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Sample records for combustor cold-start device

  1. Investigation and demonstration of a rich combustor cold-start device for alcohol-fueled engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, J W; Irick, D K [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1998-04-01

    The authors have completed a study in which they investigated the use of a rich combustor to aid in cold starting spark-ignition engines fueled with either neat ethanol or neat methanol. The rich combustor burns the alcohol fuel outside the engine under fuel-rich conditions to produce a combustible product stream that is fed to the engine for cold starting. The rich combustor approach significantly extends the cold starting capability of alcohol-fueled engines. A design tool was developed that simulates the operation of the combustor and couples it to an engine/vehicle model. This tool allows the user to determine the fuel requirements of the rich combustor as the vehicle executes a given driving mission. The design tool was used to design and fabricate a rich combustor for use on a 2.8 L automotive engine. The system was tested using a unique cold room that allows the engine to be coupled to an electric dynamometer. The engine was fitted with an aftermarket engine control system that permitted the fuel flow to the rich combustor to be programmed as a function of engine speed and intake manifold pressure. Testing indicated that reliable cold starts were achieved on both neat methanol and neat ethanol at temperatures as low as {minus}20 C. Although starts were experienced at temperatures as low as {minus}30 C, these were erratic. They believe that an important factor at the very low temperatures is the balance between the high mechanical friction of the engine and the low energy density of the combustible mixture fed to the engine from the rich combustor.

  2. Engine Cold Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED ENGINE COLD START INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 469 by Douglas M. Yost Gregory A. T. Hansen U.S...not return it to the originator. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED ENGINE COLD START INTERIM REPORT TFLRF No. 469 by Douglas M. Yost...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Engine Cold Start 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W56HZV-09-C-0100 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Douglas

  3. Modeling Cold Start in a Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balliet, Ryan James

    Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are electrochemical devices that create electricity by consuming hydrogen and oxygen, forming water and heat as byproducts. PEFCs have been proposed for use in applications that may require start-up in environments with temperatures below 0 degrees C. Doing so requires that the cell heat up, and when its own waste heat is used to do so, the process is referred to here as "cold start.'' However, at low temperatures the cell's product water freezes, and if the temperature does not rise fast enough, the accumulation of ice in the cathode catalyst layer (cCL) can reduce cell performance significantly, extending the time required to heat up. In addition to reducing performance during cold start, under some conditions the accumulation of ice can lead to irreversible structural degradation of the cCL. The objective of this dissertation is to construct and verify a cold-start model for a single PEFC, use it to improve understanding of cold-start behavior, and to demonstrate how this understanding can lead to better start protocols and material properties. The macrohomogeneous model that has been developed to meet the objective is two-dimensional, transient, and nonisothermal. A key differentiating feature is the inclusion of water in all four of the possible phases: ice, liquid, gas, and membrane. In order to predict water content in the ice, liquid, and gas phases that are present in the porous media, the thermodynamics of phase equilibrium are revisited, and a method for relating phase pressures to water content in each of these phases is developed. Verification of the model is performed by comparing model predictions for cell behavior during parametric studies to measured values taken from various sources. In most cases, good agreement is observed between the model and the experiments. Results from the simulations are used to explain the trends that are observed. The verified cold-start model is deployed to determine a cold-start

  4. Modeling Cold Start in a Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Balliet, Ryan

    2010-01-01

    Polymer-electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are electrochemical devices that create electricity by consuming hydrogen and oxygen, forming water and heat as byproducts. PEFCs have been proposed for use in applications that may require start-up in environments with temperatures below 0 degrees C. Doing so requires that the cell heat up, and when its own waste heat is used to do so, the process is referred to here as ``cold start.'' However, at low temperatures the cell's product water freezes, and i...

  5. High Time Resolution Measurements of VOCs from Vehicle Cold Starts: The Air Toxic Cold Start Pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, B. T.; Huangfu, Y.; Vanderschelden, G. S.

    2017-12-01

    Pollutants emitted during motor vehicle cold starts, especially in winter in some climates, is a significant source of winter time air pollution. While data exist for CO, NO, and total hydrocarbon emissions from federal testing procedures for vehicle emission certification, little is known about the emission rates of individual volatile organic compounds, in particular the air toxics benzene, formaldehyde, and acetaldehyde. Little is known about the VOC speciation and temperature dependence for cold starts. The US EPA vehicle emission model MOVES assumes that cold start emissions have the same speciation profile as running emissions. We examined this assumption by measuring cold start exhaust composition for 4 vehicles fueled with E10 gasoline over a temperature range of -4°C to 10°C in winter of 2015. The extra cold start emissions were determined by comparison with emissions during engine idling. In addition to CO and NOx measurements a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer was used to measure formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, toluene, and C2-alkylbenzenes at high time resolution to compare with the cold start emission speciation profiles used in the EPA MOVES2014 model. The results show that after the vehicle was started, CO mixing ratios can reach a few percent of the exhaust and then drop to several ppmv within 2 minutes of idling, while NOx showed different temporal behaviors among the four vehicles. VOCs displayed elevated levels during cold start and the peak mixing ratios can be two orders higher than idling phase levels. Molar emission ratios relative to toluene were used to compare with the emission ratio used in MOVES2014 and we found the formaldehyde-to-toluene emission ratio was about 0.19, which is 5 times higher than the emission ratio used in MOVES2014 and the acetaldehyde-to-toluene emission ratios were 0.86-0.89, which is 8 times higher than the ones in MOVES2014. The C2-alkylbenzene-to-toluene ratio agreed well with moves. Our results

  6. Cold Start of Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Kazuya; Wang, Chao-Yang

    The ability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) to startup and operate under subzero temperatures has been an issue for the commercialization of the fuel cell vehicle (FCV). It is widely believed that during PEFC operation in a subzero temperature environment a portion of water produced from the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) forms ice in the catalyst layer (CL) that hinders the oxygen transport to the reaction sites, until the PEFC eventually stops operation due to oxygen starvation. For the automotive application, successful cold start is defined as PEFC temperature increase above 0°C with self-heating before the cell shutdown due to oxygen starvation. Several automakers have already claimed capability of FCV startup from a subzero temperature environment. However, the underlying physics has only begun to emerge in the most recent literature.

  7. A Review on Cold Start of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongmin Wan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Successful and rapid startup of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs at subfreezing temperatures (also called cold start is of great importance for their commercialization in automotive and portable devices. In order to maintain good proton conductivity, the water content in the membrane must be kept at a certain level to ensure that the membrane remains fully hydrated. However, the water in the pores of the catalyst layer (CL, gas diffusion layer (GDL and the membrane may freeze once the cell temperature decreases below the freezing point (Tf. Thus, methods which could enable the fuel cell startup without or with slight performance degradation at subfreezing temperature need to be studied. This paper presents an extensive review on cold start of PEMFCs, including the state and phase changes of water in PEMFCs, impacts of water freezing on PEMFCs, numerical and experimental studies on PEMFCs, and cold start strategies. The impacts on each component of the fuel cell are discussed in detail. Related numerical and experimental work is also discussed. It should be mentioned that the cold start strategies, especially the enumerated patents, are of great reference value on the practical cold start process.

  8. TrustRank: a Cold-Start tolerant recommender system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Haitao; Gong, Zhiguo; Zhang, Nan; Zhao, Wei; Guo, Jingzhi

    2015-02-01

    The explosive growth of the World Wide Web leads to the fast advancing development of e-commerce techniques. Recommender systems, which use personalised information filtering techniques to generate a set of items suitable to a given user, have received considerable attention. User- and item-based algorithms are two popular techniques for the design of recommender systems. These two algorithms are known to have Cold-Start problems, i.e., they are unable to effectively handle Cold-Start users who have an extremely limited number of purchase records. In this paper, we develop TrustRank, a novel recommender system which handles the Cold-Start problem by leveraging the user-trust networks which are commonly available for e-commerce applications. A user-trust network is formed by friendships or trust relationships that users specify among them. While it is straightforward to conjecture that a user-trust network is helpful for improving the accuracy of recommendations, a key challenge for using user-trust network to facilitate Cold-Start users is that these users also tend to have a very limited number of trust relationships. To address this challenge, we propose a pre-processing propagation of the Cold-Start users' trust network. In particular, by applying the personalised PageRank algorithm, we expand the friends of a given user to include others with similar purchase records to his/her original friends. To make this propagation algorithm scalable to a large amount of users, as required by real-world recommender systems, we devise an iterative computation algorithm of the original personalised TrustRank which can incrementally compute trust vectors for Cold-Start users. We conduct extensive experiments to demonstrate the consistently improvement provided by our proposed algorithm over the existing recommender algorithms on the accuracy of recommendations for Cold-Start users.

  9. Cold-start link prediction in multi-relational networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shun-yao; Zhang, Qi; Wu, Mei

    2017-10-01

    During the last decade, interaction data have accumulated exponentially in many fields and provide a new opportunity for cold start link prediction. It seems necessarily to take full advantages of diversified information. However, correlation between different interactions has to be pre-tested. Therefore, this paper abstracts complex systems as multi-relational networks, and employs latent space network model to extract low-dimensional factors of sub-networks and adopts likelihood ratio test to examine correlation between factors. Then, regression between target sub-networks and correlated auxiliary sub-networks could be established for cold start link prediction. Experiments on 8 bioinformatic data sets validate the effectiveness and potential of our strategy for network correlation analysis and cold-start link prediction.

  10. Cold Start Strategy of the CubeSat GPS Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOVAR, P.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The cold start of the LEO satellite GPS receiver is complicated due to a large Doppler frequency shift, Doppler frequency rate of the navigation signals and a rapid change of the satellite visibility. The cold start time can be shortened by a proper strategy of a selection of the satellites to be searched for. The cold start simulator was developed and used for optimization of the sequence of the satellites search, for development and testing of an advanced satellite selection algorithm that utilizes information on the satellites already detected and for optimization of a frequency search range. The best performance was achieved by using an advanced selection strategy. The strategy is based on the selection of the satellites nearest to the detected satellite, using the average angle between the Earth center (apex and the satellites. Furthermore, the simulation shows that it is not practical to investigate all frequencies within the range of the maximum possible Doppler frequency shift of the carrier wave of the navigation signal, but investigate approximately +/- 35 kHz range and, if not successful, switch to the next satellite. The simulations proved that a simple GPS receiver with the sequential search algorithms can operate in the LEO orbit.

  11. Promoting cold-start items in recommender systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs.

  12. Promoting Cold-Start Items in Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Hu; Zhou, Tao; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Yang, Zimo; Liu, Chuang; Li, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    As one of the major challenges, cold-start problem plagues nearly all recommender systems. In particular, new items will be overlooked, impeding the development of new products online. Given limited resources, how to utilize the knowledge of recommender systems and design efficient marketing strategy for new items is extremely important. In this paper, we convert this ticklish issue into a clear mathematical problem based on a bipartite network representation. Under the most widely used algorithm in real e-commerce recommender systems, the so-called item-based collaborative filtering, we show that to simply push new items to active users is not a good strategy. Interestingly, experiments on real recommender systems indicate that to connect new items with some less active users will statistically yield better performance, namely, these new items will have more chance to appear in other users' recommendation lists. Further analysis suggests that the disassortative nature of recommender systems contributes to such observation. In a word, getting in-depth understanding on recommender systems could pave the way for the owners to popularize their cold-start products with low costs. PMID:25479013

  13. Investigation of the internal behavior in segmented PEMFCs of different flow fields during cold start process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, R.; Ren, Y.S.; Lin, X.W.; Jiang, Z.H.; Yang, Z.; Chang, Y.T.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we have researched the internal behavior in segmented proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with three different flow fields during cold start process. The change of internal current density and temperature in fuel cells with different flow fields could be obviously shown by the printed circuit board (PCB) technology, and the study shows that the flow field is significant for enhancing the cold start ability and durability. Single serpentine flow field has the best cold start performance, while triple channel serpentine flow field has the best uniformity. It is found that without a robust temperature rising tendency, the cell temperature reaching 0 °C does not definitely mean a successful cold start because the cell temperature might drop down 0 °C again. Polarization curves show that there is almost no performance degradation after successful cold start, but the cell degrades quickly after the failed cold start at −7 °C and −10 °C. Based on these characteristics, we optimized the rapid cold start strategy by using electric heating and make it possible to start up the PEMFC at temperatures down to −20 °C within about 11 min. - Highlights: • Segmented fuel cell were used to record the internal current density and temperature distributions during the cold start. • The effects of flow fields on the PEMFC cold start capacity were evaluated. • The effect of cold start on the performance of fuel cell was evaluated. • An optimized strategy was adopted to improve the cold start capacity.

  14. Pseudo one-dimensional analysis of polymer electrolyte fuel cell cold-start

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yun [NON LANL; Mishlera, Jeff [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    This paper investigates the electrochemical kinetics, oxygen transport, and solid water formation in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) during cold start. Following [Yo Wang, J. Electrochem. Soc., 154 (2007) B1041-B1048], we develop a pseudo one-dimensional analysis, which enables the evaluation of the impact of ice volume fraction and temperature variations on cell performance during cold-start. The oxygen profile, starvation ice volume fraction, and relevant overpotentials are obtained. This study is valuable for studying the characteristics of PEFC cold-start.

  15. Cold start-up condition model for heat recovery steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindareh-Esfahani, Peyman; Habibi-Siyahposh, Ehsan; Saffar-Avval, Majid; Ghaffari, Ali; Bakhtiari-Nejad, Firooz

    2014-01-01

    A dynamic modeling of Heat Recovery Steam Generator (HRSG) during cold start-up operation in Combined Cycle Power Plant (CCPP) is introduced. In order to characterize the essential dynamic behavior of the HRSG during cold start-up; Dynamic equations of all HRSG's components are developed based on energy and mass balances. To describe precisely the operation of HRSG; a method based on nonlinear estimated functions for thermodynamic properties is applied to estimate the model parameters. Model parameters are evaluated by a designed algorithm based on Genetic Algorithm (GA). A wide set of experimental data is used to validate HRSG model during cold start-up operation. The simulation results show the reliability and validity of the developed model for cold start-up operation. - Highlights: •Presenting a mathematical model for HRSGs cold start-up based on energy and mass balances. •A designed parameter identification algorithm based on GA is presented. •Application of experimental data in order to model and validate simulation results

  16. Experimental and Numerical Study on the Cold Start Performance of a Single PEM Fuel Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvin H. Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A combined experimental and analytical investigation of single proton exchange membrane (PEM fuel cells, during cold start, has been conducted. The temperature influence on the performance of a single PEM fuel cell and the cold start failure of the PEM fuel cell was evaluated experimentally to determine the failure mechanisms and performance. The voltage, current, and power characteristics were investigated as a function of the load, the hydrogen fuel flow rate, and the cell temperature. The characteristics of cold start for a single PEM fuel cell were analyzed, and the various failure mechanisms were explored and characterized. In an effort to better understand the operational behavior and failure modes, a numerical simulation was also developed. The results of this analysis were then compared with the previously obtained experimental results and confirmed the accuracy of the failure mechanisms identified.

  17. Electrically heated catalysts for cold-start emission control on gasoline- and methanol-fueled vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimrich, M.J.; Albu, S.; Ahuja, M.

    1992-01-01

    Cold-start emissions from current technology vehicles equipped with catalytic converters can account for over 80 percent of the emissions produced during the Federal Test Procedure (FTP). Excessive pollutants can be emitted for a period of one to two minutes following cold engine starting, partially because the catalyst has not reached an efficient operating temperature. Electrically heated catalysts, which are heated prior to engine starting, have been identified as a potential strategy for controlling cold-start emissions. This paper summarizes the emission results of three gasoline-fueled and three methanol-fueled vehicles equipped with electrically heated catalyst systems. Results from these vehicles demonstrate that heated catalyst technology can provide FTP emission levels of nonmethane organic gases (NMOG), carbon monoxide (CO), and oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) that show promise of meeting the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle (ULEV) standards established by the California Air Resources Board

  18. Low temperature operation and influence parameters on the cold start ability of portable PEMFCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oszcipok, M.; Zedda, M.; Riemann, D.; Geckeler, D.

    The start up behaviour of PEM fuel cells below 0 °C is one of the most challenging tasks to be solved before commercialisation. The automotive industry started to develop solutions to reduce the start up time of fuel cell systems in the middle of the nineties. The strategies varied from catalytic combustion of hydrogen on the electrode catalyst to fuel starvation or external stack heating via cooling loops to increase the stack temperature. Beside the automotive sector the cold start ability is as well important for portable PEMFC applications for outdoor use. But here the cold start issue is even more complicated, as the fuel cell system should be operated as passive as possible. Below 0 °C freezing of water inside the PEMFC could form ice layers in the electrode and in the gas diffusion layer. Therefore the cell reaction is limited or even inhibited. Product water during the start up builds additional barriers and leads to a strong decay of the output power at isothermal operating conditions. In order to find out which operational and hardware parameters affect this decay, potentiostatic experiments on single cells were performed at isothermal conditions. These experiments comprise investigations of the influence of membrane thickness and different GDL types as well as the effect of gas flow rates and humidification levels of the membrane. As pre stage to physical based models, empirical based prediction models are used to gain a better understanding of the main influence parameters during cold start. The results are analysed using the statistical software Cornerstone 4.0. The experience of single cell investigations are compared to start up behaviour of portable fuel cell stacks which are operated in a climate chamber at different ambient temperatures below 0 °C. Additional flow sharing problems in the fuel cell stack could be seen during cold start up experiments.

  19. HEAT TRANSFER IN EXHAUST SYSTEM OF A COLD START ENGINE AT LOW ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE

    OpenAIRE

    Snežana D Petković; Radivoje B Pešić; Jovanka K Lukić

    2010-01-01

    During the engine cold start, there is a significantly increased emission of harmful engine exhaust gases, particularly at very low environmental temperatures. Therefore, reducing of emission during that period is of great importance for the reduction of entire engine emission. This study was conducted to test the activating speed of the catalyst at low environmental temperatures. The research was conducted by use of mathematical model and developed computer programme for calculation of non-s...

  20. Ice-Crystallization Kinetics during Fuel-Cell Cold-Start

    OpenAIRE

    Dursch, Thomas James

    2014-01-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) show promise in automotive applications because of their high efficiency, high power density, and potentially low emissions. To be successful in automobiles, PEMFCs must permit rapid startup with minimal energy from subfreezing temperatures, known as cold-start. In a PEMFC, reduction of oxygen to water occurs in the cathode catalyst layer (CL). Under subfreezing conditions, water generated during startup solidifies and hinders access of gaseous oxy...

  1. Using Posters to Recommend Anime and Mangas in a Cold-Start Scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Vie, Jill-Jênn; Yger, Florian; Lahfa, Ryan; Clement, Basile; Cocchi, Kévin; Chalumeau, Thomas; Kashima, Hisashi

    2017-01-01

    Item cold-start is a classical issue in recommender systems that affects anime and manga recommendations as well. This problem can be framed as follows: how to predict whether a user will like a manga that received few ratings from the community? Content-based techniques can alleviate this issue but require extra information, that is usually expensive to gather. In this paper, we use a deep learning technique, Illustration2Vec, to easily extract tag information from the ...

  2. A Multi-Modality Deep Network for Cold-Start Recommendation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxuan Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative filtering (CF approaches, which provide recommendations based on ratings or purchase history, perform well for users and items with sufficient interactions. However, CF approaches suffer from the cold-start problem for users and items with few ratings. Hybrid recommender systems that combine collaborative filtering and content-based approaches have been proved as an effective way to alleviate the cold-start issue. Integrating contents from multiple heterogeneous data sources such as reviews and product images is challenging for two reasons. Firstly, mapping contents in different modalities from the original feature space to a joint lower-dimensional space is difficult since they have intrinsically different characteristics and statistical properties, such as sparse texts and dense images. Secondly, most algorithms only use content features as the prior knowledge to improve the estimation of user and item profiles but the ratings do not directly provide feedback to guide feature extraction. To tackle these challenges, we propose a tightly-coupled deep network model for fusing heterogeneous modalities, to avoid tedious feature extraction in specific domains, and to enable two-way information propagation from both content and rating information. Experiments on large-scale Amazon product data in book and movie domains demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed model for cold-start recommendation.

  3. Engine cold start analysis using naturalistic driving data: City level impacts on local pollutants emissions and energy consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Marta V; Varella, Roberto A; Duarte, Gonçalo O; Farias, Tiago L; Baptista, Patrícia C

    2018-02-26

    The analysis of vehicle cold start emissions has become an issue of utmost importance since the cold phase occurs mainly in urban context, where most of the population lives. In this sense, this research work analyzes and quantifies the impacts of cold start in urban context using naturalistic driving data. Furthermore, an assessment of the influence of ambient temperature on the percentage of time spent on cold start was also performed. Regarding the impacts of ambient temperature on cold start duration, a higher percentage of time spent on cold start was found for lower ambient temperatures (80% of the time for 0°C and ~50% for 29°C). Results showed that, during cold start, energy consumption is >110% higher than during hot conditions while emissions are up to 910% higher. Moreover, a higher increase on both energy consumption and emissions was found for gasoline vehicles than for diesel vehicles. When assessing the impacts on a city perspective, results revealed that the impacts of cold start increase for more local streets. The main finding of this study is to provide evidence that a higher increase on emissions occurs on more local streets, where most of the population lives. This kind of knowledge is of particular relevance to urban planners in order to perform an informed definition of public policies and regulations to be implemented in the future, to achieve a cleaner and healthier urban environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Ice-Crystallization Kinetics during Fuel-Cell Cold-Start

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursch, Thomas James, Jr.

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) show promise in automotive applications because of their high efficiency, high power density, and potentially low emissions. To be successful in automobiles, PEMFCs must permit rapid startup with minimal energy from subfreezing temperatures, known as cold-start. In a PEMFC, reduction of oxygen to water occurs in the cathode catalyst layer (CL). Under subfreezing conditions, water generated during startup solidifies and hinders access of gaseous oxygen to the catalytic sites in the cathode CL, severely inhibiting cell performance and potentially causing cell failure. Achieving cold-start is difficult in practice, due to potential flooding, sluggish reaction kinetics, durability loss, and rapid ice crystallization. Currently, however, few studies focus on the fundamentals of ice crystallization during cold-start. Elucidation of the mechanisms and kinetics of ice formation within PEMFC porous media is, therefore, critical to successful cell startup and high performance at low temperatures. First, an experimental method is presented for obtaining isothermal ice-crystallization kinetics in water-saturated gas-diffusion layers (GDLs). Ice formation is initially studied in the GDL because this layer retains a significant amount of product water during cold-start. Isothermal ice-crystallization and ice-nucleation rates are obtained in commercial Toray GDLs as functions of subcooling using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A nonlinear ice-crystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Predicted ice-crystallization rates are in excellent agreement with experiment. A validated rate expression is thus available for predicting ice-crystallization kinetics in GDLs. Ice-crystallization kinetics is also considered under experimental settings similar to real PEMFC operating

  5. A Compact Safe Cold-Start (CS2) System for Scramjets using Dilute Triethylaluminum Fuel Mixtures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the cold-start requirements of scramjet engines by developing a safe, energy-dense, and low volume hydrocarbon fuel conditioning system based...

  6. A Compact Safe Cold-Start (CS2) System for Scramjets using Dilute Triethylaluminum Fuel Mixtures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal leverages a highly successful Phase 1 feasibility effort to further develop a system that satisfies the cold-start requirements of scramjet engines....

  7. A Compact Safe Cold-Start (CS2) System for Scramjets using Dilute Triethylaluminum Fuel Mixtures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal addresses the cold-start requirements of scramjet engines by developing a safe, energy-dense, and low volume hydrocarbon fuel conditioning system based...

  8. A Compact Safe Cold-Start (CS2) System for Scramjets using Dilute Triethylaluminum Fuel Mixtures Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal leverages a highly successful Phase 1 feasibility effort to further develop a system that satisfies the cold-start requirements of scramjet engines....

  9. An Effective Recommender Algorithm for Cold-Start Problem in Academic Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vala Ali Rohani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundance of information in recent years has become a serious challenge for web users. Recommender systems (RSs have been often utilized to alleviate this issue. RSs prune large information spaces to recommend the most relevant items to users by considering their preferences. Nonetheless, in situations where users or items have few opinions, the recommendations cannot be made properly. This notable shortcoming in practical RSs is called cold-start problem. In the present study, we propose a novel approach to address this problem by incorporating social networking features. Coined as enhanced content-based algorithm using social networking (ECSN, the proposed algorithm considers the submitted ratings of faculty mates and friends besides user’s own preferences. The effectiveness of ECSN algorithm was evaluated by implementing it in MyExpert, a newly designed academic social network (ASN for academics in Malaysia. Real feedbacks from live interactions of MyExpert users with the recommended items are recorded for 12 consecutive weeks in which four different algorithms, namely, random, collaborative, content-based, and ECSN were applied every three weeks. The empirical results show significant performance of ECSN in mitigating the cold-start problem besides improving the prediction accuracy of recommendations when compared with other studied recommender algorithms.

  10. HEAT TRANSFER IN EXHAUST SYSTEM OF A COLD START ENGINE AT LOW ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana D Petković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the engine cold start, there is a significantly increased emission of harmful engine exhaust gases, particularly at very low environmental temperatures. Therefore, reducing of emission during that period is of great importance for the reduction of entire engine emission. This study was conducted to test the activating speed of the catalyst at low environmental temperatures. The research was conducted by use of mathematical model and developed computer programme for calculation of non-stationary heat transfer in engine exhaust system. During the research, some of constructional parameters of exhaust system were adopted and optimized at environmental temperature of 22 C. The combination of design parameters giving best results at low environmental temperatures was observed. The results showed that the temperature in the environment did not have any significant influence on pre-catalyst light-off time.

  11. Cold start dynamics and temperature sliding observer design of an automotive SOFC APU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Po-Hsu; Hong, Che-Wun

    This paper presents a dynamic model for studying the cold start dynamics and observer design of an auxiliary power unit (APU) for automotive applications. The APU is embedded with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack which is a quiet and pollutant-free electric generator; however, it suffers from slow start problem from ambient conditions. The SOFC APU system equips with an after-burner to accelerate the start-up transient in this research. The combustion chamber burns the residual fuel (and air) left from the SOFC to raise the exhaust temperature to preheat the SOFC stack through an energy recovery unit. Since thermal effect is the dominant factor that influences the SOFC transient and steady performance, a nonlinear real-time sliding observer for stack temperature was implemented into the system dynamics to monitor the temperature variation for future controller design. The simulation results show that a 100 W APU system in this research takes about 2 min (in theory) for start-up without considering the thermal limitation of the cell fracture.

  12. Real time NO emissions measurement during cold start in LPG SI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gong; Liu, Zhimin; Li, Zhilong; Qiu, Dongping; Li, Liguang

    2007-01-01

    To identify combustion occurrence is very important. Traditionally, cylinder pressure has been used as a criterion of combustion occurrence, but it can be unreliable when identifying lean mixture combustion (there is little difference in the cylinder pressure trace between the firing cycle and motoring cycles at the lean combustion limit). This is particularly important for fuels like LPG, which have a good capacity for lean combustion. In this study, a fast response NO detector, CambustionfNOx400, based on the chemiluminescence method, was used to measure real time NO emissions in order to evaluate the technique as a criterion for establishing combustion occurrence. At the same time, this paper presents an investigation of the characteristics of real time NO emissions of the first firing cycle during cold start in a LPG SI engine to determine the optimal excess air factor of the first firing cycle, and the cylinder pressure and crank shaft speed of the engine were measured and recorded. Test results show that the excess air ratio directly influences the cylinder pressure, engine speed and NO emissions of the first firing cycle. As the excess air coefficient is reduced from the lean misfiring limit, NO emissions increase quickly, then reduce quickly and then reduce slowly. NO emissions generally increase with peak cylinder pressure, even at constant excess air coefficient. Real time NO emissions can be used to identify cylinder combustion and misfire occurrence during engine cranking, even at the dilute combustion limit, and real time NO emission can be used to understand the combustion and misfire occurrence. (author)

  13. Emission Treatment towards Cold Start and Back Pressure in Internal Combustion Engine against Performance of Catalytic Converter: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, regulation for the vehicles emissions has becoming more stringent in order to reduce the effect of pollutant gases that was being released by the vehicles exhaust. The development of catalytic converter is to resolve the pollution emission aspect. There are lots of improvements done by the researchers towards improving catalytic converter, yet there are still key issues which give negative impact to the environment. One of the problems that are being concern by among of researchers is the cold-start and back pressure problems that usually occur in the composition of catalytic converter. Presented here is a review of cold-starts and back pressure problems together with several alternatives taken by not affecting the performance of vehicles engine and fuel consumption. The review also includes alternative system development and selection of materials to resolve these problems.

  14. Critical firing and misfiring boundary in a spark ignition methanol engine during cold start based on single cycle fuel injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhaohui; Gong, Changming; Qu, Xiang; Liu, Fenghua; Sun, Jingzhen; Wang, Kang; Li, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    The influence of the mass of methanol injected per cycle, ambient temperature, injection and ignition timing, preheating methods, and supplying additional liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) injection into the intake manifold on the critical firing and misfiring boundary of an electronically injection controlled spark ignition (SI) methanol engine during cold start were investigated experimentally based on a single cycle fuel injection with cycle-by-cycle control strategy. The critical firing and misfiring boundary was restricted by all parameters. For ambient temperatures below 16 °C, methanol engines must use auxiliary start-aids during cold start. Optimal control of the methanol injection and ignition timing can realize ideal next cycle firing combustion after injection. Resistance wire and glow plug preheating can provide critical firing down to ambient temperatures of 5 °C and 0 °C, respectively. Using an additional LPG injection into the intake manifold can provide critical firing down to an ambient temperature of −13 °C during cold start. As the ambient temperature decreases, the optimal angle difference between methanol injection timing and LPG injection timing for critical firing of a methanol engine increases rapidly during cold start. - Highlights: • A single cycle fuel injection and cycle-by-cycle control strategy are used to study. • In-cylinder pressure and instantaneous speed were used to determine firing boundary. • For the ambient temperatures below 16 °C, an auxiliary start-aids must be used. • A preheating and additional LPG were used to expand critical firing boundary. • Additional LPG can result in critical firing down to ambient temperature of −13 °C

  15. Impact of Ambient Temperatures on Exhaust Thermal Characteristics during Cold Start for Real World SI Car Urban Driving Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Li, H; Andrews, GE; Zhu, G; Daham, BK; Bell, MC; Tate, JE; Ropkins, K

    2005-01-01

    Thermal characteristics of SI engine exhaust during cold start and warm up period were investigated for different ambient temperatures (-2 to 32 °C). A Euro 1 emission compliance SI car was tested using a real world urban driving cycle to represent typical city driving patterns and simulate ECE15 urban driving cycle. The test car was equipped with 27 thermocouples along the engine and exhaust pipes so as to measure metal and exhaust gas temperatures along the engine, exhaust and catalyst. The...

  16. Cold-start characteristics at low temperatures based on the first firing cycle in an LPG engine. Paper no. IGEC-1-151

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Z.; Li, L.; Deng, B.; Zhang, Y.; Xiao, Z.; Gong, C.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the analysis of the first firing cycle (FFC), this paper presents the combustion and emissions characteristics at cold-start and their related parameters, such as excess air coefficient in a small EFI SI engine fuelled with LPG at environmental temperature from -9 o C to +4 o C. The results show that the FFC ignition reliability, instantaneous engine speed and HC emissions are strongly dependent on the excess air coefficient at cold-start. The environmental temperature has a great influence on HC emissions of the FFC, except for engine's start-up speed. The optimum excess air coefficient to guarantee the successful FFC at cold-start of LPG engine was found. The judgment of key factors to guarantee the successful first firing cycle at cold-start is also presented in this paper. (author)

  17. Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2013-02-19

    A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine. The combustor assembly includes a combustor device coupled to a main engine casing, a first fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner disposed radially inwardly from the flow sleeve. The first fuel injection system provides fuel that is ignited with the pressurized air creating first working gases. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct and defines a path for the first working gases to flow from the liner to the transition duct. An intermediate duct inlet portion is associated with a liner outlet and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the liner. An intermediate duct outlet portion is associated with a transition duct inlet section and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the transition duct.

  18. Secondary Organic Aerosol Production from Gasoline Vehicle Exhaust: Effects of Engine Technology, Cold Start, and Emission Certification Standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunliang; Lambe, Andrew T; Saleh, Rawad; Saliba, Georges; Robinson, Allen L

    2018-02-06

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from dilute exhaust from 16 gasoline vehicles was investigated using a potential aerosol mass (PAM) oxidation flow reactor during chassis dynamometer testing using the cold-start unified cycle (UC). Ten vehicles were equipped with gasoline direct injection engines (GDI vehicles) and six with port fuel injection engines (PFI vehicles) certified to a wide range of emissions standards. We measured similar SOA production from GDI and PFI vehicles certified to the same emissions standard; less SOA production from vehicles certified to stricter emissions standards; and, after accounting for differences in gas-particle partitioning, similar effective SOA yields across different engine technologies and certification standards. Therefore the ongoing, dramatic shift from PFI to GDI vehicles in the United States should not alter the contribution of gasoline vehicles to ambient SOA and the natural replacement of older vehicles with newer ones certified to stricter emissions standards should reduce atmospheric SOA levels. Compared to hot operations, cold-start exhaust had lower effective SOA yields, but still contributed more SOA overall because of substantially higher organic gas emissions. We demonstrate that the PAM reactor can be used as a screening tool for vehicle SOA production by carefully accounting for the effects of the large variations in emission rates.

  19. Combustor and combustor screech mitigation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwanwoo; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Uhm, Jong Ho; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto

    2014-05-27

    The present application provides for a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a cap member and a number of fuel nozzles extending through the cap member. One or more of the fuel nozzles may be provided in a non-flush position with respect to the cap member.

  20. Effects of various intake valve timings and spark timings on combustion, cyclic THC and NOX emissions during cold start phase with idle operation in CVVT engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Kwan Hee; Lee, Hyung Min; Hwang, In Goo; Myung, Cha Lee; Park, Sim Soo

    2008-01-01

    In a gasoline SI engine, valve events and spark timings put forth a major influence on overall efficiency, fuel economy, and exhaust emissions. Residual gases controlled by the valve overlap can be used to reduce NOx emissions and the spark retardation technique can be used to improve raw THC emissions and catalyst light-off performance during the cold start phase. This paper investigated the behaviors of the engine and its combustion characteristics with various intake valve timings and spark timings during the fast idle condition and cold start. And cyclic THC and NOx emissions were measured at the exhaust port and their formation mechanisms were examined with fast response gas analyzers. As a result, THCs and NOx were reduced by 35% and 23% with optimizing valve overlap and spark advance during the cold transient start phase. Consequently, the valve events and ignition timings were found to significantly affect combustion phenomena and cold-start emissions

  1. Investigation of Diesel combustion using multiple injection strategies for idling after cold start of passenger-car engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payri, F.; Broatch, A.; Salavert, J.M.; Martin, J. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Aptdo. 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    A comprehensive investigation was carried out in order to better understand the combustion behaviour in a low compression ratio DI Diesel engine when multiple injection strategies are applied just after the engine cold starts in low temperature conditions (idling). More specifically, the aim of this study was twofold: on one hand, to understand the effect of the multiple injection strategies on the indicated mean effective pressure; on the other hand, to contribute to the understanding of combustion stability characterized by the coefficient of variation of indicated mean effective pressure. The first objective was fulfilled by analyzing the rate of heat release obtained by in-cylinder pressure diagnosis. The results showed that the timing of the pilot injection closest to the main injection was the most influential parameter based on the behaviour of the rate of heat release (regardless of the multiple injection strategy applied). For the second objective, the combustion stability was found to be correlated with the combustion centroid angle. The results showed a trend between them and the existence of a range of centroid angles where the combustion stability is strong enough. In addition, it was also evident that convenient split injection allows shifting the centroid to such a zone and improves combustion stability after start. (author)

  2. A Cold Start Context-Aware Recommender System for Tour Planning Using Artificial Neural Network and Case Based Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Bahramian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, large amounts of tourism information and services are available over the Web. This makes it difficult for the user to search for some specific information such as selecting a tour in a given city as an ordered set of points of interest. Moreover, the user rarely knows all his needs upfront and his preferences may change during a recommendation process. The user may also have a limited number of initial ratings and most often the recommender system is likely to face the well-known cold start problem. The objective of the research presented in this paper is to introduce a hybrid interactive context-aware tourism recommender system that takes into account user’s feedbacks and additional contextual information. It offers personalized tours to the user based on his preferences thanks to the combination of a case based reasoning framework and an artificial neural network. The proposed method has been tried in the city of Tehran in Iran. The results show that the proposed method outperforms current artificial neural network methods and combinations of case based reasoning with k-nearest neighbor methods in terms of user effort, accuracy, and user satisfaction.

  3. Impact of Biodiesel Blends and Di-Ethyl-Ether on the Cold Starting Performance of a Compression Ignition Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Clenci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of biodiesel fuel in compression ignition engines has the potential to reduce CO2, which can lead to a reduction in global warming and environmental hazards. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel, as it is made from renewable resources. Many studies have been conducted to assess the impact of biodiesel use on engine performances. Most of them were carried out in positive temperature conditions. A major drawback associated with the use of biodiesel, however, is its poor cold flow properties, which have a direct influence on the cold starting performance of the engine. Since diesel engine behavior at negative temperatures is an important quality criterion of the engine’s operation, one goal of this paper is to assess the starting performance at −20 °C of a common automotive compression ignition engine, fueled with different blends of fossil diesel fuel and biodiesel. Results showed that increasing the biodiesel blend ratio generated a great deterioration in engine startability. Another goal of this study was to determine the biodiesel blend ratio limit at which the engine would not start at −20 °C and, subsequently, to investigate the impact of Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE injection into the intake duct on the engine’s startability, which was found to be recovered.

  4. Variable volume combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-01-17

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a linear actuator so as to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles axially along the liner.

  5. Methane, benzene and alkyl benzene cold start emission data of gasoline-driven passenger cars representing the vehicle technology of the last two decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Norbert V.; Forss, Anna-Maria; Saxer, Christian J.; Wilhelm, Patrick

    The US urban driving cycle (FTP-75) is widely used to estimate both the emissions under hot engine conditions as well as those associated with the cold start. Applying fast analysis techniques such as chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CI-MS) the warm-up behavior of individual vehicles can be monitored at a time resolution of 1 s. CI-MS has been used to investigate the emissions of methane, benzene and the alkyl benzene class of compounds. The amount of the emissions at cold start influence was deduced from the time-resolved emission data of four gasoline-driven vehicle classes representing the vehicle technology of the last two decades. Overall, the emissions of five EURO-0, 20 EURO-1, 18 EURO-2 and so far of six EURO-3 passenger cars were recorded. The test vehicles were selected from the currently operating Swiss car fleet based on the car sales statistics. The average methane, benzene and alkyl benzene cold start emissions are reported using both, the traditional bag method as well as the regression model. At room temperature a clear reduction of 94%, 81% and 85% was found for the methane, benzene and alkyl benzene cold start emissions from EURO-0 to EURO-3 technology, respectively.

  6. Effects of low temperature on the cold start gaseous emissions from light duty vehicles fuelled by ethanol-blended gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairotte, M.; Adam, T.W.; Zardini, A.A.; Manfredi, U.; Martini, G.; Krasenbrink, A.; Vicet, A.; Tournié, E.; Astorga, C.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Most of the pollutants studied were emitted during the cold start of the vehicle. ► More carbonyls were associated with oxygenated fuel (E85–E75) than with E5. ► Acetaldehyde emissions were found particularly enhanced at −7 °C with E75. ► Elevated methane and ozone precursor emissions were measured at −7 °C with E75. ► Ammonia and toluene emissions associated to E75–E85 were lower than with E5. -- Abstract: According to directives 2003/30/EC and 2009/28/EC of the European Parliament and the Council, Member States should promote the use of biofuel. Consequently, since 2011 all fuels on the market used for transport purpose must contain a fraction of 5.75% renewable energy sources. Ethanol in gasoline is a promising solution to reach this objective. In addition to decrease the dependence on fossil fuel, ethanol contributes to reducing air pollutant emissions during combustion (carbon monoxide and total hydrocarbons), and has a positive effect on greenhouse gas emissions. These considerations rely on numerous emission studies performed in standard conditions (20–30 °C), however, very few emission data are available for cold ambient temperatures, as they prevail in winter times in e.g., Northern Europe. This paper presents a chassis dynamometer study examining the effect of ethanol (E75–E85) versus gasoline (E5) at standard and low ambient temperatures (22 °C and −7 °C, respectively). Emissions of modern passenger cars complying with the latest European standards (Euro4 and Euro5a) were recorded over the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the Common Artemis Driving Cycle (CADC). Unregulated compounds such as methane, ammonia, and small chain hydrocarbons were monitored by an online Fourier Transformed Infra-Red spectrometer. In addition, a number of ozone precursors (carbonyls and volatile organic hydrocarbons) were collected and analyzed offline by liquid and gas chromatography in order to evaluate the ozone formation

  7. Cold Start Emissions of Spark-Ignition Engines at Low Ambient Temperatures as an Air Quality Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielaczyc Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available SI engines are highly susceptible to excess emissions when started at low ambient temperatures. This phenomenon has multiple air quality and climate forcing implications. Direct injection petrol engines feature a markedly different fuelling strategy, and so their emissions behaviour is somewhat different from indirect injection petrol engines. The excess emissions of direct injection engines at low ambient temperatures should also differ. Additionally, the direct injection fuel delivery process leads to the formation of PM, and DISI engines should show greater PM emissions at low ambient temperatures. This study reports on laboratory experiments quantifying excess emissions of gaseous and solid pollutants over a legislative driving cycle following cold start at a low ambient temperature for both engine types. Over the legislative cycle for testing at -7°C (the UDC, emissions of HC, CO, NOx and CO2 were higher when tested at -7°C than at 24°C. Massive increases in emissions of HC and CO were observed, together with more modest increases in NOx and CO2 emissions. Results from the entire driving cycle showed excess emissions in both phases (though they were much larger for the UDC. The DISI vehicle showed lower increases in fuel consumption than the port injected vehicles, but greater increases in emission of HC and CO. DISI particle number emissions increased by around 50%; DISI particle mass by over 600%. The observed emissions deteriorations varied somewhat by engine type and from vehicle to vehicle. Excesses were greatest following start-up, but persisted, even after several hundred seconds’ driving. The temperature of the intake air appeared to have a limited but significant effect on emissions after the engine has been running for some time. All vehicles tested here comfortably met the relevant EU limits, providing further evidence that these limits are no longer challenging and need updating.

  8. Dual-Mode Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefny, Charles J (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  9. EFFECTS OF USING PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS ON THE COLD START EXHAUST EMİSSİONS CHARACTERİSTİCS OF DIESEL ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Kaya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, the diesel engine performance and drivability have significantly improved with the latest technologic developments. Nevertheless, one of the disadvantageous of diesel engines is related to the difficulties for starting at cold conditions, particularly in the conditions where the ambient temperature is near or below 0ºC. Additionally, the harmful exhaust emissions are also at significantly important levels during the cold start conditions. Most of carbon monoxide (CO emissions from diesel engines are produced during the engine warm-up period.  In order to improve cold start characteristics of diesel engines, many measures have been proposed, such as glow plugs and air heaters in air intake lines.In this study, in order to increase the cold start performance and improve the exhaust emission characteristics of a direct injection diesel engine, phase change materials (PCMs have been used.PCMs have high heats of fusion and they can absorb latent energy before melting. During the phase change, temperature of PCMs remains nearly constant. In this study, a PCMs was used with the 45-51ºC melting temperature band in a heat exchanger. Hot water from an external source was circulated in the exchanger to carry out the experiments in the same conditions and was used as heat source in order to melt the PCMs.Engine intake air has been passed through the exchanger before engine intake manifold.  During the engine cooling period, the PCM in the produced heat exchanger have increased the cooling time period of engine intake air.An experimental setup has been established to observe the cold start characteristics of the two cylinder diesel engine with and without using the produced exchanger. Temperature measurements from different points, CO exhaust emissions, engine speed and in cylinder pressure measurements have been used to evaluate the contribution of exchanger and increasing the intake air temperature by using the PCMs. The

  10. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  11. Effects of heating energy and heating position on the conversion characteristics of the catalyst of a four-stroke motorcycle engine in cold start conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horng, R.-F.; Chou, H.-M.; Hsu, T.-C.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of heating energy and heating position on the conversion efficiency of an electrically heated catalyst of a four stroke motorcycle engine under cold start conditions were investigated in this study. In general, during cold start, the operating temperatures of a four stroke motorcycle engine and its catalyst would not be optimized. It was found in this paper that by applying heat to the catalyst however, the reaction of the catalyst could be promoted, which, consequently, improved the conversion efficiency. The experimented parameters were heating energy, heating position, heating temperature and the carbon monoxide (CO) setting level. The heating temperatures included 100, 140 and 180 deg. C, while three different heating powers and six different heating positions were used. The CO levels were set as 1.0%, 1.8% and 2.3%. The best CO conversion efficiency was obtained by applying heating at the inlet of the catalyst. It was revealed that a high heating power induced a high temperature rising rate and, consequently, a high CO conversion efficiency. In terms of energy economy efficiency, however, heating at the mid-section of the catalyst gave the best results and through a relatively low heating power

  12. Methodology to estimate the threshold in-cylinder temperature for self-ignition of fuel during cold start of Diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broatch, A.; Ruiz, S.; Margot, X.; Gil, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cold startability of automotive direct injection (DI) Diesel engines is frequently one of the negative features when these are compared to their closest competitor, the gasoline engine. This situation worsens with the current design trends (engine downsizing) and the emerging new Diesel combustion concepts, such as HCCI, PCCI, etc., which require low compression ratio engines. To mitigate this difficulty, pre-heating systems (glow plugs, air heating, etc.) are frequently used and their technologies have been continuously developed. For the optimum design of these systems, the determination of the threshold temperature that the gas should have in the cylinder in order to provoke the self-ignition of the fuel injected during cold starting is crucial. In this paper, a novel methodology for estimating the threshold temperature is presented. In this methodology, experimental and computational procedures are adequately combined to get a good compromise between accuracy and effort. The measurements have been used as input data and boundary conditions in 3D and 0D calculations in order to obtain the thermodynamic conditions of the gas in the cylinder during cold starting. The results obtained from the study of two engine configurations -low and high compression ratio- indicate that the threshold in-cylinder temperature is a single temperature of about 415 o C.

  13. Effect of ethanol–gasoline blends on CO and HC emissions in last generation SI engines within the cold-start transient: An experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iodice, Paolo; Senatore, Adolfo; Langella, Giuseppe; Amoresano, Amedeo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • This study assesses the effect of ethanol–gasoline blends on cold emissions. • A last generation motorcycle was operated on the chassis dynamometer. • A new calculation procedure was applied to model the cold transient behaviour. • The 20% v/v ethanol blend shows the highest reduction of CO and HC cold emissions. - Abstract: Urban areas in developed countries are characterized by an increasing decline in air quality state mainly due to the exhaust emissions from vehicles. Besides, due to catalyst improvements and electronic mixture control of last generation engines, nowadays CO and HC cold start extra-emissions are heavily higher than emissions exhausted in hot conditions, with a clear consequence on air quality of the urban contexts. Ethanol combined with gasoline can be widely used as an alternative fuel due to the benefit of its high octane number and its self-sustaining characteristics. Ethanol, in fact, is well known as potential alcohol alternative fuel for SI engines, since it can be blended with gasoline to increase oxygen content, then decreasing CO and HC emissions and the depletion of fossil fuels. Literature data about cold emissive behaviour of SI engines powered with ethanol/gasoline blended fuels are rather limited. For this reason, the aim of this study is to experimentally investigate the effect of ethanol/gasoline blends on CO and HC cold start emissions of four-stroke SI engines: a last generation motorcycle was operated on the chassis dynamometer for exhaust emission measurements without change to the engine design, while the ethanol was mixed with unleaded gasoline in different percentages (10, 20 and 30 vol.%). Results of the experimental tests and the application of a new calculation procedure, designed and optimised to model the cold transient behaviour of SI engines using different ethanol–gasoline blends, indicate that CO and HC cold start emissions decrease compared to the use of commercial gasoline, with the 20

  14. On the effect of Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) injection upon the cold starting of a biodiesel fuelled compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clenci, Adrian; Niculescu, Rodica; Iorga-Simǎn, Victor; Tricǎ, Alina; Danlos, Amélie

    2017-02-01

    The use of biodiesel fuel in compression ignition engines has the potential to reduce CO2, which can lead to a reduction in global warming and environmental hazards. Biodiesel is an attractive fuel, as it is made from renewable resources. A major drawback associated with the use of biodiesel, however, is its poor cold flow properties, which have a direct influence on the cold starting performance of the engine. This paper is a consequence of a study on assessing the cold-starting performance of a compression ignition engine fueled with different blends of fossil diesel fuel and biodiesel. Through experimental investigations, it was found that the engine starting at -20°C was no longer possible in the case of using B50 (50% diesel + 50% biofuel made from sunflower oil). In order to "force" the engine starting in this particular situation, Di-Ethyl-Ether (DEE) was injected into the intake manifold. DEE being a highly flammable substance, the result was a sudden and explosive engine starting, the peak pressure in the monitored cylinder in the first successful engine cycle being almost twice the one which is usually considered as normal. Thus, to explain the observed phenomena, we launched this work relying on the analysis of the in-cylinder instantaneous pressure evolution, which was acquired during cranking, stabilizing and idling phases. Moreover, since the cause of the sudden and explosive engine starting was the DEE, by using a CFD approach, we also obtained results regarding the inter-cylinder distribution of the injected DEE.

