WorldWideScience

Sample records for commercial nuclear units

  1. Commercial nuclear power 1988: Prospects for the United States and the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. This report presents three different nuclear supply scenarios. The Optimistic-case scenario, included in previous issues of this report, has been deleted. 7 figs; 36 tabs

  2. Summary data for U.S. commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1978-01-01

    A compilation of data is presented for all United States commercial nuclear power plants for which a construction permit application was made through the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The data are compiled in four separate tables with cross-referencing indexes: Table 1--General Data; Table 2--Reactor Data; Table 3--Site Data, and Table 4--Circulating-Water System Data. The power plants are listed in numerical order by docket number in all four tables

  3. Start up and commercial operation of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant. Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Ramirez, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Prior to start up of Laguna Verde nuclear power plant preoperational tests and start tests were performed and they are described in its more eminent aspects. In relation to commercial operation of nuclear station a series of indicator were set to which allow the measurement of performance in unit 1, in areas of plant efficiency and personal safety. Antecedents. Laguna Verde station is located in Alto Lucero municipality in Veracruz state, 70 kilometers north-northeast from port of Veracruz and a 290 kilometers east-northeast from Mexico city. The station consist of two units manufactured by General Electric, with a nuclear system of vapor supply also called boiling water (BWR/5), and with a system turbine-generator manufactured by Mitsubishi. Each unit has a nominal power of 1931 MWt and a level design power of 675 Mwe and a net power of 654 Electric Megawatts

  4. Commercial nuclear power 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents historical data on commercial nuclear power in the United States, with projections of domestic nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2020. The report also gives country-specific projections of nuclear capacity and generation through the year 2010 for other countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information is also presented regarding operable reactors and those under construction in countries with centrally planned economies. 39 tabs

  5. Summary of inspection findings of licensee inservice testing programs at United States commercial nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunlop, A.; Colaccino, J.

    1996-12-01

    Periodic inspections of pump and valve inservice testing (IST) programs in United States commercial nuclear power plants are performed by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regional Inspectors to verify licensee regulatory compliance and licensee commitments. IST inspections are conducted using NRC Inspection Procedure 73756, {open_quotes}Inservice Testing of Pumps and Valves{close_quotes} (IP 73756), which was updated on July 27, 1995. A large number of IST inspections have also been conducted using Temporary Instruction 2515/114, {open_quotes}Inspection Requirements for Generic Letter 89-04, Acceptable Inservice Testing Programs{close_quotes} (TI-2515/114), which was issued January 15, 1992. A majority of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants have had an IST inspection to either IP 73756 or TI 2515/114. This paper is intended to summarize the significant and recurring findings from a number of these inspections since January of 1990.

  6. Can we Plan. The political economy of commercial nuclear energy policy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.L. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The dissertation is an analysis of the commercial nuclear energy sector's decline in the United States. The research attempts to reconcile the debate between Weberian-institutional and Marxist political theory about the state's inability to successfully plan industrial development in advanced capitalist countries. Synthesizing these views, the central hypothesis guiding the research is that the greater the state's relative autonomy from political and economic constraints in an institutional sense, i.e., the greater its insulation from the contradictions of capitalism and democracy, the greater its planning capacity and the more successful it will be in directing industrial performance. The research examines one industrial sector, commercial nuclear energy, and draws two major comparison. First, the French and US nuclear industries are compared, since the state's relative autonomy is much greater in the former than in the latter. This comparison is developed to identify policy areas where nuclear planning has succeeded in France but failed in America. Four areas are identified: reactor standardization, waste management, reactor safety, and financing. Second, looking particularly at the US, the policy areas are compared to analyze the development of policy and its effects on the sector's performance and to determine the degree to which planning was undermined by the structural constraints characteristic of a state with low relative autonomy

  7. Decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities: a review and analysis of current regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schilling, A.H.; Lippek, H.E.; Tegeler, P.D.; Easterling, J.D.

    1979-08-01

    This report describes and analyzes the regulatory requirements and guidelines applicable to the decommissioning of commercial light water reactors, other commercial nuclear fuel cycle facilities, and byproduct utilization facilities, as contained principally in the United States Code, the United States Code of Federal Regulations, and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Regulatory Guides. State requirements are discussed where appropriate. The report provides general background informaion to license applicants and to other interested parties. Included is an outline of procedural steps required of an applicant to comply with decommissioning regulatory requiremets

  8. Commercial nuclear power: prospects for the United States and the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This analysis report presents the current status and outlook for commercial nuclear power reactors for all countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information regarding operable reactors in countries with centrally planned economies is presented in an appendix. The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 1995. Projections for US nuclear capacity and generation through 2020 are presented for various nuclear power supply scenarios. These long-term projections are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 and are used to produce the projections of fuel cycle requirements and spent fuel discharges

  9. The Price-Anderson Act: A Linchpin in the Development of Commercial Nuclear Power in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quattrocchi, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The dawn of the atomic age brought with it both the hope of great benefit and the fear of great disaster. By the mid-1950's, the United States recognized that it was in the national interest to promote commercial development of nuclear energy in medicine and industry, particularly in the generation of electric power. The uncertainties of the technology and the potential for severe accidents were clear obstacles to commercial development. Exposure to potentially serious uninsured liabilities inhibited the private sector. These impediments led Congress to enact the Price-Anderson Act in 1957. Its three-fold purpose was to encourage private development of nuclear power, establish a framework for handling liability claims and provide a ready source of funds to compensate accident victims. The law was originally enacted for ten years but has now been extended four times. The major provisions of the Act and its importance to the public and to insurers are described in this paper.(author)

  10. Commercial nuclear power: prospects for the United States and the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayes, F.; Gielecki, M.; Diedrich, R.; Hewlett, J.; Murphy, T.

    1985-01-01

    This analysis report presents the current status and outlook for commercial nuclear power reactors for all countries in the world outside centrally planned economic areas (WOCA). Information regarding operable reactors in countries with centrally planned economies is also presented. The report provides documentation of the US middle-case nuclear capacity and generation projections through 1995 that are presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1984. Additionally, US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2020 are presented for various nuclear power supply scenarios. These long-term projections are provided in support of the Department of Energy's activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The projections for foreign nuclear capacity through 1990 supplant the preliminary foreign WOCA projections presented in the Annual Energy Outlook 1984 and are supplemented by WOCA country-specific projections through the year 2000

  11. Commercial nuclear-waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.A.

    1981-04-01

    This report is primarily concerned with nuclear waste generated by commercial power operations. It is clear, however, that the total generation of commercial nuclear waste does not tell the whole story, there are sizeable stockpiles of defense nuclear wastes which will impact areas such as total nuclide exposure to the biosphere and the overall economics of waste disposal. The effects of these other nuclear waste streams can be factored in as exogenous inputs. Their generation is essentially independent of nuclear power operations. The objective of this report is to assess the real-world problems associated with nuclear waste management and to design the analytical framework, as appropriate, for handling nuclear waste management issues in the International Nuclear Model. As such, some issues that are not inherently quantifiable, such as the development of environmental Impact Statements to satisfy the National Environmental Protection Act requirements, are only briefly mentioned, if at all

  12. Nuclear development in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, S.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the nuclear development in the United States has been one of international cooperation relations so far. The United States is to offer the technical information on atomic energy utilization to foreign countries in exchange for the guarantee that they never attempt to have or develop nuclear weapons. Actually, the United States has supplied the technologies on nuclear fuel cycle and other related fields to enable other countries to achieve economical and social progress. The Department of Energy clarified the public promise of the United States regarding the idea of international energy community. The ratio of nuclear power generation to total electric power supply in the United States exceeded 12%, and will exceed 20% by 1990. Since 1978, new nuclear power station has not been ordered, and some of the contracted power stations were canceled. The atomic energy industry in the United States prospered at the beginning of 1970s, but lost the spirit now, mainly due to the institutional problems rather than the technical ones. As the policy of the government to eliminate the obstacles, the improvement of the procedure for the permission and approval, the establishment of waste disposal capability, the verification of fast breeder reactor technology and the promotion of commercial fuel reprocessing were proposed. The re-establishment of the United States as the reliable supplier of atomic energy service is the final aim. (Kako, I.)

  13. Commercial spent nuclear fuel shipments in the United States, 1964--1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This report provides an overview of US commercial light-water reactor spent-fuel shipments that have occurred from January, 1964 through December, 1987. A summary analysis was performed on these historical shipments, showing the amount of fuel that has been shipped to research facilities, reprocessing plants, away-from-reactor (AFR) storage sites, and other reactors. Also presented in this report is a listing of potential spent-fuel shipments to and/or from commercial nuclear plants. Table 1 provides the detailed listing of historical spent-fuel shipments. Table 2 is a summary of these shipments grouped by destination. Section IV discusses utility plans for future spent-fuel shipments. 2 tabs

  14. Performance of Canadian commercial nuclear units and heavy water plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, L.W.; Ingolfsrud, L.J.

    The operating history of Canadian commercial CANDU type reactors, i.e. Pickering generating station-A, is described. Capacity factors and unit energy costs are analyzed in detail. Equipment performance highlights are given. The performance of the two Canadian heavy water plants is described and five more are under construction or planned. (E.C.B.)

  15. Experience with HEPA filters at United States nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellamy, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    Part 50 of Title 10 of the United States Code of Federal Regulations requires that a number of atmosphere cleanup systems be included in the design of commercial nuclear power plants to be licensed in the United States. These filtering systems are to contain high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters for removal of radioactive particulate matter generated during normal and accident conditions. Recommendations for the design, testing and maintenance of the filtering systems and HEPA filter components are contained in a number of United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission documents and industry standards. This paper will discuss this published guidance available to designers of filtering systems and the plant operators of U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The paper will also present a survey of published reports of experience with HEPA filters, failures and possible causes for the failures, and other abnormal occurrences pertaining to HEPA filters installed in U.S. nuclear power installations. A discussion will be included of U.S. practices for qualification of HEPA filters before installation, and verification of continued performance capability at scheduled intervals during operation

  16. Commercial grade item (CGI) dedication of generators for nuclear safety related applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, R.K.; Hajos, L.G.

    1993-01-01

    The number of nuclear safety related equipment suppliers and the availability of spare and replacement parts designed specifically for nuclear safety related application are shrinking rapidly. These have made it necessary for utilities to apply commercial grade spare and replacement parts in nuclear safety related applications after implementing proper acceptance and dedication process to verify that such items conform with the requirements of their use in nuclear safety related application. The general guidelines for the commercial grade item (CGI) acceptance and dedication are provided in US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Generic Letters and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report NP-5652, Guideline for the Utilization of Commercial Grade Items in Nuclear Safety Related Applications. This paper presents an application of these generic guidelines for procurement, acceptance, and dedication of a commercial grade generator for use as a standby generator at Salem Generating Station Units 1 and 2. The paper identifies the critical characteristics of the generator which once verified, will provide reasonable assurance that the generator will perform its intended safety function. The paper also delineates the method of verification of the critical characteristics through tests and provide acceptance criteria for the test results. The methodology presented in this paper may be used as specific guidelines for reliable and cost effective procurement and dedication of commercial grade generators for use as standby generators at nuclear power plants

  17. A review from the regulatory position of the control of occupational exposure associated with the first 20 years of the United Kingdom commercial nuclear power programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerson, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The control of occupational exposure received at commercial nuclear generating plants in the United Kingdom has been subject to regulatory requirements embodied in site licence conditions since 1959, and at commercial fuel production and reprocessing plants since 1971. The paper indicates the main radiological control objectives which have applied, reviews the statutory measures introduced for their achievement and indicates some of the administrative arrangements made by site operators in order to comply. The principal sources of occupational exposure associated with each stage of the fuel cycle are identified and exposure data since licensed operations commenced are reviewed. The effectiveness of the United Kingdom site licensing procedure in ensuring adequate radiological control procedures, including the minimisation of occupational exposure, is examined in relation to the relevant ICRP recommendations and against the background of the first 20 years of commercial nuclear power production. The impact on these procedures of more recently introduced legislation relating to health and safety at all places of employment in the United Kingdom is discussed. The paper considers the changes in current regulatory procedures that may result from the introduction of ICRP-26 and the recommendations of ICRP Committee 2, and concludes with a review of the more important problems facing the licensee and the Nuclear Inspectorate with regard to the implementation of future radiological control procedures. (H.K.)

  18. Knowledge acquisition for nuclear power plant unit diagnostic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xiaodong; Xi Shuren

    2003-01-01

    The process of acquiring knowledge and building a knowledge base is critical to realize fault diagnostic system at unit level in a nuclear power plant. It directly determines whether the diagnostic system can be applied eventually in a commercial plant. A means to acquire knowledge and its procedures was presented in this paper for fault diagnostic system in a nuclear power plant. The work can be carried out step by step and it is feasible in a commercial nuclear power plant. The knowledge base of the fault diagnostic system for a nuclear power plant can be built after the staff finish the tasks according to the framework presented in this paper

  19. Commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The commercialization of nuclear power plant decommissioning is presented as a step in the commercialization of nuclear energy. Opportunities for technology application advances are identified. Utility planning needs are presented

  20. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs

  1. Commercial nuclear power 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-28

    This report presents the status at the end of 1989 and the outlook for commercial nuclear capacity and generation for all countries in the world with free market economies (FME). The report provides documentation of the US nuclear capacity and generation projections through 2030. The long-term projections of US nuclear capacity and generation are provided to the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) for use in estimating nuclear waste fund revenues and to aid in planning the disposal of nuclear waste. These projections also support the Energy Information Administration's annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment, and are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. The foreign nuclear capacity projections are used by the DOE uranium enrichment program in assessing potential markets for future enrichment contracts. The two major sections of this report discuss US and foreign commercial nuclear power. The US section (Chapters 2 and 3) deals with (1) the status of nuclear power as of the end of 1989; (2) projections of nuclear capacity and generation at 5-year intervals from 1990 through 2030; and (3) a discussion of institutional and technical issues that affect nuclear power. The nuclear capacity projections are discussed in terms of two projection periods: the intermediate term through 2010 and the long term through 2030. A No New Orders case is presented for each of the projection periods, as well as Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  2. Summary Report of Commercial reactor Criticality Data for Three Mile Island Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larry B. Wimmer

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the ''Summary Report of Commercial Reactor Criticality Data for Three Mile Island Unit I'' is to present the CRC data for the TMI-1 reactor. Results from the CRC evaluations will support the development and validation of the neutronics models used for criticality analyses involving commercial spent nuclear fuel. These models and their validation are discussed in the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000)

  3. Implications of the accident at Chernobyl for safety regulation of commercial nuclear power plants in the United States: Volume 1, Main report: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff to assess the implications of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant as they relate to reactor safety regulation for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. The facts used in this assessment have been drawn from the US fact-finding report (NUREG-1250) and its sources. The general conclusions of the document are that there are generic lessons to be learned but that no changes in regulations are needed due to the substantial differences in the design, safety features and operation of US plants as compared to those in the USSR. Given these general conclusions, further consideration of certain specific areas is recommended by the report. These include: administrative controls over reactor regulation, reactivity accidents, accidents at low or zero power, multi-unit protection, fires, containment, emergency planning, severe accident phenomena, and graphite-moderated reactors

  4. Discussion on the impact of large commercial airplane to nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Bo

    2010-01-01

    Briefly introducing the 10CFR50.150, draft guide and technical document of United States which is issued recently by NRC and NEI on impact of large commercial airplane to nuclear power plant, introducing comments from society and public and responses from NRC, and briefly discussing relevant issues. (author)

  5. Improved technical specifications and related improvements to safety in commercial Nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.R.; Demitrack, T.; Schiele, R.; Jones, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    Many of the commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (US) have been converting a portion of the plant operating license known as the Technical Specifications (TS) in accordance with a document published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The TS prescribe commercial nuclear power plant operating requirements. There are several types of nuclear power plants in the US, based on the technology of different vendors, and there is an NRC document that supports each of the five different vendor designs. The NRC documents are known as the Improved Standard Technical Specifications (ISTS) and are contained in a separate document (NUREG series) for each one of the designs. EXCEL Services Corporation (hereinafter EXCEL) has played a major role in the development of the ISTS and in the development, licensing, and implementation of the plant specific Improved Technical Specifications (ITS) (which is based on the ISTS) for the commercial nuclear power plants in the US that have elected to make this conversion. There are currently 103 operating commercial nuclear power plants in the US and 68 of them have successfully completed the conversion to the ITS and are now operating in accordance with their plant specific ITS. The ISTS is focused mainly on safety by ensuring the commercial nuclear reactors can safely shut down and mitigate the consequences of any postulated transient and accident. It accomplishes this function by including requirements directly associated with safety in a document structured systematically and taking into account some key human factors and technical initiatives. This paper discusses the ISTS including its format, content, and detail, the history of the ISTS, the ITS development, licensing, and implementation process, the safety improvements resulting from a plant conversion to ITS, and the importance of the ITS Project to the industry. (Author)

  6. Improved technical specifications and related improvements to safety in commercial Nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, D.R.; Demitrack, T.; Schiele, R.; Jones, J.C. [EXCEL Services Corporation, 11921 Rockville Pike, Suite 100, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)]. e-mail: donaldh@excelservices.com

    2004-07-01

    Many of the commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (US) have been converting a portion of the plant operating license known as the Technical Specifications (TS) in accordance with a document published by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The TS prescribe commercial nuclear power plant operating requirements. There are several types of nuclear power plants in the US, based on the technology of different vendors, and there is an NRC document that supports each of the five different vendor designs. The NRC documents are known as the Improved Standard Technical Specifications (ISTS) and are contained in a separate document (NUREG series) for each one of the designs. EXCEL Services Corporation (hereinafter EXCEL) has played a major role in the development of the ISTS and in the development, licensing, and implementation of the plant specific Improved Technical Specifications (ITS) (which is based on the ISTS) for the commercial nuclear power plants in the US that have elected to make this conversion. There are currently 103 operating commercial nuclear power plants in the US and 68 of them have successfully completed the conversion to the ITS and are now operating in accordance with their plant specific ITS. The ISTS is focused mainly on safety by ensuring the commercial nuclear reactors can safely shut down and mitigate the consequences of any postulated transient and accident. It accomplishes this function by including requirements directly associated with safety in a document structured systematically and taking into account some key human factors and technical initiatives. This paper discusses the ISTS including its format, content, and detail, the history of the ISTS, the ITS development, licensing, and implementation process, the safety improvements resulting from a plant conversion to ITS, and the importance of the ITS Project to the industry. (Author)

  7. Operating performance of LWR nuclear generating units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pia, S.

    1984-01-01

    This work aims at reviewing, on the basis of historical data, the operational problem areas which explain the degree of availability and productivity achieved up to now by nuclear power plants in commercial operation in the world. The operating performance data of nuclear power plants area analysed with respect to plant type, size and other significant reference parameters and they are evaluated also by comparison with fossil generating unit data. Major performance indices data are presented for both nuclear and fossil units type and distribution of outage causes. Unplanned full outages caused by nuclear power plant equipment and components failure are particulary emphasized. The trend for unplanned full outages due to the failure of components shows decreasing numerical values in 1981 with respect to the previous years. But this result should be weighed with the increasing plant unavailability hours needed for maintenance and repair action (chiefly preventive maintenance on critical components). This means that the number and downtime of forced outage must be drastically reduced for economic reasons (production losses and problems associated with the unavailable unit unplanned replacement) as well as for plant safe and reliable operation (sudden unavailability of key components and frequency of transients associated with plant shutdown and routine startup operation)

  8. Commercial nuclear power: Assuring safety for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsey, C.B.; Modarres, M.

    1998-03-01

    This timely book offers insights into the benefits of nuclear power as well as the technological and environmental challenges facing the nuclear industry. Containing the results of worldwide scientific studies and industrial site visits, the book represents a timely focus on the applications of commercial nuclear power, the potential benefits to be gained from contained nuclear use, the environmental risks of nuclear power, and the prevention of nuclear accidents.This timely book offers insights into the benefits of nuclear power as well as the technological and environmental challenges facing the nuclear industry. Containing the results of worldwide scientific studies and industrial site visits, the book represents a timely focus on the applications of commercial nuclear power, the potential benefits to be gained from contained nuclear use, the environmental risks of nuclear power, and the prevention of nuclear accidents

  9. Status of nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.J.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear engineering education in the United States is reflective of the perceived health of the nuclear electric power industry within the country. Just as new commercial reactor orders have vanished and some power plants have shut down, so too have university enrollments shrunk and research reactors closed. This decline in nuclear trained specialists and the disappearance of the nuclear infrastructure is a trend that must be arrested and reversed if the United States is to have a workforce capable of caring for a nuclear power industry to not only meet future electric demand but to ensure that the over 100 existing plants, their supporting facilities and their legacy in the form of high level waste and facility clean-up are addressed. Additionally, the United States has an obligation to support and maintain its nuclear navy and other defence needs. And, lastly, if the United States is to have a meaningful role in the international use of nuclear power with regard to safety, non-proliferation and the environment, then it is imperative that the country continues to produce world-class nuclear engineers and scientists by supporting nuclear engineering education at its universities. The continued support of the federal government. and industry for university nuclear engineering and nuclear energy research and development is essential to sustain the nuclear infrastructure in the United States. Even with this support, and the continued excellent operation of the existing fleet of nuclear electric power plants, it is conceivable that nuclear engineering as an academic discipline may fall victim to poor communications and a tarnished public image. What is needed is a combination of federal and industrial support along with the creativity of the universities to expand their offerings to include more than power production. The objective is a positive message on careers in nuclear related fields, and recognition of the important role of nuclear energy in meeting the country

  10. Nuclear Analytical Techniques for Commercial Applications in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Feng, S.; Yang, J.; Ouyang, H.; Feng, X.; Mao, X.

    2013-01-01

    Since the establishment of the first Chinese nuclear reactor and accelerator in 1958, the nuclear analytical techniques (NATs) in China have dramatically developed in past half century. Nowadays 10 research nuclear reactors and over 100 small accelerators are available in China. Roughly, about 50 % of the machine time is applied for commercial purpose at the moment. The versatile nuclear analytical methods, mainly NAA, PIXE, XRF, etc., in China have been and are being applied widely and extensively in the following three fields: scientific, training, and commercial. This paper will briefly describe the past experience and present status about NATs for commercial applications. Some practical examples to demonstrate the role of NATs in this aspect will be given as well. Basically, the NATs used for the commercial applications in China can be divided into two types, i.e. off-line and on-line. The former mainly includes instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) for compositional determination, particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) also for compositional analysis, accelerator-based mass-spectrometry (AMS) for analysis of C-14, Be-7, Cl-36 and other long-lived radioactive nuclides, solid state nuclear track detector

  11. New nuclear power plant unit in Finland accepted by the Finnish Parliament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaetkae, M.

    2002-01-01

    The nuclear option has been included in Finland's energy strategy since late 1990's. Based on TVO's application the Finnish Parliament accepted in May 2002 the decision in principle to build a new nuclear power plant unit. The main arguments were the growth of electricity demand, reduction of CO 2 emissions, security of energy supply and reasonable as well as predictable electricity price. TVO's intention is to get the new power plant unit into commercial operation at the end of this decade.(author)

  12. United States nuclear regulatory commission program for inspection of decommissioning nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC or Commission) has been inspecting decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) since the first such facility permanently shutdown in September 1967. Decommissioning inspections have principally focused on the safe storage and maintenance of spent reactor fuel; occupational radiation exposure; environmental radiological releases; the dismantlement and decontamination of structures, systems, and components identified to contain or potentially contain licensed radioactive material; and the performance of final radiological survey of the site and remaining structures to support termination of the USNRC-issued operating license. Over the last 5 years, USNRC inspection effort in these areas has been assessed and found to provide reasonable confidence that decommissioning can be conducted safely and in accordance with Commission rules and regulations. Recently, the staff has achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with particular decommissioning accidents 1 and plans to apply these insights to amendments proposed to enhance decommissioning rules and regulations. The probabilities, scenarios, and conclusions resulting from this effort are being assessed as to their applicability to the inspection of decommissioning commercial power reactors. (author)

  13. United States nuclear regulatory commission program for inspection of decommissioning nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, P.W. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC or Commission) has been inspecting decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) since the first such facility permanently shutdown in September 1967. Decommissioning inspections have principally focused on the safe storage and maintenance of spent reactor fuel; occupational radiation exposure; environmental radiological releases; the dismantlement and decontamination of structures, systems, and components identified to contain or potentially contain licensed radioactive material; and the performance of final radiological survey of the site and remaining structures to support termination of the USNRC-issued operating license. Over the last 5 years, USNRC inspection effort in these areas has been assessed and found to provide reasonable confidence that decommissioning can be conducted safely and in accordance with Commission rules and regulations. Recently, the staff has achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with particular decommissioning accidents 1 and plans to apply these insights to amendments proposed to enhance decommissioning rules and regulations. The probabilities, scenarios, and conclusions resulting from this effort are being assessed as to their applicability to the inspection of decommissioning commercial power reactors. (author)

  14. Commercial operation and outage experience of ABWR at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa units Nos. 6 and 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anahara, N.; Yamada, M.; Kataoka, H.

    2000-01-01

    Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Units Nos. 6 and 7, the world's first ABWRs (Advanced Boiling Water Reactor), started commercial operation on November 7, 1996 and July 2, 1997, respectively, and continued their commercial operation with a high capacity factor, low occupational radiation exposure and radioactive waste. Units 6 and 7 were in their 3rd cycle operation until 25th April 1999 and 1st November 1999, respectively. Thermal efficiency was 35.4-35.8% (design thermal efficiency: 34.5%) during these period, demonstrating better performance than that of BWR-5 (design thermal efficiency: 33.4%). Nos. 6 and 7 have experienced 2 annual outages. The first outage of unit No. 6 started on November 20, 1997 and was completed within 61 days (including 6 New Year holidays), and the second outage started on March 13, 1999 and was completed within 44 days. The first annual outage of unit No. 7 started on May 27, 1998, earlier than it would normally have been, to avoid an annual outage during the summer, and was completed within 55 days, and the second outage started on September 18th, 1999 and was completed within 45 days, All annual outages were carried out within a very short time period without any severe malfunctions, including newly designed ABWR systems and equipment. As the first outage in Japan, 55 days is a very short period, despite the fact that the Nos. 6 and 7 are the first ABWRs in the world and the largest capacity units in Japan. The total occupational radiation exposure of No. 6 was 300 man-mSv (1st outage) and 331 man-mSv (2nd outage). That of Unit 7 was 153 man-mSv (1st outage) Those of unit No. 6 were at the same level as those of unit No. 3, which is the latest design 1100MW(e) BWR-5. That of unit No. 7 was the lowest ever at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station. The drums of radioactive waste discharged during the annual outage numbered 54 (1st outage) for No. 6 and 62 (1st outage) for No. 7, which was less than the design target of 100

  15. Emergency operating instruction improvements at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station Units 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillo, M.W.; Smith, B.H.

    1989-01-01

    In late 1987, San Onofre nuclear generating station (SONGS) began an extensive upgrade of the units 2 and 3 emergency operating instructions (EOIs). The original intent of this program was to incorporate revised generic guidance and to correct problems that were identified by operators. While this program was in progress, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) conducted a series of audits of emergency operating procedure (EOP) development and maintenance programs as 16 commercial nuclear facilities in the United States. These audits included four stations with Combustion Engineering-designed nuclear steam supply systems. (One of these audits included a review of preupgrade SONGS units 2 and 3 EOIs.) Significant industrywide comments resulted from these audits. The NRC has stated its intent to continue the review and audit of EOIs and the associated maintenance programs at all US commercial nuclear facilities. The units 2 and 3 EOI upgrade program developed procedural improvements and procedural program maintenance improvements that address many of the existing audit comments that have been received by the industry. Other resulting improvements may be useful in minimizing NRC comments in future such audits. Specific improvements are discussed. The upgrade program resulted in benefits that were not originally anticipated. The results of this program can be of significant use by other utilities in addressing the industrywide concerns that have been raised in recent NRC audits of EOP development and maintenance programs

  16. Implications of the accident at Chernobyl for safety regulation of commercial nuclear power plants in the United Sates: Volume 2, Appendix - Public comments and their disposition: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report was prepared by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff to assess the implications of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant as they relate to reactor safety regulation for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. The facts used in this assessment have been drawn from the US fact-finding report(NUREG-1250) and its sources. The general conclusions of the document are that there are generic lessons to be learned but that no changes in regulations are needed due to the substantial differences in the design, safety features and operation of US plants as compared to those in the USSR. Given these general conclusions, further consideration of certain specific areas is recommended by the report. These include: administrative controls over reactor regulation, reactivity accidents, accidents at low or zero power, multi-unit protection, fires, containment, emergency planning, severe accident phenomena, and graphite-moderated reactors

  17. Outline of construction and facility features of Onagawa nuclear power station Unit No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umimura, Yoshiharu; Tsunoda, Ryohei; Watanabe, Kazunori

    1996-01-01

    Tohoku Electric Power Company promotes development of various power sources to provide a stable supply of electricity in the future, and nuclear power takes a leading part. In August 1989, construction of Onagawa nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 (825MW) was started, following Unit No. 1 (524MW) which went on line in 1984 as Tohoku Electric's first nuclear power plant unit. Unit No. 2 began commercial operation in July 1995 through satisfactory construction work such as RPV hydraulic test in March 1994, fuel loading in October 1994, and various startup tests in each power stage. The design and construction of Unit No. 2 reflect construction and operation experience gained from Unit No. 1, and the latest technology, including that of the LWR Improvement and Standardization Program, was adopted to enhance facility reliability, improve operation and maintenance performance, and reduce worker dosage. Features of the facility, construction techniques, and a description of preoperation of Onagawa nuclear power plant Unit No. 2 are described in this paper. (author)

  18. Emergency planning requirements and short-term countermeasures for commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, F.; Hogan, R.; Mohseni, A.

    1995-01-01

    Since the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit, the United States Nuclear Regulatory's Commission (NRC's) emergency planning regulations are now considered and an important part of the regulatory framework for protecting the public health and safety. Many aspects of the countermeasures are presented: Emergency Planning Zones (EPZ), off-Site emergency planning and preparedness, responsibilities of nuclear power plants operators and states and local government. Finally, protective action recommendations are given as well as the federal response to an emergency. The authors noted that the use of potassium iodide is not considered as an effective countermeasure for the public protection in the US. (TEC). 1 fig

  19. Status of spent nuclear fuel management in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    The United States produces approximately 20% of its electricity in nuclear power reactors, currently generating, approximately 2,000 metric tons of uranium (tU) of spent nuclear fuel annually. Over the past half century, the country has amassed 33,000 tU of commercial spent nuclear fuel that is being stored at 119 operating and shutdown reactors located on 73 sites around the nation. The cumulative discharge of the spent fuel from reactors is estimated to total approximately 87,000 tU by 2035. Many sites have reracked the spent fuel in their storage pool to maximize pool capacity, and a number of reactor sites have been forced to add dry storage to accommodate the growing inventory of fuel in storage. In addition, research and defense programme reactors have produced spent fuel that is being stored in pools at Federal sites. Much of this fuel will be transferred to dry storage in the coming years. Under current plans, the commercial and federally owned fuel will remain in storage at the existing sites until the United States Department of Energy (DOE) begins receipt at a federal receiving facility. (author)

  20. Organic diagenesis in commercial nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toste, A.P.; Lechner-Fish, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    The nuclear industry currently faces numerous challenges. Large volumes of already existing wastes must be permanently disposed using environmentally acceptable technologies. Numerous criteria must be addressed before wastes can be permanently disposed. Waste characterization is certainly one of the key criteria for proper waste management. some wastes are complex melting pots of inorganics, radiochemicals, and, occasionally, organics. It is clear, for example, that organics have been used extensively in nuclear operations, such as waste reprocessing, and continue to be used widely as solvents, decontamination agents, etc. The authors have analyzed the organic content of many kinds of nuclear wastes, ranging from commercial to defense wastes. In this paper, the finale analyses are described of three commercial wastes: one waste from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and two wastes from a boiling water reactor (BWR). The PWR waste is a boric acid concentrate waste. The two BWR wastes, BWR wastes Nos. 1 and 2, are evaporator concentrates of liquid wastes produced during the regeneration of ion-exchange resins used to purify reactor process water. In preliminary analyses, which were reported previously, a few know organics and myriad unknowns were detected. Recent reexamination of mass-spectral data, coupled with reanalysis of the wastes, has resulted in the firm identification of the unknowns. Most of the compounds, over thirty distinct organics, are derived from the degradation, or diagenesis, of source-term organics, revealing, for the first time, that organic diagenesis in commercial wastes is both vigorous and varied

  1. Qualified Coatings in Nuclear Power Plants. Commercial products; Qualified Coatings in Nuclear Power Plants. Commercial products. Pinturas homologadas en centrales nucleares. Productos comerciales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcena, J.; Nunez, B.; Romero, M.; Baladiam, M.

    2014-07-01

    Recently, the supplier of paints that were qualified for use in nuclear applications as protective coatings have ceased to supply in Spain the paints that was used in areas or components with special requirements for nuclear power plants (NPPs). This lack of the common commercial products called for the search for and homologation of other products. A study was performed on the current status of the homologation of commercial products for NPPs and on the codes and standards governing them. The criteria to be met have been defined and the results of the tests performed on the selected paints have been compared against the established criteria so as to allow the homologation of the paints. (Author)

  2. Commercial nuclear power in Western Europe: experience and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, D.

    1986-01-01

    The commercialization of nuclear power in Western Europe is likely to bring nuclear's share of electricity production from its current level of 30% to as high as 50% by the year 2000. Although France will build most of this new capacity and Denmark and Austria are abstaining, there is a clear trend in the region. Western Europe will likely decline in its share of world nuclear power as capacity increases in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union even though its growth has been faster than that of the US. The author compares capacity changes, plant performance, and nuclear trade developments in the individual European countries with those of the US, Soviet Union, and Japan. The author also describes the nuclear fuel cycle, the commercialization of fast breeder reactors, and public opposition to the European Community's policy of expanding nuclear power. The use of nuclear heat for district heating in addition to electric power could change the prospects over the long term. 3 tables

  3. Low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States: An overview of current commercial regulations and concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1993-08-01

    Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the United States is regulated by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under 10 CFR 61 (1991). This regulation was issued in 1981 after a lengthy and thorough development process that considered the radionuclide concentrations and characteristics associated with commercial low-level radioactive waste streams; alternatives for waste classification; alternative technologies for low-level radioactive waste disposal; and data, modeling, and scenario analyses. The development process also included the publication of both draft and final environmental impact statements. The final regulation describes the general provisions; licenses; performance objectives; technical requirements for land disposal; financial assurances; participation by state governments and Indian tribes; and records, reports, tests, and inspections. This paper provides an overview of, and tutorial on, current commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal regulations in the United States

  4. Commercialization of the global nuclear energy partnership (GNEP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loewen Eric P.; Boaz, Jeffery; Saito, Earl; Boardman, Chuck

    2007-01-01

    In February 2006 President Bush announced the Advanced Energy Initiative, which included the Department of Energy's (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). GNEP has seven broad goals, one of the major elements being to develop and deploy advanced nuclear fuel recycling technology. DOE is contemplating accelerating the deployment of these technologies to achieve the construction of a commercial scale application of these technologies. DOE now defines this approach as 'two simultaneous tracks: (1) deployment of commercial scale facilities for which advanced technologies are available now or in the near future, and (2) further research and development of transmutation fuels technologies'. GE believes an integrated technical solution, using existing reactor and fuel reprocessing technologies, is achievable in the near term to accelerate the commercial demonstration of GNEP infrastructure. The concept involves a single, integrated, commercial scale, recycling facility consisting of the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC), capable of processing LWR and fast reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fabricating Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) actinide fuel. The integrated facility would include a fast reactor that uses actinide-bearing fuel to produce electricity. For optimal performance, GE believes this integrated facility should be co-located to eliminate transportation between the CFTC and ARR, and enhance proliferation resistance. This Advanced Recycling Center takes advantage of previous investments by government and industry in fast reactor technology research and development. To allow for commercial acceptance, a prototypical demonstration reactor and associated fuel cycle facility will be constructed, tested, and licensed. Taking advantage of GE's NRC-reviewed modular sodium-cooled PRISM reactor, only a single reactor will be needed and the cost and risk minimized in the initial phase of the program. This paper outlines a process and a schedule to

  5. Nuclear energy technology: theory and practice of commercial nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knief, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews Nuclear Energy Technology: Theory and Practice of Commercial Nuclear Power by Ronald Allen Knief, whose contents include an overview of the basic concepts of reactors and the nuclear fuel cycle; the basics of nuclear physics; reactor theory; heat removal; economics; current concerns at the front and back ends of the fuel cycle; design descriptions of domestic and foreign reactor systems; reactor safety and safeguards; Three Mile Island; and a brief overview of the basic concepts of nuclear fusion. Both magnetic and inertial confinement techniques are clearly outlined. Also reviews Nuclear Fuel Management by Harry W. Graves, Jr., consisting of introductory subjects (e.g. front end of fuel cycle); core physics methodology required for fuel depletion calculations; power capability evaluation (analyzes physical parameters that limit potential core power density); and fuel management topics (economics, loading arrangements and core operation strategies)

  6. Economic Experience in Creation and Operation of Commercial Propulsion Nuclear Plants. Annex VII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    This annex considers the reduction of capital costs in commercial nuclear power by employing commercial scale production and common technologies of equipment design and fabrication, based on the vast production and operation experience of Russian Federation nuclear propulsion plants. The performed consideration proves the expediency of adopting the most effective engineering solutions and approaches used for production of propulsion nuclear plants in the production of commercial nuclear power plants.

  7. Nuclear power in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    All over the world except in the United States, nuclear energy is a low cost, secure, environmentally acceptable form of energy. In the United States, civilian nuclear power is dead. 112 nuclear power plants have been abandoned or cancelled in the last decade, and there has been no new order for nuclear plants since 1978. It will be fortunate to have 125 operating nuclear plants in the United States in the year 2000. There are almost 90 completed nuclear power plants and about 45 under construction in the United States, but several of those under construction will eventually be abandoned. About 20 % of the electricity in the United States will be generated by nuclear plants in 2000 as compared with 13 % supplied in the last year. Under the present regulatory and institutional arrangement, American electric utilities would not consider to order a new nuclear power plant. Post-TMI nuclear plants became very expensive, and there is also ideological opposition to nuclear power. Coal-firing plants are also in the similar situation. The uncertainty about electric power demand, the cost of money, the inflation of construction cost and regulation caused the situation. (Kako, I.)

  8. Commerical electric power cost studies. Capital cost addendum multi-unit coal and nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    This report is the culmination of a study performed to develop designs and associated capital cost estimates for multi-unit nuclear and coal commercial electric power stations, and to determine the distribution of these costs among the individual units. This report addresses six different types of 2400 MWe (nominal) multi-unit stations as follows: Two Unit PWR Station-1139 MWe Each, Two Unit BWR Station-1190 MWe Each, Two Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1232 MWe Each, Two Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1243 MWe Each, Three Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-794 MWe Each, Three Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-801 MWe Each. Recent capital cost studies performed for ERDA/NRC of single unit nuclear and coal stations are used as the basis for developing the designs and costs of the multi-unit stations. This report includes the major study groundrules, a summary of single and multi-unit stations total base cost estimates, details of cost estimates at the three digit account level and plot plan drawings for each multi-unit station identified

  9. Summary revaluation of energetic start-up of the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvaic, I.; Miskolci, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contents stage revaluation of energetic start-up of the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce. Test results of the stage of energetic start-up are summarized in the document, valuation of important systems and block devices as well as fulfilling the operation limits and conditions has been performed. On that base conclusions and recommendations for start-up the unit 2 and for commercial operation of the unit 1 are elaborated. The valuation has been elaborated by a scientific management for start-up nuclear power plant Mochovce of nuclear safety of nuclear power facilities. Scientific management for start-up of nuclear power plant Mochovce performed continuous valuation of individual power levels after ending of each individual level and it gave its valuation to energy power level with recommendations and conditions for further start-up process and operation. Scientific management finished its activity at the unit 1 of nuclear power plant Mochovce according to a statute of scientific management for start-up after successful completion of conclusive block run. Scientific management group was founded in February 1998 at nuclear power plant Mochovce. Its members are experts from Slovak, Czech, Russian and French organizations which are participating in power plant completion. Members are listed in a supplement No. 2

  10. 'Newcomer' nuclear nation leads way into new nuclear year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, St George' s Redditch (United Kingdom)

    2018-01-15

    At the start of a new year, it is appropriate that a 'newcomer' nuclear nation has launched work on building its first nuclear power plant. First nuclear safety-related concrete has been poured for the plant at Rooppur in Bangladesh - making the South Asia nation the first in 30 years to start building its first commercial reactor unit following the United Arab Emirates in 2012 and Belarus in 2013. Despite setbacks that nuclear has endured in recent years, there are nearly 60 reactors under construction around the world, mostly in Asia. Some 447 commercial reactor units are in operation in 30 countries.

  11. Commercial Nuclear Reprocessing in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherrill, Charles Leland [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Balatsky, Galya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-09

    The short presentation outline: Reprocessing Overview; Events leading up to Carter’s Policy; Results of the decision; Policy since Nuclear Nonproliferation Act. Conclusions reached: Reprocessing ban has become an easy and visible fix to the public concern about proliferation, but has not completely stopped proliferation; and, Reprocessing needs to become detached from political considerations, so technical research can continue, regardless of the policy decisions we decide to take.

  12. Safeguards Guidance for Designers of Commercial Nuclear Facilities – International Safeguards Requirements for Uranium Enrichment Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip Casey Durst; Scott DeMuth; Brent McGinnis; Michael Whitaker; James Morgan

    2010-04-01

    For the past two years, the United States National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of International Regimes and Agreements (NA-243), has sponsored the Safeguards-by-Design Project, through which it is hoped new nuclear facilities will be designed and constructed worldwide more amenable to nuclear safeguards. In the course of this project it was recognized that commercial designer/builders of nuclear facilities are not always aware of, or understand, the relevant domestic and international safeguards requirements, especially the latter as implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). To help commercial designer/builders better understand these requirements, a report was prepared by the Safeguards-by-Design Project Team that articulated and interpreted the international nuclear safeguards requirements for the initial case of uranium enrichment plants. The following paper summarizes the subject report, the specific requirements, where they originate, and the implications for design and construction. It also briefly summarizes the established best design and operating practices that designer/builder/operators have implemented for currently meeting these requirements. In preparing the subject report, it is recognized that the best practices are continually evolving as the designer/builder/operators and IAEA consider even more effective and efficient means for meeting the safeguards requirements and objectives.

  13. Behaviors and Conditions that Challenge Teamwork: An Assessment of Operating Events at U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desaulniers, David R.

    1998-01-01

    As part of its regulatory activities, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews events and routine activities at commercial nuclear power facilities throughout the United States. Frequently, these reviews have highlighted team performance as an important factor in either the initiation or mitigation of significant events and conditions at these facilities. This paper summarizes operating experience relevant to the understanding of teamwork at U.S. nuclear power plants during recent years, describes the specific behaviors that were considered detrimental to team performance, and discusses the conditions that were identified as contributing to these behaviors. (author)

  14. Commercialization of nuclear fuel cycle business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakabe, Hideo

    1998-01-01

    Japan depends on foreign countries almost for establishing nuclear fuel cycle. Accordingly, uranium enrichment, spent fuel reprocessing and the safe treatment and disposal of radioactive waste in Japan is important for securing energy. By these means, the stable supply of enriched uranium, the rise of utilization efficiency of uranium and making nuclear power into home-produced energy can be realized. Also this contributes to the protection of earth resources and the preservation of environment. Japan Nuclear Fuel Co., Ltd. operates four business commercially in Rokkasho, Aomori Prefecture, aiming at the completion of nuclear fuel cycle by the technologies developed by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation and the introduction of technologies from foreign countries. The conditions of location of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and the course of the location in Rokkasho are described. In the site of about 740 hectares area, uranium enrichment, burying of low level radioactive waste, fuel reprocessing and high level waste control have been carried out, and three businesses except reprocessing already began the operation. The state of operation of these businesses is reported. Hereafter, efforts will be exerted to the securing of safety through trouble-free operation and cost reduction. (K.I.)

  15. 76 FR 40754 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2011-0100; Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; Docket Nos. 50-269, 50-270, And 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3; Notice...

  16. A comparison between regulation of nuclear power in Canada and the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahearne, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    The agencies that regulate commercial nuclear power in Canada and the United States differ in five significant characteristics: size and responsibility; use of legalism and formality; inspection and enforcement approaches; relationships to the government, public and industry; and the basic philosophy of regulation. Examination shows strengths and weaknesses in each approach, tied to basic differences in philosophy of government. (author)

  17. Nuclear liability insurance in the United States: an insurer's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quattrocchi, J.

    2000-01-01

    By the mid-1950's the United States recognised that it was in the interest to promote commercial development of nuclear energy. But the uncertainties of the technology and the potential for severe accidents were clear obstacles to commercial development. Exposure to potentially serious uninsured liability inhibited the private sector. These impediments led Congress to enact the Price-Anderson Act in 1957. The Act had several purposes: the first was to encourage private development of nuclear power; the second was to establish a legal framework for handling potential liability claims; and the third was to provide a ready source of funds to compensate injured victims of a nuclear accident. Insurers chose the pooling technique by creating in the US the American Nuclear Insurers. ANI acts as a managing agent for its members insurance companies. The accident of three Miles Island occurred on 28 March 1979 and with came the claims experience in US. The 1988 amendments to the Price-Anderson Act directed the President to establish a Commission for the purpose of developing a means to assure full compensation of victims of a catastrophic nuclear accident that exceeds the limitation on aggregate public liability, or currently just over US$ 9.7 billion. The Presidential Commission issued its report in August 1990, in which it reached a number of conclusions and offered a number of recommendations.The US Congress has not acted on the Commission's report, but may revisit its recommendations as debate begins this year (1999) or next on the renewal of the Price-Anderson Act. (N.C.)

  18. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01

    This study examines the interaction of the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear burst with commercial nuclear power plant systems. The potential vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear power plant are explored. EMP signal coupling, induced plant response and component damage thresholds are established using techniques developed over several decades under Defense Nuclear Agency sponsorship. A limited test program was conducted to verify the coupling analysis technique as applied to a nuclear power plant. The results are extended, insofar as possible, to other nuclear plants.

  19. Interaction of electromagnetic pulse with commercial nuclear-power-plant systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Strawe, D.F.; Sandberg, S.J.; Jones, V.K.; Rensner, G.D.; Shoup, R.W.; Hanson, R.J.; Williams, C.B.

