, they show distinct community structures that are enriched for different molecular functions. After simulating the demographic dynamics during domestication, we found that 9% of the genes were actively selected during domestication. We also show that selection induced a further reduction in the diversity of gene expression (26%) and was associated with 5-fold enrichment of differentially expressed genes. While there is substantial evidence of positive selection associated with domestication, in a few cases, this selection has increased the nucleotide diversity in the domesticated pool at target loci associated with abiotic stress responses, flowering time, and morphology.

  12. Genetic control of the angular leaf spot reaction in common bean leaves and pods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerônimo Constantino Borel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Information about genetic control of plant reaction to pathogens is essential in plant breeding programs focusing resistance. This study aimed to obtain information about genetic control of the angular leaf spot reaction in leaves and pods from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. line ESAL 686. This line was crossed with cultivars Jalo EEP 558 (resistant, Cornell 49-242 (resistant and Carioca MG (susceptible. Generations F1, F2 and backcrosses (BC11 and BC21 were obtained. In the dry season (2009, parents and respective populations were evaluated for angular leaf spot reaction under field conditions. Disease severity was evaluated on leaves and pods using diagrammatic scales. Severity scores were obtained and mean and variance genetic components were estimated for both. Segregation of F2 generation was analyzed for some crosses. Different genes control angular leaf spot reaction in leaves and pods. Mean and variance components showed predominance of additive effects. Heritability was high, however, was greater on pods than on leaves which indicated that leaf reaction is more influenced by the environment.

  13. Natural selection and family X location interaction in the common (dry bean plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Henrique Pirola

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural selection takes place while advancing generations of segregant populations of self pollinating species by the population (bulk method. There is evidence that it maintains the individuals with greater grain yield. The question arises whether natural selection preserves the individuals which are more adapted only to the environment where the generation advance occurred, that is, if it contributes to increasing the genotype x environment interaction in the family assessment. This study was carried out to check this hypothesis in the common bean plant using families derived from a segregating population from a cross between the Carioca MG x ESAL 686 cultivars. The segregating populations increase in homozygosity was obtained by the population (bulk method until the F14 generation, in three distinct locations in Minas Gerais state: Lavras, Lambari and Patos de Minas. Forty-seven F14:15 families were randomly taken from the population in each location and later multiplied to obtain F14:16 families. These families were jointly assessed with three controls using a triple 12 x 12 lattice design in the three locations of generation advance in the wet season of 1998/1999. All the estimated parameters showed that while advancing segregant populations by the population (bulk method, natural selection acted to preserve the individuals which are more adapted to the environment in which they were advanced.

  14. Genetic control of the number of days to flowering in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Pedroso Mendes

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the genetic control of early flowering in common bean. Crosses weremade between the parents Pérola and BRS Radiante and between ESAL 506 and Preto 60 dias. The segregating generations,F3, F2BC11 and F2BC12 of each cross were evaluated in experiments with two replications. F3 plants of both crosses wererandomly taken, and F3:4 progenies evaluated for the trait number of days to flowering. There was good adjustment to theadditive-dominant model of both crosses. The dominance effect was lower than the additive effect in the trait control and, whenpresent, it reduced the number of days to flowering. The value of realized heritability (h2R was similar in both crosses andlower than the h2 estimated for selection among F3:4 progenies. There were indications that aside from the environmental effecton the trait expression, the genotype-environment interaction was also significant.

  15. Allocative efficiency of smallholder common bean producers in Uganda: A stochastic frontier and Tobit model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibiko, K.W.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated allocative efficiency levels of common bean farms in Eastern Uganda and the factors influencing allocative efficiencies of these farms. To achieve this objective, a sample of 480 households was randomly selected in Busia, Mbale, Budaka and Tororo districts in Eastern Uganda. Data was collected using a personally administered structured questionnaire with a focus on household decision makers; whereas a stochastic frontier model and a two limit Tobit regression model were employed in the analysis. It was established that the mean allocative efficiency was 29.37% and it was significantly influenced by farm size, off-farm income, asset value and distance to the market. Therefore the study suggested the need for policies to discourage land fragmentation and promote road and market infrastructure development in the rural areas. The study also revealed the need for farmers to be trained on entrepreneurial skills so that they can invest their farm profits into more income generating activities that will harness more farming capital.

  16. Effects of manganese toxicity on leaf CO{sub 2} assimilation of contrasting common bean genotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, A.; Lynch, J.P. [The Pennsylvania State Univ., Dept. of Horticulture, PA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Parameters related to leaf photosynthesis were evaluated in three genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with contrasting tolerance to Mn toxicity. Two short-term studies in solution culture were used to assess the effect of excess Mn on CO{sub 2} assimilation in mature and immature leaves. Mn toxicity decreased total chlorophyll content only in immature leaves, with a consequent reduction of leaf CO{sub 2} assimilation. Mature leaves that showed brown speckles characteristics of Mn toxicity, did not suffer any detriment in their capacity to assimilate CO{sub 2}, at least in a 4-day experiment. Stomatal conductance and transpiration were not affected by the presence of high levels of Mn in leaf tissue. Lower stomatal conductance and transpiration rates were observed only in leaves with advanced chlorosis. Differences among genotypes were detected as increased chlorosis in the more sensitive genotype ZPV-292, followed by A-283 and less chlorosis in the tolerant genotype CALIMA. Since CO{sub 2} assimilation expressed per unit of chlorophyll was not different between high-Mn plants and control plants, we conclude that the negative effect of Mn toxicity on CO{sub 2} assimilation can be explained by a reduction in leaf chlorophyll content. (au) 29 refs.

  17. Nitrate regulates rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanjareddy, Kalpana; Blanco, Lourdes; Arthikala, Manoj-Kumar; Affantrange, Xochitl Alvarado; Sánchez, Federico; Lara, Miguel

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen-limited conditions are considered to be a prerequisite for legume-rhizobial symbiosis, but the effects of nitrate-rich conditions on symbiotic status remain poorly understood. We addressed this issue by examining rhizobial (Rhizobim tropici) and arbusclar mycorrhizal (Glomus intraradices) symbiosis in Phaseolus vulgaris L. cv. Negro Jamapa under nitrate pre-incubation and continuous nitrate conditions. Our results indicate that nitrate pre-incubation, independent of the concentration, did not affect nodule development. However, the continuous supply of nitrate at high concentrations impaired nodule maturation and nodule numbers. Low nitrate conditions, in addition to positively regulating nodule number, biomass, and nitrogenase activity, also extended the span of nitrogen-fixing activity. By contrast, for arbuscular mycorrhizae, continuous 10 and 50 mmol/L nitrate increased the percent root length colonization, concomitantly reduced arbuscule size, and enhanced ammonia transport without affecting phosphate transport. Therefore, in this manuscript, we have proposed the importance of nitrate as a positive regulator in promoting both rhizobial and mycorrhizal symbiosis in the common bean. © 2014 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  18. Classification of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum races in differential cultivars of common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Ribeiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anthracnose caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is one of the main diseases affecting the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., and the pathogen is characterized by wide variability, with more than 50 physiological races identified in Brazil. Greater occurrences of races 65, 73, and 81 have been observed in Brazil along with the occurrence of pathogenic variability among isolates of a single race, destabilizing the resistance of commercial cultivars. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify physiological races of C. lindemuthianum isolates collected in the states of São Paulo and Santa Catarina, Brazil and to test for variability among the isolates of race 65.  The classification of 51 isolates resulted in the identification of 10 different physiological races: 4, 38, 55, 65, 73, 81, 83, 85, 321, and 351. Races 65 and 81 predominated, with frequencies of 37.25 and 35.29%, respectively. Regarding the isolates of race 65, wide physiological variability was evident, suggesting that a new differential set should be applied to detect the levels of variation among isolates of a single race of the pathogen.

  19. Nitrogen fertilization in irrigated common bean at different times, with and without dose division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Pereira Ramos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to evaluate the effect of nitrogen fertilization at different times on the agronomic characteristics of common bean cultivars, within the intercrop period. An experiment was installed in the town of Gurupi, Tocantins, Brazil, with randomized blocks, under a 3 x 5 factorial scheme, consisting of 3 cultivars and 5 nitrogen application times, with 4 repetitions. We evaluated the cultivars IAC Alvorada, IPR Juriti, and BRS Requinte. Regarding nitrogen fertilization, we evaluated 5 times, the first corresponding to control (E1 = N zero and the others applying 100 kg.ha-1 of nitrogen, using urea as their source, as follows: E2 = 100% of N applied at sowing; E3 = 100% of N applied 25 days after emergence (DAE; E4 = 50% of N applied 20 DAE and 50% 30 DAE; E5 = 33% of N applied 15 DAE, 33% 25 DAE, and 33% 35 DAE. There was genetic variability among cultivars with regard to response, as well as differences between nitrogen fertilization times. The cultivars IAC Alvorada and IPR Juriti obtained higher grain yields. The nitrogen application time divided into 15, 25 and 35 DAE enabled a higher grain yield for the cultivars IAC Alvorada and IPR Juriti.

  20. Genetic mapping of two genes conferring resistance to powdery mildew in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Vega, Elena; Trabanco, Noemí; Campa, Ana; Ferreira, Juan José

    2013-06-01

    Powdery mildew (PM) is a serious disease in many legume species, including the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). This study investigated the genetic control behind resistance reaction to PM in the bean genotype, Cornell 49242. The results revealed evidence supporting a qualitative mode of inheritance for resistance and the involvement of two independent genes in the resistance reaction. The location of these resistance genes was investigated in a linkage genetic map developed for the XC RIL population. Contingency tests revealed significant associations for 28 loci out of a total of 329 mapped loci. Fifteen were isolated or formed groups with less than two loci. The thirteen remaining loci were located at three regions in linkage groups Pv04, Pv09, and Pv11. The involvement of Pv09 was discarded due to the observed segregation in the subpopulation obtained from the Xana genotype for the loci located in this region. In contrast, the two subpopulations obtained from the Xana genotype for the BM161 locus, linked to the Co-3/9 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv04), and from the Xana genotype for the SCAReoli locus, linked to the Co-2 anthracnose resistance gene (Pv11), exhibited monogenic segregations, suggesting that both regions were involved in the genetic control of resistance. A genetic dissection was carried out to verify the involvement of both regions in the reaction to PM. Two resistant recombinant lines were selected, according to their genotypes, for the block of loci included in the Co-2 and Co-3/9 regions, and they were crossed with the susceptible parent, Xana. Linkage analysis in the respective F2 populations supported the hypothesis that a dominant gene (Pm1) was located in the linkage group Pv11 and another gene (Pm2) was located in the linkage group Pv04. This is the first report showing the localization of resistance genes against powdery mildew in Phaseolus vulgaris and the results offer the opportunity to increase the efficiency of breeding

  1. 77 FR 75509 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-21

    ... crops with the 2013 reinsurance year. The proposed term ``citrus fruit group'' is defined as ``a.... Producers who choose an intended use of fresh will be required to provide management records upon request to... records must be provided upon request from at least one of the previous three crop years; or for...

  2. Behavior of zinc from six organic fertilizers applied to a navy bean crop grown in a calcareous soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, D; Obrador, A; Alvarez, J M

    2007-08-22

    The objective of this study was to compare the mobility, leaching, availability, and relative effectiveness of Zn from Zn-polyhydroxyphenylcarboxilate (Zn-PHP), Zn-HEDTA (Zn-N-2-hydroxyethyl-ethylenediaminetriacetate), Zn-EDDHSA [Zn-ethylenediamine-di-(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenylacetate)], Zn-EDTA (Zn-ethylenediaminetetraacetate), Zn-S,S-EDDS (Zn-ethylenediaminedisuccinate), and Zn-EDTA-HEDTA sources by applying different Zn rates (5 and 10 mg kg(-1)) to a calcareous soil under greenhouse conditions. A lysimeter experiment was carried out for 60 days and using navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as an indicator plant. The Zn available to the plant and easily leachable Zn were determined in soil by different single extractions, while the distribution of Zn in the soil was assessed by sequential speciation. The utilization of applied Zn by the navy bean was greatest when the Zn treatments were Zn-EDTA, Zn-EDTA-HEDTA, Zn-HEDTA, and Zn-EDDHSA. Both total Zn in the plants and soluble Zn in the plant dry matter (extracted with 1 mM 2-morpholino-ethanesulfonic acid) were positive and significantly correlated with the following: the amounts of Zn extracted with the three single extractions used to estimate soil available Zn and the amounts of Zn in the water soluble plus exchangeable and organically complexed fractions. The Zn-HEDTA, Zn-EDDHSA, Zn-EDTA-HEDTA, Zn-S,S-EDDS, and Zn-EDTA sources significantly increased the mobility of micronutrients through the soil with respect to the control and Zn-PHP source. The maximum Zn concentration obtained in the leachate fractions was 65 mg L(-1) (13% of Zn applied) for the Zn-S,S-EDDS chelate applied at a rate of 10 mg Zn kg(-1) soil. In the course of the crop, the soil pH + pe parameter increased significantly with experimental time.

  3. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Andrew J.; William, H. Manilal; Perry, Gregory; Khanal, Raja; Pauls, K. Peter; Kelly, James D.; Navabi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). Alleles at the Co–4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08) where Co–4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co–4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK–4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co–4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases. PMID:26431031

  4. Candidate Gene Identification with SNP Marker-Based Fine Mapping of Anthracnose Resistance Gene Co-4 in Common Bean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Burt

    Full Text Available Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is an important fungal disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris. Alleles at the Co-4 locus confer resistance to a number of races of C. lindemuthianum. A population of 94 F4:5 recombinant inbred lines of a cross between resistant black bean genotype B09197 and susceptible navy bean cultivar Nautica was used to identify markers associated with resistance in bean chromosome 8 (Pv08 where Co-4 is localized. Three SCAR markers with known linkage to Co-4 and a panel of single nucleotide markers were used for genotyping. A refined physical region on Pv08 with significant association with anthracnose resistance identified by markers was used in BLAST searches with the genomic sequence of common bean accession G19833. Thirty two unique annotated candidate genes were identified that spanned a physical region of 936.46 kb. A majority of the annotated genes identified had functional similarity to leucine rich repeats/receptor like kinase domains. Three annotated genes had similarity to 1, 3-β-glucanase domains. There were sequence similarities between some of the annotated genes found in the study and the genes associated with phosphoinositide-specific phosphilipases C associated with Co-x and the COK-4 loci found in previous studies. It is possible that the Co-4 locus is structured as a group of genes with functional domains dominated by protein tyrosine kinase along with leucine rich repeats/nucleotide binding site, phosphilipases C as well as β-glucanases.

  5. Co-inoculation Effect of Rhizobia and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria on Common Bean Growth in a Low Phosphorus Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korir, Hezekiah; Mungai, Nancy W; Thuita, Moses; Hamba, Yosef; Masso, Cargele

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation through legume-Rhizobium symbiosis is important for enhancing agricultural productivity and is therefore of great economic interest. Growing evidence indicates that other soil beneficial bacteria can positively affect symbiotic performance of rhizobia. Nodule endophytic plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were isolated from common bean nodules from Nakuru County in Kenya and characterized 16S rDNA partial gene sequencing. The effect of co-inoculation of rhizobium and PGPR, on nodulation and growth of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was also investigated using a low phosphorous soil under greenhouse conditions. Gram-positive nodule endophytic PGPR belonging to the genus Bacillus were successfully isolated and characterized. Two PGPR strains (Paenibacillus polymyxa and Bacillus megaterium), two rhizobia strains (IITA-PAU 987 and IITA-PAU 983) and one reference rhizobia strain (CIAT 899) were used in the co-inoculation study. Two common bean varieties were inoculated with Rhizobium strains singly or in a combination with PGPR to evaluate the effect on nodulation and growth parameters. Co-inoculation of IITA-PAU 987 + B. megaterium recorded the highest nodule weight (405.2 mg) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (324.8 mg), while CIAT 899 + B. megaterium (401.2 mg) compared to CIAT 899 alone (337.2 mg). CIAT 899 + B. megaterium recorded a significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.23 g) compared to CIAT 899 alone (5.80 g). However, there was no significant difference between CIAT 899 + P. polymyxa and CIAT 899 alone. Combination of IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (6.84 g) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (5.32 g) but no significant difference was observed when co-inoculated with P. polymyxa. IITA-PAU 983 in combination with P. polymyxa led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.15 g) compared to IITA-PAU 983 alone (5.14 g). Plants inoculated with IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium received 24.0 % of

  6. Co-inoculation Effect of Rhizobia and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria on Common Bean Growth in a Low Phosphorus Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korir, Hezekiah; Mungai, Nancy W.; Thuita, Moses; Hamba, Yosef; Masso, Cargele

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation through legume-Rhizobium symbiosis is important for enhancing agricultural productivity and is therefore of great economic interest. Growing evidence indicates that other soil beneficial bacteria can positively affect symbiotic performance of rhizobia. Nodule endophytic plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were isolated from common bean nodules from Nakuru County in Kenya and characterized 16S rDNA partial gene sequencing. The effect of co-inoculation of rhizobium and PGPR, on nodulation and growth of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) was also investigated using a low phosphorous soil under greenhouse conditions. Gram-positive nodule endophytic PGPR belonging to the genus Bacillus were successfully isolated and characterized. Two PGPR strains (Paenibacillus polymyxa and Bacillus megaterium), two rhizobia strains (IITA-PAU 987 and IITA-PAU 983) and one reference rhizobia strain (CIAT 899) were used in the co-inoculation study. Two common bean varieties were inoculated with Rhizobium strains singly or in a combination with PGPR to evaluate the effect on nodulation and growth parameters. Co-inoculation of IITA-PAU 987 + B. megaterium recorded the highest nodule weight (405.2 mg) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (324.8 mg), while CIAT 899 + B. megaterium (401.2 mg) compared to CIAT 899 alone (337.2 mg). CIAT 899 + B. megaterium recorded a significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.23 g) compared to CIAT 899 alone (5.80 g). However, there was no significant difference between CIAT 899 + P. polymyxa and CIAT 899 alone. Combination of IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (6.84 g) compared to IITA-PAU 987 alone (5.32 g) but no significant difference was observed when co-inoculated with P. polymyxa. IITA-PAU 983 in combination with P. polymyxa led to significantly higher shoot dry weight (7.15 g) compared to IITA-PAU 983 alone (5.14 g). Plants inoculated with IITA-PAU 987 and B. megaterium received 24.0 % of

  7. Hydroponic growth of crops in presence of /sup 14/C-benzo(a)pyrene. [/sup 14/C tracer study in beans, cantaloupes, and cotton plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blum, S.C.; Swarbrick, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    An attempt was made to evaluate the fate of a polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon in the food chain under severe and exaggerated experimental conditions. Green beans, cantaloupes, and cotton were grown hydroponically in nutrient-containing aqueous solutions saturated with carbon-14 labeled benzo(a)pyrene, a known carcinogen. The plants were selected because of different growing times involved: 6, 12, and 22 weeks for green beans, cantaloupes, and cotton, respectively, as well as the great differences in these plant types. Results indicate that the translocation or migration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons during the growth cycle of crops is not a reasonable expectation. Any such contamination found in crops would, therefore, require some other explanation.

  8. Investigation of isolation conditions and ion-exchange purification of protein coagulation components from common bean seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antov Mirjana G.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of an extraction procedure of protein coagulants from common bean seed regarding concentration of NaCl and pH was performed. High values of protein concentration and coagulation activity in crude extract (9.19 g/l and 23.9%, respectively were obtained when the extraction was performed using 0.5 mol/l NaCl and water as solvent, which represents an advantage for economic and environmental reasons. Crude extract of common bean seed was purified by precipitation at two different percentages of (NH42SO4 saturation, followed by batch ion-exchange chromatography. The highest obtained coagulation activity, 45%, was determined in fraction that was eluated at 1.75 mol/l NaCl from resin loaded with proteins precipitated upon 80-100% (NH42SO4 saturation. High values of coagulation activity showed by some eluates suggest their application as natural coagulant for water purification. .

  9. CROP OF TRANSGENIC SOY-BEAN. PEASANT AND INDIGENOUS COMMUNITY EFFECTS OF EUSTERN PARAGUAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Florencio Centurión Mereles

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Word offers us a critical glance about the economic and socio-cultural impacts of the transgenic crops in peasant and indigenous communities of the eastern region of Paraguay, it is given special attention to the use of Roundup, with the undoubted environment cost and the uncertain risks to human and animal health. The impacts and interactions that the techno-commoditization of the organisms genetically modified OGM have on the affected populations and the environment-species, soil, water, woods, flora, fauna is discussed in the Word.The extent of use of glyphosate on transgenic crops would involve not only the environment of the crop, but go to generate profound cultural changes, technological, of management, environmental, economical, social and legal, whose effects we already see them come with the decline of peasant and indigenous communities, that at not finding adequate strategies to face them, collapse as collectivity. The Word contains important elements to renew the debate and the critical thought in relation to the problematic of transgenic crop and its impact in indigenous and peasant populations.

  10. Evaluating two-dimensional electrophoresis profiles of the protein phaseolin as markers of genetic differentiation and seed protein quality in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pedrouso, María; Bernal, Javier; Franco, Daniel; Zapata, Carlos

    2014-07-23

    High-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) profiles of the protein phaseolin, the major seed storage protein of common bean, display great number of spots with differentially glycosylated and phosphorylated α- and β-type polypeptides. This work aims to test whether these complex profiles can be useful markers of genetic differentiation and seed protein quality in bean populations. The 2-DE phaseolin profile and the amino acid composition were examined in bean seeds from 18 domesticated and wild accessions belonging to the Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools. We found that proteomic distances based on 2-DE profiles were successful in identifying the accessions belonging to each gene pool and outliers distantly related. In addition, accessions identified as outliers from proteomic distances showed the highest levels of methionine content, an essential amino acid deficient in bean seeds. These findings suggest that 2-DE phaseolin profiles provide valuable information with potential of being used in common bean genetic improvement.