  15. Exhaust emissions of volatile organic compounds of powered two-wheelers: effect of cold start and vehicle speed. Contribution to greenhouse effect and tropospheric ozone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costagliola, M Antonietta; Murena, Fabio; Prati, M Vittoria

    2014-01-15

    Powered two-wheeler (PTW) vehicles complying with recent European type approval standards (stages Euro 2 and Euro 3) were tested on chassis dynamometer in order to measure exhaust emissions of about 25 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the range C1-C7, including carcinogenic compounds as benzene and 1,3-butadiene. The fleet consists of a moped (engine capacity ≤ 50 cm(3)) and three fuel injection motorcycles of different engine capacities (150, 300 and 400 cm(3)). Different driving conditions were tested (US FPT cycle, constant speed). Due to the poor control of the combustion and catalyst efficiency, moped is the highest pollutant emitter. In fact, fuel injection strategy and three way catalyst with lambda sensor are able to reduce VOC motorcycles' emission of about one order of magnitude with respect to moped. Cold start effect, that is crucial for the assessment of actual emission of PTWs in urban areas, was significant: 30-51% of extra emission for methane. In the investigated speed range, moped showed a significant maximum of VOC emission factor at minimum speed (10 km/h) and a slightly decreasing trend from 20 to 60 km/h; motorcycles showed on the average a less significant peak at 10 km/h, a minimum at 30-40 km/h and then an increasing trend with a maximum emission factor at 90 km/h. Carcinogenic VOCs show the same pattern of total VOCs. Ozone Formation Potential (OFP) was estimated by using Maximum Incremental Reactivity scale. The greatest contribution to tropospheric ozone formation comes from alkenes group which account for 50-80% to the total OFP. VOC contribution effect on greenhouse effect is negligible with respect to CO2 emitted. © 2013.

  16. Micro-mixer/combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad Ahmad

    2014-09-18

    A micro-mixer/combustor to mix fuel and oxidant streams into combustible mixtures where flames resulting from combustion of the mixture can be sustained inside its combustion chamber is provided. The present design is particularly suitable for diffusion flames. In various aspects the present design mixes the fuel and oxidant streams prior to entering a combustion chamber. The combustion chamber is designed to prevent excess pressure to build up within the combustion chamber, which build up can cause instabilities in the flame. A restriction in the inlet to the combustion chamber from the mixing chamber forces the incoming streams to converge while introducing minor pressure drop. In one or more aspects, heat from combustion products exhausted from the combustion chamber may be used to provide heat to at least one of fuel passing through the fuel inlet channel, oxidant passing through the oxidant inlet channel, the mixing chamber, or the combustion chamber. In one or more aspects, an ignition strip may be positioned in the combustion chamber to sustain a flame without preheating.

  17. Combustor and method for distributing fuel in the combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; York, William David

    2016-04-26

    A combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The tube bundle includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A plurality of tubes extends from the upstream surface through the downstream surface, and each tube provides fluid communication through the tube bundle. A baffle extends axially inside the tube bundle between adjacent tubes. A method for distributing fuel in a combustor includes flowing a fuel into a fuel plenum defined at least in part by an upstream surface, a downstream surface, a shroud, and a plurality of tubes that extend from the upstream surface to the downstream surface. The method further includes impinging the fuel against a baffle that extends axially inside the fuel plenum between adjacent tubes.

  18. An Investigation Into: I) Active Flow Control for Cold-Start Performance Enhancement of a Pump-Assisted, Capillary-Driven, Two-Phase Cooling Loop II) Surface Tension of n-Pentanol + Water, a Self-Rewetting Working Fluid, From 25 °C to 85 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, Roberto Villa

    Cold-start performance enhancement of a pump-assisted, capillary-driven, two-phase cooling loop was attained using proportional integral and fuzzy logic controls to manage the boiling condition inside the evaporator. The surface tension of aqueous solutions of n-Pentanol, a self-rewetting fluid, was also investigated for enhancing heat transfer performance of capillary driven (passive) thermal devices was also studied. A proportional-integral control algorithm was used to regulate the boiling condition (from pool boiling to thin-film boiling) and backpressure in the evaporator during cold-start and low heat input conditions. Active flow control improved the thermal resistance at low heat inputs by 50% compared to the baseline (constant flow rate) case, while realizing a total pumping power savings of 56%. Temperature overshoot at start-up was mitigated combining fuzzy-logic with a proportional-integral controller. A constant evaporator surface temperature of 60°C with a variation of +/-8°C during start-up was attained with evaporator thermal resistances as low as 0.10 cm2--K/W. The surface tension of aqueous solutions of n-Pentanol, a self-rewetting working fluid, as a function of concentration and temperature were also investigated. Self-rewetting working fluids are promising in two-phase heat transfer applications because they have the ability to passively drive additional working fluid towards the heated surface; thereby increasing the dryout limitations of the thermal device. Very little data is available in literature regarding the surface tension of these fluids due to the complexity involved in fluid handling, heating, and experimentation. Careful experiments were performed to investigate the surface tension of n-Pentanol + water. The concentration and temperature range investigated were from 0.25%wt. to1.8%wt and 25°C to 85°C, respectively.

  19. Investigation of the effect of a hydrophilic layer in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell on the cell performance and cold start behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakata, Satoki; Hara, Masanori; Kakinuma, Katsuyosi; Uchida, Makoto; Tryk, Donald A.; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gas diffusion layer (GDL) characterization was carried out by Raman spectroscopy. • A fuel cell using a GDL with a hydrophilic layer showed superior performance. • This cell also showed favorable cold start performance from -10 °C. • The hydrophilic layer improves water retention under low humidity conditions. • The hydrophilic layer enhances water removal for high humidity and cold startup. - Abstract: The effect on PEFC performance of a gas diffusion layer (GDL) with a hydrophilic layer (HL) between the microporous layer (MPL) and the carbon paper (CP) was investigated at high and low humidity at normal operating temperatures and at subfreezing temperatures. Scanning electron microscopic examination and micro-Raman spectroscopic examination were carried out on the three-layer structure (MPL, HL and CP). In addition, high magnification SEM images of the samples showed that the HL had smaller pores than the MPL of the HL-GDL. Thus, we consider that the capillary pressure in the pores of the HL was higher than that in the MPL of the HL-GDL, which suggests that the HL can absorb more water. The performances of cells using the GDL with or without a HL were compared. The cell using a GDL with a HL showed a higher performance than a cell with a conventional GDL in the high current density region at both high and low humidity. At high humidity, the HL can absorb generated water, improving water removal from the catalyst layer (CL) to the GDL, and inhibiting the stoppage of gas diffusion by condensed water in the CL. At low humidity, the HL enhanced the water retention in the MEA, inhibiting the decrease of proton conductivity of the electrolyte by dehydration. A cell using a GDL with a HL also showed superior performance during cold startup from -10 °C, due to water removal by the HL, inhibiting the blockage of gas diffusion by condensed or frozen water in the CL. These results indicate that an HL placed between the MPL and the carbon paper of

  20. Thermal performance of a meso-scale liquid-fuel combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Demonstrated successful combustion of liquid fuel-air mixtures in a novel meso-scale combustor. → Flame quenching was eliminated using heat recirculation in a swiss roll type combustor that also extended the flammability limits. → Liquid fuel was rapidly vaporized with the use of hot narrow channel walls that eliminated the need of a fuel atomizer. → Maximum power density of the combustor was estimated to be about 8.5 GW/m3 and heat load in the range of 50-280W. → Overall efficiency of the combustor was estimated in the range of 12 to 20%. - Abstract: Combustion in small scale devices poses significant challenges due to the quenching of reactions from wall heat losses as well as the significantly reduced time available for mixing and combustion. In the case of liquid fuels there are additional challenges related to atomization, vaporization and mixing with the oxidant in the very short time-scale liquid-fuel combustor. The liquid fuel employed here is methanol with air as the oxidizer. The combustor was designed based on the heat recirculating concept wherein the incoming reactants are preheated by the combustion products through heat exchange occurring via combustor walls. The combustor was fabricated from Zirconium phosphate, a ceramic with very low thermal conductivity (0.8 W m -1 K -1 ). The combustor had rectangular shaped double spiral geometry with combustion chamber in the center of the spiral formed by inlet and exhaust channels. Methanol and air were introduced immediately upstream at inlet of the combustor. The preheated walls of the inlet channel also act as a pre-vaporizer for liquid fuel which vaporizes the liquid fuel and then mixes with air prior to the fuel-air mixture reaching the combustion chamber. Rapid pre-vaporization of the liquid fuel by the hot narrow channel walls eliminated the necessity for a fuel atomizer. Self-sustained combustion of methanol-air was achieved in a chamber volume as small as 32.6 mm 3

  1. Design Optimization of a Micro-Combustor for Lean, Premixed Fuel-Air Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Leigh Theresa

    Present technology has been shifting towards miniaturization of devices for energy production for portable electronics. Micro-combustors, when incorporated into a micro-power generation system, provide the energy desired in the form of hot gases to power such technology. This creates the need for a design optimization of the micro-combustor in terms of geometry, fuel choice, and material selection. A total of five micro-combustor geometries, three fuels, and three materials were computationally simulated in different configurations in order to determine the optimal micro-combustor design for highest efficiency. Inlet velocity, equivalence ratio, and wall heat transfer coefficient were varied in order to test a comprehensive range of micro-combustor parameters. All simulations completed for the optimization study used ANSYS Fluent v16.1 and post-processing of the data was done in CFD Post v16.1. It was found that for lean, premixed fuel-air mixtures (φ = 0.6 - 0.9) ethane (C 2H6) provided the highest flame temperatures when ignited within the micro-combustor geometries. An aluminum oxide converging micro-combustor burning ethane and air at an equivalence ratio of 0.9, an inlet velocity of 0.5 m/s, and heat transfer coefficient of 5 W/m2-K was found to produce the highest combustor efficiency, making it the optimal choice for a micro-combustor design. It is proposed that this geometry be experimentally and computationally investigated further in order to determine if additional optimization can be achieved.

  2. Comparison of Gasoline Direct-Injection (GDI) and Port Fuel Injection (PFI) Vehicle Emissions: Emission Certification Standards, Cold-Start, Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation Potential, and Potential Climate Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Georges; Saleh, Rawad; Zhao, Yunliang; Presto, Albert A; Lambe, Andrew T; Frodin, Bruce; Sardar, Satya; Maldonado, Hector; Maddox, Christine; May, Andrew A; Drozd, Greg T; Goldstein, Allen H; Russell, Lynn M; Hagen, Fabian; Robinson, Allen L

    2017-06-06

    Recent increases in the Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards have led to widespread adoption of vehicles equipped with gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engines. Changes in engine technologies can alter emissions. To quantify these effects, we measured gas- and particle-phase emissions from 82 light-duty gasoline vehicles recruited from the California in-use fleet tested on a chassis dynamometer using the cold-start unified cycle. The fleet included 15 GDI vehicles, including 8 GDIs certified to the most-stringent emissions standard, superultra-low-emission vehicles (SULEV). We quantified the effects of engine technology, emission certification standards, and cold-start on emissions. For vehicles certified to the same emissions standard, there is no statistical difference of regulated gas-phase pollutant emissions between PFIs and GDIs. However, GDIs had, on average, a factor of 2 higher particulate matter (PM) mass emissions than PFIs due to higher elemental carbon (EC) emissions. SULEV certified GDIs have a factor of 2 lower PM mass emissions than GDIs certified as ultralow-emission vehicles (3.0 ± 1.1 versus 6.3 ± 1.1 mg/mi), suggesting improvements in engine design and calibration. Comprehensive organic speciation revealed no statistically significant differences in the composition of the volatile organic compounds emissions between PFI and GDIs, including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Therefore, the secondary organic aerosol and ozone formation potential of the exhaust does not depend on engine technology. Cold-start contributes a larger fraction of the total unified cycle emissions for vehicles meeting more-stringent emission standards. Organic gas emissions were the most sensitive to cold-start compared to the other pollutants tested here. There were no statistically significant differences in the effects of cold-start on GDIs and PFIs. For our test fleet, the measured 14.5% decrease in CO 2 emissions from GDIs was much greater than

  3. Evaluation of a Liquid-Fueled Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Forster, David

    1998-01-01

    ... for use in the combustor. The chosen atomizer was installed in the combustor geometries and then analyzed over a range of combustor conditions to measure deflagration to detonation transition (DDT...

  4. DLE combustor exceeds performance guarantees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, John; Leonard, Gary [GE Marine and Industrial Engines, Evendale, OH (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The 50MW Gent power station in Belgium started operating in 1994 using General Electric`s high efficiency LM6000 gas turbine. This article describes performance testing of the new Dry Low Emissions (DLE) combustion system fitted to the aeroderivative gas turbine, which has allowed the combined cycle, cogeneration facility to function at full-power, with low emissions of nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, and unburned hydrocarbons. Conventional combustion systems are compared to the new premixed lean combustor used here. (UK)

  5. Compact Combustor Integrated (CI) with Compressor and Turbine for Perspective Turbojet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokin, V. N.; Volkov, S. A.; Ljashenko, V. P.; Popov, V. I.; Startzev, A. N.; Nigmatullin, R. Z.; Shilova, T. V.; Belikov, U. V.

    2017-11-01

    For several years, CIAM has conducted comprehensive work on the development the combustor integrated (CI) with air swirling. This project involved an integrated development of three components: diffuser, combustion chamber and nozzle guide vanes of turbine to reduce their length and, respectively, the length of the engine and obtain high performance elements with low emissions of harmful substances. The new frontal device was proposed for CI combustor. The design optimization of this type combustor was conducted in the compartments and in a full-size combustion chamber. It was shown the possibility of obtaining high combustion efficiency and low NOx emissions at a short length on cruise condition. By a simplified model of the frontal device it was shown experimentally that the proposed device provided a lighting-up and flame spreading in a wide range of equivalence ratio ER (ER > 0.014) at idling. It was shown that short vane diffuser with moderate swirling ensured high parameters of the combustion chamber. The use of residual swirling of the combustion products at the exit of combustor allows reducing the size, or the number of nozzle guide vanes of the turbine. In General, the use of the swirling of the air stream gives a possibility of total length reduction for all three elements by about 20 – 25 %.

  6. Performance of low-Btu fuel gas turbine combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevan, S.; Bowen, J.H.; Feitelberg, A.S.; Hung, S.L.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.

    1995-11-01

    This reports on a project to develop low BTU gas fuel nozzle for use in large gas turbine combustors using multiple fuel nozzles. A rich-quench-lean combustor is described here which reduces the amount of NO{sub x} produced by the combustion of the low BTU gas. The combustor incorporates a converging rich stage combustor liner, which separates the rich stage recirculation zones from the quench stage and lean stage air.

  7. Modelling of Biomass Combustor : Final assignment energy from biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, R.; Van den Hill, E.J.; Kaas, A.W.S.; Verburg, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    In this study a 1.1 MW fluidized bed combustor is modeled. A literature study is performed on aspects which determine the characteristics of the combustor. A model is set up and calculations for the design of the Fluidized Bed Combustor (FBC) are performed. Characteristics are calculated for the

  8. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  9. Development and testing of pulsed and rotating detonation combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. George, Andrew C.

    Detonation is a self-sustaining, supersonic, shock-driven, exothermic reaction. Detonation combustion can theoretically provide significant improvements in thermodynamic efficiency over constant pressure combustion when incorporated into existing cycles. To harness this potential performance benefit, countless studies have worked to develop detonation combustors and integrate these devices into existing systems. This dissertation consists of a series of investigations on two types of detonation combustors: the pulse detonation combustor (PDC) and the rotating detonation combustor (RDC). In the first two investigations, an array of air-breathing PDCs is integrated with an axial power turbine. The system is initially operated with steady and pulsed cold air flow to determine the effect of pulsed flow on turbine performance. Various averaging approaches are employed to calculate turbine efficiency, but only flow-weighted (e.g., mass or work averaging) definitions have physical significance. Pulsed flow turbine efficiency is comparable to steady flow efficiency at high corrected flow rates and low rotor speeds. At these conditions, the pulse duty cycle expands and the variation of the rotor incidence angle is constrained to a favorable range. The system is operated with pulsed detonating flow to determine the effect of frequency, fill fraction, and rotor speed on turbine performance. For some conditions, output power exceeds the maximum attainable value from steady constant pressure combustion due to a significant increase in available power from the detonation products. However, the turbine component efficiency estimated from classical thermodynamic analysis is four times lower than the steady design point efficiency. Analysis of blade angles shows a significant penalty due to the detonation, fill, and purge processes simultaneously imposed on the rotor. The latter six investigations focus on fundamental research of the RDC concept. A specially-tailored RDC data

  10. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic support struts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostebee, Heath Michael; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-03-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The support struts may include an aerodynamic contoured shape so as to distribute evenly a flow of air to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  11. Investigation of Combustion Control in a Dump Combustor Using the Feedback Free Fluidic Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Eric J.; Casiano, Matthew J.; Anderson, William E.; Heister, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    A feedback free fluidic oscillator was designed and integrated into a single element rocket combustor with the goal of suppressing longitudinal combustion instabilities. The fluidic oscillator uses internal fluid dynamics to create an unsteady outlet jet at a specific frequency. An array of nine fluidic oscillators was tested to mimic modulated secondary oxidizer injection into the combustor dump plane. The combustor has a coaxial injector that uses gaseous methane and decomposed hydrogen peroxide with an overall O/F ratio of 11.7. A sonic choke plate on an actuator arm allows for continuous adjustment of the oxidizer post acoustics enabling the study of a variety of instability magnitudes. The fluidic oscillator unsteady outlet jet performance is compared against equivalent steady jet injection and a baseline design with no secondary oxidizer injection. At the most unstable operating conditions, the unsteady outlet jet saw a 67% reduction in the instability pressure oscillation magnitude when compared to the steady jet and baseline data. Additionally, computational fluid dynamics analysis of the combustor gives insight into the flow field interaction of the fluidic oscillators. The results indicate that open loop high frequency propellant modulation for combustion control can be achieved through fluidic devices that require no moving parts or electrical power to operate.

  12. Evaluation of fuel injection configurations to control carbon and soot formation in small GT combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.; Briehl, D.

    1982-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate hardware configurations which attempt to minimize carbon formation and soot production without sacrificing performance in small gas turbine combustors has been conducted at the United Technologies Research Center. Four fuel injectors, embodying either airblast atomization, pressure atomization, or fuel vaporization techniques, were combined with nozzle air swirlers and injector sheaths, and evaluated at test conditions which included and extended beyond standard small gas turbine combustor operation. Extensive testing was accomplished with configurations embodying either a spill return or a T-vaporizer injector. Minimal carbon deposits were observed on the spill return nozzle for tests using either Jet A or ERBS test fuel. A more extensive film of soft carbon was observed on the vaporizer after operation at standard engine conditions, with large carbonaceous growths forming on the device during off-design operation at low combustor inlet temperature. Test results indicated that smoke emission levels depended on the combustor fluid mechanics (especially the mixing rates near the injector), the atomization quality of the injector and the fuel hydrogen content.

  13. Steam Reformer With Fibrous Catalytic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed steam-reforming reactor derives heat from internal combustion on fibrous catalyst. Supplies of fuel and air to combustor controlled to meet demand for heat for steam-reforming reaction. Enables use of less expensive reactor-tube material by limiting temperature to value safe for material yet not so low as to reduce reactor efficiency.

  14. Experimental investigations on effect of different materials and varying depths of one turn exhaust channel swiss roll combustor on its thermal performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mane Deshmukh, Sagar B.; Krishnamoorthy, A.; Bhojwani, V. K.; Pawane, Ashwini

    2017-05-01

    More energy density of hydrocarbon fuels compared to advanced batteries available in the market demands for development of systems which will use hydrocarbon fuels at small scale to generate power in small quantity (i.e. in few watts) and device efficiency should be reasonably good, but the basic requirement is to generate heat from the fuels like methane, propane, hydrogen, LPG and converting into power. Swiss roll combustor has proved to be best combustor at small scale. Present work is carried out on one turn exhaust channel and half turn of inlet mixture channel Swiss roll combustor. Purpose of keeping exhaust channel length more than the inlet mixture channel to ensure sufficient time for heat exchange between burned and unburned gases, which is not reported in earlier studies. Experimental study mentions effects of different design parameters like materials of combustor, various depths, equivalence ratio, mass flow rates of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), volume of combustion space and environmental conditions (with insulation and without insulation to combustors) on fuel lean limit and fuel rich limit, temperature profile obtained on all external surfaces, in the main combustion chamber, in the channel carrying unburned gas mixture and burned gas mixture, heat loss to atmosphere from all the walls of combustor, flame location. Different combustor materials tested were stainless steel, Aluminum, copper, brass, bronze, Granite. Depths considered were 22mm, 15mm, 10mm and 5mm. It was observed that flame stability inside the combustion chamber is affected by materials, depths and flow rates. Unburned mixture carrying channel was kept below quenching distance of flame to avoid flash back. Burned gas carrying channel dimension was more than the quenching distance. Considerable temperature rise was observed with insulation to combustors. But combustors with more thermal conductivity showed more heat loss to atmosphere which led to instability of flame.

  15. Method for controlling incineration in combustor for radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takaoku, Y.; Uehara, A.

    1991-01-01

    This invention relates to a method for controlling incineration in a combustor for low-level radioactive wastes. In particular, it relates to a method for economizing in the consumption of supplemental fuel while maintaining a stable incineration state by controlling the amount of fuel and of radioactive wastes fed to the combustor. The amount of fuel supplied is determined by the outlet gas temperature of the combustor. (L.L.)

  16. Low NOx Fuel Flexible Combustor Integration Project Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Joanne C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Lee, Chi-Ming; Kramer, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Technology Demonstration (ITD) 40A Low NOx Fuel Flexible Combustor Integration development is being conducted as part of the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project. Phase 2 of this effort began in 2012 and will end in 2015. This document describes the ERA goals, how the fuel flexible combustor integration development fulfills the ERA combustor goals, and outlines the work to be conducted during project execution.

  17. Flame dynamics in a micro-channeled combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Taaha; Balachandran, Ramanarayanan; Markides, Christos N.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has generated a significant interest in combustion-based power generation technologies, as a replacement of traditional electrochemical batteries which are plagued by low energy densities, short operational lives and low power-to-size and power-to-weight ratios. Moreover, the versatility of integrated combustion-based systems provides added scope for combined heat and power generation. This paper describes a study into the dynamics of premixed flames in a micro-channeled combustor. The details of the design and the geometry of the combustor are presented in the work by Kariuki and Balachandran [1]. This work showed that there were different modes of operation (periodic, a-periodic and stable), and that in the periodic mode the flame accelerated towards the injection manifold after entering the channels. The current study investigates these flames further. We will show that the flame enters the channel and propagates towards the injection manifold as a planar flame for a short distance, after which the flame shape and propagation is found to be chaotic in the middle section of the channel. Finally, the flame quenches when it reaches the injector slots. The glow plug position in the exhaust side ignites another flame, and the process repeats. It is found that an increase in air flow rate results in a considerable increase in the length (and associated time) over which the planar flame travels once it has entered a micro-channel, and a significant decrease in the time between its conversion into a chaotic flame and its extinction. It is well known from the literature that inside small channels the flame propagation is strongly influenced by the flow conditions and thermal management. An increase of the combustor block temperature at high flow rates has little effect on the flame lengths and times, whereas at low flow rates the time over which the planar flame front can be observed decreases and the time of

  18. Emissions control of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans at municipal waste combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, S.C.; Jozewicz, W.; Sedman, C.B.

    1991-01-01

    This paper gives the results of an analysis of available emission data of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF) from municipal waste combustors (MWCs) to evaluate the effectiveness of various air pollution control devices on PCDD/PCDF removal. The effects of flue gas temperature, recycling fabric filter ash, and process additives such as ammonia and Tesisorb powder were also analyzed. The analysis shows that MWCs equipped with a spray dryer followed by fabric filters can achieve PCDD/PCDF removal efficiencies (REs) of 97% and higher. A RE of 94% has been achieved at a combustor equipped with a Thermal DeNO x system followed by a spray dryer and fabric filters. MWCs equipped with a duct sorbent injection system followed by fabric filters can potentially achieve a RE of 99%. A combustor equipped with a spray dryer followed by electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) has achieved a RE of 64%. Neither a duct sorbent injection system followed by ESPs nor a furnace sorbent injection system followed by ESPs could effectively remove PCDD/PCDF. PCDD/PCDF were not effectively removed from MWCs equipped with ESPs as the only devices to control air pollution

  19. High pressure MHD coal combustors investigation, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, H.; Hamberg, R.

    1981-05-01

    A high pressure MHD coal combustor was investigated. The purpose was to acquire basic design and support engineering data through systematic combustion experiments at the 10 and 20 thermal megawatt size and to design a 50 MW/sub t/ combustor. This combustor is to produce an electrically conductive plasma generated by the direct combustion of pulverized coal with hot oxygen enriched vitiated air that is seeded with potassium carbonate. Vitiated air and oxygen are used as the oxidizer, however, preheated air will ultimately be used as the oxidizer in coal fired MHD combustors.

  20. Flame Propagation in a Dump Combustor with Shear Layer Excitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This experimentation looks to investigate the use of fluidic oscillators to attenuate combustion instability in a naturally unstable rocket combustor. Since...

  1. Low pollution combustor designs for CTOL engines - Results of the Experimental Clean Combustor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Peduzzi, A.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.

    1976-01-01

    The NASA/Pratt & Whitney Aircraft Experimental Clean Combustor Program is a multi-year, major contract effort. Primary program objectives are the generation of combustor technology for development of advanced commercial CTOL engines with lower exhaust emissions than current aircraft and demonstration of this technology in a full-scale JT9D engine in 1976. This paper describes the pollution and performance goals, Phase I and II test results, and the Phase III combustor hardware, pollution sampling techniques, and test plans. Best results were obtained with the Vorbix concept which employs multiple burning zones and improved fuel preparation and distribution. Substantial reductions were achieved in all pollutant categories, meeting the 1979 EPA standards for NOx, THC, and smoke when extrapolated to JT9D cycle conditions. The Vorbix concept additionally demonstrated the capability for acceptable altitude relight and did not appear to have unsolvable durability or exit temperature distribution problems.

  2. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  3. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  4. Combustor nozzle for a fuel-flexible combustion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Joel Meier [Niskayuna, NY; Mosbacher, David Matthew [Cohoes, NY; Janssen, Jonathan Sebastian [Troy, NY; Iyer, Venkatraman Ananthakrishnan [Mason, OH

    2011-03-22

    A combustor nozzle is provided. The combustor nozzle includes a first fuel system configured to introduce a syngas fuel into a combustion chamber to enable lean premixed combustion within the combustion chamber and a second fuel system configured to introduce the syngas fuel, or a hydrocarbon fuel, or diluents, or combinations thereof into the combustion chamber to enable diffusion combustion within the combustion chamber.

  5. Variable volume combustor with nested fuel manifold system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-13

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles, a fuel manifold system in communication with the micro-mixer fuel nozzles to deliver a flow of fuel thereto, and a linear actuator to maneuver the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the fuel manifold system.

  6. Variable volume combustor with pre-nozzle fuel injection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-06

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of fuel nozzles, a pre-nozzle fuel injection system supporting the fuel nozzles, and a linear actuator to maneuver the fuel nozzles and the pre-nozzle fuel injection system.

  7. Variable volume combustor with a conical liner support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Chrisophter Paul; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2017-06-27

    The present application provides a variable volume combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The variable volume combustor may include a liner, a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within the liner, and a conical liner support supporting the liner.

  8. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Srinivasan, Shiva; York, William David

    2016-11-29

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A combustion chamber is downstream of the end cap, and tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface. Each tube provides fluid communication through the end cap to the combustion chamber. The system further includes means for reducing combustion dynamics in the combustor. A method for reducing combustion dynamics in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through tubes that extend axially through an end cap that extends radially across the combustor and obstructing at least a portion of the working fluid flowing through a first set of the tubes.

  9. Operability of an Ejector Enhanced Pulse Combustor in a Gas Turbine Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, Daniel E.; Dougherty, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    A pressure-gain combustor comprised of a mechanically valved, liquid fueled pulsejet, an ejector, and an enclosing shroud, was coupled to a small automotive turbocharger to form a self-aspirating, thrust producing gas turbine engine. The system was constructed in order to investigate issues associated with the interaction of pulsed combustion devices and turbomachinery. Installed instrumentation allowed for sensing of distributed low frequency pressure and temperature, high frequency pressure in the shroud, fuel flow rate, rotational speed, thrust, and laboratory noise. The engine ran successfully and reliably, achieving a sustained thrust of 5 to 6 lbf, and maintaining a rotor speed of approximately 90,000 rpm, with a combustor pressure gain of approximately 4 percent. Numerical simulations of the system without pressure-gain combustion indicated that the turbocharger would not operate. Thus, the new combustor represented a substantial improvement in system performance. Acoustic measurements in the shroud and laboratory indicated turbine stage sound pressure level attenuation of 20 dB. This is consistent with published results from detonative combustion experiments. As expected, the mechanical reed valves suffered considerable damage under the higher pressure and thermal loading characteristics of this system. This result underscores the need for development of more robust valve systems for this application. The efficiency of the turbomachinery components did not appear to be significantly affected by unsteadiness associated with pulsed combustion, though the steady component efficiencies were already low, and thus not expected to be particularly sensitive.

  10. Combustor nozzles in gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Keener, Christopher Paul; Stewart, Jason Thurman; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2017-09-12

    A micro-mixer nozzle for use in a combustor of a combustion turbine engine, the micro-mixer nozzle including: a fuel plenum defined by a shroud wall connecting a periphery of a forward tube sheet to a periphery of an aft tubesheet; a plurality of mixing tubes extending across the fuel plenum for mixing a supply of compressed air and fuel, each of the mixing tubes forming a passageway between an inlet formed through the forward tubesheet and an outlet formed through the aft tubesheet; and a wall mixing tube formed in the shroud wall.

  11. Pulse Combustor Driven Pressure Gain Combustion for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Engines

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-02-01

    The gas turbine engine is an essential component of the global energy infrastructure which accounts for a significant portion of the total fossil fuel consumption in transportation and electric power generation sectors. For this reason there is significant interest in further increasing the efficiency and reducing the pollutant emissions of these devices. Conventional approaches to this goal, which include increasing the compression ratio, turbine inlet temperature, and turbine/compressor efficiency, have brought modern gas turbine engines near the limits of what may be achieved with the conventionally applied Brayton cycle. If a significant future step increase in gas turbine efficiency is to be realized some deviation from this convention is necessary. The pressure gain gas turbine concept is a well established new combustion technology that promises to provide a dramatic increase in gas turbine efficiency by replacing the isobaric heat addition process found in conventional technology with an isochoric process. The thermodynamic benefit of even a small increase in stagnation pressure across a gas turbine combustor translates to a significant increase in cycle efficiency. To date there have been a variety of methods proposed for achieving stagnation pressure gains across a gas turbine combustor and these concepts have seen a broad spectrum of levels of success. The following chapter provides an introduction to one of the proposed pressure gain methods that may be most easily realized in a practical application. This approach, known as pulse combustor driven pressure gain combustion, utilizes an acoustically resonant pulse combustor to approximate isochoric heat release and thus produce a rise in stagnation pressure.

  12. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1990-08-15

    BCR National Laboratory (BCRNL) has initiated a project aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using a rotary kiln, suitably modified, to burn Pennsylvania anthracite wastes, co-fired with high-sulfur bituminous coal. Limestone will be injected into the kiln for sulfur control, to determine whether high sulfur capture levels can be achieved with high sorbent utilization. The principal objectives of this work are: (1) to prove the feasibility of burning anthracite refuse, with co-firing of high-sulfur bituminous coal and with limestone injection for sulfur emissions control, in a rotary kiln fitted with a Universal Energy International (UEI) air injector system; (2) to determine the emissions levels of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} and specifically to identify the Ca/S ratios that are required to meet New Source Performance Standards; (3) to evaluate the technical and economic merits of a commercial rotary kiln combustor in comparison to fluidized bed combustors; and, (4) to ascertain the need for further work, including additional combustion tests, prior to commercial application, and to recommend accordingly a detailed program towards this end.

  13. Computational model of a whole tree combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryden, K.M.; Ragland, K.W. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A preliminary computational model has been developed for the whole tree combustor and compared to test results. In the simulation model presented hardwood logs, 15 cm in diameter are burned in a 4 m deep fuel bed. Solid and gas temperature, solid and gas velocity, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HC and O{sub 2} profiles are calculated. This deep, fixed bed combustor obtains high energy release rates per unit area due to the high inlet air velocity and extended reaction zone. The lowest portion of the overall bed is an oxidizing region and the remainder of the bed acts as a gasification and drying region. The overfire air region completes the combustion. Approximately 40% of the energy is released in the lower oxidizing region. The wood consumption rate obtained from the computational model is 4,110 kg/m{sup 2}-hr which matches well the consumption rate of 3,770 kg/m{sup 2}-hr observed during the peak test period of the Aurora, MN test. The predicted heat release rate is 16 MW/m{sup 2} (5.0*10{sup 6} Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}).

  14. Fluid Mechanics of Lean Blowout Precursors in Gas Turbine Combustors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Muruganandam

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of lean blowout (LBO phenomenon, along with the sensing and control strategies could enable the gas turbine combustor designers to design combustors with wider operability regimes. Sensing of precursor events (temporary extinction-reignition events based on chemiluminescence emissions from the combustor, assessing the proximity to LBO and using that data for control of LBO has already been achieved. This work describes the fluid mechanic details of the precursor dynamics and the blowout process based on detailed analysis of near blowout flame behavior, using simultaneous chemiluminescence and droplet scatter observations. The droplet scatter method represents the regions of cold reactants and thus help track unburnt mixtures. During a precursor event, it was observed that the flow pattern changes significantly with a large region of unburnt mixture in the combustor, which subsequently vanishes when a double/single helical vortex structure brings back the hot products back to the inlet of the combustor. This helical pattern is shown to be the characteristic of the next stable mode of flame in the longer combustor, stabilized by double helical vortex breakdown (VBD mode. It is proposed that random heat release fluctuations near blowout causes VBD based stabilization to shift VBD modes, causing the observed precursor dynamics in the combustor. A complete description of the evolution of flame near the blowout limit is presented. The description is consistent with all the earlier observations by the authors about precursor and blowout events.

  15. Design and fabrication of a meso-scale stirling engine and combustor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echekki, Tarek (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Haroldsen, Brent L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Morales, Alfredo Martin (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Mills, Bernice E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Liu, Shiling (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Lee, Jeremiah C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Karpetis, Adionos N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Chen, Jacqueline H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ceremuga, Joseph T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Raber, Thomas N. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Hekmuuaty, Michelle A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-05-01

    Power sources capable of supplying tens of watts are needed for a wide variety of applications including portable electronics, sensors, micro aerial vehicles, and mini-robotics systems. The utility of these devices is often limited by the energy and power density capabilities of batteries. A small combustion engine using liquid hydrocarbon fuel could potentially increase both power and energy density by an order of magnitude or more. This report describes initial development work on a meso-scale external combustion engine based on the Stirling cycle. Although other engine designs perform better at macro-scales, we believe the Stirling engine cycle is better suited to small-scale applications. The ideal Stirling cycle requires efficient heat transfer. Consequently, unlike other thermodynamic cycles, the high heat transfer rates that are inherent with miniature devices are an advantage for the Stirling cycle. Furthermore, since the Stirling engine uses external combustion, the combustor and engine can be scaled and optimized semi-independently. Continuous combustion minimizes issues with flame initiation and propagation. It also allows consideration of a variety of techniques to promote combustion that would be difficult in a miniature internal combustion engine. The project included design and fabrication of both the engine and the combustor. Two engine designs were developed. The first used a cylindrical piston design fabricated with conventional machining processes. The second design, based on the Wankel rotor geometry, was fabricated by through-mold electroforming of nickel in SU8 and LIGA micromolds. These technologies provided the requisite precision and tight tolerances needed for efficient micro-engine operation. Electroformed nickel is ideal for micro-engine applications because of its high strength and ductility. A rotary geometry was chosen because its planar geometry was more compatible with the fabrication process. SU8 lithography provided rapid

  16. Combustion generated noise in gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, W. C.; Shivashankara, B. N.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments are conducted for the noise power and spectra emitted from a gas turbine combustor can exhausting to the atmosphere. The theory of combustion noise is applied to the results to determine the noise generating capability of the flame in the absence of reflecting can surfaces. The results show that for a fixed fuel (JP-4) the noise output is independent of fuel/air ratio for well stabilized can-type flames and heavily dependent on airflow while the spectra are dominated by the can acoustics, primarily through sound absorption by the liner. In an installed configuration the noise output depends heavily on the enclosure acoustics. Scaling rules are presented for installed configurations.

  17. Method for operating a combustor in a fuel cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfant, Robert W.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of operating a combustor to heat a fuel processor in a fuel cell system, in which the fuel processor generates a hydrogen-rich stream a portion of which is consumed in a fuel cell stack and a portion of which is discharged from the fuel cell stack and supplied to the combustor, and wherein first and second streams are supplied to the combustor, the first stream being a hydrocarbon fuel stream and the second stream consisting of said hydrogen-rich stream, the method comprising the steps of monitoring the temperature of the fuel processor; regulating the quantity of the first stream to the combustor according to the temperature of the fuel processor; and comparing said quantity of said first stream to a predetermined value or range of predetermined values.

  18. Mercury emissions from municipal solid waste combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This report examines emissions of mercury (Hg) from municipal solid waste (MSW) combustion in the United States (US). It is projected that total annual nationwide MSW combustor emissions of mercury could decrease from about 97 tonnes (1989 baseline uncontrolled emissions) to less than about 4 tonnes in the year 2000. This represents approximately a 95 percent reduction in the amount of mercury emitted from combusted MSW compared to the 1989 mercury emissions baseline. The likelihood that routinely achievable mercury emissions removal efficiencies of about 80 percent or more can be assured; it is estimated that MSW combustors in the US could prove to be a comparatively minor source of mercury emissions after about 1995. This forecast assumes that diligent measures to control mercury emissions, such as via use of supplemental control technologies (e.g., carbon adsorption), are generally employed at that time. However, no present consensus was found that such emissions control measures can be implemented industry-wide in the US within this time frame. Although the availability of technology is apparently not a limiting factor, practical implementation of necessary control technology may be limited by administrative constraints and other considerations (e.g., planning, budgeting, regulatory compliance requirements, etc.). These projections assume that: (a) about 80 percent mercury emissions reduction control efficiency is achieved with air pollution control equipment likely to be employed by that time; (b) most cylinder-shaped mercury-zinc (CSMZ) batteries used in hospital applications can be prevented from being disposed into the MSW stream or are replaced with alternative batteries that do not contain mercury; and (c) either the amount of mercury used in fluorescent lamps is decreased to an industry-wide average of about 27 milligrams of mercury per lamp or extensive diversion from the MSW stream of fluorescent lamps that contain mercury is accomplished.

  19. Feasibility study of ultra-low NOx Gas turbine combustor using the RML combustion concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van, Tien Giap; Hwang, Jeong Jae; Kim, Min Kuk; Ahn, Kook Young [Environment and Energy Research Division, Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    A new combustion concept, the so called RML, was investigated to validate its application as a gas turbine combustor for combustor outlet temperatures over 1973 K. The feasibility study of the RML combustor was conducted with zero dimensional combustion calculations. The emission characteristics of RQL, LEAN, EGR and RML combustors were compared. The calculation results showed that the RQL combustor has lower NOx emissions than the LEAN at high outlet temperature. NOx emissions of the RML combustor at equivalence ratio of the rich chamber of 2.0 can be reduced by 30 % compared with the EGR combustor, and lower than the RQL combustor at a combustor outlet temperature over 1973 K. However, the CO emissions of the RML combustor were higher than those of the LEAN and EGR combustors. Also, the possibility of applying the RML combustor to gas turbines was discussed considering residence time, equivalence ratio of the rich chamber and recirculation rate. Although further research to design and realize the proposed RML combustor is needed, this study verified that the RML concept can be successfully used in a gas turbine combustor.

  20. Variable volume combustor with an air bypass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Ostebee, Heath Michael; Keener, Christopher Paul

    2017-02-07

    The present application provides a combustor for use with flow of fuel and a flow of air in a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles positioned within a liner and an air bypass system position about the liner. The air bypass system variably allows a bypass portion of the flow of air to bypass the micro-mixer fuel nozzles.

  1. Aerotrace. Measurement of particulates from an engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, C.D. [DRA, Farnborough (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The effect of gas turbine operating conditions, inlet temperature, pressure and overall air fuel ratio, on particulate number density has been measured. Particulate number density was found to be proportional to combustor inlet pressure and decrease with increasing combustor inlet temperature. The relationship with air fuel ratio is more complex. The mechanism of particulate loss down sample lines has been elucidated and equations are presented to predict particulate losses for stainless steel and PTFE sample lines. (author) 3 refs.

  2. Combustion of Syngas Fuel in Gas Turbine Can Combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Chaouki Ghenai

    2010-01-01

    Numerical investigation of the combustion of syngas fuel mixture in gas turbine can combustor is presented in this paper. The objective is to understand the impact of the variability in the alternative fuel composition and heating value on combustion performance and emissions. The gas turbine can combustor is designed to burn the fuel efficiently, reduce the emissions, and lower the wall temperature. Syngas mixtures with different fuel compositions are produced through different coal and biom...

  3. Pollution technology program, can-annular combustor engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Greene, W.

    1976-01-01

    A Pollution Reduction Technology Program to develop and demonstrate the combustor technology necessary to reduce exhaust emissions for aircraft engines using can-annular combustors is described. The program consisted of design, fabrication, experimental rig testing and assessment of results and was conducted in three program elements. The combustor configurations of each program element represented increasing potential for meeting the 1979 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) emission standards, while also representing increasing complexity and difficulty of development and adaptation to an operational engine. Experimental test rig results indicate that significant reductions were made to the emission levels of the baseline JT8D-17 combustor by concepts in all three program elements. One of the Element I single-stage combustors reduced carbon monoxide to a level near, and total unburned hydrocarbons (THC) and smoke to levels below the 1979 EPA standards with little or no improvement in oxides of nitrogen. The Element II two-stage advanced Vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) concept met the standard for THC and achieved significant reductions in CO and NOx relative to the baseline. Although the Element III prevaporized-premixed concept reduced high power NOx below the Element II results, there was no improvement to the integrated EPA parameter relative to the Vorbix combustor.

  4. Flow conditioner for fuel injector for combustor and method for low-NO.sub.x combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Partha; Smith, Kenneth O.; Ritz, Frank J.

    2013-09-10

    An injector for a gas turbine combustor including a catalyst coated surface forming a passage for feed gas flow and a channel for oxidant gas flow establishing an axial gas flow through a flow conditioner disposed at least partially within an inner wall of the injector. The flow conditioner includes a length with an interior passage opening into upstream and downstream ends for passage of the axial gas flow. An interior diameter of the interior passage smoothly reduces and then increases from upstream to downstream ends.

  5. Experimental study of a high-efficiency low-emission surface combustor-heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Tian-yu; Khinkis, M.J.; Fish, F.F.

    1991-01-01

    The surface combustor-heater is a combined combustion/heat-transfer device in which the heat-exchange surfaces are embedded in a stationary bed of refractory material where gaseous fuel is burned. Because of intensive heat radiation from the hot solid particles and enhanced heat convection from the gas flow to the heat-exchange tubes, heat transfer is significantly intensified. Removing heat simultaneously with the combustion process has the benefit of reducing the combustion temperature, which suppresses NO x formation. A basic experimental study was conducted on a 60-kW bench-scale surface combustor-heater with two rows of water-cooled tube coils to evaluate its performance and explore the mechanism of combined convective-radiative heat transfer and its interaction with combustion in the porous matrix. Combustion stability in the porous matrix, heat-transfer rates, emissions, and pressure drop through the unit have been investigated for the variable parameters of operation and unit configurations. Experimental results have demonstrated that high combustion intensity (up to 2.5 MW/m 2 ), high heat-transfer rates (up to 310 kW/m 2 ), high density of energy conversion (up to 8 MW/m 3 ), as well as ultra-low emissions (NO x and CO as low as 15 vppm*) have been achieved. The excellent performance of the test unit and the extensive data obtained from the present experimental study provide the basis for further development of high-efficiency and ultra low-emission water heaters, boilers, and process heaters based on the surface combustor-heater concept. 4 refs., 16 figs

  6. Reduced Order Modeling of Combustion Instability in a Gas Turbine Model Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold-Medabalimi, Nicholas; Huang, Cheng; Duraisamy, Karthik

    2017-11-01

    Hydrocarbon fuel based propulsion systems are expected to remain relevant in aerospace vehicles for the foreseeable future. Design of these devices is complicated by combustion instabilities. The capability to model and predict these effects at reduced computational cost is a requirement for both design and control of these devices. This work focuses on computational studies on a dual swirl model gas turbine combustor in the context of reduced order model development. Full fidelity simulations are performed utilizing URANS and Hybrid RANS-LES with finite rate chemistry. Following this, data decomposition techniques are used to extract a reduced basis representation of the unsteady flow field. These bases are first used to identify sensor locations to guide experimental interrogations and controller feedback. Following this, initial results on developing a control-oriented reduced order model (ROM) will be presented. The capability of the ROM will be further assessed based on different operating conditions and geometric configurations.

  7. Investigation on the flame dynamics of meso-combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mahbub

    Miniature heat engines burning hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels have significantly higher energy densities compared to conventional lithium batteries and thus will play an essential role in the portable production of power for future electronics, remote sensors, and micro aerial vehicles. Additionally, miniature heat engines will tremendously benefit next generation of environmental technologies such as steam reforming, ammonia decomposition and fuel cells. Successful miniaturization of heat engine components demand a more complete and broader understanding of micro-fluid dynamics and micro-combustion phenomena associated with the combustor design. This dissertation is aimed at investigating the details of the micro-mixing dynamics and the combustion behavior of the meso-combustor and to create fundamental understanding of physics based design methodology. The primary goals of the project are (i) to develop an understanding of fuel-air mixing inside a meso-combustor, (ii) to develop an understanding of the flame stability (flame quenching and velocity blowout) criteria of a meso-combustor, (iii) to understand the thermal behavior of the meso-combustor, and (iv) to correlate these with combustor operating conditions such as the Reynolds number, equivalent ratio, and thermal power etc. The present study shows that adequate mixing of fuel and air is achievable in millimeter scale combustors. Both computed results and experimental measurements of iso-thermal (non-burning) flows at different mixing configurations indicate that the laminar burning velocity remains higher than the local flow velocities in most of the combustor locations to support stable flame propagations. Stable flames of hydrogen are achieved for all mixing and flow configurations. The combustion of methane with air as oxidizer in the combustors is unreliable. However, highly stable combustion of methane at various mixing and flow conditions is achieved when pure oxygen is used as an oxidizer. The

  8. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-09-01

    This paper discusses the design and operation of a test combustor suitable for studying combustion oscillations caused by a commercial-scale gas turbine fuel nozzle. Aside from the need to be conducted at elevated pressures and temperatures, it is desirable for the experimental device to be flexible in its geometry so as to provide an acoustic environment representative of the commercial device. The combustor design, capabilities, and relevant instrumentation for such a device are presented, along with initial operating experience and preliminary data that suggests the importance of nozzle reference velocity and air temperature.

  9. Advanced low emissions catalytic combustor program at General Electric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    The Advanced Low Emissions Catalytic Combustors Program (ALECC) is being undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of employing catalytic combustion technology in aircraft gas turbine engines as a means to control emission of oxides of nitrogen during subsonic stratospheric cruise operation. The ALECC Program is being conducted in three phases. The first phase, which was completed in November, 1978, consisted of a design study to identify catalytic combustor designs having the greatest potential to meet the emissions and performance goals specified. The primary emissions goal of this program was to obtain cruise NO emissions of less than 1g/kg (compared with levels of 15 to 20 g/x obtained with current designs)/ However, good overall performance and feasibility for engine development were heavily weighted in the evaluation of combustor designs.

  10. Design and evaluation of combustors for reducing aircraft engine pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. E.; Grobman, J.

    1973-01-01

    Various techniques and test results are briefly described and referenced for detail. The effort arises from the increasing concern for the measurement and control of emissions from gas turbine engines. The greater part of this research is focused on reducing the oxides of nitrogen formed during takeoff and cruise in both advanced CTOL, high pressure ratio engines, and advanced supersonic aircraft engines. The experimental approaches taken to reduce oxides of nitrogen emissions include the use of: multizone combustors incorporating reduced dwell time, fuel-air premixing, air atomization, fuel prevaporization, water injection, and gaseous fuels. In the experiments conducted to date, some of these techniques were more successful than others in reducing oxides of nitrogen emissions. Tests are being conducted on full-annular combustors at pressures up to 6 atmospheres and on combustor segments at pressures up to 30 atmospheres.

  11. Analytical fuel property effects: Small combustors, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. G.; Monty, J. D.; Morton, H. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of non-standard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor were studied and the effectiveness of design changes intended to counter the effects of these fuels was evaluated. The T700/CT7 turboprop engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired for this study. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. No. 2 diesel fuel was also evaluated in this program. Results demonstrated the anticipated higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity with resulting increased metal temperatures on the baseline T700 combustor. Three new designs were evaluated using the non standard fuels. The three designs incorporated enhanced cooling features and smoke reduction features. All three designs, when burning the broad specification fuels, exhibited metal temperatures at or below the baseline combustor temperatures on JP-5. Smoke levels were acceptable but higher than predicted.

  12. Large Eddy Simulation of a Swirl-Stabilized Pilot Combustor from Conventional to Flameless Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Fooladgar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates flame and flow structure of a swirl-stabilized pilot combustor in conventional, high temperature, and flameless modes by means of a partially stirred reactor combustion model to provide a better insight into designing lean premixed combustion devices with preheating system. Finite rate chemistry combustion model with one step tuned mechanism and large eddy simulation is used to numerically simulate six cases in these modes. Results show that moving towards high temperature mode by increasing the preheating level, the combustor is prone to formation of thermal NOx with higher risks of flashback. In addition, the flame becomes shorter and thinner with higher turbulent kinetic energies. On the other hand, towards the flameless mode, leaning the preheated mixture leads to almost thermal NOx-free combustion with lower risk of flashback and thicker and longer flames. Simulations also show qualitative agreements with available experiments, indicating that the current combustion model with one step tuned mechanisms is capable of capturing main features of the turbulent flame in a wide range of mixture temperature and equivalence ratios.