    1983-02-01

    This study examines the interaction of the electromagnetic pulse from a high altitude nuclear burst with commercial nuclear power plant systems. The potential vulnerability of systems required for safe shutdown of a specific nuclear power plant are explored. EMP signal coupling, induced plant response and component damage thresholds are established using techniques developed over several decades under Defense Nuclear Agency sponsorship. A limited test program was conducted to verify the coupling analysis technique as applied to a nuclear power plant. The results are extended, insofar as possible, to other nuclear plants

  20. A survey of low-level radioactive waste treatment methods and problem areas associated with commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, R.L.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1987-01-01

    A survey was made (June 1985) of technologies that were currently being used, those that had been discontinued, and those that were under consideration for treatment of low-level radioactive waste from the commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. The survey results included information concerning problems areas, areas needing research and development, and the use of mobile treatment facilities

  1. Commercial Satellite Imagery Analysis for Countering Nuclear Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, David; Burkhard, Sarah; Lach, Allison

    2018-05-01

    High-resolution commercial satellite imagery from a growing number of private satellite companies allows nongovernmental analysts to better understand secret or opaque nuclear programs of countries in unstable or tense regions, called proliferant states. They include North Korea, Iran, India, Pakistan, and Israel. By using imagery to make these countries’ aims and capabilities more transparent, nongovernmental groups like the Institute for Science and International Security have affected the policies of governments and the course of public debate. Satellite imagery work has also strengthened the efforts of the International Atomic Energy Agency, thereby helping this key international agency build its case to mount inspections of suspect sites and activities. This work has improved assessments of the nuclear capabilities of proliferant states. Several case studies provide insight into the use of commercial satellite imagery as a key tool to educate policy makers and affect policy.

  2. Cost effective nuclear commercial grade dedication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maletz, J.J.; Marston, M.J.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes a new computerized database method to create/edit/view specification technical data sheets (mini-specifications) for procurement of spare parts for nuclear facility maintenance and to develop information that could support possible future facility life extension efforts. This method may reduce cost when compared with current manual methods. The use of standardized technical data sheets (mini-specifications) for items of the same category improves efficiency. This method can be used for a variety of tasks, including: Nuclear safety-related procurement; Non-safety related procurement; Commercial grade item procurement/dedication; Evaluation of replacement items. This program will assist the nuclear facility in upgrading its procurement activities consistent with the recent NUMARC Procurement Initiative. Proper utilization of the program will assist the user in assuring that the procured items are correct for the applications, provide data to assist in detecting fraudulent materials, minimize human error in withdrawing database information, improve data retrievability, improve traceability, and reduce long-term procurement costs

  3. Prospective needs for decommissioning commercial nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, G.H.; Yasui, M.; Laraia, M.

    1992-01-01

    The answers to the questions: How many reactors will face the end of their operating lifetime over the next few decades? To what extent are the issues of decommissioning urgent? The answers will lead us to those issues that should be tackled now in order to complete smoothly the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The prospective needs for decommissioning of nuclear power plants are illustrated from the viewpoint of reactor age, and some of the issues to be tackled, in particular by governments, in this century are discussed, to prepare for the future decommissioning activities. (author) 18 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  4. Shutdown and low-power operation at commercial nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The report contains the results of the NRC Staff's evaluation of shutdown and low-power operations at US commercial nuclear power plants. The report describes studies conducted by the staff in the following areas: Operating experience related to shutdown and low-power operations, probabilistic risk assessment of shutdown and low-power conditions and utility programs for planning and conducting activities during periods the plant is shut down. The report also documents evaluations of a number of technical issues regarding shutdown and low-power operations performed by the staff, including the principal findings and conclusions. Potential new regulatory requirements are discussed, as well as potential changes in NRC programs. A draft report was issued for comment in February 1992. This report is the final version and includes the responses to the comments along with the staff regulatory analysis of potential new requirements

  5. Suggested non-proliferation criteria for commercial nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laney, R.V.; Heubotter, P.R.

    1978-01-01

    Based on the Administration's policy to prevent nuclear weapons proliferation through diversion of fuel from commercial reactor fuel cycles, a ''benchmark'' set of nonproliferation criteria was prepared for the commercial nuclear fuel cycle. These criteria should eliminate incremental risks of proliferation beyond those inherent in the present generation of low-enriched-uranium-fueled reactors operating in a once-through mode, with internationally safeguarded storage of spent fuel. They focus on the balanced application of technical constraints consistent with the state of the technology, with minimal requirements for institutional constraints, to provide a basis for assessing the proliferation resistance of proposed fission power systems. The paper contains: (1) our perception of the nuclear energy policy and of the baseline proliferation risk accepted under this policy; (2) objectives for a reactor and fuel cycle strategy which address the technical, political, and institutional aspects of diversion and proliferation and, at the same time, satisfy the Nation's needs for efficient, timely, and economical utilization of nuclear fuel resources; (3) criteria which are responsive to these objectives and can therefore be used to screen proposed reactor and fuel cycle strategies; and (4) a rationale for these criteria

  6. Technical meeting on commercial applications of nuclear analytical techniques. Meeting report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Technical Meeting on the Commercial Applications of Nuclear Analytical Techniques held in Vienna on 23-26 November 2004, where an assessment was initiated of the world capacity and market potentials for neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy, including an estimation of economic revenues. Industry and governmental agencies were identified as stakeholders for these laboratories. Examples are given of potential benefits of these techniques to the stakeholders. The potentials for commercial applications of neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy (measurement of alpha, beta and gamma ray emitting radionuclides) are addressed. First estimates are given of the worldwide capacity of these laboratories, suggestions and examples are given for potential markets and the typical organizational and technical constraints are discussed. Two case studies of commercial neutron activation analysis laboratories at a small and a medium-size reactor are given in the 'individual contributions' section of this document. An assessment of other nuclear analytical techniques such as X ray Fluorescence Spectrometry, Particle Induced X ray Emission Spectrometry or Ion Beam Analysis Spectrometry has been completed after a comprehensive collection of background information

  7. Technical meeting on commercial applications of nuclear analytical techniques. Meeting report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report summarizes the findings of the Technical Meeting on the Commercial Applications of Nuclear Analytical Techniques held in Vienna on 23-26 November 2004, where an assessment was initiated of the world capacity and market potentials for neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy, including an estimation of economic revenues. Industry and governmental agencies were identified as stakeholders for these laboratories. Examples are given of potential benefits of these techniques to the stakeholders. The potentials for commercial applications of neutron activation analysis and nuclear spectroscopy (measurement of alpha, beta and gamma ray emitting radionuclides) are addressed. First estimates are given of the worldwide capacity of these laboratories, suggestions and examples are given for potential markets and the typical organizational and technical constraints are discussed. Two case studies of commercial neutron activation analysis laboratories at a small and a medium-size reactor are given in the 'individual contributions' section of this document. An assessment of other nuclear analytical techniques such as X ray Fluorescence Spectrometry, Particle Induced X ray Emission Spectrometry or Ion Beam Analysis Spectrometry has been completed after a comprehensive collection of background information.

  8. Architecture of nuclear power units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malaniuk, B.

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear units with circulation cooling using cooling towers are dominating points of the landscape. The individual cooling towers or pairs of cooling towers should be situated in the axes of double units and should also linearly be arranged, rhythmically in the respective zone. Examples are shown of the architectural designs of several nuclear power plants in the USA, the UK, the USSR, France, the FRG and Italy. (H.S.)

  9. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 1, Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is unit 1 in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  10. Start-up test of Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station Unit No.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inomata, Toshio; Umezu, Akira; Kajikawa, Makoto; Koibuchi, Hiroshi; Netsu, Nobuhiko.

    1986-01-01

    In Unit 3 of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station II (daini), a BWR power plant of output 1,100 MW, commercial operation was started in June 1985. Its start-up test was finished successfully in about nine months. That is, new equipments introduced were demonstration tested. Though the items of testing are increased, the start-up test took short time, resulting in construction period only 54.7 months of the Unit 3, the shortest in the world. During the test, there was no scramming other than the planned. Described are the following: an outline of the Unit 3, the items of its improvement and standardization, including the new equipments, preparations for the start-up test, the start-up test and its evaluation. (Mori, K.)

  11. Radioactive residues at nuclear sites in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiore, J.; Rampertaap, A.; Greeves, J.; MacKinney, J.; Raguso, M.; Selstrom, J.

    2000-01-01

    The United States of America has a large number of sites where radioactive materials have been mined, processed, produced, or used. Upon completion of activities at these sites, some will be cleaned up completely and released for unrestricted future use. However, at other sites, contamination will remain on the site following cleanup, requiring long term institutional controls. Depending on the purpose or the activity conducted at a specific site, these locations are generally under the jurisdiction of a federal agency: the United States Department of Energy, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the United States Environmental Protection Agency, or the United States Department of Defense. However, under certain conditions, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission relinquishes regulatory authority to individual states to regulate the commercial uses of radioactive materials (except for nuclear reactors), so some locations with radioactive materials are under the jurisdiction of individual states. Other sites with naturally occurring radioactive contamination may also be controlled by individual states. One or two sites under the jurisdiction of each agency are discussed where radioactive materials either existed in the past or exist today, and the source of contamination, the anticipated end state, and the process by which the responsible agency did or will conduct cleanup and site closure are described. Several issues are reviewed that must be addressed in order to design and implement remediations that will ensure long term protection for the environment and future inhabitants. The role of citizens in environmental cleanups is examined, and how institutional controls may be applied to ensure long term protection of remediations that leave some contaminants in place. (author)

  12. Physical protection of nuclear operational units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-07-01

    The general principles of and basic requirements for the physical protection of operational units in the nuclear field are established. They concern the operational units whose activities are related with production, utilization, processing, reprocessing, handling, transport or storage of materials of interest for the Brazilian Nuclear Program. (I.C.R.) [pt

  13. Prospects of Nuclear Energy in the United States in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Industry is now over 40 years old and a proven, mature product has been developed. That proven mature product has evolve into a small set of standardized designs - designs based on evolution of the best and safest features, not revolutionary changes. Just as the product design must be standardized, the regulatory process must also be standardized. With a predictable regulatory environment and rate structure the economic advantages of Nuclear Power will be self-evident. The Nuclear Industry in the United States has had a history of cycles as the economy and need for power has changed. The need for electricity to support growth is a given. With a strong focus on the standardization of the process and the product, a competent engineering approach to safety, and improved economies, the 21st century will see nuclear power assume its appropriate role as a key source in the energy mix in the United States. Presenting a discussion dealing with the future is always a risky thing. One man's prognosis is another mans wild guess. Today, I would like to talk briefly on my views of the future, and especially my views on the Prospects for Nuclear Energy in the U. S. in that future. Though it is clear that nuclear energy will play a key role in fulfilling the energy needs of the world, the future of nuclear energy in the United States is not as clear. A discussion of the future of the U. S. Nuclear Industry is especially appropriate here today because I am firmly confident that the Republic of Korea will play a major role in that future. The world energy situation and the role of nuclear power has undergone a number of upsets in the last decade. Often we tend to dwell on the gloom of the past and overlook the strengths that the Nuclear Industry has developed. Presently over 437 gigawatts of electricity in the world is planned to be produced by 564 nuclear units. There are over 32 countries with commercial nuclear programs. One of the brightest of these being here in

  14. Decommissioning project of commercial nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karigome, S.

    2008-01-01

    Decommissioning project of commercial nuclear power plant in Japan was outlined. It is expected that the land, after the decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants, will serve as sites for new plants. Steps will be taken to reduce the amount of wastes generated and to recycle/reuse them. Wastes with a radioactivity concentration below the 'clearance level' need not be dealt with as radioactive material, and may be handled in the same way as conventional wastes. The Tokai-1 power station, a 166 MWe carbon dioxide cooled reactor which closed down in 1998, is being decommissioned and the first ten years as 'safe storage' to allow radioactivity to decay. Non-reactor grade components such as turbines were already removed, heat exchanger dismantling started and the reactor will be dismantled, the buildings demolished and the site left ready for reuse. All radioactive wastes will be classified as low-level wastes in three categories and will be buried under the ground. The total cost will be 88.5 billion yen -34.7 billion for dismantling and 53.8 billion for waste treatment including the graphite moderator. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Guideline on evaluation and acceptance of commercial grade digital equipment for nuclear safety applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    Nuclear power plants are increasingly upgrading their instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems with commercial digital equipment, which allows them to continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling operating costs. However, the use of commercial software-based devices for safety related applications has raised new issues that impact design, procurement, and licensing activities. This guideline describes a consistent, comprehensive approach for the evaluation and acceptance of commercial digital equipment for nuclear safety systems

  16. Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 and Romanian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mocanu Horia

    2001-01-01

    On 18 May 2001, in the presence of Mr. Adrian Nastase, the Prime-Minister of Romania, the presidents of AECL, ANSALDO and Director General of SN Nuclearelectrica, the commercial and management contract for completing the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 was signed. This document stipulates the goal and the partners' commitments, leadership organization, the SN Nuclearelectrica's control of the Budget, costs for the technical assistance (around 180 specialists from abroad), as well as the costs of equipment supplied from Canada and Italy. Services and equipment supplied by Canada and Italy amounts up to around USD 300 millions. Efforts are currently undertaken to obtain a loan of USD 300 millions from EURATOM, beginning from 2003. An auction process, implying around 10 companies, is underway and by the completion of the process, in February 2002, the practical delivery of equipment will start. The so-far invested capital amounts around USD 650 millions while the capital funds remaining to be invested amounts up to about USD 689 millions. From the latter figure, around USD 100 millions represent the costs for heavy water and the initial nuclear fuel charging. The personnel dynamics is presented as well as problems relating with recruitment and salary policy. Romanian nuclear industry is engaged for supply of a series of important components. General Turbo SA, supplied already components of some tens USD millions for the turbogenerator complex. PETROTUB company from Roman, Romania supplied already one thousand tones of non-nuclear carbon steel tubing valued at about USD 300 millions. ARIO, Bistrita, Romania, has signed contracts valued at about USD 400,000 for non-nuclear reinforcing materials. Other companies like AVERSA SA and Ventilatorul SA supplied reliable equipment for Unit 1 and will continue to do the same for Unit 2. Contracts of over one million USD are carried on with VULCAN for carbon steel fittings and with TITAN Nuclear Equipment for components of the fueling

  17. An experimental study on the effect of TV commercials on the attitudes towards nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Yasuyuki

    1999-01-01

    The present study is about the effect TV commercials have on the subjects' attitudes towards nuclear power generation. A number of 191 female students participated in the experiment. It was hypothesized that TV commercials would have a positive effect on the viewer's attitude towards nuclear power generation. The main results of the study supported this hypothesis, demonstrating that TV commercials constitute an effective means for changing people's perception of nuclear power generation. (author)

  18. Design and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan, 1976 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Fumio; Harayama, Yasuo

    1976-10-01

    The December 1975 edition (JAERI-M 5959) contained design particulars and safety features of 20 commercial nuclear power plants in Japan as of December 1974. Subsequently new plants have been put into operation and some plants under construction have undergone design modifications. The present edition presents similar data of the commercial nuclear power plants in Japan up to June 1976, compiled by computer processing. (auth.)

  19. Experience and development of on-line BWR surveillance system at Onagawa nuclear power station unit-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, A.; Chiba, K.; Kato, K.; Ebata, S.; Ando, Y.; Sakamoto, H.

    1986-01-01

    ONAGAWA nuclear power station Unit-1 (Tohoku Electric Power Co.) is a BWR-4 nuclear power station of 524 MW electric power which started commercial operation in June 1984. To attain high reliability and applicability for ONAGAWA-1, Tohoku Electric Power Co. and Toshiba started a Research and Development project on plant surveillance and diagnosis from April 1982. Main purposes of this project are to: (1) Develop an on-line surveillance system and acquire its operating experience at a commercial BWR, (2) Assist in plant operation and maintenance by data acquisition and analysis, (3) Develop a new technique for plant surveillance and diagnosis. An outline of the project, operating experience gained from the on-line surveillance system and an introduction to new diagnosis techniques are reported in this paper. (author)

  20. An experimental study on the effect of TV commercials on the attitudes towards nuclear power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Yasuyuki [Institute of Nuclear Safety System Inc., Seika, Kyoto (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    The present study is about the effect TV commercials have on the subjects' attitudes towards nuclear power generation. A number of 191 female students participated in the experiment. It was hypothesized that TV commercials would have a positive effect on the viewer's attitude towards nuclear power generation. The main results of the study supported this hypothesis, demonstrating that TV commercials constitute an effective means for changing people's perception of nuclear power generation. (author)

  1. Organizational learning in commercial nuclear power plant safety: An empirical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcus, A.A.; Bromiley, P.; Nichols, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    The need for knowledge in organizations that manage and run high risk technologies is very high. The acquisition of useful knowledge is referred to as organizational learning. The theoretical roots of this concept are well established in the academic literature and in practice, especially in manufacturing industries. This paper focuses on organizational problem solving and learning as it relates to the safe and efficient management of commercial nuclear power plants. The authors are co-investigators on a larger team working under contract with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to develop a logical framework that enables systematic examination of potential linkages between management and organizational factors and safety in nuclear power plant performance. Management and organizational factors that facilitate or impede organizational learning are only a part of the larger study, but are the major focus of this paper. In this paper, the theoretical roots of the concept of organizational learning are discussed, relationships to measures of safety and efficiency of commercial nuclear power plants are hypothesized, and empirical findings which provide partial tests of the hypotheses are discussed. This line of research appears promising; implications for further research, regulatory application, and nuclear power plant management are described

  2. Occupational employment trends in selected nuclear industry segments in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    The United States of America's nuclear energy industry expanded rapidly between 1968 and 1977, with total employment increasing by approximately 60%. Between 1973 and 1977 employment grew at a rate of 6.8% per year. The nuclear industry appears to have reached a mature status with the primary focus on commercial activities. The relative number of workers involved in research and development activities, outside of contract research facilities, has declined considerably since 1968 but appears to have stabilized. The industry labour force still has a relatively high proportion (43%) of scientific, engineering and technical workers. The occupational employment composition appears to have stabilized in the various nuclear segments indicating the emergence of longer run occupational distribution patterns. Employment expanded rapidly between 1968 and 1977 in most nuclear segments, with the exception of the research and development segment, where employment decreased by one-third. The present uncertainties concerning nuclear power development could have substantial impacts on the nuclear-related scientific, engineering, and technical labour force if a sizeable contraction occurs in reactor design and manufacturing and in design of nuclear facilities. (author)

  3. Nuclear Data Unit correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1968-04-15

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee, and includes the names of all INDC members, liaison officers and correspondents of the Nuclear Data Unit. The IAEA Nuclear Data Unit tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. The recipients of this list are encouraged to inform the Nuclear Data Unit of any corrections, additions and deletions deemed necessary. Because of the variety of document origins and functions, and the number of countries served by this list, each addressee is assigned a seven-letter distribution code, shown to the left of each name, which indicates the categories of documents he receives. The names appear under three categories, member states, international organizations and non-member states, and are listed in alphabetical order within each state or organization. The main list is followed by seven shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, and the total number of individuals in each category.

  4. Nuclear Data Unit correspondents for the exchange of nuclear data information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-04-01

    This list serves as a basis for the distribution of documents originated by or for the International Nuclear Data Committee, and includes the names of all INDC members, liaison officers and correspondents of the Nuclear Data Unit. The IAEA Nuclear Data Unit tries to maintain this list up-to-date in order to facilitate an efficient interchange of information on nuclear data topics. The recipients of this list are encouraged to inform the Nuclear Data Unit of any corrections, additions and deletions deemed necessary. Because of the variety of document origins and functions, and the number of countries served by this list, each addressee is assigned a seven-letter distribution code, shown to the left of each name, which indicates the categories of documents he receives. The names appear under three categories, member states, international organizations and non-member states, and are listed in alphabetical order within each state or organization. The main list is followed by seven shorter lists, indicating the names of individuals in each distribution category, and the total number of individuals in each category

  5. United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War: Nuclear War Course Summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Briefly describes 46 courses on nuclear war available from United Campuses to Prevent Nuclear War (UCAM). These courses are currently being or have been taught at colleges/universities, addressing effects of nuclear war, arms race history, new weapons, and past arms control efforts. Syllabi (with assignments/reading lists) are available from UCAM.…

  6. Costs and results of federal incentives for commercial nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdek, R.H.; Wendling, R.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper (1) estimates the total costs of federal expenditures in support of incentives for the development of commercial nuclear energy through 1988, and (2) analyzes the results and benefits to the nation of this federal investment. The federal incentives analyzed include research and development, regulation of commercial nuclear energy, tax incentives, waste management and disposal, enrichment plants, liability insurance, the uranium mining industry, and all other federal support activities. The authors estimate that net federal incentives totaled about $45-50 billion (1988 dollars). They estimate the results of the federal incentives, focusing on six categories, namely, electric energy produced, the total (direct plus indirect) economic benefits of the industry created, R and D program benefits, value of energy imports displaced, environmental effects, and health, safety, and risk effects. The results total $1.9 trillion, with approximately $250-300 billion identified as net benefits. The authors conclude that the high return on the investment justified federal incentives for nuclear energy development over the past four decades and that the federal government and the nation have received a significant return on the incentives investment

  7. Commercial nuclear waste repository in basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, M.P.; Patricio, J.G.; Heley, W.H.

    1980-06-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) is an ongoing research and engineering effort being conducted by Rockwell Hanford Operations (Rockwell), which is under contract to the US Department of Energy. The objectives of this program are to assess the feasibility of and to provide the technology needed to design and construct a licensed commercial nuclear waste repository in the deep basalt formations underlying the Hanford Site. An extensive preconceptual design effort was undertaken during 1979 to develop a feasible concept that could serve as a reference design for both surface and underground facilities. The preconceptual design utilized existing technology to the greatest extent possible to offer a system design that could be utilized in establishing schedule and cost baseline data, recommend alternatives that require additional study, and develop basic design requirements that would allow evolution of the design process prior to the existence of legislated criteria. This paper provides a description of the concept developed for the subsurface aspects of this nuclear waste repository

  8. U.S. Nuclear Power Reactor Plant Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    Nuclear Regulatory Commission — Demographic data on U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors, including: plant name/unit number, docket number, location, licensee, reactor/containment type, nuclear...

  9. Seminar on the organization and management of a commercial nuclear power project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peddicord, K.L.; Alvis, J.M.; Chitkara, K.K.

    1986-01-01

    A main function of student branches of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) is to identify activities that contribute to the professional development and growth of its student members. Over the past several years, the ANS student branch at Texas A and M University has toured the construction site of the South Texas Nuclear Project (STNP), which is jointly owned by the Houston Lighting and Power Company (HL and P), the City of San Antonio, the Central Power and Light Company, and the City of Austin. This year, student branch organizers recognized that another aspect of a commercial nuclear power plant was not being covered either in the academic course work or the plant tours. This facet includes the organization and management required to undertake a major nuclear power project. To fill this gap, HL and P sponsored a one-day seminar that covered the various managerial functions for STNP. The seminar on the Organization and Management at a Commercial Nuclear Power Project was very interesting and beneficial. Other ANS branches and utilities may find this to be a useful model for future activities

  10. Decommissioning situation and research and development for the decommissioning of the commercial nuclear power station in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tatsumi.

    1996-01-01

    There are 48 commercial nuclear power stations in operation in Japan as of January 1, 1995, which supplies about 28% (2.2 x 10 8 MWh) of total annual electricity generation in FY 1992. Accordingly, as the nuclear power contributes so much in electricity generation, there is a growing concern in the public toward the safety on decommissioning nuclear power station. It is gravely important to secure the safety throughout the decommissioning. This paper discusses: the decommissioning situation in Japan; the Japanese national policy for decommissioning of commercial nuclear power stations; R and D for decommissioning of commercial nuclear power stations in Japan; and the present conditions of low-level radioactive wastes disposal in Japan

  11. 78 FR 18561 - Determination Under the Textile and Apparel Commercial Availability Provision of the United...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ...: Authority: The US-Colombia TPA; Section 203(o)(4) of the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement... Commercial Availability Provision of the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement (``US-Colombia TPA... Under the Commercial Availability Provision of the United States-Colombia Trade Promotion Agreement, 77...

  12. Financing Nuclear Projects. Case Study: Unit 2 Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, Teodor; Constantin, Carmencita; Dobrin, Marian

    2003-01-01

    The implementation of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) is a major undertaking for all entities involved, due to the necessity of planning work and coordination of the implementation process of the different fields of interest, starting with the governmental authorities and ending with the public. Having in view the specific investment costs (relatively high) for a NPP, finding an adequate financing structure is possible through an iterative process that involves first an assessment of the technical performances of the project and secondly, the mathematical modelling of the financing structure effects on the projects. In this respect, the paper will be focused on the main steps needed in order to promote an investment project in nuclear field, starting with the decision phase, providing the documentation requested by the local and international authorities to promote the project and ending with the negotiation of the contracts (commercial contract, financing contract, purchase contract, etc). The case study will be focused on the phases achieved in order to promote the Unit 2 NPP Cernavoda completion works project. (authors)

  13. Financing nuclear projects. Case study: Unit 2 Cernavoda NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirica, T.; Pall, S.; Lebedev, A.; Dobrin, M.

    2003-01-01

    The implementation of a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) in a country is a major undertaking for all entities involved, due to the necessity of planning work and co-ordination of the implementation process of the different fields of interest, starting with the governmental authorities and ending with the people. Having in view the specific investment cost (relatively high) for a NPP, to find an adequate financing structure is possible through an iterative process that involves first an assessment of the technical performances of the project and second, the mathematical modelling of the financing structure effects on the project. In this respect, the paper proposed will be focused on the main steps needed in order to promote an investment project in nuclear field, starting with the decision phase, providing the documentations requested by the local and international authorities to promote the project and ending with the negotiation of the contracts (commercial contract, financing contract, power purchase contract, etc.) The case study will be focused on the phases achieved in order to promote the Unit 2 Cernavoda NPP completion works project. (author)

  14. Operation of Nuclear Fuel Based on Reprocessed Uranium for VVER-type Reactors in Competitive Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troyanov, V.; Molchanov, V.; Tuzov, A. [TVEL Corporation, 49 Kashirskoe shosse, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Semchenkov, Yu.; Lizorkin, M. [RRC ' Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Vasilchenko, I.; Lushin, V. [OKB ' Gidropress' (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-15

    Current nuclear fuel cycle of Russian nuclear power involves reprocessed low-enriched uranium in nuclear fuel production for some NPP units with VVER-type LWR. This paper discusses design and performance characteristics of commercial nuclear fuel based on natural and reprocessed uranium. It presents the review of results of commercial operation of nuclear fuel based on reprocessed uranium on Russian NPPs-unit No.2 of Kola NPP and unit No.2 of Kalinin NPP. The results of calculation and experimental validation of safe fuel operation including necessary isotope composition conformed to regulation requirements and results of pilot fuel operation are also considered. Meeting the customer requirements the possibility of high burn-up achieving was demonstrated. In addition the paper compares the characteristics of nuclear fuel cycles with maximum length based on reprocessed and natural uranium considering relevant 5% enrichment limitation and necessity of {sup 236}U compensation. The expedience of uranium-235 enrichment increasing over 5% is discussed with the aim to implement longer fuel cycles. (authors)

  15. Current status of nuclear power in the United States and around the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKlveen, J W

    1990-09-01

    Nuclear energy's share of the world electricity market has been growing over the past 35 years. In 1989, eight generating units entered commercial operation abroad and three new units were licensed in the U.S. In early 1990, Mexico became the 26th country to produce electricity from nuclear power. Currently the 426 operating reactors supply one sixth of the world's total electrical capacity. Fourteen countries have now operated nuclear plants for 20 or more years. Since 1980, France has been the leader in the use of nuclear power and currently generates three quarters of its electricity from 54 nuclear plants. The U.S. has 112 nuclear plants, the largest number of any country in the world. These plants satisfy almost 20 percent of U.S. electrical energy requirements. Last year Three Mile Island, the would-be icon for everything that is wrong with the nuclear industry was rated as the most efficient nuclear plant in the world. The worldwide trend toward acceptance of nuclear is improving slightly, but many political and societal issues need to be resolved. Whereas recent polls indicate that a majority of the people realize nuclear must be a major contributor to the energy mix of the future, many are reluctant to support the technology until the issue of waste disposal has been resolved. Fears of another Chernobyl, lack of capital, and a new anti-nuclear campaign by Greenpeace will keep the nuclear debate alive in many countries. Additional stumbling blocks in the U.S. include the need to develop a new generation of improved reactor designs which emphasize passive safety features, standardized designs and a stream-lined federal licensing process. Nuclear power is really not dead. Even environmentalists are starting to give it another look. A nuclear renaissance will occur in the U.S. How soon or under what conditions remain to be seen. The next crisis in the U.S. will not be a shortage of energy, rather a shortage of electricity.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear plants. Final report of Subtask B: dosimeter response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, F.M.; Endres, G.W.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1983-03-01

    As part of a larger program to evaluate personnel neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear power plants, this study was designed to characterize neutron dosimeter responses inside the containment structure of commercial nuclear plants. In order to characterize those responses, dosimeters were irradiated inside containment at 2 pressurized water reactors and at pipe penetrations outside the biological shield at two boiling water reactors. The reactors were operating at full power during the irradiations. Measurements were also performed with electronic instruments, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and portable remmeters, SNOOPY, RASCAL and PNR-4.

  17. Neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear plants. Final report of Subtask B: dosimeter response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummings, F.M.; Endres, G.W.R.; Brackenbush, L.W.

    1983-03-01

    As part of a larger program to evaluate personnel neutron dosimetry at commercial nuclear power plants, this study was designed to characterize neutron dosimeter responses inside the containment structure of commercial nuclear plants. In order to characterize those responses, dosimeters were irradiated inside containment at 2 pressurized water reactors and at pipe penetrations outside the biological shield at two boiling water reactors. The reactors were operating at full power during the irradiations. Measurements were also performed with electronic instruments, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), and portable remmeters, SNOOPY, RASCAL and PNR-4

  18. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the 3rd unit, (The Nuclear Waste Policy Act) a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  19. Nuclear power plant construction activity, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Cost estimates, chronological data on construction progress, and the physical characteristics of nuclear units in commercial operation and units in the construction pipeline as of December 31, 1986, are presented. This report, which is updated annually, was prepared to provide an overview of the nuclear power plant construction industry. The report contains information on the status of nuclear generating units, average construction costs and lead-times, and construction milestones for individual reactors

  20. Management of commercial high-level nuclear waste in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Act), enacted by the 97th Congress in December and signed into law on Jan 7, 1983, by President Reagan, brings a whole new perspective to the nation's nuclear waste management effort. An elaborate set of near-term requirements and actions have to be accomplished within the first 180 days of this Act. As an initial step, Secretary of Energy Donald P. Hodel has established a Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) project office. The director of the NWPA project office, Robert L. Morgan, is responsible for the department's initial activities to implement the Act until the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, established by Section 304 of the Act, is activated. The Act requires major efforts in two primary areas: disposal and storage of spent fuel and high-level waste. Efforts in the former area are to be financed by fees collected from utilities and placed into a Nuclear Waste Fund for disposal services. The Act provides for federal storage of up to 1900 tons of spent fuel for those utilities that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) determines cannot reasonably provide sufficient additional on-site storage. This federal storage is to be financed through utility-user fees that are placed into an Interim Storage Fund. The Act also provides for cooperative research, development, and demonstration activities at utility sites and federal sites. These activities are to be jointly funded by the utilities and the federal government. Lastly, there are generic research and development (RandD) activities in the spent fuel area that are funded from general appropriations. Mandated milestones have been established by the Act in the areas of gologic repository, fund management, monitored retrievable storage, and spent fuel storage

  1. Initial startup and operations of Yonggwang Units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, T.J.; Chari, D.R.; Kiraly, F.

    1996-01-01

    A significant milestone in the nuclear power industry was achieved in 1995, when Yonggwang (YGN) Units 3 and 4 were accepted into in commercial operation by Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO). YGN Unit 3 was accepted into commercial operation on March 31, 1995, the original date established during project initiation. YGN Unit 4 was accepted into operation on January 1, 1996, 3 months ahead of schedule. Each YGN unit produces approximately 1,050 Mwe and supplies approximately ten percent of the total electric power demand in the Republic of Korea (ROK). The overall plant efficiency is approximately 37% which is at least 1% higher than most nuclear units. Since achieving commercial operation, YGN Unit 3 has operated at essentially full power which has resulted in an annual performance rate in excess of 85%. YGN Unit 3 is the first of six pressurized water reactors which are currently under design and construction in the ROK and serves as the reference design for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant program. Both YGN Units 3 and 4 include a System 800 Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS). The NSSS is rated at 2,815 Mwth and is the ABB-CE standard design. The design includes numerous advanced design features which enhance plant safety, performance and operability. A well executed startup test program was successfully completed on both units prior to commercial operation. A summary of the YGN NSSS design features, the startup test program and selected test results demonstrating the performance of those features are presented in this paper

  2. Concrete works in Igata Nuclear Power Station Unit-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanase, Hidemasa

    1981-01-01

    The construction of Igata Nuclear Power Station Unit-2 was started in February, 1978, and is scheduled to start the commercial operation in March, 1982. Construction works are to be finished by August, 1981. The buildings of Igata Nuclear Power Station are composed of large cross section concrete for the purpose of shielding and the resistance to earth quakes. In response to this, moderate heat Portland cement has been employed, and in particular, the heat of hydration has been controlled. In this report, also fine and coarse aggregates, admixtures and chemical admixtures, and further, the techniques to improve the quality are described. Concrete preparation plant was installed in the power station site. Fresh concrete was carried with agitator body trucks from the preparation plant to the unloading point, and from there with pump trucks. Placing of concrete was carried out, striving to obtain homogeneous and dense concrete by using rod type vibrators. Further, concrete was placed in low slump (8 - 15 cm) to reduce water per unit volume, and its temperature was also carefully controlled, e.g., cold water (temperature of mixing water was about 10 deg C) was used in summer season (end of June to end of September). As a result, the control target was almost satisfied. As for testing and inspection, visual appearance test was done as well as material testing in compliance with JIS and other standards. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  3. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 3, The Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This teachers guide is unit 3, the nuclear waste policy act, in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear power plants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  4. Commercial basis to nuclear industry skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Mike

    1989-01-01

    The United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) has considerable experience in measurement and control systems which it has designed for nuclear reactor use. It is now using this experience to help other industries needing to monitor variables such as flow, level, position, conductivity, thickness, temperature, density, sound, vibrations, light, movement, pressure, strain and radiation. Recently British Nuclear Fuels sought UKAEA's help to solve a process measurement problem at the Sellafield encapsulation plant which is used to recycle unspent fuel and immobilise liquid wastes using a cementation process. The level and specific gravity of the liquid waste slurry must be accurately measured before the correct amount of solidifying material can be added. The solution to this problem, using pneumacator technology, is described. (author)

  5. Canisters and nonfuel components at commercial nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbard, K.; Disbrow, J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses detailed data on canisters and nonfuel components (NFC) at US commercial nuclear power reactors. A wide variety of NFC have been reported on the Form RW-859, open-quotes Nuclear Fuel Dataclose quotes survey. They may have been integral with an assembly, noncanistered in baskets, destined for disposal as low-level radioactive waste, or stored in canisters. Similarly, data on the family of canistered spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in storage pools was compiled. Approximately 85 percent of the 40,194 pieces of nonfuel assembly (NFA) hardware reported were integral with an assembly. This represents data submitted by 95 of the 107 reactors in 10 generic assembly classes. In addition, a total of 286 canisters have been reported as being in storage pools as of December 31, 1992. However, an additional 264 open baskets were also reported to contain miscellaneous SNF and nonfuel materials, garbage and debris. All of these 286 canisters meet the dimensional envelope requirements specified for disposal for open-quotes standard fuelclose quotes under the Standard Contract for Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel and/or High-Level Radioactive Waste (10 CFR 961); most of the baskets do not

  6. A model for the release, dispersion and environmental impact of a postulated reactor accident from a submerged commercial nuclear power plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertch, Timothy Creston

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are inherently suitable for submerged applications and could provide power to the shore power grid or support future underwater applications. The technology exists today and the construction of a submerged commercial nuclear power plant may become desirable. A submerged reactor is safer to humans because the infinite supply of water for heat removal, particulate retention in the water column, sedimentation to the ocean floor and inherent shielding of the aquatic environment would significantly mitigate the effects of a reactor accident. A better understanding of reactor operation in this new environment is required to quantify the radioecological impact and to determine the suitability of this concept. The impact of release to the environment from a severe reactor accident is a new aspect of the field of marine radioecology. Current efforts have been centered on radioecological impacts of nuclear waste disposal, nuclear weapons testing fallout and shore nuclear plant discharges. This dissertation examines the environmental impact of a severe reactor accident in a submerged commercial nuclear power plant, modeling a postulated site on the Atlantic continental shelf adjacent to the United States. This effort models the effects of geography, decay, particle transport/dispersion, bioaccumulation and elimination with associated dose commitment. The use of a source term equivalent to the release from Chernobyl allows comparison between the impacts of that accident and the postulated submerged commercial reactor plant accident. All input parameters are evaluated using sensitivity analysis. The effect of the release on marine biota is determined. Study of the pathways to humans from gaseous radionuclides, consumption of contaminated marine biota and direct exposure as contaminated water reaches the shoreline is conducted. The model developed by this effort predicts a significant mitigation of the radioecological impact of the reactor accident release

  7. Construction of Shika Nuclear Power Station Unit No.2 of the Hokuriku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanari, Shozo; Miyahara, Ryohei; Umezawa, Takeshi; Teshiba, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    Construction of the Shika Nuclear Power Station Unit No.2 of the Hokuriku Electric Power Co., Inc. (advanced boiling-water reactor; output: 1.358 mega watts) was begun in August 1999 and it will resume commercial operation in March 2006 as scheduled. Hitachi contributed effectually toward realizing the project with supply of a complete set of the advanced nuclear reactor and turbine-generator system with the latest design and construction technology in harmony. Large-scale modular structures for installation and a computer-aided engineering system for work procedure and schedule management were applied with the utmost priority placed on work efficiency, safety and quality assurance. (T.Tanaka)

  8. An overview of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, T.L.; Morreale, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of low-level radioactive (LLW) waste management is to safely dispose of LLW while protecting the health of the public and the quality of the environment. LLW in the United States is generated through both Department of Energy (DOE) and commercial activities. In this paper, waste from commercial activities will be referred to as ''commercial LLW.'' The DOE waste will not be discussed in this paper. Commercial LLW is waste that is generated by Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated licensees or Agreement States. Commercial LLW is generated by nuclear power reactors, hospitals, universities, and manufacturers. This paper will give an overview of the current disposal technologies planned by selected States' for disposing of their LLW and the processes by which those selections were made. 3 refs

  9. IAEA Completes Nuclear Security Review Mission in United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: A team of nuclear security experts led by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) today completed a mission to review nuclear security practices of civil nuclear facilities licensed by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Conducted at the U.S. Government's request, the two-week International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) mission reviewed the United States' nuclear security-related legislative and regulatory framework. As part of this work, the IPPAS team, led by John O'Dacre of Canada and comprising nine experts from eight IAEA Member States, met with NRC officials and reviewed the physical protection systems at the Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The IPPAS team concluded that nuclear security within the U.S. civil nuclear sector is robust and sustainable and has been significantly enhanced in recent years. The team identified a number of good practices in the nation's nuclear security regime and at the NCNR. The IPPAS team also made a recommendation and some suggestions for the continuing improvement of nuclear security overall. The mission in the United States was the 60th IPPAS mission organized by the IAEA. 'Independent international peer reviews such as IAEA IPPAS missions are increasingly being recognized for their value as a key component for exchanges of views and advice on nuclear security measures', said Khammar Mrabit, Director of the IAEA Office of Nuclear Security. 'The good practices identified during this mission will contribute to the continuous improvements of nuclear security in other Member States'. The IPPAS team provided a draft report to the NRC and will submit a final report soon. Because it contains security-related information about a specific nuclear site, IPPAS reports are not made public. 'The IPPAS programme gives us a chance to learn from the experience and perspective of our international partners', said NRC Chairman Allison M

  10. Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories.

  11. Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories

  12. Nuclear hydrogen production programme in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sink, C.

    2010-01-01

    The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) is focused on demonstrating the economic, commercial-scale production of hydrogen using process heat derived from nuclear energy. NHI-supported research has concentrated to date on three technologies compatible with the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP): high temperature steam electrolysis (HTE); sulphur-iodine (S-I) thermochemical; and hybrid sulphur (HyS) thermochemical. In 2009 NHI will down select to a single technology on which to focus its future development efforts, for which the next step will be a pilot-scale experiment. (author)

  13. Summary of commissioning of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit No.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakunaga, T.; Sekine, Y.; Yamada, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Kawahara, M.

    2006-01-01

    The Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit No.5 was put into commercial operation in January 2005, which is the 1380 MWe advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR) incorporating design improvements and latest technologies of safer operation, reliability and maintenance. For example, S-FMCRD (Sealless Fine-Motion Control Rod Drive) was equipped to eliminate the use of seal housing by adopting a magnetic coupling and also ASD (Adjustable Speed Drive- the multiple drive power supply to reactor internal pumps) that can drive two or three Recirculation Internal Pumps with a large-capacity inverter. The reactor start-up tests were performed about for eleven months from February 2004 to confirm the plant's required performance including design change points. (T. Tanaka)

  14. A Study on the Use of Commercial Satellite Imagery for Monitoring of Yongbyon Nuclear Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    It is particularly useful for the areas that are hard to access, such as the DPRK. On April 2009, North Korea expelled IAEA inspectors and USA disabling team at Yongbyon. Since then, there is not much left except for satellite imagery analysis. In this paper, we focused on the growing role and importance of commercial satellite imagery analysis for detecting and identifying nuclear activities at Yongbyon. For this, we examined monitoring capability of commercial satellite imagery status of commercial satellite imagery analysis to monitor the Yongbyon nuclear site. And we suggested several recommendations for enhancing the monitoring and analyzing capability. Current commercial satellite imagery has proven effective in monitoring for Yongbyon nuclear activities, especially change detection including the new construction activities. But identification and technical analysis of the operation status is still limited. In case of North Korea, operation status of 5 MWe reactor should be clearly identified to assess its plutonium production capability and to set up the negotiation strategy. To enhance the monitoring capability, we need much more thermal infrared imagery and radar imagery.

  15. Evaluation Of Electricity Production Cost Of Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Models

    OpenAIRE

    DÖNER, Nimeti

    2017-01-01

    The level of the development of countries is being measured by thecountry’s quantity of production and consumption energy. Concerning Turkey,according to an energy report of The World Energy Council Turkish NationalCommittee in order to meet the electricity needs of the country in 2010, there should befounded a 2000 MW(e) capacity nuclear power plant. For the nuclear electric powerplant considered to be founded in Turkey, three types of commercial reactor models,that are Pressiued Water React...

  16. Incorporation of safety interlocks in commercial robotics for handling of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    Current robotic systems have been developed primarily for the automotive and electronic industry. The adaptation of these commercial robotic systems to applications in the manufacturing of nuclear fuel requires the addition of safety interlocks as to the handling and accountability of nuclear materials. Also, additional safety interlocks are required when the robots are operated in containment enclosures that are environmentally sealed. Interlocks have been incorporated into a commercial robot. The robotic system has been installed in the containment enclosure as part of the pellet storage subsystem into the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) facility currently being built by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The system has been installed in the Fuel Cycle Plant and is scheduled for initial operational testing in 1986

  17. Incorporation of safety interlocks in commercial robotics for handling of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, F.W.

    1986-01-01

    The adaptation of commercial robotic systems to applications in the manufacturing of nuclear fuel has required the addition of safety interlocks as to the handling and accountability of nuclear materials. Also, additional safety interlocks are required when the robots are operated in containment enclosures that are environmentally sealed. Interlocks have been incorporated in a commercial robot which was modified and with additional interlocks into the existing robotic control system. The robotic system has been installed in the containment enclosure as part of the pellet storage subsystem in the Secure Automated Fabrication facility currently being built by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. The system has been installed in the Fuel Cycle Plant and is scheduled for initial operational testing in 1986

  18. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

  19. Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackschewsky, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as 'endangered' when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A 'threatened' classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals

  20. World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System: Model documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    The World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES) is an aggregate demand-based partial equilibrium model used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to project long-term domestic and international nuclear energy requirements. WINES follows a top-down approach in which economic growth rates, delivered energy demand growth rates, and electricity demand are projected successively to ultimately forecast total nuclear generation and nuclear capacity. WINES could be potentially used to produce forecasts for any country or region in the world. Presently, WINES is being used to generate long-term forecasts for the United States, and for all countries with commercial nuclear programs in the world, excluding countries located in centrally planned economic areas. Projections for the United States are developed for the period from 2010 through 2030, and for other countries for the period starting in 2000 or 2005 (depending on the country) through 2010. EIA uses a pipeline approach to project nuclear capacity for the period between 1990 and the starting year for which the WINES model is used. This approach involves a detailed accounting of existing nuclear generating units and units under construction, their capacities, their actual or estimated time of completion, and the estimated date of retirements. Further detail on this approach can be found in Appendix B of Commercial Nuclear Power 1991: Prospects for the United States and the World

  1. United States - Japanese nuclear relations: implications for the pacific region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttmeier, R.P.