  11. A gap analysis methodology for collecting crop genepools: a case study with phaseolus beans.

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    Julián Ramírez-Villegas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The wild relatives of crops represent a major source of valuable traits for crop improvement. These resources are threatened by habitat destruction, land use changes, and other factors, requiring their urgent collection and long-term availability for research and breeding from ex situ collections. We propose a method to identify gaps in ex situ collections (i.e. gap analysis of crop wild relatives as a means to guide efficient and effective collecting activities. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The methodology prioritizes among taxa based on a combination of sampling, geographic, and environmental gaps. We apply the gap analysis methodology to wild taxa of the Phaseolus genepool. Of 85 taxa, 48 (56.5% are assigned high priority for collecting due to lack of, or under-representation, in genebanks, 17 taxa are given medium priority for collecting, 15 low priority, and 5 species are assessed as adequately represented in ex situ collections. Gap "hotspots", representing priority target areas for collecting, are concentrated in central Mexico, although the narrow endemic nature of a suite of priority species adds a number of specific additional regions to spatial collecting priorities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results of the gap analysis method mostly align very well with expert opinion of gaps in ex situ collections, with only a few exceptions. A more detailed prioritization of taxa and geographic areas for collection can be achieved by including in the analysis predictive threat factors, such as climate change or habitat destruction, or by adding additional prioritization filters, such as the degree of relatedness to cultivated species (i.e. ease of use in crop breeding. Furthermore, results for multiple crop genepools may be overlaid, which would allow a global analysis of gaps in ex situ collections of the world's plant genetic resources.

  12. Physiological and molecular analysis of the interaction between aluminium toxicity and drought stress in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Zhong-Bao; Eticha, Dejene; Albacete, Alfonso; Madhusudana Rao, Idupulapati; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium (Al) toxicity and drought are two major factors limiting common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production in the tropics. Short-term effects of Al toxicity and drought stress on root growth in acid, Al-toxic soil were studied, with special emphasis on Al-drought interaction in the root apex. Root elongation was inhibited by both Al and drought. Combined stresses resulted in a more severe inhibition of root elongation than either stress alone. This result was different from the alleviatio...

  13. Identification of a RAPD marker linked to the Co-6 anthracnose resistant gene in common bean cultivar AB 136

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzate-Marin Ana Lilia

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenic variability of the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum represents an obstacle for the creation of resistant common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. varieties. Gene pyramiding is an alternative strategy for the development of varieties with durable resistance. RAPD markers have been proposed as a means to facilitate pyramiding of resistance genes without the need for multiple inoculations of the pathogens. The main aims of this work were to define the inheritance pattern of resistance present in common bean cultivar AB 136 in segregating populations derived from crosses with cultivar Rudá (susceptible to most C. lindemuthianum races and to identify RAPD markers linked to anthracnose resistance. The two progenitors, populations F1 and F2, F2:3 families and backcross-derived plants were inoculated with race 89 of C. lindemuthianum under environmentally controlled greenhouse conditions. The results indicate that a single dominant gene, Co-6, controls common bean resistance to this race, giving a segregation ratio between resistant and susceptible plants of 3:1 in the F2, 1:0 in the backcrosses to AB 136 and 1:1 in the backcross to Rudá. The segregation ratio of F2:3 families derived from F2 resistant plants was 1:2 (homozygous to heterozygous resistant. Molecular marker analyses in the F2 population identified a DNA band of approximately 940 base pairs (OPAZ20(940, linked in coupling phase at 7.1 cM of the Co-6 gene. This marker is being used in our backcross breeding program to develop Rudá-derived common bean cultivars resistant to anthracnose and adapted to central Brazil.

  14. Co-inoculation Effect of Rhizobia and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria on Common Bean Growth in a Low Phosphorus Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Korir, Hezekiah; Mungai, Nancy W.; Thuita, Moses; Hamba, Yosef; Masso, Cargele

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation through legume-Rhizobium symbiosis is important for enhancing agricultural productivity and is therefore of great economic interest. Growing evidence indicates that other soil beneficial bacteria can positively affect symbiotic performance of rhizobia. Nodule endophytic plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) were isolated from common bean nodules from Nakuru County in Kenya and characterized 16S rDNA partial gene sequencing. The effect of co-inoculation of rhizobium...

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Isolates of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, the Causal Agent of Anthracnose in Common Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Casley Borges; Correia, Hilberty L Nunes; Menicucci, Renato Pedrozo; Vidigal, Pedro M Pereira; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira

    2017-05-04

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is the causal agent of anthracnose in common beans, one of the main limiting factors of their culture. Here, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, a draft of the complete genome sequences of two isolates belonging to 83.501 and 89 A2 2-3 of C. lindemutuianum. Copyright © 2017 de Queiroz et al.

  16. LC-MSdetermination of L-DOPA concentration in the leaf and flower tissues of six faba bean (Vicia fabaL. lines with common and rare flowercolors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinguo Hu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of muscle control, which causes trembling of the limbs and head as well as impaired balance. L-DOPA (L-3,4-dihydroxy phenylalanine is the major ingredient of several prescription drugs used to treat PD. Faba bean (Vicia faba L. is one of the few plant species that is known to produce L-DOPA and has the potential to be developed as a functional food crop for people suffering with PD. Objective: Aimed to provide needed information for people who want to use faba bean as a natural remedy or functional food to relieve PD symptoms, this study analyzed the variation of L-DOPA concentration in the leaf and flower tissues of six faba bean lines with common and rare flower colors. Methods: Leaf and flower samples were taken from field grown plants with different flower colors, namely, pink with purple lines and black dots, pure white, brown, and crimson. Samples were freeze-dried and L-DOPA was quantified by a LC-MS system consisting of an ACQUITY UPLC in line with a Synapt G2 HDMS quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. This experiment was carried out in two consecutive years (2012 and 2013 and the plants used in the second year were grown from the seeds harvested from the plants used in the first year. Results and Discussion: Our two-year study revealed a high level of variation in L-DOPA concentration for leaf and flower tissues among the six faba bean lines studied. The average L-DOPA concentration based on dry weight (DW in flowers ranged from 27.8 to 63.5 mg/g and 18.2 to 48.7 mg/g for leaf tissues. There was no significant correlation between L-DOPA concentrations in flowers and leaves. The L-DOPA concentration in flowers and in leaves of the same line varied but were not statistically significant between the two years. Ideally, the genotype with the highest average L-DOPA concentration in both flowers and leaves would be grown

  17. The Qualitative Differences for Photosynthetic Content of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Populations  in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sali Ali ALIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity analysis of common bean populations is useful for breeding programs, as it helps to select genetic material to be used for further crossings. Twenty (20 common bean populations were analyzed using qualitative traits, chlorophyll “a” (Chl ‘a’, chlorophyll “b” (Chl ‘b’, total chlorophyll “a+b” (Total Chl and carotenoides. The design of the experiment was conducted with leaves of common bean collected from different regions of Kosovo. The experiment was completely randomly with four repetitions. Pigments were extracted by grinding 80-100 mg freshly sampled leaves in 80% (v/v acetone/water containing MgCO3, at room temperature, preserved in the dark for 24 hours. Concentration of chlorophyll and carotenoid content was measured by spectrophotometer using absorbance recorded at 663 nm, 644 nm and 452.3 nm for maximum absorption of Chl ‘a’, Chl ‘b’, and carotenoids respectively. According to our data the differences between populations for Chl ‘a’, and Chl ‘b’ was significantly higher at level of probability LSDp=0.01. The average values for Chl ‘a’, was 1.67 mg.g-1, while for Chl‘b’was 0.74 mg.g-1. In addition, the results for carotenoids content between populations were with high differences.

  18. Presence of diverse rhizobial communities responsible for nodulation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in South African and Mozambican soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinga, Mwajuma K; Jaiswal, Sanjay K; Dakora, Felix D

    2017-02-01

    The diversity and phylogeny of root-nodule bacteria isolated from common bean grown in Mozambique and different provinces of South Africa was studied by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and phylogenetic analysis. The combined restriction banding pattern of 16S rRNA and nifH profile-generated dendrogram grouped all test isolates into four major clusters with XXI restriction groups and three clusters with VIII restriction groups. Location-based clustering was observed with the 16S rRNA RFLP analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA, glnII, gyrB and gltA sequences showed that common bean was nodulated specifically by Rhizobium etli in Mozambican soils, and by a diverse group of Rhizobium species in South African soils (e.g. R. etli, R. phaseoli, R. sophoriradicis, R. leucaenae and novel group of Rhizobium spp.). Isolates from the Eastern Cape region of South Africa were dominated by R. leucaenae Overall, the results suggested high nodulation promiscuity of common bean grown in Southern Africa. The nifH and nodC sequence analysis classified all the test isolates with R. etli group, except for isolates TUTPVSA117, TUTPVSA114 and TUTPVSA110 which delineated with R. tropici group. This finding was inconsistent with the phylogram of the housekeeping genes, and is probably an indication of horizontal gene transfer among the Rhizobium isolates tested. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. [Effect of the same amount of faba bean fresh straw returning with different ratios of chemi- cal fertilizer on single cropping late rice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-hong; Zhang, Xian; Cao, Kai; Hua, Jin-wei

    2015-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted on paddy soil derived from alluvial materials at Bihu Town, Lishui City, Zhejiang Province, China to explore the effects of combined application of faba bean fresh straw and different-rate chemical fertilizer on nutrient uptake, nutrient use efficiencies, and yields of single cropping late rice and to determine the optimal rate of chemical fertilizer under the condition of application of faba bean fresh straw at the rate of 15 t · hm(-2) (GM15) in 2012, April to December. The experiments consisted of 7 treatments: CK (no fertilizers) , CF (conventional chemical fertilizer rate) , and combined application of 15 t · hm(-2) of faba bean fresh straw and 0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% of the conventional chemical fertilizer rate. The results showed that the highest total uptake amounts of N, P and K by the aboveground part were obtained from the treatments of GM15 + 60%CF and GM15 + 80% CF, but the highest nutrient agronomy use efficiencies of N, P and K in rice grains were obtained from the treatments of GM15 + 60% CF and GM15 + 40% CF. The agronomy use efficiencies and physiological use efficiencies of N, P, and K were significantly correlated with rice grain yields, thus they could be used for accurate comprehensive evaluation of fertilizer efficiencies of N, P, and K. Compared with no fertilizer treatment, the treatments of 100% CF and combined application of faba bean fresh straw and different-rate chemical fertilizer increased rice gain yields by 25.0% and 6.1%-29.2%, respectively. In the cropping system of faba bean-single cropping late rice, returning of 15 t · hm2 faba bean fresh straw to the paddy field did not result in the runt seedling of rice. From the point of improving fertilizer use efficiency and reducing environmental risk perspective, the optimum rate of chemical fertilizer was 60% of the conventional chemical fertilizer rate when 15 t · h(-2) of faba bean fresh straw was applied.

  20. SOME ASPECTS OF THE NATURAL CONTROL OF PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODES IN SOIL UNDER BROAD BEAN VICIA FABA L. CULTIVATED IN CROP ROTATION AND LONG-TERM MONOCULTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skwiercz, A T; Damszel, M; Stefanovska, T; Rychcik, B

    2015-01-01

    Observations on population density of plant parasitic nematodes occurring in rhizosphere of broad bean cultivated in the crop rotation and long-term monoculture were performed during 2013-2014. 13 species were observed: Trichodorus primitivus, T. viruliferus, Paratrichodorus pachydermus, Criconema annuliferum, Paratylenchus projectus, Bitylenchus dubius, Merlinius brevidens, Pratylenchus fallax, P. flakkensis, P. neglectus, Heterodera triffolii, H. goettingiana, and Ditylenchus dipsaci. In monoculture plots 70-80% of eggs inside Heterodera cysts were colonized by pathogenic fungi (v.s. 50-62% of cysts from crop rotation). 12-18% of specimens of Pratylenchus species were colonized by the nematode-pathogenic bacteria: Bacillus penetrans.

  1. Effect of vermicompost on soil fertility and crop productivity--beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manivannan, S; Balamurugan, M; Parthasarathi, K; Gunasekaran, G; Ranganathan, L S

    2009-03-01

    Field experiments were conducted at Sivapuri, Chidambaram, Tamil Nadu to evaluate the efficacy of vermicompost, in comparison to inorganic fertilizers-NPK, on the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the soils--clay loam soil (CLS) and sandy loam soil (SLS) and on the growth, yield and nutrient content of beans--Phaseolus vulgaris. Results showed that the application of vermicompost @ 5 tonnes ha(-1) had enhanced significantly the pore space (1.09 and 1.02 times), water holding capacity (1.1 and 1.3 times), cation exchange capacity (1.2 and 1.2 times). It reduced particles (1.2 and 1.2 times), and bulk density (1.2 and 1.2 times), pH (1 and 1.02 times) and electrical conductivity (1.4 and 1.2 times) and increased organic carbon (37 and 47 times), micro (Ca 3.07 and 1.9 times, Mg 1.6 and 1.6 times, Na 2.4 and 3.8 times, Fe 7 and 7.6 times, Mn 8.2 and 10.6 times, Zn 50 and 52 times and Cu 14 and 22 times) and macro (N 1.6 and 1.7 times, P 1.5 and 1.7 times, K 1.5 and 1.4 times) nutrients and microbial activity (1.4 and 1.5 times) in both soil types, particularly more in CLS. The growth, yield (1.6 times) and quality (protein (1.05 times) and sugar (1.01 times) content in seed) of bean were enhanced in CLS than SLS. On the other hand, the application of inorganic fertilizers @ 20:80:40 kg ha(-1) has resulted in reduced porosity (1.03 and 1.01 times), organic carbon (1.04 and 9.5 times) and microbial activity (1.02 and 1.03 times) in both soil types.

  2. Biodiversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Shaanxi Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Cao, Ying; Wang, En Tao; Qiao, Ya Juan; Jiao, Shuo; Liu, Zhen Shan; Zhao, Liang; Wei, Ge Hong

    2016-05-01

    The biodiversity and biogeography of rhizobia associated with bean in Shaanxi Province were investigated. A total of 194 bacterial isolates from bean nodules collected from 13 sampling sites were characterized based on phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA gene, the housekeeping genes recA, glnII and atpD, and the symbiotic genes nodC and nifH. Fifteen genospecies belonging to the genera Rhizobium, Agrobacterium, Ensifer, Bradyrhizobium and Ochrobactrum were defined among the isolates, with Rhizobium sp. II, Agrobacterium sp. II, E. fredii and R. phaseoli being the dominant groups. Four symbiotic gene lineages corresponding to Rhizobium sp. I, Rhizobium sp. II, R. phaseoli and B. liaoningense were detected in the nodC and nifH sequence analyses, indicating different origins for the symbiotic genes and their co-evolution with the chromosome of the bacteria. Moreover, the Ensifer isolates harbored symbiotic genes closely related to bean-nodulating Pararhizobium giardinii, indicating possible lateral gene transfer from Rhizobium to Ensifer. Correlation of rhizobial community composition with moisture, temperature, intercropping, soil features and nutrients were detected. All the results demonstrated a great diversity of bean rhizobia in Shaanxi that might be due to the adaptable evolution of the bean-nodulating rhizobia subjected to the diverse ecological conditions in the area.

  3. Carbon dioxide dynamics of combined crops of wheat, cowpea, pinto beans in the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempster, William F.; Nelson, M.; Silverstone, S.; Allen, J. P.

    2009-04-01

    A mixed crop consisting of cowpeas, pinto beans and Apogee ultra-dwarf wheat was grown in the Laboratory Biosphere, a 40 m 3 closed life system equipped with 12,000 W of high pressure sodium lamps over planting beds with 5.37 m 2 of soil. Similar to earlier reported experiments, the concentration of carbon dioxide initially increased to 7860 ppm at 10 days after planting due to soil respiration plus CO 2 contributed from researchers breathing while in the chamber for brief periods before plant growth became substantial. Carbon dioxide concentrations then fell rapidly as plant growth increased up to 29 days after planting and subsequently was maintained mostly in the range of about 200-3000 ppm (with a few excursions) by CO 2 injections to feed plant growth. Numerous analyses of rate of change of CO 2 concentration at many different concentrations and at many different days after planting reveal a strong dependence of fixation rates on CO 2 concentration. In the middle period of growth (days 31-61), fixation rates doubled for CO 2 at 450 ppm compared to 270 ppm, doubled again at 1000 ppm and increased a further 50% at 2000 ppm. High productivity from these crops and the increase of fixation rates with elevated CO 2 concentration supports the concept that enhanced CO 2 can be a useful strategy for remote life support systems. The data suggests avenues of investigation to understand the response of plant communities to increasing CO 2 concentrations in the Earth's atmosphere. Carbon balance accounting and evapotranspiration rates are included.

  4. Toxicity symptoms of nickel in common bean Sintomas de toxidez de níquel em feijoeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Campanharo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of nickel (Ni in the N metabolism of legumes, common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is considered very sensitive to Ni doses. The objective in this study was to characterize the toxicity symptoms of Ni in common bean cv. Pérola. The experiment was conducted in greenhouse in the campus of the Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense - Darcy Ribeiro, Campos dos Goytacazes - RJ. Solutions containing 0; 20; 40; 60 and 100 mg L-1 of Ni, in the form of nickel chloride hexahydrate (NiCl2.6H2O, were applied to shoots of common bean plants at the rate of 2.5 mL of solution per plant of common bean, 25 days after sowing. Plants of common bean treated with 0; 20; 40 and 60 mg L-1 of Ni showed no toxicity symptoms. Plants treated with 100 mg L-1 of Ni showed chlorotic leaves with gray spots that coalesced and became necrotic in a more advanced stage.Apesar de o Ni ser importante no metabolismo do N em leguminosas, o feijoeiro comum (Phaseolus vulgaris L. é considerado bastante sensível a doses de Ni. Objetivou-se caracterizar os sintomas de fitotoxidez de Ni em feijoeiro comum cv. Pérola. O experimento foi conduzido em casa de vegetação na Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense - Darcy Ribeiro, Campos dos Goytacazes - RJ. Foram aplicados 0; 20; 40; 60 e 100 mg L-1 de Ni (2,5 mL de solução por planta na forma de cloreto de níquel hexahidratado - NiCl2.6H2O, na parte aérea de plantas de feijoeiro comum aos 25 dias após a semeadura. Plantas de feijão tratadas com 0; 20; 40 e 60 mg L-1 de Ni não apresentaram sintomas de ftoxidez. Já as plantas que receberam a dose de 100 mg L-1 de Ni apresentaram folhas cloróticas e com manchas acinzentadas que coalesceram e se tornaram necróticas em um estádio mais avançado.

  5. Genetic control of the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magn.) Scrib. reaction and corona color in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    OpenAIRE

    MENDONÇA, H. A. de.; dos Santos, J.B.; Ramalho,M.A.P.; FERREIRA, D.F.

    1998-01-01

    An important trait for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars with Carioca type grain is resistance to Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, which causes anthracnose and a pale corona. The present study was conducted to understand the genetic control of common bean reaction to the fungus and of the corona color, to provide guides to future breeding studies. Genotypes P-45, with brown corona, and EMGOPA 201-Ouro, with yellow corona, are resistant to C. lindemuthianum. Cultivar Carioca is susce...

  6. Genetic diversity of common bean accessions from former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia as revealed by molecular and morphological markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maras Marko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of common bean has a long tradition in the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (FYROM and is still nowadays important part of the human diet. In a study reported here 71 accessions from the FYROM were assessed for genetic diversity with the aim to provide information on genetic structure of Macedonian common bean germplasm and to depict its peculiarities. A total of 71 accessions were assessed using 13 microsatellite and 16 morphological markers. The average number of alleles per microsatellite was 5.8, and ranged from three to 16 alleles. High capacity of selected markers for distinguishing genotypes was identified by the calculation of a very low value of probability of identity. The relationship among 71 studied accessions was assessed by hierarchical cluster analysis. A very clear separation of accessions into two groups was observed in the UPGMA dendrogram. The larger represented Andean gene pool and contained 40 accessions (56% of total, while the other 31 accessions (44% of total composed Mesoamerican gene pool. The two groups were successfully discriminated by eight morphological traits. Within the larger Andean cluster in the UPGMA dendrogram a sub-group of 16 climbing accessions was separated from 24 bush accessions. The absence of the string in the pods of the climbers suggests that this sub-group comprises snap beans grown primarily for their fresh pods. There were eight morphological traits in total that distinguished the two Andean sub-groups. Assessment of genetic relationship among accessions, their classification into respective gene pool and identification of morphological peculiarities provided valuable information for the management of plant gene bank and Macedonian bean breeding program.

  7. Nitrogen fertilization on common bean after out-of-season maize intercropped with Urochloa brizantha and Urochloa ruziziensisAdubação nitrogenada no feijoeiro após milho safrinha consorciado com Urochloa brizantha e Urochloa ruziziensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson de Freitas Cordova de Souza

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Common bean plant demanding higher amounts of nitrogen (N, but are scarce information about common bean N demanding when grown after maize intercropped with palisade grass. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of N fertilization in common bean grown under no-tillage system, in succession to out-of-season maize intercropped with Urochloa brizantha (Syn. Brachiaria bryzantha or Urochloa ruziziensis (Syn. Brachiaria ruziziensis. The experiment was conducted during two agricultural years, on a dystroferric Haplorthox. A randomized blocks design, in a split plot scheme, with four replicates, was used. The plots were composed by two types of straws previous common bean crop (maize + U. brizantha and maize + U. ruziziensis and subplots were composed by four N rates (0, 35, 70 and 140 kg ha-1, using ammonium nitrate as source. Nitrogen application improved N nutrition and increased the growth of common bean plants grown after out-of-season maize intercropped with U. brizantha or U. ruziziensis, but little influenced grain yield. Grain yield of common bean grown after out-of-season maize intercropped with U. brizantha or U. ruziziensis was similar. O feijoeiro comum é uma planta bastante exigente em nitrogênio (N, porém, são escassas as informações sobre a necessidade da cultura por esse nutriente quando cultivada em sucessão ao milho consorciado com braquiárias. Objetivou-se avaliar o efeito da adubação nitrogenada no feijoeiro cultivado no sistema plantio direto, em sucessão ao milho safrinha consorciado com Urochloa brizantha (Syn. Brachiaria bryzantha ou Urochloa ruziziensis (Syn. Brachiaria ruziziensis. O experimento foi realizado durante dois anos agrícolas, em Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso, com parcelas subdivididas, com quatro repetições. As parcelas foram constituídas por dois tipos de palhadas precedentes ao cultivo do feijoeiro (milho + U. brizantha e

  8. Advances in tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray) genetics and breeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepary bean is a drought and heat-tolerant sister species of common bean with similar nutritional characteristics and with potential for expanded production in agroecological zones that are marginal due to abiotic stress. A key to expanded production of this orphan crop is the improvement of biotic ...