  13. Effect of ramp-cavity on hydrogen fueled scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.V.S. Moorthy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustained combustion and optimization of combustor are the two challenges being faced by combustion scientists working in the area of supersonic combustion. Thorough mixing, lower stagnation pressure losses, positive thrust and sustained combustion are the key issues in the field of supersonic combustion. Special fluid mechanism is required to achieve good mixing. To induce such mechanisms in supersonic inflows, the fuel injectors should be critically shaped incurring less flow losses. Present investigations are focused on the effect of fuel injection scheme on a model scramjet combustor performance. Ramps at supersonic flow generate axial vortices that help in macro-mixing of fuel with air. Interaction of shocks generated by ramps with the fuel stream generates boro-clinic torque at the air & liquid fuel interface, enhancing micro-mixing. Recirculation zones present in cavities increase the residence time of the combustible mixture. Making use of the advantageous features of both, a ramp-cavity combustor is designed. The combustor has two sections. First, constant height section consists of a backward facing step followed by ramps and cavities on both the top and bottom walls. The ramps are located alternately on top and bottom walls. The complete combustor width is utilized for the cavities. The second section of the combustor is diverging area section. This is provided to avoid thermal choking. In the present work gaseous hydrogen is considered as fuel. This study was mainly focused on the mixing characteristics of four different fuel injection locations. It was found that injecting fuel upstream of the ramp was beneficial from fuel spread point of view.

  14. Combustor with two stage primary fuel assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, Mehran; Zolyomi, Wendel; Whidden, Graydon Lane

    2000-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having first and second passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air supplied to a primary combustion zone. The flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages is separately regulated using a single annular fuel distribution ring having first and second row of fuel discharge ports. The interior portion of the fuel distribution ring is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel distribution manifolds and is located upstream of the inlets to the two pre-mixing passages. The annular fuel distribution ring is supplied with fuel by an annular fuel supply manifold, the interior portion of which is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel supply manifolds. A first flow of fuel is regulated by a first control valve and directed to the first fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to first fuel supply tubes that direct it to the first fuel distribution manifold. From the first fuel distribution manifold, the first flow of fuel is distributed to the first row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the first pre-mixing passage. A second flow of fuel is regulated by a second control valve and directed to the second fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to second fuel supply tubes that direct it to the second fuel distribution manifold. From the second fuel distribution manifold, the second flow of fuel is distributed to the second row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the second pre-mixing passage.

  15. Flashback behavior in a model swirl combustor at elevated pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, Rakesh; Ebi, Dominik; Clemens, Noel

    2014-11-01

    Understanding of combustion physics at high pressure is essential for safe and efficient operation of gas turbine combustors. A new optically-accessible elevated pressure combustion facility has been developed for this purpose. The modular design of the chamber allows applying various optical diagnostic techniques and the installation of different types of combustors. In the current study, the effect of pressure on boundary layer flashback in lean-premixed swirl flames is investigated. Mixtures of hydrogen and methane at different equivalence ratios are tested. High-speed chemiluminescence imaging is employed to study the upstream flame propagation inside the mixing tube, which allows comparison to previous results of flashback at atmospheric pressure.

  16. Variable volume combustor with aerodynamic fuel flanges for nozzle mounting

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnaughhay, Johnie Franklin; Keener, Christopher Paul; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ostebee, Heath Michael

    2016-09-20

    The present application provides a combustor for use with a gas turbine engine. The combustor may include a number of micro-mixer fuel nozzles and a fuel injection system for providing a flow of fuel to the micro-mixer fuel nozzles. The fuel injection system may include a number of support struts supporting the fuel nozzles and for providing the flow of fuel therethrough. The fuel injection system also may include a number of aerodynamic fuel flanges connecting the micro-mixer fuel nozzles and the support struts.

  17. Turbine combustor with fuel nozzles having inner and outer fuel circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

    2013-12-24

    A combustor cap assembly for a turbine engine includes a combustor cap and a plurality of fuel nozzles mounted on the combustor cap. One or more of the fuel nozzles would include two separate fuel circuits which are individually controllable. The combustor cap assembly would be controlled so that individual fuel circuits of the fuel nozzles are operated or deliberately shut off to provide for physical separation between the flow of fuel delivered by adjacent fuel nozzles and/or so that adjacent fuel nozzles operate at different pressure differentials. Operating a combustor cap assembly in this fashion helps to reduce or eliminate the generation of undesirable and potentially harmful noise.

  18. Thermal performance of a micro-combustor for micro-gas turbine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, H.L.; Xu, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    Premixed combustion of hydrogen gas and air was performed in a stainless steel based micro-annular combustor for a micro-gas turbine system. Micro-scale combustion has proved to be stable in the micro-combustor with a gap of 2 mm. The operating range of the micro-combustor was measured, and the maximum excess air ratio is up to 4.5. The distribution of the outer wall temperature and the temperature of exhaust gas of the micro-combustor with excess air ratio were obtained, and the wall temperature of the micro-combustor reaches its maximum value at the excess air ratio of 0.9 instead of 1 (stoichiometric ratio). The heat loss of the micro-combustor to the environment was calculated and even exceeds 70% of the total thermal power computed from the consumed hydrogen mass flow rate. Moreover, radiant heat transfer covers a large fraction of the total heat loss. Measures used to reduce the heat loss were proposed to improve the thermal performance of the micro-combustor. The optimal operating status of the micro-combustor and micro-gas turbine is analyzed and proposed by analyzing the relationship of the temperature of the exhaust gas of the micro-combustor with thermal power and excess air ratio. The investigation of the thermal performance of the micro-combustor is helpful to design an improved micro-combustor

  19. The Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas fluidized bed combustor; El combustor de lecho fluidizado del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milan Foressi, Julio [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    After synthesizing the most important aspects of the combustion technology in fluidized bed, the experimental combustor developed at the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) is described, as well as the test results of the experiences carried out with coal from Rio Escondido, Coahuila. [Espanol] Tras sintetizar los aspectos mas importantes de la tecnologia de combustion en lecho fluidizado, se describe el combustor experimental desarrollado en el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE), asi como los resultados de las experiencias realizadas con carbon proveniente de Rio Escondido, Coahuila.

  20. Multiscale Software Tool for Controls Prototyping in Supersonic Combustors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pindera, M

    2004-01-01

    .... In Phase I we have developed a proof-of-concept version of such a tool. We have developed a model-free direct control strategy with on-line training and demonstrated its capabilities in controlling isolator unstart in a hypersonic combustor...

  1. Combustion of Syngas Fuel in Gas Turbine Can Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaouki Ghenai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical investigation of the combustion of syngas fuel mixture in gas turbine can combustor is presented in this paper. The objective is to understand the impact of the variability in the alternative fuel composition and heating value on combustion performance and emissions. The gas turbine can combustor is designed to burn the fuel efficiently, reduce the emissions, and lower the wall temperature. Syngas mixtures with different fuel compositions are produced through different coal and biomass gasification process technologies. The composition of the fuel burned in can combustor was changed from natural gas (methane to syngas fuel with hydrogen to carbon monoxide (H2/CO volume ratio ranging from 0.63 to 2.36. The mathematical models used for syngas fuel combustion consist of the k-ε model for turbulent flow, mixture fractions/PDF model for nonpremixed gas combustion, and P-1 radiation model. The effect of syngas fuel composition and lower heating value on the flame shape, gas temperature, mass of carbon dioxide (CO2 and nitrogen oxides (NOx per unit of energy generation is presented in this paper. The results obtained in this study show the change in gas turbine can combustor performance with the same power generation when natural gas or methane fuel is replaced by syngas fuels.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A VORTEX CONTAINMENT COMBUSTOR FOR COAL COMBUSTION SYTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes the development of a vortex containment combustor (VCC) for coal combustion systems, designed to solve major problems facing the conversion of oil- and gas-fired boilers to coal (e.g., derating, inorganic impurities in coal, and excessive formation of NOx and...

  3. Non-linear dynamics in pulse combustor: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tages, lack of thorough understanding of the dynamics complicates the design of pulse combustors and is one of the main ... engineering community. Many researchers have investigated the dynamic behaviour of .... substantiated the qualitative observations similar to that in figure 1 with quantitative esti- mates based on ...

  4. Non-linear dynamics in pulse combustor: A review

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the regime of periodic behaviour, and (iii) using the dynamic characteristics to predict events like extinction. 2. Dynamic characterization using mathematical model. Pulse combustor consists of a combustion chamber that is often modelled as a well- stirred reactor due to intense mixing with a tailpipe extending from one end.

  5. Utilisation of low grade fuels influidised bed combustors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    North, B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This presentation highlights the utilisation of low grade fuels in Fluidised Bed Combustors (FBC) with regards to South African coal. It looks at types of coals and fuels tested, test facilities and examples of FBC’s at the CSIR. Benefits from...

  6. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering for quantitative temperature and concentration measurements in a high-pressure gas turbine combustor rig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariyan, Mathew Paul

    Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (DP-CARS) temperature and major species (CO2/N2) concentration measurements have been performed in an optically-accessible high-pressure gas turbine combustor facility (GTCF) and for partially-premixed and non-premixed flames in a laminar counter-flow burner. A window assembly incorporating pairs of thin and thick fused silica windows on three sides was designed, fabricated, and assembled in the GTCF for advanced laser diagnostic studies. An injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was used as a narrowband pump laser source in the dual-pump CARS system. Large prisms on computer-controlled translation stages were used to direct the CARS beams either into the main optics leg for measurements in the GTCF or to a reference optics leg for measurements of the nonresonant CARS spectrum and for aligning the CARS system. Combusting flows were stabilized with liquid fuel injection only for the central injector of a 9-element lean direct injection (LDI) device developed at NASA Glenn Research Center. The combustor was operated using Jet A fuel at inlet air temperatures up to 725 K and combustor pressures up to 1.03 MPa. Single-shot DP-CARS spectra were analyzed using the Sandia CARSFT code in the batch operation mode to yield instantaneous temperature and CO2/N2 concentration ratio values. Spatial maps of mean and standard deviations of temperature and CO2/N2 concentrations were obtained in the high-pressure LDI flames by translating the CARS probe volume in axial and vertical directions inside the combustor rig. The mean temperature fields demonstrate the effect of the combustor conditions on the overall flame length and the average flame structure. The temperature relative standard deviation values indicate thermal fluctuations due to the presence of recirculation zones and/or flame brush fluctuations. The correlation between the temperature and relative CO 2 concentration data has been studied at various combustor

  7. Cold start characteristics of ethanol as an automobile fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Leonard

    1982-01-01

    An alcohol fuel burner and decomposer in which one stream of fuel is preheated by passing it through an electrically heated conduit to vaporize the fuel, the fuel vapor is mixed with air, the air-fuel mixture is ignited and combusted, and the combustion gases are passed in heat exchange relationship with a conduit carrying a stream of fuel to decompose the fuel forming a fuel stream containing hydrogen gas for starting internal combustion engines, the mass flow of the combustion gas being increased as it flows in heat exchange relationship with the fuel carrying conduit, is disclosed.

  8. Strategic Delusions - The Cold Start Doctrine: Proactive Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    nuclear quotient with a view to further refine the CSD / PAS as well 37 Khurshid Khan...Major inhibitors identified were lack of intelligence , significant likelihood of corresponding response by the Pakistani government to include nuclear...terror. India is also intelligently playing the western sensitivities concerning China and Iran to her advantage. Fifth, what is the degree of success

  9. Use of Electrically Heated Metal Catalytic Converter in Cold Starting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The easiest way to preheat the converter is to use electric resistance heaters. The electrical systems on most cars provide enough energy or power to heat the catalytic converter fast enough. So, in this research the main converter remains its usual position, whereas the heated catalyst is placed close to the exhaust manifold ...

  10. Computational Analysis of Dynamic SPK(S8)-JP8 Fueled Combustor-Sector Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryder, R.; Hendricks, Roberts C.; Huber, M. L.; Shouse, D. T.

    2010-01-01

    Civil and military flight tests using blends of synthetic and biomass fueling with jet fuel up to 50:50 are currently considered as "drop-in" fuels. They are fully compatible with aircraft performance, emissions and fueling systems, yet the design and operations of such fueling systems and combustors must be capable of running fuels from a range of feedstock sources. This paper provides Smart Combustor or Fuel Flexible Combustor designers with computational tools, preliminary performance, emissions and particulates combustor sector data. The baseline fuel is kerosene-JP-8+100 (military) or Jet A (civil). Results for synthetic paraffinic kerosene (SPK) fuel blends show little change with respect to baseline performance, yet do show lower emissions. The evolution of a validated combustor design procedure is fundamental to the development of dynamic fueling of combustor systems for gas turbine engines that comply with multiple feedstock sources satisfying both new and legacy systems.

  11. Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

    2012-11-20

    A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

  12. Experimental study on the heavy-duty gas turbine combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonovsky, V.; Ahn, Kook Young

    2000-01-01

    The results of stand and field testing of a combustion chamber for a heavy-duty 150 MW gas turbine are discussed. The model represented one of 14 identical segments of a tubular multican combustor constructed in the scale 1:1. The model experiments were executed at a pressure smaller than in the real gas turbine. The combustion efficiency, pressure loss factor, pattern factor, liner wall temperature, flame radiation, fluctuating pressure, and NOx emission were measured at partial and full load for both model and on-site testing. The comparison of these items of information, received on similar modes in the stand and field tests, has allowed the development of a method of calculation and the improvement of gas turbine combustors

  13. Pulse Combustor CRADA PC91-001 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none

    1992-08-31

    As outlined in the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between BO Technical Developments, Ltd. (BO Tech) and the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) Coal Combustion Division, a BO Tech designed pulse-blade combustor was studied at PETC. Phase 1 involved limited tests of a single-blade pulsed-combustor module to evaluate the suitability of a gas-designed unit for firing coal for use in residential, commercial, or industrial sectors. During the course of the project, three different pulsed blade burners were designed and fabricated by BO Tech and subsequently delivered to PETC for evaluation. These units were designed to allow modification of the furnace dimensions, which would give PETC a means to take simple steps to improve coal firing performance is required. No major furnace design changes were to be included as part of the phase 1 activities.

  14. Coal-Fired MHD Combustor Development Project, Phase 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    The Coal-Fired MHD Combustor Development Project (phase 3D) is reported. The scope encompasses development work on the 50 MW/sub t/ combustor related to test support at the CDIF, fabrication and assembly of first and second stage hardware, plans for second stage design verification testing and power testing, and designs for a continuous slag rejector and low preheat inlet section. Progress includes the following: (1) operational verification testing of the first stage at the CDIF was completed; (2) assembly and checkout of the second first stage, two second stages, and PEM is 75 to 90% completed; (3) conceptual designs for a continuous slag rejector and low preheat inlet section are completed and low preheat preliminary design work is 75% completed; and (4) revision of the users' manual to include the second stage is 75% completed and a draft Test Plan for power train testing is reviewed.

  15. Systems and methods for preventing flashback in a combustor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2016-04-05

    Embodiments of the present application include a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly may include a combustion chamber, a first plenum, a second plenum, and one or more elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes. Each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a first length at least partially disposed within the first plenum and configured to receive a first fluid from the first plenum. Moreover, each of the elongate air/fuel premixing injection tubes may include a second length disposed downstream of the first length and at least partially disposed within the second plenum. The second length may be formed of a porous wall configured to allow a second fluid from the second plenum to enter the second length and create a boundary layer about the porous wall.

  16. System for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2016-03-01

    A system for supporting bundled tube segments within a combustor includes an annular sleeve that extends circumferentially and axially within the combustor, a support lug that extends radially inward from the annular sleeve and an annular support frame that is disposed within the annular sleeve. The annular support frame includes an inner ring portion, an outer ring portion and a plurality of spokes that extend radially between the inner and outer ring portions. The inner ring portion, the outer ring portion and the plurality of spokes define an annular array of openings for receiving a respective bundled tube segment. The inner ring portion is connected to each bundled tube segment and the outer ring portion is coupled to the support lug.

  17. Analytical fuel property effects, small combustors, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of nonstandard aviation fuels on a typical small gas turbine combustor was analyzed. The T700/CT7 engine family was chosen as being representative of the class of aircraft power plants desired. Fuel properties, as specified by NASA, are characterized by low hydrogen content and high aromatics levels. Higher than normal smoke output and flame radiation intensity for the current T700 combustor which serves as a baseline were anticipated. It is, therefore, predicted that out of specification smoke visibility and higher than normal shell temperatures will exist when using NASA ERBS fuels with a consequence of severe reduction in cyclic life. Three new designs are proposed to compensate for the deficiencies expected with the existing design. They have emerged as the best of the eight originally proposed redesigns or combinations thereof. After the five choices that were originally made by NASA on the basis of competing performance factors, General Electric narrowed the field to the three proposed.

  18. Numerical optimization of laboratory combustor geometry for NO suppression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazaheri, Karim; Shakeri, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A five-step kinetics for NO and CO prediction is extracted from GRI-3.0 mechanism. • Accuracy and applicability of this kinetics for numerical optimization were shown. • Optimized geometry for a combustor was determined using the combined process. • NO emission from optimized geometry is found 10.3% lower than the basis geometry. - Abstract: In this article, geometry optimization of a jet stirred reactor (JSR) combustor has been carried out for minimum NO emissions in methane oxidation using a combined numerical algorithm based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and differential evolution (DE) optimization. The optimization algorithm is also used to find a fairly accurate reduced mechanism. The combustion kinetics is based on a five-step mechanism with 17 unknowns which is obtained using an optimization DE algorithm for a PSR–PFR reactor based on GRI-3.0 full mechanism. The optimization design variables are the unknowns of the five-step mechanism and the cost function is the concentration difference of pollutants obtained from the 5-step mechanism and the full mechanism. To validate the flow solver and the chemical kinetics, the computed NO at the outlet of the JSR is compared with experiments. To optimize the geometry of a combustor, the JSR combustor geometry is modeled using three parameters (i.e., design variables). An integrated approach using a flow solver and the DE optimization algorithm produces the lowest NO concentrations. Results show that the exhaust NO emission for the optimized geometry is 10.3% lower than the original geometry, while the inlet temperature of the working fluid and the concentration of O 2 are operating constraints. In addition, the concentration of CO pollutant is also much less than the original chamber.

  19. Combustion and direct energy conversion inside a micro-combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Yafeng; Chen, Wei; Lei, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The flammability range of micro-combustor was broadened with heat recirculation. • The quenching diameter decreased with heat recirculation compared to without recirculation. • The surface areas to volume ratio was the most important parameter affecting the energy conversion efficiency. • The maximum conversion efficiency (3.15%) was achieved with 1 mm inner diameter. - Abstract: Electrical energy can be generated by employing a micro-thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell which absorbs thermal radiation from combustion taking place in a micro-combustor. The stability of combustion in a micro-combustor is essential for operating a micro-power system using hydrogen and hydrocarbon fuels as energy source. To understand the mechanism of sustaining combustion within the quenching distance of fuel, this study proposed an annular micro combustion tube with recirculation of exhaust heat. To explore the feasibility of combustion in the micro annular tube, the parameters influencing the combustion namely, quenching diameter, and flammability were studied through numerical simulation. The results indicated that combustion could be realized in micro- combustor using heat recirculation. Following results were obtained from simulation. The quenching diameter reduced from 1.3 mm to 0.9 mm for heat recirculation at equivalence ratio of 1; the lean flammability was 2.5%–5% lower than that of without heat recirculation for quenching diameters between 2 mm and 5 mm. The overall energy conversion efficiency varied at different inner diameters. A maximum efficiency of 3.15% was achieved at an inner diameter of 1 mm. The studies indicated that heat recirculation is an effective strategy to maintain combustion and to improve combustion limits in micro-scale system.

  20. Nonintrusive transceiver and method for characterizing temperature and velocity fields in a gas turbine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSilva, Upul P.; Claussen, Heiko

    2017-09-05

    An acoustic transceiver is implemented for measuring acoustic properties of a gas in a turbine engine combustor. The transceiver housing defines a measurement chamber and has an opening adapted for attachment to a turbine engine combustor wall. The opening permits propagation of acoustic signals between the gas in the turbine engine combustor and gas in the measurement chamber. An acoustic sensor mounted to the housing receives acoustic signals propagating in the measurement chamber, and an acoustic transmitter mounted to the housing creates acoustic signals within the measurement chamber. An acoustic measurement system includes at least two such transceivers attached to a turbine engine combustor wall and connected to a controller.

  1. Emissions from laboratory combustor tests of manufactured wood products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkening, R.; Evans, M.; Ragland, K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Baker, A. [USDA Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Manufactured wood products contain wood, wood fiber, and materials added during manufacture of the product. Manufacturing residues and the used products are burned in a furnace or boiler instead of landfilling. Emissions from combustion of these products contain additional compounds from the combustion of non-wood material which have not been adequately characterized to specify the best combustion conditions, emissions control equipment, and disposal procedures. Total hydrocarbons, formaldehyde, higher aldehydes and carbon monoxide emissions from aspen flakeboard and aspen cubes were measured in a 76 mm i.d. by 1.5 m long fixed bed combustor as a function of excess oxygen, and temperature. Emissions of hydrocarbons, aldehydes and CO from flakeboard and from clean aspen were very sensitive to average combustor temperature and excess oxygen. Hydrocarbon and aldehyde emissions below 10 ppM were achieved with 5% excess oxygen and 1,200{degrees}C average temperature for aspen flakeboard and 1,100{degrees}C for clean aspen at a 0.9 s residence time. When the average temperature decreased below these levels, the emissions increased rapidly. For example, at 950{degrees}C and 5% excess oxygen the formaldehyde emissions were over 1,000 ppM. These laboratory tests reinforce the need to carefully control the temperature and excess oxygen in full-scale wood combustors.

  2. Flame dynamics of a meso-scale heat recirculating combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vijayan, V.; Gupta, A.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The dynamics of premixed propane-air flame in a meso-scale ceramic combustor has been examined here. The flame characteristics in the combustor were examined by measuring the acoustic emissions and preheat temperatures together with high-speed cinematography. For the small-scale combustor, the volume to surface area ratio is small and hence the walls have significant effect on the global flame structure, flame location and flame dynamics. In addition to the flame-wall thermal coupling there is a coupling between flame and acoustics in the case of confined flames. Flame-wall thermal interactions lead to low frequency flame fluctuations ({proportional_to}100 Hz) depending upon the thermal response of the wall. However, the flame-acoustic interactions can result in a wide range of flame fluctuations ranging from few hundred Hz to few kHz. Wall temperature distribution is one of the factors that control the amount of reactant preheating which in turn effects the location of flame stabilization. Acoustic emission signals and high-speed flame imaging confirmed that for the present case flame-acoustic interactions have more significant effect on flame dynamics. Based on the acoustic emissions, five different flame regimes have been identified; whistling/harmonic mode, rich instability mode, lean instability mode, silent mode and pulsating flame mode. (author)

  3. Recurrence networks to study dynamical transitions in a turbulent combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavarthi, V.; Unni, V. R.; Gopalakrishnan, E. A.; Sujith, R. I.

    2017-06-01

    Thermoacoustic instability and lean blowout are the major challenges faced when a gas turbine combustor is operated under fuel lean conditions. The dynamics of thermoacoustic system is the result of complex nonlinear interactions between the subsystems—turbulent reactive flow and the acoustic field of the combustor. In order to study the transitions between the dynamical regimes in such a complex system, the time series corresponding to one of the dynamic variables is transformed to an ɛ-recurrence network. The topology of the recurrence network resembles the structure of the attractor representing the dynamics of the system. The transitions in the thermoacoustic system are then captured as the variation in the topological characteristics of the network. We show the presence of power law degree distribution in the recurrence networks constructed from time series acquired during the occurrence of combustion noise and during the low amplitude aperiodic oscillations prior to lean blowout. We also show the absence of power law degree distribution in the recurrence networks constructed from time series acquired during the occurrence of thermoacoustic instability and during the occurrence of intermittency. We demonstrate that the measures derived from recurrence network can be used as tools to capture the transitions in the turbulent combustor and also as early warning measures for predicting impending thermoacoustic instability and blowout.

  4. The preliminary design of an annular combustor for a mini gas turbine

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, Bronwyn C

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study involves the redesign of the combustor liner for a 200N mini gas turbine engine using first principles and the design methods of the NREC series as shown in Figure 1. The combustor design was performed using five different operating...

  5. Three-dimensional particle image velocimetry in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The three-dimensional flow field inside a generic can-type, forward flow, experimental combustor was measured. A stereoscopic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to obtain the flow field of the combustor in the non-reacting condition...

  6. Parametric Study of Pulse-Combustor-Driven Ejectors at High-Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungster, Shaye; Paxson, Daniel E.; Perkins, Hugh D.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse-combustor configurations developed in recent studies have demonstrated performance levels at high-pressure operating conditions comparable to those observed at atmospheric conditions. However, problems related to the way fuel was being distributed within the pulse combustor were still limiting performance. In the first part of this study, new configurations are investigated computationally aimed at improving the fuel distribution and performance of the pulse-combustor. Subsequent sections investigate the performance of various pulse-combustor driven ejector configurations operating at highpressure conditions, focusing on the effects of fuel equivalence ratio and ejector throat area. The goal is to design pulse-combustor-ejector configurations that maximize pressure gain while achieving a thermal environment acceptable to a turbine, and at the same time maintain acceptable levels of NOx emissions and flow non-uniformities. The computations presented here have demonstrated pressure gains of up to 2.8%.

  7. The pollution reduction technology program for can-annular combustor engines - Description and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, R.; Fiorentino, A. J.; Diehl, L.

    1976-01-01

    Pollutant reduction and performance characteristics were determined for three successively more advanced combustor concepts. Program Element I consisted of minor modifications to the current production JT8D combustor and fuel system to evaluate means of improved fuel preparation and changes to the basic airflow distribution. Element II addressed versions of the two-staged Vorbix (vortex burning and mixing) combustor and represented a moderate increase in hardware complexity and difficulty of development. The concept selected for Element III employed vaporized fuel as a means of achieving minimum emission levels and represented the greatest difficulty of development and adaptation to the JT8D engine. Test results indicate that the Element I single-stage combustors were capable of dramatic improvement in idle pollutants. The multistage combustors evaluated in Program Elements II and III simultaneously reduced CO, THC and NOx emissions, but were unable to satisfy the current 1979 EPA standards.

  8. Combustion of cork waste in a circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Boavida, D.; Miranda, M.; Cabrita, I. [Dept. de Tecnologias de Combustao, ITE-INETI, Lisboa (Portugal); Abelha, P. [Coaltec e Ambiente, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1999-07-01

    There is currently an ongoing joint project between Portugal and Spain, which is being funded by the FAIR programme. The principal objective of the FAIR project is to investigate the application of the fluidised bed combustion (FBC) technology to burn cork wastes with the aim of overcoming the difficulties currently experienced in the cork processing industries. The combustion studies at INETI were carried out using the 300 kW{sub th} circulating fluidised bed facility. The combustor is square in cross section with each side being 0.3 m long. The combustor height is 5 m. The temperatures in the bed, the riser and that of the flue gases leaving the reactor were continuously monitored. The combustion gases leaving the reactor passed through the recycling cyclone first to capture most of particulates elutriated out of the combustor. The solid particles were intermittently collected for analysis to determine the amount of carbon present, which helped the combustion efficiency to be calculated. Instantaneous measurements of O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O and SO{sub 2} present levels in the flue gases were also carried out. The combustion tests were done with both the cork waste dust and granular virgin cork. The difference is that cork dust gets contaminated during the process due to the use of various additives. Most of the combustion took place in the riser where the temperature was at times up to 523 K above that of the bed. The unburned carbon level was low ranging from about 1.5 to 2.% suggesting that most of the particles burned to completion in the riser. (orig.)

  9. Active Combustion Control for Aircraft Gas-Turbine Engines-Experimental Results for an Advanced, Low-Emissions Combustor Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaat, John C.; Kopasakis, George; Saus, Joseph R.; Chang, Clarence T.; Wey, Changlie

    2012-01-01

    Lean combustion concepts for aircraft engine combustors are prone to combustion instabilities. Mitigation of instabilities is an enabling technology for these low-emissions combustors. NASA Glenn Research Center s prior activity has demonstrated active control to suppress a high-frequency combustion instability in a combustor rig designed to emulate an actual aircraft engine instability experience with a conventional, rich-front-end combustor. The current effort is developing further understanding of the problem specifically as applied to future lean-burning, very low-emissions combustors. A prototype advanced, low-emissions aircraft engine combustor with a combustion instability has been identified and previous work has characterized the dynamic behavior of that combustor prototype. The combustor exhibits thermoacoustic instabilities that are related to increasing fuel flow and that potentially prevent full-power operation. A simplified, non-linear oscillator model and a more physics-based sectored 1-D dynamic model have been developed to capture the combustor prototype s instability behavior. Utilizing these models, the NASA Adaptive Sliding Phasor Average Control (ASPAC) instability control method has been updated for the low-emissions combustor prototype. Active combustion instability suppression using the ASPAC control method has been demonstrated experimentally with this combustor prototype in a NASA combustion test cell operating at engine pressures, temperatures, and flows. A high-frequency fuel valve was utilized to perturb the combustor fuel flow. Successful instability suppression was shown using a dynamic pressure sensor in the combustor for controller feedback. Instability control was also shown with a pressure feedback sensor in the lower temperature region upstream of the combustor. It was also demonstrated that the controller can prevent the instability from occurring while combustor operation was transitioning from a stable, low-power condition to

  10. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE's Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Combustor Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiangang G.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Stephan, Robert R.; Barnett, Terry R.; Ojard, Greg C.

    2003-01-01

    Combustor liners fabricated from a SiC/SiC composite (silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix) were nondestructively interrogated before and after combustion rig testing by x-ray, ultrasonic, and thermographic techniques. In addition, mechanical test results were obtained from witness coupons, representing the as-manufactured liners, and from coupons machined from the components after combustion exposure. Thermography indications correlated with reduced material properties obtained after rig testing. The thermography indications in the SiC/SiC liners were delaminations and damaged fiber tows, as determined through microstructural examinations.

  12. Single particle behaviour in circulating fluidized bed combustors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erik Weinell, Claus

    1994-01-01

    of fuel particles in a boiler. A cold pilot scale model of a circulating fluidized bed combustor was used. Here sand was recirculated by means of air. Pressure measurements along the riser determined suspension density. A radioactive tracking facility to determined the dynamic picture of the particle...... trajectories in the simulated boiler. In the splash zone, closest to the secondary air inlet an exponential decay in the solids suspension density with the riser height was observed. A transport zone was characterized by an exponential decay in the solids suspension but with a smaller decay constant...

  13. Dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering system for temperature and species measurements in an optically accessible high-pressure gas turbine combustor facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thariyan, Mathew P.; Bhuiyan, Aizaz H.; Meyer, Scott E.; Naik, Sameer V.; Gore, Jay P.; Lucht, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    The development and implementation of a dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (DP-CARS) system employing two optical sub-systems to measure temperature and major species concentrations at multiple locations in the flame zone of a high-pressure, liquid-fueled gas turbine combustor are discussed. An optically accessible gas turbine combustor facility (GTCF) was utilized to perform these experiments. A window assembly has been designed, fabricated, and assembled in the GTCF to allow optical access from three directions using a pair of thin and thick fused silica windows on each side. A lean direct injection (LDI) device consisting of an array of nine integrated air swirlers and fuel injectors was operated using Jet-A fuel at inlet air temperatures up to 725 K and combustor pressures up to 1.03 MPa. The DP-CARS system was used to measure temperature and CO2/N2 concentration ratio on single laser shots. An injection-seeded optical parametric oscillator (OPO) was used as a narrowband pump laser source in order to potentially reduce shot-to-shot fluctuations in the CARS data. Large prisms mounted on computer-controlled translation stages were used to direct the CARS beams either into the main leg optical system for measurements in the GTCF or to a reference leg optical system for measurements of the non-resonant spectrum and for alignment of the CARS system. The spatial maps of temperature and major species concentrations were obtained in high-pressure LDI flames by translating the CARS probe volume in the axial and vertical directions inside the combustor rig without loss of optical alignment.

  14. Advances in measurements and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in burners/combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, L X

    2009-01-01

    Innovative coal combustors were developed, and measurement and simulation of gas-particle flows and coal combustion in such combustors were done in the Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University. LDV/PDPA measurements are made to understand the behavior of turbulent gas-particle flows in coal combustors. Coal combustion test was done for the non-slagging cyclone coal combustor. The full two-fluid model developed by the present author was used to simulate turbulent gas-particle flows, coal combustion and NO x formation. It is found by measurements and simulation that the optimum design can give large-size recirculation zones for improving the combustion performance for all the combustors. The combustion test shows that the nonslagging coal combustor can burn 3-5mm coal particles with good combustion efficiency and low NO emission. Simulation in comparison with experiments indicates that the swirl number can significantly affect the NO formation in the swirl coal combustor.

  15. Experimental and numerical simulation for swirl flow in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulin, V. M.; Markovich, D. M.; Minakov, A. V.; Hanjalic, K.; Chikishev, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    Results of the experimental and numerical simulation for swirl flow in combustion of a lean methane-air mixture in a model combustor at atmospheric pressure are represented. The panoramic method for the flow velocity measurement and the calculation by a large eddy method were used for the investigation of the nonstationary turbulent flow. The numerical modeling for the breakdown of the vortex core of the flow and the topology of large-scale vortex structures forming in it showed the close fit to the experiment. The analysis of obtained data showed that for the case of the intensive swirl of the flow as well as in the case of the flow without combustion, dynamics of the flow with combustion was determined by the global azimuthal instability mode corresponding to the intensive precession of the vortex core. The flame had the similar characteristics of the stability and compactness in the case of stabilization by the low swirl; however, velocity pulsations in the flow corresponded to the development of only local instability modes. Thus, the other kind of vortex breakdown in the case of the low swirl, for which the central recirculation zone is lacking, is not only favorable in view of the reduction of the NO x emission, but also remains a possibility for the effective use of the active control method for the flow and combustion. In particular, the given result may be used for the elimination of the thermoacoustic resonance in combustors.

  16. Coal-fired MHD combustor development project: Phase 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    This fourth quarterly technical progress report of the Coal-Fired MHD Combustor Development Project (Phase 3D) presents the accomplishments during the period February 1 to April 30, 1985. The scope of work covered by this quarterly report encompasses development work on the 50 MW/sub t/ combustor related to test support at the CDIF, assembly and checkout of first and second stage hardware, second stage design verification testing, designs for a continuous slag rejector and low preheat inlet section, and planning for power train testing. Progress includes the following: assembly and checkout of the second first stage, two second stages, and PEM was completed and the hardware was shipped to CDIF and FETS; integration of first and second stage hardware on the FETS Cell No. 2 test stand was completed, cold flow functional tests were performed, and hot fire checkout testing was initiated; assembly of the continuous slag rejector test set-up was 70% completed; the low preheat air inlet section Preliminary Design Review was held (work on the detail design was initiated and is 85% complete); and the Users' Manual was updated to include material for the second stage and final revisions to the power train test plan were made.

  17. Three Dimensional CFD Analysis of the GTX Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, C. J., Jr.; Bond, R. B.; Edwards, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    The annular combustor geometry of a combined-cycle engine has been analyzed with three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics. Both subsonic combustion and supersonic combustion flowfields have been simulated. The subsonic combustion analysis was executed in conjunction with a direct-connect test rig. Two cold-flow and one hot-flow results are presented. The simulations compare favorably with the test data for the two cold flow calculations; the hot-flow data was not yet available. The hot-flow simulation Indicates that the conventional ejector-ramjet cycle would not provide adequate mixing at the conditions tested. The supersonic combustion ramjet flowfield was simulated with frozen chemistry model. A five-parameter test matrix was specified, according to statistical design-of-experiments theory. Twenty-seven separate simulations were used to assemble surrogate models for combustor mixing efficiency and total pressure recovery. Scramjet injector design parameters (injector angle, location, and fuel split) as well as mission variables (total fuel mass flow and freestream Mach number) were included in the analysis. A promising injector design has been identified that provides good mixing characteristics with low total pressure losses. The surrogate models can be used to develop performance maps of different injector designs. Several complex three-way variable interactions appear within the dataset that are not adequately resolved with the current statistical analysis.

  18. Combustion Dynamics in Multi-Nozzle Combustors Operating on High-Hydrogen Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santavicca, Dom; Lieuwen, Tim

    2013-09-30

    Actual gas turbine combustors for power generation applications employ multi-nozzle combustor configurations. Researchers at Penn State and Georgia Tech have extended previous work on the flame response in single-nozzle combustors to the more realistic case of multi-nozzle combustors. Research at Georgia Tech has shown that asymmetry of both the flow field and the acoustic forcing can have a significant effect on flame response and that such behavior is important in multi-flame configurations. As a result, the structure of the flame and its response to forcing is three-dimensional. Research at Penn State has led to the development of a three-dimensional chemiluminescence flame imaging technique that can be used to characterize the unforced (steady) and forced (unsteady) flame structure of multi-nozzle combustors. Important aspects of the flame response in multi-nozzle combustors which are being studied include flame-flame and flame-wall interactions. Research at Penn State using the recently developed three-dimensional flame imaging technique has shown that spatial variations in local flame confinement must be accounted for to accurately predict global flame response in a multi-nozzle can combustor.

  19. Experimental and Computational Study of Trapped Vortex Combustor Sector Rig with High-Speed Diffuser Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Hendricks

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The Trapped Vortex Combustor (TVC potentially offers numerous operational advantages over current production gas turbine engine combustors. These include lower weight, lower pollutant emissions, effective flame stabilization, high combustion efficiency, excellent high altitude relight capability, and operation in the lean burn or RQL modes of combustion. The present work describes the operational principles of the TVC, and extends diffuser velocities toward choked flow and provides system performance data. Performance data include EINOx results for various fuel-air ratios and combustor residence times, combustion efficiency as a function of combustor residence time, and combustor lean blow-out (LBO performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations using liquid spray droplet evaporation and combustion modeling are performed and related to flow structures observed in photographs of the combustor. The CFD results are used to understand the aerodynamics and combustion features under different fueling conditions. Performance data acquired to date are favorable compared to conventional gas turbine combustors. Further testing over a wider range of fuel-air ratios, fuel flow splits, and pressure ratios is in progress to explore the TVC performance. In addition, alternate configurations for the upstream pressure feed, including bi-pass diffusion schemes, as well as variations on the fuel injection patterns, are currently in test and evaluation phases.

  20. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE & RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Zauderer

    2003-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. The reacted particles impact and melt in the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall by the centrifugal force of the swirling combustion gases. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Prior analyses and laboratory scale data indicated that for Coal Tech's 20 MMBtu/hour, air-cooled, slagging coal combustor slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to validate this sulfur-in-slag model in a group of combustor tests. A total of 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed during the period of performance of this project. This was more that double the 16 test days that were required in the original work statement. The extra tests were made possible by cost saving innovations that were made in the operation of the combustor test facility and in additional investment of Coal Tech resources in the test effort. The original project plan called for two groups of tests. The first group of tests involved the injection of calcium sulfate particles in the form of gypsum or plaster of Paris with the coal into the 20 MMBtu/hour-combustor. The second group of tests consisted of the entire two-step process, in which lime or limestone is co-injected with coal and reacts with the sulfur gas released during combustion to form calcium sulfate particles that impact and dissolve in the slag layer. Since this sulfur capture process has been validated in numerous prior tests in this combustor, the primary effort in the present project was on achieving the high slag flow rates needed to retain the sulfur in the slag.

  1. Hydrogen injection scheme influence on flow structure in supersonic combustor of constant cross-section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starov, A. V.; Goldfeld, M. A.

    2017-10-01

    The efficiency of using two variants of hydrogen injection (distributed and non-distributed injection from vertical pylons) is experimentally investigated. The tests are performed in the attached pipeline regime with the Mach number at the model combustor entrance M=2. The combustion chamber has a backward-facing step at the entrance and slotted channels for combustion stabilization. The tested variants of injection differ basically by the shapes of the fuel jets and, correspondingly, by the hydrogen distribution over the combustor. As a result, distributed injection is found to provide faster ignition, upstream displacement of the elevated pressure region, and more intense combustion over the entire combustor volume.

  2. Design and preliminary results of a fuel flexible industrial gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.; Yacobucci, H. G.

    1981-01-01

    The design characteristics are presented of a fuel tolerant variable geometry staged air combustor using regenerative/convective cooling. The rich/quench/lean variable geometry combustor is designed to achieve low NO(x) emission from fuels containing fuel bound nitrogen. The physical size of the combustor was calculated for a can-annular combustion system with associated operating conditions for the Allison 570-K engine. Preliminary test results indicate that the concept has the potential to meet emission requirements at maximum continuous power operation. However, airflow sealing and improved fuel/air mixing are necessary to meet Department of Energy program goals.

  3. Quiet Clean Short-haul Experimental Engine (QCSEE). Double-annular clean combustor technology development report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, D. W.; Burrus, D. L.; Sabla, P. E.

    1979-01-01

    A sector combustor technology development program was conducted to define an advanced double annular dome combustor sized for use in the quiet clean short haul experimental engine (QCSEE). A design which meets the emission goals, and combustor performance goals of the QCSEE engine program was developed. Key design features were identified which resulted in substantial reduction in carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emission levels at ground idle operating conditions, in addition to very low nitric oxide emission levels at high power operating conditions. Their significant results are reported.

  4. Flame stabilization and mixing characteristics in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Mohan K.

    A novel combustor design, referred to as the Stagnation Point Reverse-Flow (SPRF) combustor, was recently developed that is able to operate stably at very lean fuel-air mixtures and with low NOx emissions even when the fuel and air are not premixed before entering the combustor. The primary objective of this work is to elucidate the underlying physics behind the excellent stability and emissions performance of the SPRF combustor. The approach is to experimentally characterize velocities, species mixing, heat release and flame structure in an atmospheric pressure SPRF combustor with the help of various optical diagnostic techniques: OH PLIF, chemiluminescence imaging, PIV and Spontaneous Raman Scattering. Results indicate that the combustor is primarily stabilized in a region downstream of the injector that is characterized by low average velocities and high turbulence levels; this is also the region where most of the heat release occurs. High turbulence levels in the shear layer lead to increased product entrainment levels, elevating the reaction rates and thereby enhancing the combustor stability. The effect of product entrainment on chemical timescales and the flame structure is illustrated with simple reactor models. Although reactants are found to burn in a highly preheated (1300 K) and turbulent environment due to mixing with hot product gases, the residence times are sufficiently long compared to the ignition timescales such that the reactants do not autoignite. Turbulent flame structure analysis indicates that the flame is primarily in the thin reaction zones regime throughout the combustor, and it tends to become more flamelet like with increasing distance from the injector. Fuel-air mixing measurements in case of non-premixed operation indicate that the fuel is shielded from hot products until it is fully mixed with air, providing nearly premixed performance without the safety issues associated with premixing. The reduction in NOx emissions in the SPRF

  5. Development of an analytical model to assess fuel property effects on combustor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, R. D.; Troth, D. L.; Miles, G. A.; Riddlebaugh, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    A generalized first-order computer model has been developed in order to analytically evaluate the potential effect of alternative fuels' effects on gas turbine combustors. The model assesses the size, configuration, combustion reliability, and durability of the combustors required to meet performance and emission standards while operating on a broad range of fuels. Predictions predicated on combustor flow-field determinations by the model indicate that fuel chemistry, as defined by hydrogen content, exerts a significant influence on flame retardation, liner wall temperature, and smoke emission.

  6. Development of pressurized coal partial combustor; Kaatsu sekitan bubun nenshoro gijutsu no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. [Center for Coal Utilization, Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Kawamura, K. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., Kobe (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Chubu Electric Power Co. Inc., Nagoya (Japan); Muramatsu, T. [Electric Power Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    The coal partial combustor (CPC) uses a combustion technology with which coal is burned at elevated temperatures and under revolution, the constituents are captured on the furnace wall and removed as molten slag from the furnace. This is a combustion technology to reduce load of ash on subsequent devices. To generate a molten condition, it is necessary to raise the combustion temperature as high as possible (to about 1600 degC in the furnace), but this is effective for a gas turbine composite power generation system. An efficiency of higher than 45% may be expected at the power transmission terminal. As an operation on subsidy from the Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, the normal-pressure CPC technology has already been established, and a research on pressurized CPC is being progressed since fiscal 1991. The research is in progress with a schedule that elemental tests for 7 tons per day production are conducted until fiscal 1995, a 25 tons per day pilot plant will be completed by November 1997, and verification tests for long-term continuous operation will be implemented until 1998. The 7 tons per day elemental tests have identified gasification performance and slag extraction performance using five types of coal having different properties. 7 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Near-zero emissions combustor system for syngas and biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yongho, Kim; Rosocha, Louis

    2010-01-01

    A multi-institutional plasma combustion team was awarded a research project from the DOE/NNSA GIPP (Global Initiative for Prolifereation Prevention) office. The Institute of High Current Electronics (Tomsk, Russia); Leonardo Technologies, Inc. (an American-based industrial partner), in conjunction with the Los Alamos National Laboratory are participating in the project to develop novel plasma assisted combustion technologies. The purpose of this project is to develop prototypes of marketable systems for more stable and cleaner combustion of syngas/biofuels and to demonstrate that this technology can be used for a variety of combustion applications - with a major focus on contemporary gas turbines. In this paper, an overview of the project, along with descriptions of the plasma-based combustors and associated power supplies will be presented. Worldwide, it is recognized that a variety of combustion fuels will be required to meet the needs for supplying gas-turbine engines (electricity generation, propulsion), internal combustion engines (propulsion, transportation), and burners (heat and electricity generation) in the 21st Century. Biofuels and biofuel blends have already been applied to these needs, but experience difficulties in modifications to combustion processes and combustor design and the need for flame stabilization techniques to address current and future environmental and energy-efficiency challenges. In addition, municipal solid waste (MSW) has shown promise as a feedstock for heat and/or electricity-generating plants. However, current combustion techniques that use such fuels have problems with achieving environmentally-acceptable air/exhaust emissions and can also benefit from increased combustion efficiency. This project involves a novel technology (a form of plasma-assisted combustion) that can address the above issues. Plasma-assisted combustion (PAC) is a growing field that is receiving worldwide attention at present. The project is focused on

  8. Parametric Design of Injectors for LDI-3 Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Mongia, Hukam; Lee, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Application of a partially calibrated National Combustion Code (NCC) for providing guidance in the design of the 3rd generation of the Lean-Direct Injection (LDI) multi-element combustion configuration (LDI-3) is summarized. NCC was used to perform non-reacting and two-phase reacting flow computations on several LDI-3 injector configurations in a single-element and a five-element injector array. All computations were performed with a consistent approach for mesh-generation, turbulence, spray simulations, ignition and chemical kinetics-modeling. Both qualitative and quantitative assessment of the computed flowfield characteristics of the several design options led to selection of an optimal injector LDI- 3 design that met all the requirements including effective area, aerodynamics and fuel-air mixing criteria. Computed LDI-3 emissions (namely, NOx, CO and UHC) will be compared with the prior generation LDI- 2 combustor experimental data at relevant engine cycle conditions.

  9. Analysis of a high-temperature coal combustor according to a one-dimensional flow model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, P M; Smith, R S

    1977-10-01

    A steady state, one-dimensional analysis for a high temperature coal combustor is presented. An existing solution of solid fuel ignition is employed to describe the ignition of the coal particles. A one-dimensional flow model with radiative heat loss is then constructed to describe the subsequent vaporization of ash and devolatilization, combustion, and gasification of the coal. Combustion is considered to take place either at a flame sheet in the diffusion layer surrounding each particle or at the particle surface. The combustion products are considered to be redistributed in the main gas stream of the combustor according to simplified chemical equilibrium criteria. A simplified devolatilization rate law is formulated, which incorporates in a tractable manner the various competing reactions within the coal particle. Data are presented for the variation of temperatures and mass fractions with position in the combustor and for the influence of various parameters on combustor performance.

  10. Ignition improvement by injector arrangement in a multi-fuel combustor for micro gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoshkiv, O.; Poojitganont, T.; Jeansirisomboon, S.; Berg, H. P.

    2018-01-01

    The novel combustor design also has an impact on the ignitor arrangement. The conventional ignitor system cannot guarantee optimal ignition performance in the usual radial position. The difficult ignitability of gaseous fuels was the main challenge for the ignitor system improvement. One way to improve the ignition performance significantly is a torch ignitor system in which the gaseous fuel is directly mixed with a large amount of the combustor air. To reach this goal, the ignition process was investigated in detail. The micro gas turbine (MGT) ignition was optimised considering three main procedures: torch ignitor operation, burner ignition and flame propagation between the neighbour injectors. A successful final result of the chain of ignition procedures depends on multiple aspects of the combustor design. Performed development work shows an important step towards designing modern high-efficiency low-emission combustors.

  11. Thermoacoustic analysis of the dynamic pressure inside a model combustor during limit cycle oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemela, P.R.; Roman Casado, J.C.; Tarband Veeraraghavan, S.K.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this work comprehensive experimental and numerical studies incorporating the most relevant physical mechanisms causing limit cycle pressure and combustion rate oscillations (LCO) in a laboratory scale combustor will be discussed. The strong interaction between the aerodynamics-combustion-acoustic

  12. System and method for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong H.; Johnson, Thomas Edward

    2015-11-20

    A system for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor includes a tube bundle that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor, wherein the tube bundle comprises an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A shroud circumferentially surrounds the upstream and downstream surfaces. A plurality of tubes extends through the tube bundle from the upstream surface through the downstream surface, wherein the downstream surface is stepped to produce tubes having different lengths through the tube bundle. A method for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor includes flowing a working fluid through a plurality of tubes radially arranged between an upstream surface and a downstream surface of an end cap that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor, wherein the downstream surface is stepped.

  13. Effect of Surface Impulsive Thermal Loads on Fatigue Behavior of Constant Volume Propulsion Engine Combustor Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Dongming

    2004-01-01

    .... In this study, a simulated engine test rig has been established to evaluate thermal fatigue behavior of a candidate engine combustor material, Haynes 188, under superimposed CO2 laser surface impulsive thermal loads (30 to 100 Hz...

  14. An Engineering Model for Prediction of Waste Incineration in a Dump Combustor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arunajatesan, S

    1997-01-01

    An engineering model that can be used to obtain predictions of axial distributions of temperature and species concentrations in complex flows has been formulated and applied to waste incineration in a dump combustor...

  15. Thermal Performance of a Scramjet Combustor Operating at Mach 5.6 Flight Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stouffer, Scott

    1997-01-01

    .... The objective of the thermal loads testing was to map the thermal and mechanical loads, including heat transfer, dynamic and static pressures, and skin friction in a scramjet combustor during direct...

  16. The Performance of Hydrocarbon Fuels with H2O2 in a Uni-element Combustor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muss, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    .... The combustor used decomposed 90% hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizer. The water-cooled combustion chamber included significant fuel film cooling, with the overall mixture ratio (MR) ranging from 3.75 to 7.4...