    1980-01-01

    The initiation of a new approach to non-proliferation policy by the United States in 1977 was the most upsetting development in the history of US-Japanese nuclear relations. The policy has seemingly altered Japanese views of its own nuclear future very little, yet it has altered the tone of the nuclear relationship with the United States. Recent Japanese nuclear power developments, both technical and administrative, are outlined and the prospects for the future of the United States-Japanese nuclear relationship and for Pacific regional cooperation assessed. Issues of importance in the relationship include reprocessing - enrichment, plutonium management, spent fuel and waste management and uranium supplies

  2. Fire protection of safe shutdown capability at commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, K.

    1993-01-01

    The comprehensive industrial safety standards and codes that exist today have evolved from lessons learned through past experience, research results, and improvements in technological capabilities. The current requirements for fire safety features of commercial nuclear power stations operated in the US are a notable example of this practice. Although fire protection has always been an important design requirement, from the aftermath of a serious fire that occurred in 1975 at the Browns Ferry plant, it was learned that the life safety and property protection concerns of the major fire insurance underwriters may not sufficiently encompass nuclear safety issues, particularly with regard to the potential for fire damage to result in the common mode failure of redundant trains of systems, and components important to the safe shutdown of the reactor. Following its investigations into the Browns Ferry fire, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) promulgated guidance documents, which ultimately developed into mandatory regulations, necessary to assure the implementation of a fire protection program that would address nuclear safety concerns. The new criteria that evolved, contain prescriptive design features, as well as personnel and administrative requirements the Commission determined to be necessary to provide a defense-in-depth level of protection against the hazards of fire and its associated effects on safety related equipment. These criteria are primarily contained in Appendix R of Title 10 to the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50). Since 1983, various members of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have provided technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in support of its evaluations of fire protection features implemented at commercial nuclear power stations operated in the US. This paper presents a discussion of the insights gained by the author during his active participation in this area

  3. Thermal Environment Evaluation in Commercial Kitchens of United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    The indoor climate in commercial kitchens is often unsatisfactory and the working conditions can have a significant effect on employees’ comfort and productivity. The differences between type (fast food, dining, etc.) and climatic zone can have an influence on the environment conditions and on th......The indoor climate in commercial kitchens is often unsatisfactory and the working conditions can have a significant effect on employees’ comfort and productivity. The differences between type (fast food, dining, etc.) and climatic zone can have an influence on the environment conditions...... of defining the values of thermal comfort parameters in kitchens. It can also help to evaluate if the standardized methods are applicable for such non-uniform environment, like commercial kitchens. By using an established method and procedure for evaluating the indoor thermal comfort in commercial kitchens...... more than 100 kitchens environments in the United States were investigated in summer and winter. Results show the influence due to type of kitchen (fast food, casual, etc.) and climatic region. Physical measurement confirmed that communally the workers are exposed to a warm or hot environment...

  4. 76 FR 24538 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; NRC-2011-0100; Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; Docket Nos. 50-269, 50-270, and 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

  5. The Nuclear Renaissance in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buongiorno, Jacopo

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear power currently provides 20% of the electricity generation in the U.S. and about 16% worldwide. As a carbon-free energy source, nuclear is receiving a lot of attention by industry, lawmakers and environmental groups, as they attempt to resolve the issue of man-made climate change. For the first time in 30 years several U.S. electric utilities have applied for construction and operation licenses of new nuclear power plants. This talk will review the safety, operational and economic record of the existing U.S. commercial reactor fleet, will provide an overview of the reactor designs considered for the new wave of plant construction, and will discuss several research projects being conducted at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to support the expansion of nuclear power in the U.S. and overseas.

  6. The nuclear energy in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-02-01

    With challenges like the climatic change, the hydrocarbons prices increase and the energy supply security, the nuclear park is becoming a decisive and an urgent question in the United Kingdom. The author proposes an historical aspect of the nuclear energy in UK, the actors of the today nuclear industry and the technologies used in 2006, the radioactive wastes management, the programs of the future and the british opinion on the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  7. Nuclear containment systems and in-service inspection status of Korea nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jihong, Park; Jaekeun, Hong; Banuk, Park [Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials, Dept. of Authorized Test and Evaluation, Kyungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    20 unit nuclear power plants in Korea have been operated and maintained since the first unit started in commercial service in 1978. Most recently 4 units were under construction and several units were planned to be constructed. by industries. 4 types of nuclear containment systems have been constructed until now: first, metal containments, then pre-stressed concrete containments with grouted tendon systems, followed by pre-stressed concrete containments with un-grouted tendon systems, and Korea standard nuclear containments. All the nuclear containments should be inspected periodically. Therefore for periodic in-service inspection, several appropriate technical requirements should be applied differently depending on the specific nuclear containment types. With the changes of times, nuclear containment systems have undergone a remarkable change, and finally nuclear containment system of Korea standard nuclear power plant was settled down, and as a matter of course it dominates the trend of present and future nuclear containment systems. Overall in-service inspection results of most Korea nuclear containments have not showed any serious evidence of degradation.

  8. Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit No.1 at the implementation and feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Yuhua; Xiao Bo; He Liu; Huang Min

    2014-01-01

    The article introduces the Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.l purpose, range of experience, experiment preparation, implementation, feedback and response. Turn of nuclear steam turbo-generator set flush, using the main reactor coolant pump and regulator of the heat generated by the electric heating element and the total heat capacity in secondary circuit of reactor coolant system (steam generator secondary side) of saturated steam turbine rushed to 1500 RPM, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 implementation of the performance of the inspection of steam turbine and its auxiliary system, through the test problems found in the clean up in time, the nuclear steam sweep turn smooth realization has accumulated experience. At the same time, Fuqing nuclear power of nuclear steam turbine generating unit no.1 at turn is half speed steam turbine generator non-nuclear turn at the first, with its smooth realization of other nuclear power steam turbine generator set in the field of non-nuclear turn play a reference role. (authors)

  9. Commercialism - the growth prospect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, D.K.R.

    1990-01-01

    In an attempt to ensure good business proposals for the future British Nuclear Fuels Limited (BNFL) is making a number of international initiatives. Likely markets for expansion include the United States, Japan and Western Europe, to whom the company can offer activities such as oxide fuel reprocessing, uranium hexafluoride conversion, fabrication of oxide and mixed oxide fuels, uranium enrichment and the safe transport of nuclear materials. The creation of International Nuclear Fuels Limited will expand overseas business and ensure security of fuel supply for the international nuclear industry. Working jointly with AEA Technology, BNFL will seek to market their combined decommissioning experience on the international market. The author concludes the BNFL is in a strong position to supply an increasing world-wide need for nuclear waste management and increased commercial awareness within the company will ensure a good section of the market is secured. U.K

  10. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: The Nuclear Waste Policy Act, Unit 3. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 3 of the four-part series, Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to identify the key elements of the United States' nuclear waste dilemma and introduce the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and the role of the…

  11. Heat balance calculation and feasibility analysis for initial startup of Fuqing nuclear turbine unit with non-nuclear steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Liu; Xiao Bo; Song Yumeng

    2014-01-01

    Non-nuclear steam run up compared with nuclear steam run up, can verify the design, manufacture, installation quality of the unit, at the same time shorten the follow-up duration of the entire group ready to start debugging time. In this paper, starting from the first law of thermodynamics, Analyzed Heat balance Calculation and Feasibility analysis for Initial startup of Fuqing nuclear Turbine unit with Non-nuclear steam, By the above calculation, to the system requirements and device status on the basis of technical specifications, confirmed the feasibility of Non-nuclear steam running up in theory. After the implementation of the Non-nuclear turn of Fuqing unit, confirmed the results fit with the actual process. In summary, the Initial startup of Fuqing turbine unit with Non-nuclear steam is feasible. (authors)

  12. Lessons learned from the West Valley spent nuclear fuel shipment within the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyacke, M.J.; Anderson, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the lessons learned from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) transportation of 125 DOE-owned commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies by railroad from the West Valley Demonstration Project to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). On July 17, 2003, DOE made the largest single shipment of commercial SNF in the history of the United States. This was a highly visible and political shipment that used two specially designed Type B transportation and storage casks. This paper describes the background and history of the shipment. It discusses the technical challenges for licensing Type B packages for hauling large quantities of SNF, including the unique design features, testing and analysis. This paper also discusses the preshipment planning, preparations, coordination, route evaluation and selection, carrier selection and negotiations, security, inspections, tracking, and interim storage at the INEEL

  13. The radioactive waste debate in the United States and nuclear technology for peaceful purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehan, Terrence Norbert

    Many ethical, cultural, and economic concerns have accompanied the rapid growth of Western technology. Nuclear technology in particular has experienced considerable opposition because of its perceived dangers, especially disposal of atomic waste. While this field of science remains in its infancy, many legal, political and ecological groups oppose any further application of nuclear technology--including the significant medical, environmental, and economic benefits possible from a safe and responsible application of nuclear energy. Complete and objective knowledge of this technology is needed to balance a healthy respect for the danger of atomic power with its many advantages. This study focuses on one aspect of nuclear technology that has particularly aroused political and social controversy: nuclear waste. Finding ways of disposing safely of nuclear waste has become an extremely volatile issue because of the popular misconception that there is no permanent solution to this problem. This investigation will demonstrate that the supposedly enduring waste problem has been resolved in several industrial countries that now outstrip the United States in safe commercial applications of nuclear science. This dissertation offers a reasoned and objective contribution to the continuing national debate on the peaceful uses of nuclear technology. This debate becomes more crucial as the nation seeks a dependable substitute for the non-renewable sources of energy now rapidly being exhausted.

  14. U.S.-China commercial nuclear commerce: Nonproliferation and trade issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The report concludes that the United States should not be denied access to the Chinese nuclear energy program. To the contrary, the report finds that--provided China meets the requisite nonproliferation criteria--it is strongly in the US national interest to engage in peaceful nuclear, cooperation with China, from security, environmental, safety, and economic perspectives

  15. Status of commercial food irradiation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welt, M.A.

    1983-01-01

    It may be difficult for some to realize, but the United States is now starting its fourth decade in food irradiation research. This vast storehouse of research data now makes the ultimate task of bringing the technology to the consumer marketplace that much easier. Radiation Technology, Inc. of Rockaway, New Jersey has pioneered the use of radiation processing for the commercial preservation of food and has established the first food irradiation facility in the United States in West Memphis, Arkansas. The facility, designed by Radiation Technology, Inc., provides the necessary versatility to meet the needs of the food industry. (author)

  16. Status of commercial food irradiation in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welt, Martin A.

    It may be difficult for some to realize, but the United States is now starting its fourth decade in food irradiation research. This vast storehouse of research data now makes the ultimate task of bringing the technology to the consumer marketplace that much easier. Radiation Technology, Inc. of Rockaway, New Jersey has pioneered the use of radiation processing for the commercial preservation of food and has established the first food irradiation facility in the United States in West Memphis, Arkansas. The facility, designed by Radiation Technology, Inc., provides the necessary versatility to meet the needs of the food industry.

  17. Summary of plant life management evaluation for Onagawa Nuclear Power Station Unit-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodate, Kazumi

    2014-01-01

    The Onagawa Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 (Onagawa NPS-1) began commercial operation on June 1, 1984, and has reached 30-year from starting of operation on June of 2014. To that end, we implemented the Plant Life Management (PLM) evaluation for Onagawa NPS-1 as our first experience. We decided on a Long-term Maintenance Management Policy from result of the evaluation, and then applied the Safety-Regulations change approval application on November 6, 2013 and its correcting application on April 16, 2014. Our application was approved on May 21, 2014 through investigation by the Nuclear Regulatory Agency. Also at implementation of the PLM evaluation, we considered effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake that occurred on March 11, 2011 against ageing phenomena. In this paper, we introduce summary of PLM evaluation for Onagawa NPS-1 and the evaluation that considered effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake. (author)

  18. Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste: Nuclear Waste, Unit 1. Teacher Guide. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, Washington, DC.

    This guide is Unit 1 of the four-part series Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Waste produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The goal of this unit is to help students establish the relevance of the topic of nuclear waste to their everyday lives and activities. Particular attention is…

  19. The changing structure of the international commercial nuclear power reactor industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Hill, L.J.; Reich, W.J.; Rowan, W.J.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an understanding of the international commercial nuclear power industry today and how the industry is evolving. This industry includes reactor vendors, product lines, and utility customers. The evolving structure of the international nuclear power reactor industry implies different organizations making decisions within the nuclear power industry, different outside constraints on those decisions, and different priorities than with the previous structure. At the same time, cultural factors, technical constraints, and historical business relationships allow for an understanding of the organization of the industry, what is likely, and what is unlikely. With such a frame of reference, current trends and future directions can be more readily understood

  20. Replacement of steam generators at arkansas nuclear one, unit-2 (ano-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, R.M.; Buford, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Arkansas Nuclear One, Unit-2 steam generators, originally supplied by Combustion Engineering, began commercial operation in 1980 producing a gross electrical output of 958 MW. After several years of successful operation, the owner decided that the tube degradation rates of the original steam generators were too high for the plant to meet the performance requirements for the full 40-year license period. The contract to supply replacement steam generators (RSGs) was awarded to Westinghouse Electric Company in 1996. Installation of these RSGs took place in the last months of 2000. This paper compares the design features of the original and re-placement steam generators with emphasis on design and reliability enhancements achieved. (author)

  1. Start-up tests of Kashiwazakikariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit No.2 and No.5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fueki, Kensuke; Aoki, Shiro; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Yahagi, Kimitoshi

    1991-01-01

    The Kashiwazakikariwa Nuclear Power Station Units No.5 and No.2 started commercial operation on April 10 and September 28 of 1990 respectively. As the result of the application of the First and Second LWR Improvement and Standardization Program, the plants were designed aiming at improvement of reliability, operation, and maintenance while maintaining safety. Construction of the plants took 6.5 to 7 years for completion, during which period the last 10 months were spent for the start up tests program. Start up tests were carried out under deliberate management to assure that the plants can operate safely and steadily at the prescribed operating points, and the schedules and tests item modifications adopted in Unit No.2 and No.5 were verified under the start up tests program. (author)

  2. Nuclear instrument maintenance and technical training in Nuclear Energy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamad Nasir Abdul Wahid

    1987-01-01

    Instrument maintenance service is a necessity in a Nuclear Research Institute, such as the Nuclear Energy Unit (NEU) to ensure the smooth running of our research activities. However, realising that maintenance back-up service for either nuclear or other scientific equipment is a major problem in developing countries such as Malaysia, NEU has set up an Instrumentation and Control Department to assist in rectifying the maintenance problem. Beside supporting in house activities in NEU, the Instrumentation and Control Department (I and C) is also geared into providing services to other organisations in Malaysia. This paper will briefly outline the activities of NEU in nuclear instrument maintenance as well as in technical training. (author)

  3. Commercial landscape of noninvasive prenatal testing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Ashwin; Sayres, Lauren C; Cho, Mildred K; Cook-Deegan, Robert; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini

    2013-06-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA-based noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) could significantly change the paradigm of prenatal testing and screening. Intellectual property (IP) and commercialization promise to be important components of the emerging debate about clinical implementation of these technologies. We have assembled information about types of testing, prices, turnaround times, and reimbursement of recently launched commercial tests in the United States from the trade press, news articles, and scientific, legal, and business publications. We also describe the patenting and licensing landscape of technologies underlying these tests and ongoing patent litigation in the United States. Finally, we discuss how IP issues may affect clinical translation of NIPT and their potential implications for stakeholders. Fetal medicine professionals (clinicians and researchers), genetic counselors, insurers, regulators, test developers, and patients may be able to use this information to make informed decisions about clinical implementation of current and emerging noninvasive prenatal tests. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The future of nuclear power in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, P.M.S.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments that have been put forward in the United Kingdom to justify the contention by its opponents that nuclear power should not be seen as a safe, economic, strategically desirable and environmentally attractive energy source are examined. Counter arguments are presented to support the belief that these are wholly wrong. In the short to medium term, however, economic and political considerations suggest that the prospects for nuclear power in the United Kingdom are not optimistic. The long term evolution of nuclear power is uncertain but it is possible that the security of energy supply, comparative economics and environmental attractions associated with nuclear power will become more apparent and work in its favour eventually. The conviction is expressed that, by the middle of the next century, the United Kingdom will be reaping the benefits of the fast reactor on a significant scale. (UK)

  5. Korean system of export control to support the commercial nuclear transfer to UAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Ho

    2011-01-01

    In December 2009, the Republic of Korea won the contract to build 4 1,400 MW nuclear power reactors worth USD 20 billion in the UAE. The states-owned KEPCO will complete the turnkey project to the UAE including design, engineering, construction, nuclear fuel, operations, maintenance and technical support. Since sensitive nuclear technologies convertible to military purpose can be spread by the transfer of commercial nuclear power plant, it is essential prerequisite to implement nuclear export control tenaciously and effectively. About twenty years have passed since the Republic of Korea introduced export control system in domestic laws and regulations. Marking a major historical milestone in 2009 by ranking among global nuclear suppliers, the Korean government made a major step forward in export control framework to support its next nuclear export goal. (orig.)

  6. Managing culture change in the commercial nuclear industry and the DOE weapons complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhl, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    Culture is the basic pattern of shared beliefs, behaviors, and assumptions acquired over time by the people in the organization. Culture is learned and can be modified over time. Many failures in managing change in recent years in the commercial nuclear industry and in the DOE weapons complex can be attributed to not accepting the central axiom of safety, health, and environmental matters. This paper presents specific lessons learned from experiences in commercial nuclear power and US Department of Energy weapons facilities restarts: (1) the attributes of problem plants and symptoms that predict impending regulatory doom; (2) the root causes of plant shutdown by regulators; (3) management infrastructure problems; and (4) actions required by management to effect the culture shift necessary to resume operations

  7. Role and services of the Nuclear Energy Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Tajuddin bin Ali

    1985-01-01

    This article contains the research and development activities planned to be undertaken, and the services to be provided by the Nuclear Energy Unit. The fields of research have been selected to aid the development in the use of Nuclear Science and Technology, whilst the proposed services are geared towards widening the use to this technology in socio-economic development. Objectives in the research fields have been identified following a number of consultations with IAEA, foreign and local experts, and involved careful study of local requirements. The services provided will cater for all, especially institutions involved in nuclear technology both from the public and private sectors. This effort is in line with the role of the Unit as the national promoter and coordinator in the utilization of nuclear technology in the country

  8. 76 FR 1469 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-10

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 Environmental Assessment... Plant, LLC, the licensee, for operation of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2... Impact Statement for License Renewal of Nuclear Plants, Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (NUREG-1437...

  9. Licensing operators for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannon, J.N.

    1988-01-01

    The human element in the operation of commercial nuclear power plants is of utmost importance. Not only must the operators be technically competent in the execution of numerous complicated tasks, they must be capable of working together as a team to diagnose dynamic plant conditions to ensure that their plants are operated safely. The significance of human interaction skills and crew communications has been demonstrated most vividly in TMI and Chernobyl. It follows that the NRC must retain its high standards for licensing operators. This paper discusses activities and initiatives being employed by the NRC to enhance the reliability of its licensing examinations, and to build a highly qualified examiner work force

  10. THE TESTING OF COMMERCIALLY AVAILABLE ENGINEERING AND PLANT SCALE ANNULAR CENTRIFUGAL CONTACTORS FOR THE PROCESSING OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jack D. Law; David Meikrantz; Troy Garn; Nick Mann; Scott Herbst

    2006-01-01

    Annular centrifugal contactors are being evaluated for process scale solvent extraction operations in support of United State Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative goals. These contactors have the potential for high stage efficiency if properly employed and optimized for the application. Commercially available centrifugal contactors are being tested at the Idaho National Laboratory to support this program. Hydraulic performance and mass transfer efficiency have been measured for portions of an advanced nuclear fuel cycle using 5-cm diameter annular centrifugal contactors. Advanced features, including low mix sleeves and clean-in-place rotors, have also been evaluated in 5-cm and 12.5-cm contactors

  11. The first commercial spent fuel shipment in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meinert, N.M.; Xiaoqing Li

    2004-01-01

    In two and a half years, government regulatory agencies and contractors from three countries worked together to design, license, fabricate, and transport the first commercial spent fuel shipment in China. Their cooperative efforts helped avoid the loss of full core reserve at a nuclear power plant serving two of China's largest cities. In March 2001, Everclean Environmental Engineering Corporation (EEEC) selected NAC International (NAC) to supply two United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) licensed Storable Transport Casks (NACSTC) and technology support, to ensure that qualified Chinese operators would be ready to load the first cask in late 2003. EEEC is a subsidiary of China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC), which sets nuclear policy in China. EEEC is responsible for implementing nuclear transportation policy set forth from its parent corporation. Timely implementation of EEEC's ambitious plan would avoid loss of full core reserve at Guangdong Nuclear Power Station (Daya Bay) Unit-1, which supplies power to Hong Kong and Schenzen. The spent fuel would be transported to the Lanzhou Nuclear Fuel Complex (LNFC), a reprocessing facility, approximately 4,000 kilometers Northwest of Daya Bay

  12. Licensing issues associated with the use of mixed-oxide fuel in U.S. commercial nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.L. Jr.

    1997-04-01

    On January 14, 1997, the Department of Energy, as part of its Record of Decision on the storage and disposition of surplus nuclear weapons materials, committed to pursue the use of excess weapons-usable plutonium in the fabrication of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel for consumption in existing commercial nuclear power plants. Domestic use of MOX fuel has been deferred since the late 1970s, principally due to nuclear proliferation concerns. This report documents a review of past and present literature (i.e., correspondence, reports, etc.) on the domestic use of MOX fuel and provides discussion on the technical and regulatory issues that must be addressed by DOE (and the utility/consortia selected by DOE to effect the MOX fuel consumption strategy) in obtaining approval from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to use MOX fuel in one or a group of existing commercial nuclear power plants

  13. A study of commercially-available polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and polycarbonate as nuclear track detector materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Vazquez-Lopez, C.; Trejo, R.; Lopez, K.; Rickards, J.

    2014-07-01

    In the study of the sensitivity of materials to be used as nuclear track detectors, it was found that commercial polyethylene terephthalate (PET) from Ciel® water bottles, commercial roof cover polycarbonate, and recycled packaging strips (recycled PET), can be used as nuclear track detectors. These three commercial materials present nuclear tracks when bombarded by 2.27 MeV nitrogen ions produced in a Pelletron particle accelerator, and by fission fragments from a 252Cf source (79.4 and 103.8 MeV), after a chemical etching with a 6.25M KOH solution, or with a 6.25M KOH solution with 20% methanol, both solutions at 60±1°C. As an example, the nitrogen ions deposit approximately 1 keV/nm in the form of ionization and excitation at the surface of PET, as calculated using the SRIM code. The fission fragments deposit up to 9 keV/nm at the surface, in both cases generating sufficient free radicals to initiate the track formation process. However, 5 MeV alpha particles, typical of radon (222Rn) emissions, deposit only 0.12 keV/nm, do not present tracks after the chemical etching process. This valuable information could be very useful for further studies of new materials in nuclear track methodology.

  14. Present status of nuclear containments in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jihong; Hong, Jaekeun; Lee, Byunghoon; Son, Youngho

    2007-01-01

    Since the first nuclear power plant in Korea, Kori unit no.1, was started in commercial service in 1978, 20 units including Kori unit no.1 have been operated and maintained until now in Korea. Recently several units were started to be constructed and also, additionally more than 4 units were planned to be constructed in the near future. The importance of nuclear containments has been always one of the hottest issues for the safety and protection of nuclear power plants until now. At the beginning of nuclear power plants construction in Korea, several typed nuclear containment systems were adopted. For those reasons, various codes, standards, and inspection technologies are applied to nuclear containment systems differently. In this study, the status of inservice inspection performed for the safety and maintenance of nuclear containments in Korea was researched. Overall nuclear containment systems and inspections performed up to recently in Korea including trends, inspection items, periods, and regulations were described briefly. (author)

  15. Control policies impact on commercial trade in nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatamanu, Mariana; Bugeag, Elena; Ignat Irina

    2004-01-01

    The restructuring of the economic sectors, improvement of the business environment and, implicitly, the development of the appropriate legislative framework correspond to the main objectives of the Work Programme issued by the Government of Romania with view to fulfil the criteria imposed by the European Commission for the accession of Romania to European Union planned for the year 2007. One of the legislative package section, being under revision of the Legislative Chamber of Romania, is referring to power sector, where remarkable efforts are made in connection with energy and gas market liberalization towards 40% opening, correction applied to the thermal and electric power and gas tariffs, with a view to get fully cover of the production costs, start up of the privatisation process for some of the distribution companies and all these represent part of the main priorities of the Romanian government for the restructuring of the power sector. SN Nuclearelectrica SA - SNN SA - has as domain of its main activities the development of the nuclear program in Romania regarding: Cernavoda Unit 1 operation for production and delivery of electric power to the National Grid (since 1996), the nuclear fuel fabrication at Nuclear Fuel Plant in Pitesti, the completion and commissioning of the Cernavoda Unit 2 and start up, in the near future, of the work for Unit 3 completion. The trade activity within the power production sector using nuclear fuel is governed, due to its specific, by the rules and laws of Romania and are also subject of the international rules related to the foreign trade and, particularly to the policy of transaction of the special materials on international market. This category of special materials, named strategic materials with dual use, are under the control of the National Agency for Export Control - ANCEX, as well as other specialised and dedicated Romanian authorities, as: National Commission for the Nuclear Activities Control - CNCAN, specialized

  16. Nuclear safety philosophy in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Development of the United Kingdom (UK) nuclear safety philosophy is described in the context of the UK nuclear power program since 1959 and of its legislative framework. Basic to the philosophy is that the licensee is wholly responsible for nuclear safety. The licensing process and safety assessment principles used by the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate are discussed, and examples from the assessment of the proposed UK pressurized-water reactor are used to illustrate how the approach works in practice. The UK siting policy and regulatory developments since 1979 are also discussed. Recent, current, and future issues of interest to the regulatory authority are described against the development nuclear scene in the UK

  17. Canisters and nonfuel components at commercial nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbard, K.; Thorpe, J.; Moore, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) collects data annually from commercial nuclear power reactors via the Nuclear Fuel Data survey, Form RW-859. Over the past three years, the survey has collected data on the quantities and types of nonfuel components and on the quantities and contents of canisters in storage at reactor sites. This paper focuses on the annual changes in the data, specific implications of these changes, and lessons that should be applied to future revisions of the study. The total number of canisters reported by utilities for each year from 1986 to 1993 is listed. Changes in the quantities of nonfuel components report by General Reactors from 1992 to 1993 are also provided. Comparisons of canister and nonfuel components components data from year to year and from reactor to reactor point out that survey questions on these topics have been interpreted differently by reactor personnel

  18. Nuclear power plant V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Bohunice V -1 is briefly described. This NPP consists from two reactor units. Their main time characteristics are (Reactor Unit 1, Reactor Unit 2): beginning of construction - 24 April 1972; first controlled reactor power - 27 November 1978, 15 March 1980; connection to the grid - 17 December 1978, 26 March 1980; commercial operation - 1 April 1980, 7 January 1981. This leaflet contains: NPP V-1 construction; Major technological equipment (Primary circuit: Nuclear reactor [WWER 440 V230 type reactor];Steam generator; Reactor Coolant Pumps; Primary Circuit Auxiliary Systems. Secondary circuit: Turbine generators, Nuclear power plant electrical equipment; power plant control) and technical data

  19. New state roles in the management and disposal of commercial nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udall, M.K.

    1977-01-01

    Arguments are presented for the need for congressional action to clarify the respective regulatory responsibilities of the state and Federal Governments as they relate to commercial nuclear power. Three case studies in radioactive waste management and disposal are reviewed which are proported to illustrate the inadequacy of the existing regulatory framework to effectively manage and dispose of nuclear wastes. Examples of instances in which state legislatures have taken the initiative in the waste disposal problem are cited. It is concluded that regulatory reform should be in the direction of a dual system that provides states with new authority and leverage to control nuclear energy development patterns within their borders

  20. The UAE. Lessons learned from a new nuclear regulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraev, Kamen

    2015-01-01

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is building four South Korean APR-1400 reactors at the Barakah nuclear site. The first is scheduled to enter into commercial operation in 2017. Christer Viktorsson, Director General of the United Arabic Emirate's(UAE) Federal Office for Nuclear Regulation, talks to NucNet about the challenges of establishing a nuclear regulatory body from scratch in a country where nuclear stations have never been built before.

  1. The UAE. Lessons learned from a new nuclear regulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraev, Kamen [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-12-15

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is building four South Korean APR-1400 reactors at the Barakah nuclear site. The first is scheduled to enter into commercial operation in 2017. Christer Viktorsson, Director General of the United Arabic Emirate's(UAE) Federal Office for Nuclear Regulation, talks to NucNet about the challenges of establishing a nuclear regulatory body from scratch in a country where nuclear stations have never been built before.

  2. China's Nuclear Power Program: Options for the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suttmeier, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The issue of American nuclear cooperation with the People's Republic of China is examined with regards to political relations, commercial benefits to the United States, and nonproliferation. China's interest in nuclear power is examined, and its nuclear program is briefly reviewed from the 1950's to present. China's international nuclear relations with other countries are discussed, and implications for the United States examined, particularly with regards to China's intentions toward nuclear proliferation, danger of diversion of material for nuclear weapons, use of pressurized water reactor technology for Chinese naval reactors, and the terms of the nuclear cooperation agreement

  3. Nuclear fuel element recovery using PEDSCO RMI Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, D.G.; Pedersen, B.V.

    1984-01-01

    In September 1982, a PEDSCO Remote Mobile Investigation Unit was used to recover damaged irradiated fuel elements from a fueling machine and trolley deck at Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'. This Canadian-made remote controlled vehicle was originally designed for explosive ordinance disposal by law enforcement agencies. This paper describes its adaptation to nuclear service and its first mission, within a nuclear facility

  4. New United States policies regarding international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, H.R. Jr.

    1981-10-01

    This paper discusses the United States policy on international nuclear power development in the light of the priorities established by President Reagan in the guidelines for his Administration's nuclear co-operation policy. The aim is to establish a framework allowing for co-operation in peaceful nuclear development while remaining committed to the objective of preventing the further spread of nuclear weapons, in particular by supporting the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the IAEA Safeguards System and the Tlatelolco Treaty (NEA) [fr

  5. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuze, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity

  6. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuze, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity

  7. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1979-11-01

    An updated compilation is presented of occupational radiation exposures at commercial nuclear power reactors for the years 1969 through 1978. Data received from the 64 light water cooled reactors (LWRs) that had completed at least one year of commercial operation as of December 31, 1978 are included. This represents an increase of seven reactors over the number contained in last year's report. The total number of personnel monitored at LWRs during 1978 increased by approximately 12% to 76,121. The number of workers that received measurable doses, however, increased only 8% to 45,978. The total collective dose for 1978 is estimated to be 31,806 man-rems, a small decrease from last year's value of 32,511, which results in the average dose per worker decreasing slightly to 0.69 rems. The average collective dose per reactor also decreased, by approximately 15%, to a value of 497 man-rems

  8. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1991-02-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The annual maintenance outages of the Loviisa plant units were held during the report period. All events during this quarter are classified as Level hero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were below authorised limits. Only small amounts of radioactive substances originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  9. 77 FR 58051 - Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Commercial Quota Harvested for the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    .... 120201086-2418-02] RIN 0648-XC236 Fisheries of the Northeastern United States; Bluefish Fishery; Commercial...: NMFS announces that the 2012 bluefish commercial quota allocated to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts has been harvested. Vessels issued a commercial Federal fisheries permit for the bluefish fishery may...

  10. 75 FR 66802 - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Nuclear Power Plant, LLC; Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Notice of Withdrawal of...) has granted the request of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, LLC, the licensee, to withdraw its... for the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2, located in Calvert County, MD. The...

  11. Owners of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

    1996-11-01

    Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

  12. Commercial grade item (CGI) dedication of MDR relays for nuclear safety related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ranjit K.; Julka, Anil; Modi, Govind

    1994-08-01

    MDR relays manufactured by Potter & Brumfield (P&B) have been used in various safety related applications in commercial nuclear power plants. These include emergency safety features (ESF) actuation systems, emergency core cooling systems (ECCS) actuation, and reactor protection systems. The MDR relays manufactured prior to May 1990 showed signs of generic failure due to corrosion and outgassing of coil varnish. P&B has made design changes to correct these problems in relays manufactured after May 1990. However, P&B does not manufacture the relays under any 10CFR50 Appendix B quality assurance (QA) program. They manufacture the relays under their commercial QA program and supply these as commercial grade items. This necessitates CGI Dedication of these relays for use in nuclear-safety-related applications. This paper presents a CGI dedication program that has been used to dedicate the MDR relays manufactured after been used to dedicate the MDR relays manufactured after May 1990. The program is in compliance with current Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) guidelines and applicable industry standards; it specifies the critical characteristics of the relays, provides the tests and analysis required to verify the critical characteristics, the acceptance criteria for the test results, performs source verification to quality P&B for its control of the critical characteristics, and provides documentation. The program provides reasonable assurance that the new MDR relays will perform their intended safety functions.

  13. The virtual digital nuclear power plant: A modern tool for supporting the lifecycle of VVER-based nuclear power units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkadov, G. V.; Zhukavin, A. P.; Kroshilin, A. E.; Parshikov, I. A.; Solov'ev, S. L.; Shishov, A. V.

    2014-10-01

    The article describes the "Virtual Digital VVER-Based Nuclear Power Plant" computerized system comprising a totality of verified initial data (sets of input data for a model intended for describing the behavior of nuclear power plant (NPP) systems in design and emergency modes of their operation) and a unified system of new-generation computation codes intended for carrying out coordinated computation of the variety of physical processes in the reactor core and NPP equipment. Experiments with the demonstration version of the "Virtual Digital VVER-Based NPP" computerized system has shown that it is in principle possible to set up a unified system of computation codes in a common software environment for carrying out interconnected calculations of various physical phenomena at NPPs constructed according to the standard AES-2006 project. With the full-scale version of the "Virtual Digital VVER-Based NPP" computerized system put in operation, the concerned engineering, design, construction, and operating organizations will have access to all necessary information relating to the NPP power unit project throughout its entire lifecycle. The domestically developed commercial-grade software product set to operate as an independently operating application to the project will bring about additional competitive advantages in the modern market of nuclear power technologies.

  14. Second unit scheduling concerns on a dual-unit nuclear project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, H.R.; Mazzini, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    This paper explores the planning and scheduling problems of Unit 2 of the Susquehanna steam electric station. The causes of these problems and methods to avoid or mitigate their consequences are discussed. The Susquehanna steam electric station has two boiling water reactors rated at 1,100 MW each. Topics considered include cost factors, structures, equipment, engineering and home office, construction services, completion data phasing, work sequencing, structural dependences, and segregation. Substatial cost and schedule benefits can result if two nuclear units are designed and constructed as one integral station, and if maximum sharing of facilities and services between the units occurs. It is concluded that the cost benefits of highly integrated dual unit construction outweigh the schedule and logistical problems caused by that approach

  15. Nuclear engineering education in the United States: The first 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: This paper will discuss recent trends in the nuclear engineering education infrastructure in the United States. In the last several years political, economic and technical issues have been addressed and nuclear technology appears poised to resume growing again. It is in this new environment that there has been a confluence of industry, government and academic interests to see that nuclear engineering education retains its vitality and ability to provide technological leadership and a well-educated workforce. In order to understand the current situation it is important to give a brief historical perspective covering the six decades since the inception of 'Atoms for Peace' in 1953. The passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 established the Atomic Energy Commission and the declassification of much nuclear technology and scientific material. There was an understandable optimistic outlook as to the potential for nuclear technology in the areas of power, medicine and other industrial and scientific applications. There were commercial concepts for using nuclear energy to power ships, planes, rockets, and cars. But the must successful application, by far was in the area of electric power production. In only a few years demonstration nuclear power plants were built and the infamous quote - 'two cheap to meter' was reported. In the following decade much progress was made and commercial plant orders increased substantially in number and in size. There were going to light water reactors, gas cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, reprocessing, waste buried in salt mines. There was going to be 'a 1000 reactors in the year 2000'. This was the picture in the United States in the 50's and 60's. And it was in this environment that nuclear engineering education was birthed and grew. The first nuclear engineering academic programs and university research reactors were established in the 1950's at such places as North Carolina State, MIT, Penn State and others

  16. America's nuclear waste backlog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benenson, R.

    1981-01-01

    This report discusses three topics: concern and controversy relating to nuclear waste; high-level waste storage and politics of waste disposal. The most pressing waste disposal problem concerns spent fuel assemblies from commercial nuclear power plants. It was expected that commercial spent fuel would be sent to commercial reprocessing plants. The feasibility of commercial reprocessing in the United States is contingent on the expansion of the nuclear power industry. The current high-level liquid waste inventory is about 77 million gallons. These are stored at Richland, Washington; Aiken, South Carolina; and Idaho Falls, Idaho. The only commercial high-level wastes ever produced are stored at the defunct reprocessing facility at West Valley, New York. A high-level waste repository must be capable of isolating wastes that will remain dangerous for thousands of years. Salt has long been considered the most suitable medium for high-level and transuranic waste disposal. The timetable for opening a deep geological repository is one of the issues that will have to be dealt with by Congress. The 97th Congress appears ready to act on high-level nuclear waste legislation. Even opponents of nuclear expansion admit the necessity of legislation. Even if Congress gets its act together, it does not mean that the nuclear waste issue is gone. There are still unknowns - future of reprocessing, the needs and demands of the military; the health of the nuclear power industry; the objections of residents in potential site areas; the possibility of a state veto, and the unsolved technological problems in geologic site selection

  17. 78 FR 22347 - GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-320; NRC-2013-0065] GPU Nuclear Inc., Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2, Exemption From Certain Security Requirements AGENCY: Nuclear... and State Materials and Environmental Management Programs, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission...

  18. Safety/security interface assessments at commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, K.R.; Brown, P.J.; Norderhaug, L.R.

    1985-01-01

    The findings of the Haynes Task Force Committee (NUREG-0992) are used as the basis for defining safety/security assessment team activities at commercial nuclear power plants in NRC Region V. A safety/security interface assessment outline and the approach used for making the assessments are presented along with the composition of team members. As a result of observing simulated plant emergency conditions during scheduled emergency preparedness exercises, examining security and operational response procedures, and interviewing plant personnel, the team has identified instances where safety/security conflicts can occur

  19. Safety/security interface assessments at commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, K.R.; Brown, P.J.; Norderhaug, L.R.

    1985-07-01

    The findings of the Haynes Task Force Committee (NUREG-0992) are used as the basis for defining safety/security assessment team activities at commercial nuclear power plants in NRC Region V. A safety/security interface assessment outline and the approach used for making the assessments are presented along with the composition of team members. As a result of observing simulated plant emergency conditions during scheduled emergency preparedness exercises, examining security and operational response procedures, and interviewing plant personnel, the team has identified instances where safety/security conflicts can occur. 2 refs

  20. State nuclear initiatives in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, P.L.; Stoiber, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The paper deals with State nuclear initiatives regarding the role of nuclear power in the energy future of the United States. The question of whether and under what circumstances nuclear facilities should be used to generate electricity was put to the popular vote in several States in 1976. Some general principles of Federal-State relations are discussed with specific reference to nuclear regulations. The initiative mechanism itself is described as well as its legal form and background. The parallel developments in the State and Federal legislative consideration of nuclear issues is reviewed and the suggested reasons for the defeat of the proposals in the seven States concerned are discussed. Finally, the author draws some conclusions on the effects of the 1976 initiatives on future decision-making in the US on energy policy in general and nuclear power in particular. (NEA) [fr

  1. The first commercial spent fuel shipment in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinert, N.M. [NAC International, Norcross, GA (United States); Xiaoqing Li [Everclean Environmental Engineering Corp., Beijing, BJ (China)

    2004-07-01

    In two and a half years, government regulatory agencies and contractors from three countries worked together to design, license, fabricate, and transport the first commercial spent fuel shipment in China. Their cooperative efforts helped avoid the loss of full core reserve at a nuclear power plant serving two of China's largest cities. In March 2001, Everclean Environmental Engineering Corporation (EEEC) selected NAC International (NAC) to supply two United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) licensed Storable Transport Casks (NACSTC) and technology support, to ensure that qualified Chinese operators would be ready to load the first cask in late 2003. EEEC is a subsidiary of China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC), which sets nuclear policy in China. EEEC is responsible for implementing nuclear transportation policy set forth from its parent corporation. Timely implementation of EEEC's ambitious plan would avoid loss of full core reserve at Guangdong Nuclear Power Station (Daya Bay) Unit-1, which supplies power to Hong Kong and Schenzen. The spent fuel would be transported to the Lanzhou Nuclear Fuel Complex (LNFC), a reprocessing facility, approximately 4,000 kilometers Northwest of Daya Bay.

  2. Developing a nuclear industry the spanish case in managing nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acero, M.; Gonzalez, A.

    1989-01-01

    There are presently 10 nuclear units in commercial operation in Spain. A further 5 units have been granted construction permits but are currently under government imposed moratorium due to an excess in generating capacity; construction for two of them however - namely the Valdecaballeros BWRs - is likely to be resumed in the near future. During 1989 the 10 operational units with a total installed capacity of 7,838 MWe are expected to supply over 40% of the total electricity generated in our country. With the exception of one gas graphite reactor, the rest are light water reactors - 7 PWRs and 2 BWRs. Although the NSSS design is imported from basically two sources - USA and Germany, the nuclear power units of the present generation recently connected to the grid have reached over 85% in local participation. This paper describes some of the basic strategies followed in Spain, leading to the success of our nuclear program. They have produced major payoffs in local participation and contributed to achieving real capabilities in the nuclear industry

  3. Aircraft, ships, spacecraft, nuclear plants and quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrick, M.G.

    1984-05-01

    A few quality assurance programs outside the purview of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission were studied to identify features or practices which the NRC could use to enhance its program for assuring quality in the design and construction of nuclear power plants. The programs selected were: the manufacture of large commercial transport aircraft, regulated by the Federal Aviation Administration; US Navy shipbuilding; commercial shipbuilding regulated by the Maritime Administration and the US Coast Guard; Government-owned nuclear plants under the Department of Energy; spacecraft under the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; and the construction of nuclear power plants in Canada, West Germany, France, Japan, Sweden, and the United Kingdom

  4. Economic impacts of the total nuclear waste management program envisioned for the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, L.; Zielen, A.J.; Parry, S.J.S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents information on the costs of nuclear waste management and on the impacts of those costs on the price of power and on the capital and labor markets. It is assumed that the LWR would be the sole commercial reactor used through the year 2000. Two fuel cycle options are considered: the throwaway mode (spent fuel is waste), and the full recycle for comparison. Total costs are calculated for all facilities needed to store, package, and reposit all the spent fuel through the lifetime of 380 GW capacity installed by 2000 and operating for 30 y. The economic impact is: the price of power produced by the reactors would be increased by 1.4%; the capital for nuclear plants would apply to waste management; the average annual labor effort needed over the next 50 to 75 years is 3000 to 5000 man years; and the unit cost of spent fuel disposal is $129/kg ($119/kg for full recycle). 7 tables

  5. Nuclear safety risk control in the outage of CANDU unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Mingliang; Zheng Jianhua

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear fuel remains in the core during the outage of CANDU unit, but there are still nuclear safety risks such as reactor accidental criticality, fuel element failure due to inability to properly remove residual heat. Furthermore, these risks are aggravated by the weakening plant system configuration and multiple cross operations during the outage. This paper analyzes the phases where there are potential nuclear safety risks on the basis of the typical critical path arrangement of the outage of Qinshan NPP 3 and introduces a series of CANDU-specific risk control measures taken during the past plant outages to ensure nuclear safety during the unit outage. (authors)

  6. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.K. Knudson

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M and O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis

  7. Changing Perceptions of Nuclear Power in The United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, John

    1989-01-01

    Although many new nuclear power plants have been brought on line in that time, resulting in a capacity of 110 plants with operating permits and another twelve in the last stages of completion, all of these plants were authorized before 1978. The fundamental reason for this moratorium in new orders was the precipitous reduction in electricity demand, arising from the OPEC embargo and Iran revolution, which created excess electric capacity throughout the United States. In fact, many nuclear and coal plants were cancelled to minimize the over capacity problem and no large base load generating units have been ordered of any kind in the past decade. So the 'moratorium' is not really unique to nuclear power. Progress, coupled with increased awareness that nuclear power is one of the keys to solving atmospheric environmental problems, will swing political and public acceptance back to being favorable. Successful progress in these matters will be of benefit to public acceptance around the world and, conversely, serious technical difficulties, particularly entailing any major incident with a nuclear power plants anywhere in the world, will adversely affect the improvement in political and public acceptance in the United States. It is vitally important, therefore, that we continue to further enhance international cooperation in nuclear power. We are pleased the Korea Electric power Corporation and the Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute are participating in EPRI development programs, and hope that cooperation will increase in the future. We're most encouraged by the formation of the World Association of Nuclear Operators, which will be initiated in Moscow next month. The nuclear electric utilities and their governments around the world, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD should be commended for their initiative in international cooperation

  8. The United States nuclear plant reliability data program: Its description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, M.J.

    1975-01-01

    The American National Standards Institute Subcommittee N18-20 has developed and implemented the United States Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). The NPRDS is designed to accumulate, store, analyse, and report reliability and failure statistics on systems and components of nuclear power plants related to nuclear safety. Input data to the NPRDS consist of engineering, operating, and failure information submitted on a voluntary basis by participating utilities. Prior to entry into the computerized data base, the data are thoroughly checked for accuracy by both the submitting organizations and the NPRDS operating contractor. The data base is the source of various periodic output reports to the nuclear power industry and is utilized to produce special reports upon request. The present data base represents data accumulated from about thirty nuclear units with additional units expected to begin submitting data immediately. The objective is to have essentially all operating nuclear units in the United States of America participating in the program by the end of 1975. The first NPRDS annual reports containing meaningful reliability and failure statistics are expected to be produced following the end of 1975. (author)

  9. Development of comprehensive waste acceptance criteria for commercial nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hara, F.A.; Miller, N.E.; Ausmus, B.S.; Yates, K.R.; Means, J.L.; Christensen, R.N.; Kulacki, F.A.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed methodology is presented for the identification of the characteristics of commercial nuclear waste which may require criteria. This methodology is analyzed as a six-step process which begins with identification of waste operations and proceeds until the waste characteristics affecting the potential release of radionuclides are determined. All waste types and operations were analyzed using the methodology presented. Several illustrative example are included. It is found that thirty-three characteristics can be identified as possibly requiring criteria

  10. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-10

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

  11. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, ''burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs

  12. The state of radioactive waste management and personnel radiation exposure in commercial nuclear power plants in fiscal 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive waste management: The owners of commercial nuclear power plants are obligated to control the release of gaseous and liquid radioactive wastes below the objective release levels, and to store solid wastes in containers on the site. As for the former, the released (radioactive) quantity in fiscal 1981 (from April, 1981, to March, 1982,) together with the objective levels are given for respective nuclear power stations; and as for the latter, the stored quantity and also the cumulative quantity up to the year are given. Radiation exposure: The owners of commercial nuclear power plants are obligated to control the personnel exposure below the permissible level. The personnel exposure dose in fiscal 1981 is given for respective nuclear power station. (Mori, K.)

  13. 76 FR 81994 - UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 52-016; NRC-2008-0250] UniStar Nuclear Energy; Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3; Exemption 1.0 Background: UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE) submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission ) a...

  14. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1975-10-01

    The Reactor Safety Study was sponsored by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission to estimate the public risks that could be involved in potential accidents in commercial nuclear power plants of the type now in use. It was performed under the independent direction of Professor Norman C. Rasmussen of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The risks had to be estimated, rather than measured, because although there are about 50 such plants now operating, there have been no nuclear accidents to date resulting in significant releases of radioactivity in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The objective of the study was to make a realistic estimate of these risks and, to provide perspective, to compare them with non-nuclear risks to which our society and its individuals are already exposed. This information may be of help in determining the future reliance by society on nuclear power as a source of electricity. The results from this study suggest that the risks to the public from potential accidents in nuclear power plants are comparatively small.