  9. 76 FR 71271 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Fresh Market Tomato (Dollar Plan) Crop Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    .... * * * * * Direct marketing. The sale of the insured crop directly to consumers without the intervention of an... Internet and other information technologies to provide increased opportunities for citizen access to... meet the Agricultural Marketing Service United States Standards for Grades of Fresh Tomatoes; and the...

  10. 76 FR 71276 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Pecan Revenue Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-17

    ... continuous rating methodology ``dollar spans'' will no longer be used. FCIC proposes to remove the definition.... Section 1--FCIC proposes to revise the definition of ``average gross sales per acre'' by removing specific... Crop Insurance Provisions are revised. FCIC proposes to revise the definition of ``approved...

  11. 77 FR 27658 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Processing Sweet Corn Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... are as follows: 1. Section 1--FCIC proposes to add the definition of ``Price election'' utilizing the...; b. Adding the definition of ``price election'' in section 1.'' The added text reads as follows: Sec. 457.154 Processing Sweet Corn crop insurance provisions. * * * * * 1. Definitions. * * * * * Price...

  12. 77 FR 52587 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Peach Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... problem associated with the Apple Crop Provisions which necessitated issuance of a number of bulletins to... market. No change has been made. Comment: A few commenters stated direct marketers sell fresh peaches. Due to diverse methods of record keeping many direct marketers will be unable to produce...

  13. Mapping Fusarium solani and Aphanomyces euteiches root rot resistance and root architecture quantitative trait loci in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rot diseases of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) are a constraint to dry and snap bean production. We developed the RR138 RIL mapping population from the cross of OSU5446, a susceptible line that meets current snap bean processing industry standards, and RR6950, a root rot resistant dry bean in th...

  14. ISOENZYMATIC POLYMORPHISM AND ACTIVITY OF PEROXIDASES OF COMMON BEAN (Phaseolus vulgaris L. UNDER SALINE STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. BROETTO

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the uses of the technique of tissue culture for plant breeding is the identification of cell lines tolerant to salt stress.In order to study the biochemical mechanisms involved in the genetic expression to salt tolerance, callus from embryo axis of four bean cultivars (cv. IAC-carioca; cv. IAPAR-14; cv. JALO-EEP558; CV. BAT-93 were grown in Murashige & Skoog (1962 medium, supplemented with NaCl in the concentrations of 0, 20, 40, 60 and 80 mM. After 14 days callus were harvested and analyzed according to their isoenzymatic patterns and peroxidase activities. BAT and IAPAR cultivars showed two common activity zones in the anodic region, with only one specific enzymatic band to each one (the two fastest migration band; it is possible that the two middle anodic zones detected are products of the same enzymatic locus but from different alleles with different eletrophoretic mobilities. Cv. JALO showed two anodic activities in common with cvs IAC and IAPAR with an exclusive anodic zone of slower migration which showed the most intense activity of all cultivars analyzed. This cv. still showed a dimeric heterozygotic catodic zone in all treated samples. Probably this is the same zone which occurs in homozygosis with fixation of the slower allele for all cvs BAT and IAPAR submitted to all treatments. Cv. IAC showed two anodic bands in common with Cv. IAPAR and cv. JALO. It still showed a faster anodic band in common with cv. IAPAR and an exclusive anodic band of slower migration. It is interesting to say that for this cv. IAC resulting from cultivation in NaCl 20 mM did not show activity in the three slower anodic zones. Cv. IAC showed only one dimeric heterozygotic catodic zone in all treatments. This zone is probably composed by two different alleles from the same locus detected in cv. JALO. Samples from cv. IAC treated with 40 and 60 mM showed a more intense enzymatic activity in the catodic zone. Analyses of the peroxidase activity in the

  15. Prediction of genotypic values and estimation of genetic parameters in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Fernando Chiorato

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Eighteen common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. genotypes were evaluated in 25 environments of the state of São Paulo in 2001 and 2002. The estimation of genetic parameters by the Restricted Maximum Likelihood (REML and the prediction of genotypic values via Best Linear Unbiased Prediction (BLUP were obtained by software Selegen-REML/BLUP. The estimate of the broad-sense heritability was low for the grain yield (0.03, since it took individual plots into consideration and was free of the effects of interaction with years, cultivation periods and site. Nevertheless, the heritability at the level of line means across the various environments was high (0.75, allowing a high accuracy (0.87 in the selection of lines for planting in the environment mean. Among the 18 genotypes, the predicted genotypic values of nine were higher than the general mean. The genetic gain predicted with the selection of the best line, in this case line Gen 96A31 of the IAC, was 16.25%.Dezoito genótipos de feijoeiro (Phaseolus vulgaris L. foram avaliados em 25 ambientes do estado de São Paulo durante os anos de 2001 e 2002. As estimativas de parâmetros genéticos por REML e a predição de valores genotípicos via BLUP foram obtidas por meio do aplicativo computacional Selegen REML/BLUP, seguindo o modelo misto para linhagens. A estimativa da herdabilidade no sentido amplo para produção de grãos foi baixa (0,03, por ser em nível de parcelas individuais e livre dos efeitos da interação com anos, épocas e locais. No entanto, a herdabilidade ao nível de médias de linhagens ao longo dos vários ambientes foi alta (0,75, permitindo alta acurácia (0,87 na seleção de linhagens para plantio no ambiente médio. Dentre os 18 genótipos, nove apresentaram valores genotípicos preditos superiores à média geral. O ganho genético predito com a seleção da melhor linhagem, no caso, a linhagem Gen 96A31 do IAC, foi de 16,25%.

  16. Immunocapture RT-PCR detection of Bean common mosaic virus and strain blackeye cowpea mosaic in common bean and black gram in India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Udayashankar, A.C.; Nayaka, S. Chandra; Niranjana, S.R.

    2012-01-01

    plant test, an electron microscopic observations, an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and an immunocapture RT-PCR. The incidence of the two tested viruses in common bean and black gram seed samples was 1–6% and 0.5–3.5%, respectively in growing-on test evaluations. Electron microscopic observations...... revealed filamentous virion particles from the leaves of plants showing characteristic virus disease symptoms in growing-on and host inoculation tests. The identity of the strains was confirmed by immunocapture RT-PCR, with a final amplification product of approximately 700 bp for BCMV and BCMV...

  17. Sensitivity studies of the common bean (Vigna unguiculata) and maize (Zea mays) to different soil types from the crude oil drilling site at Kutchalli, Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anoliefo, G.O. [Dept. of Botany, Univ. of Benin, Benin City (Nigeria); Isikhuemhen, O.S. [Dept. of Natural Resources and Environmental Design, NC Agricultural and Technical State Univ., Greensboro, NC (United States); Ohimain, E.I. [Rohi Biotechnologies Ltd., Port Harcourt (Nigeria)

    2006-02-15

    Background, aims and scope. The economic growth that Nigeria has enjoyed as a result of oil revenue has its drawback through exposure of people in the oil producing areas to environmental contamination, due largely to the increase in the movement of oil. Activities associated with oil well drilling on agricultural lands have led to serious economic losses on the communities affected. The local people in most of these communities are peasants who do not know how to react to drilling wastes or polluted fields where they have their crops. A case under study is the Kutchalli oil drilling area. Methods. Waste pit soil from drilling waste dumps in Kutchalli oil drilling area was tested whole and in combinations with 'clean' soil for their abilities to support plant growth and development in common bean (Vigna unguiculata) and maize (Zea mays). Seed germination, plant height, leaf area, biomass accumulation, respiratory activity as well as soil chemical analysis were used to access the ability of waste pit soil to support plant growth and development in the test plants. Results, discussion and conclusions. Waste pit soil completely inhibited the germination of bean and maize seeds. Waste pit soil in combinations with different proportions of Kutchalli soil gave growth (germination, height of plants, number of leaves, leaf area, etc.) values that were inferior to the control soil (Kutchalli) and the independent control soil (Monguno). Seeds planted in the test soil combinations containing waste pit soil showed significantly low respiratory activity. Waste pit soil seems to be toxic to plant growth and development. Drilling mud in combination with native Kutchalli soil significantly enhanced plant growth and development. Recommendations and outlook. The seed germination, growth and development inhibition by waste pit soil suggests its toxicity. We want to suggest the need for strict control and monitoring of waste pit soil in oil drilling sites. (orig.)

  18. The investigation of coagulation activity of natural coagulants extracted from different strains of common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šćiban Marina B.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coagulation and flocculation by adding chemicals are the methods that are usually used for removal of water turbidity. This study is concerned with the coagulation activity of extracts of various strains of bean. The aim was to ascertain if bean varieties influence coagulation activity. Active components were extracted from 1 g of ground sample with 100 ml distilled water. Contents of dry matter and nitrogen were specified in the solid samples, and the content of soluble nitrogen was determined in the extracts. These data were used to calculate the efficiency of extraction of nitrogen-containing compounds. The coagulation activity was assessed by jar test using synthetic turbid water, of the initial pH 9 and turbidity 35 NTU. The jar test was carried out by adding different amounts of extracts to model water, and stirring the content. After sedimentation for 1 h, residual turbidity was determined by turbidimeter and coagulation activity was calculated. The increment of organic matter concentration after the coagulation was also determined. These experiments confirmed that extracts of all investigated strains of bean could be used successfully as natural coagulants.

  19. Fine-mapping of a major QTL controlling angular leaf spot resistance in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Beat; Manzanares, Chloe; Jara, Carlos; Lobaton, Juan David; Studer, Bruno; Raatz, Bodo

    2015-05-01

    A major QTL for angular leaf spot resistance in the common bean accession G5686 was fine-mapped to a region containing 36 candidate genes. Markers have been developed for marker-assisted selection. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is an important grain legume and an essential protein source for human nutrition in developing countries. Angular leaf spot (ALS) caused by the pathogen Pseudocercospora griseola (Sacc.) Crous and U. Braun is responsible for severe yield losses of up to 80%. Breeding for resistant cultivars is the most ecological and economical means to control ALS and is particularly important for yield stability in low-input agriculture. Here, we report on a fine-mapping approach of a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) ALS4.1(GS, UC) for ALS resistance in a mapping population derived from the resistant genotype G5686 and the susceptible cultivar Sprite. 180 F3 individuals of the mapping population were evaluated for ALS resistance and genotyped with 22 markers distributed over 11 genome regions colocating with previously reported QTL for ALS resistance. Multiple QTL analysis identified three QTL regions, including one major QTL on chromosome Pv04 at 43.7 Mbp explaining over 75% of the observed variation for ALS resistance. Additional evaluation of 153 F4, 89 BC1F2 and 139 F4/F5/BC1F3 descendants with markers in the region of the major QTL delimited the region to 418 kbp harboring 36 candidate genes. Among these, 11 serine/threonine protein kinases arranged in a repetitive array constitute promising candidate genes for controlling ALS resistance. Single nucleotide polymorphism markers cosegregating with the major QTL for ALS resistance have been developed and constitute the basis for marker-assisted introgression of ALS resistance into advanced breeding germplasm of common bean.

  20. Mapping and Genetic Structure Analysis of the Anthracnose Resistance Locus Co-1HY in the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingli; Wu, Jing; Wang, Lanfen; Mantri, Nitin; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Zhendong; Wang, Shumin

    2017-01-01

    Anthracnose is a destructive disease of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). The Andean cultivar Hongyundou has been demonstrated to possess strong resistance to anthracnose race 81. To study the genetics of this resistance, the Hongyundou cultivar was crossed with a susceptible genotype Jingdou. Segregation of resistance for race 81 was assessed in the F2 population and F2:3 lines under controlled conditions. Results indicate that Hongyundou carries a single dominant gene for anthracnose resistance. An allele test by crossing Hongyundou with another resistant cultivar revealed that the resistance gene is in the Co-1 locus (therefore named Co-1HY). The physical distance between this locus and the two flanking markers was 46 kb, and this region included four candidate genes, namely, Phvul.001G243500, Phvul.001G243600, Phvul.001G243700 and Phvul.001G243800. These candidate genes encoded serine/threonine-protein kinases. Expression analysis of the four candidate genes in the resistant and susceptible cultivars under control condition and inoculated treatment revealed that all the four candidate genes are expressed at significantly higher levels in the resistant genotype than in susceptible genotype. Phvul.001G243600 and Phvul.001G243700 are expressed nearly 15-fold and 90-fold higher in the resistant genotype than in the susceptible parent before inoculation, respectively. Four candidate genes will provide useful information for further research into the resistance mechanism of anthracnose in common bean. The closely linked flanking markers identified here may be useful for transferring the resistance allele Co-1HY from Hongyundou to elite anthracnose susceptible common bean lines.

  1. Common scab and its control in seed-potato crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labruyere, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    In the Netherlands common scab of the potato is usually caused by Streptomyces scabies (Thaxter) Waksman et Henrici, following Corbaz's description, and rarely by other Streptomyces species. Variation in morphological and other characteristics could not be correlated with lesion types and non-pathog

  2. Common scab and its control in seed-potato crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labruyere, R.E.

    1971-01-01

    In the Netherlands common scab of the potato is usually caused by Streptomyces scabies (Thaxter) Waksman et Henrici, following Corbaz's description, and rarely by other Streptomyces species. Variation in morphological and other characteristics

  3. The common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca): A new industrial crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asclepias syriaca L. (the common milkweed) is a perennial plant occurring east of the Rockies in the United States, but particularly east of the Mississippi River and from Southern Canada to Mexico. The plant has many unsavory given names by frustrated farmers including “the Wheat Farmers Nightmare...

  4. Variability of root traits in common bean genotypes at different levels of phosphorus supply and ontogenetic stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto dos Santos Trindade

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivars with enhanced root growth would be a strategy for increasing P uptake and grain yield in tropical soils, but the strong plasticity of root traits may compromise their inclusion in breeding programs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the magnitude of the genotypic variability of root traits in common bean plants at two ontogenetic stages and two soil P levels. Twenty-four common bean genotypes, comprising the four growth habits that exist in the species and two wild genotypes, were grown in 4 kg pots at two levels of applied P (20 and 80 mg kg-1 and harvested at the stages of pod setting and early pod filling. Root area and root length were measured by digital image analysis. Significant genotype × P level and genotype × harvest interactions in analysis of variance indicate that the genotypic variation of root traits depended on soil nutrient availability and the stage at which evaluation was made. Genotypes differed for taproot mass, basal and lateral root mass, root area and root length at both P levels and growth stages; differences in specific root area and length were small. Genotypes with growth habits II (upright indeterminate and III (prostrate indeterminate showed better adaptation to limited P supply than genotypes of groups I (determinate and IV (indeterminate climbing. Between the two harvests, genotypes of groups II and III increased the mass of basal and lateral roots by 40 and 50 %, respectively, whereas genotypes of groups I and IV by only 7 and 19 %. Values of the genotypic coefficient of determination, which estimates the proportion of phenotypic variance resulting from genetic effects, were higher at early pod filling than at pod setting. Correlations between shoot mass and root mass, which could indicate indirect selection of root systems via aboveground biomass, were higher at early pod filling than at pod setting. The results indicate that selection for root

  5. COMPATIBILIDADE DO INSETICIDA THIAMETHOXAM COM FUNGICIDAS UTILIZADOS NO TRATAMENTO DE SEMENTES DE FEIJOEIRO COMPATIBILITY OF THE INSECTICIDE THIAMETHOXAM WITH FUNGICIDES APPLIED TO COMMON BEAN SEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Gonçalves Barros

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    A mosca-branca (Bemisia argentifolli Bellows & Perring tem causado sérios prejuízos em muitas áreas produtoras de feijão no Brasil. O dano indireto através da transmissão do vírus do mosaico dourado é um dos fatores limitantes na produção do feijão, podendo causar perdas de até 100%. Uma das medidas recentemente desenvolvidas para o controle desta praga é o tratamento das sementes com inseticida. Neste trabalho foi testada a compatibilidade do inseticida thiamethoxam com alguns dos fungicidas utilizados para tratamento de sementes de feijão destinadas ao plantio (difenoconazole, fludioxonil e carboxin. As variáveis utilizadas na avaliação foram: porcentagens de germinação, de sanidade das sementes e de eficiência de controle da mosca-branca. Considerando todas as variáveis, constatou-se que não houve incompatibilidade do inseticida com os fungicidas utilizados. Os tratamentos thiamethoxam+carboxin e thiamethoxam+fludioxonil foram os que apresentaram maior eficiência no controle de fungos incidentes em sementes e da mosca-branca em plântulas até os onze dias após a emergência.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Mosca-branca; Bemisia argentifolli; fungos de sementes; controle químico.

    The white fly (Bemisia argentifolli Bellows & Perring causes serious damage to the common bean crop in Brazil. The indirect damage through the transmission of bean gold mosaic virus can cause losses of up to 100%. One measure recently developed to control this pest is insecticide seed dressing. In this study, the compatibility of the insecticide thiamethoxam with the fungicides used for dry beans seed dressing was tested. These treatments included the fungicides difenoconazole, fludioxonil and carboxin. The variables evaluated were

  6. Diversidade no teor de nutrientes em grãos de feijão crioulo no Estado de Santa Catarina =Diversity in nutrient content of common bean seeds in the state of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Pereira

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available O feijão representa importante fonte de nutrientes, e pode ter seus teores aumentados com o uso de genótipos que apresentem naturalmente elevados teores destes nutrientes, como ocorre nos genótipos crioulos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi caracterizar 34 genótipos crioulos do Banco Ativo de germoplasma de Feijão do CAV-UDESC quantoao teor de nutrientes (cálcio, magnésio, zinco, ferro, fósforo, potássio, proteína total e solúvel e antinutriente (fitato nos grãos, durante os anos de cultivo de 2005/2006 e 2006/2007. O teor de nutrientes nos grãos de feijão foi influenciado tanto pelo genótipo,quanto pelas condições climáticas, com respostas diferentes em cada ano de cultivo, e entre os dois anos de cultivo. Os genótipos crioulos BAF 60, 69 e 108 apresentaram os mais altos níveis de ferro, fósforo e proteína total, associados a baixos níveis de fitato nos grãos e são indicados para uso em programas de melhoramento e pelo próprio agricultor para produção e comercialização. Tais resultados apontam para a necessidade de trabalhos futuros que relacionem a interação entre diversidade genética e tempo de cultivo.The common bean is an important source of nutrients. The amount ofnutrients can be increased using common bean genotypes, which is naturally rich in nutrients. The objective of this work was to characterize the nutrient content (calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, phosphorus, potassium and total and soluble protein and antinutrients (phytate of the 34 common bean genotypes of the CAV-UDESC Germplasm Active Bank, during the 2005/2006 and 2006/2007 crop seasons. The nutrient content of beans was influenced by both genotype and weather conditions in both crop seasons. BAF 60, 69 and 108 genotypes presented the highest levels of iron, phosphorus and total protein, along with the lowest levels of phytate in the grains, and are indicated for breeding programs and by producers. These results indicated the need to explore the

  7. Effect of straw mulch residues of previous crop oats on the weed population in direct seeded faba bean in Organic Farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massucati, Luiz Felipe Perrone

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Under conditions of Organic Farming, we investigated whether direct seeding of faba bean (Vicia faba L. into straw mulch from residues of precrop oats used for weed control enables at least occasional/opportunistic direct seeding in Organic Agriculture. Eight field trials were carried out at different study sites in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany, in 2008-2009 and 2009-2010. Direct seeding (DS was performed into mulch layers of 0,4 and 6 t ha-1 of straw residues applied to the remaining stubble, simulating different yield levels of the precrop oats. LBS was used as a reference treatment, where straw was harvested, stubble tillage performed and seedbed prepared in fall and oil radish (Raphanus sativus grown as winter cover crop. Mouldboard ploughing combined with conventional seedbed preparation was performed in early spring to V. faba. Compared with LBS, straw mulch with subsequent direct seeding suppressed especially dicotyledonous annuals significantly. DS treatments with straw reduced the abundance of this group by 81 and 85% compared with LBS. Straw mulch resulted in effective suppression of photosensitive weeds such as Matricaria spp. and late germinating Chenopodium album. Grasses and perennial species occurred independent of the amount of straw. Compared with DS, the abundance of these weeds was reduced by 64 and 82% in LBS treatment. The shoot dry matter production of faba bean was retarded by DS compared with LBS, but significant yield losses could be avoided with straw residues of at least 4 t ha-1. Sufficient amount of straw of from the previous crop is a key criterion to facilitate organic no-till farming of faba bean in a suitable crop sequence when pressure of perennials and grasses is low.