  17. Investigation of soot and carbon formation in small gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    An investigation of hardware configurations which attempt to minimize carbon and soot-production without sacrificing performance in small gas turbine combustors was conducted. Four fuel injectors, employing either airblast atomization, pressure atomization, or fuel vaporization techniques were combined with nozzle air swirlers and injector sheaths. Eight configurations were screened at sea-level takeoff and idle test conditions. Selected configurations were focused upon in an attempt to quantify the influence of combustor pressure, inlet temperature, primary zone operation, and combustor loading on soot and carbon formation. Cycle tests were also performed. It was found that smoke emission levels depended on the combustor fluid mechanics, the atomization quality of the injector and the fuel hydrogen content.

  18. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    This report discusses design and operation of a single-nozzle test combustor for studying lean, premixed combustion oscillations from gas turbine fuel nozzles. It was used to study oscillations from a prototype fuel nozzle that produced oscillations during testing in a commercial engine. Similar, but not identical, oscillations were recorded in the test device. Basic requirements of the device design were that the flame geometry be maintained and acoustic losses be minimized; this was achieved by using a Helmholtz resonator as the combustor geometry. Surprisingly, the combustor oscillated strongly at several frequencies, without modification of the resonator. Brief survey of operating conditions suggests that it may be helpful to characterize oscillating behavior in terms of reference velocity and inlet air temperature with the rig backpressure playing a smaller role. The preliminary results do not guarantee that the single-nozzle test device will reproduce arbitrary oscillations that occur on a complete engine test. Nozzle/nozzle interactions may complicate the response, and oscillations controlled by acoustic velocities transverse to the nozzle axis may not be reproduced in a test device that relies on a bulk Helmholtz mode. Nevertheless, some oscillations can be reproduced, and the single-nozzle test device allows both active and passive control strategies to be tested relatively inexpensively.

  19. Characterization of Centrifugally-Loaded Flame Migration for Ultra-Compact Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    with the Alstom GT24 and GT26 commercial engines [35]. Hiddeman used the term ”sequential combustion” rather than ITB and demonstrated that the benefit...of the new Alstom engines was increased power gen- eration for similar turbine temperatures via distribution of the combustion process between the main...combustor and second combustor, located in between the HPT and LPT [35]. While the Alstom engines demonstrate the ITB cycle benefits, realization of

  20. A Design Methodology for Rapid Implementation of Active Control Systems Across Lean Direct Injection Combustor Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, William T.; Saunders, William R.; Vandsburger, Uri; Saus, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The VACCG team is comprised of engineers at Virginia Tech who specialize in the subject areas of combustion physics, chemical kinetics, dynamics and controls, and signal processing. Currently, the team's work on this NRA research grant is designed to determine key factors that influence combustion control performance through a blend of theoretical and experimental investigations targeting design and demonstration of active control for three different combustors. To validiate the accuracy of conclusions about control effectiveness, a sequence of experimental verifications on increasingly complex lean, direct injection combustors is underway. During the work period January 1, 2002 through October 15, 2002, work has focused on two different laboratory-scale combustors that allow access for a wide variety of measurements. As the grant work proceeds, one key goal will be to obtain certain knowledge about a particular combustor process using a minimum of sophisticated measurements, due to the practical limitations of measurements on full-scale combustors. In the second year, results obtained in the first year will be validated on test combustors to be identified in the first quarter of that year. In the third year, it is proposed to validate the results at more realistic pressure and power levels by utilizing the facilities at the Glenn Research Center.

  1. The Use of an Ultra-Compact Combustor as an Inter-Turbine Burner for Improved Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    Alstom , formally known as ABB Power Generation, developed a line of SCgas turbines for the power generation industry [12]. The Alstom GT24 and GT26...consist of a primary combustor a turbine and a reheat combustor, with the aim of achieving high efficiency while delivering low emissions. Alstom has been...utilizing the SC concepts since the 1940’s using diffusion type combustors. In 1995 Alstom developed their modern line SC gas turbines shown in Figure

  2. NONEQUILIBRIUM SULFUR CAPTURE AND RETENTION IN AN AIR COOLED SLAGGING COAL COMBUSTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Bert Zauderer

    1999-03-15

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles. They are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, slag must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Analysis indicated that slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 42-month project was to perform a series of tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag. 36 days of testing on the combustor were completed prior to the end of this reporting period, 12/31/98. This compares with 16 tests required in the original project plan. Combustor tests in early 1997 with high (37%) ash, Indian coal confirmed that high slag mass flow rates of about 500 lb/hr resulted in retention in the slag of up to 20% of the injected sulfur content mineral matter. To further increase the slag flow rate, rice husks, which contain 20% ash, and rice husk char, which contain 70% ash, were co-fired with coal in the combustor. A series of 13 combustor tests were performed in fourth quarter of 1997 and a further 6 tests were performed in January 1998 and in the summer of 1998. The test objective was to achieve slag flow rates between 500 and 1,000 lb/hr. Due to the very low bulk density of rice husk, compared to pulverized coal, almost the entire test effort focused on developing methods for feeding the rice husks into combustor. In the last test of December 1997, a peak mineral matter, injection rate of 592 lb/hr was briefly achieved by injection of coal, rice husk char, gypsum, and limestone into the combustor. However, no significant sulfur concentration was measured in the slag removed from the combustor. The peak injection rate reached with biomass in the 1997 tests was 310 lb/hr with rice husk, and 584 lb/hr with rice husk char.

  3. Nonequilibrium Sulfur Capture & Retention in an Air Cooled Slagging Coal Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bert Zauderer

    1998-04-21

    Calcium oxide injected in a slagging combustor reacts with the sulfur from coal combustion to form sulfur-bearing particles, which are deposited on the liquid slag layer on the combustor wall. Due to the low solubility of sulfur in slag, it must be rapidly drained from the combustor to limit sulfur gas re-evolution. Analysis indicated that slag mass flow rates in excess of 400 lb/hr should limit sulfur re-evolution. The objective of this 36 month project was to perform a series of tests to determine the factors that control the retention of the sulfur in the slag. 19 days of testing were completed prior to 9/30/97. In the present quarterly reporting period ending 12/31/97, 13 tests days were completed on co-firing coal and a high ash, rice husk biomass, which was selected to produce a high slag flow rate. Most of the test effort focussed on developing methods for feeding the very low density rice husks into combustor. Various levels of mineral matter from coal ash, rice husk ash, calcium sulfate, and calcium oxide was injected in the combustor during these 13 tests. The peak mineral matter, injection rate was 592 lb/hr for a period of about one-hour. No significant sulfur concentration was measured in the slag removed from the combustor. This may be due to the brief test duration, and longer duration tests are planned for the next quarter. The two major accomplishments in this quarter are the successful co-firing of coal and biomass in the slagging combustor. This is a major technical milestone due to its application to greenhouse gas emission reduction. It was not in the original project plan. Also, the total of 31 test days completed by 12/31/97 is double the number originally planned.

  4. Life assessment of combustor liner using unified constitutive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, M. T.; Thompson, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Hot section components of gas turbine engines are subject to severe thermomechanical loads during each mission cycle. Inelastic deformation can be induced in localized regions leading to eventual fatigue cracking. Assessment of durability requires reasonably accurate calculation of the structural response at the critical location for crack initiation. In recent years nonlinear finite element computer codes have become available for calculating inelastic structural response under cyclic loading. NASA-Lewis sponsored the development of unified constitutive material models and their implementation in nonlinear finite element computer codes for the structural analysis of hot section components. These unified models were evaluated with regard to their effect on the life prediction of a hot section component. The component considered was a gas turbine engine combustor liner. A typical engine mission cycle was used for the thermal and structural analyses. The analyses were performed on a CRAY computer using the MARC finite element code. The results were compared with laboratory test results, in terms of crack initiation lives.

  5. Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, Anthony

    1983-01-01

    A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

  6. The effect of inlet conditions on lean premixed gas turbine combustor performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilayanur, Suresh Ravi

    The combustion community is today faced with the goal to reduce NOx at high efficiencies. This requirement has directed attention to the manner by which air and fuel are treated prior to and at the combustor inlet. This dissertation is directed to establishing the role of combustor inlet conditions on combustor performance, and to deriving an understanding of the relationship between inlet conditions and combustion performance. To investigate the complex effect of inlet parameters on combustor performance, (1) a test facility was designed and constructed, (2) hardware was designed and fabricated, (3) a statistically based technique was designed and applied, and (4) detailed in-situ measurements were acquired. Atmospheric tests were performed at conditions representative of industrial combustors: 670 K inlet preheat and an equivalence ratio of 0.47, and make the study immediately relevant to the combustion community. The effects of premixing length, fuel distribution, swirl angle, swirl vane thickness and swirl solidity were investigated. The detailed in-situ measurements were performed to form the database necessary to study the responsible mechanisms. A host of conventional and advanced diagnostics were used for the investigation. In situ measurements included the mapping of the thermal and velocity fields of the combustor, obtaining species concentrations inside the combustor, and quantifying the fuel-air mixing entering the combustor. Acoustic behavior of the combustor was studied, including the application of high speed videography. The results reveal that the principal statistically significant effect on NOx production is the inlet fuel distribution, and the principal statistically significant effect on CO production is the swirl strength. Elevated levels of NOx emission result when the fuel is weighted to the centerline. Eddies shedding off the swirler hub ignite as discrete packets, and due to the elevated concentrations of fuel, reach higher temperatures

  7. An experimental study of the stable and unstable operation of an LPP gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanuka, Sulabh Kumar

    A study was performed to better understand the stable operation of an LPP combustor and formulate a mechanism behind the unstable operation. A unique combustor facility was developed at the University of Michigan that incorporates the latest injector developed by GE Aircraft Engines and enables operation at elevated pressures with preheated air at flow-rates reflective of actual conditions. The large optical access has enabled the use of a multitude of state-of-the-art laser diagnostics such as PIV and PLIF, and has shed invaluable light not only into the GE injector specifically but also into gas turbine combustors in general. Results from Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) have illustrated the role of velocity, instantaneous vortices, and key recirculation zones that are all critical to the combustor's operation. It was found that considerable differences exist between the iso-thermal and reacting flows, and between the instantaneous and mean flow fields. To image the flame, Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of the formaldehyde radical was successfully utilized for the first time in a Jet-A flame. Parameters regarding the flame's location and structure have been obtained that assist in interpreting the velocity results. These results have also shown that some of the fuel injected from the main fuel injectors actually reacts in the diffusion flame of the pilot. The unstable operation of the combustor was studied in depth to obtain the stability limits of the combustor, behavior of the flame dynamics, and frequencies of the oscillations. Results from simultaneous pressure and high speed chemiluminescence images have shown that the low frequency dynamics can be characterized as flashback oscillations. The results have also shown that the stability of the combustor can be explained by simple and well established premixed flame stability mechanisms. This study has allowed the development of a model that describes the instability mechanism and accurately

  8. Parametric Modeling Investigation of a Radially-Staged Low-Emission Aviation Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Aviation gas-turbine combustion demands high efficiency, wide operability and minimal trace gas emissions. Performance critical design parameters include injector geometry, combustor layout, fuel-air mixing and engine cycle conditions. The present investigation explores these factors and their impact on a radially staged low-emission aviation combustor sized for a next-generation 24,000-lbf-thrust engine. By coupling multi-fidelity computational tools, a design exploration was performed using a parameterized annular combustor sector at projected 100% takeoff power conditions. Design objectives included nitrogen oxide emission indices and overall combustor pressure loss. From the design space, an optimal configuration was selected and simulated at 7.1, 30 and 85% part-power operation, corresponding to landing-takeoff cycle idle, approach and climb segments. All results were obtained by solution of the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Species concentrations were solved directly using a reduced 19-step reaction mechanism for Jet-A. Turbulence closure was obtained using a nonlinear K-epsilon model. This research demonstrates revolutionary combustor design exploration enabled by multi-fidelity physics-based simulation.

  9. Influence of the burner swirl on the azimuthal instabilities in an annular combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Marek; Nygård, Håkon; Worth, Nicholas; Dawson, James

    2017-11-01

    Improving our fundamental understanding of thermoacoustic instabilities will aid the development of new low emission gas turbine combustors. In the present investigation the effects of swirl on the self-excited azimuthal combustion instabilities in a multi-burner annular annular combustor are investigated experimentally. Each of the burners features a bluff body and a swirler to stabilize the flame. The combustor is operated with an ethylene-air premixture at powers up to 100 kW. The swirl number of the burners is varied in these tests. For each case, dynamic pressure measurements at different azimuthal positions, as well as overhead imaging of OH* of the entire combustor are conducted simultaneously and at a high sampling frequency. The measurements are then used to determine the azimuthal acoustic and heat release rate modes in the chamber and to determine whether these modes are standing, spinning or mixed. Furthermore, the phase shift between the heat release rate and pressure and the shape of these two signals are analysed at different azimuthal positions. Based on the Rayleigh criterion, these investigations allow to obtain an insight about the effects of the swirl on the instability margins of the combustor. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant agreement n° 677931 TAIAC).

  10. Study on the Effect of Air Throttling on Flame Stabilization of an Ethylene Fueled Scramjet Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of air throttling on flame stabilization of an ethylene fueled scramjet combustor was investigated by numerical simulation and experiments in this paper. The results were obtained under the inflow condition with Mach number of 2.0, total temperature of 900 K, total pressure of 0.8 MPa, and total equivalence ratio of 0.5. The shock train generated by air throttling had a big effect on the flow structure of the scramjet combustor. Compared with the combustor without air throttling, the flow field with air throttling had a lower velocity and higher pressure, temperature, and vortices intensity. Air throttling was an effective way to achieve flame stabilization; the combustion in the combustor without air throttling was nearly blowout. In the experiment, the combustion was nearly blowout with air throttling location of 745 mm, and the fuel/air mixture in the combustor with air throttling location of 875 mm was burned intensively. It was important to choose the location and time sequence of air throttling for fuel ignition and flame stabilization. The numerical simulation results agreed well with experimental measurements.

  11. Combustion oscillation study in a kerosene fueled rocket-based combined-cycle engine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Wei; He, Guo-Qiang; Qin, Fei; Xue, Rui; Wei, Xiang-Geng; Shi, Lei

    2016-12-01

    This study reports the combustion oscillation features in a three-dimensional (3D) rocket-based combined-cycle (RBCC) engine combustor under flight Mach number (Mflight) 3.0 conditions both experimentally and numerically. Experiment is performed on a direct-connect ground test facility, which measures the wall pressure along the flow-path. High-speed imaging of the flame luminosity and schlieren is carried out at exit of the primary rocket. Compressible reactive large eddy simulation (LES) with reduced chemical kinetics of a surrogate model for kerosene is performed to further understand the combustion oscillation mechanisms in the combustor. LES results are validated with experimental data by the time-averaged and root mean square (RMS) pressure values, and show acceptable agreement. Effects of the primary rocket jet on pressure oscillation in the combustor are analyzed. Relation of the high speed rocket jet oscillation, which is thought to among the most probable sources of combustion oscillation, with the RBCC combustor is recognized. Results reveal that the unsteady over-expanded rocket jet has significant impacts on the combustion oscillation feature of the RBCC combustor, which is different from a thermo-acoustics type oscillation. The rocket jet/air inflow physical interactions under different rocket jet expansion degrees are experimentally studied.

  12. Effects of Cavity Configurations on Flameholding and Performances of Kerosene Fueled Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Deyong; Song, Wenyan; Wang, Yuhang; Wang, Yanhua

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effects of cavity flameholder configurations on flameholding and performances of kerosene fueled scramjet combustor were studied experimentally and numerically. For experiments, a directly connected ground facility was used and clean high enthalpy air, with a total temperature of 800 K and a total pressure of 800 Kpa, was provided by an electricity resistance heater. To investigate the effects of cavity configurations on flameholding capacity and reacting-flow characteristics, three different flameholders, one single cavity flameholder and two tandem cavity flameholders, were used in experiments. For the two combustors with tandem cavity flameholders, the location and configurations of its up-stream cavity were same with the single cavity flameholder, and the length-to-depth ratios for down-stream cavities were 9 and 11 respectively. The experimental results showed that stabilize kerosene combustion were achieved for combustor with tandem cavity flameholders mounted, and none for that with single cavity flameholder. The none-reacting and reacting flows of combustor models with tandem cavity flameholders were compared and studied with numerical and experimental results. The results showed that higher combustion efficiencies and pressure recovery ratios were achieved for the combustor with down-stream cavity length-to-depth ratio of 9.

  13. Combustion Dynamic Characteristics Identification in a 9-point LDI Combustor Under Choked Outlet Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhuohui J.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2017-01-01

    Combustion dynamics data were collected at the NASA Glenn Research Center's CE-5 flame tube test facility under combustor outlet choked conditions. Two 9-point Swirl-Venturi Lean Direct Injection (SV-LDI) configurations were tested in a rectangular cuboid combustor geometry. Combustion dynamic data were measured at different engine operational conditions up to inlet air pressure and temperature of 24.13 bar and 828 K, respectively. In this study, the effects of acoustic cavity resonance, precessing vortex core (PVC), and non-uniform thermal expansion on the dynamic noise spectrum are identified by comparing the dynamic data that collected at various combustor inlet conditions along with combustor geometric calculations. The results show that the acoustic cavity resonance noises were seen in the counter-rotating pilot configuration but not in the co-rotating pilot configuration. Dynamic pressure noise band at around 0.9 kHz was only detected at the P'41 location (9.8 cm after fuel injector face) but not at the P'42 location (29 cm after the fuel injector face); the amplitude of this noise band depended on the thermal expansion ratio (T4/T3). The noise band at around 1.8 kHz was found to depend on the inlet air pressure or the air density inside the combustor. The PVC frequency was not observed in these two configurations.

  14. CFD analysis of a scramjet combustor with cavity based flame holders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummitha, Obula Reddy; Pandey, Krishna Murari; Gupta, Rajat

    2018-03-01

    Numerical analysis of a scramjet combustor with different cavity flame holders has been carried out using ANSYS 16 - FLUENT tool. In this research article the internal fluid flow behaviour of the scramjet combustor with different cavity based flame holders have been discussed in detail. Two dimensional Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes governing(RANS) equations and shear stress turbulence (SST) k - ω model along with finite rate/eddy dissipation chemistry turbulence have been considered for modelling chemical reacting flows. Due to the advantage of less computational time, global one step reaction mechanism has been used for combustion modelling of hydrogen and air. The performance of the scramjet combustor with two different cavities namely spherical and step cavity has been compared with the standard DLR scramjet. From the comparison of numerical results, it is found that the development of recirculation regions and additional shock waves from the edge of cavity flame holder is increased. And also it is observed that with the cavity flame holder the residence time of air in the scramjet combustor is also increased and achieved stabilized combustion. From this research analysis, it has been found that the mixing and combustion efficiency of scramjet combustor with step cavity design is optimum as compared to other models.

  15. Fuel property effects on USAF gas turbine engine combustors and afterburners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, C. M.

    1984-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, the cost and availability of aircraft fuel have changed drastically. These problems prompted a program to evaluate the effects of broadened specification fuels on current and future aircraft engine combustors employed by the USAF. Phase 1 of this program was to test a set of fuels having a broad range of chemical and physical properties in a select group of gas turbine engine combustors currently in use by the USAF. The fuels ranged from JP4 to Diesel Fuel number two (DF2) with hydrogen content ranging from 14.5 percent down to 12 percent by weight, density ranging from 752 kg/sq m to 837 kg/sq m, and viscosity ranging from 0.830 sq mm/s to 3.245 sq mm/s. In addition, there was a broad range of aromatic content and physical properties attained by using Gulf Mineral Seal Oil, Xylene Bottoms, and 2040 Solvent as blending agents in JP4, JP5, JP8, and DF2. The objective of Phase 2 was to develop simple correlations and models of fuel effects on combustor performance and durability. The major variables of concern were fuel chemical and physical properties, combustor design factors, and combustor operating conditions.

  16. 40 CFR 62.14103 - Emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 62.14103 Section 62.14103 Protection of... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste... nitrogen oxides in excess of the emission limits listed in table 2 of this subpart for affected facilities...

  17. 40 CFR 60.33b - Emission guidelines for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.33b Section 60.33b Protection of Environment..., acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a) The emission limits for municipal waste combustor metals... oxygen. (d) For approval, a State plan shall include emission limits for nitrogen oxides at least as...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix to Subpart Eee of... - Quality Assurance Procedures for Continuous Emissions Monitors Used for Hazardous Waste Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... determination and adjustment of CEMS. 4. Integration of CEMS with the automatic waste feed cutoff (AWFCO) system... Continuous Emissions Monitors Used for Hazardous Waste Combustors Appendix to Subpart EEE of Part 63... Hazardous Air Pollutants from Hazardous Waste Combustors Pt. 63, Subpt. EEE, App. Appendix to Subpart EEE of...

  19. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A three-component flow field inside a can-type, forward flow experimental combustor was measured under non-reacting conditions. The combustor was run at atmospheric conditions with the air flow supplied from a fan and the outlet was straight...

  20. Emissions of nitrogen oxides from an experimental hydrogen-fueled gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgren, C. T.; Ingebo, R. D.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of operating variables of a hydrogen fueled combustor on exhaust concentrations of total oxides of nitrogen was determined at inlet-air temperature levels up to 810 K, pressure of 414,000N/sa m, and reference velocity of 21.3 m/sec. The combustor, which was originally designed for hydrocarbon fuel produced a NO(x) concentration of 380 ppm with hydrogen at 810 K inlet-air temperature. A reduction in NO(x) of about 30 % was obtained by modification to a lean or rich primary zone. The lowest NO(x) levels obtained with hydrogen were equivalent to those of the reference combustor burning hydrocarbon fuels.

  1. Experimental and analytical separation of hydrodynamic, entropy and combustion noise in a gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukrishnan, M.; Strahle, W. C.; Neale, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    This paper deals with noise sources which are central to the problem of core engine noise in turbopropulsion systems. The sources dealt with are entropy noise and direct combustion noise, as well as a non-propagating psuedosound which is hydrodynamic noise. It is shown analytically and experimentally that a transition can occur from a combustion noise dominant situation to an entropy noise dominant case if the contraction of a terminating nozzle to the combustor is high enough. In the combustor tested, entropy noise is the dominant source for propagational noise if the combustor is choked at the exit. Analysis techniques include spectral, cross spectral, cross correlation, and ordinary and partial coherence analysis. Measurements include exterior and interior fluctuating and mean pressures and temperatures.

  2. An emissions audit of a biomass combustor burning treated wood waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, P.M.; Jones, H.H.; King, P.G.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes the Emissions Audit carried out on a Biomass Combustor burning treated wood waste at the premises of a furniture manufacturer. The Biomass Combustor was tested in two firing modes; continuous fire and modulating fire. Combustion chamber temperatures and gas residence times were not measured. Boiler efficiencies were very good at greater than 75% in both tests. However, analysis of the flue gases indicated that improved efficiencies are possible. The average concentrations of CO (512mgm -3 ) and THC (34mgm -3 ) for Test 1 were high, indicating that combustion was poor. The combustor clearly does not meet the requirements of the Guidance Note for the Combustion of Wood Waste. CO 2 and O 2 concentrations were quite variable showing that combustion conditions were fairly unstable. Improved control of combustion should lead to acceptable emission concentrations. (Author)

  3. Investigation of combustion in miniaturised combustor for application to micro gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidez, J.; Roux, P.; Poirson, N.; Jourdanneau, E.; Orain, M.; Grisch, F.

    2009-09-01

    Assessing the feasibility of combustion in miniaturised combustors (volume less than 1 cm3) is a key point for the development of micro gas turbines. This paper presents the results obtained in a combustion chamber operating with a hydrogen-air mixture. A stable combustion was obtained with an output power between 100 and 1200 W, for air mass flow rate from 0.1 to 0.5 g/s, and equivalence ratio between 0.3 and 0.7. Experimental results were obtained using thermocouples to measure temperature of the burnt gases at the outlet of the combustor, and information on combustion efficiency and output power was derived. In addition, laser-based measurements were performed using spontaneous Raman spectroscopy and Rayleigh scattering to determine radial profiles of temperature and main species concentrations at the outlet of the combustor.

  4. The design and testing of a can-type combustor in a compressor test rig

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, Bronwyn C

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available : Start-up Design point Unit Compressor outlet data p3 221627 548506 [Pa] P3 222000 550000 [Pa] T3 295 300 [K] ?̇?𝟑 0.32 1 [kg/s] ?̇?𝒇 0.0071 0.0133 [kg/s] Turbine inlet data T4 - 800 [K] pf 20 20 [%] Combustor 𝑷𝟑𝟒 𝑷𝟑 0.053 0.053 - 𝑷𝟒... would pose little to no effect on the performance of the combustor. Table 2 The revised input values for the preliminary combustor design Condition No.: 1 2 Condition: Start-up Design point Unit Compressor outlet data p3 221627 548506 [Pa] P3...

  5. Utility gas turbine combustor viewing system: Volume 1, Conceptual design and initial field testing: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morey, W.W.

    1988-12-01

    This report summarizes the development and field testing of a combustor viewing probe (CVP) as a flame diagnostic monitor for utility gas turbine engines. The prototype system is capable of providing a visual record of combustor flame images, recording flame spectral data, analyzing image and spectral data, and diagnosing certain engine malfunctions. The system should provide useful diagnostic information to utility plant operators, and reduce maintenance costs. The field tests demonstrated the ability of the CVP to monitor combustor flame condition and to relate changes in the engine operation with variations in the flame signature. Engine light off, run up to full speed, the addition of load, and the effect of water injection for NO/sub x/ control could easily be identified on the video monitor. The viewing probe was also valuable in identifying hard startups and shutdowns, as well as transient effects that can seriously harm the engine. 11 refs.

  6. Utility gas turbine combustor viewing system: Volume 2, Engine operating envelope test: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morey, W.W.

    1988-12-01

    This report summarizes the development and field testing of a combustor viewing probe (CVP) as a flame diagnostic monitor for utility gas turbine engines. The prototype system is capable of providing a visual record of combustor flame images, recording flame spectral data, analyzing image and spectral data, and diagnosing certain engine malfunctions. The system should provide useful diagnostic information to utility plant operators, and reduced maintenance costs. The field tests demonstrated the ability of the CVP to monitor combustor flame condition and to relate changes in the engine operation with variations in the flame signature. Engine light off, run up to full speed, the addition of load, and the effect of water injection for NO/sub x/ control could easily be identified on the video monitor. The viewing probe was also valuable in identifying hard startups and shutdowns, as well as transient effects that can seriously harm the engine.

  7. Computational simulation of multi-strut central lobed injection of hydrogen in a scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Choubey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-strut injection is an approach to increase the overall performance of Scramjet while reducing the risk of thermal choking in a supersonic combustor. Hence computational simulation of Scramjet combustor at Mach 2.5 through multiple central lobed struts (three struts have been presented and discussed in the present research article. The geometry and model used here is slight modification of the DLR (German Aerospace Center scramjet model. Present results show that the presence of three struts injector improves the performance of scramjet combustor as compared to single strut injector. The combustion efficiency is also found to be highest in case of three strut fuel injection system. In order to validate the results, the numerical data for single strut injection is compared with experimental result which is taken from the literature.

  8. Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

    1996-12-31

    General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

  9. Shock-tunnel combustor testing for hypersonic vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Mark P.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed configurations for the next generation of transatmospheric vehicles will rely on air breathing propulsion systems during all or part of their mission. At flight Mach numbers greater than about 7 these engines will operate in the supersonic combustion ramjet mode (scramjet). Ground testing of these engine concepts above Mach 8 requires high pressure, high enthalpy facilities such as shock tunnels and expansion tubes. These impulse, or short duration facilities have test times on the order of a millisecond, requiring high speed instrumentation and data systems. One such facility ideally suited for scramjet testing is the NASA-Ames 16-Inch shock tunnel, which over the last two years has completed a series of tests for the NASP (National Aero-Space Plane) program at simulated flight Mach numbers ranging from 12-16. The focus of the experimental programs consisted of a series of classified tests involving a near-full scale hydrogen fueled scramjet combustor model in the semi-free jet method of engine testing whereby the compressed forebody flow ahead of the cowl inlet is reproduced (see appendix A). The AIMHYE-1 (Ames Integrated Modular Hypersonic Engine) test entry for the NASP program was completed in April 1993, while AIMHYE-2 was completed in May 1994. The test entries were regarded as successful, resulting in some of the first data of its kind on the performance of a near full scale scramjet engine at Mach 12-16. The data was distributed to NASP team members for use in design system verification and development. Due to the classified nature of the hardware and data, the data reports resulting from this work are classified and have been published as part of the NASP literature. However, an unclassified AIAA paper resulted from the work and has been included as appendix A. It contains an overview of the test program and a description of some of the important issues.

  10. Formed platelet combustor liner construction feasibility, phase A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, W. A.; Janke, D. E.

    1992-09-01

    Environments generated in high pressure liquid rocket engines impose severe requirements on regeneratively cooled combustor liners. Liners fabricated for use in high chamber pressures using conventional processes suffer from limitations that can impair operational cycle life and can adversely affect wall compatibility. Chamber liners fabricated using formed platelet technology provide an alternative to conventional regeneratively cooled liners (an alternative that has many attractive benefits). A formed platelet liner is made from a stacked assembly of platelets with channel features. The assembly is diffusion bonded into a flat panel and then three-dimensionally formed into a section of a chamber. Platelet technology permits the liner to have very precisely controlled and thin hot gas walls and therefore increased heat transfer efficiency. Further cooling efficiencies can be obtained through enhanced design flexibility. These advantages translate into increased cycle life and enhanced wall compatibility. The increased heat transfer efficiency can alternately be used to increase engine performance or turbopump life as a result of pressure drop reductions within the regeneratively cooled liner. Other benefits can be obtained by varying the materials of construction within the platelet liner to enhance material compatibility with operating environment or with adjoining components. Manufacturing cost savings are an additional benefit of a formed platelet liner. This is because of reduced touch labor and reduced schedule when compared to conventional methods of manufacture. The formed platelet technology is not only compatible with current state-of-the art combustion chamber structural support and manifolding schemes, it is also an enabling technology that allows the use of other high performance and potentially low cost methods of construction for the entire combustion chamber assembly. The contract under which this report is submitted contains three phases: (1) phase

  11. Flow aerodynamics modeling of an MHD swirl combustor - calculations and experimental verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Beer, J.M.; Louis, J.F.; Busnaina, A.A.; Lilley, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a computer code for calculating the flow dynamics of constant density flow in the second stage trumpet shaped nozzle section of a two stage MHD swirl combustor for application to a disk generator. The primitive pressure-velocity variable, finite difference computer code has been developed to allow the computation of inert nonreacting turbulent swirling flows in an axisymmetric MHD model swirl combustor. The method and program involve a staggered grid system for axial and radial velocities, and a line relaxation technique for efficient solution of the equations. Tue produces as output the flow field map of the non-dimensional stream function, axial and swirl velocity. 19 refs

  12. Simulations of NOx Emissions from Low Emissions Discrete Jet Injector Combustor Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmani, Kumud; Breisacher, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    An experimental and computational study was conducted to evaluate the performance and emissions characteristics of a candidate Lean Direct Injection (LDI) combustor configuration with a mix of simplex and airblast injectors. The National Combustion Code (NCC) was used to predict the experimentally measured EINOx emissions for test conditions representing low power, medium power, and high-power engine cycle conditions. Of the six cases modeled with the NCC using a reduced-kinetics finite-rate mechanism and lagrangian spray modeling, reasonable predictions of combustor exit temperature and EINOx were obtained at two high-power cycle conditions.

  13. System for reducing combustion dynamics and NO.sub.x in a combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Jong Ho; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Hughes, Michael John; York, William David

    2016-05-31

    A combustor includes an end cap that extends radially across at least a portion of the combustor. The end cap includes an upstream surface axially separated from a downstream surface. A plurality of tubes extend from the upstream surface through the downstream surface of the end cap to provide fluid communication through the end cap. Each tube in a first set of the plurality of tubes has an inlet proximate to the upstream surface and an outlet downstream from the downstream surface. Each outlet has a first portion that extends a different axial distance from the inlet than a second portion.

  14. Parametric performance of a turbojet engine combustor using jet A and A diesel fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butze, H. F.; Humenik, F. M.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a single-can JT8D combustor was evaluated with Jet A and a high-aromatic diesel fuel over a parametric range of combustor-inlet conditions. Performance parameters investigated were combustion efficiency, emissions of CO, unburned hydrocarbons, and NOx, as well as liner temperatures and smoke. At all conditions the use of diesel fuel instead of Jet A resulted in increases in smoke numbers and liner temperatures; gaseous emissions, on the other hand, did not differ significantly between the two fuels.

  15. Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Flametube Facility Upgraded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, James E.; Nemets, Steve A.; Tornabene, Robert T.; Smith, Timothy D.; Frankenfeld, Bruce J.

    2004-01-01

    In fiscal year 2003, test cell 23 of the Research Combustion Laboratory (RCL 23) at the NASA Glenn Research Center was upgraded with the addition of gaseous hydrogen as a working propellant and the addition of a 450-psig air-supply system. Test flexibility was further enhanced by upgrades to the facility control systems. RCL 23 can now test with gaseous hydrogen flow rates up to 0.05 lbm/sec and jet fuel flow rates up to 0.62 lbm/sec. Research airflow rates up to 3 lbm/sec are possible with the 450-psig supply system over a range of inlet temperatures. Nonvitiated, heated air is supplied from a shell and tube heat exchanger. The maximum nonvitiated facility air temperature is 1100 F at 1.5 lbm/sec. Research-section exhaust temperatures are limited to 3200 F because of material and cooling capacity limits. A variety of support systems are available depending on the research hardware configuration. Test section ignition can be provided via either a hydrogen air torch system or an electronic spark system. Emissions measurements are obtained with either pneumatically or electromechanically actuated gas sample probes, and the electromechanical system allows for radial measurements at a user-specified axial location for measurement of emissions profiles. Gas analysis data can be obtained for a variety of species, including carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NO and NOx), oxygen (O2), unburnt hydrocarbons, and unburnt hydrogen. Facility control is accomplished with a programmable logic control system. Facility operations have been upgraded to a system based on graphical user interface control screens. A data system is available for real-time acquisition and monitoring of both measurements in engineering units and performance calculations. The upgrades have made RCL 23 a highly flexible facility for research into low emissions gas turbine combustor concepts, and the flame tube configuration inherently allows for a variety of fuel nozzle

  16. Large Engine Technology Program. Task 22: Variable Geometry Concepts for Rich-Quench-Lean Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, Robert R. (Technical Monitor); Cohen, J. M.; Padget, F. C.; Kwoka, D.; Wang, Q.; Lohmann, R. P.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the task reported herein was to define, evaluate, and optimize variable geometry concepts suitable for use with a Rich-Quench-Lean (RQL) combustor. The specific intent was to identify approaches that would satisfy High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) cycle operational requirements with regard to fuel-air ratio turndown capability, ignition, and stability margin without compromising the stringent emissions, performance, and reliability goals that this combustor would have to achieve. Four potential configurations were identified and three of these were refined and tested in a high-pressure modular RQL combustor rig. The tools used in the evolution of these concepts included models built with rapid fabrication techniques that were tested for airflow characteristics to confirm sizing and airflow management capability, spray patternation, and atomization characterization tests of these models and studies that were supported by Computational Fluid Dynamics analyses. Combustion tests were performed with each of the concepts at supersonic cruise conditions and at other critical conditions in the flight envelope, including the transition points of the variable geometry system, to identify performance, emissions, and operability impacts. Based upon the cold flow characterization, emissions results, acoustic behavior observed during the tests and consideration of mechanical, reliability, and implementation issues, the tri-swirler configuration was selected as the best variable geometry concept for incorporation in the RQL combustor evolution efforts for the HSCT.

  17. Experimental evaluation of sorbents for sulfur control in a coal-fueled gas turbine slagging combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, L.H.; Wen, C.S.; LeCren, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on a slagging combustor that has been used to evaluate three calcium-based sorbents for sulfur capture efficiency in order to assess their applicability for use in a oil-fueled gas turbine. Testing is competed in a bench-scale combustor with one-tenth the heat input needed for the full-scale gas turbine. The bench-scale rig is a two-stage combustor featuring a fuel-rich primary zone an a fuel-lean secondary zone. The combustor is operated at 6.5 bars with inlet air preheated to 600 K. Gas temperatures of 1840 K are generated in the primary zone and 1280 K in the secondary zone. Sorbents are either fed into the secondary zone or mixed with the coal-water mixture and fed into the primary zone. Dry powered sorbents are fed into the secondary zone by an auger into one of six secondary air inlet ports. The three sorbents tested in the secondary zone include dolomite, pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime, and hydrated lime. Sorbents have been tested while burning coal-water mixtures with coal sulfur loadings of 0.56 to 3.13 weight percent sulfur. Sorbents are injected into the secondary zone at varying flow rates such that the calcium/sulfur ratio varies from 0.5 to 10.0

  18. Bioethanol combustion in an industrial gas turbine combustor: simulations and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sallevelt, J.L.H.P.; Pozarlik, Artur Krzysztof; Beran, Martin; Axelsson, L.; Brem, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    Combustion tests with bioethanol and diesel as a reference have been performed in OPRA's 2 MWe class OP16 gas turbine combustor. The main purposes of this work are to investigate the combustion quality of ethanol with respect to diesel and to validate the developed CFD model for ethanol spray

  19. Experimental and numerical studies of a lean-burn internally-staged combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Zhenbo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A lean-burn internally-staged combustor for low emissions that can be used in civil aviation gas turbines is introduced in this paper. The main stage is designed and optimized in terms of fuel evaporation ratio, fuel/air pre-mixture uniformity, and particle residence time using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD software. A single-module rectangular combustor is adopted in performance tests including lean ignition, lean blowout, combustion efficiency, emissions, and combustion oscillation using aviation kerosene. Furthermore, nitrogen oxides (NOx emission is also predicted using CFD simulation to compare with test results. Under normal inlet temperature, this combustor can be ignited easily with normal and negative inlet pressures. The lean blowout fuel/air ratio (LBO FAR at the idle condition is 0.0049. The fuel split proportions between the pilot and main stages are determined through balancing emissions, combustion efficiency, and combustion oscillation. Within the landing and take-off (LTO cycle, this combustor enables 42% NOx reduction of the standard set by the 6th Committee on Aviation Environmental Protection (CAEP/6 with high combustion efficiency. The maximum board-band pressure oscillations of inlet air and fuel are below 1% of total pressure during steady-state operations at the LTO cycle specific conditions.

  20. Wall heat flux influence on the thermodynamic optimisation of irreversibilities of a circulating fluidised bed combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the study the comparison of irreversibilities was done when the wall condition of the combustor was changed from adiabatic to negative heat flux, for incoming air temperature of 400 K. The reactant mixture of solid pitch pine wood fuel and air...

  1. Genetic algorithm to optimize the design of main combustor and gas generator in liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Min; Ko, Sangho; Koo, Jaye

    2014-06-01

    A genetic algorithm was used to develop optimal design methods for the regenerative cooled combustor and fuel-rich gas generator of a liquid rocket engine. For the combustor design, a chemical equilibrium analysis was applied, and the profile was calculated using Rao's method. One-dimensional heat transfer was assumed along the profile, and cooling channels were designed. For the gas-generator design, non-equilibrium properties were derived from a counterflow analysis, and a vaporization model for the fuel droplet was adopted to calculate residence time. Finally, a genetic algorithm was adopted to optimize the designs. The combustor and gas generator were optimally designed for 30-tonf, 75-tonf, and 150-tonf engines. The optimized combustors demonstrated superior design characteristics when compared with previous non-optimized results. Wall temperatures at the nozzle throat were optimized to satisfy the requirement of 800 K, and specific impulses were maximized. In addition, the target turbine power and a burned-gas temperature of 1000 K were obtained from the optimized gas-generator design.

  2. EMISSION TEST REPORT- FIELD TEST OF CARBON INJECTION FOR MERCURY CONTROL, CAMDEN COUNTY MUNICIPAL WASTE COMBUSTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of parametric test to evaluate the injection powdered activated carbon to control volatile pollutants in municipal waste combustor (MWC) flue gas. he tests were conducted at a spray dryer absorber/electrostatic precipitator (SD/ESP)-equipped MWC in Camden...

  3. 3D Measurements of Ignition Processes at 20 kHz in a Supersonic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-05

    Wehe, 3D Flame Measurements at 5 kHz on a Jet Fueled Aviation Combustor. ASME Turbo Expo 2015 (2014) 10. M. Kang, Q. Lei, L. Ma, Characterization of...Geipel, A.M. Kempf, Computed tomography of chemiluminescence (CTC): instantaneous 3D measurements and phantom studies of a turbulent opposed jet

  4. Overview of experimental measurements in a generic can-type gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to CFD Shortfalls, experimental data on gas turbine combustors is required to obtain insight into the combustion and flow mechanisms as well as for simulation and model validation and evaluation. The temperature and velocity fields of a generic...

  5. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B.M.; Williams, R.B.; Lesher, C.E.; Bakker, R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run durations

  6. Simulation Investigation on Combustion Characteristics in a Four-Point Lean Direct Injection Combustor with Hydrogen/Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the combustion characteristics in multi-point lean direct injection (LDI combustors with hydrogen/air, two swirl–venturi 2 × 2 array four-point LDI combustors were designed. The four-point LDI combustor consists of injector assembly, swirl–venturi array and combustion chamber. The injector, swirler and venturi together govern the rapid mixing of hydrogen and air to form the mixture for combustion. Using clockwise swirlers and anticlockwise swirlers, the co-swirling and count-swirling swirler arrays LDI combustors were achieved. Using Reynolds-Averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS code for steady-state reacting flow computations, the four-point LDI combustors with hydrogen/air were simulated with an 11 species and 23 lumped reaction steps H2/Air reaction mechanism. The axial velocity, turbulence kinetic energy, total pressure drop coefficient, outlet temperature, mass fraction of OH and emission of pollutant NO of four-point LDI combustors, with different equivalence ratios, are here presented and discussed. As the equivalence ratios increased, the total pressure drop coefficient became higher because of increasing heat loss. Increasing equivalence ratios also corresponded with the rise in outlet temperature of the four-point LDI combustors, as well as an increase in the emission index of NO EINO in the four-point LDI combustors. Along the axial distance, the EINO always increased and was at maximum at the exit of the dump. Along the chamber, the EINO gradually increased, maximizing at the exit of chamber. The total temperature of four-point LDI combustors with different equivalence ratios was identical to the theoretical equilibrium temperature. The EINO was an exponential function of the equivalence ratio.

  7. Characterisation of Interaction between Combustion Dynamics and Equivalence Ratio Oscillations in a Pressurised Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaap F. van Kampen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In regular operation, all gas turbine combustors have a significant spontaneous noise level induced by the turbulent high power flame. This noise is characteristic for the operation as it is the result of the interaction between turbulence and combustion. Pressure fluctuations may also be generated by thermoacoustic instabilities induced by amplification by the flame of the acoustic field in the combustor. This paper focuses on the characterisation of the latter process, the combustion dynamics, in a pressurized premixed natural gas combustor. In order to predict the thermo-acoustically unstable operating ranges of modern gas-turbines with the use of an acoustic network model, it is essential to determine accurately the flame transfer function. This transfer function gives the relationship between a perturbation upstream of the flame and its combustion response, leading to acoustic forcing. In this paper, the flame transfer function is obtained by experimental means in a combustor test rig. This test rig was built in the framework of the European DESIRE project, and has the ability to perform thermo-acoustic measurements up to an absolute pressure of 5 bars. The maximum power of the setup is 500 kW. The paper presents a method to determine the flame transfer function by factorizing it in six subfunctions. Systematically these subfunctions are determined. With the method presented, acoustic measurements on the steady, unperturbed flame and on the unsteady, actively perturbed flame are performed. The effect of pressure is investigated. The steady measurements are used to provide an acousto-combustion finger print of the combustor. In the unsteady measurements, the flame transfer function is reconstructed from the measured acoustic pressures. These flame transfer functions are compared to transfer functions obtained from a numerical experiment in CFD. Good agreement is obtained.

  8. Thermal characteristics of various biomass fuels in a small-scale biomass combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Shemmeri, T.T.; Yedla, R.; Wardle, D.

    2015-01-01

    Biomass combustion is a mature and reliable technology, which has been used for heating and cooking. In the UK, biomass currently qualifies for financial incentives such as the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI). Therefore, it is vital to select the right type of fuel for a small-scale combustor to address different types of heat energy needs. In this paper, the authors attempt to investigate the performance of a small-scale biomass combustor for heating, and the impact of burning different biomass fuels on useful output energy from the combustor. The test results of moisture content, calorific value and combustion products of various biomass samples were presented. Results from this study are in general agreement with published data as far as the calorific values and moisture contents are concerned. Six commonly available biomass fuels were tested in a small-scale combustion system, and the factors that affect the performance of the system were analysed. In addition, the study has extended to examine the magnitude and proportion of useful heat, dissipated by convection and radiation while burning different biomass fuels in the small-scale combustor. It is concluded that some crucial factors have to be carefully considered before selecting biomass fuels for any particular heating application. - Highlights: • Six biomass materials combustion performance in a small combustor was examined. • Fuel combustion rate and amount of heat release has varied between materials. • Heat release by radiation, convection and flue gasses varied between materials. • Study helps engineers and users of biomass systems to select right materials

  9. Investigation of Methane Oxy-Fuel Combustion in a Swirl-Stabilised Gas Turbine Model Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 has a strong impact on both operability and emission behaviours in gas turbine combustors. In the present study, an atmospheric, preheated, swirl-stabilised optical gas turbine model combustor rig was employed. The primary objectives were to analyse the influence of CO2 on the fundamental characteristics of combustion, lean blowout (LBO limits, CO emission and flame structures. CO2 dilution effects were examined with three preheating temperatures (396.15, 431.15, and 466.15 K. The fundamental combustion characteristics were studied utilising chemical kinetic simulations. To study the influence of CO2 on the operational range of the combustor, equivalence ratio (Ф was varied from stoichiometric conditions to the LBO limits. CO emissions were measured at the exit of the combustor using a water-cooled probe over the entire operational range. The flame structures and locations were characterised by performing CH chemiluminescence imaging. The inverse Abel transformation was used to analyse the CH distribution on the axisymmetric plane of the combustor. Chemical kinetic modelling indicated that the CO2 resulted in a lower reaction rate compared with the CH4/air flame. Fundamental combustion properties such as laminar flame speed, ignition delay time and blowout residence time were found to be affected by CO2. The experimental results revealed that CO2 dilution resulted in a narrower operational range for the equivalence ratio. It was also found that CO2 had a strong inhibiting effect on CO burnout, which led to a higher concentration of CO in the combustion exhaust. CH chemiluminescence showed that the CO2 dilution did not have a significant impact on the flame structure.

  10. Intrauterine Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    S HARE W ITH W OMEN INTRAUTERINE DEVICES INTRAUTERINE DEVICES What is An Intrauterine Device? An intrauterine device (IUD) is anything that is placed inside the uterus (womb) to prevent pregnancy. ...

  11. In Developping a Bench-Scale Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor to Burn High Ash Brazilian Coal-Dolomites Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Behainne, Jhon Jairo; Hory, Rogério Ishikawa; Goldstein, Leonardo; Bernárdez Pécora, Araí Augusta

    This work considers some of the questions in burning high ash Brazilian coal-dolomite mixtures in a bench-scale circulating fluidized bed combustor (CFBC). Experimental tests were performed with the CE4500 coal from Santa Catarina State, in southern Brazil, with a Sauter mean diameter d p =43 μm. The coal particles were mixed with dolomite particles of d p = 111 μm and this fuel mixture was fed into the circulating fluidized reactor, previously loaded with quartz sand particles of d p =353 μm. This inert material was previously heated by the combustion of liquefied petroleum gas up to the ignition temperature of the fuel mixture. The CFBC unit has a 100mm internal diameter riser, 4.0m high, as well as a 62.8mm internal diameter downcomer. The loop has a cyclone, a sampling valve to collect particles and a 62.8mm internal diameter L-valve to recirculate the particles in the loop. A screw feeder with a rotation control system was used to feed the fuel mixture to the reactor. The operational conditions were monitored by pressure taps and thermocouples installed along the loop. A data acquisition system showed the main operational conditions to control. Experimental tests performed put in evidence the problems found during bed operation, with special attention to the solids feed device, to the L-valve operation, to particle size, solids inventory, fluidized gas velocity, fuel mixture and recirculated solids feeding positions.

  12. Investigations on the Influence of the In-Stream Pylon and Strut on the Performance of a Scramjet Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Ouyang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the in-stream pylon and strut on the performance of scramjet combustor was experimentally and numerically investigated. The experiments were conducted with a direct-connect supersonic model combustor equipped with multiple cavities. The entrance parameter of combustor corresponds to scramjet flight Mach number 4.0 with a total temperature of 947 K. The research results show that, compared with the scramjet combustor without pylon and strut, the wall pressure and the thrust of the scramjet increase due to the improvement of mixing and combustion effect due to the pylon and strut. The total pressure loss caused by the strut is considerable whereas pylon influence is slight.

  13. Diode Laser Sensor for Gas Temperature and H2O Concentration in a Scramjet Combustor Using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rieker, Gregory B; Li, Jonathan T; Jeffries, Jay B; Mathur, Tarun; Gruber, Mark R; Carter, Campbell D

    2005-01-01

    A diode laser absorption sensor which probes three spectral features of water vapor in the near infrared region to infer gas temperature and water vapor concentration near the exit of a scramjet combustor is presented...

  14. Experimental study on combustion modes and thrust performance of a staged-combustor of the scramjet with dual-strut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qingchun; Chetehouna, Khaled; Gascoin, Nicolas; Bao, Wen

    2016-05-01

    To enable the scramjet operate in a wider flight Mach number, a staged-combustor with dual-strut is introduced to hold more heat release at low flight Mach conditions. The behavior of mode transition was examined using a direct-connect model scramjet experiment along with pressure measurements. The typical operating modes of the staged-combustor are analyzed. Fuel injection scheme has a significant effect on the combustor operating modes, particularly for the supersonic combustion mode. Thrust performances of the combustor with different combustion modes and fuel distributions are reported in this paper. The first-staged strut injection has a better engine performance in the operation of subsonic combustion mode. On the contrast, the second-staged strut injection has a better engine performance in the operation of supersonic combustion mode.