  15. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-10-01

    The Reactor Safety Study was sponsored by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission to estimate the public risks that could be involved in potential accidents in commercial nuclear power plants of the type now in use. It was performed under the independent direction of Professor Norman C. Rasmussen of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The risks had to be estimated, rather than measured, because although there are about 50 such plants now operating, there have been no nuclear accidents to date resulting in significant releases of radioactivity in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. The objective of the study was to make a realistic estimate of these risks and, to provide perspective, to compare them with non-nuclear risks to which our society and its individuals are already exposed. This information may be of help in determining the future reliance by society on nuclear power as a source of electricity. The results from this study suggest that the risks to the public from potential accidents in nuclear power plants are comparatively small

  16. Principles and foundation: national standards on quantities and units in nuclear science field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lishu

    1993-11-01

    The main contents of National Standards on Quantities and units of atomic and nuclear physics (GB 3102.9) and Quantities and Units of nuclear reactions and ionizing radiations (GB 310.10) are presented in which most important quantities with their symbols and definitions in the nuclear scientific field are given. The principles and foundation, including the International System of Units (SI) and its application to the nuclear scientific field, in the setting of the National Standards are explained

  17. Administrative and research needs associated with the control of occupational exposures in commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, D.W.

    1980-01-01

    This review of occupational exposures in commercial nuclear power plants in the United States of America has revealed that, although many problem areas are being adequately addressed, there is a need for additional work. Areas relative to exposure evaluation that need attention include better data collection and analysis as to when and where exposures occur, improved information on exposures from internally deposited radionuclides, improved techniques for monitoring occupational neutron exposures, and an upgrading in quality control procedures in the manufacture, calibration, use and maintenance of monitoring instruments. Areas relative to exposure control that need attention include the development of additional design and manufacturing approaches for preventing the production and build-up of key radionuclides within reactor cooling systems, the development and testing of techniques for removing those radionuclides that do accumulate in such systems, the application of risk/benefit assessments to procedures for the maintenance, repair, modification, replacement and disposal of major nuclear power plant components, such as steam generators, and the development of design features to facilitate the decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Professional radiation workers also have to be aware of the impact that the proposed major reductions in occupational dose limits would have on their operations. This impact is compounded by the fact that the number of people receiving graduate education in radiation protection in the USA is decreasing. (author)

  18. Financing Strategies For A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

    2006-01-01

    To help meet the nation's energy needs, recycling of partially used nuclear fuel is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle, but implementing this step will require considerable investment. This report evaluates financing scenarios for integrating recycling facilities into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options from fully government owned to fully private owned were evaluated using DPL (Decision Programming Language 6.0), which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest lifecycle cost, lowest unit cost). This evaluation concludes that the lowest unit costs and lifetime costs are found for a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. However, this does not mean that the facilities should necessarily be constructed and operated by the government. The costs for hybrid combinations of public and private (commercial) financed options can compete under some circumstances with the costs of the government option. This analysis shows that commercial operations have potential to be economical, but there is presently no incentive for private industry involvement. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) currently establishes government ownership of partially used commercial nuclear fuel. In addition, the recently announced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) suggests fuels from several countries will be recycled in the United States as part of an international governmental agreement; this also assumes government ownership. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual facility capacity led to the greatest variations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; and the annual operating costs, forgiveness of debt, and overnight costs dominate the costs computed for the

  19. Qualifying commercial grade instruments for use in nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamothe, R.J.; Scally, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear environmental qualification of instrumentation has been successfully accomplished by many commercial grade equipment manufacturers. This paper was prepared as a guide to those manufacturers who want some insight into a qualification program. The areas addressed are the regulations and documents, the qualification program, and a case history of a chart recorder qualifications. The principal standards relating to a nuclear qualification program are IEEE Std. 323-1974 IEEE Standard for Qualifying Class 1E Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations, IEEE Std. 344-1975 IEEE Recommended Practices for Seismic Qualification of Class 1E Equipment for Nuclear Power Generating Stations and 10CFR50.49. Previously NUREG 0588 Interim Staff Position on Environmental Qualification of Safety-Related Equipment. These define the intent and purpose of the qualification. The qualification program itself consists of several distinct parts which require explanation, including the determination of qualified life, choice of test samples, selection of appropriate acceptance criteria, aging program, radiation testing, seismic testing, abnormal environment tests and others. The case history illustrates the qualification program and the thought processes involved

  20. New steam generators slated for nuclear units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a brief discussion of Duke Power's plans to replace steam generators at its McGuire and Catawba nuclear units. A letter of intent to purchase (from Babcock and Wilcox) the 12 Westinghouse steam generators has been signed, but no constructor has been selected at this time. This action is brought about by the failures of more than 3000 tubes in these units

  1. An international comparison of commercial nuclear power plant staffing regulations and practice, 1980--1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melber, B.; Hauth, J.; Terrill, E.; Berk, B.; Gore, B.

    1994-03-01

    In this report an international review of regulatory and industry practices is provided in the area of nuclear power plant staffing during the 1980s in Canada, France, Germany, Japan, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. The objective of this review is to highlight trends in staffing regulatory approaches, industry practices, and issues of concern in other countries that have potential relevance to nuclear power plant staffing issues in the United States. The decade of the 1980s was marked by a great deal of growth in nuclear power operations internationally; however, growth of nuclear power is not expected to continue in the 1990s except in France and Japan. A continuum of regulatory approaches to staffing was identified, ranging from prescribed regulations that are applied to all licensees (Germany is most similar to the United States in this regard), to indirect staffing regulations where the regulatory authority oversees plant operating practices that are agreed to in the plant operating license (most notably, France and the United Kingdom). Most of the changes observed in staffing regulations and practices in the early 1980s were made in response to the accident at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 nuclear power plant (TMI) in 1979. These changes included the widespread issuance of new operator and licensing requirements and the establishment of national training centers. After the post-TMI changes were implemented, a period of relative stability followed. Changes in the latter half of the 1980s have focused on continuing improvements and additions to training curricula and methods, most notably increased reliance on simulator training

  2. Unconventional wisdom [Entergy's economic management of five disparate nuclear units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, J.

    1996-01-01

    The conventional wisdom is that a competitive nuclear power programme requires standard plants, multi-unit sites and economies of scale. Entergy Operations, Inc (EOI) in the USA has five nuclear units of two reactor types, acquired from five vendors and located on four sites separated by hundreds of miles. EOI set two bench marks in its aim to deliver electricity at the market price from each of its nuclear units while meeting the costs of O and M, fuel, capital investment and overheads. The first was to become the best operator of each type of its differently designed units. The second was to combine the sense of ownership and expertise of single unit operators with the flexibility and efficiency of multi-unit sites. In order to achieve this, EOI aims to operate the five units as though they were on one site. Central to this plan is a set of peer groups, each of which deals with an aspect of plant operation, sharing good practice across all the units. Building on this, increasingly during outages, employees are brought in from other units rather than employing outside contractors. Although EOI employees are more expensive on an hourly basis they are two to three times more efficient than outside contractors. The peer group concept is also leading to rationalisation of expertise as groups become identified with particular specialisations which back-up teams working on other units. (U.K.)

  3. Optimal replacement and inspection periods of safety and control boards in Wolsung nuclear power plant unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mok, Jin Il

    1993-02-01

    In nuclear power plants, the safety and control systems are important for operating and maintaining safety of nuclear power plants. Due to the failure of the instrument and control devices of nuclear power plants caused by aging, nuclear power plants occasionally trip. Since the start of first commercial operation of Kori nuclear power plant (NPP) unit 1, the trips caused by instrument and control systems account for 28% of total trips of NPPs in Korea. Even a single trip of a nuclear power plant causes an extravagant economical loss and deteriorates public acceptance of nuclear power plants. Therefore, the replacement of the instrument and control devices with proper consideration of the aging effect is necessary in order to prevent the inadvertent trip. In this work we investigated the optimal replacement periods of the digital control computer's (DCC) and the programmable digital comparator's (PDC) electronic circuit boards of Wolsung nuclear power plant Unit 1. We first derived mathematical models which calculate optimal replacement periods for electronic circuit boards of digital control computer (DCC) and for those of the programmable digital comparator (PDC) in Wolsung NPP unit 1. And we analytically obtained the optimal replacement periods of electronic circuit boards by using these models. We compared these periods with the replacement periods currently used at Wolsung NPP Unit. The periods used at Wolsung is not based on mathematical analysis, but on empirical knowledge. As a consequence, the optimal replacement periods analytically obtained for the electronic circuit boards of DCC and those used in the field shown small difference : the optimal replacement periods analytically obtained for the electronic circuit boards of PDC are shorter than those used in the field in general. The engineered safeguards of Wolsung nuclear power plant unit 1 contains redundant systems of 2-out-of-3 logic which are not operating under normal conditions but they are called

  4. Sweden, United States and nuclear energy. The establishment of a Swedish nuclear materials control 1945-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonter, T.

    1999-05-01

    This report deals mainly with the United States nuclear energy policy towards Sweden 1945-1960. Although Sweden contained rich uranium deposits and retained high competence in the natural sciences and technology, the country had to cooperate with other nations in order to develop the nuclear energy. Besides developing the civil use of nuclear power, the Swedish political elite also had plans to start a nuclear weapons programme. From the beginning of the 1950s up to 1968, when the Swedish parliament decided to sign the non-proliferation treaty, the issue was widely debated. In this report, American policy is analyzed in two periods. In the first period, 1945-1953, the most important aim was to prevent Sweden from acquiring nuclear materials, technical know-how, and advanced equipment which could be used in the production of nuclear weapons. The Swedish research projects were designed to contain both a civil and military use of nuclear energy. The first priority of the American administration was to discourage the Swedes from exploiting their uranium deposits, especially for military purposes. In the next period, 1953-1960, the American policy was characterized by extended aid to the development of the Swedish energy programme. Through the 'Atoms for Peace'-programme, the Swedish actors now received previously classified technical information and nuclear materials. Swedish companies and research centers could now buy enriched uranium and advanced equipment from the United States. This nuclear trade was, however, controlled by the American Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The American help was shaped to prevent the Swedes from developing nuclear weapons capability. From mid-50s Swedish politicians and defence experts realised that a national production of nuclear bombs would cost much more money than was supposed 4-5 years earlier. As a consequence, Swedish officials started to explore the possibilities of acquiring nuclear weapons from United States. The American

  5. Nuclear hybrid energy systems: imperatives, prospects, and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumeier, Steven; Cherry, Robert; Boardman, Richard; Smith, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    In less than 60 years we have witnessed the transition of nuclear electricity production from an experiment on the high desert of the western United States to more than 430 commercial nuclear power reactors deployed in 31 countries, supplying nearly 14% of all global electricity consumed. The speed at which this transition took place was stunning, as has been the evolution of the technology, business management and operations approach to civil nuclear electricity production. Even as the United States took a two-decade hiatus from the construction of new nuclear electricity plants, other nations embraced the technology and continue to do so. Today, there are 53 nuclear power reactors under construction, 142 planned and 327 proposed for development, including a number in the United States

  6. The Evolution of India's Nuclear Program: Implications for the United States

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creasman, David J

    2008-01-01

    Since India began developing its nuclear program it has continually encountered issues with the United States and other nuclearized countries over whether India should be able to establish a nuclear...

  7. The trip status and the reduction countermeasure in Kori nuclear power plant unit 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung-Soo

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power account for 36% of Korea's total electric capacity and provided over 50% of the net electric power supply by June 1991. These plants supply US with the cheapest and most stable electric supply available. However each units capacity is very large and a plant trip due to failure of a component or a human error has a great influence on the nations electric power supply and drastically decreases the reserve margin. This report will analyze the trip causes and measure the trip frequency from the first commercial operation of Kori unit 1 and 2 to the end of June 1991, reflect to the plant operation, management and facility modification, etc. This will minimize the number of trips or urgent power reductions and thus contribute to an increase in plant capacity factor and safety, and stabilize the electric power demand and supply. The safety and the economy of nuclear power plant have to be secured and raised respectably by increasing the capacity factor. Since the prevention of trips plays an important role in the plant safety and economy, we have to do our best to prevent the unexpected trip

  8. Choices: A Unit on Conflict and Nuclear War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massachusetts Teachers Association, Boston.

    Ten lessons on the evolution of the nuclear arms race, the nature and consequences of using nuclear weapons, and new ways that conflicts among nations might be resolved are presented for the junior high school level. The unit contains age-appropriate materials to equip students with skills and knowledge to understand what choices can be made to…

  9. Learning effects and the commercialization of new energy technologies: the case of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, M.B.

    1982-01-01

    Recently, attention has been focused on government policy toward commercialization of new energy technologies. Arguments are offered that, in the early days of commercialization, significant learning externalities that justify subsidy are present. Using nuclear power as a case study, this article estimates the learning effects actually present. The effect of experience on construction cost and on the accuracy of cost estimation is examined. External learning is separated from internalized learning about both construction cost and cost estimation. Finally, an estimate of the value of both kinds of learning externality is provided. The results suggest learning externalities were present, but had little effect on the rate of commercialization. 19 references, 5 tables

  10. Nuclear electronics laboratory manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-05-01

    The Nuclear Electronics Laboratory Manual is a joint product of several electronics experts who have been associated with IAEA activity in this field for many years. The manual does not include experiments of a basic nature, such as characteristics of different active electronics components. It starts by introducing small electronics blocks, employing one or more active components. The most demanding exercises instruct a student in the design and construction of complete circuits, as used in commercial nuclear instruments. It is expected that a student who completes all the experiments in the manual should be in a position to design nuclear electronics units and also to understand the functions of advanced commercial instruments which need to be repaired or maintained. The future tasks of nuclear electronics engineers will be increasingly oriented towards designing and building the interfaces between a nuclear experiment and a computer. The manual pays tribute to this development by introducing a number of experiments which illustrate the principles and the technology of interfacing

  11. Cost structure analysis of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan based on corporate financial statements of electric utility companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitake, Norifumi; Nagano, Koji; Suzuki, Tatsujiro

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze past and current cost structure of commercial nuclear power plants in Japan based on annual corporate financial statements published by the Japanese electric utility companies, instead of employing the conventional methodology of evaluating the generation cost for a newly constructed model plant. The result of our study on existing commercial nuclear plants reveals the increasing significance of O and M and fuel cycle costs in total generation cost. Thus, it is suggested that electric power companies should take more efforts to reduce these costs in order to maintain the competitiveness of nuclear power in Japan. (author)

  12. Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors, 1981. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, B.G.

    1982-11-01

    This report presents an updated compilation of occupational radiation exposures at commercial nuclear power reactors for the years 1969 through 1981. This year's report contains data received from the 70 light water cooled reactors (LWRs) and one high temperature gas cooled reactor that had been declared to be in commercial operation for at least one full year as of December 31, 1981. This represents an increase of two reactors over the number contained in last year's report. The total number of personnel monitored at LWRs in 1981 was 124,504, a slight decrease from that found in 1980. The number of workers that received measurable doses during 1981 was 82,183 which is about 2000 more than that found in 1980. The total collective dose at LWRs for 1981 is estimated to be 54,142 man-rems, which is only about 350 man-rems more than that reported in 1980. The report also presents a summary and some analyses of the exposure data contained in the termination reports that have been submitted by nuclear power licensees to the Commission pursuant to 10 CFR Section 20.408. As of December 31, 1981, personal identification and exposure information had been collected and computerized for some 210,000 of these terminating reactor personnel

  13. Nuclear power plant V-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear power plant Bohunice V -2 is briefly described. This NPP consists from two reactor units. Their main time characteristics are (Reactor Unit 1, Reactor Unit 2): beginning of construction - December 1976; first controlled reactor power - 7 August 1984, 2 August 1985; connection to the grid - 20 August 1984, 9 August 1985; commercial operation - 14 February 1985, 18 December 1985. This leaflet contains: NPP V-2 construction; Major technological equipment [WWER 440 V230 type reactor; Nuclear Power plant operation safety (Safety barriers; Safety systems [Active safety systems, Passive safety systems]); Centralized heat supply system; Scheme of Bohunice V-2 NPP and technical data

  14. The United States nuclear liability regime under the Price-Anderson Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, O. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 1958 U. S. Price-Anderson Act created the worlds first national nuclear liability regime. It now provides US $12,6 Billion of nuclear liability coverage for the 104 nuclear power plants in the United States, by far the highest monetary coverage of any nuclear liability regime in the world. Each power plant operator provides nuclear hazards coverage for anyone liable through a combination of private insurance from the American nuclear insurance pool (now US$ 375 million) and a retrospective assessment (now US$111,9 million per power plant per incident plus 5 percent for claims and costs). The United States in 2008 ratified the International Atomic Energy Agency's Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC). and is promoting it as the basis for a more global nuclear liability regime uniting States that are party to the Vienna Convention or the Paris Convention, or have a domestic law consistent with the CSC Annex. The CSC Annex was written to grad father the Price-Anderson Acts economic channeling of liability to the installation operator. The omnibus feature of Price-Anderson is similar to the legal channeling of all liability to the installation operator under the international nuclear liability conventions and domestic laws of many other countries. The Price-Anderson system (like the Vienna and Paris Conventions) does not provide liability coverage for nuclear damage to or loss of use of on-site property. (Author)

  15. SP-100 nuclear space power systems with application to space commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to familiarize the Space Commercialization Community with the status and characteristics of the SP-100 space nuclear power system. The program is a joint undertaking by the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy and NASA. The goal of the program is to develop, validate, and demonstrate the technology for space nuclear power systems in the range of 10 to 1000 kWe electric for use in the future civilian and military space missions. Also discussed are mission applications which are enhanced and/or enabled by SP-100 technology and how this technology compares to that of more familiar solar power systems. The mission applications include earth orbiting platforms and lunar/Mars surface power

  16. Shipping cask demand associated with United States Government storage of commercial spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daling, P.M.; Engel, R.L.

    1983-05-01

    There were primarily two objectives of this study. The first was to develop estimates of the shipping cask fleet size that will be needed in the United States in the near future. These estimates were compared with current US spent fuel cask fleet size to determine its adequacy to provide the transportation services. The second objective was to develop estimates of the transportation costs associated with future movements of spent fuel. The results of this study were based on assumptions that were made prior to passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 which authorizes the Department of Energy (DOE) to provide Federal Interim Storage of spent fuel from commercial reactors. The Act requires that the DOE is responsible for transportation of the fuel, although private industry is to provide these services. This paper examined the impacts of various spent fuel management strategies on spent fuel transportation hardware requirements and transportation costs. Conclusions related to optimization of the spent fuel transportation system can be drawn from the results of this study. The conclusions can be affected by changing the given set of assumptions used in this analysis. 3 tables

  17. 78 FR 77726 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Exemption... License No. DPR-50, which authorizes operation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (TMI-1... Facility Operating License No. DPR-50, which authorizes operation of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Station...

  18. Operational behaviour of WWER nuclear power units after Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milivojevic, S.; Spasojevic, D.

    2000-01-01

    The indicators of effectiveness of WWER operation, in 1987-1998 were analyzed. For three groups of nuclear units (WWER, NPP Kozloduy, NPP Paks), the trends of Indicators flow were established. The comparative analysis of forced outage rate, and load factor of WWERs and nuclear units all in the world was carried out; it gives the general picture of accident influence on the states and the relations of these indicators in considered period (author)

  19. Nevada commercial spent nuclear fuel transportation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to present an historic overview of commercial reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) shipments that have occurred in the state of Nevada, and to review the accident and incident experience for this type of shipments. Results show that between 1964 and 1990, 309 truck shipments covering approximately 40,000 miles moved through Nevada; this level of activity places Nevada tenth among the states in the number of truck shipments of SNF. For the same period, 15 rail shipments moving through the State covered approximately 6,500 miles, making Nevada 20th among the states in terms of number of rail shipments. None of these shipments had an accident or an incident associated with them. Because the data for Nevada are so limited, national data on SNF transportation and the safety of truck and rail transportation in general were also assessed

  20. Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  1. Simulator of nuclear power plant with WWER-440 units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krcek, V.

    1985-01-01

    The use is discussed of simulators in the training of qualified personnel for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants. Simulators are used for training all activities and thinking processes related to the control of a nuclear reactor in the course of quasi-steady and non-steady states. The development and implementation is summed up of the construction of such a simulator for WWER-440 nuclear power plants. The main parts of the simulator include the unit control room, the computer system, the teacher's workplace and the interface system. The possibility of simulating the functions of the unit for personnel training is based on the description of the behaviour of the simulated object in form of mathematical models of its basic technological subsystems and their interrelations within the range of operating patterns. (J.C.)

  2. Status of commercial nuclear high-level waste disposal. Special report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dau, G.J.; Williams, R.F.

    1976-09-01

    The results of this review, presented in the form of a functional description of high level waste management system, shows that technology is available to dispose of nuclear waste safely by several different processes. The most attractive alternative in terms of available technology and shortness of time to demonstrate it at commercial scale is a system that converts the waste to a solid by immobilizing the radioactive elements in a glass matrix. Brief comments are also given on international efforts in high level waste management and advanced disposal concepts

  3. Liquid hydrogen production and commercial demand in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydorn, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, the single largest purchaser of liquid hydrogen (LH2) in the United States, evaluated current and anticipated hydrogen production and consumption in the government and commercial sectors. Specific objectives of the study are as follows: (1) identify LH2 producers in the United States and Canada during 1980-1989 period; (2) compile information in expected changes in LH2 production capabilities over the 1990-2000 period; (3) describe how hydrogen is used in each consuming industry and estimate U.S. LH2 consumption for the chemicals, metals, electronics, fats and oil, and glass industries, and report data on a regional basis; (4) estimate historical and future consumption; and (5) assess the influence of international demands on U.S. plants.

  4. Comprehensive vibration assessment program for Yonggwang nuclear power plant unit 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Hui Nam; Hwang, Jong Keun; Kim, Tae Hyung; Kim, Jung Kyu; Song, Heuy Gap; Kim, Beom Shig

    1995-01-01

    A Comprehensive Vibration Assessment Program (CVAP) has been performed for Yonggwang Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 (YGN 4) in order to verify the structural integrity of the reactor internals for flow induced vibrations prior to commercial operation. The theoretical evidence for the structural integrity of the reactor internals and the basis for measurement and inspection are provided by the analysis. Flow induced hydraulic loads and reactor internals vibration response data were measured during pre-core hot functional testing in YGN 4 site. Also, the critical areas in the reactor internals were inspected visually to check any existence of structural abnormality before and after the pre-core hot functional testing. Then, the measured data have been analyzed and compared with the predicted data by analysis. The measured stresses are less than the predicted values and the allowable limits. It is concluded that the vibration response of the reactor internals due to the flow induced vibration under normal operation is acceptable for long term operation

  5. Workstation environment supports for startup of YGN 3 and 4 nuclear unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Won Bong; Lee, Byung Chae

    1995-07-01

    Light water reactor fuel development division of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute participated in the installation of the plant computer system and software, and the user support activities of Asea Brown Boveri/Combustion Engineering for the Plant Monitoring System during the startup phase of YGN-3 nuclear unit. The main purpose of the participation is to have the self-reliant plant- computer technology for the independent design and startup of next nuclear units. This report describes the activities performed by KAERI with ABB/CE at the plant site. In addition, it describes the direct transfer of data files between PMS and workstation which was independently carried out by KAERI. Since KAERI should support the site in setting-up the plant computer environment independent of ABB-CE from the next nuclear units, the review was performed for the technical details of activities provided to the site in order to provide the better computer environment in the next nuclear units. In conclusion, this report is expected to provide the technical background for the supporting of plant computing environment and the scope of support work at plant site during Yonggwang 3, 4 startup in the area of plant computer for the next nuclear units. 6 refs. (Author) .new

  6. Workstation environment supports for startup of YGN 3 and 4 nuclear unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Won Bong; Lee, Byung Chae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    Light water reactor fuel development division of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute participated in the installation of the plant computer system and software, and the user support activities of Asea Brown Boveri/Combustion Engineering for the Plant Monitoring System during the startup phase of YGN-3 nuclear unit. The main purpose of the participation is to have the self-reliant plant- computer technology for the independent design and startup of next nuclear units. This report describes the activities performed by KAERI with ABB/CE at the plant site. In addition, it describes the direct transfer of data files between PMS and workstation which was independently carried out by KAERI. Since KAERI should support the site in setting-up the plant computer environment independent of ABB-CE from the next nuclear units, the review was performed for the technical details of activities provided to the site in order to provide the better computer environment in the next nuclear units. In conclusion, this report is expected to provide the technical background for the supporting of plant computing environment and the scope of support work at plant site during Yonggwang 3, 4 startup in the area of plant computer for the next nuclear units. 6 refs. (Author) .new.

  7. Opting out of the commercial use of nuclear power in Germany and challenges arising to nuclear supervision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renneberg, W.

    2001-01-01

    The governing majority in Germany has decided to opt out of the commercial use of nuclear power and to terminate this use in a safe and managed way. In the opinion of the federal government, the reasons for this decision include the potential for severe accidents, which is considered intolerable in the long run even though the probability of occurrence is low. In addition, there are the problems of final storage of radioactive waste, issues associated with the risk of proliferation, and the need to end a deep-seated societal conflict in Germany. In its function as the Top Regulator, the department responsible for nuclear matters of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, and Nuclear Safety (BMU) has two important functions: It acts as the federal supervisor of the federal states which execute the Atomic Energy Act on behalf of the federal government, and it exercises the duty of preparing the nuclear policy outlined in the norms established by the federal government. After lengthy discussions with the operators of nuclear power plants an agreement was elaborated in preparation of a solution acceptable to all participants, which essentially defines an electricity quota for nuclear power plant operation and deals with spent fuel and nuclear waste management problems. This implies a number of challenges arising to the BMU as a consequence of the need to further ensure a high safety standard. It also means international efforts as well as the need to counteract the impending loss of competence in the nuclear field. (orig.) [de

  8. 2002 Nuclear Power World Report - Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2003-01-01

    Last year, in 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were available for power supply in 31 countries in the world. With an aggregate gross power of 377,359 MWe, and an aggregate net power of 359,429 MWe, respectively, the nuclear generating capacity reached its highest level so far. Nine different reactor lines are used in commercial facilities. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) contribute 355 plants, which makes them the most common reactor line. In twelve countries, 32 nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross power of 26,842 MWe and an aggregate net power of 25,546 MWe, respectively, are under construction. Of these, 25 units are light water reactors while eight are CANDU-type plants. In eighteen countries, 94 commercial reactors with more than 5 MWe power have been decommissioned so far. Most of these plants are prototypes with low powers. 228 of the nuclear power plants currently in operation, i.e. slightly more than half of them, were commissioned in the eighties. The oldest commercial nuclear power plant, Calder Hall unit 1, supplied power into the public grid in its 47th year of operation in 2002. The availability in terms of time and capacity of nuclear power plants rose from 74.23% in 1991 to 83.40% in 2001. A continued rise to approx. 85% is expected for 2002. In the same way, the non-availability in terms of time (unscheduled) dropped from 6.90% to 3.48%. The four nuclear power plants in Finland are the world's leaders with a cumulated average capacity availability of 90.00%. (orig.) [de

  9. Probabilistic safety assessment technology for commercial nuclear power plant security evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liming, J.K.; Johnson, D.H.; Dykes, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Commercial nuclear power plant physical security has received much more intensive treatment and regulatory attention since September 11, 2001. In light of advancements made by the nuclear power industry in the field of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for its power plants over that last 30 years, and given the many examples of successful applications of risk-informed regulation at U. S. nuclear power plants during recent years, it may well be advisable to apply a 'risk-informed' approach to security management at nuclear power plants from now into the future. In fact, plant PSAs developed in response to NRC Generic Letter 88-20 and related requirements are used to help define target sets of critical plant safety equipment in our current security exercises for the industry. With reasonable refinements, plant PSAs can be used to identify, analyze, and evaluate reasonable and prudent approaches to address security issues and associated defensive strategies at nuclear power plants. PSA is the ultimate scenario-based approach to risk assessment, and thus provides a most powerful tool in identifying and evaluating potential risk management decisions. This paper provides a summary of observations of factors that are influencing or could influence cost-effective or 'cost-reasonable' security management decision-making in the current political environment, and provides recommendations for the application of PSA tools and techniques to the nuclear power plant operational safety response exercise process. The paper presents a proposed framework for nuclear power plant probabilistic terrorist risk assessment that applies these tools and techniques. (authors)

  10. Start-up and commercial operation of the Laguna Verde power plants, unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres R, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    The main features of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Power Plant is presented as well as the phases of the start-up process. The process includes various steps and tests up to start the commercial operation. (author)

  11. Nuclear information and education experience in the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginniff, M.E.

    1993-01-01

    The presentation discusses the importance of public information and education in the field of energy and particularly in the field of nuclear energy development. The attempt is made to explain some issues connected with the nuclear fuel cycle. Appendix contains comments on the United Kingdom educational materials in this area

  12. American commercial nuclear power industry programs, work processes, and organizational changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynerson, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    The American electric utility industry is undergoing a continuing series of regulatory and commercial changes unprecedented in the recent history of the industry. The changes are resulting in an industrywide examination of all facets of the business including the arena of operations and maintenance costs in conjunction with the nuclear facilities. The very viability of most nuclear facilities to a large extent depends on the effective implementation of program, process, and organizational reviews. These reviews, in one form or another, are under way at a number of facilities sometimes as a open-quotes stand-alone activityclose quotes and as often as not as a portion of a corporate and firmwide initiative. The impetus is coming from the marketplace, and both major challenges and opportunities are encompassed by the changes

  13. 75 FR 36700 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ...; Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact... Company, LLC (the licensee), for operation of Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (TMI-1), located... Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, NUREG-0552, dated December 1972, and Generic...

  14. Towards a nuclear merchant ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, R.L.R.; Llewelyn, G.I.W.; Farmer, A.A.

    1976-01-01

    The operation of nuclear merchant ships is likely to be attended by a number of constraints and requirements. Not all of these can be fully resolved until such ships come into use and the necessary experience and confidence have been acquired. But the timing of commercial introduction, if it comes about, will depend on the relative economics of nuclear versus fossil fuel propulsion, and the differences in turn depend in part on the operating costs particular to nuclear ships. A review of operation aspects is essential not only to commercial appraisal; each country whose trade may be carried in nuclear ships - whether it will build such ships or not - will have occasion to give some attention to the problems. It is an international problem and is, as noted later, being considered internationally. This paper; i) reviews some of the operational aspects as seen in the U.K.; ii) summarizes views received by the Nuclear Merchant Ship Unit (NMSU) from U.K. shipping, shipbuilding and nuclear industries on the prospects of a U.K. nuclear merchant ship. (author)

  15. Progress of French nuclear programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierrard, J.-H.

    1981-02-01

    The aims of the French nuclear programme launched in 1974 are briefly recalled to mind, as are the projects completed at the end of 1980. The operating results mentioned, particularly concern the new PWR units brought into commercial service in 1980 [fr

  16. 77 FR 29701 - Impact of Construction (Under a Combined License) of New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-18

    ... New Nuclear Power Plant Units on Operating Units at Multi-Unit Sites AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... construct and operate new nuclear power plants (NPPs) on multi-unit sites to provide an evaluation of the... License) of New Nuclear Power Plants on Operating Units at Multi-Unit Sites (Package). ML112630039 Federal...

  17. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 4, The waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is unit 4 (The Waste Management System) in a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  18. Nuclear Legislation in OECD and NEA Countries. Regulatory and Institutional Framework for Nuclear Activities - United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This country profile provide comprehensive information on the regulatory and Institutional Framework governing nuclear activities as well as a detailed review of a full range of nuclear law topics, including: mining regime; radioactive substances; nuclear installations; trade in nuclear materials and equipment; radiation protection; radioactive waste management; non-proliferation and physical protection; transport; and nuclear third party liability. The profile is complemented by reproductions of the primary legislation regulating nuclear activities in the country. Content: I. General Regulatory Regime: 1. Introduction; 2. Mining Regime; 3. Radioactive Substances; 4. Nuclear Installations (Licensing and inspection, including nuclear safety; Protection of the environment against radiation effects; Emergency response); 5. Trade in Nuclear Materials and Equipment; 6. Radiation Protection; 7. Radioactive Waste Management; 8. Non-Proliferation and Physical Protection; 9. Transport; 10. Nuclear Third Party Liability; II. Institutional Framework: 1. Regulatory and Supervisory Authorities (Department of Trade and Industry - DTI; Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and the Secretary of State for Health; Secretary of State for Transport; Secretary of State for Education); 2. Advisory Bodies (Medical Research Council - MRC; Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee; Radioactive Waste Management Advisory Committee); 3. Public and Semi-Public Agencies (United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority - UKAEA; Health and Safety Commission and Executive - HSC/HSE; National Radiological Protection Board - NRPB; Environment Agencies; British Nuclear Fuels plc. - BNFL; Amersham International plc.; The National Nuclear Corporation Ltd. - NNC; United Kingdom Nirex Ltd.; Magnox Electric plc.; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Scottish Electricity Generator Companies; British Energy Generation Ltd.; Regional Electricity Companies in England and Wales)

  19. Nuclear engineering education in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williamson, T.G.

    1982-01-01

    In discussing nuclear engineering education in the United States it is shown that the most critical issue facing the nuclear engineering education community today is enrolment in a time of increasing demand for graduate engineers. Related to the issue of enrolment is support for graduate students, whether it be fellowships, traineeships, or research assistantships. Other issues are those of maintaining a vital faculty in the face of a competitive job market, of maintaining research facilities and developing new ones, and of determining the directions of educational efforts in the future. (U.K.)

  20. Environmental Impact Assessment for Olkiluoto 4 Nuclear Power Plant Unit in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dersten, Riitta; Gahmberg, Sini; Takala, Jenni

    2008-01-01

    In order to improve its readiness for constructing additional production capacity, Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) initiated in spring 2007 the environmental impact assessment procedure (EIA procedure) concerning a new nuclear power plant unit that would possibly be located at Olkiluoto. When assessing the environmental impacts of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant extension project, the present state of the environment was first examined, and after that, the changes caused by the projects as well as their significance were assessed, taking into account the combined impacts of the operations at Olkiluoto. The environmental impact assessment for the planned nuclear power plant unit covers the entire life cycle of the plant unit. (authors)

  1. Environmental Impact Assessment for Olkiluoto 4 Nuclear Power Plant Unit in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dersten, Riitta; Gahmberg, Sini; Takala, Jenni [Teollisuuden Voima Oyj, Olkiluoto, FI-27160 Eurajoki (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    In order to improve its readiness for constructing additional production capacity, Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) initiated in spring 2007 the environmental impact assessment procedure (EIA procedure) concerning a new nuclear power plant unit that would possibly be located at Olkiluoto. When assessing the environmental impacts of the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant extension project, the present state of the environment was first examined, and after that, the changes caused by the projects as well as their significance were assessed, taking into account the combined impacts of the operations at Olkiluoto. The environmental impact assessment for the planned nuclear power plant unit covers the entire life cycle of the plant unit. (authors)

  2. 75 FR 6223 - PSEG Nuclear LLC; Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Unit Nos. 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-272, 50-311 and 50-354; NRC-2010-0043] PSEG Nuclear LLC; Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...-70, and DPR-75, issued to PSEG Nuclear LLC (PSEG, the licensee), for operation of the Hope Creek...

  3. Vendors woo South Africa as a potential new 'powerhouse' for nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepherd, John

    2014-01-01

    South Africa is a country which is increasingly seen as a potential new nuclear market that promises to give one or more of the world's major nuclear vendors an important foothold on the continent. South Africa has two pressurised water reactors operating at the Koeberg nuclear plant. The 930-megawatt (MW) first unit entered commercial operation in July 1984, followed by the second (900 MW) unit in November 1985. These are the only commercial nuclear power plants on the continent of Africa. South Africa's updated draft integrated resources plan (IRP) for electricity for 2010-30, for which a public consultation period ended in February of this year, included revised projections. that suggested no new nuclear baseload capacity would be needed 'until after 2025'. A capacity 'at least 6,600 MW less' is required in terms of reliable overall generating capacity in 2030. However great South Africa's demand for a clean, affordable and reliable supply of nuclear-generated electricity, coupled with the economic benefits such developments will bring, investors also understand the potential for nuclear growth in this part of the world. (orig.)

  4. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones (status as of January 1, 1979)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    Construction and operational milestones are tabulated for US nuclear power plants. Data are presented on nuclear steam supply system orders. A schedule of commercial operation and projected capital costs through 1990 is given

  5. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D.

    1994-03-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  6. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, S.; Katz, D.; Daavettila, N.; Lehnert, D. [MDC-Ogden Environmental and Energy Services, Southfield, MI (United States)

    1994-03-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant pumps important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  7. Site selection and evaluation of nuclear power units in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnefille, R.

    1980-01-01

    The selection of sites for nuclear power units in Egypt by SOFRATOME for Nuclear Plants Authority is carried on using a method based on interaction between different criteria. The method and the main results on criterion 'radio-ecological impact' are sketched briefly [fr

  8. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest: 1997 edition. Volume 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest (digest) provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, NRC licensed activities, and general information on domestic and world-wide nuclear energy. The digest, published annually, is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1996, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed

  9. Nuclear power economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan [World Nuclear Association, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  10. Nuclear power economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emsley, Ian; Cobb, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Many countries recognize the substantial role which nuclear power has played in providing energy security of supply, reducing import dependence and reducing greenhouse gas and polluting emissions. Nevertheless, as such considerations are far from being fully accounted for in liberalized or deregulated power markets, nuclear plants must demonstrate their viability in these markets on commercial criteria as well as their lifecycle advantages. Nuclear plants are operating more efficiently than in the past and unit operating costs are low relative to those of alternative generating technologies. The political risk facing the economic functioning of nuclear in a number of countries has increased with the imposition of nuclear-specific taxes that in some cases have deprived operators of the economic incentive to continue to operate existing plants.

  11. Total generating costs: coal and nuclear plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    The study was confined to single and multi-unit coal- and nuclear-fueled electric-generating stations. The stations are composed of 1200-MWe PWRs; 1200-MWe BWRs; 800-and 1200-MWe High-Sulfur Coal units, and 800- and 1200-MWe Low-Sulfur Coal units. The total generating cost estimates were developed for commercial operation dates of 1985 and 1990; for 5 and 8% escalation rates, for 10 and 12% discount rates; and, for capacity factors of 50, 60, 70, and 80%. The report describes the methodology for obtaining annualized capital costs, levelized coal and nuclear fuel costs, levelized operation and maintenance costs, and the resulting total generating costs for each type of station. The costs are applicable to a hypothetical Middletwon site in the Northeastern United States. Plant descriptions with general design parameters are included. The report also reprints for convenience, summaries of capital cost by account type developed in the previous commercial electric-power cost studies. Appropriate references are given for additional detailed information. Sufficient detail is given to allow the reader to develop total generating costs for other cases or conditions

  12. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 4, The waste management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the teachers guide to unit 4, (The Waste Management System), of a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  13. Evaluation of Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 Technical Specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.; Bruske, S.J.

    1985-08-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the assumption of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, and the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, and the SER as supplemented was performed with the Watts Bar T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved through discussions with the cognizant NRC reviewer, NRC staff reviewers and/or utility representatives. The Watts Bar Nuclear Plant Unit 1 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR and SER

  14. Evaluation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.; Bruske, S.J.

    1985-08-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the assumptions of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, and the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, and the SER as supplemented was performed with the Shoreham T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved through discussions with the cognizant NRC reviewer, NRC staff reviewers and/or utility representatives. The Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR and SER

  15. 76 FR 19148 - PSEG Nuclear, LLC, Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-06

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-272, 50-311, 50-354; NRC-2009-0390 and NRC-2009-0391] PSEG Nuclear, LLC, Hope Creek Generating Station and Salem Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2..., DPR-70, and DPR-75 for an additional 20 years of operation for the Hope Creek Generating Station (HCGS...

  16. A closed Brayton power conversion unit concept for nuclear electric propulsion for deep space missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joyner, Claude Russell II; Fowler, Bruce; Matthews, John

    2003-01-01

    In space, whether in a stable satellite orbit around a planetary body or traveling as a deep space exploration craft, power is just as important as the propulsion. The need for power is especially important for in-space vehicles that use Electric Propulsion. Using nuclear power with electric propulsion has the potential to provide increased payload fractions and reduced mission times to the outer planets. One of the critical engineering and design aspects of nuclear electric propulsion at required mission optimized power levels is the mechanism that is used to convert the thermal energy of the reactor to electrical power. The use of closed Brayton cycles has been studied over the past 30 or years and shown to be the optimum approach for power requirements that range from ten to hundreds of kilowatts of power. It also has been found to be scalable to higher power levels. The Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) engine power conversion unit (PCU) is the most flexible for a wide range of power conversion needs and uses state-of-the-art, demonstrated engineering approaches. It also is in use with many commercial power plants today. The long life requirements and need for uninterrupted operation for nuclear electric propulsion demands high reliability from a CBC engine. A CBC engine design for use with a Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system has been defined based on Pratt and Whitney's data from designing long-life turbo-machines such as the Space Shuttle turbopumps and military gas turbines and the use of proven integrated control/health management systems (EHMS). An integrated CBC and EHMS design that is focused on using low-risk and proven technologies will over come many of the life-related design issues. This paper will discuss the use of a CBC engine as the power conversion unit coupled to a gas-cooled nuclear reactor and the design trends relative to its use for powering electric thrusters in the 25 kWe to 100kWe power level

  17. Inspection of licensed nuclear power plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thornburg, H. D.

    1977-01-01

    Inspection of licensed nuclear power plants in the United States is performed by the Office of Inspection and Enforcement (IE), United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. IE has several key functions : a) Inspection of licensees and investigation of incidents, occurrences and allegations. b) Detection and correction of safety and security problems. c) Enforcement of rules, regulations, and Commission orders. d) Feedback to the industry and others regarding safety experience. e) Informing the public and others. Major enforcement actions and events involving operating power reactors for the past several years will be summarized. (author)

  18. Genetic characterization of commercial honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) populations in the United States by using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. A. Delaney; M.D. Meixner; N.M. Schiff; W.S. Sheppard

    2009-01-01

    Genetic diversity levels within and between the two commercial breeding areas in theUnited States were analyzed using the DraI restriction fragment length polymorphism of the COICOII mitochondrial region and 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The western commercial breeding population (WCBP) and the southeastern commercial...

  19. CINDU: Catalogue of Numerical Neutron Data Available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, W. K.; Attrae, P. M.; Ekberg, K.; Lemmel, H. D.; Lorenz, A.; Otstavnov, P. [IAEA, Nuclear Data Unit, Vienna (Austria)

    1967-08-15

    As a consequence of the progress in the field of international data exchange, and in compliance with the recommendations of the International Nuclear Data Committee (INDC) to the Director General of the IAEA, the Nuclear Data Unit has established a neutron data compilation center for the purpose of promoting international acquisition and exchange of basic neutron data. A specific orientation was given to this activity last year with the adoption of Operation Post-Box, according to which other major data centers submit either voluntarily or on request contributions of data to a fund held by the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit, which is in turn freely distributed to the remaining major data centers and to individuals. In the course of the last 12 months, this fund of data, embodied in the Nuclear Data Unit DASTAR file, has increased considerably as a result of the contributions by the data centers of Brookhaven, Obninsk and Saclay, as well as from collections from the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit service area. The CINDU catalog, submitted herewith, is an index of the current data holdings of the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit as of first August 1967. It serves a dual function: firstly, to act as an essential aid in the operation of the Post-Box concept, and secondly to inform data users within the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit service area of the current holdings in Vienna. A method to locate available data at any one of the data centers, including the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit, exists now in CINDA in the form of an indicator at the right hand side of the page. In addition to the external reference function filled by CINDA, the present CINDU catalog serves an internal function as the bibliographic part of DASTAR as well. This internal function required slight modifications of the CINDA format, in order to provide more comprehensive information and retrieval capabilities in the overall operation of the DASTAR system. The present form of the CINDU catalog is working satisfactorily; however

  20. The status and prospects of nuclear energy in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taek, P.Y.

    1997-01-01

    The development of nuclear power in Korea has been growing rapidly, and at the end of 1996 attained 36% of power generated. As of May 1997, 11 nuclear units, comprising 10 PWR and one CANDU, were in commercial operation. As a result of great efforts to improve efficiency and safety, Korean plants have a higher capacity factor than the world average, and their capacity factor has improved over the years. Korean content has continued to increase. The first CANDU plant, Wolsong Unit 1, began commercial operation in April 1983, and has achieved an average lifetime capacity factor of 85%. At the time of the conference, Wolsong 2 was in the final stage of commissioning, despite some equipment failures, notably with control valves, ion exchange column screens and boiler feed water pumps; however, AECL and KEPCO worked together expeditiously to overcome these difficulties. It is planned that by 2010, a total of 28 nuclear units, having a total capacity of 26.3 GWe, will be in operation, representing 33% of total electrical power installed. 2 tabs., 3 figs

  1. United States nuclear tests, July 1945 through September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Several tests conducted during Operation Dominic involved missile launches from Johnston Atoll. Several of these missile launches were aborted, resulting in the destruction of the missile and nuclear device either on the pad or in the air.