  8. Genome-Wide Profiling of Histone Modifications (H3K9me2 and H4K12ac) and Gene Expression in Rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) Inoculated Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyappan, Vasudevan; Kalavacharla, Venu; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Bhide, Ketaki P; Sripathi, Venkateswara R; Smolinski, Tomasz G; Manoharan, Muthusamy; Thurston, Yaqoob; Todd, Antonette; Kingham, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Histone modifications such as methylation and acetylation play a significant role in controlling gene expression in unstressed and stressed plants. Genome-wide analysis of such stress-responsive modifications and genes in non-model crops is limited. We report the genome-wide profiling of histone methylation (H3K9me2) and acetylation (H4K12ac) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) under rust (Uromyces appendiculatus) stress using two high-throughput approaches, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). ChIP-Seq analysis revealed 1,235 and 556 histone methylation and acetylation responsive genes from common bean leaves treated with the rust pathogen at 0, 12 and 84 hour-after-inoculation (hai), while RNA-Seq analysis identified 145 and 1,763 genes differentially expressed between mock-inoculated and inoculated plants. The combined ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq analyses identified some key defense responsive genes (calmodulin, cytochrome p450, chitinase, DNA Pol II, and LRR) and transcription factors (WRKY, bZIP, MYB, HSFB3, GRAS, NAC, and NMRA) in bean-rust interaction. Differential methylation and acetylation affected a large proportion of stress-responsive genes including resistant (R) proteins, detoxifying enzymes, and genes involved in ion flux and cell death. The genes identified were functionally classified using Gene Ontology (GO) and EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOGs). The Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis identified a putative pathway with ten key genes involved in plant-pathogen interactions. This first report of an integrated analysis of histone modifications and gene expression involved in the bean-rust interaction as reported here provides a comprehensive resource for other epigenomic regulation studies in non-model species under stress.

  9. The Effects of Cropping Regimes on Fungal and Bacterial Communities of Wheat and Faba Bean in a Greenhouse Pot Experiment Differ between Plant Species and Compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Granzow

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and fungi in the plant rhizosphere and endosphere are beneficial to plant nutrient acquisition, health, and growth. Although playing essential roles in ecosystem functioning, our knowledge about the effects of multiple cropping regimes on the plant microbiome and their interactions is still limited. Here, we designed a pot experiment simulating different cropping regimes. For this purpose, wheat and faba bean plants were grown under controlled greenhouse conditions in monocultures and in two intercropping regimes: row and mixed intercropping. Bacterial and fungal communities in bulk and rhizosphere soils as well as in the roots and aerial plant parts were analyzed using large-scale metabarcoding. We detected differences in microbial richness and diversity between the cropping regimes. Generally, observed effects were attributed to differences between mixed and row intercropping or mixed intercropping and monoculture. Bacterial and fungal diversity were significantly higher in bulk soil samples of wheat and faba bean grown in mixed compared to row intercropping. Moreover, microbial communities varied between crop species and plant compartments resulting in different responses of these communities toward cropping regimes. Leaf endophytes were not affected by cropping regime but bacterial and fungal community structures in bulk and rhizosphere soil as well as fungal community structures in roots. We further recorded highly complex changes in microbial interactions. The number of negative inter-domain correlations between fungi and bacteria decreased in bulk and rhizosphere soil in intercropping regimes compared to monocultures due to beneficial effects. In addition, we observed plant species-dependent differences indicating that intra- and interspecific competition between plants had different effects on the plant species and thus on their associated microbial communities. To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating

  10. The Effects of Cropping Regimes on Fungal and Bacterial Communities of Wheat and Faba Bean in a Greenhouse Pot Experiment Differ between Plant Species and Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzow, Sandra; Kaiser, Kristin; Wemheuer, Bernd; Pfeiffer, Birgit; Daniel, Rolf; Vidal, Stefan; Wemheuer, Franziska

    2017-01-01

    Many bacteria and fungi in the plant rhizosphere and endosphere are beneficial to plant nutrient acquisition, health, and growth. Although playing essential roles in ecosystem functioning, our knowledge about the effects of multiple cropping regimes on the plant microbiome and their interactions is still limited. Here, we designed a pot experiment simulating different cropping regimes. For this purpose, wheat and faba bean plants were grown under controlled greenhouse conditions in monocultures and in two intercropping regimes: row and mixed intercropping. Bacterial and fungal communities in bulk and rhizosphere soils as well as in the roots and aerial plant parts were analyzed using large-scale metabarcoding. We detected differences in microbial richness and diversity between the cropping regimes. Generally, observed effects were attributed to differences between mixed and row intercropping or mixed intercropping and monoculture. Bacterial and fungal diversity were significantly higher in bulk soil samples of wheat and faba bean grown in mixed compared to row intercropping. Moreover, microbial communities varied between crop species and plant compartments resulting in different responses of these communities toward cropping regimes. Leaf endophytes were not affected by cropping regime but bacterial and fungal community structures in bulk and rhizosphere soil as well as fungal community structures in roots. We further recorded highly complex changes in microbial interactions. The number of negative inter-domain correlations between fungi and bacteria decreased in bulk and rhizosphere soil in intercropping regimes compared to monocultures due to beneficial effects. In addition, we observed plant species-dependent differences indicating that intra- and interspecific competition between plants had different effects on the plant species and thus on their associated microbial communities. To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating microbial communities in

  11. Comparisons of phaseolin type and α-amylase inhibitor in common bean(Phaseolus vulgaris L.)in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Yao; Yibo Hu; Yingying Zhu; Yue Gao; Guixing Ren

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the phaseolin type and a-amylase(αAI) level in common bean(Phaseolus vidgaris L.) accessions deposited in the Chinese National Genebank.The 40 accessions sampled were common varieties originating in Asia,North America,South America,Europe,and Africa.No Inca(I-) phaseolin was observed in the accessions.Only four accessions contained Tendergreen(T-) phaseolin and the remaining36 contained Sanilac(S-) phaseolin.aAI proteins extracted from nine accessions showed higher a-amylase inhibitory activity than the control(Phase 2,IC50 = 0.65 μg).These common bean accessions have potential use as nutraceutical ingredients.

  12. Chromosome identification in the Andean common bean accession G19833 (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae

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    Sarah Altrock

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of all chromosomes of the Andean G19833 bean genotype was carried out by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Eleven single-copy genomic sequences, one for each chromosome, two BACs containing subtelomeric and pericentromeric repeats and the 5S and 45S ribosomal DNA (rDNA were used as probes. Comparison to the Mesoamerican accession BAT93 showed little divergence, except for additional 45S rDNA sites in four chromosome pairs. Altogether, the results indicated a relative karyotypic stability during the evolution of the Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools of P. vulgaris.

  13. Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov., an indigenous N2-fixing symbiont of the Ecuadorian common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genetic pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Martins, Talita Busulini; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Marçon Delamuta, Jakeline Renata; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2015-09-01

    There are two major centres of genetic diversification of common bean (Phaseolus vilgaris L.), the Mesoamerican and the Andean, and the legume is capable of establishing nitrogen-fixing symbioses with several rhizobia; Rhizobium etli seems to be the dominant species in both centres. Another genetic pool of common bean, in Peru and Ecuador, is receiving increasing attention, and studies of microsymbionts from the region can help to increase our knowledge about coevolution of this symbiosis. We have previously reported several putative new lineages from this region and here present data indicating that strains belonging to one of them, PEL4, represent a novel species. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence phylogeny, PEL4 strains are positioned in the Rhizobium phaseoli/R. etli/Rhizobium leguminosarum clade, but show unique properties in several morphological, physiological and biochemical analyses, as well as in BOX-PCR profiles ( Rhizobium fabae. DNA-DNA hybridization ( Rhizobium ecuadorense sp. nov. The type strain is CNPSo 671(T) ( = UMR 1450(T) = PIMAMPIRS I 5(T) = LMG 27578(T)).

  14. High genetic variability in endophytic fungi from the genus Diaporthe isolated from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, T T; de Souza Leite, T; de Queiroz, C B; de Araújo, E F; Pereira, O L; de Queiroz, M V

    2016-02-01

    The goals of the present study were to identify, to analyse the phylogenetic relations and to evaluate the genetic variability in Diaporthe endophytic isolates from common bean. Diaporthe sp., D. infecunda and D. phaseolorum strains were identified using multilocus phylogeny (rDNA ITS region; EF1-α, β-tubulin, and calmodulin genes). IRAP (Inter-Retrotransposon Amplified Polymorphism) and REMAP (Retrotransposon-Microsatellite Amplified Polymorphism) molecular markers reveal the existence of high genetic variability, especially among D. infecunda isolates. It was concluded that the multilocus phylogenetic approach was more effective than individual analysis of ITS sequences, in identifying the isolates to species level, and that IRAP and REMAP markers can be used for studying the genetic variability in the genus Diaporthe particularly at the intraspecific level. The combined use of molecular tools such as multilocus phylogenetic approach and molecular markers, as performed in this study, is the best way to distinguish endophytic strains of Diaporthe isolated from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Methyl and p-Bromobenzyl Esters of Hydrogenated Kaurenoic Acid for Controlling Anthracnose in Common Bean Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Suellen F; Oliveira, Denilson F; Heleno, Vladimir C G; Soares, Ana Carolina F; Midiwo, Jacob O; Souza, Elaine A

    2017-03-01

    Kaurenoic acid derivatives were prepared and submitted to in vitro assays with the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, which causes anthracnose disease in the common bean. The most active substances were found to be methyl and p-bromobenzylesters, 7 and 9, respectively, of the hydrogenated kaurenoic acid, which presented a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.097 and 0.131 mM, respectively, while the commercial fungicide methyl thiophanate (MT) presented a MIC of 0.143 mM. Substances 7 (1.401 mM) and 9 (1.886 mM) reduced the severity of anthracnose in common bean to values statistically comparable to MT (2.044 mM). According to an in silico study, both compounds 7 and 9 are inhibitors of the ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) enzyme produced by other organisms, the amino acid sequence of which could be detected in fungal genomes. These substances appeared to act against C. lindemuthianum by inhibiting its KSI. Therefore, substances 7 and 9 are promising for the development of new fungicides.

  16. Quantificação de Polifenóis e Digestibilidade Protéica de Famílias de Feijoeiro Comum Polyphenol quantification and protein digestibility in common bean lineages

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    Carla Viviane C. Egg Mendonça

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available O feijão é um dos alimentos encontrados em maior quantidade em todo o território nacional e é cultivado em quase todos os Estados. É uma importante fonte protéica na dieta do povo brasileiro, estando presente na alimentação da população rural e urbana. No presente trabalho, quantificaram-se os polifenóis e determinaram-se os níveis de digestibilidade protéica de cem famílias de feijoeiro comum (Phaseolus vulgaris L. obtidas do cruzamento entre os genótipos Amarelinho e CI 107. Os polifenóis afetam a qualidade do feijão, causando escurecimento, endurecimento e, ainda, podem reduzir a digestibilidade protéica. Pelos resultados obtidos, pôde-se encontrar 13 famílias com teores reduzidos de polifenóis e boa digestibilidade protéica in vitro, as quais poderão ser utilizadas em programas de melhoramento dessa importante cultura.Common beans are one of the most important food crops in Brazil and are cultivated in almost all Brazilian states. It is an important protein source for Brazilian people in both rural and urban areas. The present work performed the quantification of phenolic compounds and in vitro protein digestibility of one hundred common bean lines (Phaseolus vulgaris L. obtained by crossing the genotypes "Amarelinho" and CI 107. The results suggested that the phenolic compounds affected bean cooking traits and quality through darkening and hardening of the seed coat. Phenolic compounds also influenced the in vitro protein digestibility. It was observed that all 13 lines presented low levels of phenolic compounds and good in vitro protein digestibility and, as a result, must be incorporated in the breeding programs for this important crop.

  17. A specific endogenous reference for genetically modified common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) DNA quantification by real-time PCR targeting lectin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Gustavo L; Brod, Fábio C A; Rossi, Gabriela B; Zimmermann, Naíra F; Oliveira, Jaison P; Faria, Josias C; Arisi, Ana C M

    2014-11-01

    The Embrapa 5.1 genetically modified (GM) common bean was approved for commercialization in Brazil. Methods for the quantification of this new genetically modified organism (GMO) are necessary. The development of a suitable endogenous reference is essential for GMO quantification by real-time PCR. Based on this, a new taxon-specific endogenous reference quantification assay was developed for Phaseolus vulgaris L. Three genes encoding common bean proteins (phaseolin, arcelin, and lectin) were selected as candidates for endogenous reference. Primers targeting these candidate genes were designed and the detection was evaluated using the SYBR Green chemistry. The assay targeting lectin gene showed higher specificity than the remaining assays, and a hydrolysis probe was then designed. This assay showed high specificity for 50 common bean samples from two gene pools, Andean and Mesoamerican. For GM common bean varieties, the results were similar to those obtained for non-GM isogenic varieties with PCR efficiency values ranging from 92 to 101 %. Moreover, this assay presented a limit of detection of ten haploid genome copies. The primers and probe developed in this work are suitable to detect and quantify either GM or non-GM common bean.

  18. Genetic analysis of the response to eleven Colletotrichum lindemuthianum races in a RIL population of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Ana; Rodríguez-Suárez, Cristina; Giraldez, Ramón; Ferreira, Juan José

    2014-04-30

    Bean anthracnose is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magnus) Lams.- Scrib. Resistance to C. lindemuthianum in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) generally follows a qualitative mode of inheritance. The pathogen shows extensive pathogenic variation and up to 20 anthracnose resistance loci (named Co-), conferring resistance to specific races, have been described. Anthracnose resistance has generally been investigated by analyzing a limited number of isolates or races in segregating populations. In this work, we analyzed the response against eleven C. lindemuthianum races in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) common bean population derived from the cross Xana × Cornell 49242 in which a saturated linkage map was previously developed. A systematic genetic analysis was carried out to dissect the complex resistance segregations observed, which included contingency analyses, subpopulations and genetic mapping. Twenty two resistance genes were identified, some with a complementary mode of action. The Cornell 49242 genotype carries a complex cluster of resistance genes at the end of linkage group (LG) Pv11 corresponding to the previously described anthracnose resistance cluster Co-2. In this position, specific resistance genes to races 3, 6, 7, 19, 38, 39, 65, 357, 449 and 453 were identified, with one of them showing a complementary mode of action. In addition, Cornell 49242 had an independent gene on LG Pv09 showing a complementary mode of action for resistance to race 453. Resistance genes in genotype Xana were located on three regions involving LGs Pv01, Pv02 and Pv04. All resistance genes identified in Xana showed a complementary mode of action, except for two controlling resistance to races 65 and 73 located on LG Pv01, in the position of the previously described anthracnose resistance cluster Co-1. Results shown herein reveal a complex and specific interaction between bean and fungus genotypes leading to anthracnose resistance. Organization

  19. Identification of expressed resistance gene-like sequences by data mining in 454-derived transcriptomic sequences of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhanji; Crampton, Mollee; Todd, Antonette; Kalavacharla, Venu

    2012-03-23

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is one of the most important legumes in the world. Several diseases severely reduce bean production and quality; therefore, it is very important to better understand disease resistance in common bean in order to prevent these losses. More than 70 resistance (R) genes which confer resistance against various pathogens have been cloned from diverse plant species. Most R genes share highly conserved domains which facilitates the identification of new candidate R genes from the same species or other species. The goals of this study were to isolate expressed R gene-like sequences (RGLs) from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of common bean, and to develop RGL-tagged molecular markers. A data-mining approach was used to identify tentative P. vulgaris R gene-like sequences from approximately 1.69 million 454-derived sequences and 116,716 ESTs deposited in GenBank. A total of 365 non-redundant sequences were identified and named as common bean (P. vulgaris = Pv) resistance gene-like sequences (PvRGLs). Among the identified PvRGLs, about 60% (218 PvRGLs) were from 454-derived sequences. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed that PvRGLs were actually expressed in the leaves of common bean. Upon comparison to P. vulgaris genomic sequences, 105 (28.77%) of the 365 tentative PvRGLs could be integrated into the existing common bean physical map. Based on the syntenic blocks between common bean and soybean, 237 (64.93%) PvRGLs were anchored on the P. vulgaris genetic map and will need to be mapped to determine order. In addition, 11 sequence-tagged-site (STS) and 19 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers were developed for 25 unique PvRGLs. In total, 365 PvRGLs were successfully identified from 454-derived transcriptomic sequences and ESTs available in GenBank and about 65% of PvRGLs were integrated into the common bean genetic map. A total of 30

  20. Culinary and sensory traits diversity in the Spanish Core Collection of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

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    Pedro A. Casquero

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Spanish National Plant Genetic Resource Center’s core collection of bean germplasm includes 202 accessions selected from more than 3000 accessions in function of passport data, seed phenotype, genetic background, and agronomic traits. To acquire more useful information about these accessions, we cultivated and characterized them for sensory and culinary traits. We found considerable variation for culinary and sensory traits of the cooked beans (mean coefficients of variation: 41% for the sensory traits and 40% for the culinary traits. The large dataset enabled us to study correlations between sensory and culinary traits and among these traits and geographic origin, seed color, and growth habit. Greater proportion of white in the seed coat correlated positively with brightness and negatively with mealiness (r=0.60, r=-0.60, p<0.001, respectively. Mealiness correlated negatively with seed-coat roughness and rate of water absorption (r=-0.60, r=-0.53, p<0.001, respectively. Materials of Andean origin had lower seed-coat brightness (p<0.01 and seed-coat roughness, and greater seed-coat perceptibility, mealiness, flavor, and aroma (p<0.001 than materials of Mesoamerican origin. Growth habit failed to correlate with culinary or sensory traits. Breeders can benefit from the information about this core collection available at www.crf.inia.es/crfesp/paginaprincipaljudia.asp.

  1. Culinary and sensory traits diversity in the Spanish Core Collection of common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, A.; Casquero, P.A.; Mayo, S.; Almirall, A.; Plans, M.; Simó, J.; Romero-del-Castillo, R.; Casañas, F.

    2016-11-01

    The Spanish National Plant Genetic Resource Center’s core collection of bean germplasm includes 202 accessions selected from more than 3000 accessions in function of passport data, seed phenotype, genetic background, and agronomic traits. To acquire more useful information about these accessions, we cultivated and characterized them for sensory and culinary traits. We found considerable variation for culinary and sensory traits of the cooked beans (mean coefficients of variation: 41% for the sensory traits and 40% for the culinary traits). The large dataset enabled us to study correlations between sensory and culinary traits and among these traits and geographic origin, seed color, and growth habit. Greater proportion of white in the seed coat correlated positively with brightness and negatively with mealiness (r=0.60, r=-0.60, p<0.001, respectively). Mealiness correlated negatively with seed-coat roughness and rate of water absorption (r=-0.60, r=-0.53, p<0.001, respectively). Materials of Andean origin had lower seed-coat brightness (p<0.01) and seed-coat roughness, and greater seed-coat perceptibility, mealiness, flavor, and aroma (p<0.001) than materials of Mesoamerican origin. Growth habit failed to correlate with culinary or sensory traits. Breeders can benefit from the information about this core collection available at www.crf.inia.es/crfesp/paginaprincipaljudia.asp. (Author)

  2. A method for the rapid detection and identification of halo blight pathogen on common bean

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    Popović Tatjana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A diagnostic method based on nested-PCR, followed by ELISA and conventional bacteriology tests, for the rapid and reliable detection of halo blight pathogen Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. phaseolicola (Psp collected from infected bean leaves and seeds is described. Psp formed white, small and flat colonies on nutrient agar medium, creamy white, flat and circular on Milk-Tween agar medium and light yellow, convex and shiny on modified sucrose peptone agar medium. Eighteen Gram-negative, catalase-positive and oxidase-negative strains were subjected to nested PCR with primers P 5.1/P 3.1 and P 5.2/P 3.2, which directed the amplification of the 450 bp target DNA fragment in all tested strains. According to the results of DAS- and PTA-ELISA with respect to reactivity to specific antibodies, all analyzed strains belonged to Psp bacterium. Pathogenicity was tested on bean pods and cotyledon leaves, on which greasy spots were formed. Psp did not cause hypersensitive reaction on the leaves of tobacco and geranium. Strains produced levan, fluorescent pigment, oxidative metabolism of glucose, did not reduce nitrate, did not produce indole and H2S, did not hydrolyze starch, gelatin and esculin; they produced acid from glucose, mannose, sucrose and glycerol, and did not produce acid from maltose, starch, esculin, dulcite, sorbitol, inositol and erythritol.

  3. Environmental Effects of Nanoceria on Seed Production of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris): A Proteomic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Almeida, Igor C; Arigi, Emma A; Choi, Hyungwon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Flores-Margez, Juan P; White, Jason C; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2015-11-17

    The rapidly growing literature on the response of edible plants to nanoceria has provided evidence of its uptake and bioaccumulation, which delineates a possible route of entry into the food chain. However, little is known about how the residing organic matter in soil may affect the bioavailability and resulting impacts of nanoceria on plants. Here, we examined the effect of nanoceria exposure (62.5-500 mg/kg) on kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) productivity and seed quality as a function of soil organic matter content. Cerium accumulation in the seeds produced from plants in organic matter enriched soil showed a dose-dependent increase, unlike in low organic matter soil treatments. Seeds obtained upon nanoceria exposure in soils with higher organic matter were more susceptible to changes in nutrient quality. A quantitative proteomic analysis of the seeds produced upon nanoceria exposure provided evidence for upregulation of stress-related proteins at 62.5 and 125 mg/kg nanoceria treatments. Although the plants did not exhibit overt toxicity, the major seed proteins primarily associated with nutrient storage (phaseolin) and carbohydrate metabolism (lectins) were significantly down-regulated in a dose dependent manner upon nanoceria exposure. This study thus suggests that nanoceria exposures may negatively affect the nutritional quality of kidney beans at the cellular and molecular level. More confirmatory studies with nanoceria along different species using alternative and orthogonal "omic" tools are currently under active investigation, which will enable the identification of biomarkers of exposure and susceptibility.