  15. Impact of start-up and shut-down losses on the economic benefit of an integrated hybrid solar cavity receiver and combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Jin Han; Hu, Eric; Nathan, Graham J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • We present the benefits of integrating a solar cavity receiver and a combustor. • The hybrid solar receiver combustor is compared with its equivalent hybrid. • The start-up losses of the back-up boiler are calculated for a variable resource. • Levelized cost of electricity is reduced by up to 17%. • Fuel consumption is reduced by up to 31%. - Abstract: The impact of avoiding the start-up and shut-down losses of a solar thermal power plant by directly integrating the back-up boiler into a tubular solar-only cavity receiver is studied using a multiple time-step, piecewise-continuous model. A steady-state analytical model of the mass and energy flows through both this device and a solar-only cavity receiver reported previously are incorporated within a model of the solar power generating plant with storage. The performance of the Hybrid Solar Receiver Combustor (HSRC) is compared with an equivalent reference conventional hybrid solar thermal system employing a solar-only cavity receiver and a back-up boiler. The model accounts for start-up and shut-down losses of the boiler, threshold losses of the solar-only cavity receiver and the amount of trace heating required to avoid cooling of the heat transfer fluid. The model is implemented for a 12 month/five year time-series of historical Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI) at 1 h time-steps to account for the variability in the solar resource at four sites spanning Australia and the USA. A method to optimize the size of the heliostat field is also reported, based on the dumped fraction of solar power from the heliostat field. The Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE) for the HSRC configuration was estimated to be reduced by up to 17% relative to the equivalent conventional hybrid solar thermal system depending on the cost of the fuel, the storage capacity and the solar resource, while the fuel consumption was estimated to be reduced by some 12–31%.

  16. Large Eddy Simulations and Experimental Investigation of Flow in a Swirl Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Kewlani, Gaurav

    2012-01-09

    Swirling flows are the preferred mode of flame stabilization in lean premixed gas turbine engine combustors. Developing a fundamental understanding of combustion dynamics and flame stability in such systems requires a detailed investigation of the complex interactions between fluid mechanics and combustion. The turbulent reacting flow in a sudden expansion swirl combustor is studied using compressible large eddy simulations (LES) and compared with experimental data measured using PIV. Different vortex breakdown structures are observed, as the mixture equivalence ratio is reduced, that progressively diminish the stability of the flame. Sub-grid scale combustion models such as the artificially thickened flame method and the partially stirred reactor approach, along with appropriate chemical schemes, are implemented to describe the flame. The numerical predictions for average velocity correspond well with experimental results, and higher accuracy is obtained using the more detailed reaction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Inc.

  17. Experiments and computations on coaxial swirling jets with centerbody in an axisymmetric combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, Y.C.; Ho, W.C.; Lin, S.K.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments and computations of turbulent, confined, coannular swirling flows have been performed in a model combustor. Numerical results are obtained by means of a revised two-equation model of turbulence. The combustor consists of two confined, concentric, swirling jets and a centerbody at the center of the inlet. Results are reported for cold flow conditions under co- and counter-swirl. The numerical results agree with the experimental data under both conditions. The size of the central recirculation zone is dominated by the strength of the outer swirl. A two-cell recirculation zone may be formed due to the presence of the swirler hub. The mechanism of interaction between the separation bubble at the hub of the swirler and the central recirculation zone due to vortex breakdown is also investigated. 18 references

  18. Ultra low injection angle fuel holes in a combustor fuel nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, William David

    2012-10-23

    A fuel nozzle for a combustor includes a mixing passage through which fluid is directed toward a combustion area and a plurality of swirler vanes disposed in the mixing passage. Each swirler vane of the plurality of swirler vanes includes at least one fuel hole through which fuel enters the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes thereby decreasing a flameholding tendency of the fuel nozzle. A method of operating a fuel nozzle for a combustor includes flowing a fluid through a mixing passage past a plurality of swirler vanes and injecting a fuel into the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes.

  19. Diffuse interfacelets in transcritical flows of propellants into high-pressure combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urzay, Javier; Jofre, Lluis

    2017-11-01

    Rocket engines and new generations of high-power jet engines and diesel engines oftentimes involve the injection of one or more reactants at subcritical temperatures into combustor environments at high pressures, and more particularly, at pressures higher than those corresponding to the critical points of the individual components of the mixture, which typically range from 13 to 50 bars for most propellants. This class of trajectories in the thermodynamic space has been traditionally referred to as transcritical. Under particular conditions often found in hydrocarbon-fueled chemical propulsion systems, and despite the prevailing high pressures, the flow in the combustor may contain regions close to the injector where a diffuse interface is formed in between the fuel and oxidizer streams that is sustained by surface-tension forces as a result of the elevation of the critical pressure of the mixture. This talk describes progress towards modeling these effects in the conservation equations. Funded by the US Department of Energy.

  20. NOx results from two combustors tested on medium BTU coal gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, T. P.; Carl, D. E.; Vermes, G.; Schwab, J.; Notardonato, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    The results of tests of two combustor configurations using coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are reported. The trials were run with a ceramic-lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannular swirl burner (MASB) using a range of temperatures and pressures representative of industrial turbine inlet conditions. A lean mixture was examined at 104, 197, and 254 Btu/Scf, yielding NO(x) emissions of 5, 20, and 70 ppmv, respectively. The MASB was employed only with a gas rated at 220-270 Btu/Scf, producing 80 ppmv NO(x) at rated engine conditions. The results are concluded to be transferrable to current machines. Further tests on the effects of gas composition, the scaling of combustors to utility size, and the development of improved wall cooling techniques and variable geometry are indicated.

  1. Numerical analysis of lean premixed combustor fueled by propane-hydrogen mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahjoub Mustafa Makhzoum Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of combustion of propane-hydrogen mixture in a swirl premixed micro gas turbine combustor is presented. The effects of hydrogen addition into propane on temperature distribution in the combustor, reaction rates of propane and hydrogen and NOx emissions for different equivalence ratios and swirl numbers are given. The propane-hydrogen mixture of 90/10% by volume was assumed. The numerical results and measurements of NOx emissions for pure propane are compared. Excellent agreements are found for all equivalence ratios and swirl numbers, except for the highest swirl number (1.13. It is found that the addition of hydrogen into propane increases NOx emission. On the other hand, the increase of swirl number and the decrease of equivalence ratio decrease the NOx emissions.

  2. Parameterised Model of 2D Combustor Exit Flow Conditions for High-Pressure Turbine Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Schneider

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An algorithm is presented generating a complete set of inlet boundary conditions for Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes computational fluid dynamics (RANS CFD of high-pressure turbines to investigate their interaction with lean and rich burn combustors. The method shall contribute to understanding the sensitivities of turbine aerothermal performance in a systematic approach. The boundary conditions are based on a set of input parameters controlling velocity, temperature, and turbulence fields. All other quantities are derived from operating conditions and additional modelling assumptions. The algorithm is coupled with a CFD solver by applying the generated profiles as inlet boundary conditions. The successive steps to derive consistent flow profiles are described and results are validated against flow fields extracted from combustor CFD.

  3. Effects of the reacting flowfield on combustion processes in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Priya

    The performance of dry, low NOx gas turbines, which employ lean premixed (or partially premixed) combustors, is often limited by static and dynamic combustor stability, and they require complicated mixing hardware. To overcome these issues, a novel design, referred to as a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow (SPRF) combustor, has been recently demonstrated. The SPRF combustor has been shown to operate with ultra low NOx emissions in premixed and nonpremixed modes with gaseous and liquid fuels. The objective of this thesis is to elucidate the interactions between the flowfield and combustion processes in this novel combustor for gas- and liquid-fueled operation. This is achieved with experimental measurements employing various optical diagnostic techniques, which include Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), chemiluminescence imaging, Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals and elastic laser scattering from liquid droplets. The velocity measurements obtained during gas-fueled operation show that both nonreacting and reacting flows exhibit a "stagnation" region with low mean velocity and high RMS fluctuations. In nonreacting flow, it has been shown that the decay rate of the jet can be modeled as a combination of a free jet and a jet in a uniform opposed flow. The high shear between the forward and reverse flows causes significant recirculation, resulting in enhanced entrainment and mixing of the returning hot product gases into the incoming reactant jet for the reacting flow cases, which enables stable operation of the combustor at very lean equivalence ratios. Nonpremixed operation produces a flowfield similar to that of the premixed case except in the near-field region. The coaxial injector design results in high turbulence intensities close to the injector exit leading to significant fuel-air premixing before combustion occurs. The operation of the SPRF combustor fueled with liquid Jet-A is also experimentally investigated. The results indicate that while

  4. Combustion of biomass-derived, low caloric value, fuel gas in a gasturbine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andries, J.; Hoppesteyn, P.D.J.; Hein, K.R.G. [Technische Univ. Delf (Netherlands)

    1998-09-01

    The use of biomass and biomass/coal mixtures to produce electricity and heat reduces the net emissions of CO{sub 2}, contributes to the restructuring of the agricultural sector, helps to reduce the waste problem and saves finite fossil fuel reserves. Pressurised fluidised bed gasification followed by an adequate gas cleaning system, a gas turbine and a steam turbine, is a potential attractive way to convert biomass and biomass/coal mixtures. To develop and validate mathematical models, which can be used to design and operate Biomass-fired Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (BIGCC) systems, a Process Development Unit (PPDU) with a maximum thermal capacity of 1.5 MW{sub th}, located at the Laboratory for Thermal Power Engineering of the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands is being used. The combustor forms an integral part of this facility. Recirculated flue gas is used to cool the wall of the combustor. (orig.)

  5. Flow structures in a lean-premixed swirl-stabilized combustor with microjet air injection

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary A.

    2011-01-01

    The major challenge facing the development of low-emission combustors is combustion instability. By lowering flame temperatures, lean-premixed combustion has the potential to nearly eliminate emissions of thermally generated nitric oxides, but the chamber acoustics and heat release rate are highly susceptible to coupling in ways that lead to sustained, high-amplitude pressure oscillations, known as combustion instability. At different operating conditions, different modes of instability are observed, corresponding to particular flame shapes and resonant acoustic modes. Here we show that in a swirl-stabilized combustor, these instability modes also correspond to particular interactions between the flame and the inner recirculation zone. Two stable and two unstable modes are examined. At lean equivalence ratios, a stable conical flame anchors on the upstream edge of the inner recirculation zone and extends several diameters downstream along the wall. At higher equivalence ratios, with the injection of counter-swirling microjet air flow, another stable flame is observed. This flame is anchored along the upstream edge of a stronger recirculation zone, extending less than one diameter downstream along the wall. Without the microjets, a stationary instability coupled to the 1/4 wave mode of the combustor shows weak velocity oscillations and a stable configuration of the inner and outer recirculation zones. Another instability, coupled to the 3/4 wave mode of the combustor, exhibits periodic vortex breakdown in which the core flow alternates between a columnar mode and a vortex breakdown mode. © 2010 Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of The Combustion Institute. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental investigation of open cavity as flame holder of supersonic combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldfeld Marat

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of a study of combustion stabilization in a supersonic combustor for Mach numbers 2, 2.5, and 3 are presented. It was shown that the choice of the fuel injection scheme has decisive influence on the mixing efficiency and flame holding. It has been established that the efficiency of combustion stabilization depends essentially on Mach number and total temperature at the channel entrance.

  7. Co-combustion of waste with coal in a circulating fluidised bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulyurtlu, I.; Boavida, D.; Abelha, P.; Lopes, H.; Cabrita, I. [DEECA-INETI, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2002-07-01

    The results of a study of cocombustion of waste with coal is described. Various wastes (biomass, sludge, and refuse derived fuel) were burned with coal in a circulating fluidised bed combustor. Conditions that prevent segregated combustion, reduce production of nitrogen oxides, and attain high combustion efficiency were studied. The effects of variations in air staging in the riser, mixing of air with volatiles, coal/biomass ratio, methods of feeding biomass, and temperature are described. 5 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Numerical Investigation of Detonation Combustion Wave in Pulse Detonation Combustor with Ejector

    OpenAIRE

    P. Debnath; K. M. Pandey

    2017-01-01

    Detonation combustion based engines are more efficient compared to conventional deflagration based engines. Pulse detonation engine is the new concept in propulsion technology for future propulsion system. In this contrast, an ejector was used to modify the detonation wave propagation structure in pulse detonation engine combustor. In this paper k-ε turbulence model was used for detonation wave shock pattern simulation in PDE with ejectors at Ansys 14 Fluent platform. The unsteady Euler equat...

  9. OPTIMIZATION OF DESIGN PARAMETERS OF A STIRLING GENERATOR FOR USE WITH A FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTOR

    OpenAIRE

    Lombardi, Simone; Bizon, Katarzyna; Marra, Francesco; Continillo, Gaetano

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the possibility to place the head of a Stirling engine, more specifically the elements of the hot side heat exchanger, in direct contact with the sand of a Fluidized Bed Combustor. This choice is primarily suggested by the heat exchange coefficients between the multiphase fluidized bed medium and the surface of the heat exchanger, much larger than those attained when the heat exchanger is located in the stream of hot flue gases. Moreover, the mechanical action exerted b...

  10. Coupling between Hydrodynamics, Acoustics, and Heat Release in a Self-Excited Unstable Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-07

    and K. N. Bray, “Self-excited oscillations in combustors with Spray atomizers,” J. Eng. Gas Turbines Power 4, 779-786 (2001). 23 Z. Yao, Y. Gao, M. Zhu...of the k-ω turbulence model revisited,” AIAA J. 46(11), 2823-2838 (2008). 56 C. Westbrook and F. Dryer , “Simplified reaction mechanisms for the

  11. Combustion of peanut and tamarind shells in a conical fluidized-bed combustor: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuprianov, Vladimir I; Arromdee, Porametr

    2013-07-01

    Combustion of peanut and tamarind shells was studied in the conical fluidized-bed combustor using alumina sand as the bed material to prevent bed agglomeration. Morphological, thermogravimetric and kinetic characteristics were investigated to compare thermal and combustion reactivity between the biomass fuels. The thermogravimetric kinetics of the biomasses was fitted using the Coats-Redfern method. Experimental tests on the combustor were performed at 60 and 45 kg/h fuel feed rates, with excess air within 20-80%. Temperature and gas concentrations were measured along radial and axial directions in the reactor and at stack. The axial temperature and gas concentration profiles inside the combustor exhibited sensible effects of fuel properties and operating conditions on combustion and emission performance. High (≈ 99%) combustion efficiency and acceptable levels of CO, CxHy, and NO emissions are achievable when firing peanut shells at excess air of about 40%, whereas 60% is more preferable for burning tamarind shells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The development of an ultra-low-emission gas-fired cyclonic combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Tian-yu; Khinkis, M.J.; Coppin, W.P.

    1991-01-01

    A gas-fired cyclonic combustor has been developed for relatively low-temperature direct-air heating applications that require ultra-low pollutant emissions. High-lean premixed combustion with a flame stabilizer is adopted to achieve ultra-low emissions and high turndown operation. On the basis of analytical studies and cold modeling, a 350-kW test combustor was designed and successfully tested. Experimental results obtained using natural gas and ambient air demonstrated that the test combustor can operate steadily at high excess air up to 80% to 100% over a large turndown range up to 40:1. At design operating conditions, NO x emissions as low as 0.6 vppm and CO and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions below 3 vppm were achieved. Over the full operating range, NO x emissions from 0.3 to 1.0 vppm and CO and THC emissions below 4 vppm were demonstrated. In all tests, concentrations of NO 2 were less than 40% of the total NO x emissions -- lower than the level of NO 2 emissions from combustion processes required for good indoor air quality (0.5 vppm). This paper presents the concept of high-lean premixed ultra-low-emission cyclonic combustion, design specifications for the combustion system, and the major experimental results, including flame stability, emissions, and turndown performance. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  13. The development of an ultra-low-emission gas-fired combustor for space heaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Tian-yu; Khinkis, M.J.; Coppin, W.P.

    1991-01-01

    An ultra-low-emission as-fired combustor has been developed for relatively low-temperature direct-air heating applications. High-lean premixed cyclonic combustion with a flame stabilizer is employed to achieve ultra-low emissions and high turndown operation. On the basis of analytical studies and cold modeling a 350-kW test combustor was designed and successfully tested. Experimental results obtained using natural gas and ambient air demonstrated that the test combustor can operate steadily at high excess air up to 80% to 100% over a large turndown range up to 40:1. At design operating conditions, NO x emissions as low as 0.6 vppm and CO and total hydrocarbon (THC) emissions below 3 vppm were achieved. Over the full operating range, NO x emissions from 0.3 to 1.0 vppm and CO and THC emissions below 4 vppm were demonstrated. In all tests, concentrations of NO 2 were less than 40% of the total NO 2 emissions from combustion processes required for good indoor air quality (0.5 vppm). This paper presents the concept of high-lean premixed ultra-low-emission cyclonic combustion, design specifications for the combustion system, and the major experimental results, including flame stability, emissions, and turndown performance. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  14. A numerical study of mixing and combustion in hypervelocity flows through a scramjet combustor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishamurthy, Ramesh

    1993-01-01

    Interest in high speed, air-breathing propulsion systems such as scramjets has revived in recent years fueled to a large extent by the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. These vehicles are expected to fly trans-atmospheric and as a consequence, the Mach number level within the engine/combustor would be rather high (M greater than 5). Ground based testing of such scramjet engines requires a facility that can not only achieve the right Mach number, but also have the proper pressures and temperatures to simulate the combustion processes. At present, only pulse type facilities can provide such high enthalpy flows. The newest of these is the free-piston shock tunnel, T5 located at GALCIT. Recently, a generic combustor model was tested in T5, and the experimental data from that study is analyzed in the present report. The available experimental data from T5 are essentially the static pressures on the injection wall and the one opposite to it. Thus, a principal aim of the present study was to validate the available experimental data by using a proven CFD tool and then investigate the performance characteristics of the combustor model, such as, the mixing efficiency and combustion efficiency. For this purpose, in this study, the code GASP has been used.

  15. NASA One-Dimensional Combustor Simulation--User Manual for S1D_ML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stueber, Thomas J.; Paxson, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The work presented in this paper is to promote research leading to a closed-loop control system to actively suppress thermo-acoustic instabilities. To serve as a model for such a closed-loop control system, a one-dimensional combustor simulation composed using MATLAB software tools has been written. This MATLAB based process is similar to a precursor one-dimensional combustor simulation that was formatted as FORTRAN 77 source code. The previous simulation process requires modification to the FORTRAN 77 source code, compiling, and linking when creating a new combustor simulation executable file. The MATLAB based simulation does not require making changes to the source code, recompiling, or linking. Furthermore, the MATLAB based simulation can be run from script files within the MATLAB environment or with a compiled copy of the executable file running in the Command Prompt window without requiring a licensed copy of MATLAB. This report presents a general simulation overview. Details regarding how to setup and initiate a simulation are also presented. Finally, the post-processing section describes the two types of files created while running the simulation and it also includes simulation results for a default simulation included with the source code.

  16. User's manual for rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) and analysis computer program. Volume 1: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muss, J. A.; Nguyen, T. V.; Johnson, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    The user's manual for the rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) computer program is presented. The program, written in Fortran 77, provides a standardized methodology using state of the art codes and procedures for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine combustor's steady state combustion performance and combustion stability. The ROCCID is currently capable of analyzing mixed element injector patterns containing impinging like doublet or unlike triplet, showerhead, shear coaxial, and swirl coaxial elements as long as only one element type exists in each injector core, baffle, or barrier zone. Real propellant properties of oxygen, hydrogen, methane, propane, and RP-1 are included in ROCCID. The properties of other propellants can easily be added. The analysis model in ROCCID can account for the influence of acoustic cavities, helmholtz resonators, and radial thrust chamber baffles on combustion stability. ROCCID also contains the logic to interactively create a combustor design which meets input performance and stability goals. A preliminary design results from the application of historical correlations to the input design requirements. The steady state performance and combustion stability of this design is evaluated using the analysis models, and ROCCID guides the user as to the design changes required to satisfy the user's performance and stability goals, including the design of stability aids. Output from ROCCID includes a formatted input file for the standardized JANNAF engine performance prediction procedure.

  17. Microjet Injection Strategies for Mitigating Dynamics in a Lean Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary

    2011-01-04

    Combustion dynamics remain a challenge in the development of low-emission, air-breathing combustors for power generation and aircraft propulsion. In this paper, we presenta parametric study on the use of microjet injectors for suppressing or mitigating the combustion dynamics that energize the thermoacoustic instability in a swirl-stabilized, premixed combustor. Microjet injectors consist of small inlet ports intended to inject flow with high momentum at relatively low mass flow rates into the flame-anchoring region. The microjets were configured to inject flow either axially, into the outer recirculation zone, or radially into the inner recirculation zone. Additionally, different injectors were tested with different relative senses of swirl (signs of angular momentum)with respect to the main flow: co-swirling, not swirling, or counter-swirling. We observed that injecting air or premixed fuel/air into the inner recirculation zone via counter-swirling radial microjets, we were able to reduce the overall sound pressure level in the combustor by over 20 dB in the lean end of the operating range. Other injector configurations were not observed to positively influence the combust or stability. Detailed PIV measurements are used to examine possible mechanisms of how the microjets impact the combustion dynamics, and the technology implications of our experiments are discussed.

  18. The combustion of low calorific value fuels (oil shale) by using fluidized bed combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azzam, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The present work reports an experimental data for combustion of oil-shale in a fluidized bed combustor. The experimental set up was designed for the combustion of low calorific value fuel such as oil-shale to facilitate the variation of many parameters over a wide operating range. A cold run was firstly conducted to study the fluidization parameters. Fluidization experiment were made with different sized quartiz particles. Minimum fluidization velocities and other fluidization characteristics were determined at room temperature. Secondary a hot run was started, first studying the combustion of 'LPG' in a fluidized bed as a starting process, then studying the combustion if oil-shale with different flow rates. The experimetal results are promising and give rise to hopes that this valuable deposit can be used as a fuel source and can be burned sucessfully in a fluidized bed combustor. This study had prooved that utilization of oil-shale a fuel source is no more a complicated technical problem, this opens the way for power generation using fluidized bed combustors. (author). 17 refs., 32 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Ignition and flame stabilization of a strut-jet RBCC combustor with small rocket exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jichao; Chang, Juntao; Bao, Wen

    2014-01-01

    A Rocket Based Combined Cycle combustor model is tested at a ground direct connected rig to investigate the flame holding characteristics with a small rocket exhaust using liquid kerosene. The total temperature and the Mach number of the vitiated air flow, at exit of the nozzle are 1505 K and 2.6, respectively. The rocket base is embedded in a fuel injecting strut and mounted in the center of the combustor. The wall of the combustor is flush, without any reward step or cavity, so the strut-jet is used to make sure of the flame stabilization of the second combustion. Mass flow rate of the kerosene and oxygen injected into the rocket is set to be a small value, below 10% of the total fuel when the equivalence ratio of the second combustion is 1. The experiment has generated two different kinds of rocket exhaust: fuel rich and pure oxygen. Experiment result has shown that, with a relative small total mass flow rate of the rocket, the fuel rich rocket plume is not suitable for ignition and flame stabilization, while an oxygen plume condition is suitable. Then the paper conducts a series of experiments to investigate the combustion characteristics under this oxygen pilot method and found that the flame stabilization characteristics are different at different combustion modes.

  20. A Comparison of Combustion Dynamics for Multiple 7-Point Lean Direct Injection Combustor Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacina, K. M.; Hicks, Y. R.

    2017-01-01

    The combustion dynamics of multiple 7-point lean direct injection (LDI) combustor configurations are compared. LDI is a fuel-lean combustor concept for aero gas turbine engines in which multiple small fuel-air mixers replace one traditionally-sized fuel-air mixer. This 7-point LDI configuration has a circular cross section, with a center (pilot) fuel-air mixer surrounded by six outer (main) fuel-air mixers. Each fuel-air mixer consists of an axial air swirler followed by a converging-diverging venturi. A simplex fuel injector is inserted through the center of the air swirler, with the fuel injector tip located near the venturi throat. All 7 fuel-air mixers are identical except for the swirler blade angle, which varies with the configuration. Testing was done in a 5-atm flame tube with inlet air temperatures from 600 to 800 F and equivalence ratios from 0.4 to 0.7. Combustion dynamics were measured using a cooled PCB pressure transducer flush-mounted in the wall of the combustor test section.

  1. Dual-Pump CARS Thermometry and Species Concentration Measurements in a Supersonic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    OByrne, Sean; Danehy, Paul M.; Cutler, Andrew D.

    2004-01-01

    The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method was used to measure temperature and the absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic combustor. Experiments were conducted in NASA Langley Research Center's Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility. In this facility, hydrogen and air bum to increase the enthalpy of the test gas; O2 is then added to simulate air. This gas is expanded through a Mach 2 nozzle and into a combustor model consisting of a short constant-area section followed by a small rearward facing step and another constant area section. At the end of this straight section H2 fuel is then injected at Mach 2 and at 30 deg. angle with respect to the freestream. One wall of the duct then expands at a 3 deg. angle for over 1 meter. The ensuing combustion is monitored optically through ports in the side of the combustor. CARS measurements were performed at the nozzle exit and at four different planes downstream fuel injection. Maps were obtained of the mean temperature, as well as quantitative N2 and O2 and qualitative H2 mean mole fraction fields. Correlations between fluctuations of the different measured parameters are presented for one of the planes of data.

  2. Dual-Pump CARS Temperature and Species Concentration Measurements in a Supersonic Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Byrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Tedder, S. A.; Cutler, A. D.

    2007-01-01

    The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) method was used to measure temperature and the mole fractions of N2 and O2 in a supersonic combustor. Experiments were conducted in NASA Langley Research Center s Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility. In this facility, H2 and oxygen-enriched air burn to increase the enthalpy of the simulated air test gas. This gas is expanded through a Mach 2 nozzle and into a combustor model consisting of a short constant-area section followed by a small rearward-facing step and another constant-area section. At the end of this straight section, H2 fuel is injected at Mach 2 and at a 30 angle with respect to the freestream. One wall of the duct then expands at a 3 angle for over 1 meter. The ensuing combustion is probed optically through ports in the side of the combustor. Dual-pump CARS measurements were performed at the facility nozzle exit and at four planes downstream of fuel injection. Maps are presented of the mean temperature, as well as N2 and O2 mean mole fraction fields. Correlations between fluctuations of the different measured parameters are also presented.

  3. Modeling the integration of thermoelectrics in anode exhaust combustors for waste heat recovery in fuel cell systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghdouri Moghaddam, Anita

    Recently developed small-scale hydrocarbon-fueled fuel cell systems for portable power under 1 kW have overall system efficiencies typically no higher than 30-35%. This study explores the possibility of using of thermoelectric waste heat recovery in anode exhaust combustors to improve the fuel cell system efficiencies by as much as 4-5% points and further to reduce required battery power during system start-up. Two models were used to explore this. The first model simulated an integrated SOFC system with a simplified catalytic combustor model with TEs integrated between the combustor and air preheating channels for waste heat recovery. This model provided the basis for assessing how much additional power can achieve during SOFC operation as a function of fuel cell operating conditions. Results for the SOFC system indicate that while the TEs may recover as much as 4% of the total fuel energy into the system, their benefit is reduced in part because they reduce the waste heat transferred back to the incoming air stream and thereby lower the SOFC operating temperatures and operating efficiencies. A second model transient model of a TE-integrated catalytic combustor explored the performance of the TEs during transient start-up of the combustor. This model incorporated more detailed catalytic combustion chemistry and enhanced cooling air fin heat transfer to show the dynamic heating of the integrated combustor. This detailed model provided a basis for exploring combustor designs and showed the importance of adequate reactant preheating when burning exhaust from a reformer during start-up for the TEs to produce significant power to reduce the size of system batteries for start-up.

  4. Combustion Noise at Elevated Pressures in a Liquid-Fueled Premixed Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darling, Douglas; Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Oyediran, Ayo

    1997-01-01

    Noise generated in gas turbine combustors can exist in several forms-broadband noise, sharp resonant peaks, and regular or intermittent nonlinear pulsing. In the present study, dynamic pressure measurements were made in several JP-5-fueled combustor configurations, at various mean pressures and temperatures. The fluctuating pressure was measured at mean pressures from 6 to 14 atm and inlet temperatures from 550 K to 850 K. The goal of the present work was to study the effect of changes in mean flow conditions on combustor noise: both broadband noise and sharp tones were considered. In general, the shape of the broadband noise spectrum was consistent from one configuration to another. The shape of the spectrum was influenced by the acoustic filtering of the combustion zone. This filtering ensured the basic consistency of the spectra. In general, the trends in broadband noise observed at low mean pressures were also seen at high mean pressures; that is, the total sound level decreased with both increasing equivalence ratio and increasing inlet temperature. The combustor configurations without a central pilot experienced higher broadband noise levels and were more susceptible to narrow peak resonances than configurations with a central pilot. The sharp peaks were more sensitive to the mean flow than was the broadband noise, and the effects were not always the same. In some situations, increasing the equivalence ratio made the sharp peaks grow, while at other conditions, increasing the equivalence ratio made the sharp peaks shrink. Thus, it was difficult to predict when resonances would occur; however, they were reproducible. Acoustic coupling between the upstream and downstream regions of the combustor may play a role in the sharp-peaked oscillations. Noise was also observed near lean blow out. As with other types of noise, lean blow out noise was affected by the combustion chamber acoustics, which apparently maintains the fluctuations at a uniform frequency. However

  5. Development of the control and ignition systems on a high pressure gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Carlos Alejandro

    The ignition and control systems of a laboratory scale high-pressure gas turbine combustor were developed in the present work. This work provides a detailed description of the design, development and testing of the remote control system developed for a High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustor (HPTC). The combustor has the capability to operate at pressures up to 1.5 MPa and temperatures up to 2400 K. It is also designed for a maximum air and fuel flow rates of 81.93 g/s and 35.77 g/s respectively. The fuel used will be CH4 for the early experiments but it is designed to operate using a mixture of H2-CO with a hydrogen fuel composition variation of up to 30 percent. The HPTC also has optical accessibility capabilities in its combustion chamber with a converging nozzle that restricts the exhaust flow. It also has three circular ports that can be used as instrumentation ports to obtain real time data from the combustion chamber. LabVIEW was used as the controlling interface for the user. A detailed outline of the LabVIEW programming is also described. LabVIEW controlled the proportional valves (ball valves), and solenoid valves; it also provided the user with data from mass flow meters as well as pressure transducers. Both proportional and solenoid valves are 1.91 cm and can withstand pressures of up to 1551 kPa. Thermal mass flow meters were used to obtain the flow in the lines with a range from 200-1000 L/min with an accuracy of 1.5 percent. Pressure transducers with a range from 0 to 2068 kPa were also positioned on the lines in order to know the line pressures. The ignition system design, development and testing is also described with its integration to the High Pressure Gas Turbine Combustor. A modified spark plug was used to provide the igniter with an ignition source. A diffusion flame was used to ignite the main line using methane as the fuel that utilizes the air in the combustion chamber as the oxidizer. Testing included a functional test of the equipment, and

  6. Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahsan Choudhuri

    2011-03-31

    Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards

  7. The combustion of refuse derived fuel on a ''Nordfab'' biomass combustor at Leonard Ironside Ltd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fells, A.R.

    1991-08-01

    Warren Spring Laboratory has been assessing the performance of a Nordfab biofuel combustor fitted with a Danstoker boiler rated at 4.5MW (100% MCR), when firing Easiburn refuse derived fuel. The unit is situated at Leonard Ironside Ltd, a market gardening business near Lyminge Kent. A number of operational problems were encountered with the system, namely excessive fuel consumption and intermittent production of a persistent acrid plume. A trials history is given with details of monitoring methods used. The results of the test work show the reciprocating grate to be unsuitable for continuous firing of refuse derived fuel. The performance of the Nordfab combustor when burning refuse derived fuel is compared with two other units using similar fuel bed transport systems. These are the coking stoker and the Dantrim biofuel combustor. (author).

  8. Analysis of the impact of the use of broad specification fuels on combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szetela, E. J.; Lehmann, R. P.; Smith, A. L.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical study was conducted to assess the impact of the use of broad specification fuels with reduced hydrogen content on the design, performance, durability, emissions and operational characteristics of combustors for commercial aircraft gas turbine engines. The study was directed at defining necessary design revisions to combustors designed for use of Jet A when such are operated on ERBS (Experimental Referee Broad Specification Fuel) which has a nominal hydrogen content of 12.8 percent as opposed to 13.7 percent in current Jet A. The results indicate that improvements in combustor liner cooling, and/or materials, and methods of fuel atomization will be required if the hydrogen content of aircraft gas turbine fuel is decreased.

  9. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  10. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  11. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  12. Refractory experience in circulating fluidized bed combustors, Task 7. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, R.Q.

    1989-11-01

    This report describes the results of an investigation into the status of the design and selection of refractory materials for coal-fueled circulating fluidized-bed combustors. The survey concentrated on operating units in the United States manufactured by six different boiler vendors: Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering, Foster Wheeler, Keeler Dorr-Oliver, Pyropower, and Riley Stoker. Information was obtained from the boiler vendors, refractory suppliers and installers, and the owners/operators of over forty units. This work is in support of DOE`s Clean Coal Technology program, which includes circulating fluidized-bed technology as one of the selected concepts being evaluated.

  13. Radial flow fuel nozzle for a combustor of a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Means, Gregory Scott; Boardman, Gregory Allen; Berry, Jonathan Dwight

    2016-07-05

    A combustor for a gas turbine generally includes a radial flow fuel nozzle having a fuel distribution manifold, and a fuel injection manifold axially separated from the fuel distribution manifold. The fuel injection manifold generally includes an inner side portion, an outer side portion, and a plurality of circumferentially spaced fuel ports that extend through the outer side portion. A plurality of tubes provides axial separation between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold. Each tube defines a fluid communication path between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold.

  14. On the sensitivity of a helicopter combustor wall temperature to convective and radiative thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.; Richard, S.; Duchaine, F.; Staffelbach, G.; Gicquel, L.Y.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Coupling of LES, DOM and conduction is applied to an industrial combustor. • Thermal sensitivity of the combustor to convection and radiation is investigated. • CHT based on LES is feasible in an industrial context with acceptable CPU costs. • Radiation heat fluxes are of the same order of magnitude that the convective ones. • CHT with radiation are globally in good agreement with thermocolor test. - Abstract: The design of aeronautical engines is subject to many constraints that cover performance gain as well as increasingly sensitive environmental issues. These often contradicting objectives are currently being answered through an increase in the local and global temperature in the hot stages of the engine. As a result, hot spots could appear causing a premature aging of the combustion chamber. Today, the characterization of wall temperatures is performed experimentally by complex thermocolor tests in advanced phases of the design process. To limit such expensive experiments and integrate the knowledge of the thermal environment earlier in the design process, efforts are currently performed to provide high fidelity numerical tools able to predict the combustion chamber wall temperature including the main physical phenomena: combustion, convection and mixing of hot products and cold flows, radiative transfers as well as conduction in the solid parts. In this paper, partitioned coupling approaches based on a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) solver, a Discrete Ordinate Method radiation solver and an unsteady conduction code are used to investigate the sensitivity of an industrial combustor thermal environment to convection and radiation. Four computations including a reference adiabatic fluid only simulation, Conjugate Heat Transfer, Radiation-Fluid Thermal Interaction and fully coupled simulations are performed and compared with thermocolor experimental data. From the authors knowledge, such comparative study with LES has never been published. It

  15. Spatially-resolved measurements of soot size and population in a swirl-stabilized combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, CP; Smith, RA; Samuelsen, GS

    1985-01-01

    Isooctane, and mixtures of isooctane with various ring and aromatic compounds blended to yield the same smoke point were separately injected through a twin-fluid atomizer into a turbulent, swirl-stabilized model combustor. A nonintrusive optical probe based on larege angle (60°, 20°) intensity ratio scattering was used to yield a point measurement of soot particulate in the size range of 0.08 to 0.38 μm. The velocity and temperature fields were characterized by a two-color laser anemometer an...

  16. Synergistic erosion/corrosion of superalloys in PFB coal combustor effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benford, S. M.; Zellars, G. R.; Lowell, C. E.

    1981-01-01

    Two Ni-based superalloys were exposed to the high velocity effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed coal combustor. Targets were 15 cm diameter rotors operating at 40,000 rpm and small flat plate specimens. Above an erosion rate threshold, the targets were eroded to bare metal. The presence of accelerated oxidation at lower erosion rates suggests erosion/corrosion synergism. Various mechanisms which may contribute to the observed oxide growth enhancement include erosive removal of protective oxide layers, oxide and subsurface cracking, and chemical interaction with sulfur in the gas and deposits through damaged surface layers.

  17. Turbomachine combustor nozzle including a monolithic nozzle component and method of forming the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoia, Lucas John; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier; Vanselow, John Drake; Westmoreland, James Harold

    2016-02-23

    A turbomachine combustor nozzle includes a monolithic nozzle component having a plate element and a plurality of nozzle elements. Each of the plurality of nozzle elements includes a first end extending from the plate element to a second end. The plate element and plurality of nozzle elements are formed as a unitary component. A plate member is joined with the nozzle component. The plate member includes an outer edge that defines first and second surfaces and a plurality of openings extending between the first and second surfaces. The plurality of openings are configured and disposed to register with and receive the second end of corresponding ones of the plurality of nozzle elements.

  18. Effects of chemical equilibrium on turbine engine performance for various fuels and combustor temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Donald H.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the differences in turbine engine performance with and without the chemical dissociation effects for various fuel types over a range of combustor temperatures. Both turbojet and turbofan engines were studied with hydrocarbon fuels and cryogenic, nonhydrocarbon fuels. Results of the study indicate that accuracy of engine performance decreases when nonhydrocarbon fuels are used, especially at high temperatures where chemical dissociation becomes more significant. For instance, the deviation in net thrust for liquid hydrogen fuel can become as high as 20 percent at 4160 R. This study reveals that computer central processing unit (CPU) time increases significantly when dissociation effects are included in the cycle analysis.

  19. Bed agglomeration in fluidized combustor fueled by wood and rice straw blends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thy, Peter; Jenkins, Brian; Williams, R.B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Petrographic techniques have been used to examine bed materials from fluidized bed combustion experiments that utilized wood and rice straw fuel blends. The experiments were conducted using a laboratory-scale combustor with mullite sand beds, firing temperatures of 840 to 1030 °C, and run...... areas between bed particles, ultimately led to bed agglomeration. The interfaces and the presence of gas bubbles in the cement suggest a bonding material with a high surface tension and a liquid state. The cement films originate by filling of irregularities on individual and partially agglomerated bed...

  20. Continuous spin detonation of a syngas-air mixture in a plane-radial vortex combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykovskii, F. A.; Zhdan, S. A.; Vedernikov, E. F.

    2017-09-01

    Continuous spin detonation in syngas-air mixtures with three different syngas compositions [CO]/[H2] = 1/3, 1/2, and 1/1 is experimentally studied in a flow-type radial vortex combustor 500 mm in diameter. It is found that all these mixtures with three syngas compositions can be effectively burned in air in the detonation regime. Transverse detonation waves of identical structure are detected. The limits of existence of continuous detonation in terms of the specific flow rates of the mixtures (minimum values) are determined.

  1. Thermo-hydrodynamic design of fluidized bed combustors estimating metal wastage

    CERN Document Server

    Lyczkowski, Robert W; Bouillard, Jacques X; Folga, Stephen M

    2012-01-01

    Thermo-Hydrodynamic Design of Fluidized Bed Combustors: Estimating Metal Wastage is a unique volume that finds that the most sensitive parameters affecting metal wastage are superficial fluidizing velocity, particle diameter, and particle sphericity.  Gross consistencies between disparate data sources using different techniques were found when the erosion rates are compared on the same basis using the concept of renormalization.  The simplified mechanistic models and correlations, when validated, can be used to renormalize any experimental data so they can be compared on a consistent basis using a master equation.

  2. A micro fuel reformer integrated with a combustor and a microchannel evaporator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazushi; Tanaka, Shuji; Hiraki, Hisashi; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2006-09-01

    This paper describes the development of a micro fuel reformer integrated with a combustor and an evaporator. Fuel reforming tests were performed by using a mixture of methanol and water as reforming fuel and hydrogen as combustion fuel. It was found that the design of the microchannel evaporator is critical to obtain larger hydrogen output. Hydrogen output and CO concentration were investigated by varying the input combustion power at different fuel feeding rates. 32.9 sccm of hydrogen, which is equivalent to 5.9 W in lower heating value, was produced, when input combustion power was 11 W.

  3. Drag and distribution measurements of single-element fuel injectors for supersonic combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, L. A.

    1974-01-01

    The drag caused by several vortex generating fuel injectors for scramjet combustors was measured in a Mach 2 to 3.5 airstream. Injector drag was found to be strongly dependent on injector thickness ratio. The distribution of helium injected into the stream was measured both in the near field and the far field of the injectors for a variety of pressure ratios. The far field results differed appreciably from measurements in the near field. Injection pressure ratio was found to profoundly influence the penetration. One of the aerowing configurations tested yielded low drag consistent with desirable penetration and spreading characteristics.

  4. Effect of increased fuel temperature on emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a gas turbine combustor burning natural gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1973-01-01

    An annular gas turbine combustor was tested with heated natural gas fuel to determine the effect of increasing fuel temperature on the formation of oxides of nitrogen. Fuel temperatures ranged from ambient to 800 K (980 F). Combustor pressure was 6 atmospheres and the inlet air temperature ranged from 589 to 894 K (600 to 1150 F). The NOx emission index increased with fuel temperature at a rate of 4 to 9 percent per 100 K (180 F), depending on the inlet air temperature. The rate of increase in NOx was lowest at the highest inlet air temperature tested.

  5. Combustor deployments of femtosecond laser written fiber Bragg grating arrays for temperature measurements surpassing 1000°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert B.; Ding, Huimin; Coulas, David; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Duchesne, Marc A.; Hughes, Robin W.; McCalden, David J.; Burchat, Ryan; Yandon, Robert; Yun, Sangsig; Ramachandran, Nanthan; Charbonneau, Michel

    2017-05-01

    Femtosecond Infrared (fs-IR) laser written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), have demonstrated great potential for extreme sensing. Such conditions are inherent to advanced power plant technologies and gas turbine engines, under development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and the ability to measure temperature gradients in these harsh environments is currently limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding the high temperature, pressure and corrosive conditions present. This paper reviews our fabrication and deployment of hundreds of fs-IR written FBGs, for monitoring temperature gradients of an oxy-fuel fluidized bed combustor and an aerospace gas turbine combustor simulator.

  6. Beyond Movie Recommendations: Solving the Continuous Cold Start Problem in E-commerce Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiseleva, J.; Tuzhilin, A.; Kamps, J.; Bernardi, L.; Davis, C.; Kovacek, I.; Einarsen, M.S.; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    Many e-commerce websites use recommender systems or personalized rankers to personalize search results based on their previous interactions. However, a large fraction of users has no prior inter-actions, making it impossible to use collaborative filtering or rely on user history for personalization.

  7. Semi analytical solution of point kinetic equation with source from cold start up to delayed critical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathiyasheela, T.

    2009-01-01

    Point kinetics equations (P. K. E) are system of differential equations, which is solved simultaneously to get the neutron density as a function of time for a given reactivity input. P. K. E are stiff differential equations, computational solution through the conventional explicit method will give a stable consistent result only for smaller time steps. Analytical solutions are available either with step or ramp reactivity insertion without considering the source power contribution. When a reactor operates at low power, the neutron source gives a considerable contribution to the net reactor power. Similarly, when the reactor is brought to delayed critical with the presence of external source, the sub critical reactor kinetics studies with source power are important to understand the power behavior as a function of reactivity insertion rate with respect to the initial reactivity. In the present work, P.K.E with one group delayed neutron are solved analytically to determine the reactor power as a function of reactivity insertion rate in the presence of neutron source. The analytical solution is a combination of converging two infinite series. Truncated infinite series is the analytical solution of P.K E. A general formulation is made by Combining both the ramp reactivity and step reactivity solution. So that the analytical solution could be useful in analyzing either step and ramp reactivity insertion exclusively or the combination of both. This general formulation could be useful in analyzing many reactor operations, like the air bubble passing through the core, stuck rod conditions, uncontrolled withdrawal of controlled rod, discontinuous lifting of control rod, lowering of rod and etc. Results of analytical solutions are compared against the results of numerical solution which is developed based on Cohen's method. The comparisons are found to be good for all kind of positive and negative ramp reactivity insertions, with or without the combination of step reactivity. The methodology is found to be a promising tool for analyzing low power reactor with the inclusion of external source. (author)

  8. Advanced hydrogen/methanol utilization technology demonstration. Phase II: Hydrogen cold start of a methanol vehicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    This is the Phase 11 Final Report on NREL Subcontract No. XR-2-11175-1 {open_quotes}Advanced Hydrogen/Methane Utilization Demonstration{close_quotes} between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, Golden, Colorado and Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. (HCI), Littleton, Colorado. Mr. Chris Colucci was NREL`s Technical Monitor. Colorado State University`s (CSU) Engines and Energy Conversion Laboratory was HCI`s subcontractor. Some of the vehicle test work was carried out at the National Center for Vehicle Emissions Control and Safety (NCVECS) at CSU. The collaboration of the Colorado School of Mines is also gratefully acknowledged. Hydrogen is unique among alternative fuels in its ability to burn over a wide range of mixtures in air with no carbon-related combustion products. Hydrogen also has the ability to burn on a catalyst, starting from room temperature. Hydrogen can be made from a variety of renewable energy resources and is expected to become a widely used energy carrier in the sustainable energy system of the future. One way to make a start toward widespread use of hydrogen in the energy system is to use it sparingly with other alternative fuels. The Phase I work showed that strong affects could be achieved with dilute concentrations of hydrogen in methane (11). Reductions in emissions greater than the proportion of hydrogen in the fuel provide a form of leverage to stimulate the early introduction of hydrogen. Per energy unit or per dollar of hydrogen, a greater benefit is derived than simply displacing fossil-fueled vehicles with pure hydrogen vehicles.

  9. Diesel Engine Cold-Starting Studies: Optically Accessible Engine Experiments and Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henein, Naeim

    1997-01-01

    .... The pre-ignition chemistry showed great sensitivity to the compressed air temperature. KIVA with a modified shell model responds accordingly to the change of inlet air temperatures and fuel injection parameters...

  10. An item-oriented recommendation algorithm on cold-start problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian; Chen, Guang; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2011-09-01

    Based on a hybrid algorithm incorporating the heat conduction and probability spreading processes (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 107 (2010) 4511), in this letter, we propose an improved method by introducing an item-oriented function, focusing on solving the dilemma of the recommendation accuracy between the cold and popular items. Differently from previous works, the present algorithm does not require any additional information (e.g., tags). Further experimental results obtained in three real datasets, RYM, Netflix and MovieLens, show that, compared with the original hybrid method, the proposed algorithm significantly enhances the recommendation accuracy of the cold items, while it keeps the recommendation accuracy of the overall and the popular items. This work might shed some light on both understanding and designing effective methods for long-tailed online applications of recommender systems.

  11. Effects of inlet conditions on dynamics of a thermal pulse combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sirshendu; Mukhopadhyay, Achintya; Sen, Swarnendu

    2012-02-01

    To increase the pulse combustor load, a higher amount of fuel-air mixture has to be supplied. This increases the flow rate or equivalently, the flow time is reduced. However, an increase in flow rate leads to an early extinction. This implies that obtaining pulsating combustion is difficult at higher loads. The objective of the present work is to explore the possibility of extending the regime of pulsating combustion at higher flow rates by preheating and diluting the reactants. In this work, the effects of preheating and dilution are examined by varying the inlet temperature and inlet fuel mass fraction. Varying these parameters, a map, presenting regime of pulsating combustion from steady combustion to extinction for each value of flow time considered, has been made. Lastly, Hopf bifurcation points of the system have been investigated by determining the eigenvalues of Jacobian matrix of the coupled non-linear system at the fixed point using a specialised package for bifurcation analysis, MATCONT. It has been found that at higher load, pulsating combustion can be achieved at higher inlet temperature and lower inlet fuel mass fraction. Comparing the Hopf points with mapping, it is found that existence of Hopf bifurcation agrees with the birth and death of pulsating combustion. The results indicate that altering the mixture condition at the inlet can be used for controlling chaos and stabilising periodic solutions in thermal pulse combustors and thus increase the range of pulsating combustion to higher power regimes.

  12. Experimental characterization of onset of acoustic instability in a nonpremixed half-dump combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, Satyanarayanan R; Shreenivasan, Obla J; Boehm, Benjamin; Dreizler, Andreas; Janicka, Johannes

    2007-07-01

    This paper reports work on a nonpremixed half-dump combustor, in which methane is injected at the backward-facing step, and mixes and burns with the air flowing past the step in the unsteady recirculation zone. The flow and geometric parameters are widely varied, to gradually change from conditions of low-amplitude noise to excitation of high-amplitude discrete tones. The purpose of the work is to focus on the transition from the former condition to the latter, and to mark the onset of instability. Dimensionless groups such as the Helmholtz and Strouhal numbers are formed based on the observed dominant frequencies, whose variation with the air flow Reynolds number is used to identify the oscillations as those due to the natural acoustic modes or the vortex shedding process. High-speed chemiluminescence imaging reveals shedding of vortical structures in the flame zone. With variation in the conditions, flow-acoustic lock-on and transition from one vortex shedding mode to another is marked by nonlinearity in the corresponding amplitude variations. Such conditions are identified as the onset of instability in terms of the ratio of the flow time scale to the acoustic time scale and mapped against the operating fuel-air equivalence ratio of the combustor.

  13. Synthetic sorbents for removal of sulfur dioxide in fluidized-bed coal combustors. [25 refs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, R.B.; Wilson, W.I.; Johnson, I.; Jonke, A.A.

    1977-06-01

    Synthetic sorbents have been investigated for use in place of limestone for SO/sub 2/ emission control in fluidized-bed coal combustors. Sorbents prepared by impregnation of porous alumina with alkali metal or alkaline earth oxides were studied. The most promising sorbent was found to be calcium oxide in alumina. However, the SO/sub 2/ reactivity of this synthetic sorbent was less than that for a moderately reactive limestone. Hence, a greater quantity of synthetic sorbent would be needed to meet SO/sub 2/ emission standards. The attrition resistance of this synthetic sorbent was found to be greater than that of natural stones; therefore, a larger number of cycles of use would be expected. It is estimated that the use of this synthetic sorbent would reduce the amount of waste sorbent to about one-sixth the amount expected using a moderately reactive once-through limestone. The cost of using this synthetic sorbent is estimated to be about three and a half times the cost expected using once-through limestone. This cost is considered to be too large in view of the expected modest decrease in environmental impact. The synthetic sorbents developed in this study are therefore not considered viable alternatives for limestone in fluidized-bed coal combustors.