  2. The nuclear review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey, R.

    1995-01-01

    The prospects for nuclear power in the United Kingdom are considered from the point of view of Scottish Nuclear and in the context of the government's Nuclear Review and forthcoming proposals for the future of nuclear generation. Scottish Nuclear has been successful in transforming a loss making public sector company into one which is profitable. If proper account is taken of the risks of higher gas prices, environmental costs and the vulnerability to which the UK energy supply industry might be exposed by over dependence on gas, nuclear power is seen to be attractive. Outcome from the Review which Scottish Nuclear would like to see includes: a separation of their successful ongoing AGR programme from the historical magnox liabilities; a segregated fund to deal with long term AGR decommissioning and waste liabilities; greater commercial freedom and a move towards privatisation. (UK)

  3. United Kingdom: Procurement Related Nuclear Experience (Operating Experience)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Procurement of nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom is subject to nuclear site licence conditions issued by the Government through the Office for Nuclear Regulation (ONR). Each nuclear facility in the United Kingdom must have a nuclear site licence and must comply with the 36 general conditions that are set out in the Licence Condition Handbook (October 2014). In addition, the ONR has published a technical assessment guide for the procurement of nuclear safety related items or services; a guide on intelligent customers and a guide on records management also apply to the procurement phase, and ONR interventions look across all three of these documents. Procurement governance arrangements need to be developed (including a policy, manual, procedures and template documents) and approved within the utility company. The ONR monitors the arrangements via interventions and deems the arrangements to be ‘adequate’. Some procurement contracts become lifetime records for nuclear safety related systems and need to be retained while the plant is in place. A formal record retention schedule needs to be created and managed by the procurement organization. The utility company may elect to set hold points during the various procurement stages and, importantly, obtain approval for the contract and its content from all technical stakeholders (with particular emphasis on the engineering, project management and design authority quality functions before contract award). For contracts with high nuclear safety significance, the ONR may enforce additional hold points before and/or after contract award. There is a general requirement that the utility puts in place adequate arrangements to ensure that suitably qualified and experienced personnel are employed to implement adequate management arrangements and to act as an intelligent customer. This includes being able to demonstrate that any contractor or supplier is suitable, capable and experienced, and has the necessary processes and

  4. Nuclear power: Europe report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2000-01-01

    Last year, 1999, nuclear power plants were available for energy supply, respectively, in 18 countries all over Europe. In eight of the fifteen member countries of the European Union nuclear power plants have been in operation. A total of 218 plants with an aggregate net capacity of 181,120 MWe and an aggregate gross capacity of 171,802 MWe were in operation. Two units, i.e. Civaux 2 in France and Mochovce-2 in Slovakia went critical for the first time and started commercial operation after having been connected to the grid. Three further units in France, Chooz 1 and 2 and Civaux 1, started commercial operation in 1999 after the completion of technical measures in the primary circuit. Last year, 13 plants were under construction in Romania, Russia, Slovakia and the Czech Republic, that is only in East European countries. In eight countries of the European Union 146 nuclear power plants have been operated with an aggregate gross capacity of 129.772 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 123.668 MWe. Net electricity production in 1999 in the EU amounts to approx. 840.2 TWh, which means a share of 35 per cent of the total production. Shares of nuclear power differ widely among the operator countries. They reach 75 per cent in France, 73 per cent in Lithuania, 58 per cent in Belgium and 47 per cent in Bulgaria, Sweden and Slovakia. Nuclear power also provides a noticeable share in the electricity supply of countries, which operate no own nuclear power plants, e.g. Italy, Portugal and Austria. (orig.) [de

  5. Nuclear power industry, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    The intent of this publication is to provide a single volume of resource material that offers a timely, comprehensive view of the nuclear option. Chapter 1 discusses the development of commercial nuclear power from a historical perspective, reviewing the factors and events that have and will influence its progress. Chapters 2 through 5 discuss in detail the nuclear powerplant and its supporting fuel cycle, including various aspects of each element from fuel supply to waste management. Additional dimension is brought to the discussion by Chapters 6 and 7, which cover the Federal regulation of nuclear power and the nuclear export industry. This vast body of thoroughly documented information offers the reader a useful tool in evaluating the record and potential of nuclear energy in the United States

  6. Advances in multi-unit nuclear power plant probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, Mohammad; Zhou, Taotao; Massoud, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi accident highlighted the importance of risks from multiple nuclear reactor unit accidents at a site. As a result, there has been considerable interest in Multi-Unit Probabilistic Risk Assessment (MUPRA) in the past few years. For considerations in nuclear safety, the MUPRA estimates measures of risk and identifies contributors to risk representing the entire site rather than the individual units in the site. In doing so, possible unit-to-unit interactions and dependencies should be modeled and accounted for in the MUPRA. In order to effectively account for these risks, six main commonality classifications—initiating events, shared connections, identical components, proximity dependencies, human dependencies, and organizational dependencies—may be used. This paper examines advances in MUPRA, offers formal definitions of multi-unit site risk measures and proposes quantitative approaches and data to account for unit-to-unit dependencies. Finally, a parametric approach for the multi-unit dependencies has been discussed and a simple example illustrates application of the proposed methodology. - Highlights: • This paper will discuss the technical aspects of an integrated MUPRA, including consideration of dependencies and assessment of the multi-unit dependency data and models for quantifying such dependencies. • The paper also provides discussions on formal definitions and metrics for multi-unit site risks. • The parametric methods are used to address multi-unit dependency situations. • A conceptual two-unit logic example is used to demonstrate the application of proposed methodology.

  7. Sodium content of popular commercially processed and restaurant foods in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrient Data Laboratory (NDL) of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) in close collaboration with U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention is monitoring the sodium content of commercially processed and restaurant foods in the United States. The main purpose of this manuscript is to prov...

  8. A study of the public opinion concerning nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oiso, Shinichi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, I surveyed the outcome of opinion poll about people's attitude toward nuclear power and analysed their awareness of nuclear power generation in the United States. As a result, it was found that percentage of the people who have positive attitude toward nuclear power has been over 60% since 1998. This result corresponds to the fact that people's preference is tending more toward nuclear power generation which is called the nuclear power Renaissance in the United States. Furthermore, analysis of the outcome of the opinion poll in power stations site region was also conducted and it was found that attitude of the people in the site region was more positive than that of average level in the United States. (author)

  9. S. 2258: Independent Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Act of 1990. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, March 8, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the United States Senate March 8, 1990. The purpose of the bill is to amend the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 to allow commercial nuclear utilities that have contracts with the Secretary of Energy under section 302 of that Act to receive credits to offset the cost of storing spent fuel that the Secretary is unable to accept for storage on and after January 31, 1998. The credits will be deducted from each remittance of a person's fee payments to the Nuclear Waste Fund and will be in the amount of 0.56 mil per kilowatt-hour for electricity generated by the person's civilian nuclear power reactor and sold during the period the person is eligible for the credit

  10. Evaluation of Perry Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, D.E.; Bruske, S.J.

    1985-11-01

    This document was prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assist them in determining whether the Perry Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 Technical Specifications (T/S), which govern plant systems configurations and operations, are in conformance with the requirements of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) as amended, and the requirements of the Safety Evaluation Report (SER) as supplemented. A comparative audit of the FSAR as amended, and the SER as supplemented was performed with the Perry T/S. Several discrepancies were identified and subsequently resolved through telephone conversations with the staff reviewer and the utility representative. Pending completion of the resolutions noted in Parts 3 and 4 of this report, the Perry Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1 T/S, to the extent reviewed, are in conformance with the FSAR and SER

  11. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

  12. Second periodic safety review of Angra Nuclear Power Station, unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Carlos F.O.; Crepaldi, Roberto; Freire, Enio M., E-mail: ottoncf@tecnatom.com.br, E-mail: emfreire46@gmail.com, E-mail: robcrepaldi@hotmail.com [Tecnatom do Brasil Engenharia e Servicos Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Campello, Sergio A., E-mail: sacampe@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the second Periodic Safety Review (PSR2-A1) of Angra Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, prepared by Eletrobras Eletronuclear S.A. and Tecnatom do Brasil Engenharia e Servicos Ltda., during Jul.2013-Aug.2014, covering the period of 2004-2013. The site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises: Unit 1, (640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR, operating), Unit 2 (1300 MWe, KWU/Areva, operating) and Unit 3 (1405 MWe, KWU/Areva, construction). The PSR2-A1 attends the Standards 1.26-Safety in Operation of Nuclear Power Plants, Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNEN), and IAEA.SSG.25-Periodic Safety Review of Nuclear Power Plants. Within 18 months after each 10 years operation, the operating organization shall perform a plant safety review, to investigate the evolution consequences of safety code and standards, regarding: Plant design; structure, systems and components behavior; equipment qualification; plant ageing management; deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis; risk analysis; safety performance; operating experience; organization and administration; procedures; human factors; emergency planning; radiation protection and environmental radiological impacts. The Review included 6 Areas and 14 Safety Parameters, covered by 33 Evaluations.After document evaluations and discussions with plant staff, it was generated one General and 33 Specific Guide Procedures, 33 Specific and one Final Report, including: Description, Strengths, Deficiencies, Areas for Improvement and Conclusions. An Action Plan was prepared by Electronuclear for the recommendations. It was concluded that the Unit was operated within safety standards and will attend its designed operational lifetime, including possible life extensions. The Final Report was submitted to CNEN, as one requisite for renewal of the Unit Permanent Operation License. (author)

  13. Second periodic safety review of Angra Nuclear Power Station, unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Carlos F.O.; Crepaldi, Roberto; Freire, Enio M.; Campello, Sergio A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the second Periodic Safety Review (PSR2-A1) of Angra Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, prepared by Eletrobras Eletronuclear S.A. and Tecnatom do Brasil Engenharia e Servicos Ltda., during Jul.2013-Aug.2014, covering the period of 2004-2013. The site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises: Unit 1, (640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR, operating), Unit 2 (1300 MWe, KWU/Areva, operating) and Unit 3 (1405 MWe, KWU/Areva, construction). The PSR2-A1 attends the Standards 1.26-Safety in Operation of Nuclear Power Plants, Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNEN), and IAEA.SSG.25-Periodic Safety Review of Nuclear Power Plants. Within 18 months after each 10 years operation, the operating organization shall perform a plant safety review, to investigate the evolution consequences of safety code and standards, regarding: Plant design; structure, systems and components behavior; equipment qualification; plant ageing management; deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis; risk analysis; safety performance; operating experience; organization and administration; procedures; human factors; emergency planning; radiation protection and environmental radiological impacts. The Review included 6 Areas and 14 Safety Parameters, covered by 33 Evaluations.After document evaluations and discussions with plant staff, it was generated one General and 33 Specific Guide Procedures, 33 Specific and one Final Report, including: Description, Strengths, Deficiencies, Areas for Improvement and Conclusions. An Action Plan was prepared by Electronuclear for the recommendations. It was concluded that the Unit was operated within safety standards and will attend its designed operational lifetime, including possible life extensions. The Final Report was submitted to CNEN, as one requisite for renewal of the Unit Permanent Operation License. (author)

  14. 75 FR 8757 - Nebraska Public Power District, Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Notice of Availability of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ..., Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Notice of Availability of the Draft Supplement 41 to the Generic... Renewal of Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1 Notice is hereby given that the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory... operating license DPR-46 for an additional 20 years of operation for Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (CNS-1...

  15. United Kingdom procedures in case of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalfont, L.

    1988-01-01

    From the United Kingdom experience, general principles for establishing emergency plans are drawn. Every country with nuclear plant should have such emergency arrangements capable of dealing with the largest scale that can be envisaged as a practical possibility. While the effects of accidents cannot be anticipated in detail these plans should form a good flexible basis for providing the resources, communications and procedures that are likely to be needed. They encompass the administrative infrastructure of the area surrounding the nuclear installation and involve co-ordination with the police, fire services and ambulance services, the local and county authorities, the authorities responsible for food, agriculture, fisheries and water, and the health authorities including hospitals and medical services. Special training and procedures have to be established for the personnel that are involved and exercises graduating from the exercising of special procedures to large scale simulated accidents need to be carried out periodically. Good communication systems have to be established between the nuclear installations, the operational support centres or equivalent, the field and headquarters units of the relevant organizations, and the central government departments so that whatever additional resources and support are needed can be marshalled quickly and efficiently. (author)

  16. Effects of the accident at Mihama Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 on the public's attitude to nuclear power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Atsuko

    2005-01-01

    As part of an ongoing public opinion survey regarding nuclear power generation, which started in 1993, a survey was carried out in the Kansai and Kanto regions two months after the accident at Unit 3 of the Mihama Nuclear Power Plant. In addition to analyzing the statistically significant changes that have taken place since the previous survey (taken in 2003), increase and decrease of the ratio of answers to all the questions related to nuclear power before and after the two accidents were compared in the case of the accidents which occurred in the Mihama Unit 3 and the JCO company's nuclear-fuel plant. In the Kansai region, a feeling of uneasiness about the risky character of nuclear power generation increased to some extent, while the public's trust in the safety of nuclear power plants decreased somewhat. After a safety-related explanation on ''Early detection of troubles'' and Accident prevention'' was given from a managerial standpoint, people felt a little less at ease than they had before. Uneasiness, however, did not increase in relation to the overall safety explanation given about the engineering and technical functioning of the plant. There was no significant negative effect on the respondents' evaluation of or attitude toward nuclear power generation. It was found that the people's awareness about the Mihama Unit 3 accident was lower and the effect of the accident on their awareness of nuclear power generation was more limited and smaller when compared with the case of the JCO accident. In the Kanto region, people knew less about the Mihama Unit 3 accident than those living in the Kansai region, and they remembered the JCO accident, the subsequent cover-up by Tokyo Electric Power Company, and the resulting power shortage better than those living in Kansai. This suggested that there was a little difference in terms of psychological distance in relation to the accidents an incidents depending on the place where the events occurred and the company which

  17. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  18. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants - heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Booker, S.; Lehnert, D.; Daavettila, N.; Palop, E.

    1994-06-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in commercial nuclear power plant heat exchangers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein.

  19. Science, society, and America's nuclear waste: Unit 2, Ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    ''Science, Society and America's Nuclear Waste'' is a four-unit secondary curriculum. It is intended to provide information about scientific and societal issues related to the management of spent nuclear fuel from generation of electricity at nuclear powerplants and high-level radioactive waste from US national defense activities. The curriculum, supporting classroom activities, and teaching materials present a brief discussion of energy and electricity generation, including that produced at nuclear powerplants; information on sources, amounts, location, and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste; sources, types and effects of radiation; US policy for managing and disposing of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and what other countries are doing; and the components of the nuclear waste management system

  20. The independent nuclear state. The United States, Britain and the military atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.

    1983-01-01

    A chronological account and overview are presented of the 40-year history of British military research, development and production work in atomic energy. The United Kingdom's efforts in this field have always had close links with equivalent activities in the United States, and have often been conducted on a mutually co-operative basis. This book contains descriptions of the technical evolution of British nuclear weapon designs and production models, estimates of annual output figures for fissile material and weapon types, and indications of the nature of the weapon-testing programme. Decision-points are charted. The impact of the agreements with the United States, both upon weapon development and production programmes and upon stockpiling, is analysed, as well as their effects upon the nuclear submarine programme. The impact of later events upon Anglo-American relations is identified, together with the recent British attempts to move to a closer political association with Europe. The study concludes by evaluating the essential nature of four decades of United Kingdom military nuclear development, and identifying the practical limits imposed by past policies upon any attempt by a British government to implement a policy of unilateral nuclear disarmament. (author)

  1. Nuclear engineering education in the United States: a status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, D.W.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1986-01-01

    The executive summary of the White Paper entitled The Revitalization of Nuclear Energy Education in the United States is the major component of this paper. The White Paper was completed under the auspices of the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO). The presentation highlights events and program changes that have occurred in 1985-1986 following publication of the NEDHO White Paper. Many of these events provide optimism for the revitalization of nuclear engineering education

  2. Standardization of nuclear power plants in the United States: recent regulatory developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, B.Z.; Tourtellotte, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    On April 18, 1989, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended the regulations governing the process for licensing nuclear power plants in the United States to provide for issuance of early site permits, standard design certifications and combined construction permits and operating licenses for nuclear power reactors. The new regulations are designed to achieve early resolution of licensing issues and facilitate standardization of nuclear power plants in the United States. The program for design standardization is central to efforts mounted by the U.S. government and industry to ensure that there will be a next generation of nuclear power facilities in the U.S. The most significant changes are provisions for certification of standard designs and for issuance prior to start of construction of combined licenses which incorporate a construction permit and an operating license with conditions. Such certifications and combined licenses must contain tests, inspections and analyses, and acceptance criteria, which are necessary and sufficient to provide reasonable assurance that the facility has been constructed and will operate in accordance with the combined license. A number of significant implementation issues have arisen. In addition a major court case brought by several anti-nuclear groups is pending, challenging NRC authority to issue combined licenses. It is the goal of the U.S. nuclear industry to have the first of the next generation of standardized nuclear power plants ordered, licensed, constructed and on-line by the year 2000. (author)

  3. Preoperation of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyo, Tadashi; Kurata, Satoshi

    1994-01-01

    Chubu Electric Power Co. finished preoperation of Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 4 in September, 1993. Although unit 4 has the same reactor design as unit 3, its rated electrical output (1,137MW) is 37MW more than that of unit 3. This increase was achieved mainly by adopting a Moisture Separater Heater in the turbine system. We started preoperation of unit 4 in November 1992 and performed various tests at electrical outputs of 20%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. We finished preoperation without any scram or other major problems and obtained satisfactory results for the functions and performance of the plant. This paper describes the major results of unit 4 preoperation. (author)

  4. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics

  5. Economic and Market Challenges Facing the U.S. Nuclear Commercial Fleet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sharpe, Phil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kee, Edward [Nuclear Economics Consulting Group, Washington, DC (United States); Davis, Edward [Nuclear Economics Consulting Group, Washington, DC (United States); Grecheck, Eugene [Grecheck Consulting LLC, Midlothian, VA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report identifies underlying economic and electricity market factors that have led to early retirements of U.S. operating nuclear power plants, assesses the Gap between operating revenues and operating costs for selected nuclear power plants, and discusses a range of actions that might be taken to stop early retirement of operating nuclear power plants. The Kewaunee and Vermont Yankee nuclear power plants were retired early for economic and financial reasons. Early retirement has been announced or proposed for Clinton and Quad Cities in Illinois, Fitzpatrick and Ginna in New York, Fort Calhoun in Nebraska. Other nuclear power plants, including Palisades, Davis-Besse, Prairie Island, and Three Mile Island Unit 1, have been identified as facing financial stress that might lead to early retirement. The early retirement of operating nuclear power plants will mean the loss of a large amount of zero-emission electricity, inconsistent with the goal of reducing carbon emissions in the electricity sector. This report provides a high-level view of the major factors driving early retirement: • The U.S. market and private ownership approach to the electricity sector; • Low electricity market prices resulting from low natural gas prices, low demand growth, increased penetration of renewable generation, and negative electricity market prices; and • No compensation to nuclear power plants for public benefits including zero-emission electricity.

  6. Economic and Market Challenges Facing the U.S. Nuclear Commercial Fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szilard, Ronaldo; Sharpe, Phil; Kee, Edward; Davis, Edward; Grecheck, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    This report identifies underlying economic and electricity market factors that have led to early retirements of U.S. operating nuclear power plants, assesses the Gap between operating revenues and operating costs for selected nuclear power plants, and discusses a range of actions that might be taken to stop early retirement of operating nuclear power plants. The Kewaunee and Vermont Yankee nuclear power plants were retired early for economic and financial reasons. Early retirement has been announced or proposed for Clinton and Quad Cities in Illinois, Fitzpatrick and Ginna in New York, Fort Calhoun in Nebraska. Other nuclear power plants, including Palisades, Davis-Besse, Prairie Island, and Three Mile Island Unit 1, have been identified as facing financial stress that might lead to early retirement. The early retirement of operating nuclear power plants will mean the loss of a large amount of zero-emission electricity, inconsistent with the goal of reducing carbon emissions in the electricity sector. This report provides a high-level view of the major factors driving early retirement: • The U.S. market and private ownership approach to the electricity sector; • Low electricity market prices resulting from low natural gas prices, low demand growth, increased penetration of renewable generation, and negative electricity market prices; and • No compensation to nuclear power plants for public benefits including zero-emission electricity.

  7. Millstone nuclear power plant emergency system assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhmad Khusyairi

    2011-01-01

    U.S.NRC determined an obligation to build a nuclear power plant emergency response organization for both on-site and off-site. Millstone Nuclear Power Plants have 3 nuclear reactors and 2 of 3 still in commercial operation. Reactor unit 1, BWR type has been permanently shut down in 1998, while the two others, units 2 and 3 obtain the extended operating license respectively until 2035 and 2045. As a nuclear installation has the high potential radiological impact, Millstone nuclear power plant emergency response organization must establish both on-site or off-site. Emergency response organization that is formed must involve several state agencies, both state agencies and municipality. They have specific duties and functions in a state of emergency, so that protective measures can be undertaken in accordance with the community that has been planned. Meanwhile, NRC conduct their own independent assessment of nuclear power plant emergencies. (author)

  8. Britain's nervous nuclear reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, G.

    1988-01-01

    The paper concerns the nuclear energy business in the United Kingdom, with emphasis on the management of the industry. A brief history is given of the development of the nuclear power programme and the creation of UKAEA and BNFL. BNFL is responsible for reprocessing at Sellafield, fuel element manufacture at Springfields, fuel reprocessing at Thorp, and uranium enrichment at Caperhurst. The development and management of these projects are discussed with respect to export markets, competition in international markets, commercial skills, and public opinion. (U.K.)

  9. Experience with reactor power cutback system at Palo Verde nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chari, D.R.; Rec, J.R.; Simoni, L.P.; Eimar, R.L.; Sowers, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS) is a three unit site which illustrates System 80 nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) design. The System 80 NSSS is the Combustion Engineering (C-E) standard design rated at 3817 Mwth. PVNGS Units 1 and 2 achieved commercial operation on February 13, 1986 and September 22, 1986, respectively, while Unit 3 has a forecast date for commercial operation in the third quarter of 1987. The System 80 design incorporates a reactor power cutback system (RPCS) feature which reduces plant trips caused by two common initiating events: loss of load/turbine trip (LOL) and loss of one main feedwater pump (LOMFWP). The key design objective of the RPCS is to improve overall plant availability and performance, while minimizing challenges to the plant safety system

  10. Designing a nuclear power plant with 1000 MW WWER-type units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berkovich, V; Kaloshin, J; Tatarnikov, V; Shenderovich, A

    1977-06-01

    A brief description is presented of a WWER-1000 nuclear power plant also considering its environmental impact and the problem of core poisoning. The following indicators are graphically shown in relation to the reactor output: turbogenerator unit outputs, efficiency, specific capital costs and own costs of electric power generated by the Voronezh nuclear power plant. Also listed are the specific consumption of metal and concrete, specific equipment weight and the specific volume of the buildings of the main generating unit as well as the cross section thereof.

  11. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-12-01

    During the second quarter of 1990 the Finnish nuclear plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. The feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1 and the resulting inspections and repairs at both Loviisa plant units brought about an outage the overall duration of which was 32 days. The annual maintenance outages of the TVO plant units were arranged during the report period and their combined duration was 31.5 days. Nuclear electricity accounted for 35.3% of the total Finnish electricity production during this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 83.0%. Three events occurred during the report period which are classified as Level 1 on the International Nuclear Event Scale: feedwater pipe rupture at Loviisa 1, control rod withdrawal at TVO I in a test during an outage when the hydraulic scram system was rendered inoperable and erroneous fuel bundle transfers during control rod drives maintenance at TVO II. Other events during this quarter are classified as Level Zero (Below Scale) on the International Nuclear Event Scale. Occupational radiation doses and external releases of radioactivity were considerably below authorised limits. Only small amounts of nuclides originating in nuclear power plants were detected in samples taken in the vicinity of nuclear power plants

  12. Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, Georgeta; Mueller, Don; Goluoglu, Sedat; Hollenbach, Daniel F; Fox, Patricia B

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation report, Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, is to validate the computational method used to perform postclosure criticality calculations. The validation process applies the criticality analysis methodology approach documented in Section 3.5 of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report. The application systems for this validation consist of waste packages containing transport, aging, and disposal canisters (TAD) loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) of varying assembly types, initial enrichments, and burnup values that are expected from the waste stream and of varying degree of internal component degradation that may occur over the 10,000-year regulatory time period. The criticality computational tool being evaluated is the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The nuclear cross-section data distributed with MCNP 5.1.40 and used to model the various physical processes are based primarily on the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B Version VI (ENDF/B-VI) library. Criticality calculation bias and bias uncertainty and lower bound tolerance limit (LBTL) functions for CSNF waste packages are determined based on the guidance in ANSI/ANS 8.1-1998 (Ref. 4) and ANSI/ANS 8.17-2004 (Ref. 5), as described in Section 3.5.3 of Ref. 1. The development of this report is consistent with Test Plan for: Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality. This calculation report has been developed in support of licensing activities for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the results of the calculation may be used in the criticality evaluation for CSNF waste packages based on a conceptual TAD canister.

  13. Situation and development trend of nuclear power and uranium industry in the united states and Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chenglong

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the situation, trend of nuclear electrical and uranium industry in the United States and Russia. The United States and Russia are the two biggest countries in the world which generated nuclear power earliest. After 40 years' development, nuclear power in the United States and Russia are approximately 20%, 11% respectively of the total generation capacity in 2001. In the United States, only 6% of the nuclear power consumed uranium resource is domestic, in Russia about half of its uranium production is for export. Due to the collision between the energy development and environment protection, nuclear power in USA is still strong, but the uranium industry declines. In the future, uranium production for nuclear power in the United States will depend on the international market and the uranium storage of different levels. On the basis of pacifying people and making the country prosper, Russia has established their great plans for nuclear power with their substantial uranium resources. The author considers the supply and demand of uranium industry will remain balanced in the future decade on the whole, despite the United States and Russia's trend of uranium industry could take a major effect on uranium industry to the world. (authors)

  14. Lessons learned from Spain's nuclear program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Rodriguez, A.

    1993-01-01

    The commercial nuclear program in Spain dates back to the beginning of the 1960s. There are currently nine units in operation, one more has been decommissioned and a further five are in different phases of construction but under nuclear moratorium since 1983. This article gives a general overview of the program, the criteria applied, what it has meant to and required of the industry and, finally, what lessons have been learned. (author) 2 figs

  15. SOURCE OF BURNUP VALUES FOR COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BSC

    2004-01-01

    Waste packages are loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that satisfies the minimum burnup requirements of a criticality loading curve. The burnup value assigned by the originating nuclear utility to each SNF assembly (assigned burnup) is used to load waste packages in compliance with a criticality loading curve. The burnup provided by a nuclear utility has uncertainties, so conservative calculation methods are used to characterize those uncertainties for incorporation into the criticality loading curves. Procedural safety controls ensure that the correct assembly is loaded into each waste package to prevent a misload that could create a condition affecting the safety margins. Probabilistic analyses show that procedural safety controls can minimize the chance of a misload but can not completely eliminate the possibility. Physical measurements of burnup with instrumentation in the surface facility are not necessary due to the conservative calculation methods used to produce the criticality loading curves. The reactor records assigned burnup of a commercial SNF assembly contains about two percent uncertainty, which is increased to five-percent to ensure conservatism. This five-percent uncertainty is accommodated by adjusting the criticality loading curve. Also, the record keeping methods of nuclear utilities are not uniform and the level of detail required by the NRC has varied over the last several decades. Thus, some SNF assemblies may have assigned burnups that are averages for a batch of assemblies with similar characteristics. Utilities typically have access to more detailed core-follow records that allow the batch average burnup to be changed to an assembly specific burnup. Alternatively, an additional safety margin is incorporated into the criticality loading curve to accommodate SNF assemblies with batch average burnups or greater uncertainties due to the methodology used by the nuclear utility. The utility records provide the assembly identifier

  16. New generation nuclear power units of PWR type integral reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitenkov, F.M.; Kurachen Kov, A.V.; Malamud, V.A.; Panov, Yu.K.; Runov, B.I.; Flerov, L.N.

    1997-01-01

    Design bases of new generation nuclear power units (nuclear power plants - NPP, nuclear co-generation plants - NCP, nuclear distract heating plants - NDHP), using integral type PWPS, developed in OKBM, Nizhny Novgorod and trends of design decisions optimization are considered in this report. The problems of diagnostics, servicing and repair of the integral reactor components in course of operation are discussed. The results of safety analysis, including the problems of several accident localization with postulated core melting and keeping corium in the reactor vessel and guard vessel are presented. Information on experimental substantiation of the suggested plant design decisions is presented. (author)

  17. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    Volume IV provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest

  18. U.S. Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Assembly Characteristics - 1968-2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Jianwei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Peterson, Joshua L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Gauld, Ian C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowman, Stephen M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Activities related to management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are increasing in the US and many other countries. Over 240,000 SNF assemblies have been discharged from US commercial reactors since the late 1960s. The enrichment and burnup of SNF have changed significantly over the past 40 years, and fuel assembly designs have also evolved. Understanding the general characteristics of SNF helps regulators and other stakeholders form overall strategies towards the final disposal of US SNF. This report documents a survey of all US commercial SNF assemblies in the GC-859 database and provides reference SNF source terms (e.g., nuclide inventories, decay heat, and neutron/photon emission) at various cooling times up to 200 years after fuel discharge. This study reviews the distribution and evolution of fuel parameters of all SNF assemblies discharged over the past 40 years. Assemblies were categorized into three groups based on discharge year, and the median burnups and enrichments of each group were used to establish representative cases. An extended burnup case was created for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuels, and another was created for the pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuels. Two additional cases were developed to represent the eight mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in the database. Burnup calculations were performed for each representative case. Realistic parameters for fuel design and operations were used to model the SNF and to provide reference fuel characteristics representative of the current inventory. Burnup calculations were performed using the ORIGEN code, which is part of the SCALE nuclear modeling and simulation code system. Results include total activity, decay heat, photon emission, neutron flux, gamma heat, and plutonium content, as well as concentrations for 115 significant nuclides. These quantities are important in the design, regulation, and operations of SNF storage, transportation, and disposal systems.

  19. The role of Nuclear Energy Unit in gathering, organizing and disseminating of nuclear information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsurdin Ahamad

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Unit (UTN) was established with an aim to promote the application of Nuclear Science and Technology in industries, agriculture and medicine in Malaysia. Therefore UTN represents Malaysia in INIS so as to share the available information for collection, merging and dissemination of information. In UTN a variety of activities are being carried out, especially by the Information Science Department whereby a library, equipped with reading materials and a computerized information system (SMBK) is set up as the information centre. A number of publications have also been made so as to keep the technical officers and other staff aware of the developments in Nuclear Science and Technology. To provide a better understanding of the latest techniques and nuclear technological procedures, courses, seminars and workshops for officers involved are carried out. Talks and exhibitions are also organized in order to promote Nuclear Science and Technology amongst the layman. (author)

  20. Regulatory challenges facing the global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, Edwin S.

    2007-01-01

    In January 2006 the Department of Energy (DOE) announced the creation of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), an ambitious plan to reshape the nuclear energy production sector both in the United States and worldwide. If fully realized in the United States, GNEP would entail the construction of a large number of sodium-cooled fast reactors utilizing actinide-based fuels, multiple commercial-scale reprocessing plants for both light-water and fast reactors, and fast reactor fuel fabrication plants. It appears likely that the first commercial-scale GNEP facilities, as well as a future full-scale GNEP complex, would fall under the licensing jurisdiction of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This will be a challenging endeavor for the NRC, primarily because the proposed GNEP facilities will in large part be based on novel and untested designs and processes that have not been developed on a commercial scale. In order to effectively regulate the GNEP complex, the NRC will have to quickly address the many technical and policy questions that will arise in any GNEP licensing scheme. This paper identifies some difficult issues that will be encountered in GNEP licensing by examining the potential implications of NRC's current policies and regulatory requirements, and analyzing the impacts of some emerging post-9/11 security issues. (author)

  1. US nuclear industry plans squeeze on O and M costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The United States nuclear industry, still the largest in the world with 107 operating commercial plants, wants to squeeze still more fat out of operation and maintenance costs. Success or failure could decide whether many operating units remain competitive with other forms of baseload electricity generation over the coming decade. (Author)

  2. 1997 State-by-State Assessment of Low-Level Radioactive Wastes Received at Commercial Disposal Sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    Each year the National Low-Level Waste Management Program publishes a state-by-state assessment report. This report provides both national and state-specific disposal data on low-level radioactive waste commercially disposed in the United States. Data in this report are categorized according to disposal site, generator category, waste class, volumes, and radionuclide activity. Included in this report are tables showing the distribution of waste by state for 1997 and a comparison of waste volumes and radioactivity by state for 1993 through 1997; also included is a list of all commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States as of December 31, 1997

  3. Analysis of gross error rates in operation of commercial nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joos, D.W.; Sabri, Z.A.; Husseiny, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Experience in operation of US commercial nuclear power plants is reviewed over a 25-month period. The reports accumulated in that period on events of human error and component failure are examined to evaluate gross operator error rates. The impact of such errors on plant operation and safety is examined through the use of proper taxonomies of error, tasks and failures. Four categories of human errors are considered; namely, operator, maintenance, installation and administrative. The computed error rates are used to examine appropriate operator models for evaluation of operator reliability. Human error rates are found to be significant to a varying degree in both BWR and PWR. This emphasizes the import of considering human factors in safety and reliability analysis of nuclear systems. The results also indicate that human errors, and especially operator errors, do indeed follow the exponential reliability model. (Auth.)

  4. Aging management guideline for commercial nuclear power plants-stationary batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, R.; Shao, J.; Krencicki, G.; Giachetti, R.

    1994-03-01

    The Aging Management Guideline (AMG) describes recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant stationary batteries important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  5. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Electrical switchgear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.; Schuler, K.

    1993-07-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in BWR and PWR commercial nuclear power plant electrical switchgear important to license renewal. The latent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance, to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  6. Fire protection of safe shutdown capability at commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, K.

    1993-01-01

    The comprehensive industrial safety standards and codes that exist today have evolved from lessons learned through past experience, research results, and improvements in technological capabilities. The current requirements for fire safety features of commercial nuclear power stations operated in the U.S. are a notable example of this practice. Although fire protection has always been an important design requirement, from the aftermath of a serious fire that occurred in 1975 at the Browns Ferry plant, it was learned that the life safety and property protection concerns of the major fire insurance underwriters may not sufficiently encompass nuclear safety issues, particularly with regard to the potential for fire damage to result in the common mode failure of redundant trains of systems, and composites important to the safe shutdown of the reactor. Following its investigations into the Browns Ferry fire, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) promulgated guidance documents, which ultimately developed into mandatory regulations, necessary to assure the implementation of a fire protection program that would address nuclear safety concerns. The new criteria that evolved, contain prescriptive design features, as well as personnel and administrative requirements the Commission determined to be necessary to provide a defense-in-depth level of protection against the hazards of fire and its associated effects on safety related equipment. These criteria are primarily contained in Appendix R of Title 10 to the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR 50)

  7. Commercial disposal of High Integrity Containers (HICs) containing EPICOR-II prefilters from Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Lynch, R.J.; Tyacke, M.J.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and commercially disposing of 45 High Integrity Containers (HICs), each containing an EPICOR-II prefilter. Also described are the improvements that were applied in the disposition of the 45 commercial EPICOR-II prefilters at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), versus those used for the demonstration unit. The significance of this effort was that the commercial disposal campaign involved the first-of-a-kind production use of a reinforced concrete HIC at the US Ecology, Inc. facility in the State of Washington. This allowed for safe disposal of high-specific-activity ion exchange material in EPICOR-II prefilters generated during the cleanup of the Unit-2 Auxiliary and Fuel Handling Building of the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Station. 26 figs

  8. Designing a nuclear power plant with 1000 MW WWER-type units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovich, V.; Kaloshin, J.; Tatarnikov, V.; Shenderovich, A.

    1977-01-01

    A brief description is presented of a WWER-1000 nuclear power plant also considering its environmental impact and the problem of core poisoning. The following indicators are graphically shown in relation to the reactor output: turbogenerator unit outputs, efficiency, specific capital costs and own costs of electric power generated by the Voronezh nuclear power plant. Also listed are the specific consumption of metal and concrete, specific equipment weight and the specific volume of the buildings of the main generating unit as well as the cross section thereof. (J.B.)

  9. Summary report on the 1985 United Kingdom radioactive waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, A.M.; Wear, F.J.; Haselden, H.; Shepherd, J.; Tymons, B.J.

    1986-04-01

    Stocks of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom which have arisen, or are projected to arise, from commercial nuclear power reactors and fuel cycle facilities, research, medical and industrial uses of radioactive nuclides are given in the form of summary tables. Projected future arisings from operation and decommissioning of facilities and notional nuclear power generation programmes to 2030 are also given. (author)

  10. NRC/FEMA operational response procedures for response to a commercial nuclear reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-11-01

    Procedures have been developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which provide the response teams of both agencies with the steps to be taken in responding to an emergency at a commercial nuclear power plant. The emphasis of these procedures is mainly on the interface between NRC and FEMA at their respective Headquarters and Regional Offices and at the various sites at which such an emergency could occur. Detailed procedures are presented that cover for both agencies, notification schemes and manner of activation, organizations at Headquaters and the site, interface procedures, coordination of onsite and offsite operations, the role of the Senior FEMA Official, and the cooperative efforts of each agency's public information staff

  11. International nuclear cooperation in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Yong-Kyu

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power project traditionally involve huge financial investment, highly sophisticated technology, and long lead time. Many countries, particularly developing ones, find it impossible to implement their nuclear power programs without technical cooperation and assistance from advanced countries. In this Asia and Pacific Region, seven countries have commercial nuclear power units in operation and/or under construction. Korea has six nuclear power units in operation, and three under construction. Active nuclear cooperation has been instrumental in implementing her abmitious nuclear power programs successfully. Nuclear cooperation is one of the widely recognized necessities, which is quite often talked about among the countries of the Asia and Pacific Region. But the differences in nuclear maturity and national interests among those in the region seem to be standing against it. Given the constraints, it is not easy to select appropriate areas for cooperation. There is no doubt, however, that they should include the nuclear policy, nuclear safety, radwaste management, radiological protection, and the management of nuclear units. In order to effectively promote nuclear cooperation in the Region, the scope of RCA activities must be expanded to include the nuclear power area. The Regional Nuclear Data Bank, the Regional Training Center and the Nuclear Emergency Response Center, for example, would be the effective tools for cooperation to meet the demands of the countries in the Region. In view of the technological gap between Japan and all others in the region, we cannot speak of a regional nuclear cooperation without heavily counting on Japan, the most advanced nuclear state in the region. For these reasons, Japan is expected to share an increasing portion of her nuclear technology with others. (author)

  12. Lessons learned from commercial experience with nuclear plant decontamination to safe storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, S.R.; Partain, W.L.; Sype, T.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has successfully performed decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) on many production reactors it. DOE now has the challenge of performing D ampersand D on a wide variety of other nuclear facilities. Because so many facilities are being closed, it is necessary to place many of them into a safe-storage status before conducting D ampersand D-for perhaps as much as 20 yr. The challenge is to achieve this safe-storage condition in a cost-effective manner while remaining in compliance with applicable regulations. The DOE Office of Environmental Management, Office of Transition and Management, commissioned a lessons learned study of commercial experience with safe storage and transition to D ampersand D. Although the majority of the commercial experience has been with reactors, many of the lessons learned presented in this paper are directly applicable to transitioning the DOE Weapons Complex

  13. National profile on commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J.A.; Mrochek, J.E.; Jolley, R.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Francis, A.A.; Wright, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This report details the findings and conclusions drawn from a survey undertaken as part of a joint US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and US Environmental Protection Agency-sponsored project entitled ``National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste.`` The overall objective of the work was to compile a national profile on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of commercially generated low-level mixed waste for 1990 by five major facility categories-academic, industrial, medical, and NRC-/Agreement State-licensed goverment facilities and nuclear utilities. Included in this report are descriptions of the methodology used to collect and collate the data, the procedures used to estimate the mixed waste generation rate for commercial facilities in the United States in 1990, and the identification of available treatment technologies to meet applicable EPA treatment standards (40 CFR Part 268) and, if possible, to render the hazardous component of specific mixed waste streams nonhazardous. The report also contains information on existing and potential commercial waste treatment facilities that may provide treatment for specific waste streams identified in the national survey. The report does not include any aspect of the Department of Energy`s (DOES) management of mixed waste and generally does not address wastes from remedial action activities.

  14. National profile on commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, J.A.; Mrochek, J.E.; Jolley, R.L.; Osborne-Lee, I.W.; Francis, A.A.; Wright, T.

    1992-12-01

    This report details the findings and conclusions drawn from a survey undertaken as part of a joint US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and US Environmental Protection Agency-sponsored project entitled ''National Profile on Commercially Generated Low-Level Radioactive Mixed Waste.'' The overall objective of the work was to compile a national profile on the volumes, characteristics, and treatability of commercially generated low-level mixed waste for 1990 by five major facility categories-academic, industrial, medical, and NRC-/Agreement State-licensed goverment facilities and nuclear utilities. Included in this report are descriptions of the methodology used to collect and collate the data, the procedures used to estimate the mixed waste generation rate for commercial facilities in the United States in 1990, and the identification of available treatment technologies to meet applicable EPA treatment standards (40 CFR Part 268) and, if possible, to render the hazardous component of specific mixed waste streams nonhazardous. The report also contains information on existing and potential commercial waste treatment facilities that may provide treatment for specific waste streams identified in the national survey. The report does not include any aspect of the Department of Energy's (DOES) management of mixed waste and generally does not address wastes from remedial action activities

  15. The nuclear option in Canada - why it is gaining ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopwood, J.M.; Alizadeh, A.; Hedges, K.R.; Tighe, P.

    2005-01-01

    Over the last five years, the nuclear option in Canada has gone from 'off-the-radar' to an essential part of the energy debate. In Ontario, in particular, building new nuclear plants, along with life-extension of existing plants, has been recommended by government commissions as one of the vital energy-supply options to be pursued. Both life-extension and introduction of new nuclear power plants are complicated by uncertainties in the energy market, and by changes in the organizational and policy environment. Public and policy-maker recognition of the nuclear role are steadily growing, but commercial conditions to support nuclear projects are still difficult to define and obtain. In Canada, as in many OECD countries, the need to add to electricity infrastructure is becoming apparent. Life-extension of existing nuclear units, and projects to build new unit, are being planned. The key challenges, once energy policy issues have been addressed, are mainly commercial. Based on its successful experience with overseas projects such as Quinshan, and on its evolutionary approach to design of new, advanced power plants, AECL is well placed to meet these challenges and launch a new round of nuclear projects. Overall, the Canadian perspective is towards increasing support for the nuclear option. Canada is poised to join the vanguard of the broadening nuclear power expansion. (orig.)

  16. Nuclear power plant V-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this leaflet the short history of commissioning of Bohunice V-2 NPP is reviewed (beginning of construction December 1976; First controlled reactor power, Reactor Unit 1 (RU1): 7 August 1984, Reactor Unit 2 (RU2): 2 August 1985; Connection to the grid: RU1 20 August 1984, RU2 9 August 1985; Commercial operation: RU1 14 February 1985, RU2 18 December 1985. The scheme of the nuclear reactor WWER 440/V213 is depicted. The major technological equipment are described. Principles of nuclear power plant operation safety (safety barriers, active and passive safety systems, centralized heat supply system, as well as technical data of the Bohunice V-2 NPP are presented

  17. Nuclear power plant V-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In this leaflet the short history of commissioning of Bohunice V-1 NPP is reviewed (beginning of construction 24 April 1972; First controlled reactor power, Reactor Unit 1 (RU1): 27 November 1978, Reactor Unit 2 (RU2): 15 March 1980; Connection to the grid: RU1 17 December 1978, RU2 26 March 1980; Commercial operation: RU1 1 April 1980, RU2 7 January 1981. The scheme of the nuclear reactor WWER 440/V230 is depicted. The major technological equipment (primary circuit, nuclear reactor, steam generators, reactor coolant pumps, primary circuit auxiliary systems, secondary circuit, turbine generators, NPP electrical equipment, and power plant control) are described. Technical data of the Bohunice V-1 NPP are presented

  18. BN-1200 Reactor Power Unit Design Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilyev, B.A.; Shepelev, S.F.; Ashirmetov, M.R.; Poplavsky, V.M.

    2013-01-01

    Main goals of BN-1200 design: • Develop a reliable new generation reactor plant for the commercial power unit with fast reactor to implement the first-priority objectives in changing over to closed nuclear fuel cycle; • Improve technical and economic indices of BN reactor power unit to the level of those of Russian VVER of equal power; • Enhance the safety up to the level of the requirements for the 4th generation RP

  19. TEPCO plans to construct Higashidori Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuruta, Atsushi

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, TEPCO submitted to the government plans for the construction of Higashidori Nuclear Power Station. The application was filed 41 years after the project approved by the Higashidori Village Assembly. This nuclear power station will be the first new nuclear power plant constructed by TEPCO since the construction of Units No.6 and 7 at the Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station 18 years ago. Higashidori Nuclear Power Station is to be constructed at a completely new site, which will become the fourth TEPCO nuclear power station. Higashidori Nuclear Power Station Unit No.1 will be TEPCO's 18th nuclear reactor. Unit No.1 will be an advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), a reactor-type with a proven track record. It will be TEPCO's third ABWR. Alongside incorporating the latest technology, in Higashidori Nuclear Power Station Unit No.1, the most important requirement is for TEPCO to reflect in the new unit information and experience acquired from the operation of other reactors (information and experience acquired through the experience of operating TEPCO's 17 units at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, Fukushima Daini Nuclear Power Station and Kashiwazaki Kashiwa Nuclear Power Station in addition to information on non-conformities at nuclear power stations in Japan and around the world). Higashidori Nuclear Power Station is located in Higashidori-Village (Aomori Prefecture) and the selected site includes a rich natural environment. From an environmental perspective, we will implement the construction with due consideration for the land and sea environment, aiming to ensure that the plant can co-exist with its natural surroundings. The construction plans are currently being reviewed by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency. We are committed to making progress in the project for the start of construction and subsequent commercial operation. (author)

  20. Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A.

    1997-09-01

    This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects

  1. Commercial Buildings Characteristics, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-29

    Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992 presents statistics about the number, type, and size of commercial buildings in the United States as well as their energy-related characteristics. These data are collected in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national survey of buildings in the commercial sector. The 1992 CBECS is the fifth in a series conducted since 1979 by the Energy Information Administration. Approximately 6,600 commercial buildings were surveyed, representing the characteristics and energy consumption of 4.8 million commercial buildings and 67.9 billion square feet of commercial floorspace nationwide. Overall, the amount of commercial floorspace in the United States increased an average of 2.4 percent annually between 1989 and 1992, while the number of commercial buildings increased an average of 2.0 percent annually.

  2. Public acceptance of nuclear power generation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liverman, J.L.; Thorne, R.D.