  4. Maternal Effects on Seed and Seedling Phenotypes in Reciprocal F1 Hybrids of the Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jugpreet; Clavijo Michelangeli, Jose A.; Gezan, Salvador A.; Lee, Hyungwon; Vallejos, C. Eduardo

    2017-01-01

    Maternal control of seed size in the common bean provides an opportunity to study genotype-independent seed weight effects on early seedling growth and development. We set out to test the hypothesis that the early heterotrophic growth of bean seedlings is determined by both the relative amount of cotyledon storage reserves and the genotype of the seedling, provided the hybrid genotype could be fully expressed in the seedlings. The hypothesis was tested via comparison of seed weight and seedling growth phenotypes of small-seeded (wild, ~0.10 g) and large-seeded (landrace, ~0.55 g) parents and their reciprocal F1 hybrids. Akaike's Information Criteria were used to estimate growth parameters and identify the phenotypic model that best represented the data. The analysis presented here indicates that the hybrid embryo genotype is not fully expressed during both seed and seedling growth and development. The analysis presented here shows that seed growth and development are controlled by the sporophyte. The strong similarity in seed size and shape of the reciprocal hybrid seed with seeds of the maternal parents is evidence of this control. The analysis also indicates that since the maternal sporophyte controls seed size and therefore the amount of cotyledon reserves, the maternal sporophyte indirectly controls early seedling growth because the cotyledons are the primary nutrient source during heterotrophic growth. The most interesting and surprising results indicated that the maternal effects extended to the root architecture of the reciprocal hybrid seedlings. This phenomenon could not be explained by seed size, but by alterations in the control of the pattern of gene expression of the seedling, which apparently was set by a maternally controlled mechanism. Although seed weight increase was the main target of bean domestication, it also had positive repercussions on early-growth traits and stand establishment. PMID:28174586

  5. Improving adaptation to drought stress in white pea bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L): genotypic effects on grain yield, yield components and pod harvest index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is the most important food legume crop in Africa and Latin America where rainfall pattern is unpredictable. The objectives were to identify better yielding common bean lines with good canning quality under drought, and to identify traits that could be used as sele...

  6. Common bean cultivars response to lime surface application under no tillage systemResposta de cultivares de feijoeiro comum à calagem superficial em semeadura direta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil acidity in no tillage system, if not in high situations, can be neutralized by lime surface application, improving mineral nutrition and crop yield. Aiming to evaluate the agronomic performance of common bean cultivars, to surface lime application, in no tillage system, an experiment was conducted in Oxisol, Botucatu Municipal District, São Paulo State, Brazil. The experimental design was a complete randomized block in split plot with four replications, where the plots were formed by common bean cultivars (Carioca, IAC Carioca Eté, Pérola, IAPAR 81 e Campeão 2 and subplots consisted of surface application of dolomitic limestone (zero, 1.8 t ha-1, 3.6 t ha-1 and 5.4 t ha-1. The surface lime application on the soil occurred in October 2002 and subsequently the sequence millet (spring – beans (summer – oat (autumn-winter were planted under rainfed conditions. Bean cultivars sowing were done on December 17, 2003. It can be concluded that there is influence of cultivars and limestone surface application under no tillage, where IAPAR 81 showed better grain yield with the increase of lime rates, obtaining values of 2,025 kg ha-1 without the lime application to 2,655 kg ha-1 with 5.4 t ha-1 lime rate, obtaining 31% yield increase. A acidez do solo no sistema de semeadura direta, caso não se encontre em situações elevadas, pode ser resolvida com aplicação superficial de calcário, melhorando a nutrição mineral e a produtividade das culturas. Com o objetivo de avaliar o desempenho agronômico de cultivares de feijoeiro, em razão da aplicação superficial de calcário, em semeadura direta, foi realizado um experimento num Latossolo Vermelho distrófico, em Botucatu (SP. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos casualizados, em esquema de parcelas subdivididas com quatro repetições, onde as parcelas foram formadas por cultivares de feijão comum (Carioca, IAC Carioca Eté, Pérola, IAPAR 81 e Campeão 2 e as subparcelas constitu

  7. Breeding Beans with Bruchid and Multiple Virus Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are worldwide threats to dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production. Beans planted in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean also need resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). The common bean weev...

  8. Fermented nondigestible fraction from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar Negro 8025 modulates HT-29 cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Bravo, R K; Guevara-Gonzalez, R; Ramos-Gomez, M; Garcia-Gasca, T; Campos-Vega, R; Oomah, B D; Loarca-Piña, G

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of a fermented nondigestible fraction (FNDF) of cooked bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar Negro 8025 on human colon adenocarcinoma HT-29 cell survival. Negro 8025 was chosen for in vitro fermentation based on comparison of chemical composition with 2 other cultivars: Azufrado Higuera and Pinto Durango. Negro 8025 had 58% total dietary fiber, 27% resistant starch, and 20 mg of (+)-catechin equivalents per gram of sample. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) production and pH of the medium were measured after fermentation as indicators of colon protection through induced arrest on cell culture and apoptosis. Butyrate and pH of FNDF of Negro 8025 were higher than the control fermented raffinose extract. The FNDF inhibited HT-29 cell survival in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The lethal concentration 50 (LC(50)) was 13.63% FNDF (equivalent to 7.36, 0.33, and 3.31 mmol of acetic, propionic, and butyric acids, respectively). DNA fragmentation, an apoptosis indicator, was detected by the TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling method in cells treated with the LC(50)-FNDF and a synthetic mixture of SCFAs mimicking LC(50)-FNDF. Our results suggest that common bean is a reliable source of fermentable substrates in colon, producing compounds with potential chemoprotective effect on HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells, so it may present an effective alternative to mitigate colon cancer development.

  9. Histological anomalies in stems of common and runner beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and Ph. coccineus L. treated with pendimenthalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Weryszko-Chmielewska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. 'Augustynka' and 'Złota Saxa' and runner beans (Ph. coccineus L. 'Blanka' and 'Eureka' were seeded on loess-like soil containing 1.6% of organic matter, and sprayed with pendimethalin at the dose of 1650 g•ha-1 ' immediately after seeding in the middle of May. The herbicide inhibited shoot growth and caused enlargement of the stem at the soil level. Observations made in light and scanning electron microscope showed that in the swollen parts of the stem, the diameter of cortical parenchyma cells was bigger, the thickness of phloem layer was irregular, phloem fibers were less lignified, and the xylem cylinder was asymmetrical. In stems of 'Augustynka', 'Złota Saxa' and 'Eureka' cultivars, the thickness of secondary xylem and the diameter of vessels were reduced. Some vessels and tracheids were positioned transversely and obliquely to the stem axis and had an arched shape. Cell walls were less lignified and had a smaller number of pits. The largest number of histological anomalies was found in stems of the 'Augustynka' and 'Złota Saxa' cultivars.

  10. Performance and meat quality of Nordic Red and Aberdeen Angus bulls offered faba bean or field pea based whole crop legume-cereal silages

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    Arto Kalevi Huuskonen

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effects of silage plant species (faba bean and field pea based whole crop legume-cereals vs. grass on performance and meat quality of growing Aberdeen Angus (AA and Nordic Red (NR bulls. A 2×3 factorial design was used. The experiment comprised 30 AA and 30 NR bulls. Both breeds were randomly allotted to the three feeding treatments. The compositions (g kg-1 dry matter of diets were: 1 grass silage (650 plus rolled barley (350, 2 faba bean-wheat silage (650 plus rolled barley (350 and 3 pea-wheat silage (650 plus rolled barley (350. The experimental diets were offered as total mixed rations ad libitum. The AA bulls grew faster, had better feed conversion rates and superior dressing proportion and carcass conformation compared to the NR bulls. Replacing grass silage by whole crop legume-cereal silages in the diet did not have remarkable effects on animal performance, carcass characteristics or meat quality.

  11. Integrated effects of reduction dose of nitrogen fertilizer and mode of biofertilizer application on soil health under mung bean cropping system

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    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the integrated effects of reduced dose of chemical fertilizer with different methods and times of application of Rhizobium biofertilizer on soil health and fertility under mung bean (Vigna radiata cropping, field experiments were carried out during three years (2009, 2010, and 2011 in West Bengal, India, in randomized block design. In the first year, varietal screening of mung bean under recommended dose of chemical fertilizer (20:40:20 were performed with five available varieties adapted to local climate. Reduced nitrogen fertilizer doses (20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% and the recommended dose, as well as the Rhizobium biofertilizer application (basal, soil, and spray, were done, and data were recorded for pH, electrical conductivity, organic carbon, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, total potassium, and bacterial population of soil, both before sowing and after harvesting. The results indicated significant improvement in the soil quality with gradual buildup of soil macronutrient status after harvesting of crop. Application of biofertilizer has contributed significantly towards higher soil organic matter, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium. The use of biofertilizer significantly improved soil bacterial population count in the soil thereby increasing the soil health.

  12. Agronomic performance of naked oat (Avena nuda L. and faba bean intercropping

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    Agnieszka Klimek-Kopyra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The most common cereals for faba bean (Vicia faba L. used in intercrops is conventional oat (Avena sativa L. An alternative to oat may be naked oat (Avena nuda L., whose oil content and quality is double. Here, intercropping of naked oat with two different faba bean cultivars (determinate-high tannin and indeterminate-low tannin was compared with sole crops of each species in 2006-2008. The treatments were: sole naked oat at 500 kernels m², indeterminate sole faba bean at 50 seeds m², determinate sole faba bean at 70 seeds m², and an additive series of 25%, 50%, and 75% of faba bean seeding rate mixed with the naked oat seeding rate. Our results demonstrated that intercropping increased the Land Equivalent Ratio by +3% to +9% over sole cropping. Raising the faba bean seeding rate in a mixture from 25% to 75% reduced oat grain yield from 630 (determinate cultivar to 760 kg ha-1 (indeterminate cultivar but increased faba bean grain yield from 760 kg ha-1. Higher yield and leaf area index (LAI and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR values show that the indeterminate cultivar of faba bean is more suitable in mixture with naked oat. The high value of competition index (CR > 1 indicates domination and aggressiveness of faba bean towards naked oat. Regardless of cultivar type, mixture of faba bean with naked oat is less productive than pure sowing.

  13. Detection of genome donor species of neglected tetraploid crop Vigna reflexo-pilosa (créole bean), and genetic structure of diploid species based on newly developed EST-SSR markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chankaew, Sompong; Isemura, Takehisa; Isobe, Sachiko; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko; Somta, Prakit; Hirakawa, Hideki; Shirasawa, Kenta; Vaughan, Duncan A; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    Vigna reflexo-pilosa, which includes a neglected crop, is the only one tetraploid species in genus Vigna. The ancestral species that make up this allotetraploid species have not conclusively been identified, although previous studies suggested that a donor genome of V. reflexo-pilosa is V. trinervia. In this study, 1,429 azuki bean EST-SSR markers were developed of which 38 EST-SSR primer pairs that amplified one product in diploid species and two discrete products in tetraploid species were selected to analyze 268 accessions from eight taxa of seven Asian Vigna species including V. reflexo-pilosa var. glabra, V. reflexo-pilosa var. reflexo-pilosa, V. exilis, V. hirtella, V. minima, V. radiata var. sublobata, V. tenuicaulis and V. trinervia to identify genome donor of V. reflexo-pilosa. Since both diploid and tetraploid species were analyzed and each SSR primer pair detected two loci in the tetraploid species, we separated genomes of the tetraploid species into two different diploid types, viz. A and B. In total, 445 alleles were detected by 38 EST-SSR markers. The highest gene diversity was observed in V. hirtella. By assigning the discrete PCR products of V. reflexo-pilosa into two distinguished genomes, we were able to identify the two genome donor parents of créole bean. Phylogenetic and principal coordinate analyses suggested that V. hirtella is a species complex and may be composed of at least three distinct taxa. Both analyses also clearly demonstrated that V. trinervia and one taxon of V. hirtella are the genome donors of V. reflexo-pilosa. Gene diversity indicates that the evolution rate of EST-SSRs on genome B of créole bean might be faster than that on genome A. Species relationship among the Vigna species in relation to genetic data, morphology and geographical distribution are presented.

  14. Detection of genome donor species of neglected tetraploid crop Vigna reflexo-pilosa (creole bean, and genetic structure of diploid species based on newly developed EST-SSR markers from azuki bean (Vigna angularis.

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    Sompong Chankaew

    Full Text Available Vigna reflexo-pilosa, which includes a neglected crop, is the only one tetraploid species in genus Vigna. The ancestral species that make up this allotetraploid species have not conclusively been identified, although previous studies suggested that a donor genome of V. reflexo-pilosa is V. trinervia. In this study, 1,429 azuki bean EST-SSR markers were developed of which 38 EST-SSR primer pairs that amplified one product in diploid species and two discrete products in tetraploid species were selected to analyze 268 accessions from eight taxa of seven Asian Vigna species including V. reflexo-pilosa var. glabra, V. reflexo-pilosa var. reflexo-pilosa, V. exilis, V. hirtella, V. minima, V. radiata var. sublobata, V. tenuicaulis and V. trinervia to identify genome donor of V. reflexo-pilosa. Since both diploid and tetraploid species were analyzed and each SSR primer pair detected two loci in the tetraploid species, we separated genomes of the tetraploid species into two different diploid types, viz. A and B. In total, 445 alleles were detected by 38 EST-SSR markers. The highest gene diversity was observed in V. hirtella. By assigning the discrete PCR products of V. reflexo-pilosa into two distinguished genomes, we were able to identify the two genome donor parents of créole bean. Phylogenetic and principal coordinate analyses suggested that V. hirtella is a species complex and may be composed of at least three distinct taxa. Both analyses also clearly demonstrated that V. trinervia and one taxon of V. hirtella are the genome donors of V. reflexo-pilosa. Gene diversity indicates that the evolution rate of EST-SSRs on genome B of créole bean might be faster than that on genome A. Species relationship among the Vigna species in relation to genetic data, morphology and geographical distribution are presented.

  15. Diversidad de faseolinas en frijol común cultivado del Caribe Phaseolin diversity in cultivated common bean from the Caribbean

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    Matthew W. Blair

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el tipo de faseolina en 180 accesiones cultivadas de Phaseolus vulgaris del Caribe de la colección del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT. En fríjoles de Cuba (25 accesiones predominó el tipo S (68%, semilla pequeña, roja o negra y hábito de crecimiento de tipos II y III, seguidos por fríjoles con faseolina T (20 % y con un bajo porcentaje los tipos B, CH y Sd. En Haití (108 accesiones las faseolinas más comunes fueron T (48.1%, semilla grande, rojo moteado y hábito arbustivo y S (42.6%, semilla pequeña, negra, y unas pocas mostraron faseolinas B, Sb y Sd. En los fríjoles de Puerto Rico (21 accesiones las faseolinas más comunes fueron T (57.14%, semilla grande, rojo moteada y S (42.86%, semilla pequeña amarilla, negra o blanca. En los de República Dominicana (21 accesiones abundó el tipo T (85.7%, semilla grande o mediana rojomoteada. En los fríjoles de Jamaica (5 predominaron las faseolinas T y B (40% de cada una. Los patrones de faseolina indicaron la prevalencia tanto de fríjoles Mesoamericanos como Andinos.In this study, 180 genotypes of cultivated Phaseolus vulgaris from the Caribbean were evaluated with the phaseolin marker. All the accessions belonged to the germplasm collection of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT. Beans from Cuba were mostly S phaseolin (68.0 % type, with small seed size, red and black seed color and type II or type III growth habit. These were followed by beans with T phaseolin (20.0 % and finally by those with B, CH and Sd phaseolin. In Haiti , the most common phaseolin was T (48.1%, the majority of which were large seeded bush beans, mostly of the red mottled seed color class. Many of the remaining accessions were S phaseolin (42.6% and had small black seed, although a few had B, Sb and Sd phaseolin (4.6, 2.8 and 1.9% of genotypes, respectively. In Puerto Rico, T phaseolin was in the majority with 57.1%, most of these with large red or red mottled seed

  16. Phaseolin diversity in cultivated common bean from the Caribbean Diversidad de faseolinas en frijol común cultivado del Caribe

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    Hidalgo Rigoberto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 180 genotypes of cultivated Phaseolus vulgaris from the Caribbean were evaluated with the phaseolin marker. All the accessions belonged to the germplasm collection of the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT. Beans from Cuba were mostly S phaseolin (68.0 % type, with small seed size, red and black seed color and type II or type III growth habit. These were followed by beans with T phaseolin (20.0 % and finally by those with B, CH and Sd phaseolin. In Haiti, the most common phaseolin was T (48.1%, the majority of which were large seeded bush beans, mostly of the red mottled seed color class. Many of the remaining accessions were S phaseolin (42.6% and had small black seed, although a few had B, Sb and Sd phaseolin (4.6, 2.8 and 1.9% of genotypes, respectively. In Puerto Rico, T phaseolin was in the majority with 57.1%, most of these with large red or red mottled seed. S phaseolin was represented by 42.9 % of landraces some of which had small yellow, black or white seed. In the Dominican Republic, the T phaseolin was very abundant (85.7% the majority of which were medium to large seeded bush beans all of which were red mottled. A smaller proportion of Dominican landraces had S and B phaseolin (9.5% and 4.8% respectively. Finally, in Jamaica, T phaseolin was found for 40.0 % of the landraces, B phaseolin was equally common and 20% of the landraces had S phaseolin although this was based on a small sample of genotypes. The phaseolin patterns indicated the prevalence of both Andean and Mesoamerican beans in the Caribbean.

    Se evaluó el tipo de faseolina en 180 accesiones cultivadas de Phaseolus vulgaris del Caribe de la colección del Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT

  17. Morphological evaluation of common bean diversity in Bosnia and Herzegovina using the discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC multivariate method

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    Grahić Jasmin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to analyze morphological characteristics of locally cultivated common bean landraces from Bosnia and Herzegovina (B&H, thirteen quantitative and qualitative traits of 40 P. vulgaris accessions, collected from four geographical regions (Northwest B&H, Northeast B&H, Central B&H and Sarajevo and maintained at the Gene bank of the Faculty of Agriculture and Food Sciences in Sarajevo, were examined. Principal component analysis (PCA showed that the proportion of variance retained in the first two principal components was 54.35%. The first principal component had high contributing factor loadings from seed width, seed height and seed weight, whilst the second principal component had high contributing factor loadings from the analyzed traits seed per pod and pod length. PCA plot, based on the first two principal components, displayed a high level of variability among the analyzed material. The discriminant analysis of principal components (DAPC created 3 discriminant functions (DF, whereby the first two discriminant functions accounted for 90.4% of the variance retained. Based on the retained DFs, DAPC provided group membership probabilities which showed that 70% of the accessions examined were correctly classified between the geographically defined groups. Based on the taxonomic distance, 40 common bean accessions analyzed in this study formed two major clusters, whereas two accessions Acc304 and Acc307 didn’t group in any of those. Acc360 and Acc362, as well as Acc324 and Acc371 displayed a high level of similarity and are probably the same landrace. The present diversity of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s common been landraces could be useful in future breeding programs.

  18. Physiological Responses of Two Varieties of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. to Foliar Application of Silver Nanoparticles

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    Ahmed Ibrahim El-Batal

    2016-02-01

    The foliar application of GA-AgNPs and AgNO3 signifi‐ cantly increased plant height, root length, number of leaves/plant, the leaves’ area, total fresh and dry weights/ plant and yield (i.e., number, fresh and dry weights of pods/ plant and 100-seed weight. It also altered protein patterns in the two varieties and changed the phytohormone balance in the Nebraska variety by increasing the levels of growth-regulating substances, which explains the increase in both growth parameters and yield in GA-AgNPs and AgNO3 treated plants. An Atomic Absorption Spectrosco‐ py (AAS study unveiled the movement and residual accumulation of both forms of silver in different parts of the two bean varieties. The results indicate the successful use of GA-AgNPs and AgNO3 in enhancing the growth and yield of the Bronco and Nebraska varieties under pot experiment conditions, and present a viable alternative to genetically modified (GM crops for ensuring food security.

  19. Proteins from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seed as a natural coagulant for potential application in water turbidity removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antov, Mirjana G; Sćiban, Marina B; Petrović, Nada J

    2010-04-01

    The ability of coagulation active proteins from common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) seed for the removal of water turbidity was studied. Partial purification of protein coagulant was performed by precipitation with ammonium sulphate, dialysis and anion exchange chromatography. Adsorption parameters for ion-exchange process were established using dialysate extract. Results revealed that the highest values of the adsorbed protein were achieved in 50 mmol/L phosphate buffer at pH 7.5 and the maximum adsorption capacity was calculated to be 0.51 mg protein/mL matrix. Partially purified coagulant at initial turbidity 35 NTU expressed the highest value of coagulation activity, 72.3%, which was almost 22 times higher than those obtained by crude extract considering applied dosages. At the same time, the increase in organic matter that remained in water after coagulation with purified protein coagulant was more than 16 times lower than those with crude extract, relatively to its content in blank.

  20. Purification and characterization of an alkaline phosphatase induced by phosphorus starvation in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) roots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales, L.; Gutierrez, N.; Maya, V.; Parra, C.; Martinez B, E.; Coello, P., E-mail: pcoello@servidor.unam.mx [UNAM, Facultad de Quimica, Departamento de Bioquimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    Two phosphatase isoforms from roots of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) showed an increase in activity in response to phosphate deficiency. One of them (APIII) was chosen for further purification through ionic exchange chromatography and preparative electrophoresis. The estimated molecular mass of APIII was 35 kDa by both SDS-Page and gel filtration analyses, suggesting a monomeric form of the active enzyme. The phosphatase was classified as an alkaline phosphatase based on the requirement of ph 8 for optimum catalysis. It not only exhibited broad substrate specificity, with the most activity against pyrophosphate, but also effectively catalyzed the hydrolysis of polyphosphate, glucose-1-phosphate and phospho enol-pyruvate. Activity was completely inhibited by molybdate, vanadate and phosphate but was only partially inhibited by fluoride. Although divalent cations were not essential for the pyro phosphatase activity of this enzyme, the hydrolysis of pyro phosphatase increased substantially in the presence of Mg{sup 2+}.