  14. Experimental investigations of extracted rapeseed combustion emissions in a small scale stationary fluidized bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh Tung, N.; Steinbrecht, D. [Rostock University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Technology, Chair of Environmental Technology, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D - 18059 Rostock (Germany); Tung, N. D. [Hanoi University of Agriculture- Hanoi/Vietnam, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Trau Quy - Gia Lam - Hanoi (Viet Nam); Vincent, T. [Rostock University, Chair of Energy Systems, Justus-von-Liebig-Weg 6, D - 18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    The objective of this study was to observe the combustion process of extracted rapeseed (ER) grist in a stationary fluidized bed combustor (SFBC) and evaluate the chemical compositions of the flue gas emissions. The experimental tests of ER combustion in the 90 to 200 kW SFB combustion test facility show that the optimal ER combustion temperature is within the range from 850 to 880 {sup o}C. Temperature and the concentration of exhausted emissions (e.g. O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, C{sub org}) were measured with dedicated sensors distributed within the combustor, along its height and in the flue gas duct. The experimental results showed that with respect to German emission limits the concentration of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in the flue gas were high whereas that of CO was low. This study furthermore is applicable for the abundant biomass residue resources in Vietnam (rice husk, rice straw, bagasse, cassava residues, coconut shell etc.), which have similar chemical compositions to ER. (author)

  15. Low NO subx heavy fuel combustor concept program. Phase 1A: Coal gas addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosfjord, T.; Sederquist, R.

    1982-01-01

    The performance and emissions from a rich-lean combustor fired on simulated coal gas fuels were investigated using a 12.7-cm diameter axially-staged burner originally designed for operation with high heating value liquid fuels. A simple, tubular fuel injector was substituted for the liquid fuel nozzle; no other combustor modifications were made. Four test fuels were studied including three chemically bound nitrogen-free gas mixtures with higher heating values of 88, 227, and 308 kj/mol (103, 258 and 349 Btu/scf), and a 227 kj/mol (258 Btu/scf) heating value doped with ammonia to produce a fuel nitrogen content of 0.5% (wt). Stable, ultra-low nitrogen oxide, smoke-free combustion was attained for the nitrogen-free fuels. Results with the doped fuel indicated that less than 5% conversion of NH3 to nitrogen oxide levels below Environmental Protection Agency limits could be achieved. In some instances, excessive CO levels were encountered. It is shown that use of a burner design employing a less fuel-rich primary zone than that found optimum for liquid fuels would yield more acceptable CO emissions.

  16. Low Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2005-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 600 to 1000 deg F, 60 to 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia), and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over seven times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 2.5 and 3.5-in. diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NOx emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 1.0, 3.125, and 5.375 in. from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NOx emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  17. Low-Emission Hydrogen Combustors for Gas Turbines Using Lean Direct Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, C. John; Smith, Timothy D.; Kundu, Krishna

    2007-01-01

    One of the key technology challenges for the use of hydrogen in gas turbine engines is the performance of the combustion system, in particular the fuel injectors. To investigate the combustion performance of gaseous hydrogen fuel injectors flame tube combustor experiments were performed. Tests were conducted to measure the nitrogen oxide (NO(x)) emissions and combustion performance at inlet conditions of 588 to 811 K, 0.4 to 1.4 MPa, and equivalence ratios up to 0.48. All the injectors were based on Lean Direct Injection (LDI) technology with multiple injection points and quick mixing. One challenge to hydrogen-based premixing combustion systems is flashback since hydrogen has a reaction rate over 7 times that of Jet-A. To reduce the risk, design mixing times were kept short and velocities high to minimize flashback. Five fuel injector designs were tested in 6.35- and 8.9-cm-diameter flame tubes with non-vitiated heated air and gaseous hydrogen. Data is presented on measurements of NO(x) emissions and combustion efficiency for the hydrogen injectors at 2.540, 7.937, and 13.652 cm from the injector face. Results show that for some configurations, NO(x) emissions are comparable to that of state of the art Jet-A LDI combustor concepts.

  18. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  19. Azimuthally spinning wave modes and heat release in an annular combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygard, Hakon; Mazur, Marek; Dawson, James R.; Worth, Nicholas A.

    2017-11-01

    In order to reduce NOx emissions from aeroengines and stationary gas turbines the fuel-air mixture can be made leaner, at the risk of introducing potentially damaging thermo-acoustic instabilities. At present this phenomenon is not understood well enough to eliminate these instabilities at the design stage. Recently, the presence of different azimuthal modes in annular combustors has been demonstrated both experimentally and numerically. These naturally occurring instabilities in annular geometry have been observed to constantly switch between spinning and standing modes, making it more difficult to analyse the flame structure and dynamics. Very recently this issue was partially addressed using novel acoustic forcing to generate a standing mode. In the present study this concept has been developed further by creating an azimuthal array of loud speakers, which for the first time permits predominantly spinning modes to be set up inside the combustion chamber. The use of pressure and high speed OH* measurements enables the study of the flame dynamics and heat release rate oscillations of the combustor, which will be reported in the current paper. The ability to precisely control the azimuthal mode of oscillation greatly enhances our further understanding of the phenomenon. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (Grant Agreement No 677931 TAIAC).

  20. Optical measurements of soot size and number density in a complex flow, swirl-stabilized combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelsen, G. S.; Wood, C. P.; Jackson, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    In-flame optical measurements of soot particulates in a turbulent, recirculating (i.e., complex flow) model laboratory combustor are described. A nonintrusive optical probe based on large angle (60 deg, 20 deg) intensity ratio scattering was used to yield a point measurement of particulate in the size range of 0.08 to 0.38 micrometers. The performance of the optical technique was evaluated, and an exploratory assessment of the spatial distribution of soot was conducted with attention to fuel molecular structure, fuel loading, and a smoke-suppressant additive (ferrocene). Isooctane and mixtures of isooctane with various ring and aromatic compounds blended to yield the smoke point of a JP-8 stock were prevaporized and introduced through a hollow cone nozzle. The addition of ring compounds to the base isooctane substantially changed the distribution of soot and increased the overall emission by 300%. The production of soot was substantially reduced by a decrease in fuel loading, and marginally reduced or not affected by the additive depending on fuel structure. The optical technique is a potentially powerful tool for providing the experimental evidence necessary to understand the processes of soot formation and burnout in complex flows typical of gas turbine combustors. However, scanning electron micrographs of extracted sample established that the technique is limited to the large particle wing of the soot size distribution, and optical and electronic processing can induce biasing and uncertainties which must be understood and controlled before the potential of the technique can be fulfilled.

  1. Numerical studies of the integration of a trapped vortex combustor into traditional combustion chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrignani, L.; Losurdo, M.; Bruno, C. [Sapienza Univ. de Roma, Rome (Italy)

    2010-09-15

    Exhaust emissions from furnace burners can be reduced by premixing reactants with combustion products. This paper discussed the use of a trapped vortex combustor (TVC) as a very promising technology for gas turbines. The TVC can reduce emissions and ensure that the temperature is uniform in the exhaust products, which is a key aspect for certain types of heat treatments, such as in steel rolling mills. The TVC for gas turbines is configured to mix air, fuel and hot products at turbulent scales fine enough to render the combustion mode flameless, or close to flameless. The vortex ensures a high recirculation factor between hot combustion products and reactants, and ultimately flame stability. In this study, the TVC configuration for an existing gas turbine was numerically investigated by means of RANS and LES. According to preliminary results of the fast-flameless combustion (FFC) strategy, the proposed TVC is a suitable candidate to reduce nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions while keeping the pressure drop below 1 per cent. Both RANS and LES show that too much fuel burns along the main duct. Better fuel splitting or a different position for the injectors may enhance combustion inside the recirculation zone. Behaviour of the main vortices showed that a more accurate design of the internal shape of the combustor is needed to prevent excessive velocity fluctuation or vortex instabilities and therefore emissions. 13 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Experimental Investigations of Extracted Rapeseed Combustion Emissions in a Small Scale Stationary Fluidized Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Steinbrecht

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to observe the combustion process of extracted rapeseed (ER grist in a stationary fluidized bed combustor (SFBC and evaluate the chemical compositions of the flue gas emissions. The experimental tests of ER combustion in the 90 to 200 kW (Kilowatt SFB combustion test facility show that the optimal ER combustion temperature is within the range from 850 to 880° C. Temperature and the concentration of exhausted emissions (e.g. O2, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2, Corg were measured with dedicated sensors distributed within the combustor, along its height and in the flue gas duct. The experimental results showed that with respect to German emission limits the concentration of SO2 and NOx in the flue gas were high whereas that of CO was low. This study furthermore is applicable for the abundant biomass residue resources in Vietnam (rice husk, rice straw, bagasse, cassava residues, coconut shell etc., which have similar chemical compositions to ER.

  3. Instability Suppression in a Swirl-Stabilized Combustor Using Microjet Air Injection

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary

    2010-01-04

    In this study, we examine the effectiveness of microjet air injection as a means of suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities in a swirl-stabilized, lean-premixed propane/air combustor. High-speed stereo PIV measurements, taken to explore the mechanism of combustion instability, reveal that the inner recirculation zone plays a dominant role in the coupling of acoustics and heat release that leads to combustion instability. Six microjet injector configurations were designed to modify the inner and outer recirculation zones with the intent of decoupling the mechanism leading to instability. Microjets that injected air into the inner recirculation zone, swirling in the opposite sense to the primary swirl were effective in suppressing combustion instability, reducing the overall sound pressure level by up to 17 dB within a certain window of operating conditions. Stabilization was achieved near an equivalence ratio of 0.65, corresponding to the region where the combustor transitions from a 40 Hz instability mode to a 110 Hz instability mode. PIV measurements made of the stabilized flow revealed significant modification of the inner recirculation zone and substantial weakening of the outer recirculation zone.

  4. Thermionic combustor application to combined gas and steam turbine power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskolczy, G.; Wang, C. C.; Lieb, D. P.; Margulies, A. E.; Fusegni, L. J.; Lovell, B. J.

    A design for the insertion of thermionic converters into the wall of a conventional combustor to produce electricity in a topping cycle is described, and a study for applications in gas and steam generators of 70 and 30 MW is evaluated for engineering and economic feasibility. Waste heat from the thermionic elements is used to preheat the combustor air; the heat absorbed by the elements plus further quenching of the exhaust gases with ammonia is projected to reduce NO(x) emissions to acceptable levels. Schematics, flow diagrams, and components of a computer model for cost projections are provided. It was found that temperatures around the emitters must be maintained above 1,600 K, with maximum efficiency and allowable temperature at 1,800 K, while collectors generate maximally at 950 K, with a corresponding work function of 1.5 eV. Cost sensitive studies indicate an installed price of $475/kW for the topping cycle, with improvements in thermionic converter characteristics bringing the cost to $375/kW at a busbar figure of 500 mills/kWh.

  5. Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.

    1989-10-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop a high efficiency advanced coal combustor (HEACC) for coal-based fuels capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas, distillate, and/or residual oil. The HEACC system is to be capable of firing microfine coal water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system are that it be simple to operate and will offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal fired combustor technology. The specific objective of this report is to document the work carried out under Task 1.0 of this contract, Cold Flow Burner Development''. As are detailed in the report, key elements of this work included primary air swirler development, burner register geometry design, cold flow burner model testing, and development of burner scale up criteria.

  6. Measurement of nitrogen species NO{sub y} at the exhaust of an aircraft engine combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristori, A. [Office National d`Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales (ONERA), Palaiseau (France); Baudoin, C. [Societe Nationale d`Etude et de Construction de Moteurs d`Aviation (SNECMA), Villaroche (France)

    1997-12-31

    A research programme named AEROTRACE was supported by the EC (CEC contract AERA-CT94-0003) in order to investigate trace species measurements at the exhaust of aero-engines. Within this project, NO{sub y}, NO, HNO{sub 3} and HONO were measured at the exhaust of aircraft engine combustors. Major species (NO{sub y},NO) were measured by using a chemiluminescence instrument. Minor species (HNO{sub 3},HONO) were measured by using filter packs. Two combustors were tested under various running conditions; the first one at ONERA (Task 2) and the second one at DRA (Task 5). Results show that EI{sub NOy} < 50 g/kg, EI{sub HNO3} < 0.2 g/kg and EI{sub HONO} < 0.55 g/kg. Regarding ratios, (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub y}) < 0.5%, (HONO)/(NO{sub y}) < 8%, (HONO)/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 19.2%, and (HNO{sub 3})/(NO{sub 2}) {approx} 0.8% was found. (author) 9 refs.

  7. Effect of flue gas recirculation on heat transfer in a supercritical circulating fluidized bed combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błaszczuk Artur

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on assessment of the effect of flue gas recirculation (FGR on heat transfer behavior in 1296t/h supercritical coal-fired circulating fluidized bed (CFB combustor. The performance test in supercritical CFB combustor with capacity 966 MWth was performed with the low level of flue gas recirculation rate 6.9% into furnace chamber, for 80% unit load at the bed pressure of 7.7 kPa and the ratio of secondary air to the primary air SA/PA = 0.33. Heat transfer behavior in a supercritical CFB furnace between the active heat transfer surfaces (membrane wall and superheater and bed material has been analyzed for Geldart B particle with Sauter mean diameters of 0.219 and 0.246 mm. Bed material used in the heat transfer experiments had particle density of 2700 kg/m3. A mechanistic heat transfer model based on cluster renewal approach was used in this work. A heat transfer analysis of CFB combustion system with detailed consideration of bed-to-wall heat transfer coefficient distributions along furnace height is investigated. Heat transfer data for FGR test were compared with the data obtained for representative conditions without recycled flue gases back to the furnace through star-up burners.

  8. Low NOx heavy fuel combustor concept program addendum: Low/mid heating value gaseous fuel evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, A. S.; Troth, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion performance of a rich/quench/lean (RQL) combustor was evaluated when operated on low and mid heating value gaseous fuels. Two synthesized fuels were prepared having lower heating values of 10.2 MJ/cu m. (274 Btu/scf) and 6.6 MJ/cu m (176 Btu/scf). These fuels were configured to be representative of actual fuels, being composed primarily of nitrogen, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. A liquid fuel air assist fuel nozzle was modified to inject both of the gaseous fuels. The RQL combustor liner was not changed from the configuration used when the liquid fuels were tested. Both gaseous fuels were tested over a range of power levels from 50 percent load to maximum rated power of the DDN Model 570-K industrial gas turbine engine. Exhaust emissions were recorded for four power level at several rich zone equivalence ratios to determine NOx sensitivity to the rich zone operating point. For the mid Btu heating value gas, ammonia was added to the fuel to simulate a fuel bound nitrogen type gaseous fuel. Results at the testing showed that for the low heating value fuel NOx emissions were all below 20 ppmc and smoke was below a 10 smoke number. For the mid heating value fuel, NOx emissions were in the 50 to 70 ppmc range with the smoke below a 10 smoke number.

  9. Current Status of Post-combustor Trace Chemistry Modeling and Simulation at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey, Thomas; Liu, Nan-Suey

    2003-01-01

    The overall objective of the current effort at NASA GRC is to evaluate, develop, and apply methodologies suitable for modeling intra-engine trace chemical changes over post combustor flow path relevant to the pollutant emissions from aircraft engines. At the present time, the focus is the high pressure turbine environment. At first, the trace chemistry model of CNEWT were implemented into GLENN-HT as well as NCC. Then, CNEWT, CGLENN-HT, and NCC were applied to the trace species evolution in a cascade of Cambridge University's No. 2 rotor and in a turbine vane passage. In general, the results from these different codes provide similar features. However, the details of some of the quantities of interest can be sensitive to the differences of these codes. This report summaries the implementation effort and presents the comparison of the No. 2 rotor results obtained from these different codes. The comparison of the turbine vane passage results is reported elsewhere. In addition to the implementation of trace chemistry model into existing CFD codes, several pre/post-processing tools that can handle the manipulations of the geometry, the unstructured and structured grids as well as the CFD solutions also have been enhanced and seamlessly tied with NCC, CGLENN-HT, and CNEWT. Thus, a complete CFD package consisting of pre/post-processing tools and flow solvers suitable for post-combustor intra-engine trace chemistry study is assembled.

  10. 40 CFR 60.52b - Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. 60.52b Section 60.52b Protection of Environment... § 60.52b Standards for municipal waste combustor metals, acid gases, organics, and nitrogen oxides. (a... (total mass), corrected to 7 percent oxygen. (d) The limits for nitrogen oxides are specified in...

  11. CFD Analysis of Fuel Atomization, Secondary Droplet Breakup and Spray Dispersion in the Premix Duct of a LPP Combustor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmehl, R.; Maier, G.; Wittig, S.

    2000-01-01

    The two phase flow in the premix duct of a LPP combustor is computed using a Lagrangian droplet tracking method. To reproduce the characteristic spray structure of an air-assisted pressure-swirl atomizer, a sheet spray model is de-rived from measured sheet parameters and combined with an advanced

  12. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF HIGH LEVELS OF SO2 REMOVAL IN ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE FUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes tests conducted in an atmospheric-pressure-fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) with a cross-section of 1 x 1.6 m) to demonstrate high levels of S02 removal when burning a high-sulfur coal and feeding limestone sorbent for S02 removal. The goal was to achieve 90-plu...

  13. HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION: THE IN-SITU CAPTURE OF LEAD BY SORBENTS IN A LABORATORY DOWNFLOW COMBUSTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses experiments on a 17-kW downflow combustor to determine how sorbent injection into the postflame influenced the particle size distribution of a lead (Pb) aerosol formed from a surrogate Pb-containing waste. n the absence of chlorine (CI), the Pb aerosol size di...

  14. Thermodynamic optimisation and computational analysis of irreversibilities in a small-scale wood-fired circulating fluidised bed adiabatic combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Baloyi, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of irreversibilities generated due to combustion in an adiabatic combustor burning wood was conducted. This was done for a reactant mixture varying from a rich to a lean mixture. A non-adiabatic non-premixed combustion model of a...

  15. Experimental study of unsteady heat release in an unstable single element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Varun S.

    In an effort to curb emissions from gas turbine engines, many low emission engine concepts have been developed. Among the most promising of these is the LDI (Lean Direct Injection). These systems operate at relatively low equivalence ratios close to blowout and are prone to instabilities. Combustion instabilities can reduce the life of the combustor by causing large pressure fluctuations and enhanced heat release to the walls of the combustor and reduce the efficiency of the engines. The understanding of combustion instabilities is vital to the implementation of such systems. Combustion instabilities are studied in an self-excited single element gas turbine combustor that uses an LDI element for fuel injection at elevetaed chamber pressures. The LDI combustor uses a swirler to ensure mixing of the air and the fuel and expansion of the swirl through a pressure swirl venturi to create a swirl stabilized flame. This project aims to study the heat release modes that occur in the combustor through measurement of light emissions from the flame using photodiodes that are sensitive to wavelengths of light produced by the flame. These are used along with high frequency pressure transducers. The focus is on the flame behavior in the diverging section of the venturi where the swirl is expanded and the flame starts since optic access cannot be obtained in this section. The use of photodiodes also facilitates the study of hydrodynamic modes that occur in the combustor alongside the thermoacoustics. A section which could accommodate the photodiodes was designed and installed on the LDI test rig in the Gas Turbine Cell at Maurice J Zucrow Propulsion Labs at Purdue University. The combustor was tested with this section and dynamic data was obtained from the pressure transducers and the photodiodes for a range of inlet air temperatures and range of equivalence ratios for each inlet air temperature. The dominant instability modes in both sets of data were analyzed and are presented

  16. Fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    Three types of thermonuclear fusion devices currently under development are reviewed for an electric utilities management audience. Overall design features of laser fusion, tokamak, and magnetic mirror type reactors are described and illustrated. Thrusts and trends in current research on these devices that promise to improve performance are briefly reviewed. Twenty photographs and drawings are included

  17. PLASMA DEVICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, J.D.; Wilcox, J.M.

    1961-12-26

    A device is designed for producing and confining highenergy plasma from which neutrons are generated in copious quantities. A rotating sheath of electrons is established in a radial electric field and axial magnetic field produced within the device. The electron sheath serves as a strong ionizing medium to gas introdueed thereto and also functions as an extremely effective heating mechanism to the resulting plasma. In addition, improved confinement of the plasma is obtained by ring magnetic mirror fields produced at the ends of the device. Such ring mirror fields are defined by the magnetic field lines at the ends of the device diverging radially outward from the axis of the device and thereafter converging at spatial annular surfaces disposed concentrically thereabout. (AFC)

  18. Combustor Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-02-01

    a teuto 014aceo 0-oiuato 4 ajj 210- I 14 *Experiments l~~lamCID - l2 C15 model+ Aida ditane &Gray medium K .2 a Experiments hont target n-IO a0 deawa...possibilita di valutazione dello scambio termico in focolai di caldaie per ricaldamento"I Atti E Rassegna Tecnica Societa ingegneri e arc~hitetti in Torino

  19. Biomass Fuel and Combustion Conditions Selection in a Fixed Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Arce

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The biomass market has experienced an increase in development, leading to research and development efforts that are focused on determining optimal biofuel combustion conditions. Biomass combustion is a complex process that involves divergent parameters and thus requires the use of advanced analysis methods. This study proposes combining grey relational analysis (GRA and error propagation theory (EPT to select a biofuel and its optimal combustion conditions. This research will study three biofuels that are currently used in a region of South Europe (Spain, and the most important variables that affect combustion are the ignition front propagation speed and the highest temperature that is reached at the fixed bed combustor. The results demonstrate that a combination of both theories for the analysis of solid-state thermochemical phenomena enables a fast and simple way of choosing the best configuration for each fuel.

  20. Sampling related issues in pod-based model reduction of simplified circulating fluidised bed combustor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bizon Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades the method of proper orthogonal decomposition (POD has been successfully employed for reduced order modelling (ROM in many applications, including distributed parameter models of chemical reactors. Nevertheless, there are still a number of issues that need further investigation. Among them, the policy of the collection of representative ensemble of experimental or simulation data, being a starting and perhaps most crucial point of the POD-based model reduction procedure. This paper summarises the theoretical background of the POD method and briefly discusses the sampling issue. Next, the reduction procedure is applied to an idealised model of circulating fluidised bed combustor (CFBC. Results obtained confirm that a proper choice of the sampling strategy is essential for the modes convergence however, even low number of observations can be sufficient for the determination of the faithful dynamical ROM.

  1. Post-processing computational fluid dynamic simulations of gas turbine combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturgess, G.J.; Inko-Tariah, W.P.C.; James, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    The flowfield in combustors for gas turbine engines is extremely complex. Numerical simulation of such flowfields using computational fluid dynamics techniques has much to offer the design and development engineer. It is a difficult task, but it is one which is now being attempted routinely in the industry. The results of such simulations yield enormous amounts of information from which the responsible engineer has to synthesize a comprehensive understanding of the complete flowfield and the processes contained therein. The complex picture so constructed must be distilled down to the essential information upon which rational development decisions can be made. The only way this can be accomplished successfully is by extensive post-processing of the calculation. Post processing of a simulation relies heavily on computer graphics, and requires the enhancement provided by color. The application of one such post-processor is presented, and the strengths and weaknesses of various display techniques are illustrated

  2. Energy extraction from wine dregs by self-sustained burning with fluidized-bed combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leu, J.H. [Yu-Da Inst. of Business Technology, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Marketing and Logistics Management; Chung, Y.N.; Pan, T.S.; Chen, C.S. [Dayeh Univ., Taiwan (China). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2005-07-01

    Wine dregs typically have moisture contents of between 70 and 80 per cent, and the disposal of wine dregs in Taiwan is both costly and time-consuming. This paper described a method of extracting energy from wine dregs through the use of a pre-drying technique with a fluidized bed technology. A bubble-type fluidized bed combustor was used to combust high moisture Chinese Kaoliang wine lees. The system consisted of an incinerator, a feeding system, a heat recovery system, and an air pollution control system. Results of the experimental study showed that 92.3 per cent combustion was achieved for the wine lees at temperatures of 860 degrees C. Sulfur oxide (SO{sub x}) emissions and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions were negligible. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions were suppressed to 92 ppm by modulating operating temperatures, axial temperature distributions, and primary and excess air. 3 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  3. Reduction of gaseous pollutant emissions from gas turbine combustors using hydrogen-enriched jet fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, R. M.

    1976-01-01

    Recent progress in an evaluation of the applicability of the hydrogen enrichment concept to achieve ultralow gaseous pollutant emission from gas turbine combustion systems is described. The target emission indexes for the program are 1.0 for oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide, and 0.5 for unburned hydrocarbons. The basic concept utilizes premixed molecular hydrogen, conventional jet fuel, and air to depress the lean flammability limit of the mixed fuel. This is shown to permit very lean combustion with its low NOx production while simulataneously providing an increased flame stability margin with which to maintain low CO and HC emission. Experimental emission characteristics and selected analytical results are presented for a cylindrical research combustor designed for operation with inlet-air state conditions typical for a 30:1 compression ratio, high bypass ratio, turbofan commercial engine.

  4. CO-COMBUSTION OF REFUSE DERIVED FUEL WITH COAL IN A FLUIDISED BED COMBUSTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. WAN AB KARIM GHANI

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Power generation from biomass is an attractive technology which utilizes municipal solid waste-based refused derived fuel. In order to explain the behavior of biomass-fired fluidized bed incinerator, biomass sources from refuse derived fuel was co-fired with coal in a 0.15 m diameter and 2.3 m high fluidized bed combustor. The combustion efficiency and carbon monoxide emissions were studied and compared with those from pure coal combustion. This study proved that the blending effect had increased the carbon combustion efficiency up to 12% as compared to single MSW-based RDF. Carbon monoxide levels fluctuated between 200-1600 ppm were observed when coal is added. It is evident from this research that efficient co-firing of biomass with coal can be achieved with minimum modification of existing coal-fired boilers.

  5. The effect of kerosene injection on ignition probability of local ignition in a scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Heng; Zhou, Jin; Pan, Yu

    2017-03-01

    The spark ignition of kerosene is investigated in a scramjet combustor with a flight condition of Ma 4, 17 km. Based plentiful of experimental data, the ignition probabilities of the local ignition have been acquired for different injection setups. The ignition probability distributions show that the injection pressure and injection location have a distinct effect on spark ignition. The injection pressure has both upper and lower limit for local ignition. Generally, the larger mass flow rate will reduce the ignition probability. The ignition position also affects the ignition near the lower pressure limit. The reason is supposed to be the cavity swallow effect on upstream jet spray near the leading edge, which will make the cavity fuel rich. The corner recirculation zone near the front wall of the cavity plays a significant role in the stabilization of local flame.

  6. Investigation of flameholding characteristics in a kerosene-fueled scramjet combustor with tandem dual-cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-hang; Song, Wen-yan; Shi, De-yong

    2017-11-01

    The flameholding characteristics in a kerosene-fueled scramjet combustor with a tandem dual-cavity were investigated experimentally under various inlet stagnation pressure conditions. Flame stabilization locations were judged by the pressure distributions and flame luminescence images. The results show that at lower and higher equivalence ratios, the flame was stabilized in the downstream and upstream cavities, respectively. While at intermediate range of equivalence ratio the flame was oscillating between the two cavities. The inlet stagnation pressure has a significant impact on the flameholding characteristics by affecting the relative pressure rise and the flame speed. The transition of flame stabilization location can occur in a higher local flow Mach number in the case of the higher inlet stagnation pressure.

  7. System for supporting a bundled tube fuel injector within a combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBegue, Jeffrey Scott; Melton, Patrick Benedict; Westmoreland, III, James Harold; Flanagan, James Scott

    2016-06-21

    A combustor includes an end cover having an outer side and an inner side, an outer barrel having a forward end that is adjacent to the inner side of the end cover and an aft end that is axially spaced from the forward end. An inner barrel is at least partially disposed concentrically within the outer barrel and is fixedly connected to the outer barrel. A fluid conduit extends downstream from the end cover. A first bundled tube fuel injector segment is disposed concentrically within the inner barrel. The bundled tube fuel injector segment includes a fuel plenum that is in fluid communication with the fluid conduit and a plurality of parallel tubes that extend axially through the fuel plenum. The bundled tube fuel injector segment is fixedly connected to the inner barrel.

  8. CARS Temperature and Species Concentration Measurements in a Supersonic Combustor with Normal Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, S. A.; OByrne, S.; Danehy, P. M.; Cutler, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    The dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) method was used to measure temperature and the absolute mole fractions of N2, O2 and H2 in a supersonic combustor. Experiments were conducted in the NASA Langley Direct-Connect Supersonic Combustion Test Facility. CARS measurements were performed at the facility nozzle exit and at three planes downstream of fuel injection. Processing the CARS measurements produced maps of the mean temperature, as well as quantitative N2 and O2 and qualitative H2 mean mole fraction fields at each plane. The CARS measurements were also used to compute correlations between fluctuations of the different simultaneously measured parameters. Comparisons were made between this 90 degree angle fuel injection case and a 30 degree fuel injection case previously presented at the 2004 Reno AIAA Meeting.

  9. Large eddy simulation of premixed and non-premixed combustion in a Stagnation Point Reverse Flow combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undapalli, Satish

    A new combustor referred to as Stagnation Point Reverse Flow (SPRF) combustor has been developed at Georgia Tech to meet the increasingly stringent emission regulations. The combustor incorporates a novel design to meet the conflicting requirements of low pollution and high stability in both premixed and non-premixed modes. The objective of this thesis work is to perform Large Eddy Simulations (LES) on this lab-scale combustor and elucidate the underlying physics that has resulted in its excellent performance. To achieve this, numerical simulations have been performed in both the premixed and non-premixed combustion modes, and velocity field, species field, entrainment characteristics, flame structure, emissions, and mixing characteristics have been analyzed. Simulations have been carried out first for a non-reactive case to resolve relevant fluid mechanics without heat release by the computational grid. The computed mean and RMS quantities in the non-reacting case compared well with the experimental data. Next, the simulations were extended for the premixed reactive case by employing different sub-grid scale combustion chemistry closures: Eddy Break Up (EBU), Artificially Thickened Flame (TF) and Linear Eddy Mixing (LEM) models. Results from the EBU and TF models exhibit reasonable agreement with the experimental velocity field. However, the computed thermal and species fields have noticeable discrepancies. Only LEM with LES (LEMLES), which is an advanced scalar approach, has been able to accurately predict both the velocity and species fields. Scalar mixing plays an important role in combustion, and this is solved directly at the sub-grid scales in LEM. As a result, LEM accurately predicts the scalar fields. Due to the two way coupling between the super-grid and sub-grid quantities, the velocity predictions also compare very well with the experiments. In other approaches, the sub-grid effects have been either modeled using conventional approaches (EBU) or need

  10. The Performance of Hydrocarbon Fuels with H2O2 in a Uni-Element Combustor. An Abstract for the 2003 AIAA/JPC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muss, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    .... The combustor used decomposed hydrogen peroxide at concentrations of 90% as the oxidizer. The water-cooled combustion chamber included significant fuel film cooling with an overall mixture ratio between 4 and 6...

  11. Consideraciones sobre una cámara de combustión experimental de 400 kW // Considerations on a 400 kW experimental combustor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Cabrera Rodríguez

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo aborda el diseño térmico y constructivo de la cámara de combustión de un combustor experimental para lasimulación de procesos reales de combustión. Se analizan distintas variantes constructivas y se valora su influencia en elcomportamiento del horno, su estabilidad térmica y los gastos energéticos incurridos durante su funcionamiento.Palabras claves: Cámara de combustión, diseño, combustor.________________________________________________________________________________AbstractThe work approaches the thermal and mechanical design of a combustion chamber of an experimental combustor for thesimulation of real combustion process. Different designs are analyzed and their influence is valued in the behavior of thefurnace, thermal stability and cost incurred during their operation.Key words: Combustor, furnace design, thermical design .

  12. The Performance of Hydrocarbon Fuels with H2O2 in a Uni-Element Combustor. An Abstract for the 2003 AIAA/JPC

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muss, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    A team including Sierra%a Engineering, AFRL, and TRW tested several different hydrocarbon fuels in a 1200 pound thrust hydrogen peroxide hydrocarbon rocket unielement combustor at the AFRL propulsion directorate Edwards AFB research site...

  13. An Experimental Investigation of Self-Excited Combustion Dynamics in a Single Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gejji, Rohan M.

    The management of combustion dynamics in gas turbine combustors has become more challenging as strict NOx/CO emission standards have led to engine operation in a narrow, lean regime. While premixed or partially premixed combustor configurations such as the Lean Premixed Pre-vaporized (LPP), Rich Quench Lean burn (RQL), and Lean Direct Injection (LDI) have shown a potential for reduced NOx emissions, they promote a coupling between acoustics, hydrodynamics and combustion that can lead to combustion instabilities. These couplings can be quite complex, and their detailed understanding is a pre-requisite to any engine development program and for the development of predictive capability for combustion instabilities through high-fidelity models. The overarching goal of this project is to assess the capability of high-fidelity simulation to predict combustion dynamics in low-emissions gas turbine combustors. A prototypical lean-direct-inject combustor was designed in a modular configuration so that a suitable geometry could be found by test. The combustor comprised a variable length air plenum and combustion chamber, air swirler, and fuel nozzle located inside a subsonic venturi. The venturi cross section and the fuel nozzle were consistent with previous studies. Test pressure was 1 MPa and variables included geometry and acoustic resonance, inlet temperatures, equivalence ratio, and type of liquid fuel. High-frequency pressure measurements in a well-instrumented metal chamber yielded frequencies and mode shapes as a function of inlet air temperature, equivalence ratio, fuel nozzle placement, and combustor acoustic resonances. The parametric survey was a significant effort, with over 105 tests on eight geometric configurations. A good dataset was obtained that could be used for both operating-point-dependent quantitative comparisons, and testing the ability of the simulation to predict more global trends. Results showed a very strong dependence of instability amplitude on

  14. Dynamic data-driven prediction of instability in a swirl-stabilized combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumalya Sarkar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Combustion instability poses a negative impact on the performance and structural durability of both land-based and aircraft gas turbine engines, and early detection of combustion instabilities is of paramount importance not only for performance monitoring and fault diagnosis, but also for initiating efficient decision and control of such engines. Combustion instability is, in general, characterized by self-sustained growth of large-amplitude pressure tones that are caused by a positive feedback arising from complex coupling of localized hydrodynamic perturbations, heat energy release, and acoustics of the combustor. This paper proposes a fast dynamic data-driven method for detecting early onsets of thermo-acoustic instabilities, where the underlying algorithms are built upon the concepts of symbolic time series analysis (STSA via generalization of D-Markov machine construction. The proposed method captures the spatiotemporal co-dependence among time series from heterogeneous sensors (e.g. pressure and chemiluminescence to generate an information-theoretic precursor, which is uniformly applicable across multiple operating regimes of the combustion process. The proposed method is experimentally validated on the time-series data, generated from a laboratory-scale swirl-stabilized combustor, while inducing thermo-acoustic instabilities for various protocols (e.g. increasing Reynolds number (Re at a constant fuel flow rate and reducing equivalence ratio at a constant air flow rate at varying air-fuel premixing levels. The underlying algorithms are developed based on D-Markov entropy rates, and the resulting instability precursor measure is rigorously compared with the state-of-the-art techniques in terms of its performance of instability prediction, computational complexity, and robustness to sensor noise.

  15. Combustor with two stage primary fuel tube with concentric members and flow regulating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David Marchant; Whidden, Graydon Lane; Zolyomi, Wendel

    1999-01-01

    A combustor for a gas turbine having a centrally located fuel nozzle and inner, middle and outer concentric cylindrical liners, the inner liner enclosing a primary combustion zone. The combustor has an air inlet that forms two passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air to be supplied to the primary combustion zone. Each of the pre-mixing passages has a circumferential array of swirl vanes. A plurality of primary fuel tube assemblies extend through both pre-mixing passages, with each primary fuel tube assembly located between a pair of swirl vanes. Each primary fuel tube assembly is comprised of two tubular members. The first member supplies fuel to the first pre-mixing passage, while the second member, which extends through the first member, supplies fuel to the second pre-mixing passage. An annular fuel manifold is divided into first and second chambers by a circumferentially extending baffle. The proximal end of the first member is attached to the manifold itself while the proximal end of the second member is attached to the baffle. The distal end of the first member is attached directly to the second member at around its mid-point. The inlets of the first and second members are in flow communication with the first and second manifold chambers, respectively. Control valves separately regulate the flow of fuel to the two chambers and, therefore, to the two members of the fuel tube assemblies, thereby allowing the flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages to be separately controlled.

  16. Dynamic Data-Driven Prediction of Lean Blowout in a Swirl-Stabilized Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumalya Sarkar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses dynamic data-driven prediction of lean blowout (LBO phenomena in confined combustion processes, which are prevalent in many physical applications (e.g., land-based and aircraft gas-turbine engines. The underlying concept is built upon pattern classification and is validated for LBO prediction with time series of chemiluminescence sensor data from a laboratory-scale swirl-stabilized dump combustor. The proposed method of LBO prediction makes use of the theory of symbolic dynamics, where (finite-length time series data are partitioned to produce symbol strings that, in turn, generate a special class of probabilistic finite state automata (PFSA. These PFSA, called D-Markov machines, have a deterministic algebraic structure and their states are represented by symbol blocks of length D or less, where D is a positive integer. The D-Markov machines are constructed in two steps: (i state splitting, i.e., the states are split based on their information contents, and (ii state merging, i.e., two or more states (of possibly different lengths are merged together to form a new state without any significant loss of the embedded information. The modeling complexity (e.g., number of states of a D-Markov machine model is observed to be drastically reduced as the combustor approaches LBO. An anomaly measure, based on Kullback-Leibler divergence, is constructed to predict the proximity of LBO. The problem of LBO prediction is posed in a pattern classification setting and the underlying algorithms have been tested on experimental data at different extents of fuel-air premixing and fuel/air ratio. It is shown that, over a wide range of fuel-air premixing, D-Markov machines with D > 1 perform better as predictors of LBO than those with D = 1.

  17. Analytical and experimental investigations of gas turbine model combustor acoustics operated at atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richecoeur, Franck; Schuller, Thierry; Lamraoui, Ammar; Ducruix, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    When coupled to acoustics, unsteady heat release oscillations may cause recurrent problems in many combustion chambers, potentially leading to dramatic damages to the structure. Accumulation of acoustic energy around the eigenmodes of the combustor results from the resonant coupling between pressure disturbances in the flame region with synchronized heat release rate perturbations. Predicting these frequencies and the corresponding sound pressure field is a key issue to design passive or active control systems to prevent the growth of these instabilities. In this study, an acoustically controlled combustion test bench CESAM is used to stabilize a partially premixed swirling propane-air flame. In the premixing tube, reactants are injected tangentially to generate the swirling flow, the flame being stabilized in the combustion chamber by a sudden expansion of the cross section. The premixer backplane is equipped with an Impedance Control System (ICS) allowing to adjust the acoustic reflection coefficient at this location. Acoustics of the coupled-cavity system formed by the premixer and the combustion chamber is investigated analytically by taking into account the measured acoustic impedances at the premixer backplane and in the feeding lines. The chamber length is also modified to examine the effects of the geometry on these predictions. It is shown that the premixer and combustion chamber can be considered as acoustically decoupled for small values of the acoustic coupling index, defined in the article. This offers flexible solutions to control the pressure distribution within the combustor, except when these frequencies match. When the frequencies are close to each other, only the analysis of the damping of the different cavities enables to indicate whether the system is coupled or not. Modifying either the acoustic coupling index or the damping values featuring the same frequency appears then as alternative solutions to decouple cavities.

  18. Sealing devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulson, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    A sealing device for minimising the leakage of toxic or radioactive contaminated environments through a biological shield along an opening through which a flexible component moves that penetrates the shield. The sealing device comprises an outer tubular member which extends over a length not less than the maximum longitudinal movement of the component along the opening. An inner sealing block is located intermediate the length of the component by connectors and is positioned in the bore of the outer tubular member to slide in the bore and effect a seal over the entire longitudinal movement of the component. The cross-section of the device may be circular and the block may be of polytetrafluoroethylene or of nylon impregnated with molybdenum or may be metallic. A number of the sealing devices may be combined into an assembly for a plurality of adjacent longitudinally movable components, each adapted to sustain a tensile load, providing the various drives of a master-slave manipulator. (author)

  19. Ferroelectric devices

    CERN Document Server

    Uchino, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Updating its bestselling predecessor, Ferroelectric Devices, Second Edition assesses the last decade of developments-and setbacks-in the commercialization of ferroelectricity. Field pioneer and esteemed author Uchino provides insight into why this relatively nascent and interdisciplinary process has failed so far without a systematic accumulation of fundamental knowledge regarding materials and device development.Filling the informational void, this collection of information reviews state-of-the-art research and development trends reflecting nano and optical technologies, environmental regulat

  20. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  1. Preliminary study of NO{sub x}, CO, and lean blowoff in a piloted-lean premixed combustor. Part 2: Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, J.C.; Mello, J.P.; Mellor, A.M. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Combustion and Propulsion Group; Malte, P.C. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1996-05-01

    The characteristic time model (CTM) is a semi-empirical model for gas turbine emissions and performance. The CTM represents the essence of the dominant physical subprocesses related to combustor performance in terms of characteristic times. Properly formulated, these characteristic times account for variations in combustor geometry, fuel characteristics, and operating conditions. In this work, the capability of the CTM to correlate the piloted-LP NO{sub x}, CO and blowoff data described in part 1 of this paper is assessed.

  2. Combustion of peanut shells in a cone-shaped bubbling fluidized-bed combustor using alumina as the bed material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arromdee, Porametr; Kuprianov, Vladimir I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We propose burning of peanut shells in a conical fluidized bed using alumina sand. ► We examine hydrodynamic, combustion and emission characteristics of the reactor. ► High, over 99%, combustion efficiency is achievable. ► Emissions of CO and NO from the combustor meet the national emission limits. ► Composition of the bed material undergoes significant changes during the combustion. -- Abstract: This paper reports experimental studies on burning peanut shells in the conical fluidized-bed combustor using alumina sand as the fluidizing agent. Prior to combustion tests, hydrodynamic regimes and characteristics of a conical alumina–biomass bed were investigated under cold-state conditions for variable percentage of peanut shells in the mixture and static bed height. With selected particle sizes (300–500 μm) and static bed height (30 cm), alumina ensured bubbling fluidization regime of the bed at operating conditions specified for firing biomass. Combustion tests were performed at 60 kg/h and 45 kg/h fuel feed rates, while ranging excess air from 20% to 80% at a fixed combustor load. Temperature and gas concentrations (O 2 , CO, C x H y as CH 4 , and NO) were measured along radial and axial directions inside the reactor as well as at stack in order to characterize combustion and emission performance of the combustor for the ranges of operating conditions. For firing 60 kg/h peanut shells, excess air of 40% can be selected as an appropriate value ensuring high, about 99%, combustion efficiency and rather low emissions of CO and NO: 520 ppm and 125 ppm, respectively (both on a dry basis and at 6% O 2 ). With reducing combustor load, the combustion efficiency and emission characteristics were improved to a little extent. No evidence of bed agglomeration was found during 30-h combustion tests on this conical fluidized-bed combustor using alumina sand as the bed material. However, the timescale effect on the composition of the bed material was

  3. Guide device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  4. Identification device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-Shian; Su, Chih-Chieh; Chou, Ta-Hsin; Wu, Mount-Learn; Lai, Chieh-Lung; Hsu, Che-Lung; Lan, Hsiao-Chin; Huang, Hung-I.; Liu, Yung-Chih; Tu, Zong-Ru; Lee, Chien-Chieh; Chang, Jenq-Yang

    2007-09-01

    In this Letter, the identification device disclosed in the present invention is comprised of: a carrier and a plurality of pseudo-pixels; wherein each of the plural pseudo-pixels is formed on the carrier and is further comprised of at least a light grating composed of a plurality of light grids. In a preferred aspect, each of the plural light grids is formed on the carrier while spacing from each other by an interval ranged between 50nm and 900nm. As the aforesaid identification device can present specific colors and patterns while it is being viewed by naked eye with respect to a specific viewing angle, the identification device is preferred for security and anti-counterfeit applications since the specific colors and patterns will become invisible when it is viewed while deviating from the specific viewing angle.

  5. Fuel nozzle assembly for use as structural support for a duct structure in a combustor of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

    2015-03-31

    A fuel nozzle assembly for use in a combustor apparatus of a gas turbine engine. An outer housing of the fuel nozzle assembly includes an inner volume and provides a direct structural connection between a duct structure and a fuel manifold. The duct structure defines a flow passage for combustion gases flowing within the combustor apparatus. The fuel manifold defines a fuel supply channel therein in fluid communication with a source of fuel. A fuel injector of the fuel nozzle assembly is provided in the inner volume of the outer housing and defines a fuel passage therein. The fuel passage is in fluid communication with the fuel supply channel of the fuel manifold for distributing the fuel from the fuel supply channel into the flow passage of the duct structure.

  6. The erosion/corrosion of small superalloy turbine rotors operating in the effluent of a PFB coal combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellars, G. R.; Benford, S. M.; Rowe, A. P.; Lowell, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The operation of a turbine in the effluent of a pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) coal combustor presents serious materials problems. Synergistic erosion/corrosion and deposition/corrosion interactions may favor the growth of erosion-resistant oxides on blade surfaces, but brittle cracking of these oxides may be an important source of damage along heavy particle paths. Integrally cast alloy 713LC and IN792 + Hf superalloy turbine rotors in a single-stage turbine with 6% partial admittance have been operated in the effluent of a PFB coal combustor for up to 164 hr. The rotor erosion pattern exhibits heavy particle separation with severe erosion at the leading edge, pressure side center, and suction side trailing edge at the tip. The erosion distribution pattern gives a spectrum of erosion/oxidation/deposition as a function of blade position. The data suggest that preferential degradation paths may exist even under the targeted lower loadings (less than 20 ppm).

  7. Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit. Task 1, Cold flow burner development: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFlesh, R.C.; Rini, M.J.; McGowan, J.G.

    1989-10-01

    The overall objective of this program is to develop a high efficiency advanced coal combustor (HEACC) for coal-based fuels capable of being retrofitted to industrial boilers originally designed for firing natural gas, distillate, and/or residual oil. The HEACC system is to be capable of firing microfine coal water fuel (MCWF), MCWF with alkali sorbent (for SO{sub 2} reduction), and dry microfine coal. Design priorities for the system are that it be simple to operate and will offer significant reductions in NO{sub x}, SO{sub x}, and particulate emissions as compared with current coal fired combustor technology. The specific objective of this report is to document the work carried out under Task 1.0 of this contract, ``Cold Flow Burner Development``. As are detailed in the report, key elements of this work included primary air swirler development, burner register geometry design, cold flow burner model testing, and development of burner scale up criteria.

  8. Testing of DLR C/C-SiC and C/C for HIFiRE 8 Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, David E.; Capriotti, Diego P.; Reimer, Thomas; Kutemeyer, Marius; Smart, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) have been proposed for use as lightweight hot structures in scramjet combustors. Previous studies have calculated significant weight savings by utilizing CMCs (active and passive) versus actively cooled metallic scramjet structures. Both a carbon/carbon (C/C) and a carbon/carbon-silicon carbide (C/C-SiC) material fabricated by DLR (Stuttgart, Germany) are being considered for use in a passively cooled combustor design for Hypersonic International Flight Research Experimentation (HIFiRE) 8, a joint Australia / Air Force Research Laboratory hypersonic flight program, expected to fly at Mach 7 for approximately 30 sec, at a dynamic pressure of 55 kilopascals. Flat panels of the DLR C/C and C/C-SiC materials were installed downstream of a hydrogen-fueled, dual-mode scramjet combustor and tested for several minutes at conditions simulating flight at Mach 5 and Mach 6. Gaseous hydrogen fuel was used to fuel the scramjet combustor. The test panels were instrumented with embedded Type K and Type S thermocouples. Zirconia felt insulation was used during some of the tests to reduce heat loss from the back surface and thus increase the heated surface temperature of the C/C-SiC panel approximately 177 C (350 F). The final C/C-SiC panel was tested for three cycles totaling over 135 sec at Mach 6 enthalpy. Slightly more erosion was observed on the C/C panel than the C/C-SiC panels, but both material systems demonstrated acceptable recession performance for the HIFiRE 8 flight.

  9. Impact of ethane and propane variation in natural gas on the performance of a model gas turbine combustor

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, RM; McDonell, VG; Samuelsen, GS

    2003-01-01

    In the area of stationary power generation, there exists a growing interest in understanding the role that gaseous fuel composition plays on the performance of natural gas-fired gas turbine systems. In this study, an atmospherically fired model gas turbine combustor with a fuel flexible fuel/air premixer is employed to investigate the impact of significant amounts of ethane and propane addition into a baseline natural gas fuel supply. The impacts of these various fuel compositions, in terms o...

  10. Large-eddy simulation and acoustic analysis of a turbulent flow field in a swirl-stabilized combustor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Chan; Yoo, Kwang Hee; Sung, Hong Gye [Korea Aerospace University, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    To conduct a comprehensive study on the flow characteristics and acoustic oscillation in a gas turbine combustor, a 3D large-eddy simulation (LES) was implemented. The formulation consists of the Favre-filtered conservation equations of mass, momentum, and energy. The subgrid-scale dynamics are modeled using a compressible flow version of the Smagorinsky model. To investigate the dominant coherent structure, the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) method was used for post-processing. The combustor of concern is the LM6000, lean-premixed dry low-NOx annular combustor, developed by General Electric Aircraft Engines (GEAE). Four important characteristics of swirl flow are visualized: vortex breakdown, procession and dissipation of vortical structures, recirculation zones, and helical waves immediately downstream of the swirl injector. It is shown that the turbulent motion of swirl flow directly affects acoustic oscillation through the cycle and spectral analysis. The four most dominant acoustic modes are extracted from the flow field by the POD analysis. The transverse modes in the y and z directions are dominant in all four modes, since the pressure fields are significantly affected by swirl flow.

  11. User's manual for rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) and analysis computer program. Volume 2: Appendixes A-K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muss, J. A.; Nguyen, T. V.; Johnson, C. W.