    1977-01-01

    Within the United States environmental awareness has spread and matured since the early 1960's. Evidence of this is found in cautious attitudes toward the installation of nuclear power reactors and other components of the nuclear fuel cycle. Hazards associated with nuclear energy technologies appear to attract a greater share of public attention than the hazards of nonnuclear counterparts. The association of nuclear power with nuclear weapons may be at the root of this concern. The explicit identification of increased incidences of cancer and genetic effects in humans as potential consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation and knowledge that radiation exposures and health consequences arising from nuclear power operations might occur many generations after operations cease also underlie this concern. Based in large part on these concerns, a number of actions have been taken in the United States to prevent and to delay installation and development of nuclear technology. These actions are reviewed and analyzed with emphasis on the 1976 California nuclear moratorium referendum and other more recent actions at state and national levels. They are compared with the status and outcome of similar actions in other nations as is possible. Additionally, ERDA's current approaches to public involvement in the decision making process is discussed, including the value of comprehensive analyses of health, environmental, and socioeconomic aspects of alternative energy sources in responding to public needs. U.S. plans for providing such analyses for all installed and developing energy technologies are presented with special reference to areas which require international cooperation for implementation. The value of international analysis and internationally accepted environmental control strategies for all energy technologies is also addressed

  3. 78 FR 9111 - Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units: Reconsideration and Final Amendments...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... impacts? 2. What are the water and solid waste impacts? 3. What are the energy impacts? 4. What are the.... Pulp and Paper Sludge 4. Rulemaking Petition Process for Other Categorical Non-Waste Determinations (40... and 241 Commercial and Industrial Solid Waste Incineration Units: Reconsideration and Final Amendments...

  4. Nuclear electric power and the proliferation of nuclear weapon states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walske, C.

    1977-01-01

    Control and elimination of the strategic nuclear weapons held by the nuclear weapon states remains the central problem in the arms control and disarmament field. Whether the proliferation of nations with nuclear weapons can be stopped is dubious. A sovereign nation will launch a nuclear weapons program if it has the motivation and resource. Motivation depends on military and political considerations. The necessary resources are economic and technological. Conditions in some sovereign states explain this issue. A survey of commercial nuclear power programs outside the USA lists 45 countries using or planning to use nuclear reactors for power generation. There are currently 112 reactors now operating outside the United States, 117 more under construction, 60 on order, and 180 planned. The U. S. as of December 1976 has 64 operating reactors, 72 under construction, 84 on order, and 8 planned. Nuclear trade and export policies are discussed. In this article, Mr. Walske says that American industry is convinced that the need for nuclear energy abroad is more urgent than in the United States; that in the long run, the breeder reactor must be developed to enable the supply of nuclear fuel to last for centuries; and that the experience of American industry abroad has convinced it that emphasis on restrictive, denial type policies will almost certainly fail--a collapse of what has been gained through the test ban treaty and the nonproliferation treaty

  5. Recent technology for BWR nuclear steam turbine unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Shin-ichi; Masuda, Toyohiko; Kashiwabara, Katsuto; Oshima, Yoshikuni

    1990-01-01

    As to the ABWR plants which is the third improvement standard boiling water reactor type plants, already the construction of a plant of 1356 MWe class for 50 Hz is planned. Hitachi Ltd. has accumulated the technology for the home manufacture of a whole ABWR plant including a turbine. As the results, the application of a butterfly type combination intermediate valve to No.5 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., which began the commercial operation recently and later plants, the application of a moisture separating heater to No.4 plant in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., which is manufactured at present and later plants and so on were carried out. As to the steam turbine facilities for nuclear power generation manufactured by Hitachi Ltd., three turbines of 1100 MWe class for 50 Hz and one turbine for 60 Hz are in operation. As the new technologies for the steam turbines, the development of 52 in long last stage blades, the new design techniques for the rotor system, the moisture separating heater, the butterfly type combination intermediate valve, cross-around pipes and condensate and feedwater system are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Quality control for the construction of Ikata Nuclear Power Station No. 2 Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onishi, Akiyoshi

    1983-01-01

    In the construction of No. 2 unit in Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., the quality control was practiced making effective use of the experience in preceding stations including the Three Mile Island station, U.S., and improving those. The construction works were also performed in consideration of ensuring the safe running of No. 1 unit in commercial operation. In this report, first the outline of No. 2 unit facility and the quality control in the construction processes are described sequentially. For the comprehensive quality control activity over a series of plant design, manufacturing, installation and commissioning processes, the quality control policy was fixed, the system was established, the plan was prepared, and the quality control was promoted as planned and systematically. The outline of the quality control in each stage is described as follows. Design stage: It was implemented for the confirmation of applicable standards and references, the management of drawings submitted for approval, the selection of materials used, the coordination among sub-contractors, design change and the reflection of experience in preceding stations. Manufacturing stage. It was performed for material control, manufacturing management, factory test and control. Installation stage. It was practiced for the management of installation works, the inspection during the installation, and the check-up and control after the installation. Several quality control items were implemented also in the method of construction works and construction management. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Chernobyl lesson and the nuclear power prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilegan, Iosif

    2002-01-01

    At sixteen years from the disaster which made the commercial power reactor nr. 4 of the Chernobyl NPP known worldwide, the radiation effects and the consequences are still vivid. A basic statement is to be underlined, namely, the Chernobyl event was not an accident in a nuclear power plant being in an industrial, commercial state of operation but an accident following an experiment done on the reactor. Lack of professionalism, of nuclear safety culture, the outrageous violation of basic rules and regulations, established for the unit operation, represent some of the causes originating the Chernobyl disaster. One of the most unfair consequences enhanced by an incorrect mass media information and political manipulation was the ensuing antinuclear media campaign. The paper quotes recent monographs and United Nations Documents showing how the facts were distorted to render arguments and support for various political, economical or humanistic goals. Thus, over more than 15 years due to the hard controversies and irrational campaigns on a global scale the nuclear power was discredited. Practically, all the nuclear power plant constructions were either delayed or cancelled. Moreover, some governments have sustained even closing the existing nuclear stations. The author asks himself rhetorically whether somebody has considered and quantified the immense losses produced by such unmotivated policy or else the additional damage and abuse caused to our home planet by the additional burning of fossil fuels to replace the nuclear fuel burning in nuclear power plants. The paper ends by mentioning the environmental advantages and economic efficiency of that clean energy source which is the nuclear power

  8. Large-scale distribution of tritium in a commercial product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combs, F.; Doda, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Tritium enters the environment from various sources including nuclear reactor operations, weapons testing, natural production, and from the manufacture, use and ultimate disposal of commercial products containing tritium. A recent commercial application of tritium in the United States of America involves the backlighting of liquid crystal displays (LCD) in digital electronic watches. These watches are distributed through normal commercial channels to the general public. One million curies (MCi) of tritium were distributed in 1977 in this product. This is a significant quantity of tritium compared with power reactor-produced tritium (3MCi yearly) or with naturally produced tritium (6MCi yearly). This is the single largest commercial application involving tritium to date. The final disposition of tritium from large quantities of this product, after its useful life, must be estimated by considering the means of disposal and the possibility of dispersal of tritium concurrent with disposal. The most likely method of final disposition of this product will be disposal in solid refuse; this includes burial in land fills and incineration. Burial in land fills will probably contain the tritium for its effective lifetime, whereas incineration will release all the tritium gas (as the oxide) to the atmosphere. The use and disposal of this product will be studied as part of an environmental study that is at present being prepared for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. (author)

  9. Main messages for the new nuclear unit in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikula, Anneli

    2001-01-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted last year, on 15th November, to the Council of State an application for a decision in principle concerning the construction of additional nuclear capacity. In this presentation, the main messages to decision makers for the new unit are discussed. Also the studies, which the messages are based on, are described. According to the Finnish Nuclear Energy Act, a company considering a nuclear plant project must apply for a decision in principle from the Government beforehand. The Government then decides whether the project is in accordance with the overall good of the society. If the decision is positive, it needs ratification by the Parliament. Before the Government decision, various interested parties are heard, including the municipality of location and the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority. The phase of statements is underway and they all will be ready by the end of March 2001. The entire application process takes approximately 1-2 years. The main messages arguing for more nuclear power in Finland were as follows. The new nuclear power plant unit replaces old fossil power plants and satisfies the need for additional demand of electricity; makes possible to meet the requirements of the Kyoto agreement; reduces the dependence on the imported energy and assures a stable and predictable electricity price. Messaging concerning a new nuclear power plant unit is made in co-operation with several organisations. The most important of them, in addition to the company shareholders, are the companies which have shown interested in the new project as well as the Finnish Energy Industries Federation (Finergy) and the Confederation of Finnish Industry and Employers. A transparency folder 'Nuclear electricity 2000' was put together of the messages in collaboration with the organisations. The folder was distributed to about 400 opinion leaders in the energy field. To ensure the consistency of the messages, several interest group meetings

  10. Proposal for broader United States-Russian transparency of nuclear arms reductions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percival, C.M.; Ingle, T.H.; Bieniawski, A.J.

    1995-01-01

    During the January 1994 Summit Presidents Clinton and Yeltsin agreed on the goal of ensuring the ''transparency and irreversibility'' of the nuclear arms reduction process. As a result, negotiations are presently underway between the United States Government and the Russian Federation to confirm the stockpiles of plutonium and highly enriched uranium removed from nuclear weapons. In December 1994 the United States presented a paper to the Russian Federation proposing additional measures to provide broader transparency of nuclear arms reduction. The US Department of Energy is studying the implementation of these broader transparency measures at appropriate DOE facilities. The results of the studies include draft protocols for implementation, assessments of the implementation procedures and the impacts on the facilities and estimates of the cost to implement these measures at various facilities

  11. United States extension of indemnification to utilities and contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.H.

    1988-01-01

    The status of legislation in the United States, usually known as the Price-Anderson Act, provides an assured source and means of compensation for members of the public who may be injured as a result of a nuclear accident at a licensed commercial nuclear power plant or at a facility of the United States Government operated by a contractor. First a brief overview of the Act and its history is given, then the course of legislation to extend the Price-Anderson Act through the United States Congress is charted with comments made on the major issues of the debate. The Act requires that a least $560 million in insurance and/or Government indemnity is available to cover public liability claims arising out of an accident at a nuclear power plant. The Act also limits the total liability of all persons for any nuclear incident to a predetermined amount and this is one issue discussed. Final action on the legal situation should be taken in 1988. (U.K.)

  12. An operating nuclear utility's experience with the ALARA design of a new nuclear unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodgers, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This talk presents a review of how operating experience at Northeast Utilities has been factored into the design of a new nuclear unit and the development and management of the radiation protection program. Their operational experience has indicated that there are two facets to keeping radiation exposures ALARA. The first is the proper ALARA design of the unit. The other facet is the design of a comprehensive radiation protection program. The author discusses these facets in some detail

  13. Commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    The near term (one to five year) needs of domestic and foreign commercial suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals for electromagnetically separated stable isotopes are assessed. Only isotopes purchased to make products for sale and profit are considered. Radiopharmaceuticals produced from enriched stable isotopes supplied by the Calutron facility at ORNL are used in about 600,000 medical procedures each year in the United States. A temporary or permanent disruption of the supply of stable isotopes to the domestic radiopharmaceutical industry could curtail, if not eliminate, the use of such diagnostic procedures as the thallium heart scan, the gallium cancer scan, the gallium abscess scan, and the low radiation dose thyroid scan. An alternative source of enriched stable isotopes exist in the USSR. Alternative starting materials could, in theory, eventually be developed for both the thallium and gallium scans. The development of a new technology for these purposes, however, would take at least five years and would be expensive. Hence, any disruption of the supply of enriched isotopes from ORNL and the resulting unavailability of critical nuclear medicine procedures would have a dramatic negative effect on the level of health care in the United States.

  14. Research achievements and commercial interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    ANSTO, in partnership with Australian and overseas organisations, continues to make significant contributions to selected fields of research and development. Major revenue for ANSTO is generated through sales of radiopharmaceuticals and radioisotopes for medical, industrial, environmental and research purposes and through neutron irradiation services. Further, ANSTO is actively trying to generate maximum value from its knowledge and know-how through protection and exploitation of its intellectual property. Strategic alliances have been developed to further the commercial utilisation of ANSTO know-how in, for example, delivery systems for tumour treatments, commercial waste remediation and applications of plasma implantation. The 2000-2001 financial year saw the establishment of an ANSTO business unit called Sulfide Solutions targeted at better management of environmental issues arising from mining operations. Overall, ANSTO's capacity to generate value from the application of its knowledge and know-how is being increasingly acknowledged, the organisation attaining credibility as an international leader in the application of nuclear science and technology in targeted areas

  15. Pyrolytic carbon coatings for nuclear fuels from commercial butane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, I.D.; Abdelhalim, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    Uranium dioxide and graphite semi-spherical particles (average diameter = 300 um) were coated with pyrolytic carbon at relatively low temperatures (800 to 1200 0 C). The spouting gas was a mixture of commercial butane and nitrogen. The hydrocarbon served as a source for carbon whereas nitrogenated as a diluent and a support for the bed. The total gas flow rate was 3.5 lit/min and the hydrocarbon content varied from 3 to 10%. Coating efficiencies ranging from 4 to 25 percent were obtained. The densities of the coatings varied from 1.25 g/cm 3 (which corresponds to coatings of laminar microstructures) and 1.82 g/cm 3 (which suggests the formation of isotropic coatings. Metallographic examination (using polarized light) of the pyrolytic carbon formed at the experimental conditions indicated the possibility of using the coatings for nuclear fuel applications

  16. State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-04-01

    A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report

  17. 75 FR 80547 - Carolina Power & Light Company, Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ..., Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant, Unit No. 1; Exemption 1.0 Background Carolina Power & Light Company... operation of the Shearon Harris Nuclear Power Plant (HNP), Unit 1. The license provides, among other things... request to generically extend the rule's compliance date for all operating nuclear power plants, but noted...

  18. Nuclear power plants 1995 - a world survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1996-01-01

    The atw Statistics Report compiled by atw lists 428 nuclear power plants with 363 397 gross MWe in operation in 30 countries in late 1995. Another 62 units with 55 180 gross MWe were under construction in 18 countries. This adds up to a total of 490 units with an aggregate 418 577 MWe. In the course of 1995 four units in four countries started commercial operation. In the survey of electricity generation in 1995 for which no information was made available from China and Kasachstan, a total of 417 nuclear power plants were covered. In the year under review they generated an aggregate 2 282 614 GWH, which is 3.4% more than in the previous year. The highest nuclear generation again was recorded in the USA with 705 771 GWh, followed by France with 377 021 GWh. The Grohnde power station in Germany attained the maximum annual production figure of 11 359 GWh. The survey includes nine tables indicating the generating performance of each nuclear power plant, the development of electricity generation in nuclear plants, and status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1995 arranged by countries, types of reactors, and reactor manufacturers. (orig.) [de

  19. Retail Marijuana Purchases in Designer and Commercial Markets in New York City: Sales Units, Weights, and Prices per Gram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sifaneck, Stephen J.; Ream, Geoffrey L.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Dunlap, Eloise

    2007-01-01

    This paper documents the bifurcation of the market for commercial marijuana from the market for designer marijuana in New York City. Commercial marijuana is usually grown outdoors, imported to NYC, and of average quality. By contrast, several strains of designer marijuana are usually grown indoors from specially-bred strains and carefully handled for maximum quality. The mechanisms for selling include street/park sellers, delivery services, private sales, and storefronts. Retail sales units vary from $5 to $50 and more, but the actual weights and price per gram of retail marijuana purchases lacks scientific precision. Ethnographic staff recruited marijuana purchasers who used digital scales to weigh a purposive sample of 99 marijuana purchases. Results indicate clear differences in price per gram between the purchases of commercial (avg. $8.20/gram) and designer (avg. $18.02/gram) marijuana. Designer purchases are more likely to be made by whites, downtown (Lower East Side/Union Square area), via delivery services, and in units of $10 bags, $50 cubes, and eighth and quarter ounces. Commercial marijuana purchases are more likely to be made by blacks, uptown (Harlem), via street dealers, and in units of $5 and $20 bags. Imported commercial types Arizona and Chocolate were only found uptown, while designer brand names describing actual strains like Sour Diesel and White Widow were only found downtown. Findings indicate clear divisions between commercial and designer marijuana markets in New York City. The extent that these differences may be based upon different THC potencies is a matter for future research. PMID:17055670

  20. What can nuclear energy do for society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    It is pointed out that the earth's crust holds 30,000 times as much energy in the form of fissionable atoms as fossil fuel. Moreover, nuclear fuel costs less per unit of energy than fossil fuel. Capital equipment used to release nuclear energy, on the other hand, is expensive. For commercial electric-power production and marine propulsion, advantages of nuclear power have outweighed disadvantages. As to nuclear submarines, applications other than military may prove feasible. The industry has proposed cargo submarines to haul oil from the Alaskan North Slope beneath the Arctic ice. Other possible applications for nuclear power are in air-cushion-vehicles, aircraft, and rockets.-

  1. Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) is located in Zarechny, approximately 60 km east of Ekaterinberg along the Trans-Siberian Highway. Zarechny, a small city of approximately 30,000 residents, was built to support BNPP operations. It is a closed city to unescorted visitors. Residents must show identification for entry. BNPP is one of the first and oldest commercial nuclear power plants in Russia and began operations in 1964. As for most nuclear power plants in the Russian Federation, BNPP is operated by Rosenergoatom, which is subordinated to the Ministry of Atomic Energy of the Russian Federation (Minatom). BNPP is the site of three nuclear reactors, Units 1, 2, and 3. Units 1 and 2, which have been shut-down and defueled, were graphite moderated reactors. The units were shut-down in 1981 and 1989. Unit 3, a BN-600 reactor, is a 600 MW(electric) sodium-cooled fast breeder reactor. Unit 3 went on-line in April 1980 and produces electric power which is fed into a distribution grid and thermal power which provides heat to Zarechny. The paper also discusses the SF NIKIET, the Sverdiovsk Branch of NIKIET, Moscow, which is the research and development branch of the parent NIKEIT and is primarily a design institute responsible for reactor design. Central to its operations is a 15 megawatt IVV research reactor. The paper discusses general security and fissile material control and accountability at these two facilities

  2. A comparison of the nuclear options for greenhouse gas mitigation in China and in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chi-Jen, E-mail: cj.y@duke.edu [Center on Global Change, Box 90658, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    China is quickly building up its nuclear power capacity while the hailed nuclear renaissance in the United States has been largely stagnant. The political and industrial structures explain the divergent paths. This paper draws lessons from the French experiences in deploying nuclear power and uses the lessons in comparing Chinese and U.S. policies. An authoritative political system and state-owned utility industry allow China to emulate the French approaches such as government-backed financing and broad-scale deployment with standardized design. The democratic political system and fragmented utility industry, and the laissez-faire ideology in the United States, on the other hand, are unfavorable to a nuclear renaissance. The prospect of a nuclear revival in the United States remains highly uncertain. As China builds up its nuclear industry, it will be able to reduce carbon emissions without a carbon price through a national plan to deploy low-carbon nuclear electricity, while the United States cannot implement a climate policy without a carbon price. American politicians should stop using China's lack of carbon cap as an excuse for postponing the legislation of a carbon price. - Highlights: > The Chinese government and Chinese state-owned companies are indigenizing nuclear power technologies, establishing nuclear manufacturing capacity, and gradually scaling up nuclear power deployment. > China is likely on a path to the biggest nuclear buildup in human history. > The hailed nuclear renaissance in the United States has been largely stagnant. > The underlying causes of U.S. Nuclear stagnation is rooted in the democratic political system and fragmented utility industry, and the laissez-faire ideology, which are unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. > China can move toward a low-carbon electricity system without a carbon price. The United States needs a carbon price to implement a climate policy.

  3. A comparison of the nuclear options for greenhouse gas mitigation in China and in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chi-Jen

    2011-01-01

    China is quickly building up its nuclear power capacity while the hailed nuclear renaissance in the United States has been largely stagnant. The political and industrial structures explain the divergent paths. This paper draws lessons from the French experiences in deploying nuclear power and uses the lessons in comparing Chinese and U.S. policies. An authoritative political system and state-owned utility industry allow China to emulate the French approaches such as government-backed financing and broad-scale deployment with standardized design. The democratic political system and fragmented utility industry, and the laissez-faire ideology in the United States, on the other hand, are unfavorable to a nuclear renaissance. The prospect of a nuclear revival in the United States remains highly uncertain. As China builds up its nuclear industry, it will be able to reduce carbon emissions without a carbon price through a national plan to deploy low-carbon nuclear electricity, while the United States cannot implement a climate policy without a carbon price. American politicians should stop using China's lack of carbon cap as an excuse for postponing the legislation of a carbon price. - Highlights: → The Chinese government and Chinese state-owned companies are indigenizing nuclear power technologies, establishing nuclear manufacturing capacity, and gradually scaling up nuclear power deployment. → China is likely on a path to the biggest nuclear buildup in human history. → The hailed nuclear renaissance in the United States has been largely stagnant. → The underlying causes of U.S. Nuclear stagnation is rooted in the democratic political system and fragmented utility industry, and the laissez-faire ideology, which are unlikely to change in the foreseeable future. → China can move toward a low-carbon electricity system without a carbon price. The United States needs a carbon price to implement a climate policy.

  4. Final environmental statement related to construction of Skagit Nuclear Power Project Units 1 and 2: (Docket Nos. 50-522 and 50-523)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-05-01

    The proposed action is the issuance of construction permits to the Pudget Sound Power and Light Company, Pacific Power and Light Company, Washington Water Power Company and the Washington Public Power Supply System, for the construction of Skagit Nuclear Power Projects Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-522 and 50-523) in Skagit County, Washington (about 64 miles north of Seattle and 6 miles ENE of Sedro Woolley). These units are scheduled for commercial service in 1982 and 1985, respectively. Each unit will employ a boiling-water nuclear reactor with a maximum expected thermal power level of 4100 MWt, which is considered in the assessments contained in this statement. At the 3800 MWt power level initially to be licensed, the net electrical capacity of each unit will be 1288 MWe. The exhaust steam from the turbine-generators will be cooled in condensers which will utilize one hyperbolic-type natural-draft cooling tower per unit to dissipate heat to the atmosphere. Water (106 cfs max.) for the cooling tower makeup (82.4 cfs) and other plant uses will be withdrawn from the Skagit River through Ranney Collectors embedded in the north bank of the river and pumped to the plant through a pipeline about 35,000 ft. long. Cooling tower blowdown (7 cfs max.) from the project and dilution water (20 cfs max.) will flow through a pipeline back to the river where it will be discharged through a diffuser

  5. Mobile Unit and Its Role in the Case of Nuclear Emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franic, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Emergency response mobile units play a significant role in the case of nuclear emergencies. The functioning and practice of such teams depend on the nature and phase of the nuclear emergency. In the acute phase, several teams with good navigational and communication abilities performing simple measurements can provide essential data for characterization of plume location and its magnitude. Therefore, such activities are complemental with the network of telemetric radiation monitors. However, in the late phase of an accident, in order to gather reliable data needed for utilization of remedial and recovery measures, a better equipped mobile units are necessary. (author)

  6. Occupational exposures and practices in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    As the first generation of commercial nuclear power comes to a close, it is timely to consider the status of occupational exposure in the power generation industry, that is, the collective occupational radiation doses received by workers in nuclear power plants. The picture is surprising. One might have thought that as newer, larger, and more modern plants came on line, there would be a significant decrease in exposure per unit of electricity generated. There is some indication that this is now happening. One might also have thought that the United States, being a leader in the development of nuclear power, and in the knowledge, experience and technology of nuclear radiation protection, would have the greatest success in controlling exposure. This expectation has not been fulfilled. 32 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  7. Nuclear technologies for local energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonnell, F.N.; Lynch, G.F.

    1990-03-01

    If nuclear energy is to realize its full potential as a safe and cost-effective alternative to fossil fuels, applications beyond those that are currently being serviced by large, central nuclear power stations must be identified and appropriate reactors developed. The Canadian program on reactor systems for local energy supply is at the forefront of these developments. This program emphasizes design simplicity, low power density and fuel rating, reliance on natural processes, passive systems, and reduced reliance on operator action. The first product, the SLOWPOKE Energy System, is a 10 MW heat source specifically designed to provide hot water to satisfy the needs of local heating systems for building complexes, institutions and municipal district heating systems. A demonstration heating reactor has been constructed at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment in Manitoba and has been undergoing an extensive test program since first operation in 1987 July. Based on the knowledge learned from the design, construction, licensing and operational testing of this facility, the design of the 10 MW commercial-size unit is well advanced, and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is prepared to commit the construction of the first commercial unit. Although the technical demonstration of the concept is important, it is recognized that another crucial element is the public and regulatory acceptance of small nuclear systems in urban areas. The decision by a community to commit the construction of a SLOWPOKE Energy System brings to a sharp focus the current public apprehension about nuclear technologies

  8. Vendors woo South Africa as a potential new 'powerhouse' for nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear24, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    South Africa is a country which is increasingly seen as a potential new nuclear market that promises to give one or more of the world's major nuclear vendors an important foothold on the continent. South Africa has two pressurised water reactors operating at the Koeberg nuclear plant. The 930-megawatt (MW) first unit entered commercial operation in July 1984, followed by the second (900 MW) unit in November 1985. These are the only commercial nuclear power plants on the continent of Africa. South Africa's updated draft integrated resources plan (IRP) for electricity for 2010-30, for which a public consultation period ended in February of this year, included revised projections. that suggested no new nuclear baseload capacity would be needed 'until after 2025'. A capacity 'at least 6,600 MW less' is required in terms of reliable overall generating capacity in 2030. However great South Africa's demand for a clean, affordable and reliable supply of nuclear-generated electricity, coupled with the economic benefits such developments will bring, investors also understand the potential for nuclear growth in this part of the world. (orig.)

  9. International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism. United Nations 2005: International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The International Convention for the Suppression of Acts of Nuclear Terrorism is a 2005 United Nations treaty designed to criminalize acts of nuclear terrorism and to promote police and judicial cooperation to prevent, investigate and punish those acts. As of September 2016, the convention has 115 signatories and 106 state parties, including the nuclear powers China, France, India, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The Convention covers a broad range of acts and possible targets, including nuclear power plants and nuclear reactors; covers threats and attempts to commit such crimes or to participate in them, as an accomplice; stipulates that offenders shall be either extradited or prosecuted; encourages States to cooperate in preventing terrorist attacks by sharing information and assisting each other in connection with criminal investigations and extradition proceedings; and, deals with both crisis situations, assisting States to solve the situations and post-crisis situations by rendering nuclear material safe through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  10. Use of open source information and commercial satellite imagery for nuclear nonproliferation regime compliance verification by a community of academics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solodov, Alexander

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons is a great threat to world peace and stability. The question of strengthening the nonproliferation regime has been open for a long period of time. In 1997 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Board of Governors (BOG) adopted the Additional Safeguards Protocol. The purpose of the protocol is to enhance the IAEA's ability to detect undeclared production of fissile materials in member states. However, the IAEA does not always have sufficient human and financial resources to accomplish this task. Developed here is a concept for making use of human and technical resources available in academia that could be used to enhance the IAEA's mission. The objective of this research was to study the feasibility of an academic community using commercially or publicly available sources of information and products for the purpose of detecting covert facilities and activities intended for the unlawful acquisition of fissile materials or production of nuclear weapons. In this study, the availability and use of commercial satellite imagery systems, commercial computer codes for satellite imagery analysis, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification International Monitoring System (IMS), publicly available information sources such as watchdog groups and press reports, and Customs Services information were explored. A system for integrating these data sources to form conclusions was also developed. The results proved that publicly and commercially available sources of information and data analysis can be a powerful tool in tracking violations in the international nuclear nonproliferation regime and a framework for implementing these tools in academic community was developed. As a result of this study a formation of an International Nonproliferation Monitoring Academic Community (INMAC) is proposed. This would be an independent organization consisting of academics (faculty, staff and students) from both nuclear weapon states (NWS) and

  11. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest.

  12. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume IV. Commercial potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP) report provides time and cost estimates for positioning new nuclear power systems for commercial deployment. The assessment also estimates the rates at which the new systems might penetrate the domestic market, assuming the continuing viability of the massive light-water reactor network that now exists worldwide. This assessment does not recommend specific, detailed program plans and budgets for individual systems; however, it is clear from this analysis that any of the systems investigated could be deployed if dictated by national interest

  13. R and M practices in commercial aviation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteson, T.D.

    1985-01-01

    During 1982-83, Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA) and American Management Systems (AMS) conducted an extensive review of design and operations practices in the commercial air transport industry focused on reliability and maintenance for the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The genesis of this review was a discussion of the technical and environmental similarities of the commercial air transport and commercial nuclear power communities and the potential opportunities for experience transfer from air transport to nuclear power. This paper focuses on those similarities believed to be of particular interest to the nuclear power community

  14. Nuclear power for the new millennium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hucik, S.A.; Redding, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced nuclear technology is being commercially deployed. Two ABWR's have been constructed in Japan and are reliably generating large amounts of low cost electricity. Taiwan is now in the process of licensing and constructing two more ABWR's, which will enter commercial operation in 2004 and 2005. Other countries have similar strategies to deploy advanced nuclear plants and the successful deployment of ABWR's in Japan and Taiwan, coupled with international agreements to limit CO 2 emissions, will only reinforce these plans. The ABWR will play an important role in meeting the conflicting needs of developed and developing economies for more massive amounts of electricity and the need worldwide to limit CO 2 emissions. Successful ABWR projects in Japan arid Taiwan, coupled with licensing approval in the United States, represent the new approach to the design, licensing, construction and operation of nuclear power in the new millennium. (author)

  15. Nuclear power generation costs in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willis, W.F.

    1983-01-01

    Increasing world energy prices and shortages of fuel resources make the utilization of nuclear power extremely important. The United States nuclear power industry represents the largest body of nuclear power experience in the world. Analysis of the recent United States experience of substantial increases in the cost of nuclear power generation provides good insight into the interdependence of technological, financial, and institutional influences and their combined impact on the economic viability of nuclear power generation. The various factors influencing ultimate generation costs, including construction cost, fuel cost, regulatory reviews, and siting considerations are discussed, and their relative impacts are explored, including discussion of design complexity and related regulatory response. A closer look into the recent relatively high escalation of nuclear plant construction costs shows how differing economic conditions can affect the relative cost effectiveness of various methods of power generation. The vulnerability of capital-intensive, long-lead-time projects to changes in economic conditions and uncertainty in future power demands is discussed. Likewise, the pitfalls of new designs and increased sophistication are contrasted to the advantages which result from proven designs, reliable engineering, and shorter lead times. The value of reliable architect-engineers experienced in the design and construction of the plant is discussed. A discussion is presented of additional regulatory requirements stemming from public safety aspects of nuclear power. These include recognition of requirements for the very large effort for quality assurance of materials and workmanship during plant construction and operation. Likewise, a discussion is included of the demanding nature of operations, maintenance, and modification of plants during the operational phase because of the need for highly qualified operations and maintenance personnel and strict quality assurance

  16. The Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (United Kingdom) Nuclear Archive: The importance of stakeholder engagement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tucker, Simon; Wisbey, Simon

    2015-01-01

    This presentation sketched how the United Kingdom's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) deals with its obligation of identification, storage, preservation, sharing and destruction of records related to the memory of the UK civilian nuclear industry. Based on the experience of the ongoing establishment of a National Nuclear Archive, the speaker reflected on who the main actors are and how they could contribute; to what extent their work should be co-ordinated; whether there are guidelines; whether 'stories' are being generated out of these archives for the benefits of all readerships; and whether there are issues of secrecy. It was highlighted that to successfully maintain the interest and the knowledge, it will be necessary to go beyond the technical and legislative areas and reach out to the wider society, for instance to the fields of education and culture

  17. Structural, compositional, and sensorial properties of United States commercial ice cream products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Maya M; Hartel, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Commercial vanilla ice cream products from the United States (full fat, low fat, and nonfat) were analyzed for their structural, behavioral (i.e., melt rate and drip-through), compositional, and sensorial attributes. Mean size distributions of ice crystals and air cells, drip-through rates, percent partially coalesced fat, percent overrun and total fat, and density were determined. A trained panel carried out sensory analyses in order to determine correlations between ice cream microstructure attributes and sensory properties using a Spectrum(TM) descriptive analysis. Analyses included melt rate, breakdown, size of ice particulates (iciness), denseness, greasiness, and overall creaminess. To determine relationships and interactions, principle component analysis and multivariate pairwise correlation were performed within and between the instrumental and sensorial data. Greasiness and creaminess negatively correlated with drip-through rate and creaminess correlated with percent total fat and percent fat destabilization. Percent fat did not determine the melt rate on a sensorial level. However, drip-through rate at ambient temperatures was predicted by total fat content of the samples. Based on sensory analysis, high-fat products were noted to be creamier than low and nonfat products. Iciness did not correlate with mean ice crystal size and drip-through rate did not predict sensory melt rate. Furthermore, on a sensorial level, greasiness positively correlated with total percent fat destabilization and mean air cell size positively correlated with denseness. These results indicate that commercial ice cream products vary widely in composition, structure, behavior, and sensory properties. There is a wide range of commercial ice creams in the United States market, ranging from full fat to nonfat. In this research we showed that these ice creams vary greatly in their microstructures, behaviors (the melt/drip-though, collapse, and/or stand up properties of ice cream

  18. Commercial incineration demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavruska, J.S.; Borduin, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated by nuclear utilities presently are shipped to commercial burial grounds for disposal. Increasing transportation and disposal costs have caused industry to consider incineration as a cost-effective means of volume reduction of combustible LLW. Repeated inquiries from the nuclear industry regarding the applicability of the Los Alamos controlled air incineration (CAI) design led the DOE to initiate a commercial demonstration program in FY-1980. Development studies and results in support of this program involving ion exchange resin incineration and fission/activation product distributions within the Los Alamos CAI are described

  19. Spectral analysis of coolant activity from a commercial nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swann, J.D.; Lewis, B.J.; Ip, M.

    2008-01-01

    In support of the development of a real-time on-line fuel failure monitoring system for the CANDU reactor, actual gamma spectroscopy data files from the gaseous fission product (GFP) monitoring system were acquired from almost four years of operation at a commercial Nuclear Generating Station (NGS). Several spectral analysis techniques were used to process the data files. Radioisotopic activity from the plant information (PI) system was compared to an in-house C++ code that was used to determine the photopeak area and to a separate analysis with commercial software from Canberra-Aptec. These various techniques provided for a calculation of the coolant activity concentration of the noble gas and iodine species in the primary heat transport system. These data were then used to benchmark the Visual DETECT code, a user friendly software tool which can be used to characterize the defective fuel state based on a coolant activity analysis. Acceptable agreement was found with the spectral techniques when compared to the known defective bundle history at the commercial reactor. A more generalized method of assessing the fission product release data was also considered with the development of a pre-processor to evaluate the radioisotopic release rate from mass balance considerations. The release rate provided a more efficient means to characterize the occurrence of a defect and was consistent with the actual defect situation at the power plant as determined from in-bay examination of discharged fuel bundles. (author)

  20. Job creation due to nuclear power resurgence in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenley, C.R.; Klingler, R.D.; Plowman, C.M.; Soto, R.; Turk, R.J.; Baker, R.L.; Close, S.A.; McDonnell, V.L.; Paul, S.W.; Rabideau, L.R.; Rao, S.S.; Reilly, B.P.

    2009-01-01

    The recent revival of global interest in the next generation of nuclear power reactors is causing a re-examination of the role of nuclear power in the United States. This renewed interest has led to questions regarding the capability and capacity of current US industries to support a renewal of nuclear power plant deployment. Key among the many questions currently being asked is what potential exists for the creation of new jobs as a result of developing and operating these new plants? Idaho National Laboratory and Bechtel Power Corporation collaborated to perform a Department of Energy-sponsored study that evaluated the potential for job creation in the United States should these new next generation nuclear power plants be built. The study focused primarily on providing an initial estimate of the numbers of new manufacturing jobs that could be created, including those that could be repatriated from overseas, resulting from the construction of these new reactors. In addition to the growth in the manufacturing sector, the study attempted to estimate the potential increase in construction trades necessary to accomplish the new construction. (author)

  1. 76 FR 69120 - Regulatory Changes To Implement the United States/Australian Agreement for Peaceful Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Government of the United States of America Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy'' (the Agreement). The... applicable requirements. Environmental Assessment: Finding of No Significant Environmental Impact The NRC has... and the Government of the United States of America Concerning Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy, dated...

  2. Evaluating Russian space nuclear reactor technology for United States applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polansky, G.F.; Schmidt, G.L.; Voss, S.S.; Reynolds, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    Space nuclear power and nuclear electric propulsion are considered important technologies for planetary exploration, as well as selected earth orbit applications. The Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP) was intended to provide an early flight demonstration of these technologies at relatively low cost through extensive use of existing Russian technology. The key element of Russian technology employed in the program was the Topaz II reactor. Refocusing of the activities of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO), combined with budgetary pressures, forced the cancellation of the NEPSTP at the end of the 1993 fiscal year. The NEPSTP was faced with many unique flight qualification issues. In general, the launch of a spacecraft employing a nuclear reactor power system complicates many spacecraft qualification activities. However, the NEPSTP activities were further complicated because the reactor power system was a Russian design. Therefore, this program considered not only the unique flight qualification issues associated with space nuclear power, but also with differences between Russian and United States flight qualification procedures. This paper presents an overview of the NEPSTP. The program goals, the proposed mission, the spacecraft, and the Topaz II space nuclear power system are described. The subject of flight qualification is examined and the inherent difficulties of qualifying a space reactor are described. The differences between United States and Russian flight qualification procedures are explored. A plan is then described that was developed to determine an appropriate flight qualification program for the Topaz II reactor to support a possible NEPSTP launch

  3. CINDU-8 catalogue of numerical neutron data available from the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qood, W M; Attree, P M; Byer, T A; Hjarne, L; Konshin, V A; Lemmel, H D; Lorenz, A [Nuclear Data Unit, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1969-01-15

    This catalogue is the index to DASTAR, the DAta STorage And Retrieval System of the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit. For the first time, this issue indexes also some parts of evaluated data libraries held at the Nuclear Data Unit. CINDU is written in a slightly modified CINDA format and should be read with the help of the introduction to CINDA. Tables of abbreviations for references and laboratories mentioned in this issue are given on the verso of the front cover. The catalogue serves as a reference to all the experimental and calculated numerical data which are stored at the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit, and each set of data is referred to by an index-number, e.g. DASTAR-00896. The bibliographic references for each experiment are blocked together with the relevant data index entry. All of the indexed data are available to anyone on request. Data should be ordered by their index number. This issue of CINDU is distributed to data centres, members of the International Nuclear Data Committee, correspondents to the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit, and others who have expressed their interest. Entries which have been added or changed since the issue of CINDU-7 are marked with an asterisk following the entry date.

  4. A comparative study of Japan and United States nuclear enterprise: Industry structure and construction experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinman, G.W.; Lowinger, T.C.

    1987-01-01

    Both Japan and the United States have undertaken major programs to utilize nuclear power for central station electricity generation. Over the past 20 years, the Japanese have developed their own construction and government regulatory institutions and now have an essentially independent domestic nuclear power program. Nuclear construction and government oversight of nuclear power have developed somewhat differently in Japan and the United States, reflecting to some extent the two countries' different business and social cultures. In the United States the vendor and utility industries are much more fragmented than those in Japan, and construction projects are carried out on a more competitive basis. The Japanese industry operates through a few well-established consortia while the U.S. industry does not. Relations among the national government, the vendors, and the electric utilities tend to be cooperative in Japan while they are more adversarial in the Untied States. This paper discusses these topics in a framework of a comparative study of the countries' nuclear industries. Whether because of the factors mentioned above or for other reasons the success of nuclear power in Japan and the United States has differed dramatically in recent years. This paper compares the performance of the nuclear enterprise in these two countries in terms of the physical attributes of the plants themselves, the labor required to build them, and the construction times required. It also discusses the relationship between initial estimates of costs and schedules and actual results achieved. On all counts, recent Japanese performance has been better than in the United States

  5. Development of the MARS input model for Kori nuclear units 1 transient analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, M.; Kim, K. D.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, Y. J.; Lee, W. J.; Chung, B. D.; Jeong, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    KAERI has been developing the 'NSSS transient analyzer' based on best-estimate codes for Kori Nuclear Units 1 plants. The MARS and RETRAN codes have been used as the best-estimate codes for the NSSS transient analyzer. Among these codes, the MARS code is adopted for realistic analysis of small- and large-break loss-of-coolant accidents, of which break size is greater than 2 inch diameter. So it is necessary to develop the MARS input model for Kori Nuclear Units 1 plants. This report includes the input model (hydrodynamic component and heat structure models) requirements and the calculation note for the MARS input data generation for Kori Nuclear Units 1 plant analyzer (see the Appendix). In order to confirm the validity of the input data, we performed the calculations for a steady state at 100 % power operation condition and a double-ended cold leg break LOCA. The results of the steady-state calculation agree well with the design data. The results of the LOCA calculation seem to be reasonable and consistent with those of other best-estimate calculations. Therefore, the MARS input data can be used as a base input deck for the MARS transient analyzer for Kori Nuclear Units 1

  6. Renovation of the 'old' NPP units as an economically effective way of nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zrodnikov, A.V.; Toshinsky, G.I.; Komlev, O.G.; Dragunov, Yu.G.; Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N.; Kopytov, I.I.; Krushelnitsky, V.N.

    2005-01-01

    In the process of nuclear power development there comes a phase when the old' power-units, which reactor installations have expired the designed and extended service lifetime are withdrawn from operating. At this phase in the case of the same annual investments into nuclear power, the increase of the total set up capacity of the nuclear power will be terminated because introduction of capacities due to construction of 'new' power-units only compensates for the reduction of capacities caused by withdrawing from operating the 'old' power-units. Along with this, taking into account a sizeable difference in the service lifetime of the nuclear steam supplying systems and the rest infrastructure of the nuclear power plants, it is an opportunity to find the solution to the problem of compensating for the withdrawn capacities without considerable increasing the annual investments. This opportunity is connected with use of the innovative nuclear power technology based on multipurpose small power modular fast reactors with lead-bismuth coolant for replacement of the withdrawn capacities (renovation of power-units). The features of the innovative nuclear power technology based on the SVBR-76/100 reactor installations, the results of the technical and economical investigations that demonstrate the high economical efficiency of use of the renovation technology using the SVBR-75/100 reactor modules are presented in the Paper. (author)

  7. Draft nuclear energy policy statement for DOE report to the International Energy Agency: long version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    US national energy policy recognizes that the continued development of commercial nuclear power in the United States is vital to US national security and energy stability since it is a significant domestic energy resource that is relatively free from international pressures. As of this writing (August 1989) the United States had 108 nuclear power reactors in commercial status. In January 1989 nuclear energy produced 46 billion KwH or 20% of total US electricity generated in contrast to 45 billion KwH (18.8%) produced in January 1988. The US Federal Government has been engaged in a variety of activities to ensure that nuclear energy remains a safe, economically competitive and environmentally acceptable option. Much of the federal effort in recent months has been devoted to developing initiatives designed to remove institutional and regulatory obstacles to the continued use of nuclear power as part of the US energy system. Within this context, the following paragraphs summarize the major features of the current status of the US nuclear energy program and policies

  8. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Kataoka, H.

    1998-01-01

    Safe and stable operation of a nuclear power station requires personnel fostering. In Japan, with the objectives of systematically securing qualified people for a long period of time, and maintaining and improving their skills and knowledge, the utilities have created strict personnel training plans, for continuous education and training. Concrete examples of education and training for operators and maintenance personnel at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan, such as education systems training, facility and contents of curriculum, are detailed including some related matters. Recent activities to catch up with environment changes surrounding education and training of operators and maintenance staff are also mentioned. (author)

  9. Nuclear power reactor licensing and regulation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapar, H.K.

    1979-01-01

    The report is devoted to four subjects: an explanation of the origins, statutory basis and development of the present regulatory system in the United States; a description of the various actions which must be taken by a license applicant and by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission before a nuclear power plant can be constructed and placed on-line, an account of the current regulatory practices followed by the US NRC in licensing nuclear power reactors; an identification of some of the 'lessons learned' from the Three Mile Island accident and some proposed regulatory and legislative solutions. (NEA) [fr

  10. Some considerations regarding the reforms of nuclear liability legislation in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welck, S. von

    1980-01-01

    In the United States, as in the Federal Republic of Germany and in Switzerland, some thought is presently being given to reforms of nuclear liability legislation. In each case it was either triggered or influenced by the Three Mile Island incident of March 28, 1979. Some of the current thinking in the United States has already been incorporated in a number of draft bills now before Congress for deliberation and decision. Other draft bills on reforms of U.S. nuclear liability law have been announced. It is certain that this reform of nuclear liability legislation in the United States will be carried out not only with determination and the political will to improve the present situation, but also with the required caution and prudence, and that it will keep Congress busy not only for this term, but also next year. (orig.) [de

  11. An advanced NSSS integrity monitoring system for Shin-Kori nuclear units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Y. G.; Kim, H. B.; Galin, S. R.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, S. J.

    2009-01-01

    The advanced design features of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) Integrity Monitoring System for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 are summarized herein. During the overall system design and detailed component design processes, many design improvements have been made for the system. The major design changes are: 1) the application of a common software platform for all subsystems, 2) the implementation of remote access, control and monitoring capabilities, and 3) the equipment redesign and rearrangement that has simplified the system architecture. Changes give an effect on cabinet size, number of cables, cyber-security, graphic user interfaces, and interfaces with other monitoring systems. The system installation and operation for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 will be more convenient than those for previous Korean nuclear units in view of its remote control capability, automated test functions, improved user interface functions, and much less cabling. (authors)

  12. An Advanced NSSS Integrity Monitoring System for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yang Gyun; Galin, Scott R.; Lee, Sang Jeong

    2010-12-01

    The advanced design features of NSSS (Nuclear Steam Supply System) Integrity Monitoring System for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 are summarized herein. During the overall system design and detailed component design processes, many design improvements have been made for the system. The major design changes are: 1) the application of a common software platform for all subsystems, 2) the implementation of remote access, control and monitoring capabilities, and 3) the equipment redesign and rearrangement that has simplified the system architecture. Changes give an effect on cabinet size, number of cables, cyber-security, graphic user interfaces, and interfaces with other monitoring systems. The system installation and operation for Shin-Kori Nuclear Units 3 and 4 will be more convenient than those for previous Korean nuclear units in view of its remote control capability, automated test functions, improved user interface functions, and much less cabling.

  13. Commercial nuclear reactors and waste: the current status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platt, A.M.; Robinson, J.V.

    1980-04-01

    During the last five years, the declared size of the commercial light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power industry in the US has steadily decreased. As of January 1980, the total number of power plants had dropped to 191 from the 226 in December 31, 1974. At least another nine were cancelled in the last few months. This report was developed as the first of a series to track implications to waste management due to such changes in the declared size of the industry. For the presently declared size, key conclusions are: the declared reactors will peak at a capacity of 162 GWe and consume about 10 6 MTU as enrichment feed. As few as two repositories of about 100,000 MTHM capacity each would hold the waste. Predisposal storage (reactor basins and AFRs) would peak at less than 100,000 MTHM (in the year 2020) with one repository opening in the year 1997 and the other in the year 2020. Most of the 100,000 MTHM would have to be in AFR storage unless current practice regarding reactor basin size was radically changed

  14. Commercializing the next generation: the AP600 advanced simplified nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.