  1. SCAR, RAPD and RFLP markers linked to a dominant gene (Are) conferring resistance to anthracnose in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam-Blondon, A F; Sévignac, M; Bannerot, H; Dron, M

    1994-08-01

    Anthracnose, caused by the fungusColletotrichum lindemuthianum, is a severe disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) controlled, in Europe, by a single dominant gene,Are. Four pairs of near-isogenic lines (NILs) were constructed, in which theAre gene was introgressed into different genetic backgrounds. These pairs of NILs were used to search for DNA markers linked to the resistance gene. Nine molecular markers, five RAPDs and four RFLPs, were found to discriminate between the resistant and the susceptible members of these NILs. A backcross progeny of 120 individuals was analysed to map these markers in relation to theAre locus. Five out of the nine markers were shown to be linked to theAre gene within a distance of 12.0 cM. The most tightly linked, a RAPD marker, was used to generate a pair of primers that specifically amplify this RAPD (sequence characterized amplified region, SCAR).

  2. Fertilization variants effect in the incidence and populational fluctuation of the true bugs complex (Hemipterous: Pentatomidae in common bean

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    Yordanys Ramos González

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was done in the “Panchita Orchard” Township Quemado de Guines, province of Villa Clara from September 2010 to December 2011. Was to determine the effect of fertilization have some variations in behavior and incidence of associated pentatomid common bean. Varieties were planted two different colored heads (1 red and 1 white in random blocks on a Brown soil Carbonated Fluffy. The input of the first adults phenophase occurred in R2 and R3 peak in population with 28.8% of the Pentatomidae detected. In the two varieties studied, Rhizobium fertilization showed the best effects in reducing insect and the rate and degree of involvement, the opposite of what happened with the urea, which were equal to the control population levels, but higher affectations. The pentatomids presented similar preference for the two varieties since no differences in the parameters.

  3. Damaged-self recognition in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris shows taxonomic specificity and triggers signalling via reactive oxygen species (ROS

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    Dalia eDuran

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants require reliable mechanisms to detect injury. Danger signals or 'damage-associated molecular patterns' (DAMPs are released from stressed host cells and allow injury detection independently of enemy-derived molecules. We studied the response of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris to the application of leaf homogenate as a source of DAMPs and measured the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS as an early response and the secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN as a jasmonic acid (JA–dependent late response. We observed a strong taxonomic signal in the response to different leaf homogenates. ROS formation and EFN secretion were highly correlated and responded most strongly to leaf homogenates produced using the same cultivar or closely related accessions, less to a distantly related cultivar of common bean or each of the two congeneric species, P. lunatus and P. coccineus, and not at all to homogenates prepared from species in different genera, not even when using other Fabaceae. Interestingly, leaf homogenates also reduced the infection by the bacterial pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, when they were applied directly before challenging, although the same homogenates exhibited no direct in vitro inhibitory effect in the bacterium. We conclude that ROS signaling is associated to the induction of EFN secretion and that the specific blend of DAMPs that are released from damaged cells allows the plant to distinguish the 'damaged self' from the damaged 'non-self'. The very early responses of plants to DAMPs can trigger resistance to both, herbivores and pathogens, which should be adaptive because injury facilitates infection, independently of its causal reason.

  4. Uncovering the genetic architecture of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resistance through QTL mapping and epistatic interaction analysis in common bean

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    Ana M. eGonzález

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in common bean. Despite the genetics of anthracnose resistance has been studied for a long time, few quantitative trait loci (QTLs studies have been conducted on this species. The present work examines the genetic basis of quantitative resistance to races 23 and 1545 of C. lindemuthianum in different organs (stem, leaf and petiole. A population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RIL derived from the cross PMB0225 x PHA1037 was evaluated for anthracnose resistance under natural and artificial photoperiod growth conditions. Using multi-environment QTL mapping approach, 10 and 16 main effect QTLs were identified for resistance to anthracnose races 23 and 1545, respectively. The homologous genomic regions corresponding to 17 of the 26 main effect QTLs detected were positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL proteins. Among them, it is worth noting that the main effect QTLs detected on linkage group 05 for resistance to race 1545 in stem, petiole and leaf were located within a 1.2 Mb region. The NL gene Phvul.005G117900 is located in this region, which can be considered an important candidate gene for the non-organ-specific QTL identified here. Furthermore, a total of 39 epistatic QTL (E-QTLs (21 for resistance to race 23 and 18 for resistance to race 1545 involved in 20 epistatic interactions (eleven and nine interactions for resistance to races 23 and 1545, respectively were identified. None of the main and epistatic QTLs detected displayed significant environment interaction effects. The present research provides essential information not only for the better understanding of the plant-pathogen interaction but also for the application of genomic assisted breeding for anthracnose resistance improvement in common bean through application of marker-assisted selection (MAS.

  5. Uncovering the genetic architecture of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum resistance through QTL mapping and epistatic interaction analysis in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Ana M; Yuste-Lisbona, Fernando J; Rodiño, A Paula; De Ron, Antonio M; Capel, Carmen; García-Alcázar, Manuel; Lozano, Rafael; Santalla, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Colletotrichum lindemuthianum is a hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in common bean. Despite the genetics of anthracnose resistance has been studied for a long time, few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) studies have been conducted on this species. The present work examines the genetic basis of quantitative resistance to races 23 and 1545 of C. lindemuthianum in different organs (stem, leaf and petiole). A population of 185 recombinant inbred lines (RIL) derived from the cross PMB0225 × PHA1037 was evaluated for anthracnose resistance under natural and artificial photoperiod growth conditions. Using multi-environment QTL mapping approach, 10 and 16 main effect QTLs were identified for resistance to anthracnose races 23 and 1545, respectively. The homologous genomic regions corresponding to 17 of the 26 main effect QTLs detected were positive for the presence of resistance-associated gene cluster encoding nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich repeat (NL) proteins. Among them, it is worth noting that the main effect QTLs detected on linkage group 05 for resistance to race 1545 in stem, petiole and leaf were located within a 1.2 Mb region. The NL gene Phvul.005G117900 is located in this region, which can be considered an important candidate gene for the non-organ-specific QTL identified here. Furthermore, a total of 39 epistatic QTL (E-QTLs) (21 for resistance to race 23 and 18 for resistance to race 1545) involved in 20 epistatic interactions (eleven and nine interactions for resistance to races 23 and 1545, respectively) were identified. None of the main and epistatic QTLs detected displayed significant environment interaction effects. The present research provides essential information not only for the better understanding of the plant-pathogen interaction but also for the application of genomic assisted breeding for anthracnose resistance improvement in common bean through application of marker-assisted selection (MAS).

  6. Genetic map of the common bean using a breeding population derived from the Mesoamerican gene pool

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    Luciana Gomes Ferreira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mapping population consisted of 94 F2 generation plants derived from a cross between the CNFC 7812and CNFC 8056 lines, with different protein contents, 24% and 19% respectively. Seven hundred and fifty-two molecularmarkers were tested among the parents and four individuals from the segregant population. A total of 101 loci were used todevelop the genetic map. The polymorphism rate was 8.3% and 23.2% for the microsatellite and RAPD markers, respectively.The sizes of the linkage groups ranged from 6.7 to 139.0 cM , presenting a mean of 49.4 ± 36.8. The map length was 840.7cM and the mean group length was 45.9 cM. The average distance between the framework loci was 16.1 cM. This map wascompared with international reference bean maps and results were discussed. The construction of the genetic map fromparents of the same center of origin and the commercial grain type were discussed.

  7. Competitivity of the common-bean plant relative to the weed alexandergrass [Brachiaria plantaginea (link hitch.] Competitividade do feijoeiro-comum com o capim-marmelada [Brachiaria plantaginea (link hitch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Passini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Methodologies of competitive interaction quantification between weeds and crops are not widely elucidated and compared in the literature. The competitive ability of common-bean (Phaseolus vulgaris relative to alexandergrass (Brachiaria plantaginea was assessed and two approaches of replacement series experiment analysis were compared. The response of the species to the presence of each other at different densities and proportion was evaluated. Replacement series at total densities of 625, 816 and 1,111 plants m-2 were performed at the proportions of common-bean:alexandergrass of 100:0 (pure stand of common-bean, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100% (pure stand of alexandergrass, at four replicates in a randomized block design. Data analyses were performed by the qualitative compared to the quantitative approach. The quantitative approach provided larger number of information than did the qualitative approach, and indicated that there was intraspecific competition among common-bean plants, and a minimum of interspecific competition from alexandergrass. There was no intraspecific competition among alexandergrass plants, being the crop effect on the weed larger than the effect among alexandergrass plants. The ecological niche differentiation was partial, since the crop intraspecific competition was larger than the interspecific, and the last one was negligible, at the same time that the weed interspecific competition was larger than the intraspecific. Common-bean, as a competitor species, is superior to alexandergrass.As metodologias de quantificação das interações competitivas entre plantas cultivadas e daninhas não estão amplamente elucidadas e comparadas na literatura. A competitividade da cultura de feijão-comum (Phaseolus vulgaris em relação ao capim-marmelada (Brachiaria plantaginea foi avaliada pela comparação entre o método qualitativo e um método quantitativo de análise de resultados. A resposta de cada espécie à presença da

  8. Controle de plantas daninhas em feijão num sistema de rotação culturas em plantio direto Weed control in beans in a no-tillage crop rotation system

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    Benedito N. Rodrigues

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar culturas de inverno para formação de cobertura morta que reduza a população de plantas daninhas na cultura do feijão (Phaseolus vulgaris. Ocupou-se o terreno durante o ano todo, com a sucessão, em plantio direto, de pousio ou cultura de inverno/feijão/cultura para silagem, estudando-se três modalidades de controle de plantas daninhas na cultura do feijão. A maior renda líquida acumulada após duas safras foi obtida com feijão semeado sobre palha de aveia-preta e controle de plantas daninhas com um gramicida pré-emergente, completando-se com capinas, quando necessário.This study was undertaken to select winter crops for mulching to reduce the weed infestation and to lower weed control costs in bean (Phaseolus vulgaris production. The soil was kept convered all the year under no-tillage with a sequence of a winter crop or fallow/beans/silage crop. Three weed control methods for beans were studied. After two complete crop sequences, the highest total net income was obtained with the beans directly drilled on the black oats (Avena strigosa mulching, spraying a pre-emergence grasskiller plus hoeing when needed.

  9. Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH-Based Karyotyping Reveals Rapid Evolution of Centromeric and Subtelomeric Repeats in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris and Relatives

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    Aiko Iwata-Otsubo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH-based karyotyping is a powerful cytogenetics tool to study chromosome organization, behavior, and chromosome evolution. Here, we developed a FISH-based karyotyping system using a probe mixture comprised of centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats, 5S rDNA, and chromosome-specific BAC clones in common bean, which enables one to unambiguously distinguish all 11 chromosome pairs. Furthermore, we applied the karyotyping system to several wild relatives and landraces of common bean from two distinct gene pools, as well as other related Phaseolus species, to investigate repeat evolution in the genus Phaseolus. Comparison of karyotype maps within common bean indicates that chromosomal distribution of the centromeric and subtelomeric satellite repeats is stable, whereas the copy number of the repeats was variable, indicating rapid amplification/reduction of the repeats in specific genomic regions. In Phaseolus species that diverged approximately 2–4 million yr ago, copy numbers of centromeric repeats were largely reduced or diverged, and chromosomal distributions have changed, suggesting rapid evolution of centromeric repeats. We also detected variation in the distribution pattern of subtelomeric repeats in Phaseolus species. The FISH-based karyotyping system revealed that satellite repeats are actively and rapidly evolving, forming genomic features unique to individual common bean accessions and Phaseolus species.

  10. Genetic diversity of rhizobia associated with common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown under no-tillage and conventional systems in Southern Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaschuk, G.; Hungria, M.; Andrade, D.S.; Campo, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and consumer of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), but yields are often low and may be improved by a higher N supply through symbiosis with rhizobia. One main limitation to the N2-fixation process is the susceptibility of the symbiosis to environmental stresses f

  11. Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 infecting common bean Phaseolus vulgaris genotypes show differential infection patterns between gene pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the occurrence of two plant endornaviruses, Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 1 (PvEV-1) and Phaseolus vulgaris endornavirus 2 (PvEV-2), in breeding-lines, cultivars, landraces, and wild genotypes of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) as well as other Phaseolus species collected from two...

  12. Genetic reduction of antinutrients in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) seed, increases nutrients and in vitro iron bioavailability without depressing main agronomical traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    In common bean, lectins, phytic acid, polyphenols and tannins exert major antinutritional effects when grains are consumed as a staple food. Reduced iron and zinc absorption, low protein digestibility and high toxicity at the intestinal level are the causes of their antinutritional effect. To improv...

  13. Selection of soil physical attributes spatially related with the grain yield common bean in Chapadão do Sul, MS, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, J. T.; Jung, L. H.; Correa, A. R.; Pellin, D. M. P.; Souza, B. R. F.; Roque, C. G.; Teixeira, R. B.; Minotto, V.; Montanari, R.

    2012-04-01

    In Brazil, the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is in one of the most representative farms, not only by the area under cultivation as well as the value of production. Thus, in the agricultural year 2010/2011, the Foundation of the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS) Campus de Chapadão do Sul, we studied the variability and spatial dependence between physical properties of the soil and grain yield common bean under conventional tillage in Oxisol of Chapadão do Sul, Northeast region of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We also studied the linear and spatial correlations between these attributes, investigating conditions that provide increased agricultural productivity. For this, the area with the cultivation of common bean under conventional tillage installed a mesh containing 121 sampling points, with spacing of 5.0 x 5.0 m between them, a total area of 1600 m2. The grain yield common bean, with high variability, was found to average national standards. However, variability in soil physical attributes was higher, indicating that conventional tillage is a system that generates the heterogeneity of the environment, and the total porosity at a depth of 0.00 to 0.10 m is the attribute that might explain the average variability of grain yield. Index terms: soil management, conventional tillage, soil physical attributes.

  14. Linkage mapping of the Phg-1 and Co-14 genes for resistance to angular leaf spot and anthracnose in the common bean cultivar AND 277

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Andean common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar AND 277 is an important source of disease resistance to angular leaf spot (ALS, caused by Pseudocercospora griseola) and anthracnose (caused by Colletotrichum lindemuthianum). AND 277 has the Phg-1 gene that confers resistance to eight races of...

  15. Evidence for introduction bottleneck and extensive inter-gene pool (Mesoamerica x Andes) hybridization in the European common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioia, Tania; Logozzo, Giuseppina; Attene, Giovanna; Bellucci, Elisa; Benedettelli, Stefano; Negri, Valeria; Papa, Roberto; Spagnoletti Zeuli, Pierluigi

    2013-01-01

    Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs) were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs) and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1) data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from "pure" accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2%) than in America (12.3%). The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with "pure" accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed.

  16. Evidence for introduction bottleneck and extensive inter-gene pool (Mesoamerica x Andes hybridization in the European common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. germplasm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Gioia

    Full Text Available Common bean diversity within and between Mesoamerican and Andean gene pools was compared in 89 landraces from America and 256 landraces from Europe, to elucidate the effects of bottleneck of introduction and selection for adaptation during the expansion of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in Europe. Thirteen highly polymorphic nuclear microsatellite markers (nuSSRs were used to complement chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSRs and nuclear markers (phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 data from previous studies. To verify the extent of the introduction bottleneck, inter-gene pool hybrids were distinguished from "pure" accessions. Hybrids were identified on the basis of recombination of gene pool specific cpSSR, phaseolin and Pv-shatterproof1 markers with a Bayesian assignments based on nuSSRs, and with STRUCTURE admixture analysis. More hybrids were detected than previously, and their frequency was almost four times larger in Europe (40.2% than in America (12.3%. The genetic bottleneck following the introduction into Europe was not evidenced in the analysis including all the accessions, but it was significant when estimated only with "pure" accessions, and five times larger for Mesoamerican than for Andean germplasm. The extensive inter-gene pool hybridization generated a large amount of genotypic diversity that mitigated the effects of the bottleneck that occurred when common bean was introduced in Europe. The implication for evolution and the advantages for common bean breeding are discussed.

  17. Minerals and chosen heavy metals retention in immature common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. seeds depending on the method of preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Słupski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available   Background. Legumes are a good source of protein, and are also abundant in carbohydrates, B-group vita­mins, dietary fibre and mineral compounds. Material and methods. This work evaluates the retention of ash, eleven minerals and two heavy metals in products obtained from two common bean cultivars harvested before reaching full maturity, with a diy mat­ter content of about 40%. Analyses were conducted on raw, blanched and cooked seeds and three products prepared for consumption after 12-month storage: two frozen and one canned (sterilized. The former com­prised two types of frozen product: one traditionally produced (blanching-freezing-frozen storage-cooking, the other a convenience, "ready-to-eat" product obtained using a modified method (cooking-freezing-frozen storage-defrosting-heating to consumption temperature in a microwave oven. Results. In cooked bean seeds of both cultivars, levels of potassium, calcium, magnesium and copper were significantly lower, the only exception being the content of ash and sodium (due to added salt, than in blanched seeds; the changes in the remaining components were not so clear-cut and depended on the cultivar. Seeds frozen using the modified technology generally showed higher levels of the elements investigated than frozen products produced traditionally, with the exception of chromium, nickel and lead. Sterilized seeds had lower levels of ash, phosphorus, calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, manganese, copper and chromium com­pared with both types of frozen product; retention levels of individual components depended on the cultivar examined. Conclusions. Compared with the traditionally produced frozen product, prepared for consumption, seeds after modified method of freezing (convenience food contained significantly higher levels of ash and all macroelements, regardless of the cultivar. Seeds preserved by sterilization, compared with frozen seeds (ei­ther method of production prepared for consumption

  18. Comparison of AC electronic monitoring and field data for estimating tolerance to Empoasca kraemeri (Homoptera: Cicadellidae) in common bean genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, M S; Backus, E A; Cardona, C

    2000-12-01

    Two methods for estimating the tolerance of common bean genotypes to Empoasca kraemeri Ross & Moore were compared, using a yield trial carried out at Centro Internacional de Agricultura Tropical (CIAT), Cali, Colombia, versus stylet penetration tactics measured by AC electronic feeding monitors. A stylet penetration index was devised based on principal component scores of three penetration tactics identified (pulsing laceration, cell rupturing, and lancing sap ingestion), combined with knowledge of the hopperburn symptoms caused by each tactic. Tolerant genotypes, as classified by the CIAT yield index, showed significantly more unprotected yield and lower hopperburn scores than the susceptible control. They also induced performance of less pulsing laceration (the tactic considered most damaging to the plant), and more of the other two, mitigating tactics, especially cell rupturing. When index values were calculated for each genotype, stylet penetration index values matched those of the yield index for three out of five genotypes: two EMP-coded tolerant lines ('EMP 385' and 'EMP 392') and the susceptible control 'BAT 41'. Thus, for these three genotypes, all subsequent hoppereburn symptoms are predictable by the type of feeding behavior performed on them. 'Porrillo Sintético' and 'EMP 84', considered borderline genotypes by the yield index, were overestimated and underestimated respectively, by the stylet penetration index. We postulate that, for these two genotypes, plant physiological responses to feeding (either compensatory or heightened sensitivity, respectively) synergize with type of feeding performed to generate the overall hopperburn condition. This multivariate analysis of electronic monitoring data was successfully used to devise an index of resistance. The implications of using the stylet penetration index and the advantages of using electronic monitoring in a bean-breeding program are discussed.

  19. Identification of Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA Markers Linked to the Co-4 Resistance Gene to Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in Common Bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arruda, M C; Alzate-Marin, A L; Chagas, J M; Moreira, M A; de Barros, E G

    2000-07-01

    ABSTRACT New cultivars of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) with durable resistance to anthracnose can be developed by pyramiding major resistance genes using marker-assisted selection. To this end, it is necessary to identify sources of resistance and molecular markers tightly linked to the resistance genes. The objectives of this work were to study the inheritance of resistance to anthracnose in the cultivar TO (carrying the Co-4 gene), to identify random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers linked to Co-4, and to introgress this gene in the cultivar Rudá. Populations F(1), F(2), F(2:3), BC(1)s, and BC(1)r from the cross Rudá x TO were inoculated with race 65 of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, causal agent of bean anthracnose. The phenotypic ratios (resistant/susceptible) were 3:1 in the F(2) population, 1:1 in the BC(1)s, and 1:0 in the BC(1)r, confirming that resistance to anthracnose in the cultivar TO was monogenic and dominant. Six RAPD markers linked to the Co-4 gene were identified, four in the coupling phase: OPY20(830C) (0.0 centimorgan [cM]), OPC08(900C) (9.7 cM), OPI16(850C) (14.3 cM), and OPJ01(1,380C) (18.1 cM); and two in the repulsion phase: OPB03(1,800T) (3.7 cM) and OPA18(830T) (17.4 cM). OPY20(830C) and OPB03(1,800T), used in association as a codominant pair, allowed the identification of the three genotypic classes with a high degree of confidence. Marker OPY20(830C), which is tightly linked to Co-4, is being used to assist in breeding for resistance to anthracnose.

  20. Identification of clusters that condition resistance to anthracnose in the common bean differential cultivars AB136 and MDRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Ana; Trabanco, Noemi; Ferreira, Juan Jose

    2017-07-25

    The correct identification of the anthracnose resistance systems present in the common bean cultivars AB136 and MDRK is important because both are included in the set of 12 differential cultivars proposed for use in classifying the races of the anthracnose causal agent, Colletrotrichum lindemuthianum. In this work, the responses against seven C. lindemuthianum races were analyzed in a recombinant inbred line population derived from the cross AB136 x MDRK. A genetic linkage map of 100 molecular markers distributed across the 11 bean chromosomes was developed in this population to locate the gene or genes conferring resistance against each race, based on linkage analyses and chi-square tests of independence. The identified anthracnose resistance genes were organized in clusters. Two clusters were found in AB136: one located on linkage group Pv07, which corresponds to the anthracnose resistance cluster Co-5, and the other located at the end of linkage group Pv11, which corresponds to the Co-2 cluster. The presence of resistance genes at the Co-5 cluster in AB136 was validated through an allelism test conducted in the F2 population TU x AB136. The presence of resistance genes at the Co-2 cluster in AB136 was validated through genetic dissection using the F2:3 population ABM3 × MDRK, in which it was directly mapped to a genomic position between 46.01 and 47.77 Mb of chromosome Pv11. In MDRK, two independent clusters were identified: one located on linkage group Pv01, corresponding to the Co-1 cluster, and the second located on LG Pv04 corresponding to the Co-3 cluster. This report enhances the understanding of the race-specific P. vulgaris-C. lindemuthianum interactions and will be useful in breeding programs.