    1991-01-01

    The appendices A-K to the user's manual for the rocket combustor interactive design (ROCCID) computer program are presented. This includes installation instructions, flow charts, subroutine model documentation, and sample output files. The ROCCID program, written in Fortran 77, provides a standardized methodology using state of the art codes and procedures for the analysis of a liquid rocket engine combustor's steady state combustion performance and combustion stability. The ROCCID is currently capable of analyzing mixed element injector patterns containing impinging like doublet or unlike triplet, showerhead, shear coaxial and swirl coaxial elements as long as only one element type exists in each injector core, baffle, or barrier zone. Real propellant properties of oxygen, hydrogen, methane, propane, and RP-1 are included in ROCCID. The properties of other propellants can be easily added. The analysis models in ROCCID can account for the influences of acoustic cavities, helmholtz resonators, and radial thrust chamber baffles on combustion stability. ROCCID also contains the logic to interactively create a combustor design which meets input performance and stability goals. A preliminary design results from the application of historical correlations to the input design requirements. The steady state performance and combustion stability of this design is evaluated using the analysis models, and ROCCID guides the user as to the design changes required to satisfy the user's performance and stability goals, including the design of stability aids. Output from ROCCID includes a formatted input file for the standardized JANNAF engine performance prediction procedure.

  12. Rich-burn, flame-assisted fuel cell, quick-mix, lean-burn (RFQL) combustor and power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milcarek, Ryan J.; Ahn, Jeongmin

    2018-03-01

    Micro-tubular flame-assisted fuel cells (mT-FFC) were recently proposed as a modified version of the direct flame fuel cell (DFFC) operating in a dual chamber configuration. In this work, a rich-burn, quick-mix, lean-burn (RQL) combustor is combined with a micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (mT-SOFC) stack to create a rich-burn, flame-assisted fuel cell, quick-mix, lean-burn (RFQL) combustor and power generation system. The system is tested for rapid startup and achieves peak power densities after only 35 min of testing. The mT-FFC power density and voltage are affected by changes in the fuel-lean and fuel-rich combustion equivalence ratio. Optimal mT-FFC performance favors high fuel-rich equivalence ratios and a fuel-lean combustion equivalence ratio around 0.80. The electrical efficiency increases by 150% by using an intermediate temperature cathode material and improving the insulation. The RFQL combustor and power generation system achieves rapid startup, a simplified balance of plant and may have applications for reduced NOx formation and combined heat and power.

  13. Numerical simulations of single and multi-staged injection of H2 in a supersonic scramjet combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Abu-Farah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational fluid dynamics (CFD simulations of a single staged injection of H2 through a central wedge shaped strut and a multi-staged injection through wall injectors are carried out by using Ansys CFX-12 code. Unstructured tetrahedral grids for narrow channel and quarter geometries of the combustor are generated by using ICEM CFD. Steady three-dimensional (3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-stokes (RANS simulations are carried out in the case of no H2 injection and compared with the simulations of single staged pilot and/or main H2 injections and multistage injection. Shear stress transport (SST based on k-ω turbulent model is adopted. Flow field visualization (complex shock waves interactions and static pressure distribution along the wall of the combustor are predicted and compared with the experimental schlieren images and measured wall static pressures for validation. A good agreement is found between the CFD predicted results and the measured data. The narrow and quarter geometries of the combustor give similar results with very small differences. Multi-staged injections of H2 enhance the turbulent H2/air mixing by forming vortices and additional shock waves (bow shocks.

  14. Experimental investigations on active cooling thermal protection structure of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor in arc heated facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianqiang, Tu; Jinlong, Peng; Xianning, Yang; Lianzhong, Chen

    2016-10-01

    The active cooling thermal protection technology is the efficient method to resolve the long-duration work and reusable problems of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustor, where worst thermo-mechanical loads occur. The fuel is passed through coolant channels adjacent to the heated surfaces to absorb heat from the heating exchanger panels, prior to injection into the combustor. The heating exchanger both cooled down the wall temperature of the combustor wall and heats and cracks the hydrocarbon fuel inside the panel to permit an easier combustion and satisfying combustion efficiency. The subscale active cooling metallic panels, with dimensions of 100×100 mm and different coolant channel sizes, have been tested under typical combustion thermal environment produced by arc heated Turbulent Flow Duct (TFD). The heat exchange ability of different coolant channel sizes has been obtained. The big-scale active cooling metallic panel, with dimensions of 100 × 750 mm and the coolant channel sizes of better heating exchange performance, has been made and tested in the big-scale arc heated TFD facility. The test results show that the local superheated ablation is easy to happen for the cooling fuel assigned asymmetrically in the bigscale active cooling metallic panel, and the cooling fuel rate can reduce 8%˜10% after spraying the Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) in the heating surface.

  15. Experimental study of cone-struts and cavity flameholders in a kerosene-fueled round scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongqing; Song, Wenyan

    2017-10-01

    Experimental investigations of liquid kerosene ignition and flameholding in a round supersonic combustor are presented. Three kinds of flameholders, a cone-struts structure, a cavity and the combination of the both, are studied for the kerosene ignition and flameholding. Results show that ignition and flameholding cannot be achieved by using the sole cone-struts flameholder, although flames are observed at the combustor outlet. The ignition and flameholding are achieved in a narrow range of equivalence ratios by using the cavity flameholder. This range is widened by employing the combination of the cone-struts and the cavity flameholders. It is observed that the back pressure disrupts the isolator entrance flow slightly by using the larger cone-struts (CR = 0.261). However, it does not happen when the smaller cone-struts (CR = 0.221) is employed. Then a characteristic air mass flow rate in the round combustor is redefined to calculate a modified Damkohler number that correlates the nonpremixed flame stability limits. The correlations are in good agreements with the experimental results.

  16. Experimental investigation on combustion performance of cavity-strut injection of supercritical kerosene in supersonic model combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-bo; Zhong, Zhan; Liang, Jian-han; Wang, Hong-bo

    2016-10-01

    Supersonic combustion with cavity-strut injection of supercritical kerosene in a model scramjet engine was experimentally investigated in Mach 2.92 facility with the stagnation temperatures of approximately 1430 K. Static pressure distribution in the axial direction was determined using pressure transducers installed along the centerline of the model combustor top walls. High speed imaging camera was used to capture flame luminosity and combustion region distribution. Multi-cavities were used to and stabilize the combustion in the supersonic combustor. Intrusive injection by thin struts was used to enhance the fuel-air mixing. Supercritical kerosene at temperatures of approximately 780 K and various pressures was prepared using a heat exchanger driven by the hot gas from a pre-burner and injected at equivalence ratios of approximately 1.0. In the experiments, combustor performances with different strut injection schemes were investigated and compared to direct wall injection scheme based on the measured static pressure distributions, the specific thrust increments and the images obtained by high-speed imaging camera. The experimental results showed that the injection by thin struts could obtain an enhanced mixing in the field but could not acquire a steady flame when mixing field cannot well match cavity separation region. There is no significant difference on performance between different schemes since the unsteady intermittent and oscillating flame leads to no actual combustion efficiency improvement.

  17. Numerical Investigation of Fuel Distribution Effect on Flow and Temperature Field in a Heavy Duty Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaowen; Xing, Li; Yin, Hong; Tian, Feng; Zhang, Qun

    2018-03-01

    Multiple-swirlers structure is commonly adopted for combustion design strategy in heavy duty gas turbine. The multiple-swirlers structure might shorten the flame brush length and reduce emissions. In engineering application, small amount of gas fuel is distributed for non-premixed combustion as a pilot flame while most fuel is supplied to main burner for premixed combustion. The effect of fuel distribution on the flow and temperature field related to the combustor performance is a significant issue. This paper investigates the fuel distribution effect on the combustor performance by adjusting the pilot/main burner fuel percentage. Five pilot fuel distribution schemes are considered including 3 %, 5 %, 7 %, 10 % and 13 %. Altogether five pilot fuel distribution schemes are computed and deliberately examined. The flow field and temperature field are compared, especially on the multiple-swirlers flow field. Computational results show that there is the optimum value for the base load of combustion condition. The pilot fuel percentage curve is calculated to optimize the combustion operation. Under the combustor structure and fuel distribution scheme, the combustion achieves high efficiency with acceptable OTDF and low NOX emission. Besides, the CO emission is also presented.

  18. Printing Device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den M.J.; Markies, P.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2014-01-01

    An ink jetprinting device includes a pressure chamber formed by a plurality of wall segments, a first aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink jet orifice and a second aperture extending through a wall segment and communicating with an ink supply duct. The pressure

  19. Detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  20. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high

  1. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Yasuomi; Takahashi, Ken; Hashimoto, Hiroshi.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the plasma confining performances by bringing the irregular magnetic fields nearly to zero and decreasing the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields at every positions. Constitution: The winding direction of a plurality of coil elements, for instance, double pan cake coils of toroidal coils in a torus type or mirror type thermonuclear device are reversed to each other in their laminating direction, whereby the irregular magnetic fields due to the coil-stepped portions in each toroidal coils are brought nearly to zero. This enables to bring the average irregular magnetic fields as a whole in the thermonuclear device nearly to zero, as well as, decrease the absolute value of the irregular magnetic fields in each positions. Thus, the plasma confining performances can be improved. (Moriyama, K.)

  2. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tezuka, Masaru.

    1993-01-01

    Protrusions and recesses are formed to a vacuum vessel and toroidal magnetic coils, and they are engaged. Since the vacuum vessel is generally supported firmly by a rack or the like by support legs, the toroidal magnetic field coils can be certainly supported against tumbling force. Then, there can be attained strong supports for the toroidal magnetic field coils, in addition to support by wedges on the side of inboard and support by share panels on the side of outboard, capable of withstanding great electromagnetic forces which may occur in large-scaled next-generation devices. That is, toroidal magnetic field coils excellent from a view point of deformation and stress can be obtained, to provide a thermonuclear device of higher reliability. (N.H.)

  3. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oosaki, Osamu; Masuda, Kenju.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide excellent electric properties and high reliability in a thermonuclear device by improving a current collecting board connected to a coil device. Constitution: A current collecting board element perforated with an opening for enserting a connecting terminal is sized to be inserted into a plating tank, and is surface treated in the plating tank. Only the current collecting board element preferably surface treated is picked up. A plurality of such current collecting board elements are connected and welded to form a large current collecting board. In this manner, the current collecting board having several m 2 to several ten order m 2 in area can be obtained as preferably surface treated at the connecting terminal hole. The current collecting board element can be determined in shape with the existing facility without increasing the size of a surface treating tank. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Clamping device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuengel, P.

    1976-01-01

    Device for prestressing a multiplicity of screw bolts sitting on a hole circle, where a carrying ring is provided which is supported on the flange of the pressure vessel of a nuclear reactor, and where on the carrying ring a hydraulic cylinder is arranged the force of which is to be guided into the screw bolt over an auxiliary bolt which may be coupled to the screw bolt. (orig./TK) [de

  5. "Distinvar" device

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    The alignment of one of the accelerator magnets being checked by the AR Division survey group. A "distinvar" device, invented by the group, using calibrated invar wires stretched between the fixed survey pillar (on the left) and a fixed point on the magnet. In two days it is thus possible to measure the alignment of the 100 magnets with an accuracy better than 1/10.

  6. Latching device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, G. W. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A latching device is suited for use in establishing a substantially motionless connection between a stationary receiver and a movable latching mechanism. The latching mechanism includes a pivotally supported restraining hook continuously urged into a capturing relationship with the receiver, characterized by a spring-biased pawl having a plurality of aligned teeth. The teeth are seated in the surface of the throat of the hook and positionable into restraining engagement with a rigid restraining shoulder projected from the receiver.

  7. Emissions and performance of catalysts for gas turbine catalytic combustors. [automobile engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1977-01-01

    Three noble-metal monolithic catalysts were tested in a 12-cm-dia. combustion test rig to obtain emissions and performance data at conditions simulating the operation of a catalytic combustor for an automotive gas turbine engine. Tests with one of the catalysts at 800 K inlet mixture temperature, 3 x 10 to the 5th Pa pressure, and a reference velocity (catalyst bed inlet velocity) of 10 m/sec demonstrated greater than 99 percent combustion efficiency for reaction temperatures higher than 1300 K. With a reference velocity of 25 m/sec the reaction temperature required to achieve the same combustion-efficiency increased to 1380 K. The exit temperature pattern factors for all three catalysts were below 0.1 when adiabatic reaction temperatures were higher than 1400 K. The highest pressure drop was 4.5 percent at 25 m/sec reference velocity. Nitrogen oxides emissions were less than 0.1 g NO2/kg fuel for all test conditions.

  8. Combustion generated noise in gas turbine combustors. [engine noise/noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strahle, W. C.; Shivashankara, B. N.

    1974-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the noise power and spectra emitted from a gas turbine combustor can exhausting to the atmosphere. Limited hot wire measurements were made of the cold flow turbulence level and spectra within the can. The fuels used were JP-4, acetone and methyl alcohol burning with air at atmospheric pressure. The experimental results show that for a fixed fuel the noise output is dominated by the airflow rate and not the fuel/air ratio. The spectra are dominated by the spectra of the cold flow turbulence spectra which were invariant with airflow rate in the experiments. The effect of fuel type on the noise power output was primarily through the heat of combustion and not the reactivity. A theory of combustion noise based upon the flame radiating to open surroundings is able to reasonably explain the observed results. A thermoacoustic efficiency for noise radiation as high as .00003 was observed in this program for JP-4 fuel. Scaling rules are presented for installed configurations.

  9. Large scale organized motion in isothermal swirling flow through an axisymmetric dump combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daddis, E.D.; Lieber, B.B.; Nejad, A.S.; Ahmed, S.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on velocity measurements that were obtained in a model axisymmetric dump combustor which included a coaxial swirler by means of a two component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) at a Reynolds number of 125,000. The frequency spectrum of the velocity fluctuations is obtained via the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT). The velocity field downstream of the dump plane is characterized, in addition to background turbulence, by large scale organized structures which are manifested as sharp spikes of the spectrum at relatively low frequencies. The decomposition of velocity disturbances to background turbulence and large scale structures can then be achieved through spectral methods which include matched filters and spectral factorization. These methods are demonstrated here for axial velocity obtained one step height downstream of the dump plane. Subsequent analysis of the various velocity disturbances shows that large scale structures account for about 25% of the apparent normal stresses at this particular location. Naturally, large scale structures evolve spatially and their contribution to the apparent stress tensor may vary depending on the location in the flow field

  10. Hydrogen jet combustion in a scramjet combustor with the rearwall-expansion cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan-Xiang; Wang, Zhen-Guo; Sun, Ming-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xin; Wang, Hong-Bo

    2018-03-01

    This study is carried out to experimentally investigate the combustion characteristics of the hydrogen jet flame stabilized by the rearwall-expansion cavity in a model scramjet combustor. The flame distributions are characterized by the OH* spontaneous emission images, and the dynamic features of the flames are studied through the high speed framing of the flame luminosity. The combustion modes are further analyzed based on the visual flame structure and wall pressure distributions. Under the present conditions, the combustion based on the rearwall-expansion cavity appears in two distinguished modes - the typical cavity shear-layer stabilized combustion mode and the lifted-shear-layer stabilized combustion mode. In contrast with the shear-layer stabilized mode, the latter holds stronger flame. The transition from shear-layer stabilized combustion mode to lifted-shear-layer stabilized mode usually occurs when the equivalence ratio is high enough. While the increases of the offset ratio and upstream injection distance both lead to weaker jet-cavity interactions, cause longer ignition delay, and thus delay the mode transition. The results reveal that the rearwall-expansion cavity with an appropriate offset ratio should be helpful in delaying mode transition and preventing thermal choke, and meanwhile just brings minor negative impact on the combustion stability and efficiency.

  11. Evaluation by Rocket Combustor of C/C Composite Cooled Structure Using Metallic Cooling Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takegoshi, Masao; Ono, Fumiei; Ueda, Shuichi; Saito, Toshihito; Hayasaka, Osamu

    In this study, the cooling performance of a C/C composite material structure with metallic cooling tubes fixed by elastic force without chemical bonding was evaluated experimentally using combustion gas in a rocket combustor. The C/C composite chamber was covered by a stainless steel outer shell to maintain its airtightness. Gaseous hydrogen as a fuel and gaseous oxygen as an oxidizer were used for the heating test. The surface of these C/C composites was maintained below 1500 K when the combustion gas temperature was about 2800 K and the heat flux to the combustion chamber wall was about 9 MW/m2. No thermal damage was observed on the stainless steel tubes that were in contact with the C/C composite materials. The results of the heating test showed that such a metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure is able to control the surface temperature as a cooling structure (also as a heat exchanger) as well as indicated the possibility of reducing the amount of coolant even if the thermal load to the engine is high. Thus, application of this metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure to reusable engines such as a rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine is expected.

  12. Experimental Combustion Dynamics Behavior of a Multi-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Gas Turbine Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Waldo A.; Chang, Clarence T.

    2016-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the combustion dynamic characteristics of a research multi-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor under simulated gas turbine conditions was conducted. The objective was to gain a better understanding of the physical phenomena inside a pressurized flametube combustion chamber under acoustically isolated conditions. A nine-point swirl venturi lean direct injection (SV-LDI) geometry was evaluated at inlet pressures up to 2,413 kPa and non-vitiated air temperatures up to 867 K. The equivalence ratio was varied to obtain adiabatic flame temperatures between 1388 K and 1905 K. Dynamic pressure measurements were taken upstream of the SV-LDI, in the combustion zone and downstream of the exit nozzle. The measurements showed that combustion dynamics were fairly small when the fuel was distributed uniformly and mostly due to fluid dynamics effects. Dynamic pressure fluctuations larger than 40 kPa at low frequencies were measured at 653 K inlet temperature and 1117 kPa inlet pressure when fuel was shifted and the pilot fuel injector equivalence ratio was increased to 0.72.

  13. Near-infrared diode laser absorption diagnostic for temperature and water vapor in a scramjet combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jonathan T.C.; Rieker, Gregory B.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Gruber, Mark R.; Carter, Campbell D.; Mathur, Tarun; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2005-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption measurements of gas temperature and water concentration were made at the exit of a model scramjet combustor fueled on JP-7. Multiplexed, fiber-coupled, near-infrared distributed feedback lasers were used to probe three water vapor absorption features in the 1.34-1.47 μm spectral region (2v1and v1+ v3overtone bands). Ratio thermometry was performed using direct-absorption wavelength scans of isolated features at a 4-kHz repetition rate, as well as 2f wavelength modulation scans at a 2-kHz scan rate. Large signal-to-noise ratios demonstrate the ability of the optimally engineered optical hardware to reject beam steering and vibration noise. Successful measurements were made at full combustion conditions for a variety of fuel/air equivalence ratios and at eight vertical positions in the duct to investigate spatial uniformity. The use of three water vapor absorption features allowed for preliminary estimates of temperature distributions along the line of sight. The improved signal quality afforded by 2f measurements, in the case of weak absorption, demonstrates the utility of a scanned wavelength modulation strategy in such situations

  14. A model combustor for studying a reacting jet in an oscillating crossflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugger, Christopher A.; Gejji, Rohan M.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Yu, Yen; Lucht, Robert P.; Anderson, William E.

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses a novel model combustion experiment that was built for studying the structure and dynamics of a reacting jet in an unsteady crossflow. A natural-gas-fired dump combustor is used to generate and sustain an acoustically oscillating vitiated flow that serves as the crossflow for transverse jet injection. Unlike most other techniques that are limited in operating pressure or acoustic amplitude, this method of generating an unsteady flow field is demonstrated at a pressure of 10 atm with peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes approaching 20% of the mean pressure. An optically accessible test section designed for these conditions provides access for advanced laser and optical diagnostic measurements. Detailed measurements provide insight into the complex acoustic-hydrodynamic-combustion coupling processes and offer high-quality, high-resolution validation data for numerical simulations. Careful instrumentation port design considerations for the higher amplitude acoustics are detailed. As a whole, this paper focuses on select representative segments of the experiment operational space that highlight our strategy of providing an oscillatory flowfield. This includes presenting the acoustic operational space such as acoustic amplitudes, frequencies, and mode shapes. Select imaging results are then reported to support our strategies capability to produce high-fidelity measurements.

  15. A model combustor for studying a reacting jet in an oscillating crossflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugger, Christopher A; Gejji, Rohan M; Portillo, J Enrique; Yu, Yen; Lucht, Robert P; Anderson, William E

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses a novel model combustion experiment that was built for studying the structure and dynamics of a reacting jet in an unsteady crossflow. A natural-gas-fired dump combustor is used to generate and sustain an acoustically oscillating vitiated flow that serves as the crossflow for transverse jet injection. Unlike most other techniques that are limited in operating pressure or acoustic amplitude, this method of generating an unsteady flow field is demonstrated at a pressure of 10 atm with peak-to-peak oscillation amplitudes approaching 20% of the mean pressure. An optically accessible test section designed for these conditions provides access for advanced laser and optical diagnostic measurements. Detailed measurements provide insight into the complex acoustic-hydrodynamic-combustion coupling processes and offer high-quality, high-resolution validation data for numerical simulations. Careful instrumentation port design considerations for the higher amplitude acoustics are detailed. As a whole, this paper focuses on select representative segments of the experiment operational space that highlight our strategy of providing an oscillatory flowfield. This includes presenting the acoustic operational space such as acoustic amplitudes, frequencies, and mode shapes. Select imaging results are then reported to support our strategies capability to produce high-fidelity measurements.

  16. Effects of injection pressure variation on mixing in a cold supersonic combustor with kerosene fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Lai; Zhu, Lin; Qi, Yin-Yin; Ge, Jia-Ru; Luo, Feng; Zou, Hao-Ran; Wei, Min; Jen, Tien-Chien

    2017-10-01

    Spray jet in cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow has been characterized under different injection pressures to assess the effects of the pressure variation on the mixing between incident shock wave and transverse cavity injection. Based on the real scramjet combustor, a detailed computational fluid dynamics model is developed. The injection pressures are specified as 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 and 4.0 MPa, respectively, with the other constant operation parameters (such as the injection diameter, angle and velocity). A three dimensional Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach incorporating an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model is used to investigate the interaction between kerosene and supersonic air. The numerical simulations primarily concentrate on penetration depth, span expansion area, angle of shock wave and sauter mean diameter distribution of the kerosene droplets with/without evaporation. Validation has been implemented by comparing the calculated against the measured in literature with good qualitative agreement. Results show that the penetration depth, span-wise angle and expansion area of the transverse cavity jet are all increased with the injection pressure. However, when the injection pressure is further increased, the value in either penetration depth or expansion area increases appreciably. This study demonstrates the feasibility and effectiveness of the combination of Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids approach and an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model, in turn providing insights into scramjet design improvement.

  17. Characterization of kerosene distribution around the ignition cavity in a scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xipeng; Liu, Weidong; Pan, Yu; Yang, Leichao; An, Bin; Zhu, Jiajian

    2017-05-01

    Kerosene distribution before its ignition in a scramjet combustor with dual cavity was measured using kerosene-PLIF under transverse injection upstream of the cavity and different injection pressures. The simulated flight condition is Ma 5.5, and the isolator entrance has a Mach number of 2.52, a total pressure of 1.6 MPa and a stagnation temperature of 1486 K. Effects of injection pressure on fuel distribution characteristics were analyzed. The majority of kerosene is present in the cavity shear layer as well as its upper region. Kerosene extends gradually into the cavity, almost, at a constant angle. Large scale structures are evident on the windward side of kerosene. The cavity shear layer plays an important role in determining the kerosene distribution and its entrainment into the cavity. The middle part of cavity is the most suitable location for ignition as a result of a favorable local equivalent ratio. As the injection pressure increases, the penetration height gets higher with the rate of increase getting slower at higher injection pressure. Meanwhile, the portion of kerosene entrained into cavity through shear layer becomes smaller as injection pressure increases. However, the kerosene entrained into cavity still increase due to the increased mass flow rate of kerosene.

  18. Investigation of flameholding mechanisms in a kerosene-fueled scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-hang; Song, Wen-yan; Shi, De-yong

    2017-11-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence and high-speed photography were employed to investigate the kerosene flame stabilization mechanism in a cavity-based scramjet combustor with an inlet condition corresponds to flight Mach number of 4. Pilot hydrogen was used to ignite the kerosene fuel. The PLIF results of kerosene distribution in the reacting cases showed that the mixing process was dramatically enhanced compared to the non-reacting cases. Sharp OH gradients were observed in the shear layer and the aft region of cavity, which indicated that the flame was located at these positions. A portion of hot products participated in the recirculation of the cavity and preheated the kerosene-air mixture in the leading edge. The heated mixture was ignited in the mid-cavity and the reaction zone spread into the mainstream flow. Due to the competition between the local flame speed and the local flow speed, the high-speed images showed that the spreading location was in fluctuation. This movement was observed to cause a low-frequency wall pressure fluctuation.

  19. Experiments and numerical studies on a Syngas-fired Ultra low NOx combustor

    KAUST Repository

    S, Krishna

    2017-06-06

    Exhaust measurements of temperature and pollutants in a syngas-fired model trapped vortex combustor for stationary power generation applications are reported. The performance was further evaluated for configurations where mixing enhancement was obtained using struts in the mainstream flow. Mainstream premixing of fuel was also studied to investigate its effect on emissions. The exhaust temperature pattern factor was found to be poor for baseline cases, but improved with the introduction of struts. NO emissions were steadily below 3-ppm across various flow conditions, whereas CO emissions tended to increase with increasing Momentum Flux Ratios (MFRs) and mainstream fuel addition. Combustion efficiencies ~96% were observed for all conditions. The performance characteristics were found to be favourable at higher MFRs with low pattern factors and high combustion efficiencies. Numerical simulations employing RANS and LES with Presumed Probability Distribution Function (PPDF) model were also carried out. Mixture fraction profiles in the TVC cavity for non-reacting conditions show that LES simulations are able to capture the mean mixing field better than the RANS-based approach. This is attributed to the prediction of the jet decay rate and is reflected on the mean velocity magnitude fields, which reinforce this observation at different sections in the cavity. Both RANS and LES simulations show close agreement with the experimentally measured OH concentration, however, the RANS approach does not perform satisfactorily in capturing the trend of velocity magnitude. LES simulations clearly capture the trend observed in exhaust measurements which is primarily attributed to the flame stabilization mechanism.

  20. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Toyokazu; Murata, Toru.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To shield superconducting coils for use in the generation of magnetic field against neutron irradiation thereby preventing tritium contamination. Constitution: The thermonuclear device comprises, in its inside, a vacuum container for containing plasmas, superconducting coils disposed to the outside of the vacuum container and neutron absorbers disposed between the super-conducting coils and the vacuum container. since neutrons issued from the plasma are absorbed by neutron absorbers and not irradiated to the superconducting coils, generation of tritium due to the reaction between 3 He in the liquid helium as the coolants for the super-conducting coils and the neutrons is prevented. (Aizawa, K.)

  1. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Takuro; Maki, Koichi.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a thermonuclear device, in which integrity of a measuring device is kept, the reactor wall temperature and wear of armour materials are monitored accurately even under intense radiation rays, so that the flow rate of coolants and plasma power can be controlled by using the signals. Infrared rays generated from the surface of the armour materials disposed on a first wall are detected to measure the reactor wall temperature. Coolant flow rate and plasma power are controlled based on the obtained reactor wall temperature. In addition, infrared rays generated from the back of the armour materials are detected to obtain the surface temperature in order to avoid intense radiation rays from plasmas. The coolant flow rate and the plasma power are controlled based on the obtained temperature on the surface of the reactor thereby controlling the temperature of the first wall and the armour material to 300degC or lower in a case of the first wall made of stainless steel and 1000degC or lower in a case of the armour material made of graphite. (I.S.)

  2. Scalable devices

    KAUST Repository

    Krüger, Jens J.

    2014-01-01

    In computer science in general and in particular the field of high performance computing and supercomputing the term scalable plays an important role. It indicates that a piece of hardware, a concept, an algorithm, or an entire system scales with the size of the problem, i.e., it can not only be used in a very specific setting but it\\'s applicable for a wide range of problems. From small scenarios to possibly very large settings. In this spirit, there exist a number of fixed areas of research on scalability. There are works on scalable algorithms, scalable architectures but what are scalable devices? In the context of this chapter, we are interested in a whole range of display devices, ranging from small scale hardware such as tablet computers, pads, smart-phones etc. up to large tiled display walls. What interests us mostly is not so much the hardware setup but mostly the visualization algorithms behind these display systems that scale from your average smart phone up to the largest gigapixel display walls.

  3. Thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Noriyuki.

    1994-01-01

    In a thermonuclear device, a protrusion is protruded the direction to point X of a separatrix of magnetic fields and oscillated. Further, a protrusion continuous in the toroidal direction is formed from a first wall toward the point X and the position for the point X is oscillated in perpendicular to the divertor. If moving widths are compared for the shape of each of the divertors, it is longest in the case of the protruded shape, and a sweeping speed in a collision region is greatest in a case of the protruded shape and the moving width can be increased for the moving time and moving width of the identical point X. Accordingly, fluctuation of the magnetic fields of the divertor coils can relatively be reduced. A high heat receiving portion of the surface of the divertor can be made sufficiently great and moved rapidly with less oscillation width for the point X, thereby enabling to suppress AC loss of superconductors of toroidal coils and keep a stable superconductive state. Further, the divertor can be kept from melting, to attain a reliable thermonuclear device. (I.S.)

  4. Practical microwave electron devices

    CERN Document Server

    Meurant, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Practical Microwave Electron Devices provides an understanding of microwave electron devices and their applications. All areas of microwave electron devices are covered. These include microwave solid-state devices, including popular microwave transistors and both passive and active diodes; quantum electron devices; thermionic devices (including relativistic thermionic devices); and ferrimagnetic electron devices. The design of each of these devices is discussed as well as their applications, including oscillation, amplification, switching, modulation, demodulation, and parametric interactions.

  5. On the Role of Chemical Kinetics Modeling in the LES of Premixed Bluff Body and Backward-Facing Step Combustors

    KAUST Repository

    Chakroun, Nadim W.

    2017-01-05

    Recirculating flows in the wake of a bluff body, behind a sudden expansion or down-stream of a swirler, are pivotal for anchoring a flame and expanding the stability range. The size and structure of these recirculation zones and the accurate prediction of the length of these zones is a very important characteristic that computational simulations should have. Large eddy simulation (LES) techniques with an appropriate combustion model and reaction mechanism afford a balance between computational complexity and predictive accuracy. In this study, propane/air mixtures were simulated in a bluff-body stabilized combustor based on the Volvo test case and also in a backward-facing step combustor. The main goal is to investigate the role of the chemical mechanism and the accuracy of estimating the extinction strain rate on the prediction of important ow features such as recirculation zones. Two 2-step mechanisms were employed, one which gave reasonable extinction strain rates and another modi ed 2-step mechanism where it grossly over-predicted the values. This modified mechanism under-predicted recirculation zone lengths compared to the original mechanism and had worse agreement with experiments in both geometries. While the recirculation zone lengths predicted by both reduced mechanisms in the step combustor scale linearly with the extinction strain rate, the scaling curves do not match experimental results as none of the simpli ed mechanisms produce extinction strain rates that are consistent with those predicted by the comprehensive mechanisms. We conclude that it is very important that a chemical mechanism is able to correctly predict extinction strain rates if it is to be used in CFD simulations.

  6. Experimental investigation on ignition and lean blow-out performance of a multi-sector centrally staged combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fuqiang; Zhang, Kaiyu; Mu, Yong; Liu, Cunxi; Yang, Jinhu; Xu, Gang; Zhu, Junqiang

    2014-10-01

    Improvement on extinction and pollution emission have become one of the most prominent research topics in gas turbine. It is widely recognized that the fuel/air mixture distribution in the recirculation zone is a critical factor in improving lean blow-out (LBO) and ignition. This paper proposed a new low emission scheme with fuel staged centrally and hybrid injector to improve flameout and emission. A relative small amount of fuel enters into central pilot airblast atomizer burner and then atomized by inner swirl air. The remaining majority of fuel is directly injected into vane channels of the primary swirler through a series of holes located on the sidewall of the main stage. Only pilot stage is fueled under ignition and lean flameout condition. The uniformity of fuel/air mixture distribution in the primary zone of the new design decreases NOX emission, meanwhile the fuel air mixture in pilot recirculation zone is locally rich to improve flameout and ignition. Experimental investigation was conducted to compare the new scheme with baseline design of dual-swirler in terms of LBO and ignition characteristics under the same condition in a multi-sector combustor. It is found that the fuel-air ratio of ignition limit and LBO decrease with the reference velocity increasing. The experimental results also show that the new scheme successfully improve lean blow-out and broaden the operation range of the combustor. The experimental results indicated that the centrally staged scheme can widen the operation boundary of the combustor and can provide guidance for design and optimization of combustion chamber.

  7. Numerical study of effect of wall parameters on catalytic combustion characteristics of CH4/air in a heat recirculation micro-combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yunfei; Wang, Haibo; Pan, Wenli; Zhang, Li; Li, Lixian; Yang, Zhongqing; Lin, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion in heat recuperation micro-combustors with different materials was studied. • Heat concentration is more obvious with thermal conductivity decreasing. • Combustor with copper baffles has uniform temperature distribution and best preheating effectiveness. • Influence of wall thermal conductivity is negligible on OH(s) coverage. • Methane conversion rate firstly increases and then decreases with h increasing. - Abstract: Premixed combustion of methane/air mixture in heat recuperation micro-combustors made of different materials (corundum, quartz glass, copper and ferrochrome) was investigated. The effects of wall parameters on the combustion characters of a CH 4 /air mixture under Rhodium catalyst as well as the influence of wall materials and convection heat transfer coefficients on the stable combustion limit, temperature field, and free radicals was explored using numerical analysis methodology. The results show that with a decrease of thermal conductivity of wall materials, the temperature of the reaction region increases and hot spots becomes more obvious. The combustor with copper baffles has uniform temperature distribution and best preheating effectiveness, but when inlet velocity is too small, the maximum temperature in the combustor with copper or ferrochrome baffles is well beyond the melting point of the materials. With an increase in thermal conductivity, the preheat zone for premixed gas increases, but the influence of thermal conductivity on OH(s) coverage is negligible. With an increase of the wall convection heat transfer coefficient, the methane conversion rate firstly increases, then decreases reaching a maximum value at h = 8.5 W/m 2 K, however, the average temperature of both the axis and exterior surface of the combustor decrease.

  8. Intrauterine devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilian, Xiao

    2002-04-01

    The aim of this chapter is to review the worldwide use of intrauterine devices (IUDs) for contraception and the long-term contraceptive efficacy and safety of copper-bearing IUDs. The TCu380A and Multiload Cu375 have a very low failure rate (0.2-0.5%) over 10 years. The main concerns of the use of IUDs are risk of pelvic inflammatory diseases and increased menstrual blood loss and irregular bleeding. Factors associated with an increase in risk of pelvic inflammatory diseases are discussed. Preventive measures can be taken with careful screening of eligible IUD users, technical training and adequate service facilities for provision of IUDs. Levonorgestrel-releasing IUDs have the benefit of reducing menstrual blood loss in addition to high contraceptive efficacy. The copper IUD is the most effective method for emergency contraception. It can prevent over 95% of unwanted pregnancies within 5 days of unprotected intercourse. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  9. Radiative heat transfer in strongly forward scattering media of circulating fluidized bed combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Cihan; Ozen, Guzide; Selçuk, Nevin; Kulah, Gorkem

    2016-10-01

    Investigation of the effect of particle scattering on radiative incident heat fluxes and source terms is carried out in the dilute zone of the lignite-fired 150 kWt Middle East Technical University Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor (METU CFBC) test rig. The dilute zone is treated as an axisymmetric cylindrical enclosure containing grey/non-grey, absorbing, emitting gas with absorbing, emitting non/isotropically/anisotropically scattering particles surrounded by grey diffuse walls. A two-dimensional axisymmetric radiation model based on Method of Lines (MOL) solution of Discrete Ordinates Method (DOM) coupled with Grey Gas (GG)/Spectral Line-Based Weighted Sum of Grey Gases Model (SLW) and Mie theory/geometric optics approximation (GOA) is extended for incorporation of anisotropic scattering by using normalized Henyey-Greenstein (HG)/transport approximation for the phase function. Input data for the radiation model is obtained from predictions of a comprehensive model previously developed and benchmarked against measurements on the same CFBC burning low calorific value indigenous lignite with high volatile matter/fixed carbon (VM/FC) ratio in its own ash. Predictive accuracy and computational efficiency of nonscattering, isotropic scattering and forward scattering with transport approximation are tested by comparing their predictions with those of forward scattering with HG. GG and GOA based on reflectivity with angular dependency are found to be accurate and CPU efficient. Comparisons reveal that isotropic assumption leads to under-prediction of both incident heat fluxes and source terms for which discrepancy is much larger. On the other hand, predictions obtained by neglecting scattering were found to be in favorable agreement with those of forward scattering at significantly less CPU time. Transport approximation is as accurate and CPU efficient as HG. These findings indicate that negligence of scattering is a more practical choice in solution of the radiative

  10. Mode Transition and Intermittency in an Acoustically Uncoupled Lean Premixed Swirl-Stabilized Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    LaBry, Zachary A.

    2014-06-16

    The prediction of dynamic instability remains an open and important issue in the development of gas turbine systems, particularly those constrained by emissions limitations. The existence and characteristics of dynamic instability are known to be functions of combustor geometry, flow conditions, and combustion parameters, but the form of dependence is not well understood. By modifying the acoustic boundary conditions, changes in flame and flow structure due to inlet parameters can be studied independent of the acoustic modes with which they couple. This paper examines the effect of equivalence ratio on the flame macrostructure — the relationship between the turbulent flame brush and the dominant flow structures — in an acoustically uncoupled environment. The flame brush is measured using CH* chemiluminescence, and the flow is interrogated using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry. We examine a range of equivalence ratios spanning three distinct macrostructures. The first macrostructure (ϕ = 0.550) is characterized by a diffuse flame brush confined to the interior of the inner recirculation zone. We observe a conical flame in the inner shear layer, continuing along the wall shear layer in the second macrostructure (ϕ = 0.600). The third macrostructure exhibits the same flame brush as the second, with an additional flame brush in the outer shear layer (ϕ = 0.650). Between the second and third macrostructures, we observe a regime in which the flame brush transitions intermittently between the two structures. We use dynamic mode decomposition on the PIV data to show that this transition event, which we call flickering, is linked to vorticity generated by the intermittent expansion of the outer recirculation zone as the flame jumps in and out of the outer shear layer. In a companion paper, we show how the macrostructures described in this paper are linked with dynamic instability [1].

  11. Effects of spray angle variation on mixing in a cold supersonic combustor with kerosene fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Luo, Feng; Qi, Yin-Yin; Wei, Min; Ge, Jia-Ru; Liu, Wei-Lai; Li, Guo-Li; Jen, Tien-Chien

    2018-03-01

    Effective fuel injection and mixing is of particular importance for scramjet engines to be operated reliably because the fuel must be injected into high-speed crossflow and mixed with the supersonic air at an extremely short time-scale. This study numerically characterizes an injection jet under different spray angles in a cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow and thus assesses the effects of the spray angle on the mixing between incident shock wave and transverse cavity injection. A detailed computational fluid dynamics model is developed in accordance with the real scramjet combustor. Next, the spray angles are designated as 45°, 90°, and 135° respectively with the other constant operational conditions (such as the injection diameter, velocity and pressure). Next, a combination of a three dimensional Couple Level Set & Volume of Fluids with an improved Kelvin-Helmholtz & Rayleigh-Taylor model is used to investigate the interaction between kerosene and supersonic air. The numerical predictions are focused on penetration depth, span expansion area, angle of shock wave and sauter mean diameter distribution of the kerosene droplets with or without evaporation. Finally, validation has been implemented by comparing the calculated to the measured in literature with good qualitative agreement. Results show that no matter whether the evaporation is considered, the penetration depth, span-wise angle and expansion area of the kerosene droplets are all increased with the spray angle, and most especially, that the size of the kerosene droplets is surely reduced with the spray angle increase. These calculations are beneficial to better understand the underlying atomization mechanism in the cold kerosene-fueled supersonic flow and hence provide insights into scramjet design improvement.

  12. An experimental study of interacting swirl flows in a model gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanath, Rahul B.; Tilak, Paidipati Mallikarjuna; Chaudhuri, Swetaprovo

    2018-03-01

    In this experimental work, we analyze the flow structures emerging from the mutual interaction between adjacent swirling flows at variable degrees of swirl, issued into a semi-confined chamber, as it could happen in a three cup sector of an annular premixed combustor of a modern gas turbine engine. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry ( sPIV) is used to characterize both the non-reacting and reacting flow fields in the central diametrical (vertical) plane of the swirlers and the corresponding transverse (horizontal) planes at different heights above the swirlers. A central swirling flow with a fixed swirl vane angle is allowed to interact with its neighboring flows of varied swirl levels, with constant inlet bulk flow velocity through the central port. It is found that the presence of straight jets with zero swirl or co-rotating swirling jets with increasing swirl on both sides of the central swirling jet, significantly alters its structures. As such, an increase in the amount of swirl in the neighboring flows increases the recirculation levels in central swirling flow leading to a bubble-type vortex breakdown, not formed otherwise. It is shown with the aid of Helmholtz decomposition that the transition from conical to bubble-type breakdown is captured well by the radial momentum induced by the azimuthal vorticity. Simultaneous sPIV and OH-planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) are employed to identify the influence of the neighboring jets on the reacting vortex breakdown states. Significant changes in the vortex breakdown size and structure are observed due to variation in swirl levels of the neighboring jets alongside reaction and concomitant flow dilatation.

  13. High resolution temperature mapping of gas turbine combustor simulator exhaust with femtosecond laser induced fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert B.; Yun, Sangsig; Ding, Huimin; Charbonneau, Michel; Coulas, David; Lu, Ping; Mihailov, Stephen J.; Ramachandran, Nanthan

    2017-04-01

    Femtosecond infrared (fs-IR) laser written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), have demonstrated great potential for extreme sensing. Such conditions are inherent in advanced gas turbine engines under development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and the ability to measure temperature gradients in these harsh environments is currently limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding the high temperature, pressure and corrosive conditions present. This paper discusses fabrication and deployment of several fs-IR written FBG arrays, for monitoring exhaust temperature gradients of a gas turbine combustor simulator. Results include: contour plots of measured temperature gradients, contrast with thermocouple data.

  14. Experimental and numerical analysis for high intensity swirl based ultra-low emission flameless combustor operating with liquid fuels

    KAUST Repository

    Vanteru, Mahendra Reddy

    2014-06-21

    Flameless combustion offers many advantages over conventional combustion, particularly uniform temperature distribution and lower emissions. In this paper, a new strategy is proposed and adopted to scale up a burner operating in flameless combustion mode from a heat release density of 5.4-21 MW/m(3) (thermal input 21.5-84.7 kW) with kerosene fuel. A swirl flow based configuration was adopted for air injection and pressure swirl type nozzle with an SMD 35-37 lm was used to inject the fuel. Initially, flameless combustion was stabilized for a thermal input of 21.5 kW ((Q) over dot \\'\\'\\'= 5.37 MW/m(3)). Attempts were made to scale this combustor to higher intensities i.e. 10.2, 16.3 and 21.1 MW/m(3). However, an increase in fuel flow rate led to incomplete combustion and accumulation of unburned fuel in the combustor. Two major difficulties were identified as possible reasons for unsustainable flameless combustion at the higher intensities. (i) A constant spray cone angle and SMD increases the droplet number density. (ii) Reactants dilution ratio (R-dil) decreased with increased thermal input. To solve these issues, a modified combustor configuration, aided by numerical computations was adopted, providing a chamfer near the outlet to increase the R-dil. Detailed experimental investigations showed that flameless combustion mode was achieved at high intensities with an evenly distributed reaction zone and temperature in the combustor at all heat intensities. The emissions of CO, NOx and HC for all heat intensities (Phi = 1-0.6) varied between 11-41, 6-19 and 0-9 ppm, respectively. These emissions are well within the range of emissions from other flameless combustion systems reported in the literature. The acoustic emission levels were also observed to be reduced by 8-9 dB at all conditions. (C) 2014 The Combustion Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A parametric study on the effect of an acoustic field on a spray-fired, Rijke-tube, pulse combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Raj Kumar

    A parametric experimental and theoretical study was performed to investigate the effects of an acoustic field on spray combustion characteristics. A Rijke-tube pulse combustor was constructed with variable length and a fixed diameter. A burner was designed for use with both gaseous and liquid fuel. An active control mechanism was implemented to externally control the acoustic field inside the combustor, as it was not possible to sustain natural oscillations with the long spray flame. Active control of the combustor was characterized for gaseous and spray flames applying both indirect control (in-line actuators) as well as direct control using external speakers. The size and velocity distribution of a nonreacting and reacting spray in an actively controlled acoustic field were measured using a two-component phase-Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA). The effects of burner location, frequency, and sound pressure level on the spray size and velocity distribution were studied. Based on the measured trends in the Dsb{32}, velocity, and data rate, mechanisms governing the interactions of the acoustic field with the spray were identified. These include atomization, evaporation and reaction, dispersion, droplet lifetime and flame lift. Also, the faster burning of the droplets was more prominent when the spray was placed at locations corresponding to the acoustic velocity antinode. A significant decrease in CO and NO emissions were found in the presence of an acoustic field as compared to the steady operation of the combustor. A mathematical model was developed to study the effects of frequency, sound pressure level, phase lag of droplet injection with respect to the acoustic velocity field, droplet injection velocity, and surrounding gas velocity on the Sauter-mean diameter of a reacting ethanol spray. The enhanced burning of the droplets are indicated by model results with higher initial slopes in the Dsb{32} profiles along the axial direction. For burner locations

  16. Influence of Actively Controlled Heat Release Timing on the Performance and Operational Characteristics of a Rotary Valve, Acoustically Resonant Pulse Combustor

    KAUST Repository

    Lisanti, Joel

    2017-01-05

    The influence of heat release timing on the performance and operational characteristics of a rotary valve, acoustically resonant pulse combustor is investigated both experimentally and numerically. Simulation results are obtained by solving the quasi-1D Navier-Stokes equations with forced volumetric heat addition. Experimental efforts modify heat release timing through modulated fuel injection and modification of the fluid dynamic mixing. Results indicate that the heat release timing has a profound effect on the operation and efficiency of the pulse combustor and that this timing can be difficult to control experimentally.

  17. Reluctance device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claridge, A.N.; Smith, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    A reluctance device comprises two or more phases, each of which has a rotor mounted for rotation within a tubular member and an annular stator positioned externally of the tubular member. The rotor and the internal surface of the tubular member are each provided with aligned, axially spaced apart annular arrays of teeth, the teeth on the rotor confronting those on the tubular member in radially spaced apart relationship. The stator encloses a coil which, when electrically energised, creates a plurality of magnetic flux paths each of which extends radially between the rotor and stator via the confronting teeth and the tubular member, and axially along both the rotor and the portion of the stator located radially outwardly of the coil. The portion of the tubular member intermediate the teeth thereon is provided with a non-magnetic insert in order to resist the axial passage of magnetic flux therethrough. In one of the claims, the tubular member comprises a portion of a nuclear reactor which is adapted to contain a reactor control rod, the rotor constituting a portion of the drive mechanism for the control rod contained in operation within the tubular member. (author)

  18. Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Quarterly report No. 1, April 16, 1990--July 15, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cobb, J.T. Jr.

    1990-08-15

    BCR National Laboratory (BCRNL) has initiated a project aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using a rotary kiln, suitably modified, to burn Pennsylvania anthracite wastes, co-fired with high-sulfur bituminous coal. Limestone will be injected into the kiln for sulfur control, to determine whether high sulfur capture levels can be achieved with high sorbent utilization. The principal objectives of this work are: (1) to prove the feasibility of burning anthracite refuse, with co-firing of high-sulfur bituminous coal and with limestone injection for sulfur emissions control, in a rotary kiln fitted with a Universal Energy International (UEI) air injector system; (2) to determine the emissions levels of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} and specifically to identify the Ca/S ratios that are required to meet New Source Performance Standards; (3) to evaluate the technical and economic merits of a commercial rotary kiln combustor in comparison to fluidized bed combustors; and, (4) to ascertain the need for further work, including additional combustion tests, prior to commercial application, and to recommend accordingly a detailed program towards this end.

  19. Effect of Air Staging Ratios on the Burning Rate and Emissions in an Underfeed Fixed-Bed Biomass Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Regueiro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This experimental work studies a small-scale biomass combustor (5–12 kW with an underfed fixed bed using low air staging ratios (15%–30%. This document focuses on the influence of the operative parameters on the combustion process, so gaseous emissions and the distribution and concentration of particulate matter have also been recorded. The facility shows good stability and test repeatability. For the studied airflow ranges, the results show that increasing the total airflow rate does not increase the overall air excess ratio because the burning rate is proportionally enhanced (with some slight differences that depend on the air staging ratio. Consequently, the heterogeneous reactions at the bed remain in the so-called oxygen-limited region, and thus the entire bed operates under sub-stoichiometric conditions with regards of the char content of the biomass. In addition, tests using only primary air (no staging may increase the fuel consumption, but in a highly incomplete way, approaching a gasification regime. Some measured burning rates are almost 40% higher than previous results obtained in batch combustors due to the fixed position of the ignition front. The recorded concentration of particulate matter varies between 15 and 75 mg/Nm3, with a main characteristic diameter between 50 and 100 nm.

  20. Parametric performance analysis of steam-injected gas turbine with a thermionic-energy-converter-lined combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Y. K.; Burns, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of steam-injected gas turbines having combustors lined with thermionic energy converters (STIG/TEC systems) was analyzed and compared with that of two baseline systems; a steam-injected gas turbine (without a TEC-lined combustor) and a conventional combined gas turbine/steam turbine cycle. Common gas turbine parameters were assumed for all of the systems. Two configurations of the STIG/TEC system were investigated. In both cases, steam produced in an exhaust-heat-recovery boiler cools the TEC collectors. It is then injected into the gas combustion stream and expanded through the gas turbine. The STIG/TEC system combines the advantage of gas turbine steam injection with the conversion of high-temperature combustion heat by TEC's. The addition of TEC's to the baseline steam-injected gas turbine improves both its efficiency and specific power. Depending on system configuration and design parameters, the STIG/TEC system can also achieve higher efficiency and specific power than the baseline combined cycle.