    1994-01-01

    Today, government and industry are working together on advanced nuclear power plant designs that take advantage of valuable lessons learned from the experience to date and promise to reconcile the demands of economic expansion with the laws of environmental protection. In the U.S., the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) initiated a design certification program in 1989 to develop and commercialize advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) for the next round of power plant construction. Advanced, simplified technology is one approach under development to end the industry's search for a simpler, more forgiving, and less costly reactor. As part of this program, Westinghouse is developing the AP600, a new standard 600 MWe advanced, simplified plant. The design strikes a balance between the use of proven technology and new approaches. The result is a greatly streamlined plant that can meet safety regulations and reliability requirements, be economically competitive, and promote broader public confidence in nuclear energy. 1 fig

  15. The United States nuclear merchant ship program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    The issues of financial protection contemplate appropriate financing to permit construction of the involved vessels. In addition, the licensing process will require a demonstrated ability for financial response in the event of injury to persons or damage to property. Since the thrust in the United States is to use the Price-Anderson framework for Insurance and Indemnity, much attention is devoted to this legislation. The pre-existing regime is related to the distinguishing requirements of the Maritime field with proposals being advanced to more nearly parallel the insurance coverage philosophy of Europe, i.e., to utilize insurance pools for the nuclear risks and utilize the conventional insurance market for non-nuclear risks. Public affairs issues impact heavily on legislation efforts and thusly become significant in developing a program for Financial Protection

  16. The Department of Energy's nuclear R and D programmes [United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This Consultation Document reviews how the United Kingdom Department of Energy's nuclear R and D programmes support the Government's nuclear policy and reaches preliminary conclusions about their future direction. It describes the changes the Department has adopted, and is proposing, to ensure that it is better informed about the nuclear R and D it commissions and that the work is carried out cost-effectively. The areas of research reviewed are: safety; radiological protection; safeguards; reactor technology; fusion; decommissioning and waste management. (author)

  17. Seismic evaluation of commercial plutonium fabrication plants in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernreuter, D.L.; Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.; Tokarz, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    This report is an overview of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's seismic assessment of six commercial plutonium fabrication plants licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before September 2, 1971. The seismic assessment generally has three parts: (1) documentation of the structural condition of each facility and its critical equipment; (2) characterization of the seismic hazard (i.e., determination of peak ground acceleration vs return period for each site); and (3) evaluation of seismic capacity to determine ground motion levels at which critical structures and equipment fail. The failure evaluation used structural capacities of median-centered strength characteristics of the as-built configurations from (1) and seismic hazard input from (2). Results of the assessment were partial input for an overall natural risks study by the NRC

  18. The Iranian nuclear deal. Caught between centrifuge and separative working unit?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghoshal, Debalina

    2017-11-15

    In November 2013, a historic nuclear deal, the Joint Plan of Action (JPA) was struck between Iran and the P5+1 Countries, United States, Russia, China, Britain, France and Germany. Under this deal, Iran agreed to restrict its nuclear program that would close the doors for Iran to develop nuclear weapons. This indeed was historic as for over a decade, ever since the Iranian nuclear program attracted international attention and criticism, several arrangements were made to curtail the Iranian nuclear program, but none reached the desired success. In exchange for abiding by the JPA, Iran was promised partial relief of sanctions. The paper tracks the development and identifies the scope of Iran's centrifuge program.

  19. 75 FR 43571 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment And...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414; NRC-2010-0260] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment And Finding of No Significant... Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2...

  20. Economic evaluation of Kori and Wolsong Unit 1 plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, T. H.; Jeong, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    24 years have been passed since Kori Unit 1 began its commercial operation, and 19 years have been passed since Wolsong Unit 1 began its commercial operation. As the end point of design life become closer, plant life extension and periodic safety assessment is paid more and more attention to by the utility company. In this paper, the methodologies and results of plant lifetime management economic evaluations of both units have been presented in comparison with Korean standard nuclear power plant 10, 20 and 30 year life extension cases respectively. In addition to that, sensitivity analysis and break even point analysis results are presented with the variables of capacity factor, operation and maintenance cost, and discount rate

  1. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    Volume 6 of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power-generating capability and one without. This volume also provides estimates of the time required for development of large-scale commercial reactor systems to reach the construction permit application stage and for fuel-cycle facilities to reach the operating license application stage, which is a measure of the relative technical status of alternative nuclear systems

  2. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moden, R.; O'Brien, B.; Sanders, L.; Steinberg, H.

    1985-01-01

    Projections of uranium requirements (both yellowcake and enrichment services) and spent fuel discharges are presented, corresponding to the nuclear power plant capacity projections presented in ''Commercial Nuclear Power 1984: Prospects for the United States and the World'' (DOE/EIA-0438(85)) and the ''Annual Energy Outlook 1984:'' (DOE/EIA-0383(84)). Domestic projections are provided through the year 2020, with foreign projections through 2000. The domestic projections through 1995 are consistent with the integrated energy forecasts in the ''Annual Energy Outlook 1984.'' Projections of capacity beyond 1995 are not part of an integrated energy foreccast; the methodology for their development is explained in ''Commercial Nuclear Power 1984.'' A range of estimates is provided in order to capture the uncertainty inherent in such forward projections. The methodology and assumptions are also stated. A glossary is provided. Two appendixes present additional material. This report is of particular interest to analysts involved in long-term planning for the disposition of radioactive waste generated from the nuclear fuel cycle. 14 figs., 18 tabs

  3. Data acquisition and treatment unit for use in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annaix, C; Prieur, G; Vilayleck, S; Jallet, P [C.H.R., Angers (France)

    1981-01-01

    Here is below a one-channel data acquisition unit piloted through a minicomputer programmed by means of an advanced language of the Basic type. This unit allows, especially in nuclear medicine, pulse counts from a spectrometer according to a programmed sequence. Moreover, it provides treatment of measures as well as printing and filing of interpreted results. The acquisition unit is linked to the minicomputer through a RS 232 C serial mode, which ensures both easy operation and universal use of the system here described. Accuracy of measurement is also examined.

  4. Multi-purpose canister storage unit and transfer cask thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montgomery, R.A.; Niemer, K.A.; Lindner, C.N.

    1997-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) generated at commercial nuclear power plants throughout the US is a concern because of continued delays in obtaining a safe, permanent disposal facility. Most utilities maintain their SNF in wet storage pools; however, after decades of use, many pools are filled to capacity. Unfortunately, DOE's proposed final repository at Yucca Mountain is at least 10 years from completion, and commercial power utilities have few options for SNF storage in the interim. The Multi-Purpose Canister (MPC) system, sponsored by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, is a viable solution to the interim storage problem. The system is designed for interim dry storage, transport, and ultimate disposal of commercial SNF. The MPC system consists of four separate components: an MPC, Transfer Cask, Storage Unit, and Transport Cask. The SNF assemblies are loaded and sealed inside the helium-filled steel MPC. Once sealed, the MPC is not reopened, eliminating the need to re-handle the individual spent fuel assemblies. The MPC is transferred, using the MPC Transfer Cask, into a cylindrical, reinforced-concrete Storage Unit for on-site dry storage. The MPC may be removed from the Storage Unit at any time and transferred into the MPC Transport Cask for transport to the final repository. This paper discusses the analytical approach used to evaluate the heat transfer characteristics of an MPC containing SNF assemblies in the MPC Transfer Cask and Storage Unit

  5. Status of Korean nuclear industry and Romania-Korea cooperation in the field of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myung Key

    2005-01-01

    The Kyoto Protocol on climate change has urged the world to explore ways of cutting down the greenhouse emissions, and it also boosted a number of nuclear power projects that is so-called the renaissance of nuclear power. Nuclear power has proven to be the cleanest energy source and one of the cheapest types of energies, compared with other energy sources. Korea began developing its nuclear power projects from the early 1970's. Since the first nuclear power plant Kori Unit 1, started commercial operation in 1978, Korea has continuously promoted the development of nuclear power projects, and today it operates 20 nuclear power units (17,716 MW), including 4 units of CANDU plants. Korea ranked No. 6 in the world in terms of installed capacity of nuclear power plants, and 40% of its domestic electricity generation comes from nuclear power plants. The average plant capacity factor was 95.5% in 2005, which is about 16% than the world average of around 79%. All the Korean nuclear power projects are led and implemented by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. (KHNP) which is the sole state-owned nuclear power project company spun off from Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO) in 2001 as part of the government's program for electric industry restructuring. The cooperation between Romania and Korea in the nuclear power field began in March 2001. At industrial level a technical agreement between the Romanian Company Nuclearelectrica S.A. (SNN) and KHNP was signed in July 2003 for cooperation in Cernavoda NPP projects. The joint development of the Cernavoda NPP unit 3 was one of the major topics. Heavy water produced by Romanian Heavy Water plant at Drobeta Turnu Severin was supplied to KHNP (16 tones in 2001 and another 16 tones in 2004). The feasibility study for units 3 and 4 is being performed in two phases under leadership of SNN in cooperation with KHNP, AECL, ANSALDO and Deloitte and Touche as a financial advisor in Phase 2. It is expected that the appropriate securities

  6. NRC [Nuclear Regulatory Commission] perspective of software QA [quality assurance] in the nuclear history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Computer technology has been a part of the nuclear industry since its inception. However, it is only recently that computers have been integrated into reactor operations. During the early history of commercial nuclear power in the United States, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) discouraged the use of digital computers for real-time control and monitoring of nuclear power plant operation. At the time, this position was justified since software engineering was in its infancy, and horror stories on computer crashes were plentiful. Since the advent of microprocessors and inexpensive computer memories, significant advances have been made in fault-tolerant computer architecture that have resulted in highly reliable, durable computer systems. The NRC's requirement for safety parameter display system (SPDS) stemmed form the results of studies and investigations conducted on the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. An NRC contractor has prepared a handbook of software QA techniques applicable to the nuclear industry, published as NUREG/CR-4640 in August 1987. Currently, the NRC is considering development of an inspection program covering software QA. Future efforts may address verification and validation as applied to expert systems and artificial intelligence programs

  7. Project for construction of a new nuclear unit in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    WorleyParsons Project Description Scope of work: Management Services for Implementation of the Project on Construction of New Nuclear Unit(s) in the Republic of Armenia. Client: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources (MENR), Republic of Armenia •Contract signed on 29 of May 2009 •Project divided into 4 Phases. Addendum 1 covers phase I and II signed on 27 of July. Contract entered into force 7 of August

  8. US company's new nuclear project progresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archie, Jeffrey B.

    2011-01-01

    Operated by South Carolina Electric and Gas Company in the southeastern United States, V.C. Summer Nuclear Station has maintained a reputation of excellence for more than 25 years. The key to its success: placing safety as its first priority, keeping a keen focus on operations, establishing a culture of continuous learning, and embracing collaboration with industry peers. This philosophy guides its new nuclear project, which SCE and G has undertaken to meet the need for baseload generation in its service area in a manner that is clean, safe, reliable, and efficient. In the process, SCE and G is generating jobs and boosting the economy. Site preparation has been under way since 2009. SCE and G anticipates receiving its combined construction and operating license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the independent, federal agency that oversees commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S., in late 2011 or early 2012, which will allow major construction to commence. The 2 new reactors are scheduled to begin commercial operation in 2016 and 2019, respectively, placing V.C. Summer at the forefront of a U.S. nuclear renaissance and carrying its legacy of excellence into the future. (orig.)

  9. Civilian protection and Britain's commercial nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The subject is treated as follows: initial conclusions (major nuclear attack on military installations; nuclear attack including civil nuclear targets; conventional attack on civil nuclear installations); nature of nuclear weapons explosions and power reactor releases (general; dose effects and biologically significant isotopes; nuclear weapon effects; effect of reactors and other fuel-cycle installations in a thermonuclear area; implications of reactor releases due to conventional attack, sabotage, civil disorder or major accident). (U.K.)

  10. Personality Factors and Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Initial License Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVita-Cochrane, Cynthia

    Commercial nuclear power utilities are under pressure to effectively recruit and retain licensed reactor operators in light of poor candidate training completion rates and recent candidate failures on the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license exam. One candidate failure can cost a utility over $400,000, making the successful licensing of new operators a critical path to operational excellence. This study was designed to discover if the NEO-PI-3, a 5-factor measure of personality, could improve selection in nuclear utilities by identifying personality factors that predict license candidate success. Two large U.S. commercial nuclear power corporations provided potential participant contact information and candidate results on the 2014 NRC exam from their nuclear power units nation-wide. License candidates who participated (n = 75) completed the NEO-PI-3 personality test and results were compared to 3 outcomes on the NRC exam: written exam, simulated operating exam, and overall exam result. Significant correlations were found between several personality factors and both written and operating exam outcomes on the NRC exam. Further, a regression analysis indicated that personality factors, particularly Conscientiousness, predicted simulated operating exam scores. The results of this study may be used to support the use of the NEO-PI-3 to improve operator selection as an addition to the current selection protocol. Positive social change implications from this study include support for the use of a personality measure by utilities to improve their return-on-investment in candidates and by individual candidates to avoid career failures. The results of this study may also positively impact the public by supporting the safe and reliable operation of commercial nuclear power utilities in the United States.

  11. Long-term effects of a shortsighted us political decision banning commercial waste reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterle, B.T.

    2003-01-01

    In 1977, US President Jimmy Carter ordered a drastic change in United States nuclear policy, banning all commercial reprocessing activities, and cancelling plans and funding for fast-breeding reactors. It was a political decision, influenced by immediate world events, and intended to be temporary. Contemporary documents and speeches given by Carter are examined in depth to determine the reasoning behind this dramatic change in US nuclear policy and the response by other countries. President Ronald Reagan rescinded these bans, but general mistrust by the US nuclear industry of further changes in political policy prevented further commercial reprocessing activities and construction of fast-breeding reactors in the US. The increase in the number of operating US fission reactors along with the lack of reprocessing activities caused concern among both Reagan and members of Congress. The resulting legislation set the stage for the proposed High-Level-Waste Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. construction of the proposed repository had faced many serious setbacks due to several factors. The uncertainty regarding the project's timely completion has drastic repercussions for the involved parties. The conclusion of the author is that further evaluation into commercial reprocessing activities should be undertaken before final approval of the proposed repository is granted. (author)

  12. Psychology in nuclear power plants: an integrative approach to safety - general statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikiar, R.

    1983-08-01

    Since the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant on March 28, 1979, the commercial nuclear industry in the United States has paid increasing attention to the role of humans in overall plant safety. As the regulatory body with primary responsibility for ensuring public health and safety involving nuclear operations, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has also become increasingly involved with the ''human'' side of nuclear operations. The purpose of this symposium is to describe a major program of research and technical assistance that the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is performing for the NRC that deals with the issues of safety at nuclear power plants (NPPs). This program addresses safety from several different levels of analysis, which are all important within the context of an integrative approach to system safety

  13. Conceptual basic and status of nuclear power plant decommissioning effort in the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazounov, V.; Khamyanov, L.

    1998-01-01

    Decommissioning of nuclear power plants, although a usual phase in nuclear facility life cycle still has significant peculiarities due to radioactive contamination of NPP equipment and structural elements. This paper deals with the phases in decommissioning process, as follows: NPP shutdown, meaning end of commercial operation; NPP unit mothballing, radiation review of the unit to justify particular concept of decommissioning; extended hold-up, which means maintaining of contaminated equipment in the isolated zone under radiologically safe conditions; unit dismantling and burial. Status of NPP decommissioning effort in Russia is described

  14. 77 FR 50533 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ....; Millstone Power Station, Unit 3 AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Environmental assessment and... search, select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and then select ``Begin Web- based ADAMS Search.'' For problems... Optimized ZIRLO\\TM\\ fuel rod cladding in future core reload applications for Millstone Power Station, Unit 3...

  15. 78 FR 49305 - Luminant Generation Company LLC, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-13

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446; NRC-2013-0182] Luminant Generation Company LLC, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Application for Amendment to Facility... Operating License Nos. NPF-87 and NPF-89 for the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Unit Nos. 1 and 2...

  16. Restoration of trust and activities for public consensus toward installation of newly added units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogawa, Junko; Murabe, Yoshikazu

    2001-01-01

    Japan Atomic Power Company, as a pioneer of nuclear power generation in Japan, owns 4 units in total in Tokai Mura, Ibaraki Prefecture and Tsuruga City, Fukui Prefecture. The Tokai Power Plant installed at Tokai Mura has ceased its commercial operation, now in preparation for decommissioning. It is necessary for Japan to promote nuclear power generation with such factors taken into consideration as self-reliance and stable supply of energy, reduction of CO 2 emissions for prevention of global warming, etc., despite fallen confidence in nuclear energy due to various troubles like the JCO accident. Under such circumstances, our Company has the plan to add 2 Units of Advanced Pressurised Water Reactor (APWR ) as Units No. 3 and 4 of the Tsuruga Power Generating Station, each rated to be 1,530 MWe, the world largest capacity , totalling 3,070 MWe. at this nuclear site. This paper presents the basic Corporate principles for promotion of understanding of nuclear energy itself, and the Corporate activities for promotion of understanding by the community people on adding the Tsuruga Units 3 and 4, in pursuant to the basic principles, discussing how the public trust in nuclear energy should be restored in the toughest situation against nuclear energy, and how the added installation of the nuclear units should be promoted

  17. Design data and safety features of commercial nuclear power plants. Vol. IV. Dockets 50-452 through 50-503

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heddleson, F.A.

    1975-03-01

    Design data, safety features, and site characteristics are summarized for 36 nuclear power units in 18 power stations in the United States. Six pages of data are presented for each plant consisting of thermal-hydraulic and nuclear factors, containment features, emergency-core-cooling systems, site features, circulating water system data, and miscellaneous factors. An aerial perspective is also presented for each plant. The volume covers reactors with dockets 50-452 through 50-503. (U.S.)

  18. Commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the near term (one-to-five-year) needs of domestic and foreign commercial suppliers of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals for electromagnetically separated stable isotopes. Only isotopes purchased to make products for sale and profit are considered in this assessment. Radiopharmaceuticals produced from enriched stable isotopes supplied by the Calutron facility at ORNL are used in about 600,000 medical procedures each year in the United States. A temporary or permanent disruption of the supply of stable isotopes to the domestic radiopharmaceutical industry could curtail, if not eliminate, the use of such diagnostic procedures as the thallium heart scan, the gallium cancer scan, the gallium abscess scan, and the low-radiation-dose thyroid scan. The word could in the preceding sentence is underlined because an alternative source of enriched stable isotopes does exist in the USSR. Alternative starting materials could, in theory, eventually be developed for both the thallium and gallium scans. The development of a new technology for these purposes, however, would take at least five years and would be expensive. Hence, any disruption of the supply of enriched isotopes from ORNL and the resulting unavailability of critical nuclear medicine procedures would have a dramatic negative effect on the level of health care in the United States

  19. United Nuclear Industries, Inc. reactor and fuel production facilities 1975 environmental release report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucchiara, A.L.

    1976-01-01

    During calendar year 1975, an estimated total of 3,000,000 pounds of waste materials and approximately 150 curies of radionuclides were discharged to the environs in liquid effluent streams emanating from United Nuclear Industries, Inc., operated facilities. During the same period, approximately 1,700,000 pounds of reported waste materials, including 34,000 curies of reported radionuclides, were discharged to the atmosphere from United Nuclear Industries, Inc., operated facilities. Superscript numbers reference explanatory notes contained at the end of the report

  20. Nuclear power in the United Arab Emirates: Legal framework and regulatory cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasquez-Maignan, X.

    2012-01-01

    As part of a decision to diversify its energy mix, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) has begun construction of its first nuclear power plant. In that context, it has also taken a number of important steps to integrate itself into the international regime for nuclear safety: adoption of the UAE's Federal Law No. 6 of 2009 on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, establishment of the Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR), establishment of the Emirates Nuclear Energy Corporation (ENEC), awarding of the first contract for nuclear power plants in the UAE, etc. The UAE nuclear liability regime is then presented, with details on the basic principles that form the foundation of the nuclear liability conventions, followed by the participation of the FANR in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) in September 2012

  1. Licensing the first nuclear power plant in the United Arab Emirates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, I.

    2013-01-01

    United Arab Emirates (UAE) has established a comprehensive legal & regulatory framework conforming to IAEA standards/guidance to regulate the nuclear sector. Federal Authority for Nuclear Regulation (FANR) is a functioning independent nuclear regulator providing controls on safety, security and non-proliferation. UAE benefits from strong international support, incl. IAEA and access to Korean organizations and practices. UAE has an active capacity building programme both human and technical. Peer reviews show UAE regulatory system is aligned with good international practices. UAE has long term commitment to develop and maintain safety culture.

  2. Development of a Flexible Computerized Management Infrastructure for a Commercial Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Hajek, Brian K.; Usman, Shoaib

    2006-01-01

    The report emphasizes smooth transition from paper-based procedure systems (PBPSs) to computer-based procedure systems (CBPSs) for the existing commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. The expected advantages and of the transition are mentioned including continued, safe and efficient operation of the plants under their recently acquired or desired extended licenses. The report proposes a three-stage survey to aid in developing a national strategic plan for the transition from PBPSs to CBPSs. It also includes a comprehensive questionnaire that can be readily used for the first stage of the suggested survey

  3. Development of a Flexible Computerized Management Infrastructure for a Commercial Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ali, Syed Firasat; Hajek, Brian K.; Usman, Shoaib

    2006-05-01

    The report emphasizes smooth transition from paper-based procedure systems (PBPSs) to computer-based procedure systems (CBPSs) for the existing commercial nuclear power plants in the U.S. The expected advantages and of the transition are mentioned including continued, safe and efficient operation of the plants under their recently acquired or desired extended licenses. The report proposes a three-stage survey to aid in developing a national strategic plan for the transition from PBPSs to CBPSs. It also includes a comprehensive questionnaire that can be readily used for the first stage of the suggested survey.

  4. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, L [ed.

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures.

  5. Pressurized thermal shock evaluation of the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbott, L.

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation of the risk to the Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 nuclear power plant due to pressurized thermal shock (PTS) has been completed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the assistance of several other organizations. This evaluation was part of a Nuclear Regulatory Commission program designed to study the PTS risk to three nuclear plants, the other two plants being Oconee Unit 1 and H.B. Robinson Unit 2. The specific objectives of the program were to (1) provide a best estimate of the frequency of a through-the-wall crack in the pressure vessel at each of the three plants, together with the uncertainty in the estimated frequency and its sensitivity to the variables used in the evaluation; (2) determine the dominant overcooling sequences contributing to the estimated frequency and the associated failures in the plant systems or in operator actions; and (3) evaluate the effectiveness of potential corrective measures

  6. Nuclear closed-cycle gas turbine (HTGR-GT): dry cooled commercial power plant studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, C.F.; Boland, C.R.

    1979-11-01

    Combining the modern and proven power conversion system of the closed-cycle gas turbine (CCGT) with an advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) results in a power plant well suited to projected utility needs into the 21st century. The gas turbine HTGR (HTGR-GT) power plant benefits are consistent with national energy goals, and the high power conversion efficiency potential satisfies increasingly important resource conservation demands. Established technology bases for the HTGR-GT are outlined, together with the extensive design and development program necessary to commercialize the nuclear CCGT plant for utility service in the 1990s. This paper outlines the most recent design studies by General Atomic for a dry-cooled commercial plant of 800 to 1200 MW(e) power, based on both non-intercooled and intercooled cycles, and discusses various primary system aspects. Details are given of the reactor turbine system (RTS) and on integrating the major power conversion components in the prestressed concrete reactor vessel

  7. Computerization of off-site dose calculations at two nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, W.; Robertson, C.E.; Moore, G.T.; Rawls, B.E.; Sipp, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The Brunswick Nuclear Project (BNP) consists of two boiling water reactors designed to generate a total net output of 1642 MWe. Unit 2 achieved commercial production in 1975, and Unit 1 began commercial operation in 1977. The Harris nuclear Project (HNP) is an 860 MWe pressurized water reactor that entered commercial operation in May of 1987. both plant sites are operated by Carolina Power and Light Company (CP and L). During January 1984, BNP replaced its older effluent technical specifications (part of the plant's original license) with the newer generation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) mandated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The RETS for HNP were integrated directly into this initial technical specifications. The initial version of the ODCM for BNP was drafted by a vendor and then extensively rewritten by the plant staff. The manual for HNP was drafted by CP and L corporate staff. At the outset, it was realized how impractical it would be to attempt to manually perform all of the dose calculations and keep the necessary records. The alternative-computerization-required extensive in-plant and corporate efforts to identify the computing resources (hardware) needed, create the software for ODCM implementation, and test, verify, validate, and document the software. This paper discusses these efforts

  8. Nuclear powered ships. Findings from a feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namikawa, Shunichiro; Maerli, Morten Bremer; Hoffmann, Peter Nyegaard; Brodin, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear shipping is attractive for several reasons, one of which is its positive effect on emissions (CO 2 , NOx and SOx). The benefits, however, do not come without risks of possible harmful effects on humans and wildlife. Nuclear ships set themselves apart from conventional ships, as well as from on-shore nuclear power-plants, on several counts. 1) The reactor-unit are non-stationary, and the reactor is subject to the ship motions. 2) Ship reactors must be compact due to space constraints. 3) Special design considerations are required to ensure reactor safety and security, as well as to enable refuelling. 4) A naval nuclear fuel cycle infrastructure for fuel fabrication, handling, and disposal is needed. Technological feasibility of nuclear shipping is by itself inconclusive to a expansion into civilian applications and use. Civilian nuclear propulsion needs to be commercially viable and politically acceptable. Appropriate legislation must be in place, and nuclear shipping concepts with proven safety records and highest possible nuclear proliferation-resistance must be established. Possible 'showstoppers' to a viable nuclear civilian shipping industry are outlined in the paper in view of Political, Technical, Regulatory, Commercial, Safety and Security aspects. Further, different types of ships with different propulsion system are compared in lights of life cycle cost and air emission. (author)

  9. A European perspective on the US nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkinson, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    Many Europeans believe that the main problems which have impeded progress in solving the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States have been a series of ideological and political hang-ups and these, coupled with excessive bureaucracy, have made logical decision making on the back-end problems impossible. This situation has been caused by a succession of political nondecisions. Public confidence in nuclear generation was thereby undermined and, because of plentiful supplies of other energy sources, there was no urgent need to expand the nuclear program in the United States. Since uranium was cheap and fast reactors not commercially attractive, there was no economic incentive to reprocess fuel from existing reactors in the United States. The problem facing the United States is that of managing the large stocks of spent fuel which have arisen over many years. A logical way forward for the United States would appear to be as follows: build more storage for spent fuel; consider overseas reprocessing to provide plutonium; develop reprocessing technology; and develop direct disposal technology

  10. Bridging the energy gap through small and medium sized nuclear reactors in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, R.

    1987-01-01

    India is the only country in the world which is employing small sized nuclear reactors for its nuclear power programme. It has now embarked on a programme of augmenting the contribution of the nuclear power by way of employing both medium and small sized nuclear reactors in the next 15 years. This paper discusses the Indian experience and its efforts for industrial mobilisation for rapidly constructing 235/500 MWe nuclear reactor units in a period of about 8 to 9 years. The current energy situation in India and this context the near term role of nuclear power for supplementing the existing sources of commercial energy have been evaluated. Nuclear power has reached such a stage of maturity whereby it has now become a commercially viable source of electricity and it could be utilised on large scale to bridge the energy gap. At present six reactor units of 210/235 MWe capacity are in operation and eight more are in different stages of construction. While we are continuing with the construction of 235 MWe units, a programme of being pursued to construct 550 MWe capacity reactor units from midnineties onwards. This has become possible with the strengthening of regional electricity grids and simultaneous efforts undertaken for augmentation of fuel supply, heavy water production and industrial infrastructure. For a developing country like India, implementation of a sizable nuclear power programme has posed certain special challenges as major inputs are required to be made available with indigeneous efforts. This paper discusses such challenges and presents the ways and means adopted to surmount them. Other developing countries with conditions comparable to those in India could benefit from Indian experience in this regard. This paper also proposes India's willingness to cooperate with other countries for exchange of information and assistance in terms of technical knowhow. (author)

  11. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2007. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  12. Radioactive Effluents from Nuclear Power Plants Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This report describes radioactive effluents from commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States. This information was reported by the licensees for radioactive discharges that occurred in 2008. The report provides information relevant to the potential impact of NPPs on the environment and on public health.

  13. Integrated spent nuclear fuel database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henline, S.P.; Klingler, K.G.; Schierman, B.H.

    1994-01-01

    The Distributed Information Systems software Unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has designed and developed an Integrated Spent Nuclear Fuel Database System (ISNFDS), which maintains a computerized inventory of all US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Commercial SNF is not included in the ISNFDS unless it is owned or stored by DOE. The ISNFDS is an integrated, single data source containing accurate, traceable, and consistent data and provides extensive data for each fuel, extensive facility data for every facility, and numerous data reports and queries

  14. OCRWM International Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.; Levich, R.; Strahl, J.

    2002-01-01

    With the implementation of nuclear power as a major energy source, the United States is increasingly faced with the challenges of safely managing its inventory of spent nuclear materials. In 2002, with 438 nuclear power facilities generating electrical energy in 31 nations around the world, the management of radioactive material including spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, is an international concern. Most of the world's nuclear nations maintain radioactive waste management programs and have generally accepted deep geologic repositories as the long-term solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Similarly, the United States is evaluating the feasibility of deep geologic disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project is directed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), which has responsibility for managing the disposition of spent nuclear fuel produced by commercial nuclear power facilities along with U.S. government-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Much of the world class science conducted through the OCRWM program was enhanced through collaboration with other nations and international organizations focused on resolving issues associated with the disposition of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

  15. Three Mile Island Unit-2 events of 28 March 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed Hussin Shabuddin, Syed Nahar [PUSPATI, Selangor (Malaysia)

    1984-12-01

    Three Mile Island was the most severe accident at a commercial nuclear power plant in the United States. This paper attempts to give in detail and chronological order the technical events that happened on the day of the accident. Operator response to plant conditions and its consequences are explained.

  16. 76 FR 24064 - Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3, Notice...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-29

    ... Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3, Notice of Issuance of Renewed... Company (licensee), the operator of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3 (PVNGS... Plants: Supplement 43, Regarding Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station,'' issued January 2011, discusses...

  17. 2004 world nuclear power report - evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    Last year, 2003, 439 nuclear power plants were available for electricity generation in 31 countries of the world. With an aggregate gross capacity of 380,489 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 361,476MWe, nuclear generating capacity reached its highest level so far. Nine different reactor lines are operated in the commercial nuclear power plants. Light water reactors (PWR and BWR) continue to be in the lead with 355 plants. Twenty-nine nuclear power plants with an aggregate gross capacity of 24,222 MWe and an aggregate net capacity of 23,066 MWe were under construction in eleven countries. Of these, twenty are light water reactors, and seven are CANDU-type reactors. Ninety-nine commercial reactors with a capacity in excess of 5 MWe have so far been decommissioned in eighteen countries, most of them prototype plants of low power. 228 plants, i. e. slightly more than half of the number of plants currently in operation, were commissioned in the 1980s. The oldest commercial nuclear power plant in the world, Calder Hall unit 1, was disconnected from the power grid for good in its 48th year of operation in 2003. For the first time in ten years, the availability in terms of time and capacity of nuclear power plants has decreased from 83,80% in 2002 to 80.50%, and from 84.60% to 81.50%, respectively, in 2003. The main causes are prolonged outages of high-capacity plants in Japan as a consequence of administrative restrictions. The four nuclear power plants in Finland continue to be at the top of the list worldwide with a cumulated average availability of capacity of 90.30%. (orig.)

  18. Commercial incineration demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borduin, L.C.; Neuls, A.S.

    1981-01-01

    Low-level radioactive wastes (LLW) generated by nuclear utilities presently are shipped to commercial burial grounds for disposal. Substantially increasing shipping and disposal charges have sparked renewed industry interest in incineration and other advanced volume reduction techniques as potential cost-saving measures. Repeated inquiries from industry sources regarding LLW applicability of the Los Alamos controlled-air incineration (CAI) design led DOE to initiate this commercial demonstration program in FY-1980. The selected program approach to achieving CAI demonstration at a utility site is a DOE sponsored joint effort involving Los Alamos, a nuclear utility, and a liaison subcontractor. Required development tasks and responsibilities of the particpants are described. Target date for project completion is the end of FY-1985

  19. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Motor control centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.; O'Hearn, E.

    1994-02-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) commercial nuclear power plant motor control centers important to license renewal. The intent of this AMG is to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner that allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  20. United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-12-01

    This document list chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. Revision 15, dated December 2000.

  1. Ten years of ALARA experience in commercial nuclear pharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffey, J.L.; Seifert, K.L.; Green, R.L.; McAnany, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review ten years of extremity exposure in a growing nuclear pharmacy company and determine those practices that have been most effective in keeping exposures ALARA. The focus of this study was specifically on extremity exposure since whole body exposures have not been as significant. Methods: More than 400 dispensing employees are monitored weekly for extremity exposure. Currently, these employees handle and dispense more than 9,000 Curies (333,000 GBq) of activity ready for use in nuclear medicine procedures each week. The quarterly and annual extremity exposure histories were examined and compared with the introduction of different initiatives to limit these exposures. Changes in the total activity per unit dose were considered as well as the introduction of different compounding practices during this time. An attempt was made to also determine specifically which activities contribute most to the extremity exposure of a dispenser. Procedural changes were reviewed as well as engineering controls such as new shielding materials and designs. Results: A significant conversion of cardiac doses occurred during the time period evaluated. Tc-99m heart agents became the preferred radiopharmaceutical replacing a significant portion of Tl-201 that had been used previously. Tl-201 is still used often in conjunction with a Tc-99m agent. The significance of the switch is the high percentage of dispensed doses for cardiac studies and the higher activities of the Tc-99m agents. A combination of procedural changes and engineering controls (primarily tungsten shielding devices) have been effective in preventing the extremity exposure increase one might expect based on higher activities dispensed per unit dose and the higher energy of Tc-99m compared to Tl-201. One procedural change, the mandatory use of tongs for handling unshielded syringes of radiopharmaceuticals, resulted in a 17% reduction in the average exposure to the extremities

  2. Nuclear Electricity in the United States : Providing Energy For The Nation's Security and Well-Being

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finger, Harold B.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear energy in the United States has made major contributions since the small Shippingport prototype power plant began operating in 1957. Recent legislative and regulatory actions, as well as research an development, are indicating that additional nuclear capacity can be available in the years ahead. These actions reflect the public's recognition of the importance of nuclear energy. In addition, recent regulatory actions are reaffirming the health and safety of our current nuclear plants, as well as of those being completed. The performance of our current plants is being improved through the conscious dedication of the entire industry to excellence. There is increasing discussion in the United States of the importance of advanced reactor concepts development. The next generation of nuclear plants is already being ordered outside of the United States for example, here in Korea, in Japan, in the United Kingdom and those plants all use light water reactors. We are pleased that U. S. companies are working with you on these new plants. That continues to mean that we never let up on our drive for excellence. Excellence in operations must continue to be the conscious target of all operators. Excellence in communications to the public of the need for electrical capacity, of the benefits of nuclear energy, and of the excellence being achieved in operations is also essential. And excellence in communication to decision makers at all levels of government is also required to assure that sound legalisation and regulation is established and implemented

  3. Rewriting the history: a new future for the nuclear energy in United Kingdom?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodman, B.

    2009-01-01

    From ends of the ninety, the new nuclear energy has been rejected three times like an option of viable energy generation for United Kingdom: once during the privatization of the electric supply industry and twice during the subsequent revisions to the energy politicians carried out in 2003. Nevertheless, three years more late, a new debate around the energy politics gave an unusual turning in the industry destination, characterized by the firm consideration in the political calendar about the new reactors development, as well as of governmental politicians guided to impel it. This recent interest arises of restlessness regarding the future security of the supply and to the necessity of reducing the carbon dioxide emissions of United Kingdom. With the purpose of obtaining the sufficient support of civil politicians and investors for the new construction project, the industry will have to devise convincing arguments to prove that it has already solved those problems that it suffered in the past and, also that deserves to receive a special treatment in the liberated market of the electricity. This document synthesizes the structure of the nuclear industry in United Kingdom, some recent historical data and the reasons for those that the new nuclear reactors were not very received in the past. It also indicates the measures that have taken in recent times to modify that perspective. Finally, it analyzes the possible future of the nuclear energy at long term in United Kingdom. (Author)

  4. 76 FR 72007 - ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-295 and 50-304; NRC-2011-0244] ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security Requirements 1.0 Background Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS or Zion), Unit 1, is a Westinghouse 3250 MWt Pressurized Water Reactor...

  5. 75 FR 43572 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370; NRC-2010-0259] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC, McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant... Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee), for operation of the McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2...

  6. Operation of Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tossavainen, K.

    1990-03-01

    In the Quarterly Reports on the operation of the Finnish nuclear power plants such incidents and observations are described relating to nuclear and radiation safety which the regulatory body, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, considers safety-related. During the third quarter of 1989 the Finnish nuclear power plant units Loviisa 1 and 2 and TVO I and II were in commercial operation for most of the time. Nuclear electricity accounted for 39.0% of the total Finnish electricity production in this quarter. The load factor average of the nuclear power plant units was 78.9%. At Loviisa 1, two holes were found in the feedwater distributor of one steam generator. Corresponding wall thinning corrosion was also detected in the walls of two other distributors. The holes were found on the feedwater distributor upper surface in the joint of the secondary circuit feedwater pipe. One hole was about 20 mm x 50 mm in size and the other was a pit hole ca 5 mm in diameter. Metal power had entered the primary circuit at TVO I. This was observed during a post-scram plant start-up. Several control rod drive units had become jammed so tight that control rod withdrawal failed. Metal powder did not hamper reactor scram under the prevailing circumstances because the drive units are prone to jamming only after a control rod is almost fully inserted and because the forces which insert a control rod by various means (electrical, hydraulic) are 6-8 fold compared with the withdrawing force

  7. Calculating the Unit Cost Factors for Decommissioning Cost Estimation of the Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kwan Seong; Lee, Dong Gyu; Jung, Chong Hun; Lee, Kune Woo

    2006-01-01

    The estimated decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor is calculated by applying a unit cost factor-based engineering cost calculation method on which classification of decommissioning works fitted with the features and specifications of decommissioning objects and establishment of composition factors are based. Decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor is composed of labor cost, equipment and materials cost. Labor cost of decommissioning costs in decommissioning works are calculated on the basis of working time consumed in decommissioning objects. In this paper, the unit cost factors and work difficulty factors which are needed to calculate the labor cost in estimating decommissioning cost of nuclear research reactor are derived and figured out.

  8. Multi-unit Operations in Non-Nuclear Systems: Lessons Learned for Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OHara J. M.; Higgins, J.; DAgostino, A.

    2012-01-17

    The nuclear-power community has reached the stage of proposing advanced reactor designs to support power generation for decades to come. Small modular reactors (SMRs) are one approach to meet these energy needs. While the power output of individual reactor modules is relatively small, they can be grouped to produce reactor sites with different outputs. Also, they can be designed to generate hydrogen, or to process heat. Many characteristics of SMRs are quite different from those of current plants and may be operated quite differently. One difference is that multiple units may be operated by a single crew (or a single operator) from one control room. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is examining the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of SMRs to support licensing reviews. While we reviewed information on SMR designs to obtain information, the designs are not completed and all of the design and operational information is not yet available. Nor is there information on multi-unit operations as envisioned for SMRs available in operating experience. Thus, to gain a better understanding of multi-unit operations we sought the lesson learned from non-nuclear systems that have experience in multi-unit operations, specifically refineries, unmanned aerial vehicles and tele-intensive care units. In this paper we report the lessons learned from these systems and the implications for SMRs.

  9. Notice to exporters on products prohibited from export (nuclear material, equipment and large nuclear units)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In order to ensure that the policy to avoid the proliferation of nuclear weapons is complied with, the French Administration applies stricter controls over the export of certain sensitive products, materials and equipment. To this effect, lists of such products, materials and equipment are published in the form of Notices to exporters and periodically revised. This Notice repeals and replaces the previous Notice published in the Official Gazette of 21 January 1986. Annex I contains the list of materials whose export is subject to nuclear non-proliferation controls. Annex II lists the equipment whose export is subject to the same controls. Annex III includes the list of large nuclear units for which an application for prior approval of export must be submitted to the Administrations concerned. (NEA) [fr

  10. Third Party Nuclear Liability: The Case of a Supplier in the United Kingdom

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, A.; Heffron, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    The law surrounding third party nuclear liability is important to all parties in the nuclear supply chain whether they are providing decommissioning services, project management expertise or a new reactor. This paper examines third party nuclear liability, and in particular, in relation to a Supplier in the nuclear energy sector in the United Kingdom (UK). The term “Supplier” is used in this paper and, depending on the context, is intended to cover all parties in the supply chain providing se...

  11. Nuclear materials accountancy in an industrial MOX fuel fabrication plant safeguards versus commercial aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canck, H. de; Ingels, R.; Lefevre, R.

    1991-01-01

    In a modern MOX Fuel Fabrication Plant, with a large throughput of nuclear materials, computerized real-time accountancy systems are applied. Following regulations and prescriptions imposed by the Inspectorates EURATOM-IAEA, the State and also by internal plant safety rules, the accountancy is kept in plutonium element, uranium element and 235 U for enriched uranium. In practice, Safeguards Authorities are concerned with quantities of the element (U tot , Pu tot ) and to some extent with its fissile content. Custom Authorities are for historical reasons, interested in fissile quantities (U fiss , Pu fiss ) whereas owners wish to recover the energetic value of their material (Pu equivalent). Balancing the accountancy simultaneously in all these related but not proportional units is a new problem in a MOX-plant where pool accountancy is applied. This paper indicates possible ways to solve the balancing problem created by these different units used for expressing nuclear material quantities

  12. Safety Evaluation Report on Tennessee Valley Authority: Browns Ferry Nuclear Performance Plan: Browns Ferry Unit 2 restart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This safety evaluation report (SER) on the information submitted by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) in its Nuclear Performance Plan, through Revision 2, for the Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Station and in supporting documents has been prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff. The plan addresses the plant-specific concerns requiring resolution before startup of Unit 2. The staff will inspect implementation of those programs. Where systems are common to Units 1 and 2 or to Units 2 and 3, the staff safety evaluations of those systems are included herein. 3 refs

  13. NRC/FEMA operational response procedures for response to a commercial nuclear reactor accident. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    Procedures have been developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) which provide the response teams of both agencies with the steps to be taken in responding to an emergency at a commercial nuclear power plant. The emphasis of these procedures is mainly on the interface between NRC and FEMA at their respective Headquarters and Regional Offices and at the various sites at which such an emergency could occur. Detailed procedures are presented that cover for both agencies, notification schemes and manner of activation, organizations at Headquarters and the site, interface procedures, coordination of onsite and offsite operations, the role of the Senior FEMA Official, and the cooperative efforts of each agency's public information staff

  14. Nuclear reactors built, being built, or planned, June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.

    1992-01-01

    This is a fold-out map and data table for the commercial nuclear power plants of the United States. The map displays the position of each power plant with symbols representing generating capacity. The table presents site, status, MD capacity, licensee, and startup data for the plants. (JL)

  15. United States Nuclear Tests, July 1945 through September 1992, September 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2015-09-01

    This document lists chronologically and alphabetically by name all nuclear tests and simultaneous detonations conducted by the United States from July 1945 through September 1992. This is Revision 16, dated September 2015.

  16. Owners of nuclear power plants: Percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, R.S.

    1987-08-01

    The following list indicates percentage ownership of commercial nuclear power plants by utility companies as of June 1, 1987. The list includes all plants licensed to operate, under construction, docked for NRC safety and environmental reviews, or under NRC antitrust review. It does not include those plants announced but not yet under review or those plants formally canceled. In many cases, ownership may be in the process of changing as a result of altered financial conditions, changed power needs, and other reasons. However, this list reflects only those ownership percentages of which the NRC has been formally notified. Part I lists plants alphabetically with their associated applicants/licensees and percentage ownership. Part II lists applicants/licensees alphabetically with their associated plants and percentage ownership. Part I also indicates which plants have received operating licenses (OL's). Footnotes for both parts appear at the end of this document

  17. INVENTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF COMMERCIAL REACTOR FUELS WITHIN THE UNITED STATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2011-03-31

    There are currently 104 nuclear reactors in 31 states, operated by 51 different utilities. Operation of these reactors generates used fuel assemblies that require storage prior to final disposition. The regulatory framework within the United States (U.S.) allows for the licensing of used nuclear fuel storage facilities for an initial licensing period of up to 40 years with potential for license extensions in 40 years increments. Extended storage, for periods of up to 300 years, is being considered within the U.S. Therefore, there is an emerging need to develop the technical bases to support the licensing for long-term storage. In support of the Research and Development (R&D) activities required to support the technical bases, a comprehensive assessment of the current inventory of used nuclear fuel based upon publicly available resources has been completed that includes the most current projections of used fuel discharges from operating reactors. Negotiations with the nuclear power industry are ongoing concerning the willingness of individual utilities to provide information and material needed to complete the R&D activities required to develop the technical bases for used fuel storage for up to 300 years. This report includes a status of negotiations between DOE and industry in these regards. These negotiations are expected to result in a framework for cooperation between the Department and industry in which industry will provide and specific information on used fuel inventory and the Department will compensate industry for the material required for Research and Development and Testing and Evaluation Facility activities.

  18. Interaction of science and diplomacy: Latin American, the United States and nuclear energy, 1945-1955

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, R.