  1. Image based remote sensing method for modeling black-eyed beans (Vigna unguiculata) Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Crop Height (CH) over Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadavid, Giorgos; Fasoula, Dionysia; Hadjimitsis, Michael; Skevi Perdikou, P.; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Crop Height (CH) are modeled to the most known spectral vegetation index — NDVI — using remotely sensed data. This approach has advantages compared to the classic approaches based on a theoretical background. A GER-1500 field spectro-radiometer was used in this study in order to retrieve the necessary spectrum data for estimating a spectral vegetation index (NDVI), for establishing a semiempirical relationship between black-eyed beans' canopy factors and remotely sensed data. Such semi-empirical models can be used then for agricultural and environmental studies. A field campaign was undertaken with measurements of LAI and CH using the Sun-Scan canopy analyzer, acquired simultaneously with the spectroradiometric (GER1500) measurements between May and June of 2010. Field spectroscopy and remotely sensed imagery have been combined and used in order to retrieve and validate the results of this study. The results showed that there are strong statistical relationships between LAI or CH and NDVI which can be used for modeling crop canopy factors (LAI, CH) to remotely sensed data. The model for each case was verified by the factor of determination. Specifically, these models assist to avoid direct measurements of the LAI and CH for all the dates for which satellite images are available and support future users or future studies regarding crop canopy parameters.

  2. High light exposure on seed coat increases lipid accumulation in seeds of castor bean (Ricinus communis L.), a nongreen oilseed crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Mulpuri, Sujatha; Liu, Aizhong

    2016-05-01

    Little was known on how sunlight affects the seed metabolism in nongreen seeds. Castor bean (Ricinus communis L.) is a typical nongreen oilseed crop and its seed oil is an important feedstock in industry. In this study, photosynthetic activity of seed coat tissues of castor bean in natural conditions was evaluated in comparison to shaded conditions. Our results indicate that exposure to high light enhances photosynthetic activity in seed coats and consequently increases oil accumulation. Consistent results were also reached using cultured seeds. High-throughput RNA-Seq analyses further revealed that genes involved in photosynthesis and carbon conversion in both the Calvin-Benson cycle and malate transport were differentially expressed between seeds cultured under light and dark conditions, implying several venues potentially contributing to light-enhanced lipid accumulation such as increased reducing power and CO2 refixation which underlie the overall lipid biosynthesis. This study demonstrated the effects of light exposure on oil accumulation in nongreen oilseeds and greatly expands our understanding of the physiological roles that light may play during seed development in nongreen oilseeds. Essentially, our studies suggest that potential exists to enhance castor oil yield through increasing exposure of the inflorescences to sunlight either by genetically changing the plant architecture (smart canopy) or its growing environment.

  3. CULTIVAR RELEASE - BRSMG União: common bean cultivar with jalo grain for the state of Minas Gerais

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    Magno Antonio Patto Ramalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The bean cultivar BRSMG União as a new option of a bean cultivar with jalo grains for the state of Minas Gerais. The cultivar BRSMG União had an average grain yield of 9.8% above the mean of the controls (Jalo EEP 558 and BRS Radiante and was resistant to powdery-mildew.

  4. The bean polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein 2 (PvPGIP2) is highly conserved in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) germplasm and related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Anna; Rocchi, Valentina; Janni, Michela; Benedettelli, Stefano; De Lorenzo, Giulia; D'Ovidio, Renato

    2009-05-01

    Polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs) are extracellular plant protein inhibitors of endo-polygalacturonases (PGs) that belong to the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) protein family. In bean, PGIP is encoded by a small gene family of four members among which Pvpgip2 encodes the most wide-spectrum and efficient inhibitor of fungal PGs. In order to evaluate the sequence polymorphism of Pvpgip2 and its functional significance, we have analyzed a number of wild and cultivated bean (P. vulgaris) accessions of Andean and Mesoamerican origin, and some genotypes from the related species P. coccineus, P. acutifolius, and P. lunatus. Our analyses indicate that the protein encoded by Pvpgip2 is highly conserved in the bean germplasm. The few detected polymorphic sites correspond to synonymous substitutions and only two wild genotypes contain a Pvpgip2 with a single non-synonymous replacement. Sequence comparison showed a slightly larger variation in the related bean species P. coccineus, P. acutifolius, and P. lunatus and confirmed the known phylogenetic relationships with P. vulgaris. The majority of the replacements were within the xxLxLxx region of the leucine rich repeat (LRR) domain and none of them affected residues contributing to structural features. The variant PGIPs were expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana using PVX as vector and their inhibitory activity compared to that of PvPPGIP2. All the variants were able to fully inhibit the four fungal PGs tested with minor differences. Taken together these results support the hypothesis that the overall sequence conservation of PGIP2 and minor variation at specific sites is necessary for high-affinity recognition of different fungal PGs.

  5. MANEJO DA ADUBAÇÃO NITROGENADA NO FEIJOEIRO IRRIGADO SOB PLANTIO DIRETO MANAGEMENT OF NITROGEN FERTILIZATION IN IRRIGATED COMMON BEAN UNDER NO-TILLAGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Fernando Stone

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Os restos da cultura precedente deixados na superfície do solo, dependendo da relação C/N, podem afetar a disponibilidade de nitrogênio (N para o feijoeiro. Este trabalho objetivou estudar a resposta do feijoeiro irrigado, cultivado em sucessão ao milho, sob plantio direto, à adubação nitrogenada, aplicada em diferentes épocas e doses. O experimento foi conduzido em blocos ao acaso, com quatro repetições, no outono–inverno de 1999 e 2000, sob irrigação por aspersão em sistema pivô central, com a cultivar Aporé, em Latossolo Vermelho perférrico de textura argilosa, na Embrapa Arroz e Feijão, em Santo Antônio de Goiás, GO. Todos os tratamentos receberam 120 kg de N/ha durante o ciclo da cultura, parcelados ou não, aplicados vinte dias antes da semeadura, na semeadura e em cobertura. Realizaram-se os seguintes tratamentos: T1 (0-0-120 kg/ha, T2 (0-17,5-102,5 kg/ha, T3 (0-40-80 kg/ha, T4 (0-60-60 kg/ha, T5 (0-80-40 kg/ha, T6 (0-120-0 kg/ha, T7 (40-40-40 kg/ha, T8 (0-17,5-102,5 kg/ha e T9 (0-60-60 kg/ha, tendo os dois últimos a palhada do milho picada. O feijoeiro cultivado sob plantio direto necessitou de maior dose de nitrogênio na semeadura em relação à usualmente recomendada para o preparo convencional, sendo a dose mais adequada a de 60 kg/ha de N, independentemente de se ter mantido a palhada do milho inteira ou picada. Acima dessa dose, na semeadura, houve tendência de queda na produtividade do feijoeiro. Em contrapartida, verificou-se incremento na produtividade quando a palhada do milho foi picada.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Phaseolus vulgaris; parcelamento de N; palhada.

    Ground mulching can affect the availability of nitrogen to a common bean crop depending on the C/N relationship. The objective of this paper was to study the response

  6. A re-sequencing based assessment of genomic heterogeneity and fast neutron-induced deletions in a common bean cultivar

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    Jamie A. O'Rourke

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A small fast neutron mutant population has been established from Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Hawk. We leveraged the available P. vulgaris genome sequence and high throughput next generation DNA sequencing to examine the genomic structure of five Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Red Hawk fast neutron mutants with striking visual phenotypes. Analysis of these genomes identified three classes of structural variation; between cultivar variation, natural variation within the fast neutron mutant population, and fast neutron induced mutagenesis. Our analyses focused on the latter two classes. We identified 23 large deletions (>40 bp common to multiple individuals, illustrating residual heterogeneity and regions of structural variation within the common bean cv. Red Hawk. An additional 18 large deletions were identified in individual mutant plants. These deletions, ranging in size from 40 bp to 43,000 bp, are potentially the result of fast neutron mutagenesis. Six of the 18 deletions lie near or within gene coding regions, identifying potential candidate genes causing the mutant phenotype.

  7. Leaching and efficiency of six organic zinc fertilizers applied to navy bean crop grown in a weakly acidic soil of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, D; Novillo, J; Rico, M I; Alvarez, J M

    2008-05-14

    Zinc contamination of groundwater from fertilizers applied to pulse crops is a potential problem, but the use of different types of organic chelates can minimize the contamination potential while still adequately feeding the crops. The objective of this study was to compare the leaching, distribution in fractions and availability, and relative effectiveness of Zn from six organic Zn fertilizers (zinc-ethylenediaminetetraacetate- N-2-hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetate (Zn-EDTA-HEDTA), Zn-HEDTA, zinc- S, S'-ethylenediaminedisuccinate (Zn- S, S-EDDS), zinc-polyhydroxyphenylcarboxylate, Zn-EDTA, and zinc-ethylenediaminedi(2-hydroxy-5-sulfophenylacetate) (Zn-EDDHSA)) applied to a navy bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris, L.) crop cultivated by applying different Zn levels, in a weakly acidic soil under greenhouse conditions. Zinc soil behavior was evaluated by diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-triethanolamine (DTPA-TEA), DTPA-ammonium bicarbonate (DTPA-AB), Mehlich-3, and BaCl 2 extractions and sequential fractionation. In all the fertilizer treatments, the percentage of labile Zn that remained in the soil was high with respect to the quantity of Zn applied, with values respectively ranging from 42 to 80% for Zn-EDDHSA and Zn-EDTA sources. A positive correlation with a high level of significance existed between the micronutrient concentration in the navy bean crop (total and soluble) and labile Zn fractions, available Zn, and easily leachable Zn ( r ranged from 0.89 to 0.95, P < 0.0001). The relatively high quantity of total Zn leached by applying Zn-EDTA and Zn-S,S-EDDS sources (11.9 and 6.0%, respectively, for the rate 10 mg of Zn kg(-1) of soil) poses a potential pollution risk for neighboring waters. It would seem recommendable to apply Zn-HEDTA or Zn-EDDHSA sources, even applied at the low rate (5 mg of Zn kg(-1) of soil), because they produced available Zn concentrations in the soil that were above the critical concentration and also produced high Zn concentrations in

  8. Tamanho de grão comercial em cultivares de feijoeiro Commercial grain size in common bean cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Augusto Morais Carbonell

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Os objetivos do trabalho foram avaliar e indicar parâmetros de seleção para classificação de grãos de feijão que atendam as exigências do mercado consumidor. Foram instalados experimentos contendo 19 genótipos de feijoeiro em nove ambientes, no Estado de São Paulo. A produção de grãos foi estratificada em peneiras de classificação 10 (10/64" pol. a 15 (15/64" pol. e avaliada a produção relativa de grãos em peneiras 13 e 14, rendimento de peneira, massa de 1.000 grãos, tamanho de grãos e para os índices J=perfil e H=forma do grão. A produção relativa de grãos, rendimento de peneira, forma e perfil foram as características que apresentaram diferenças estatísticas significativas, indicando presença de variabilidade genética. Por meio da comparação dos resultados com testemunhas de feijoeiro já recomendadas para o setor produtivo, conclui-se que uma cultivar de feijoeiro deve apresentar alta massa de 1.000 grãos (251 a 300g, produção relativa de grãos em peneiras 13 e 14 com valores acima de sete, rendimento de peneira acima de 70,0% e também sementes elípticas e perfil semiachatado.The aim of this research was to evaluate and to direct the genetic parameters to classify the grain size of common bean, according to the market demand. Experiments with 19 common bean genotypes were assembled in nine sites in the São Paulo State. The grain yield was stratified following sieve classification 10 (10/64" inch to 15 (15/64" inch. The following parameters were evaluated: relative yield with 13 and 14 sieves, sieve yield, thousand grain weight, grain size, J and H indexes (J=grain profile; H=grain shape. The relative grain yield, sieve yield, shapes and grain profiles presented significant statistical differences, indicating the presence of genetic variability among the genotypes. Compared to the market recommended and productive checks, the results showed that a common bean cultivar should present high thousand grain

  9. Are Lotus species good models for studying iron accumulation in common beans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlowska, Elzbieta; Laszcyca, Katarzyna Malgorzata; Urbanski, Dorian Fabian

      Iron is an important micronutrient for all living organisms. Although iron is abundant in the Earth's crust, iron deficiency is a common problem throughout the food chain. Legume seeds have relatively high but also highly variable iron content. Little is known about the mechanisms controlling...

  10. Evidence for the endophytic colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris(common bean roots by the diazotroph Herbaspirillum seropedicae

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    M.A. Schmidt

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophytic diazotrophic bacterium, which associates with important agricultural plants. In the present study, we have investigated the attachment to and internal colonization of Phaseolus vulgaris roots by the H. seropedicae wild-type strain SMR1 and by a strain of H. seropedicae expressing a red fluorescent protein (DsRed to track the bacterium in the plant tissues. Two-day-old P. vulgaris roots were incubated at 30°C for 15 min with 6 x 10(8 CFU/mL H. seropedicae SMR1 or RAM4. Three days after inoculation, 4 x 10(4 cells of endophytic H. seropedicae SMR1 were recovered per gram of fresh root, and 9 days after inoculation the number of endophytes increased to 4 x 10(6 CFU/g. The identity of the recovered bacteria was confirmed by amplification and sequencing of the 16SrRNA gene. Furthermore, confocal microscopy of P. vulgaris roots inoculated with H. seropedicae RAM4 showed that the bacterial cells were attached to the root surface 15 min after inoculation; fluorescent bacteria were visible in the internal tissues after 24 h and were found in the central cylinder after 72 h, showing that H. seropedicae RAM4 is capable of colonizing the roots of the dicotyledon P. vulgaris. Determination of dry weight of common bean inoculated with H. seropedicae SMR1 suggested that this bacterium has a negative effect on the growth of P. vulgaris.

  11. Genetic dissection of ICP-detected nutrient accumulation in the whole seed of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Blair

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient transport to grain legume seeds is not well studied and can benefit from modern methods of elemental analysis including spectroscopic techniques. Some cations such as potassium (K and magnesium (Mg are needed for plant physiological purposes. Meanwhile, some minerals such as copper (Cu, iron (Fe, molybdenum (Mo and zinc (Zn are important micronutrients. Phosphorus (P is rich in legumes, while sulfur (S concentration is related to essential amino acids. In this research, the goal was to analyze a genetic mapping population of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. with inductively coupled plasma (ICP spectrophotometry to determine concentrations of and to discover quantitative trait loci (QTL for 15 elements in ground flour of whole seeds. The population was grown in randomized complete block design experiments that had been used before to analyze Fe and Zn. A total of 21 QTL were identified for 9 additional elements, of which four QTL were found for Cu followed by three each for Mg, Mn and P. Fewer QTL were found for K, Na and S. Boron (B and calcium (Ca had only one QTL each. The utility of the QTL for breeding adaptation to element deficient soils and association with previously discovered nutritional loci are discussed.

  12. Evaluation of foliar phenols of 25 Mexican varieties of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) as antioxidants and varietal markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Martínez, Alfonso; Almaraz-Abarca, Norma; Gallardo-Velázquez, Tzayhri; González-Elizondo, María Del Socorro; Herrera-Arrieta, Yolanda; Pajarito-Ravelero, Arnulfo; Alanís-Bañuelos, Ruth Elizabeth; Torres-Morán, Martha Isabel

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidant properties and the foliar phenol composition of 25 Mexican varieties of Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean) were evaluated. Phaseolus coccineus was analysed with comparative aims. The high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection analysis revealed 27 phenolics in the leaves of P. vulgaris (13 quercetin-3-O-glycosides, 8 kaempferol-3-O-glycosides, 2 myricetin glycosides and 4 phenolic acids) and 5 in P. coccineus (2 kaempferol-3-O-glycoside, 2 apigenin-7-O-glycoside and 1 luteolin-7-O-glycoside). All extracts showed high levels of phenols and flavonoids (0.964-5.601 mg g⁻¹ dry tissue, and 0.287-1.418 mg g⁻¹ dry tissue, respectively) and relevant antioxidant properties, suggesting that the leaves of the varieties of P. vulgaris are a significant source of natural antioxidants. The foliar phenol profiles were species-specific and, besides, the qualitative variation allowed discriminating among varieties of P. vulgaris. These profiles can represent an important varietal authenticity proof.

  13. Isolation and characterization of 13 new polymorphic microsatellite markers in the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Common Bean) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aihua; Ding, Yi; Hu, Zhenhua; Lin, Chufa; Wang, Shuzhen; Wang, Bingcai; Zhang, Hongyuan; Zhou, Guolin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 13 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated from the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean) by using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequence COntaining Repeats (FIASCO) protocol. These markers revealed two to seven alleles, with an average of 3.64 alleles per locus. The polymorphic information content (PIC) values ranged from 0.055 to 0.721 over 13 loci, with a mean value of 0.492, and 7 loci having PIC greater than 0.5. The expected heterozygosity (H(E)) and observed heterozygosity (H(O)) levels ranged from 0.057 to 0.814 and from 0.026 to 0.531, respectively. Cross-species amplification of the 13 prime pairs was performed in its related specie of Vigna unguiculata L. Seven out of all these markers showed cross-species transferability. These markers will be useful for future genetic diversity and population genetics studies for this agricultural specie and its related species.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of 13 New Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers in the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (Common Bean Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 13 polymorphic microsatellite markers were isolated from the Phaseolus vulgaris L. (common bean by using the Fast Isolation by AFLP of Sequence COntaining Repeats (FIASCO protocol. These markers revealed two to seven alleles, with an average of 3.64 alleles per locus. The polymorphic information content (PIC values ranged from 0.055 to 0.721 over 13 loci, with a mean value of 0.492, and 7 loci having PIC greater than 0.5. The expected heterozygosity (HE and observed heterozygosity (HO levels ranged from 0.057 to 0.814 and from 0.026 to 0.531, respectively. Cross-species amplification of the 13 prime pairs was performed in its related specie of Vigna unguiculata L. Seven out of all these markers showed cross-species transferability. These markers will be useful for future genetic diversity and population genetics studies for this agricultural specie and its related species.

  15. Analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., genotype BAT93 calmodulin cDNA using computational tools

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    Kassim Amelia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is an important part of the human diet and serves as a source of natural products. Identification and understanding of genes in P. vulgaris is important for its improvement. Characterization of expressed sequence tags (ESTs is one of the approaches in understanding the expressed genes. For the understanding of genes expression in P. vulgaris pod-tissue, research work of ESTs generation was initiated by constructing cDNA libraries using 5-day and 20-day old bean-pod-tissues. Altogether, 5972 cDNA clones were isolated to have ESTs. While processing ESTs, we found a transcript for calmodulin (CaM gene. It is an important gene that encodes for a calcium-binding protein and known to express in all eukaryotic cells. Hence, this study was undertaken to analyse and annotate it. Objective: The objective of this study was to analyze and annotate P. vulgaris CaM (PvCaM gene cDNA and its deduced protein (amino acids sequence. Materials and Methods: Both strands of PvCaM cDNA clone were sequenced using M13 forward and reverse primer to elucidate the nucleotide sequence. The cDNA sequence and deduced protein sequence were analyzed and annotated using bioinformatics tools available online. The secondary structures and three-dimensional (3D structure of PvCaM protein were predicted using the Phyre automatic fold recognition server. Results: Results showed that PvCaM cDNA is 818 bp in length. The cDNA analysis results showed that it contains an open reading frame that encodes for 149 amino acid residues. The deduced protein sequence analysis results showed the presence of conserved domains required for CaM function. The predicted secondary structures and 3D structure are analogous to the Solanum tuberosum CaM. Conclusions: This study analyzed and annotated PvCaM cDNA and protein. However, in order to obtain a complete understanding of PvCaM protein, further study on its expression, structure and regulation is

  16. THE EFFECT OF SALINITY AND NITROGEN DEFICIENCY ON THE CHANGES IN SELECTED PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF COMMON BEAN (PHASEOLEUS VULGARIS L. GROWN IN HYDROPONIC CULTURES

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    Jacek Wróbel

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the physiological activity of common bean grown under the conditions of stress being induced by salinity and nitrogen deficiency and its lack in substrate. Three series of two-factorial hydroponic experiment with the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. cultivar Basta were carried out from May to July in 2013–2014. The first experimental factor was three levels of nitrogen content in a Hoagland hydroponic medium (level 1 – a complete medium, level 2 – without 50% N, level 3 – without 100% N. The second experimental factor was three levels of medium salinity (level 1 – no NaCl addition, level 2 – 30 mM NaCl addition, level 3 – 50 mM NaCl addition. Nitrogen deficiency in a Hoagland hydroponic medium, together with increased salinity level, significantly affected the changes in the physiological parameters of the common bean cultivar Basta being tested, i.e. assimilation pigment concentration (chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b and chlorophyll-a+b and carotenoids, assimilation and transpiration intensities, and RWC (relative water content. The 50% nitrogen deficiency in medium induced a significant increase in the concentration of all assimilation pigments in common bean leaves and was by far the highest among the experimental variants being tested. A significant decrease in the content of assimilation pigments was observed in the hydroponic mediums without nitrogen and salined with 30 and 50 mM sodium chloride. The interaction of these two experimental factors being analysed, i.e. nitrogen deficiency and its lack in a Hoagland hydroponic medium and its salinity, significantly decreased the intensity of assimilation in bean leaves, while a significant increase in transpiration was observed in the variant without nitrogen and with 50 mM NaCl. The experimental variants being tested had a significant effect on the changes in leaf water balance of the common bean cultivar being tested. Salinity, in interaction with

  17. Morphological, Phenological And Agronomical Characterisation Of Variability Among Common Bean (Phaseolus Vulgaris L. Local Populations From The National Centre For Plant Genetic Resources: Polish Genebank

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    Boros Lech

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this work was to analyse the morphological, phenological and agronomical variability among common bean local populations from The National Centre for Plant Genetic Resources, Polish Genebank, in order to know the relation among them, and to identify potentially useful accessions for future production and breeding. A considerable genotypic variation for number of seeds per plant, number of pods per plant and weight of seeds per plant were found. Studied bean accessions differed significantly in terms of thousand seeds weight (TSW as well as severity of bacterial halo blight and anthracnose, the major bean diseases. The lowest genotypic diversity was found for the percentage of protein in the seeds, the length of the vegetation period and lodging. The cluster analysis allowed identification of five groups of bean accessions. Genotypes from the first cluster (POLPOD 98-77, KOS 002 and Raba cv. and from the second cluster (WUKR 06-573a, KRA 4, WUKR 06-0534 together with Prosna cv. are of the highest usefulness for breeding purposes. There was no grouping of local populations depending on region of origin.