    1986-01-01

    Nuclear programs in Argentina and Brazil can be traced to August 1945 when their scientific communities articulated responses to the atomic bombings of Japan. They culminated in attempts to develop independent nuclear programs, sharply opposed by the United States, during the nationalist governments of Juan Peron and Getulio Vargas. This dissertation, based on primary sources from the three nations, analyzes these programs and the American responses. Latin America entered the nuclear age attempting to control natural resources, to improve scientific establishments, and to appraise Latin American-United States relations. Despite some clear warnings about nuclear dangers, the new form of energy was seen as the solution to industrial problems, poverty, and outside political interference. International opposition, which may have included nuclear threats from the United States, blocked Argentina's first attempt in 1947. After 1948, Peron wanted a nuclear program for cheap energy and prestige. The qualifications of the Brazilian scientists gave more substance to their program. The program originated in August, 1945, but assumed national proportion with the government of Vargas in 1951. Lack of American cooperation forced Vargas to establish a secret program with Germany. American troops intervened taking over the German equipment already completed. The final collapse came about with Vargas' suicide in August, 1954

  19. Outline of safety regulations and administrations for commercial nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinichi Yamamoto

    1987-01-01

    Outline of safety regulations and administrations for the commercial nuclear power plants in Japan is briefly described. The strict measures for safety assurance are always taken based on the principle of defense-indepth. In the actual procedures of regulatory control, the examinations and inspections shall be performed at each individual step in the stage of applications, and also in the stage of constructions. Thus, those regulatory examinations and inspections shall be performed in detail and carefully, and at the most suitable time; resulting in an effective regulatory control by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. (author)

  20. Nuclear material control in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, C.; Waddoups, I.

    1995-01-01

    The Department of Energy has defined a safeguards system to be an integrated system of physical protection, material accounting and material control subsystems designed to deter, prevent, detect, and respond to unauthorized possession, use, or sabotage of SNM. In practice, safeguards involve the development and application of techniques and procedures dealing with the establishment and continued maintenance of a system of activities. The system must also include administrative controls and surveillance to assure that the procedures and techniques of the system are effective and are being carried out. The control of nuclear material is critical to the safeguarding of nuclear materials within the United States. The U.S. Department of Energy includes as part of material control four functional performance areas. They include access controls, material surveillance, material containment and detection/assessment. This paper will address not only these areas but also the relationship between material control and other safeguards and security functions

  1. The development of nuclear power and nuclear manpower training in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lin; Xu Xiyue

    2000-01-01

    There are two nuclear power plants (NPP) in operation in China. The Qinshan NPP was the first that was constructed by China's own efforts and went into operation on 1991. The Daya Bay NPP was constructed using foreign funds, technology and went into operation on 1994. Four nuclear power projects with 8 units were initiated during the State Ninth Five-years Plan. The 8 units are expected for commercial operation between 2002 and 2005. China is preparing for the Tenth Five-Year Plan, in which China will develop the nuclear power at a moderate pace. The 13 universities and colleges were offering nuclear science educations. The students from these universities and college can meet the needs of nuclear institutes and enterprises. China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) owns the Graduated School of Nuclear Industry and the Nuclear Industry Administrative Cadre College, which will turn into the nuclear training center in future. Besides, CNNC also owns 4 institutions awarding Doctorate and 9 institutes awarding Master Degree. Many programs for education and training carried out by CNNC are presented, such as direct education supported by CNNC's finances, on job training, education for the second bachelor degree, training for senior economic professionals, research course for senior professionals, short time training course and training for license. China trained nuclear personnel by international cooperation with other countries both through multilateral and bilateral cooperation programs. CNNC has established scientific and economic ties with over 40 countries. CNNC has held diversified training for nuclear industry professionals with our own efforts and with the support from the State for many years. Today, the rapid development of nuclear industry needs more professionals. We must make greater efforts to enhance human resources development. Nuclear Safety is very important for nuclear energy development. Nuclear safety is closely related to each person who works in

  2. Development of regulatory requirements/guides for desalination unit coupled with nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik

    2005-10-01

    The basic design of System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor (SMART), a small-to-medium sized integral type pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capacity of 330MWth, has been developed in Korea. In order to demonstrate the safety and performance of the SMART design, 'Development Project of SMART-P (SMART-Pilot Plant)' has been being performed as one of the 'National Mid and Long-term Atomic Energy R and D Programs', which includes design, construction, and start-up operation of the SMART-P with the capacity of 65MWth, a 1/5 scaled-down design of the SMART. At the same time, a study on the development of regulatory requirements/guides for the desalination unit coupled with nuclear plant has been carried out by KINS in order to prepare for the forthcoming SMART-P licensing. The results of this study performed from August of 2002 to October of 2005 can be summarized as follows: (1) The general status of desalination technologies has been survey. (2) The design of the desalination plant coupled with the SMART-P has been investigated. (3) The regulatory requirements/guides relevant to a desalination unit coupled with a nuclear plant have been surveyed. (4) A direction on the development of domestic regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination unit has been established. (5) A draft of regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination unit has been developed. (6) Expert technical reviews have been performed for the draft regulatory requirements/guides for a desalination unit. The draft regulatory requirements/guides developed in this study will be finalized and can be applied directly to the licensing of the SMART-P and SMART. Furthermore, it will be also applied to the licensing of the desalination unit coupled with the nuclear plant

  3. Ontario Power Generation Nuclear: results and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermarkar, F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the accomplishments of Ontario Power Generation (OPG) Nuclear and outlines future opportunities. OPG's mandate is to cost effectively produce electricity, while operating in a safe, open and environmentally responsible manner. OPG's nuclear production has been increasing over the past three years - partly from the addition of newly refurbished Pickering A Units 1 and 4, and partly from the increased production from Darlington and Pickering B. OPG will demonstrate its proficiency and capability in nuclear by continuing to enhance the performance and cost effectiveness of its existing operations. Its priorities are to focus on performance excellence, commercial success, openness, accountability and transparency

  4. Nuclear units operating improvement by using operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotaru, I.; Bilegan, I.C.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents how the information experience can be used to improve the operation of nuclear units. This areas include the following items: conservative decision making; supervisory oversight; teamwork; control room distraction; communications; expectations and standards; operator training and fundamental knowledge, procedure quality and adherence; plant status awareness. For each of these topics, the information illustrate which are the principles, the lessons learned from operating experience and the most appropriate exemplifying documents. (authors)

  5. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D.G.; Clapper, M.; Thrower, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program has completed 23 shipments. Almost 5000 spent fuel assemblies from eligible research reactors throughout the world have been accepted into the United States under this program. Over the past year, another cross-country shipment of fuel was accomplished, as well as two additional shipments in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2001. These shipments attracted considerable safeguards oversight since they occurred post September 11. Recent guidance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pertaining to security and safeguards issues deals directly with the transport of nuclear material. Since the Acceptance Program has consistently applied above regulatory safety enhancements in transport of spent nuclear fuel, this guidance did not adversely effect the Program. As the Program draws closer to its termination date, an increased number of requests for program extension are received. Currently, there are no plans to extend the policy beyond its current expiration date; therefore, eligible reactor operators interested in participating in this program are strongly encouraged to evaluate their inventory and plan for future shipments as soon as possible. (author)

  6. 40 CFR 73.18 - Submittal procedures for units commencing commercial operation during the period from January 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... commencing commercial operation during the period from January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1995. 73.18 Section 73.18 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) SULFUR DIOXIDE ALLOWANCE SYSTEM Allowance Allocations § 73.18 Submittal procedures for units...

  7. Aging Management Guideline for commercial nuclear power plants: Power and distribution transformers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toman, G.; Gazdzinski, R.

    1994-05-01

    This Aging Management Guideline (AMG) provides recommended methods for effective detection and mitigation of age-related degradation mechanisms in power and distribution transformers important to license renewal in commercial nuclear power plants. The intent of this AMG to assist plant maintenance and operations personnel in maximizing the safe, useful life of these components. It also supports the documentation of effective aging management programs required under the License Renewal Rule 10 CFR Part 54. This AMG is presented in a manner which allows personnel responsible for performance analysis and maintenance to compare their plant-specific aging mechanisms (expected or already experienced) and aging management program activities to the more generic results and recommendations presented herein

  8. Comparative costs of coal and nuclear-generated electricity in the united states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandfon, W.W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper compares the future first-year operating costs and lifetime levelized costs of producing baseload coal- and nuclear-generated electricity under schedules shorter than those recently experienced at U.S. plants. Nuclear appears to have a clear economic advantage. Coal is favorable only when it is assumed that the units will operate at very low capacity factors and/or when the capital cost differential between nuclear and coal is increased far above the recent historical level. Nuclear is therefore a cost-competitive electric energy option for utilities and should be considered as an alternative to coal when large baseload capacity is required. (author)

  9. Elecnuc. Nuclear power plants in the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This small booklet summarizes in tables all the numerical data relative to the nuclear power plants worldwide. These data come from the French CEA/DSE/SEE Elecnuc database. The following aspects are reviewed: 1997 highlights; main characteristics of the reactor types in operation, under construction or on order; map of the French nuclear power plants; worldwide status of nuclear power plants at the end of 1997; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction and on order; capacity of nuclear power plants in operation; net and gross capacity of nuclear power plants on the grid and in commercial operation; forecasts; first power generation of nuclear origin per country, achieved or expected; performance indicator of PWR units in France; worldwide trend of the power generation indicator; nuclear power plants in operation, under construction, on order, planned, cancelled, shutdown, and exported; planning of steam generators replacement; MOX fuel program for plutonium recycling. (J.S.)

  10. The nuclear energy in the United Kingdom; L'energie nucleaire au Royaume-Uni

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    With challenges like the climatic change, the hydrocarbons prices increase and the energy supply security, the nuclear park is becoming a decisive and an urgent question in the United Kingdom. The author proposes an historical aspect of the nuclear energy in UK, the actors of the today nuclear industry and the technologies used in 2006, the radioactive wastes management, the programs of the future and the british opinion on the nuclear. (A.L.B.)

  11. Licensed operating reactors. Operating units status report, data as of 2-28-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices and IE Headquarters; and the third section is an appendix containing comparative statistics of U.S. nuclear/fossil capacity, identification of nuclear power plants within regional Electric Reliability Councils, the relative status of U.S. nuclear electric production to all U.S. electric production by state, and selected Edison Electric Institute operating statistics. Throughout the report, statistical factors for periods greater than a report month, or for more than one unit, are computed as the arithmetic average of each unit's individual operating statistics. The statistical factors for each unit for the report month are computed from actual power production for the month. The factors for the life-span of each unit (the ''Cumulative'' column) are reported by the utility and are not entirely re-computed by NRC. Utility power production data is checked for consistency with previously submitted statistics

  12. Use of a tangential filtration unit for processing liquid waste from nuclear laundries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustin, X.; Buzonniere, A. de; Barnier, H.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear laundries produce large quantities of weakly contaminated effluents charged with insoluble and soluble products. In collaboration with CEA, TECHNICATOME has developed an ultrafiltration process for liquid waste from nuclear laundries, associated with prior in-solubilization of the radiochemical activity. This process 'seeded ultrafiltration' is based on the use of decloggable mineral filter media and combines very high separation efficiency with long membrane life. The efficiency of the tangential filtration unit which has been processing effluents from the Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (CEA-France) nuclear laundry since mid-1988, has been confirmed on several sites

  13. United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum Progress Report. Data Studies during 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawkes, N.P. (ed.) [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-02-15

    The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) meets twice a year to discuss issues relating to the measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. Topics cover a wide range of applications in the UK nuclear industry. Links between members are maintained throughout the year, mainly through e-mail and the UKNSF website (www.uknsf.ofg.uk). Work of primary interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g. half-lives and gamma ray emission probabilities), fission yields, and neutron cross sections for fission and fusion. All known studies within the UK are summarised in this report. Specific applications and international links of relevance are also described. (author)

  14. United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum Progress Report. Data Studies during 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkes, N.P.

    2010-02-01

    The United Kingdom Nuclear Science Forum (UKNSF) meets twice a year to discuss issues relating to the measurement and evaluation of nuclear data. Topics cover a wide range of applications in the UK nuclear industry. Links between members are maintained throughout the year, mainly through e-mail and the UKNSF website (www.uknsf.ofg.uk). Work of primary interest includes the measurement and evaluation of decay data (e.g. half-lives and gamma ray emission probabilities), fission yields, and neutron cross sections for fission and fusion. All known studies within the UK are summarised in this report. Specific applications and international links of relevance are also described. (author)

  15. Status of US program for disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.I.

    1991-04-01

    In this paper, a brief history of the United States' program for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and the legislative acts that have guided the program are discussed. The current plans and schedules for beginning acceptance of SNF from the nuclear utilities for disposal are described, and some of the development activities supporting the program are discussed. And finally, the viability of the SNF disposal fee presently paid into the Nuclear Waste Fund by the owners/generators of commercial SNF and high-level waste (HLW) is examined. 12 refs., 9 figs

  16. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume VI. Safety and environmental considerations for licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-06-01

    This volume of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program report addresses safety and environmental considerations in licensing the principal alternative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles in the United States for large-scale commercial nuclear power plants. In addition, this volume examines the safety and environmental considerations for licensing fuel service centers. These centers, which have been proposed for controlling sensitive fuel-cycle facilities and special nuclear materials, would contain a combination of such facilities as reprocessing plants, fabrication plants, and reactors. For this analysis, two fuel service center concepts were selected - one with power - generating capability and one without

  17. History of Fire Events in the U.S. Commercial Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijan Najafi; Joglar-Biloch, Francisco; Kassawara, Robert P.; Khalil, Yehia

    2002-01-01

    Over the past decade, interest in performance-based fire protection has increased within the nuclear industry. In support of this growing interest, in 1997 the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) developed a long-range plan to develop/improve data and tools needed to support Risk-Informed/Performance-Based fire protection. This plan calls for continued improvement in collection and use of information obtained from fire events at nuclear plants. The data collection process has the objectives of improving the insights gained from such data and reducing the uncertainty in fire risk and fire modeling methods in order to make them a more reliable basis for performance based fire protection programs. In keeping with these objectives, EPRI continues to collect, review and analyze fire events in support of the nuclear industry. EPRI collects these records in cooperation with the Nuclear Electric Insurance Limited (NEIL), by compiling public fire event reports and by direct solicitation of U.S. nuclear facilities. EPRI fire data collection project is based on the principle that the understanding of history is one of the cornerstones of improving fire protection technology and practice. Therefore, the goal has been to develop and maintain a comprehensive database of fire events with flexibility to support various aspects of fire protection engineering. With more than 1850 fire records over a period of three decades and 2400 reactor years, this is the most comprehensive database of nuclear power industry fire events in existence today. In general, the frequency of fires in the U.S. commercial nuclear industry remains constant. In few cases, e.g., transient fires and fires in BWR offgas/recombiner systems, where either increasing or decreasing trends are observed, these trends tend to slow after 1980. The key issues in improving quality of the data remain to be consistency of the recording and reporting of fire events and difficulties in collection of records. EPRI has

  18. Nuclear power plant operational data compilation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberberg, S.

    1980-01-01

    Electricite de France R and D Division has set up a nuclear power plant operational data compilation system. This data bank, created through American documents allows results about plant operation and operational material behaviour to be given. At present, French units at commercial operation are taken into account. Results obtained after five years of data bank operation are given. (author)

  19. The Canadian nuclear scene - a 1983 perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foulkes, F.M.

    1983-01-01

    The author reviews the previous year's performance and future prospects for the Canadian nuclear industry. Continued economic difficulties have meant continued streamlining of the industry. Basic strength is still the year-after-year record performance of the Ontario Hydro CANDU units. Given this performance, flexibility in the structure of the industry, and strong government support commercial success can be achieved eventually

  20. Key Factors for the Linkage Strategy between R and D and Commercialization for Gen-ΙV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoungmi; Hong, Jung Suk

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima nuclear disaster has leaded to enhance the safety and the cost-effectiveness of technology for the future so that advanced countries such as United Sates and France have concerned about a next generation nuclear power plant, Gen-IV(Generation-IV Reactor). Considering various characteristics of nuclear R and D, it is necessary to have more elaborated strategies for the effective development of the next generation of nuclear technology. In this study, we suggest 5 key factors for the successful commercialization of Gen-IV by analyzing the distinct characteristics of nuclear R and D with Gen-IV and CSF(Critical Success Factor)s of several cases in these field and conducting the FGI(Focus Group Interview). Considering these results, we could find and suggest some important points for further strategy for Gen-IV. That is, following five key factors for the linkage improvement between R and D and commercialization of Gen-IV should be considered: the participation of nuclear power plant operators from the beginning, the establishment of consistent and comprehensive plan/roadmap/detailed strategy, the technology development based on global energy issues and international cooperation, the stable and clear funding plans for long-term projects, the cooperation of relative ministries. Gen-IV system is getting a positive response in that it accompanies long-term R and D plans in Korea. We think that the standard of Gen-IV would lead the next generation of nuclear industry if the proper strategy for the cooperation between the private sector and the regulation from the beginning. Moreover, we expect that this study will facilitate its development process from R and D to commercialization

  1. Key Factors for the Linkage Strategy between R and D and Commercialization for Gen-ΙV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyoungmi; Hong, Jung Suk [Korean Institute of S and T Evaluation and Planning, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The Fukushima nuclear disaster has leaded to enhance the safety and the cost-effectiveness of technology for the future so that advanced countries such as United Sates and France have concerned about a next generation nuclear power plant, Gen-IV(Generation-IV Reactor). Considering various characteristics of nuclear R and D, it is necessary to have more elaborated strategies for the effective development of the next generation of nuclear technology. In this study, we suggest 5 key factors for the successful commercialization of Gen-IV by analyzing the distinct characteristics of nuclear R and D with Gen-IV and CSF(Critical Success Factor)s of several cases in these field and conducting the FGI(Focus Group Interview). Considering these results, we could find and suggest some important points for further strategy for Gen-IV. That is, following five key factors for the linkage improvement between R and D and commercialization of Gen-IV should be considered: the participation of nuclear power plant operators from the beginning, the establishment of consistent and comprehensive plan/roadmap/detailed strategy, the technology development based on global energy issues and international cooperation, the stable and clear funding plans for long-term projects, the cooperation of relative ministries. Gen-IV system is getting a positive response in that it accompanies long-term R and D plans in Korea. We think that the standard of Gen-IV would lead the next generation of nuclear industry if the proper strategy for the cooperation between the private sector and the regulation from the beginning. Moreover, we expect that this study will facilitate its development process from R and D to commercialization.

  2. The political economy of nuclear energy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nivola, P.S.

    2004-05-01

    A tendency among commentators, even experts like the author of the sentence above, is to regard the complicated story of nuclear energy in the United States as exceptionally troubled and frustrating. The root cause of the troubles and frustrations, moreover, is commonly thought to be more political than economic. The promise of nuclear power in this country is said to have been dimmed primarily by an eccentrically risk-averse public and an unusually hostile regulatory climate. Practically nowhere else, it is said, have political and legal institutions been so uncooperative. Supposedly the central governments of most other advanced countries have lent far more support to their nuclear industries. And because those governments are assumed to be more aggressive in combating pollution, including greenhouse gas emissions from burning fossil fuels, surely 'the rest of the world' has been doing much more than America to level the playing field for the development of nuclear energy. The following paper challenges this conventional picture. (author)

  3. Policy and practices in the United States of America for DOE-generated nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, F.C.

    1984-01-01

    Throughout the history of attempts to utilize atomic power in the USA, health and safety have been primary considerations in programme policy formulation. A brief historical review of the US nuclear waste management policy formulation over the years aids understanding of our current management strategy for government-generated (primarily defence-related) nuclear wastes. Scientists involved in the Manhattan project during World War II were aware of the dangers of radioactive wastes. The first reaction to this concern was the establishment of a health physics programme to monitor radioactive hazards in Manhattan District Laboratories. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946, which established the Atomic Energy Commission, called for protection of the health and safety of the public as well as atomic workers. That concept has been continued and strengthened, throughout the history of nuclear waste management in the USA. Passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 required consideration of radioactive wastes generated by private industry as well as those produced by the Manhattan projects. Commercial waste management policy was based on the already established policy for management of government-generated wastes and is the subject of a separate paper at this symposium. Current US policy is to maintain separate but complementary programmes for nuclear wastes generated by government activities and those from commercial sources. US policy and practices for management of government-generated radioactive waste are summarized. Key organizational structure relating to waste management responsibility is presented. (author)

  4. 78 FR 4467 - UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 52-016; NRC-2008-0250] UniStar Nuclear Energy, Combined License Application for Calvert Cliffs Power Plant, Unit 3, Exemption 1.0 Background UniStar Nuclear Energy (UNE), on behalf of Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Project, LLC and UniStar Nuclear Operating Services...

  5. 1980 nuclear plant survey: no reactors sold; more cancellations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlander, G.D.

    1980-01-01

    No sales were reported in 1979 by any of the big four reactor suppliers. Three cancellations were reported and construction was suspended on the Jersey Central Power and Light Co.'s Forked River unit. Since last year's survey, the commercial operation dates of about 80 units have been postponed from one year to indefinitely, and nuclear commitments are down from last year's 195 units to 193 units. Presently, there are 72 plants on line, with a capacity of more than 53,000 MW. A resumption of new reactor orders is expected in either late 1980 or early 1981

  6. UPDATE: Nuclear Power Program information and data, July-September 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Converter Reactor Deployment, Office of Nuclear Energy, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office

  7. Update: nuclear power program information and data, April-June 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interst to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office

  8. Update: nuclear power program information and data, March-April 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office

  9. Update: nuclear power program information and data, October-December 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office

  10. UPDATE: nuclear power program information and data, May-June 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current of nuclear status powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new development in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilities quick response for data and information of the type often solicited from this office

  11. UPDATE: nuclear power program information and data, July-September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATA is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office

  12. Update: nuclear power program information and data, October-December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    UPDATE is published by the Office of Coordination and Special Projects, Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs, to provide a quick reference source on the current status of nuclear powerplant construction and operation in the United States and for information on the fuel cycle, economics, and performance of nuclear generating units. Similar information on other means of electric generation as related to nuclear power is included when appropriate. The subject matter of the reports and analyses presented in UPDATE will vary from issue to issue, reflecting changes in foci of interest and new developments in the field of commercial nuclear power generation. UPDATE is intended to provide a timely source of current statistics, results of analyses, and programmatic information proceeding from the activities of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Programs and other components of the Department of Energy, as well as condensations of topical articles from other sources of interest to the nuclear community. It also facilitates quick responses to requests for data and information of the type often solicited from this office.

  13. The comparison of license management procedure for nuclear power plant in China and United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zusheng

    2006-01-01

    'Tow steps' license management procedure for nuclear power plant has been performed bas- ted on the requirement of 10CFR Part50-DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES in United States since last century fifties. In order to ulterior reduce the risk of investment and technical for new construction nuclear power plants, new regulations 'One step' license management procedure-10CFR Part52-EARLY SITE PERMITS; STANDARD DESIGN CERTIFICATIONS; AND COMBINED LICENSES FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS issued in 1989. The new regulations has been adopted by new design of nuclear power plant, for example AP1000. ‘The similar tow steps’ license management procedure for nuclear power plant has been performed basted on the requirement of HAFO01/01 Rules for the Implementation of Regulations on the Safety Regulation for Civilian Nuclear Installations of the People's Re- public of China Part One: Application and Issuance of Safety License for Nuclear Power Plant (December 1993) in China since last century nineties. This article introduces and compares the requirements and characteristics of above license management procedure for nuclear power plant in China and United States. (author)

  14. Safstor decommissioning of the Humboldt Bay Power Plant Unit No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The Humboldt Bay Power Plant is located near Eureka, California, about 265 miles north of San Francisco. The plant consists of two fossil fueled units, two mobil gas turbine peaking units, and a nuclear unit - Unit No. 3. Unit No. 3, which utilized a boiling water reactor, was constructed between 1960 and 1963. The unit began commercial operation in August 1963 and operated until July 2, 1976 when it was shutdown for refueling, seismic modifications, and additional seismic and geologic studies. During the years Unit 3 operated it had one of the best operating records of any nuclear power plant in the United States. For its operating lifetime Unit 3 had an overall capacity factor of 63.0% and an availability factor of 85.9%. The unit included certain design features which made it unique among nuclear power plants of its era. Some of these unique features included natural circulation recirculation flow which eliminated the need for costly recirculation pumps, utilization of a pressure suppression containment system which had been developed jointly by PG and E and the General Electric Company, and the fact that the reactor vessel and the containment system were constructed in a caisson below ground level. These design features reduced the overall construction cost of the unit and improved its inherent safety

  15. Development of wall thinning screening system and its application to a commercial nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kyung Ha; Hwang, Il Soon; Kim, Ji Hyun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Wall loss screening system (WalSS) has been developed based on ES-DCPD method. • Screening criteria was established based on the thinning of the actual shape that occur in the power plant. • With the criteria, the WalSS gives priority of the need for inspection. • This technique was successfully applied to commercial nuclear power plant. - Abstract: A new non-destructive evaluation (NDE) method has been developed for metal pipes for the detection wall thinning. The method has been showed to be suitable for applications to electric power generation plants where flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steel piping is a significant cause of increased maintenance and plant personnel casualty. The wall thinning screening system (WalSS) was developed in two major phases. In the first phase, the equipotential switching direct current potential drop (ES-DCPD) method was developed for piping wall (Ryu et al., 2008a, 2010). In the second phase, in this paper, a quantitative detection criteria was developed. The relative ES-DCPD change of 3.8% has been defined as the screening criteria for wall thinning schematization. This criteria means that the component with measured ES-DCPD change greater than 3.8% is called for a more comprehensive examination. In the criteria development, all variables were taken into consideration based on commercial plant piping inspection data such as initial thickness distributions, wall thinning shape and nominal thickness. The developed WalSS based on ES-DCPD was applied to a moisture separator reheater (MSR) drain line of a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) during a scheduled overhaul. The measured ES-DCPD change was 2.16%, which is lower than the ES-DCPD criteria, identifying the pipe having adequate wall thickness. This is confirmed by site thickness inspection using ultrasonic technique (UT)

  16. Application of Digital Technology for the Plant Protection System in Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Units 5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deucksoo, Lee; Insik, Kim

    2006-01-01

    Since the completion of construction of Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Units 3 and 4 (UCN 3 and 4), the first units of the OPR (Optimized Power Reactor) series, various advanced design features have been incorporated to the following OPRs. The Ulchin Nuclear Power Plant Units 5 and 6(UCN 5 and 6) which started commercial operation in Korea from 2004 and 2005 respectively, are designed to provide improvements in safety, reliability and costs by applying both advanced proven technology and experiences gained from the construction and operation of the previous OPRs. Among those improvements, the digital plant protection system (DPPS) and the digital engineered safety feature actuation system (DESFAS) are the key elements to the UCN 5 and 6 designs. The DPPS and DESFAS utilizing the digital computer technology offer a solution to the obsolescence problem of analog system. These features also provide the potential for additional benefits such as ease of maintenance, increased performance, reduction of internal and external cross channel wiring, improvement of the surveillance testability and flexibility of control logic programming change. During the initial design stage, the Korean regulatory body had evaluated these design concepts intensively and concluded it to be acceptable for the safety point of view. Also, in-depth review on the detailed design and the special evaluation/audit for the software design process has been performed to secure the quality of the software. As a result, every issue raised during licensing review has been clarified and the operating licenses for the UCN 5 and 6 were issued in October, 2003 and October, 2004 respectively, by the government. In this paper, design characteristics of the UCN 5 and 6 are introduced, and advanced design features and implementation process are presented focused on the DPPS/DESFAS with some benefit analysis results. (authors)

  17. 78 FR 14361 - In the Matter of Luminant Generation Company LLC, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0310; Docket Nos. 50-445 and 50-446; License Nos. NPF-87 and NPF-89] In the Matter of Luminant Generation Company LLC, Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant, Units... Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2 (CPNPP), and its Independent Spent Fuel Storage Installation Facility...

  18. 78 FR 79709 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant Post-Shutdown...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 50-302; NRC-2013-0283] Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Crystal River Unit 3 Nuclear Generating Plant Post-Shutdown Decommissioning Activities Report AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION: Notice of receipt; availability; public meeting; and request...

  19. Review of operating history at the Palisades Nuclear Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mays, G.T.; Harrington, K.H.

    1982-01-01

    the Systematic Evaluation Program Branch (SEPB) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is conducting the Systematic Evaluation Program whose purpose is to determine the safety margins of the design and operation of the eleven oldest operating commercial nuclear power plants in the United States. A portion of the SEP includes the compilation and interpretation of operational occurrences at these plants. This summary describes the methodology and results of the operational experience review of Palisades Nuclear Plant. The review includes a detailed examination of the operating experience in two segments - plant shutdowns and power reductions, and reportable events

  20. Nuclear material control and accounting safeguards in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woltermann, H.A.; Rudy, C.R.; Rakel, D.A.; DeVer, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Material control and accounting (MC and A) of special nuclear material (SNM) must supplement physical security to protect SNM from unlawful use such as terrorist activities. This article reviews MC and A safeguards of SNM in the United States. The following topics are covered: a brief perspective and history of MC and A safeguards, current MC and A practices, measurement methods for SNM, historical MC and A performance, a description of near-real-time MC and A systems, and conclusions on the status of MC and A in the United States

  1. Consistent adoption of the International System of Units (SI) in nuclear science and technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klumpar, J; Kovar, Z [Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Prague. Laborator Radiologicke Dozimetrie; Sacha, J [Slovenska Akademia Vied, Bratislava (Czechoslovakia). Fyzikalny Ustav

    1975-11-01

    The principles are stressed behind a consistent introduction of the International System of Units (SI) in Czechoslovakia complying with the latest edition of the Czechoslovak Standard CSN 01 1300 on the prescribed system of national and international units. The use of special and auxiliary units in nuclear physics and technology is discussed, particular attention being devoted to the units of activity and to the time units applied in radiology. Conversion graph and tables are annexed.

  2. FIND: Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.M.

    1975-12-01

    This index is presented as a guide to microfiche items 1 through 136 in Docket 50448, which was assigned to Potomac Electric Power Company's Application for Licenses to construct and operate Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2. Information received from August, 1973 through July, 1975 is included

  3. Decommissioning: a United Kingdom perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haworth, A.; Reed, D.L.; Bleeze, A.

    1995-01-01

    The paper considers the United Kingdom legislative framework relevant to decommissioning of facilities on nuclear licensed sites. It describes the various legislative bodies involved in regulating this activity and the inspectorate concerned. The licensing regime is described in some detail highlighting the UK arrangements whereby a license is granted for the site upon which nuclear facilities are planned or exist. The license remains in place throughout the life of the plant on the site: from initial planning through to the end of decommissioning. A site (of part of) is not de-licensed until it can be stated that there has ceased to be any danger from ionising radiations from anything on the site (or appropriate part of the site). The final part of the paper considers the changes arising from the commercialization of the nuclear power industry in UK and the restatement of the Nuclear Installation Inspectorate's policy on decommissioning which has arisen as a result of a review made in response to these changes. (author)

  4. Present and future of Korean nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, K-H

    2014-01-01

    'Full text:' The Korean nuclear power industry has devoted itself to technological development and self-reliance over the last 30 years since Kori unit 1, the first nuclear power plant commenced its commercial operation in 1978. As a result of such efforts and accumulated experiences, the Korean nuclear power industry has developed the OPR 1000 and APR 1400 units and is almost completing the development of the APR+ as a 1,500MW class reactor with its own technologies of design and manufacturing. Also, the Korean nuclear power industry has been able to build a strong supply chain from engineering, manufacturing, construction, and fuel supply, to operation and maintenance. At present, Korea is operating 23 commercial power reactors with a total installed capacity of 20,716 MW, accounting for 25 percent of the installed capacity and one third of the nation's total electricity generation. Also, the share of nuclear power generation capacity will be 29 percent by 2035 in the Long Term Energy Development Plan and 43 GW of nuclear energy capacity will be needed. Thanks to nuclear power generation as an essential driving force, Korea has been able to supply cheap and stable electricity. However, amid the growing public concerns about nuclear safety after the Fukushima accident, the Korean government and related organizations are exerting its utmost effort in all areas, for example, enhancing nuclear safety and safety culture, carrying out management innovation, and communicating with the public in order to enhance transparency. Also, the Korean government launched the Public Engagement Commission on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in 2013, which is tasked to initiate public consultation & discussion and submit recommendation to government after in-depth review and analysis on SNF management options by the end of 2014. Nuclear power has become very essential part of national economy in Korea because Korea has virtually no indigenous energy resources and

  5. Present and future of Korean nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, K-H [Korea Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    'Full text:' The Korean nuclear power industry has devoted itself to technological development and self-reliance over the last 30 years since Kori unit 1, the first nuclear power plant commenced its commercial operation in 1978. As a result of such efforts and accumulated experiences, the Korean nuclear power industry has developed the OPR 1000 and APR 1400 units and is almost completing the development of the APR+ as a 1,500MW class reactor with its own technologies of design and manufacturing. Also, the Korean nuclear power industry has been able to build a strong supply chain from engineering, manufacturing, construction, and fuel supply, to operation and maintenance. At present, Korea is operating 23 commercial power reactors with a total installed capacity of 20,716 MW, accounting for 25 percent of the installed capacity and one third of the nation's total electricity generation. Also, the share of nuclear power generation capacity will be 29 percent by 2035 in the Long Term Energy Development Plan and 43 GW of nuclear energy capacity will be needed. Thanks to nuclear power generation as an essential driving force, Korea has been able to supply cheap and stable electricity. However, amid the growing public concerns about nuclear safety after the Fukushima accident, the Korean government and related organizations are exerting its utmost effort in all areas, for example, enhancing nuclear safety and safety culture, carrying out management innovation, and communicating with the public in order to enhance transparency. Also, the Korean government launched the Public Engagement Commission on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) management in 2013, which is tasked to initiate public consultation & discussion and submit recommendation to government after in-depth review and analysis on SNF management options by the end of 2014. Nuclear power has become very essential part of national economy in Korea because Korea has virtually no indigenous energy resources and

  6. NO global warming = YES nuclear energy. The International Nuclear Forum and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, Emma

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear industry sits along side the renewable energy sector in its role as a non carbon emitting technology. But persuading international political leaders of this fact presents a challenge. Generating electricity from nuclear fuel avoids at least 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide every year through its 16% share of world wide electricity generation. Nuclear energy is essential to minimising greenhouse gas emissions. This presentation highlights the main issues resulting from the climate change negotiations that are highly relevant to the industry; explains the activities of the International Nuclear Forum and our interaction with the delegates to the process; outlines future activities. The International Nuclear Forum (INF) was formed to provide a collective voice lobbying for nuclear at the climate change negotiations. It's internationally representative of the industry and comprises of: the Uranium Institute; the Nuclear Energy Institute; the Japan Atomic Industry Forum; the Canadian Nuclear Association; the European Nuclear Society, and Foratom. All are accredited non governmental observers to the negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  7. Comprehensive study on nuclear weapons. Summary of a United Nations study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    In December 1988, by resolution 43/75N, the United Nations General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to carry out a comprehensive update of a 1980 study on nuclear weapons. The study was to take into account recent relevant studies, and consider the political, legal and security aspects of: (a) nuclear arsenals and pertinent technological developments; (b) doctrines concerning nuclear weapons; (c) efforts to reduce nuclear weapons; (d) physical, environmental, medical and other effects of the use of nuclear weapons and of nuclear testing; (e) efforts to achieve a comprehensive nuclear-test ban; (f) efforts to prevent the use of nuclear weapons and their horizontal and vertical proliferation; and (g) the question of verification of compliance with nuclear-arms limitation agreements. The Group's report is presented in nine chapters, eight of which are summarized here; chapter 9, entitled ''Conclusions'', is included in its entirety. In his foreword to the report, the Secretary-General observes that the study represents the most comprehensive review of the relevant developments in the field over the last decade and was carried out during a period of ''far-reaching changes in international relations'' and an ''unprecedented evolution in the relationship between East and West''. This period experienced for the first time the initiation of an effective process of reduction of nuclear weapon stockpiles

  8. 1992 state-by-state assessment of low-level radioactive wastes received at commercial disposal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, R.L.; McDonald, S.D.

    1993-09-01

    Each year the National Low-Level Waste Management Program publishes a state-by-state assessment report. This report provides both national and state-specific disposal data on low-level radioactive waste commercially disposed in the United States. Data in this report are categorized according to disposal site, generator category, waste class, volumes, and radionuclide activity. Included in this report are tables showing the distribution of waste by state for 1992 and a comparison of waste volumes and radioactivity by state for 1988 through 1992; also included is a list of all commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States as of December 31, 1992. This report distinguishes between low-level radioactive waste shipped directly for disposal by generators and waste that was handled by an intermediary, a reporting change introduced in the 1988 state-by-state report

  9. 1994 state-by-state assessment of low-level radioactive wastes received at commercial disposal sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    Each year the National Low-Level Waste Management Program publishes a state-by-state assessment report. This report provides both national and state-specific disposal data on low-level radioactive waste commercially disposed in the United States. Data in this report are categorized according to disposal site, generator category, waste class, volumes, and radionuclide activity. Included in this report are tables showing the distribution of waste by state for 1994 and a comparison of waste volumes and radioactivity by state for 1990 through 1994; also included is a list of all commercial nuclear power reactors in the United States as of December 31, 1994. This report distinguishes between low-level radioactive waste shipped directly for disposal by generators and waste that was handled by an intermediary, a reporting change introduced in the 1988 state-by-state report.

  10. Market driven strategy for acquisition of waste acceptance and transportation services for commercial spent fuel in the united states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemeshewsky, W.; Macaluso, C.; Smith, P.; Teer, B.

    1998-01-01

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (the Act) for the shipment of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from commercial reactors to a Federal facility for storage and/or disposal. The Act requires the use of private industry to the 'fullest extent possible' in the transportation of spent fuels. An OCRWM goal is to develop a safe, efficient and effective transportation system while meeting the mandate of the Act. OCRWM has then develop a strategy for a market driven approach for the acquisition of transportation services and equipment. To implement this strategy, OCRWM is planning to issue a Request for Proposal (RPF) for the provision of the required services and equipment to accept SNF from the utilities and transport the SNF to a Federal facility. Two draft RPFs have been issued with the second draft incorporating comments on the first draft from potential contractors and other interested parties. The overall strategy as outlined in the draft RPF relies on private industry to use the innovative powers of the marketplace to help DOE accomplish its mission objectives. DOE intends to pursue this procurement strategy whether or not the OCRWM program includes interim storage. The concept described in the draft RPF provides for DOE to purchase services and equipment from a contractor-operated waste acceptance and transportation organization. The contractor is expected to provide initial financing for the project including that necessary for initial acquisition of operational equipment, establish the necessary management organization, and mobilize the necessary resources and capabilities to provide the SNF delivery services at a fixed rate. DOE will retain final approval on all routes and maintain primary responsibility to the States, tribes, and local units of government for assuring appropriate interaction and consideration of their input on

  11. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ''Nuclear Fuel Data'' survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

  12. Station black out of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 was not caused by tsunamis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Station black out (SBO) of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 would be concluded to be caused before 15:37 on March 11, 2011 because losses of emergency ac power A system was in 15:36 and ac losses of B system in 15:37 according to the data published by Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) in May 10, 2013. Tsunami attacked the site of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station passed through the position of wave amplitude meter installed at 1.5 km off the coast after 15:35 and it was also recognized tsunami arrived at the coast of Unit 4 sea side area around in 15:37 judging from a series of photographs taken from the south side of the site and general knowledge of wave propagation. From a series of photographs and witness testimony, tsunami didn't attack Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station uniformly and tsunami's arrival time at the site of Unit 1 would be far later than arrival time at the coast of Unit 4 sea side area, which suggested it would be around in 15:39. TEPCO insisted tsunami passed through 1.5 km off the coast around in 15:33 and clock of wave amplitude meter was incorrect, which might be wrong. Thus SBO of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 occurred before tsunami's arrival at the site of Unit 1 and was not caused by tsunami. (T. Tanaka)

  13. Nuclear power in the United States: public views and industry actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poncelet, C.G.

    1981-01-01

    The author describes the public policy environment that surround the nuclear power program in the United States and the social implications as an expression of the public opinion, the mass media as a source of information and the organized opposition movements with their socio-political motivations. The political climate after the new Republican government is also analysed as well as the communication efforts of the nuclear industry to ascertain the need of assertive programs and the sense of cooperation and commitment on the part of both the nuclear and electric utility industries. The general situation is characterized on the one hand by the growing acknowledgement of the need for nuclear power development in an economy dominated by the oil crisis; on the other hand, it is the financial crisis faced by electric utilities which directly impacts on this future development. (AF)

  14. Systems approach to nuclear waste glass development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantzen, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Development of a host solid for the immobilization of nuclear waste has focused on various vitreous wasteforms. The systems approach requires that parameters affecting product performance and processing be considered simultaneously. Application of the systems approach indicates that borosilicate glasses are, overall, the most suitable glasses for the immobilization of nuclear waste. Phosphate glasses are highly durable; but the glass melts are highly corrosive and the glasses have poor thermal stability and low solubility for many waste components. High-silica glasses have good chemical durability, thermal stability, and mechanical stability, but the associated high melting temperatures increase volatilization of hazardous species in the waste. Borosilicate glasses are chemically durable and are stable both thermally and mechanically. The borosilicate melts are generally less corrosive than commercial glasses, and the melt temperature miimizes excessive volatility of hazardous species. Optimization of borosilicate waste glass formulations has led to their acceptance as the reference nuclear wasteform in the United States, United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, France, Sweden, Switzerland, and Japan

  15. United States panel presentations[Nuclear power technology in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyea, J [National Audubon Society, New York, NY (United States)

    1990-07-01

    Before I begin I have to make a disclaimer. That is that I am going to be talking about public perception because I think that is very important. But I do not want to give the impression that I think the public is wrong. I happen to agree with the public's perception of nuclear power, and I want to make that clear. I do not like the current generation of nuclear plants as I have made clear in many statements that I have made. On the other hand, in the long term, I feel that we have only two choices on the supply side, and that is nuclear power and solar electricity. And although I think solar electricity has the best chance, I am realistic enough to know that technologies do not always work the way I want. And so I think it is necessary to have at least some kind of nuclear option available. On the other hand, I do not think just any kind of nuclear technology will do. I want to talk to you about the conditions that I think you have to take into account when you try to design reactors that are publicly acceptable. I look at this as an insurance policy. Again, I do not want to be misquoted: I think nuclear power should be considered as an insurance policy, not as our first line of defense. Having made those disclaimers, what we need to do is set out a problem statement. The problem statement I set out is, 'How could one design and demonstrate a nuclear reactor that would regain public confidence in the United States, if one chose to do that?' By regaining confidence, I mean regaining sufficient confidence to site reactors at a number of locations. It is a pretty heavy task because the public cannot judge the technical issues. They have to judge the players by their characters and their histories, just as the way we calibrate anyone that knows things that we do not. I have three theses that I think are crucial. The first is that people do not believe in the claims of advocates, of any point of view, not just nuclear power, once the advocates have been proved wrong on

  16. Potential advantages and disadvantages of sequentially building small nuclear units instead of a large nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feretic, D.; Cavlina, N.; Grgic, D.

    2008-01-01

    Renewal of nuclear power programs in countries with modest electricity consumptions and weak electrical grid interconnections has raised the question of optimal nuclear power plants sizes for such countries. The same question would be also valid for isolated or weakly connected regions within a large country. Building large size nuclear power plant could be prevented by technical or financial limits. Research programs have been initiated in the International Atomic Energy Agency and in the USA (within the framework of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program) with the aim to inspect under which circumstances small and medium reactors could be the preferred option compared to large nuclear plants. The economy of scale is a clear advantage of large plants. This paper compares, by using probabilistic methods, the net cash flow of large and medium size plants, taking as example a large nuclear plant (around 1200 MW) and four sequentially built smaller plants (300 MW). Potential advantages and disadvantageous of both options have been considered. Main advantages of the sequential construction of several identical small units could be the reduced investor risk and reduced investment costs due to the learning effect. This analysis is a part of studies for the Croatian power generating system development. (orig.)

  17. The nuclear electricity generating industry in England and Wales post-privatisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, C.B.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the new legal framework within which the nuclear generating industry has operated in England and Wales since 31 March 1990. It describes the formation of Nuclear Electric plc and the licensing arrangements, including the various obligations which have been placed upon Nuclear Electric by virtue of its Generation Licence. The impact of competition law is outlined, together with the commercial arrangements including electricity pooling and some of the other more important agreements which Nuclear Electric has entered into. Finally, the Paper discusses some of the constraints under which Nuclear Electric operates, and summarises Government policy towards nuclear power and its future prospects in the United Kingdom. (author)

  18. Nuclear safety improvement activities related to WWER-440 units in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gantchev, T.

    1998-01-01

    The systematic evaluation of the deficiencies of the original design of the WWER reactors brought to the development of a Short Term Programme for Safety Upgrading and Modernisation of Kozloduy WWER-440 units. The implementation of this Programme was completed in 1997. The strive for continuos improvement of Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) safety level, the new requirements of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority and the public concern initiated the development of new Complex Programme for Safety Improvement (PRG'97), now in a process of implementation. (author)

  19. Extending nuclear energy to non-electrical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingersoll, D.; Houghton, Z. [NuScale Power, LLC, Corvallis, Oregon (United States); Bromm, R. [Fluor Corp., Greenville, SC (United States); Desportes, C. [Aquatech International, Canonsburg, PA (United States); McKellar, M.; Boardman, R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Electricity represents less than half of all energy consumed in the United States and globally. Although a few commercial nuclear power plants world-wide provide energy to non-electrical applications such as district heating and water desalination, nuclear energy has been largely relegated to base-load electricity production. A new generation of smaller-sized nuclear power plants offers significant promise for extending nuclear energy to many non-electrical applications. The NuScale small modular reactor design is especially well suited for these nontraditional customers due to its small unit size, very robust reactor protection features and a highly flexible and scalable plant design. A series of technical and economic evaluation studies have been conducted to assess the practicality of using a NuScale plant to provide electricity and heat to a variety of non-electrical applications, including water desalination, oil refining, and hydrogen production. The studies serve to highlight the unique design features of the NuScale plant for these applications and provide encouraging conclusions regarding the technical and economic viability of extending clean nuclear energy to a broad range of non-electrical energy consumers. (author)

  20. EXTENDING NUCLEAR ENERGY TO NON-ELECTRICAL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Boardman; M. McKellar; D. Ingersoll; Z. Houghton; , R. Bromm; C. Desportes

    2014-09-01

    Electricity represents less than half of all energy consumed in the United States and globally. Although a few commercial nuclear power plants world-wide provide energy to non-electrical applications such as district heating and water desalination, nuclear energy has been largely relegated to base-load electricity production. A new generation of smaller-sized nuclear power plants offers significant promise for extending nuclear energy to many non-electrical applications. The NuScale small modular reactor design is especially well suited for these non-traditional customers due to its small unit size, very robust reactor protection features and a highly flexible and scalable plant design. A series of technical and economic evaluation studies have been conducted to assess the practicality of using a NuScale plant to provide electricity and heat to a variety of non-electrical applications, including water desalination, oil refining, and hydrogen production. The studies serve to highlight the unique design features of the NuScale plant for these applications and provide encouraging conclusions regarding the technical and economic viability of extending clean nuclear energy to a broad range of non-electrical energy consumers.