  18. A comprehensive assessment of the correlations between field crop yields and commonly used MODIS products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David M.

    2016-10-01

    An exploratory assessment was undertaken to determine the correlation strength and optimal timing of several commonly used Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) composited imagery products against crop yields for 10 globally significant agricultural commodities. The crops analyzed included barley, canola, corn, cotton, potatoes, rice, sorghum, soybeans, sugarbeets, and wheat. The MODIS data investigated included the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR), Leaf Area Index (LAI), and Gross Primary Production (GPP), in addition to daytime Land Surface Temperature (DLST) and nighttime LST (NLST). The imagery utilized all had 8-day time intervals, but NDVI had a 250 m spatial resolution while the other products were 1000 m. These MODIS datasets were also assessed from both the Terra and Aqua satellites, with their differing overpass times, to document any differences. A follow-on analysis, using the Terra 250 m NDVI data as a benchmark, looked at the yield prediction utility of NDVI at two spatial scales (250 m vs. 1000 m), two time precisions (8-day vs. 16-day), and also assessed the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI, at 250 m, 16-day). The analyses spanned the major farming areas of the United States (US) from the summers of 2008-2013 and used annual county-level average crop yield data from the US Department of Agriculture as a basis. All crops, except rice, showed at least some positive correlations to each of the vegetation related indices in the middle of the growing season, with NDVI performing slightly better than FPAR. LAI was somewhat less strongly correlated and GPP weak overall. Conversely, some of the crops, particularly canola, corn, and soybeans, also showed negative correlations to DLST mid-summer. NLST, however, was never correlated to crop yield, regardless of the crop or seasonal timing. Differences between the Terra and Aqua results were found to be minimal. The 1000 m

  19. Fiber and nonstarch polysaccharide content and variation in common crops used in broiler diets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

    2014-01-01

    AX, but β-glucan can also be present mainly in rye and wheat brans. The CW composition of seeds and grains of protein crops and feedstuffs are different from that of cereals. The main CW polymers are pectic substances (homogalacturonan, rhamnogalacturonan type I and II, xylogalacturonan......The current paper reviews content and variation in fiber and nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) of common crops used in broiler diets. The cereal grain is a complex structure, and its cell walls (CW) differ in their composition and hence properties. Arabinoxylan (AX), mixed linkage (1→3; 1→4)-β......-glucan (β-glucan), cellulose, and the noncarbohydrate component lignin are the predominant polymers in cereals. They occur in different proportions depending on the species and tissue type. Rye, triticale, wheat, corn, and sorghum are all rich in AX, whereas barley and oats contain a high level of β...

  20. 一种新发现的侵染绿豆的菜豆普通花叶病毒分子鉴定%Molecular Identification of a Newly Discovered Bean common mosaic virus Infection of Mung Bean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈良; 崔瑾; 夏妍; 崔晓艳; 陈新

    2014-01-01

    This study was performed to identify one isolate with wizened ,mottle and vein clearing mosaic symp-tom collected from greenhouse mung bean(Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek)in Jangsu.We used electron micrograph, PCR,determination of nucleotide sequence and ELISA .We can see the characteristics of the virus under transmis-sion electron microscopy .We used Potyvirus universal primers for RT-PCR,found the symptom was caused by Bean common mosaic virus(BCMV).This isolate was called BCWV-JAAS.The nucleotides sequences of the genes from the isolate shared homologies from 95% with reported BCMV-HB.Total RNA was amplified by RT-PCR with the specific primers designed on the basis of the reported coat protein gene of Bean common mosaic virus( BCMV) .An 1 082 bp gene fragment was amplified from total RNA of isolate ,and subsequent sequence analysis indicated that the 862 bp fragment contained complete cp gene which encoded 228 amino acids.By amplification cp genes and construct phylogenetic trees get BCMV-JAAS with other Chinese isolates of BCMV have a close genetic relationship . We performed the virus samples by ELISA ,the results shown positive we ensured that was infecting by Bean com-mon mosaic virus(BCMV) to cause the mung bean plant disease .This is the first time found the mung bean was in-fected by BCMV in China .%为确定从江苏省农科院蔬菜所温室大棚所采集到的表现花叶、皱缩、明脉症状的绿豆植株是由何种病毒引起的,采取了透射电子显微镜观察、RT-PCR、序列测序以及酶联免疫吸附法( ELISA)等方法进行鉴定。结果表明,在透射电镜下可观察到风轮状、束状病毒内含体,与Potyvirus属病毒粒子形态一致;对所提取的病样总RNA使用Poty-virus通用引物进行RT-PCR扩增,得到由1082个核苷酸组成的序列,包含编码228个氨基酸的完整cp基因,产物通过NCBI比对,发现和已报道的菜豆普通花叶病毒( Bean common mosaic virus,BCMV) HB

  1. Coated potassium choride in residual effect on winter common bean irrigated in Cerrado regionCloreto de potássio revestido em efeito residual no feijoeiro de inverno irrigado na região de cerrado

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    Mateus Augusto de Carvalho Rodrigues

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to maintain the nutrients available to plants have been studied controlled release fertilizers. In this context, the objective was to evaluate the residual effect of doses of potassium chloride, coated or not, applied in the corn crop, regarding the crop components and grains yield of irrigated winter common bean, cultivated in followed, in Cerrado region. The experiment was conducted in Selvíria – MS, Brazil, 51°22’ west longitude and 20°22’ south latitude, in a clayey Oxisol, in 2009 and 2010. A randomized block design with four repetitions was used, disposed in a factorial scheme 4 x 2, being: four K2O doses (0, 40, 80 and 120 kg ha-1 and two potassium sources (potassium chloride and coated potassium chloride by polymers applied at sowing in the corn crop. The coated potassium chloride by polymers have the same residual effect as conventional KCl, because it provides results similar for the K and chlorophyll leaf contents, crop components and grains yield of winter common bean irrigated. The increment of potassium doses in the previous crop (corn have residual effect, because it influenced positively the number of grains per plant in 2009 and increased linearly the chlorophyll leaf content and the grains yield of winter common bean irrigated in 2010, regardless of the source used for K.Com a finalidade de manter os nutrientes disponíveis para as plantas têm-se buscado fertilizantes de liberação controlada. Neste contexto, objetivou-se avaliar o efeito residual de doses de potássio usando cloreto de potássio e cloreto de potássio revestido por polímeros, aplicados na cultura do milho, nos componentes de produção e a produtividade do feijoeiro de inverno irrigado, cultivado em sucessão, em condições de cerrado. O experimento foi conduzido em Selvíria – MS, com coordenadas geográficas de 51o 22” de longitude Oeste e 20o 22” de latitude Sul, num Latossolo Vermelho distrófico de textura argilosa, em 2009 e

  2. Multivariate analysis and determination of the best indirect selection criteria to genetic improvement the biological nitrogen fixation ability in common bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

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    Golparvar Reza Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the best indirect selection criteria for genetic improvement of biological nitrogen fixation, sixty four common bean genotypes were cultivated in two randomized complete block design. Genotypes were inoculated with bacteria Rhizobium legominosarum biovar Phaseoli isolate L-109 only in one of the experiments. The second experiment was considered as check for the first. Correlation analysis showed positive and highly significant correlation of majority of the traits with percent of nitrogen fixation. Step-wise regression designated that traits percent of total nitrogen of shoot, number of nodule per plant and biological yield accounted for 92.3 percent of variation exist in percent of nitrogen fixation. Path analysis indicated that these traits have direct and positive effect on percent of nitrogen fixation. Hence, these traits are promising indirect selection criteria for genetic improvement of nitrogen fixation capability in common bean genotypes especially in early generations.

  3. Qualidade nutricional e tecnológica de genótipos de feijão cultivados em diferentes safras agrícolas Nutritional and technological quality of common bean genotypes cultivaded in different seasons

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    Rogério Farinelli

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O feijão é um dos alimentos mais produzidos em todo o território nacional, sendo intensa a busca por cultivares produtivas, adaptadas ao local de cultivo e com boas características culinárias. Assim, este trabalho foi desenvolvido com o objetivo de avaliar o comportamento de genótipos de feijoeiro, quanto ao teor de proteína, tempo para cozimento e capacidade de hidratação dos grãos. O experimento foi desenvolvido em três safras, correspondendo às épocas da "seca" 2005, das "águas" 2005 e da "seca" 2006. O delineamento experimental utilizado foi o de blocos casualizados, com 24 tratamentos, representados pelos genótipos de feijoeiro dos grupos comerciais Carioca e Preto, com quatro repetições. Os grãos de feijão produzidos na safra das "águas" 2005 tiveram maior tempo médio para cozimento, menor teor de proteína bruta e maior tempo para máxima hidratação. Os genótipos LP 98-20 e CNFC 9494 (Grupo comercial Carioca, como também as cultivares Graúna e IAC Una (Grupo comercial Preto destacaram-se quanto ao menor tempo para cozimento nas três safras estudadas, enquanto Gen 96A10, CNFC 9484 (Ambos do grupo comercial Carioca e CNFP 10138 (Grupo comercial Preto destacaram-se em relação aos demais pela baixa porcentagem de grãos de casca dura e menor tempo para a máxima hidratação dos grãos.The common bean is one of the most cultivated crops in the Brazil, and thus, the search for cultivars that are more productive, adapted to the environment and have good cooking characteristics is intense. The objective of this study was to assess the behavior of different common bean genotypes in relation to protein content, cooking time and hydration capacity. The experiment was carried out during three successive crop seasons, including the dry and rainy seasons of 2005 and the dry season of 2006. The experiment was designed in a randomized blocks, with 24 treatments represented by the common bean genotypes (Carioca and Black

  4. Saturation of an intra-gene pool linkage map: towards a unified consensus linkage map for fine mapping and synteny analysis in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Carlos H; Fernandez, Andrea C; Franco-Herrera, Natalia; Cichy, Karen A; McClean, Phillip E; Vanderleyden, Jos; Blair, Matthew W

    2011-01-01

    Map-based cloning and fine mapping to find genes of interest and marker assisted selection (MAS) requires good genetic maps with reproducible markers. In this study, we saturated the linkage map of the intra-gene pool population of common bean DOR364 × BAT477 (DB) by evaluating 2,706 molecular markers including SSR, SNP, and gene-based markers. On average the polymorphism rate was 7.7% due to the narrow genetic base between the parents. The DB linkage map consisted of 291 markers with a total map length of 1,788 cM. A consensus map was built using the core mapping populations derived from inter-gene pool crosses: DOR364 × G19833 (DG) and BAT93 × JALO EEP558 (BJ). The consensus map consisted of a total of 1,010 markers mapped, with a total map length of 2,041 cM across 11 linkage groups. On average, each linkage group on the consensus map contained 91 markers of which 83% were single copy markers. Finally, a synteny analysis was carried out using our highly saturated consensus maps compared with the soybean pseudo-chromosome assembly. A total of 772 marker sequences were compared with the soybean genome. A total of 44 syntenic blocks were identified. The linkage group Pv6 presented the most diverse pattern of synteny with seven syntenic blocks, and Pv9 showed the most consistent relations with soybean with just two syntenic blocks. Additionally, a co-linear analysis using common bean transcript map information against soybean coding sequences (CDS) revealed the relationship with 787 soybean genes. The common bean consensus map has allowed us to map a larger number of markers, to obtain a more complete coverage of the common bean genome. Our results, combined with synteny relationships provide tools to increase marker density in selected genomic regions to identify closely linked polymorphic markers for indirect selection, fine mapping or for positional cloning.

  5. Fine mapping of Co-x, an anthracnose resistance gene to a highly virulent strain of Colletotrichum lindemuthianum in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Manon M S; Pflieger, Stéphanie; Sévignac, Mireille; Thareau, Vincent; Blanchet, Sophie; Li, Yupeng; Jackson, Scott A; Geffroy, Valérie

    2014-07-01

    The Co - x anthracnose R gene of common bean was fine-mapped into a 58 kb region at one end of chromosome 1, where no canonical NB-LRR-encoding genes are present in G19833 genome sequence. Anthracnose, caused by the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, is one of the most damaging diseases of common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. Various resistance (R) genes, named Co-, conferring race-specific resistance to different strains of C. lindemuthianum have been identified. The Andean cultivar JaloEEP558 was reported to carry Co-x on chromosome 1, conferring resistance to the highly virulent strain 100. To fine map Co-x, 181 recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross between JaloEEP558 and BAT93 were genotyped with polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based markers developed using the genome sequence of the Andean genotype G19833. Analysis of RILs carrying key recombination events positioned Co-x at one end of chromosome 1 to a 58 kb region of the G19833 genome sequence. Annotation of this target region revealed eight genes: three phosphoinositide-specific phospholipases C (PI-PLC), one zinc finger protein and four kinases, suggesting that Co-x is not a classical nucleotide-binding leucine-rich encoding gene. In addition, we identified and characterized the seven members of common bean PI-PLC gene family distributed into two clusters located at the ends of chromosomes 1 and 8. Co-x is not a member of Co-1 allelic series since these two genes are separated by at least 190 kb. Comparative analysis between soybean and common bean revealed that the Co-x syntenic region, located at one end of Glycine max chromosome 18, carries Rhg1, a major QTL contributing to soybean cyst nematode resistance. The PCR-based markers generated in this study should be useful in marker-assisted selection for pyramiding Co-x with other R genes.

  6. Minor crops for export: a case study of boscalid, pyraclostrobin, lufenuron and lambda-cyhalothrin residue levels on green beans and spring onions in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi, Ahmad; Garau, Vincenzo L; Caboni, Pierluigi; Sarais, Giorgia; Cabras, Paolo

    2010-08-01

    Dissipation rates of boscalid [2-chloro-N-(4' -chlorobiphenyl-2-yl)nicotinamide], pyraclostrobin [methyl 2-[1-(4-chlorophenyl) pyrazol-3-yloxymethyl]-N-methoxycarbanilate], lufenuron [(RS)-1-[2,5-dichloro-4-(1,1,2,3,3,3-hexafluoropropoxy)phenyl]-3-(2,6-difluorobenzoyl)urea] and lambda-cyhalothrin [(R)-cyano(3-phenoxyphenyl)methyl (1S,3S)-rel-3-[(1Z)-2-chloro-3,3,3-trifluoro-1-propenyl]-2,2-dimethylcyclopropanecarboxylate] in green beans and spring onions under Egyptian field conditions were studied. Field trials were carried out in 2008 in a Blue Nile farm, located at 70 kilometer (km) from Cairo (Egypt). The pesticides were sprayed at the recommended rate and samples were collected at pre-determined intervals. After treatment (T(0)) the pesticide residues in green beans were 7 times lower than in spring onions. This is due to a different structure of vegetable plant in the two crops. In spring onions, half-life (t(1/2)) of pyraclostrobin and lufenuron was 3.1 days and 9.8 days respectively. At day 14th (T(14)) after treatment boscalid residues were below the Maximum Residue Limit (MRL) (0.34 versus 0.5 mg/kg), pyraclostrobin and lambda -cyhalothrin residues were not detectable (ND), while lufenuron residues were above the MRL (0.06 versus 0.02 mg/kg). In green beans, at T(0), levels of boscalid, lufenuron and lambda -cyhalothrin were below the MRL (0.28 versus 2 mg/kg; ND versus 0.02 mg/kg; 0.06 versus 0.2 mg/kg, respectively) while, after 7 days treatment (T(7)) pyraclostrobin residues were above the MRL (0.03 versus 0.02 mg/kg). However, after 14 days the residue level could go below the MRL (0.02 mg/kg), as observed in spring onions.

  7. Governing the management and use of pooled microbial genetic resources: Lessons from the global crop commons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Halewood

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper highlights lessons learned over the last thirty years establishing a governance structure for the global crop commons that are of relevance to current champions of the microbial commons. It argues that the political, legal and biophysical situation in which microbial genetic resources (and their users are located today are similar to the situation of plant genetic resources in the mid-1990s, before the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources was negotiated. Consequently, the paper suggests that it may be useful to look to the model of global network of ex situ plant genetic resources collections as a precedent to follow – even if only loosely – in developing an intergovernmentally endorsed legal substructure and governance framework for the microbial commons.

  8. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Varieties of Genetically Modified (GM) Embrapa 5.1 Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and Their Non-GM Counterparts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Geisi M; Valentim-Neto, Pedro A; Mello, Carla S; Arisi, Ana C M

    2015-12-01

    The genetically modified (GM) common bean event Embrapa 5.1 was commercially approved in Brazil in 2011; it is resistant to golden mosaic virus infection. In the present work grain proteome profiles of two Embrapa 5.1 common bean varieties, Pérola and Pontal, and their non-GM counterparts were compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) followed by mass spectrometry (MS). Analyses detected 23 spots differentially accumulated between GM Pérola and non-GM Pérola and 21 spots between GM Pontal and non-GM Pontal, although they were not the same proteins in Pérola and Pontal varieties, indicating that the variability observed may not be due to the genetic transformation. Among them, eight proteins were identified in Pérola varieties, and four proteins were identified in Pontal. Moreover, we applied principal component analysis (PCA) on 2-DE data, and variation between varieties was explained in the first two principal components. This work provides a first 2-DE-MS/MS-based analysis of Embrapa 5.1 common bean grains.

  9. The Qualitative Differences for Photosynthetic Content of Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Populations  in Kosovo

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    Sali Ali ALIU

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity analysis of common bean populations is useful for breeding programs, as it helps to select genetic material to be used for further crossings. Twenty (20 common bean populations were analyzed using qualitative traits, chlorophyll “a” (Chl ‘a’, chlorophyll “b” (Chl ‘b’, total chlorophyll “a+b” (Total Chl and carotenoides. The design of the experiment was conducted with leaves of common bean collected from different regions of Kosovo. The experiment was completely randomly with four repetitions. Pigments were extracted by grinding 80-100 mg freshly sampled leaves in 80% (v/v acetone/water containing MgCO3, at room temperature, preserved in the dark for 24 hours. Concentration of chlorophyll and carotenoid content was measured by spectrophotometer using absorbance recorded at 663 nm, 644 nm and 452.3 nm for maximum absorption of Chl ‘a’, Chl ‘b’, and carotenoids respectively. According to our data the differences between populations for Chl ‘a’, and Chl ‘b’ was significantly higher at level of probability LSDp=0.01. The average values for Chl ‘a’, was 1.67 mg.g-1, while for Chl‘b’was 0.74 mg.g-1. In addition, the results for carotenoids content between populations were with high differences.

  10. Shoot and Root Traits Contribute to Drought Resistance in Recombinant Inbred Lines of MD 23–24 × SEA 5 of Common Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polania, Jose; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Cajiao, Cesar; Grajales, Miguel; Rivera, Mariela; Velasquez, Federico; Raatz, Bodo; Beebe, Stephen E.

    2017-01-01

    Drought is the major abiotic stress factor limiting yield of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in smallholder systems in Latin America and eastern and southern Africa; where it is a main source of protein in the daily diet. Identification of shoot and root traits associated with drought resistance contributes to improving the process of designing bean genotypes adapted to drought. Field and greenhouse studies were conducted at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Palmira, Colombia to determine the relationship between grain yield and different shoot and root traits using a recombinant inbred lines (RILs) population (MD23–24 × SEA 5) of common bean. The main objectives of this study were to identify: (i) specific shoot and root morpho-physiological traits that contribute to improved resistance to drought and that could be useful as selection criteria in breeding beans for drought resistance; and (ii) superior genotypes with desirable shoot and root traits that could serve as parents in breeding programs that are aimed at improving drought resistance. A set of 121 bean genotypes (111 RILs, 2 parents, 8 checks) belonging to the Mesoamerican gene pool and one cowpea variety were evaluated under field conditions with two levels of water supply (irrigated and rainfed) over three seasons. To complement field studies, a greenhouse study was conducted using plastic cylinders with soil inserted into PVC pipes, to determine the relationship between grain yield obtained under field conditions with different root traits measured under greenhouse conditions. Resistance to drought stress was positively associated with a deeper and vigorous root system, better shoot growth, and superior mobilization of photosynthates to pod and seed production. The drought resistant lines differed in their root characteristics, some of them with a vigorous and deeper root system while others with a moderate to shallow root system. Among the shoot traits measured, pod

  11. Gis-Based Crop Support System For Common Oatand Naked Oat in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Fan; Wang, Zhen; Li, Fengmin; Cao, Huhua; Sun, Guojun

    The identification of the suitable areas for common oat (Avena sativa L.) and naked oat (Avena nuda L.) in China using Multi-Criteria Evaluation (MCE) approach based on GIS is presented in the current article. Climate, topography, soil, land use and oat variety databases were created. Relevant criteria,suitability levels and their weights for each factor were defined. Then the criteria maps were obtained and turned into the MCE process, and suitability maps for common oat and naked oat were created. The land use and the suitability maps were crossed to identify the suitable areas for each crop. The results identified 397,720 km2 of suitable areas for common oats of forage purpose distributed in 744 counties in 17 provinces, and 556,232 km2 of suitable areas for naked oats of grain purpose distributed in 779 counties in 19 provinces. This result is in accordance with the distribution of farmingpastoral ecozones located i