  1. A Priori Analysis of a Compressible Flamelet Model using RANS Data for a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Jesse R.; Drozda, Tomasz G.; McDaniel, James C.; Lacaze, Guilhem; Oefelein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to make large eddy simulation of hydrocarbon-fueled scramjet combustors more computationally accessible using realistic chemical reaction mechanisms, a compressible flamelet/progress variable (FPV) model was proposed that extends current FPV model formulations to high-speed, compressible flows. Development of this model relied on observations garnered from an a priori analysis of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) data obtained for the Hypersonic International Flight Research and Experimentation (HI-FiRE) dual-mode scramjet combustor. The RANS data were obtained using a reduced chemical mechanism for the combustion of a JP-7 surrogate and were validated using avail- able experimental data. These RANS data were then post-processed to obtain, in an a priori fashion, the scalar fields corresponding to an FPV-based modeling approach. In the current work, in addition to the proposed compressible flamelet model, a standard incompressible FPV model was also considered. Several candidate progress variables were investigated for their ability to recover static temperature and major and minor product species. The effects of pressure and temperature on the tabulated progress variable source term were characterized, and model coupling terms embedded in the Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations were studied. Finally, results for the novel compressible flamelet/progress variable model were presented to demonstrate the improvement attained by modeling the effects of pressure and flamelet boundary conditions on the combustion.

  2. Improved Modeling of Finite-Rate Turbulent Combustion Processes in Research Combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanOverbeke, Thomas J.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to further develop and test a stochastic model of turbulent combustion in recirculating flows. There is a requirement to increase the accuracy of multi-dimensional combustion predictions. As turbulence affects reaction rates, this interaction must be more accurately evaluated. In this work a more physically correct way of handling the interaction of turbulence on combustion is further developed and tested. As turbulence involves randomness, stochastic modeling is used. Averaged values such as temperature and species concentration are found by integrating the probability density function (pdf) over the range of the scalar. The model in this work does not assume the pdf type, but solves for the evolution of the pdf using the Monte Carlo solution technique. The model is further developed by including a more robust reaction solver, by using accurate thermodynamics and by more accurate transport elements. The stochastic method is used with Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations. The SIMPLE method is used to solve for velocity, pressure, turbulent kinetic energy and dissipation. The pdf solver solves for temperature and species concentration. Thus, the method is partially familiar to combustor engineers. The method is compared to benchmark experimental data and baseline calculations. The baseline method was tested on isothermal flows, evaporating sprays and combusting sprays. Pdf and baseline predictions were performed for three diffusion flames and one premixed flame. The pdf method predicted lower combustion rates than the baseline method in agreement with the data, except for the premixed flame. The baseline and stochastic predictions bounded the experimental data for the premixed flame. The use of a continuous mixing model or relax to mean mixing model had little effect on the prediction of average temperature. Two grids were used in a hydrogen diffusion flame simulation. Grid density did not effect the predictions except

  3. DEVELOPMENT AND DEMONSTRATION OF AN ULTRA LOW NOx COMBUSTOR FOR GAS TURBINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NEIL K. MCDOUGALD

    2005-04-30

    Alzeta Corporation has developed surface-stabilized fuel injectors for use with lean premixed combustors which provide extended turndown and ultra-low NOX emission performance. These injectors use a patented technique to form interacting radiant and blue-flame zones immediately above a selectively-perforated porous metal surface. This allows stable operation at low reaction temperatures. This technology is being commercialized under the product name nanoSTAR. Initial tests demonstrated low NOX emissions but, were limited by flashback failure of the injectors. The weld seams required to form cylindrical injectors from flat sheet material were identified as the cause of the failures. The approach for this project was to first develop new fabrication methods to produce injectors without weld seams, verify similar emissions performance to the original flat sheet material and then develop products for microturbines and small gas turbines along parallel development paths. A 37 month project was completed to develop and test a surface stabilized combustion system for gas turbine applications. New fabrication techniques developed removed a technological barrier to the success of the product by elimination of conductive weld seams from the injector surface. The injectors demonstrated ultra low emissions in rig tests conducted under gas turbine operating conditions. The ability for injectors to share a common combustion chamber allowing for deployment in annular combustion liner was also demonstrated. Some further development is required to resolve integration issues related to specific engine constraints, but the nanoSTAR technology has clearly demonstrated its low emissions potential. The overall project conclusions can be summarized: (1) A wet-laid casting method successfully eliminated weld seams from the injector surface without degrading performance. (2) Gas turbine cycle analysis identified several injector designs and control schemes to start and load engines using

  4. Visualization and Analysis of a Hydrocarbon Premixed Flame a in Small Scale Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, Luca Maria Luigi

    Nitric oxide (NO) planar induced laser fluorescence (PLIF) measurements have been performed in a small scale scramjet combustor at the University of Virginia Aerospace Research Laboratory at nominal simulated Mach 5 flight enthalpy. A mixture of NO and N2 was injected at the upstream end of the inlet isolator as a surrogate for ethylene fuel, and the mixing of this fuel simulant was studied with and without a shock train. The shock train was produced by an air throttle, which simulated the blockage effects of combustion downstream of the cavity flame holder. NO PLIF signal was imaged in a plane orthogonal to the freestream at the leading edge of the cavity. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to identify the most uniform cases, which were achieved by varying the location of the fuel injection and shock train. This method was used to screen different possible fueling configurations to provide optimized test conditions for follow-on combustion measurements using ethylene fuel. A theoretical study of the selected NO rotational transitions was performed to obtain a LIF signal that is linear with NO mole fraction and approximately independent of pressure and temperature. In the same facility, OH PLIF measurements were also performed; OH lines were carefully chosen to have fluorescent signal that is independent of pressure and temperature but linear with mole fraction. The OH PLIF signal was imaged in planes orthogonal to and parallel to the freestream flow at different equivalence ratios. Flameout limits were tested and identified. Instantaneous planar images were recorded and analyzed to compare the results with width increased dual-pump enhanced coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (WIDECARS) measurements in the same facility and large eddy simulation/Reynolds average Navier-Stokes (LES/RANS) numerical simulations. The flame angle was found to be approximately 10 degrees for several different conditions, which is in agreement with numerical

  5. Effect of increased fuel temperature on emissions of oxides of nitrogen from a gas turbine combustor burning ASTM jet-A fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionna, N. R.

    1974-01-01

    An annular gas turbine combustor was tested with heated ASTM Jet-A fuel to determine the effect of increased fuel temperature on the formation of oxides of nitrogen. Fuel temperature ranged from ambient to 700 K. The NOx emission index increased at a rate of 6 percent per 100 K increase in fuel temperature.

  6. 5 kHz thermometry in a swirl-stabilized gas turbine model combustor using chirped probe pulse femtosecond CARS. Part 1: Temporally resolved swirl-flame thermometry

    KAUST Repository

    Dennis, Claresta N.

    2016-06-20

    Single-laser-shot temperature measurements at 5 kHz were performed in a gas turbine model combustor using femtosecond (fs) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). The combustor was operated at two conditions; one exhibiting a low level of thermoacoustic instability and the other a high level of instability. Measurements were performed at 73 locations within each flame in order to resolve the spatial flame structure and compare to previously published studies. The measurement procedures, including the procedure for calibrating the laser system parameters, are discussed in detail. Despite the high turbulence levels in the combustor, signals were obtained on virtually every laser shot, and these signals were strong enough for spectral fitting analysis for determination of flames temperatures. The spatial resolution of the single-laser shot temperature measurements was approximately 600 µm, the precision was approximately ±2%, and the estimated accuracy was approximately ±3%. The dynamic range was sufficient for temperature measurements ranging from 300 K to 2200 K, although some detector saturation was observed for low temperature spectra. These results demonstrate the usefulness of fs-CARS for the investigation of highly turbulent combustion phenomena. In a companion paper, the time-resolved fs CARS data are analyzed to provide insight into the temporal dynamics of the gas turbine model combustor flow field.

  7. An investigation of co-combustion municipal sewage sludge with biomass in a 20kW BFB combustor under air-fired and oxygen-enriched condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajesh; Singh, Ravi Inder

    2017-12-01

    The behavior of municipal sewage sludge (MSS) with biomass (Guar stalks (GS), Mustard Husk (MH), Prosopis Juliflora Wood (PJW)) has been investigated in a 20kW bubbling fluidized bed (BFB) combustor under both air-fired (A-F) and oxygen-enriched (O-E) conditions. The work presented is divided into three parts, first part cover the thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), second part cover the experimental investigation of BFB combustor, and third part covers the ash analysis. TGA was performed with a ratio of 50%MSS/50%biomass (GS, MH, PJW) and results show that 50%MSS/50%GS has highest combustion characteristic factor (CCF). The experimental investigation of BFB combustor was performed for two different ratios of MSS/biomass (50%/50% and 25%/75%) and the combustion characteristics of blends were distinctive under both A-F and O-E condition. Despite 50%MSS/50%GS showing the highest combustion performance in TGA analysis, it formed agglomerates during burning in BFB. Due to this formation of large amount of agglomerates, de-fluidization was observed in the combustor bed after 65-75min in A-F conditions. The rate of de-fluidization increased under O-E condition. The de-fluidization problem disappeared when the share of MSS was reduced to 25%, but small amounts of the agglomerate were still present in the bed. With oxygen enhancement, the combustion efficiency of BFB combustor was improved and flue gasses were found within permissible limit. The maximum conceivable combustion efficiency (97.1%) for BFB combustor was accomplished by using 50% MSS/50%PJW under O-E condition. Results show that a ratio of 25%MSS/75%biomass combusted successfully inside the BFB combustor and extensive work is required for efficient utilization of significant share of MSS with biomass. SEM/EDS analyses were performed for agglomerate produced and for the damaged heater to study the surface morphology and compositions. The elemental heterogeneity of fly ash generated during MSS/biomass combustion

  8. Effect of the air-fuel mixing on the NOx yield in a low-emission gas-turbine plant combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasil'ev, V. D.; Bulysova, L. A.; Berne, A. L.

    2016-04-01

    The article deals with construction of a simplified model of inhibition of nitric oxides formed in the combustors of the gas-turbine plants (GTPs) operating on natural gas. A combustor in which premixed, lean air-fuel mixtures are burnt is studied theoretically and experimentally. The research was carried out using a full-scale combustor that had parameters characteristic of modern GTPs. The article presents the results computed by the FlowVision software and the results of the experiments carried out on the test bench of the All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute. The calculations and the tests were conducted under the following conditions: a flow rate of approximately 4.6 kg/s, a pressure to 450 kPa, an air temperature at the combustor inlet of approximately 400°C, the outlet temperature t 3 ≤ 1200°C, and natural gas as the fuel. The comparison of the simulated parameters with the experimental results underlies the constructed correlation dependence of the experimental NO x emission on the calculated parameter of nonuniform fuel concentration at the premixing zone outlet. The postulate about a weak dependence of the emission of NO x formed upon combustion of a perfectly mixed air-fuel mixture—when the methane concentration in air is constant at any point of the air-fuel mixture, i.e., constant in the mixture bulk—on the pressure in the combustor has been experimentally proven. The correctness and the practicability of the stationary mathematical model of the mixing process used to assess the NO x emission by the calculated amount of the air-fuel mixture generated in the premixing zone has been validated. This eliminates some difficulties that arise in the course of calculation of combustion and formation of NO x .

  9. Medical Device Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    A medical device is any product used to diagnose, cure, or treat a condition, or to prevent disease. They ... may need one in a hospital. To use medical devices safely Know how your device works. Keep ...

  10. Intrauterine devices (IUD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007635.htm Intrauterine devices (IUD) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small plastic T-shaped device ...

  11. Infrared criminalistic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibin, Igor S.; Savkov, E. V.; Popov, Pavel G.

    1996-12-01

    We are presenting the devices of near-IR spectral range in this report. The devices may be used in criminalistics, in bank business, in restoration works, etc. the action principle of these devices is describing briefly.

  12. FTIR Determination of Pollutants in Automobile Exhaust: An Environmental Chemistry Experiment Comparing Cold-Start and Warm-Engine Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhurst, Laura L.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment developed from the Advanced Integrated Environmental Laboratory illustrates the differences in automobile exhaust before and after the engine is warmed, using gas-phase Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The apparatus consists of an Avatar 360 FTIR spectrometer from Nicolet fitted with a variable path length gas cell,…

  13. Method for heating of the primary circuit of WWER electric power units at cold start-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, I.N.; Dimitrov, B.D.; Korkinova, M.I.

    1982-01-01

    The method increases the heating rate and shorten the start-up time of the electric power units. It comprises a primary stopping of the reactor core heating and provides a forced circulation of the heat-carrier through the circulation cycles of the primary circuit. The thermal energy is supplied in one or several steam generators in the secondary circuit of an NPP operating unit. 1 cl., 3 figs

  14. Implantable electronic medical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Implantable Electronic Medical Devices provides a thorough review of the application of implantable devices, illustrating the techniques currently being used together with overviews of the latest commercially available medical devices. This book provides an overview of the design of medical devices and is a reference on existing medical devices. The book groups devices with similar functionality into distinct chapters, looking at the latest design ideas and techniques in each area, including retinal implants, glucose biosensors, cochlear implants, pacemakers, electrical stimulation t

  15. Ultraefficient Themoelectric Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thermoelectric (TE) devices already found a wide range of commercial, military and aerospace applications. However, at present commercially available TE devices...

  16. Numerical Simulations of Two-Phase Reacting Flow in a Single-Element Lean Direct Injection (LDI) Combustor Using NCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nan-Suey; Shih, Tsan-Hsing; Wey, C. Thomas

    2011-01-01

    A series of numerical simulations of Jet-A spray reacting flow in a single-element lean direct injection (LDI) combustor have been conducted by using the National Combustion Code (NCC). The simulations have been carried out using the time filtered Navier-Stokes (TFNS) approach ranging from the steady Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), unsteady RANS (URANS), to the dynamic flow structure simulation (DFS). The sub-grid model employed for turbulent mixing and combustion includes the well-mixed model, the linear eddy mixing (LEM) model, and the filtered mass density function (FDF/PDF) model. The starting condition of the injected liquid spray is specified via empirical droplet size correlation, and a five-species single-step global reduced mechanism is employed for fuel chemistry. All the calculations use the same grid whose resolution is of the RANS type. Comparisons of results from various models are presented.

  17. High-resolution fast temperature mapping of a gas turbine combustor simulator with femtosecond infrared laser written fiber Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Robert B.; Yun, Sangsig; Ding, Huimin; Charbonneau, Michel; Coulas, David; Ramachandran, Nanthan; Mihailov, Stephen J.

    2017-02-01

    Femtosecond infrared (fs-IR) written fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs), have demonstrated great potential for extreme sensing. Such conditions are inherent to the advanced gas turbine engines under development to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and the ability to measure temperature gradients in these harsh environments is currently limited by the lack of sensors and controls capable of withstanding the high temperature, pressure and corrosive conditions present. This paper discusses fabrication and deployment of several fs-IR written FBG arrays, for monitoring the sidewall and exhaust temperature gradients of a gas turbine combustor simulator. Results include: contour plots of measured temperature gradients contrasted with thermocouple data, discussion of deployment strategies and comments on reliability.

  18. Experimental and numerical analysis of natural bio and syngas swirl flames in a model gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, S.; Benim, A. C.; Fischer, S.; Joos, F.; Kluβ, D.; Wiedermann, A.

    2016-10-01

    Turbulent reacting flows in a generic swirl gas turbine combustor model are investigated both numerically and experimentally. In the investigation, an emphasis is placed upon the external flue gas recirculation, which is a promising technology for increasing the efficiency of the carbon capture and storage process, which, however, can change the combustion behaviour significantly. A further emphasis is placed upon the investigation of alternative fuels such as biogas and syngas in comparison to the conventional natural gas. Flames are also investigated numerically using the open source CFD software OpenFOAM. In the numerical simulations, a laminar flamelet model based on mixture fraction and reaction progress variable is adopted. As turbulence model, the SST model is used within a URANS concept. Computational results are compared with the experimental data, where a fair agreement is observed.

  19. EFFECT OF COMBUSTOR INLET GEOMETRY ON ACOUSTIC SIGNATURE AND FLOW FIELD BEHAVIOUR OF THE LOW SWIRL INJECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Therkelsen, Peter L.; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, Robert K.; Portillo, J. Enrique; Martin, Scott M.

    2009-11-30

    Low Swirl Injector (LSI) technology is a lean premixed combustion method that is being developed for fuel-flexible gas turbines. The objective of this study is to characterize the fuel effects and influences of combustor geometry on the LSI's overall acoustic signatures and flowfields. The experiments consist of 24 flames at atmospheric condition with bulk flows ranging between 10 and 18 m/s. The flames burn CH{sub 4} (at {phi} = 0.6 & 0.7) and a blend of 90% H{sub 2} - 10% CH{sub 4} by volume (at {phi} = 0.35 & 0.4). Two combustor configurations are used, consisting of a cylindrical chamber with and without a divergent quarl at the dump plane. The data consist of pressure spectral distributions at five positions within the system and 2D flowfield information measured by Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV). The results show that acoustic oscillations increase with U{sub 0} and {phi}. However, the levels in the 90% H{sub 2} flames are significantly higher than in the CH{sub 4} flames. For both fuels, the use of the quarl reduces the fluctuating pressures in the combustion chamber by up to a factor of 7. The PIV results suggest this to be a consequence of the quarl restricting the formation of large vortices in the outer shear layer. A Generalized Instability Model (GIM) was applied to analyze the acoustic response of baseline flames for each of the two fuels. The measured frequencies and the stability trends for these two cases are predicted and the triggered acoustic mode shapes identified.

  20. Commercial liquid-metal MHD conversion systems coupled to LMFBR and coal-fired fluidized bed combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amend, W.E.; Brunsvold, A.; Pierson, E.S.

    1975-01-01

    The constraints imposed on two-phase liquid-metal MHD (LMMHD) when employed in commercial power plants with practical heat sources have not previously been studied. The coupling of a LMMHD power system with an LMFBR and a coal-fired fluidized bed combustor are considered. Two MHD systems are considered. The first is a dual cycle where heat is added to both the liquid metal and the gas, and the gas may expand through a gas turbine after the MHD generator. The second system, a binary cycle, differs in that a significant portion of the sensible heat in the gas entering the compression loop is converted to useful power in a steam bottoming cycle. The effect of liquid-metal vapor carry-over into the gas loop is included. The couplings of the LMMHD system with the heat sources and with the steam plants were studied in depth. The results of the study of each interface are presented parametrically for each heat source and energy conversion system. Operating points have been selected and the complete schematic of each system considered is presented along with all thermodynamic state points and fluid flow rates. All system parameters and component efficiencies were selected to be consistent with near term technology and good engineering design principles. These criteria yielded a system performance of 37 percent for an LMFBR operating with a maximum reactor coolant temperature of 1200 0 F when the pure LMMHD energy converter was used. A LMMHD/steam binary cycle is shown to be capable of achieving a thermal efficiency of 44.8 percent when used with the same heat source. Results with the coal fluidized bed combustor as a heat source show even higher performance levels (about 50 percent efficiency) since the maximum cycle temperature is increased

  1. In-use NOx emissions from model year 2010 and 2011 heavy-duty diesel engines equipped with aftertreatment devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Chandan; Collins, John F; Herner, Jorn D; Sax, Todd; Krishnamurthy, Mohan; Sobieralski, Wayne; Burntizki, Mark; Chernich, Don

    2013-07-16

    The California Air Resources Board (ARB) undertook this study to characterize the in-use emissions of model year (MY) 2010 or newer diesel engines. Emissions from four trucks: one equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and three equipped with EGR and a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) device were measured on two different routes with three different payloads using a portable emissions measurement system (PEMS) in the Sacramento area. Results indicated that brake-specific NOx emissions for the truck equipped only with an EGR were independent of the driving conditions. Results also showed that for typical highway driving conditions, the SCR technology is proving to be effective in controlling NOx emissions. However, under operations where the SCR's do not reach minimum operating temperature, like cold starts and some low load/slow speed driving conditions, NOx emissions are still elevated. The study indicated that strategies used to maintain exhaust temperature above a certain threshold, which are used in some of the newer SCRs, have the potential to control NOx emissions during certain low-load/slow speed driving conditions.

  2. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a...

  3. Development of an advanced high efficiency coal combustor for boiler retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rini, M.J.; LaFlesh, R.C. (Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (United States)); Beer, J.M.; Togan, M.A.; Yu, T.U. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); McGowan, J.G. (Univ. of Massachusetts, MA (United States))

    1987-05-06

    During the quarter from October 1986 to January 1987 the following technical progress was made: (1) Initiated a literature study focusing on optimized burner aerodynamics and design methodologies for high efficiency swirl generation devices, (2) Completed design of Swirler Test Facility (STF) to be used for comparative swirler evaluations, and (3) Initiated facility preparation at MIT for thermal atomization studies and high shear viscosity measurements.

  4. High Speed Optical Diagnostics in a High Pressure, GOx/RP 2 Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-10

    Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRC 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB, CA 93524-7680 Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQR 5...Engineering, 635 Strong Street, Atlanta, GA 30318, AIAA Student Member. 4 Research Scientist, RQRC, Combustion Devices Group, 10 Saturn Blvd...Edwards AFB, CA 93524. 5 Research Engineer, AFRL/RQRC., 10 E. Saturn Blvd, Building 8451, Edwards, CA 935324, Senior Member. 6 William R. T. Oakes

  5. Final Environmental Impact Statement for the JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-06-30

    This EIS assesses environmental issues associated with constructing and demonstrating a project that would be cost-shared by DOE and JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) under the Clean Coal Technology Program. The project would demonstrate circulating fluidized bed (CFB) combustion technology at JEA's existing Northside Generating Station in Jacksonville, Florida, about 9 miles northeast of the downtown area of Jacksonville. The new CFB combustor would use coal and petroleum coke to generate nearly 300 MW of electricity by repowering the existing Unit 2 steam turbine, a 297.5-MW unit that has been out of service since 1983. The proposed project is expected to demonstrate emission levels of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), and particulate matter that would be lower than Clean Air Act limits while at the same time producing power more efficiently and at less cost than conventional coal utilization technologies. At their own risk, JEA has begun initial construction activities without DOE funding. Construction would take approximately two years and, consistent with the original JEA schedule, would be completed in December 2001. Demonstration of the proposed project would be conducted during a 2-year period from March 2002 until March 2004. In addition, JEA plans to repower the currently operating Unit 1 steam turbine about 6 to 12 months after the Unit 2 repowering without cost-shared funding from DOE. Although the proposed project consists of only the Unit 2 repowering, this EIS analyzes the Unit 1 repowering as a related action. The EIS also considers three reasonably foreseeable scenarios that could result from the no-action alternative in which DOE would not provide cost-shared funding for the proposed project. The proposed action, in which DOE would provide cost-shared finding for the proposed project, is DOE's preferred alternative. The EIS evaluates the principal environmental issues, including air quality

  6. Design, construction and testing of annular diffusers for high speed civil transportation combustor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhio, Cyril B.

    1995-01-01

    A theoretical and an experimental design study of subsonic flow through curved-wall annular diffusers is being carried out in order to establish the most pertinent design parameters for such devices and the implications of their application in the design of engine components in the aerospace industries. This investigation consists of solving numerically the full Navier Stokes and Continuity equations for the time-mean flow. Various models of turbulence are being evaluated for adoption throughout the study and comparisons would be made with experimental data where they exist. Assessment of diffuser performance based on the dissipated mechanical energy would also be made. The experimental work involves the application of Computer Aided Design software tool to the development of a suitable annular diffuser geometry and the subsequent downloading of such data to a CNC machine at Central State University. The results of the investigations are expected to indicate that more cost effective component design of such devices as effective component design of such devices as diffusers which normally contain complex flows can still be achieved. In this regard a review paper was accepted and presented at the First International Conference on High Speed Civil Transportation Research held at North Carolina A&T in December of 1994.

  7. Numerical investigation on the combustion characteristics of methane/air in a micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Yang, Zhongqing

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A micro-combustor with a hollow hemisphere bluff body is developed. • Blow-off limit of reactor is expanded 2.5 times by the hollow hemisphere bluff body. • Methane conversion rate of combustor sharply increases at the location of bluff body. • Methane conversion rate is mainly affected by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. • Recirculation zone expands blow-off limit and increases methane conversion rate. - Abstract: The combustion characteristics of methane in a cube micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body were numerically investigated. The blow-off limit, recirculation zone length and methane conversion rate were examined. The results illustrate that the blow-off limit of the micro-combustor with a hollow hemispherical bluff body is 2.5 times higher than that without bluff body, which are 24.5 m/s and 9.5 m/s at the same equivalence ratio (ϕ = 1), respectively. With the use of hollow hemispherical bluff body, methane conversion sharply increases from 0.24% to 17.95% at 3 mm along the inlet-flow direction, where is the location of bluff-body, which is not affected by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. The recirculation zone size has determined influence on residence time of the mixture gas, which increases with the increase of inlet velocity. Methane conversion rate is determined by equivalence ratio and inlet velocity. Methane conversion rate firstly increases and then decreases when the equivalence ratio and inlet velocity increase, reaching the maximum value (97.84%) at ϕ = 1 and 0.02 m/s. Methane conversion rate sharply increases from 45% to 97.84% when the inlet velocity increases from 0.008 m/s to 0.02 m/s

  8. Development of a coupled reactor with a catalytic combustor and steam reformer for a 5 kW solid oxide fuel cell system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Sanggyu; Lee, Kanghun; Yu, Sangseok; Lee, Sang Min; Ahn, Kook-Young

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Proposes the scale-up strategy to develop a large-scale coupled reactor. • Investigation of performance of steam reformer coupled with catalytic combustor. • Experimental parameters are inlet temp., air excess ratio, SCR, fuel utilization. • Evaluation of the heat transfer distribution along the gas flow direction. • The mean value of methane conversion rate is approximately 93.4%. - Abstract: The methane (CH 4 ) conversion rate of a steam reformer can be increased by thermal integration with a catalytic combustor, called a coupled reactor. In the present study, a 5 kW coupled reactor has been developed based on a 1 kW coupled reactor in previous work. The geometric parameters of the space velocity, diameter and length of the coupled reactor selected from the 1 kW coupled reactor are tuned and applied to the design of the 5 kW coupled reactor. To confirm the scale-up strategy, the performance of 5 kW coupled reactor is experimentally investigated with variations of operating parameters such as the fuel utilization in the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack, the inlet temperature of the catalytic combustor, the excess air ratio of the catalytic combustor, and the steam to carbon ratio (SCR) in the steam reformer. The temperature distributions of coupled reactors are measured along the gas flow direction. The gas composition at the steam reformer outlet is measured to find the CH 4 conversion rate of the coupled reactor. The maximum value of the CH 4 conversion rate is approximately 93.4%, which means the proposed scale-up strategy can be utilized to develop a large-scale coupled reactor

  9. Electrically charged small soot particles in the exhaust of an aircraft gas-turbine engine combustor: comparison of model and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A.; Arnold, F.

    The emission of electrically charged soot particles by an aircraft gas-turbine combustor is investigated using a theoretical model. Particular emphasis is placed on the influence of the fuel sulfur content (FSC). The model considers the production of primary "combustion" electrons and ions in the flame zone and their following interaction with molecular oxygen, sulfur-bearing molecules (e.g. O 2, SO 2, SO 3, etc.) and soot particles. The soot particle size distribution is approximated by two different populations of mono-dispersed large and small soot particles with diameters of 20-30 and 5-7 nm, respectively. The effect of thermal ionization of soot and its interaction with electrons and positive and negative ions is included in the model. The computed positive and negative chemiion (CI) concentrations at the combustor exit and relative fractions of small neutral and charged soot particles were found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. The results show that the FSC indeed may influence the concentration of negative CI at low fuel flow into combustor. Importantly the simulation indicates a very efficient mutual interaction of electrons and ions with soot particles with a large effect on both ion and charged soot particle concentrations. This result may be interpreted as a possible indirect effect of FSC on the growth and size distribution of soot particles.

  10. The Effect of Air Preheat at Atmospheric Pressure on the Formation of NO(x) in the Quick-Mix Sections of an Axially Staged Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardakas, M. A.; Leong, M. Y.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Holdeman, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    The Rich-burn/Quick-mix/Lean-burn (RQL) combustor concept has been proposed to minimize the formation of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) in gas turbine systems. The success of this combustor strategy is dependent upon the efficiency of the mixing section bridging the fuel-rich and fuel-lean stages. Note that although these results were obtained from an experiment designed to study an RQL mixer, the link between mixing and NOx signatures is considerably broader than this application, in that the need to understand this link exists in most advanced combustors. The experiment reported herein was designed to study the effects of inlet air temperature on NO(x) formation in a mixing section. The results indicate that NO(x) emission is increased for all preheated cases compared to non-preheated cases. When comparing the various mixing modules, the affect of jet penetration is important, as this determines where NO(x) concentrations peak, and affects overall NO(x) production. Although jet air comprises 70 percent of the total airflow, the impact that jet air preheat has on overall NO(x) emissions is small compared to preheating both main and jet air flow.

  11. Component testing of a ground based gas turbine steam cooled rich-burn primary zone combustor for emissions control of nitrogeneous fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D. F.

    1986-01-01

    This effort summarizes the work performed on a steam cooled, rich-burn primary zone, variable geometry combustor designed for combustion of nitrogeneous fuels such as heavy oils or synthetic crude oils. The steam cooling was employed to determine its feasibility and assess its usefulness as part of a ground based gas turbine bottoming cycle. Variable combustor geometry was employed to demonstrate its ability to control primary and secondary zone equivalence ratios and overall pressure drop. Both concepts proved to be highly successful in achieving their desired objectives. The steam cooling reduced peak liner temperatures to less than 800 K. This low temperature offers the potential of both long life and reduced use of strategic materials for liner fabrication. These degrees of variable geometry were successfully employed to control air flow distribution within the combustor. A variable blade angle axial flow air swirler was used to control primary zone air flow, while the secondary and tertiary zone air flows were controlled by rotating bands which regulated air flow to the secondary zone quench holes and the dilutions holes respectively.

  12. Large-Eddy / Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Simulations of a Dual-Mode Scramjet Combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Jesse A.; Edwards, Jack R.; Hassan, Hassan A.; Rockwell, Robert; Goyne, Christopher; McDaniel, James; Smith, Chad; Cutler, Andrew; Johansen, Craig; Danehy, Paul M.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations of reacting and non-reacting flows within a scramjet combustor configuration experimentally mapped at the University of Virginia s Scramjet Combustion Facility (operating with Configuration A ) are described in this paper. Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and hybrid Large Eddy Simulation / Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (LES / RANS) methods are utilized, with the intent of comparing essentially blind predictions with results from non-intrusive flow-field measurement methods including coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS), hydroxyl radical planar laser-induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF), stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV), wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS), and focusing Schlieren. NC State's REACTMB solver was used both for RANS and LES / RANS, along with a 9-species, 19- reaction H2-air kinetics mechanism by Jachimowski. Inviscid fluxes were evaluated using Edwards LDFSS flux-splitting scheme, and the Menter BSL turbulence model was utilized in both full-domain RANS simulations and as the unsteady RANS portion of the LES / RANS closure. Simulations were executed and compared with experiment at two equivalence ratios, PHI = 0.17 and PHI = 0.34. Results show that the PHI = 0.17 flame is hotter near the injector while the PHI = 0.34 flame is displaced further downstream in the combustor, though it is still anchored to the injector. Reactant mixing was predicted to be much better at the lower equivalence ratio. The LES / RANS model appears to predict lower overall heat release compared to RANS (at least for PHI = 0.17), and its capability to capture the direct effects of larger turbulent eddies leads to much better predictions of reactant mixing and combustion in the flame stabilization region downstream of the fuel injector. Numerical results from the LES/RANS model also show very good agreement with OH-PLIF and SPIV measurements. An un-damped long-wave oscillation of the pre-combustion shock train, which caused

  13. Devices for hearing loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the sounds you want to hear. Assistive listening devices bring certain sounds directly to your ears. This can ... a small room or on a stage. Other devices can bring the sound from your TV, radio, or music ...

  14. Memristive devices for computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J Joshua; Strukov, Dmitri B; Stewart, Duncan R

    2013-01-01

    Memristive devices are electrical resistance switches that can retain a state of internal resistance based on the history of applied voltage and current. These devices can store and process information, and offer several key performance characteristics that exceed conventional integrated circuit technology. An important class of memristive devices are two-terminal resistance switches based on ionic motion, which are built from a simple conductor/insulator/conductor thin-film stack. These devices were originally conceived in the late 1960s and recent progress has led to fast, low-energy, high-endurance devices that can be scaled down to less than 10 nm and stacked in three dimensions. However, the underlying device mechanisms remain unclear, which is a significant barrier to their widespread application. Here, we review recent progress in the development and understanding of memristive devices. We also examine the performance requirements for computing with memristive devices and detail how the outstanding challenges could be met.

  15. Liquid Crystal Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Madeline J.

    1983-01-01

    The nature of liquid crystals and several important liquid crystal devices are described. Ideas for practical experiments to illustrate the properties of liquid crystals and their operation in devices are also described. (Author/JN)

  16. Novel Magnetic Devices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schuller, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    ...: ballistic magnetoresistance, magnetic field proximity effect and spin drag. These three phenomena would then be exploited for the design of novel device architectures and to investigate the physical principles behind these devices...

  17. Abstract Storage Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Koenig, Robert; Maurer, Ueli; Tessaro, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    A quantum storage device differs radically from a conventional physical storage device. Its state can be set to any value in a certain (infinite) state space, but in general every possible read operation yields only partial information about the stored state. The purpose of this paper is to initiate the study of a combinatorial abstraction, called abstract storage device (ASD), which models deterministic storage devices with the property that only partial information about the state can be re...

  18. Heterostructures and quantum devices

    CERN Document Server

    Einspruch, Norman G

    1994-01-01

    Heterostructure and quantum-mechanical devices promise significant improvement in the performance of electronic and optoelectronic integrated circuits (ICs). Though these devices are the subject of a vigorous research effort, the current literature is often either highly technical or narrowly focused. This book presents heterostructure and quantum devices to the nonspecialist, especially electrical engineers working with high-performance semiconductor devices. It focuses on a broad base of technical applications using semiconductor physics theory to develop the next generation of electrical en

  19. Device-less interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monaci, G.; Triki, M.; Sarroukh, B.E.

    2009-01-01

    This document describes the results of a technology survey for device-less interaction. The Device-less Interaction project (2007-307) aims at providing interaction options for future home appliances without resorting to a remote control or any other dedicated control device. The target home

  20. Inspection device in liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Etsuo.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention provides an inspection device in PWR reactor core in which inspection operations are made efficient by stabilizing a posture of the device in front-to-back, vertical and left-to-right directions by a simple structure. When the device conducts inspection while running in liquid, the front and the back directions of the device main body are inspected using a visual device while changing the posture by operating a front-to-back direction propulsion device and a right-to-left direction propulsion device, and a vertical direction propulsion device against to rolling, pitching and yawing of the device main body. In this case, a spherical magnet moves freely in the gravitational direction in a vibration-damping fluid in a non-magnetic spherical shell following the change of the posture of the device main body, in which the vibrations due to the movement of the spherical magnet is settled by the vibration-damping fluid thereby stabilizing the posture of the device main body. At a typical inspection posture, the settling effect is enhanced by the attraction force between the spherical magnets in the spherical shell and each of magnetic force-attracted magnetic members disposed to the outer circumference of the shell, and the posture of the device main body can be confirmed in front-to-back, right-to-left and vertical directions by each of the posture confirming magnetic sensors. (N.H.)

  1. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  2. Photovoltaic device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleereman, Robert J; Lesniak, Michael J; Keenihan, James R; Langmaid, Joe A; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K; Boven, Michelle L

    2015-01-27

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  3. Containment and surveillance devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J.W.; Johnson, C.S.; Stieff, L.R.

    The growing acceptance of containment and surveillance as a means to increase safeguards effectiveness has provided impetus to the development of improved surveillance and containment devices. Five recently developed devices are described. The devices include one photographic and two television surveillance systems and two high security seals that can be verified while installed

  4. Articulating feedstock delivery device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2013-11-05

    A fully articulable feedstock delivery device that is designed to operate at pressure and temperature extremes. The device incorporates an articulating ball assembly which allows for more accurate delivery of the feedstock to a target location. The device is suitable for a variety of applications including, but not limited to, delivery of feedstock to a high-pressure reaction chamber or process zone.

  5. Wall temperature measurements at elevated pressures and high temperatures in sooting flames in a gas turbine model combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nau, Patrick; Yin, Zhiyao; Geigle, Klaus Peter; Meier, Wolfgang

    2017-12-01

    Wall temperatures were measured with thermographic phosphors on the quartz walls of a model combustor in ethylene/air swirl flames at 3 bar. Three operating conditions were investigated with different stoichiometries and with or without additional injection of oxidation air downstream of the primary combustion zone. YAG:Eu and YAG:Dy were used to cover a total temperature range of 1000-1800 K. Measurements were challenging due to the high thermal background from soot and window degradation at high temperatures. The heat flux through the windows was estimated from the temperature gradient between the in- and outside of the windows. Differences in temperature and heat flux density profiles for the investigated cases can be explained very well with the previously measured differences in flame temperatures and flame shapes. The heat loss relative to thermal load is quite similar for all investigated flames (15-16%). The results complement previous measurements in these flames to investigate soot formation and oxidation. It is expected, that the data set is a valuable input for numerical simulations of these flames.

  6. Effect of different wall injection schemes on the flow-field of hydrogen fuelled strut-based scramjet combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Gautam; Pandey, K. M.

    2018-04-01

    The multi-strut injector is one of the most favourable perspectives for the mixing improvement in between the hydrogen and the high-speed air, and its parametric investigation has drawn an increasing attention among the researchers. Hence the flow-field aspects of a particular multi-strut based scramjet combustor have been investigated numerically with the addition of four wall injectors and at the same time, the influence of combination of different strut as well as wall injector scheme on the performance of multi-strut scramjet engine has also been explored. Moreover, the current computational approach has been validated against the experimental data present in the open literature in case of single strut scramjet engine. The attained results reveal that the collaboration of multi-strut along with 2 wall injectors' improves the efficiency of scramjet as compared to other multi-strut + wall injection scheme as this combination achieve higher penetration height which will boost to a wider temperature and robust combustion area adjacent to the wall. Again, the appearance of extra H2 in the separated flow region precisely ahead of the wall injection region is mainly reasonable for the abrupt decrease in the mixing as well combustion efficiency plot in all the multi-strut + wall injection strategy.

  7. Low NO sub x heavy fuel combustor concept program. Phase 1A: Combustion technology generation coal gas fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherlock, T. P.

    1982-01-01

    Combustion tests of two scaled burners using actual coal gas from a 25 ton/day fluidized bed coal gasifier are described. The two combustor configurations studied were a ceramic lined, staged rich/lean burner and an integral, all metal multiannual swirl burner (MASB). The tests were conducted over a range of temperature and pressures representative of current industrial combustion turbine inlet conditions. Tests on the rich lean burner were conducted at three levels of product gas heating values: 104, 197 and 254 btu/scf. Corresponding levels of NOx emissions were 5, 20 and 70 ppmv. Nitrogen was added to the fuel in the form of ammonia, and conversion efficiencies of fuel nitrogen to NOx were on the order of 4 percent to 12 percent, which is somewhat lower than the 14 percent to 18 percent conversion efficiency when src-2 liquid fuel was used. The MASB was tested only on medium btu gas (220 to 270 btu/scf), and produced approximately 80 ppmv NOx at rated engine conditions. Both burners operated similarly on actual coal gas and erbs fuel, and all heating values tested can be successfully burned in current machines.

  8. Characterisation of particulate matter emitted from cofiring of lignite and agricultural residues in a fixed-bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantananont, Nattasut; Garivait, Savitri; Patumsawad, Suthum

    2012-01-01

    This study is focused on the emission of fixed bed combustor batch operated. Real-time analyser ELPI (electrical low-pressure impactor) system was used to size-segregated particulate matter emission ranging from 40 nm to 10 μm. The results show that total number concentration were 3.4 × 10(3), 1.6 × 10(4), and 1.5 × 10(5) particles/cm(3) · kg(fuel), while total mass of particles were 12.2, 8.0, and 6.5 mg/Nm(3) · kg(fuel) for combustion of lignite, rice husk and bagasse, respectively. But it can be noticed that cofiring released more particulate matter. Meanwhile it was found that the effect of ratio of over-fired air to total air supply is more pronounced, since decrease in this ratio, the amount of particles are decreased significantly. For particle size distribution, it can be observed that submicron-sized particles dominate and the most prevailing size is in the range: 50 nm particle size; 40 nm particle morphology showed that the isolate shape of submicron particle produced during lignite combustion is characterised by different geometries such as round, capsule, rod, flake-like, whereas the spherical shape is obtained with combustion of rice husk.

  9. Development of a pulsed coal combustor fired with CWM (coal-water mixture): Phase 3, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, M.N.; Durai-Swamy, K.

    1986-11-01

    This report presents the results of an R and D program aimed at developing a new burner technology for coal-water mixture (CWM) fuels to enable the substitution of these new fuels in utility and industrial boilers and process heaters currently firing oil and gas. The application of pulse combustion to CWM fuels is chosen to alleviate many of the physical plant and environmental constraints presently associated with the direct use of these fuels in equipment designed for oil and gas firing. Pulse combustion has been shown to be capable of high-intensity burning of coal for acceptably complete combustion within relatively small equipment volumes. It also has the inherent capability to agglomerate ash particles, thus rendering ash more easily separable from the combustion gas prior to its entrance into the convective section of the boiler or heater, thereby reducing ash buildup and pluggage. Pulse combustion is also well-suited to staged combustion for NO/sub x/ control and has excellent potential for enhanced in-furnace SO/sub 2/ removal due to the enhanced levels of mass transfer brought about by the vigorous flow oscillations. The primary objective of the Phase 2 work was to develop a detailed program for laboratory development and evaluation of the pulse CWM combustor and system design concepts. 112 refs., 40 figs., 94 tabs.

  10. Radiation emitting devices regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    The Radiation Emitting Devices Regulations are the regulations referred to in the Radiation Emitting Devices Act and relate to the operation of devices. They include standards of design and construction, standards of functioning, warning symbol specifications in addition to information relating to the seizure and detention of machines failing to comply with the regulations. The radiation emitting devices consist of the following: television receivers, extra-oral dental x-ray equipment, microwave ovens, baggage inspection x-ray devices, demonstration--type gas discharge devices, photofluorographic x-ray equipment, laser scanners, demonstration lasers, low energy electron microscopes, high intensity mercury vapour discharge lamps, sunlamps, diagnostic x-ray equipment, ultrasound therapy devices, x-ray diffraction equipment, cabinet x-ray equipment and therapeutic x-ray equipment

  11. Smart portable rehabilitation devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leahey Matt

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of current portable orthotic devices and rehabilitative braces provide stability, apply precise pressure, or help maintain alignment of the joints with out the capability for real time monitoring of the patient's motions and forces and without the ability for real time adjustments of the applied forces and motions. Improved technology has allowed for advancements where these devices can be designed to apply a form of tension to resist motion of the joint. These devices induce quicker recovery and are more effective at restoring proper biomechanics and improving muscle function. However, their shortcoming is in their inability to be adjusted in real-time, which is the most ideal form of a device for rehabilitation. This introduces a second class of devices beyond passive orthotics. It is comprised of "active" or powered devices, and although more complicated in design, they are definitely the most versatile. An active or powered orthotic, usually employs some type of actuator(s. Methods In this paper we present several new advancements in the area of smart rehabilitation devices that have been developed by the Northeastern University Robotics and Mechatronics Laboratory. They are all compact, wearable and portable devices and boast re-programmable, real time computer controlled functions as the central theme behind their operation. The sensory information and computer control of the three described devices make for highly efficient and versatile systems that represent a whole new breed in wearable rehabilitation devices. Their applications range from active-assistive rehabilitation to resistance exercise and even have applications in gait training. The three devices described are: a transportable continuous passive motion elbow device, a wearable electro-rheological fluid based knee resistance device, and a wearable electrical stimulation and biofeedback knee device. Results Laboratory tests of the devices

  12. Euro 6 Unregulated Pollutant Characterization and Statistical Analysis of After-Treatment Device and Driving-Condition Impact on Recent Passenger-Car Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinet, Simon; Liu, Yao; Louis, Cédric; Tassel, Patrick; Perret, Pascal; Chaumond, Agnès; André, Michel

    2017-05-16

    This study aims to measure and analyze unregulated compound emissions for two Euro 6 diesel and gasoline vehicles. The vehicles were tested on a chassis dynamometer under various driving cycles: Artemis driving cycles (urban, road, and motorway), the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and the World Harmonized Light-Duty Test Cycle (WLTC) for Europe, and world approval cycles. The emissions of unregulated compounds (such as total particle number (PN) (over 5.6 nm); black carbon (BC); NO 2 ; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX); carbonyl compounds; and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) were measured with several online devices, and different samples were collected using cartridges and quartz filters. Furthermore, a preliminary statistical analysis was performed on eight Euro 4-6 diesel and gasoline vehicles to study the impacts of driving conditions and after-treatment and engine technologies on emissions of regulated and unregulated pollutants. The results indicate that urban conditions with cold starts induce high emissions of BTEX and carbonyl compounds. Motorway conditions are characterized by high emissions of particle numbers and CO, which mainly induced by gasoline vehicles. Compared with gasoline vehicles, diesel vehicles equipped with catalyzed or additive DPF emit fewer particles but more NO x and carbonyl compounds.

  13. Fluid circulation control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benard, Henri; Henocque, Jean.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal fluid circulation control device, of the type having a pivoting flap. This device is intended for being fitted in the pipes of hydraulic installation, particularly in a bleed and venting system of a nuclear power station shifting radioactive or contaminated liquids. The characteristic of this device is the cut-out at the top of the flap to allow the air contained in the pipes to flow freely [fr

  14. Understanding medical device regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galgon, Richard E

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a structural and functional understanding of the systems used for the regulation of medical devices in the USA and European Union (EU). Safe and effective anesthesia care depends heavily on medical devices, including simple, low risk devices to complex life-supporting and life-sustaining devices. In the USA and EU, the Food and Drug Administration and European Commission, respectively, provide regulatory oversight to ensure medical devices are reasonably safe and effective when used for their intended purposes. Unfortunately, practicing anesthesiologists generally have little or no understanding of how medical devices are regulated, nor do they have sufficient knowledge of available adverse event reporting systems. The US and EU medical device regulatory systems are similar in many ways, but differ in important ways too, which impacts the afforded level of safety and effectiveness assurance. In both systems, medical devices are classified and regulated on a risk basis, which fundamentally differs from drug regulation, where uniform requirements are imposed. Anesthesia providers must gain knowledge of these systems and be active players in both premarket and postmarket activities, particularly with regard to vigilance and adverse event/device failure reporting.

  15. Recoil transporter devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavan, N.

    2005-01-01

    The study of sparsely produced nuclear reaction products in the direction of intense primary beam is a challenging task, the pursuit of which has given rise to the advent or several types of selective devices. These range from a simple parallel plate electrostatic deflector to state-of-the-art electromagnetic separators. There is no single device which can satisfy all the requirements of an ideal recoil transporter, simultaneously. An overview of such devices and their building blocks is presented, which may help in the proper choice of the device as per the experimental requirements. (author)

  16. Temperature indicating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angus, J.P.; Salt, D.

    1988-01-01

    A temperature indicating device comprises a plurality of planar elements some undergoing a reversible change in appearance at a given temperature the remainder undergoing an irreversible change in appearance at a given temperature. The device is useful in indicating the temperature which an object has achieved as well as its actual temperature. The reversible change is produced by liquid crystal devices. The irreversible change is produced by an absorbent surface carrying substances e.g. waxes which melt at predetermined temperatures and are absorbed by the surface; alternatively paints may be used. The device is used for monitoring processes of encapsulation of radio active waste. (author)

  17. Virtual Training Devices Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Training Devices (VTD) Laboratory at the Life Cycle Software Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, provides a software testing and support environment...

  18. Establishment Registration & Device Listing

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This searchable database contains establishments (engaged in the manufacture, preparation, propagation, compounding, assembly, or processing of medical devices...

  19. CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF METHANE OVER Pt/γ-Al2O3 IN MICRO-COMBUSTOR WITH DETAILED CHEMICAL KINETIC MECHANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUNJIE CHEN

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Micro-scale catalytic combustion characteristics and heat transfer processes of preheated methane-air mixtures (φ = 0.4 in the plane channel were investigated numerically with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. The plane channel of length L = 10.0 mm, height H =1.0 mm and wall thickness δ = 0.1 mm, which inner horizontal surfaces contained Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst washcoat. The computational results indicate that the presence of the gas phase reactions extends mildly the micro-combustion stability limits at low and moderate inlet velocities due to the strong flames establishment, and have a more profound effect on extending the high-velocity blowout limits by allowing for additional heat release originating mainly from the incomplete CH4 gas phase oxidation in the plane channel. When the same mass flow rate (ρin × Vin is considered, the micro-combustion stability limits at p: 0.1 MPa are much narrower than at p: 0.6 MPa due to both gas phase and catalytic reaction activities decline with decreasing pressure. Catalytic micro-combustor can achieve stable combustion at low solid thermal conductivity ks < 0.1 W∙m-1•K-1, while the micro-combustion extinction limits reach their larger extent for the higher thermal conductivity ks = 20.0-100.0 W∙m-1•K-1. The existence of surface radiation heat transfers significantly effects on the micro-combustion stability limits and micro-combustors energy balance. Finally, gas phase combustion in catalytic micro-combustors can be sustained at the sub-millimeter scale (plane channel height of 0.25 mm.

  20. Effects of operating conditions and fuel properties on emission performance and combustion efficiency of a swirling fluidized-bed combustor fired with a biomass fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuprianov, Vladimir I.; Kaewklum, Rachadaporn; Chakritthakul, Songpol

    2011-01-01

    This work reports an experimental study on firing 80 kg/h rice husk in a swirling fluidized-bed combustor (SFBC) using an annular air distributor as the swirl generator. Two NO x emission control techniques were investigated in this work: (1) air staging of the combustion process, and (2) firing rice husk as moisturized fuel. In the first test series for the air-staged combustion, CO, NO and C x H y emissions and combustion efficiency were determined for burning 'as-received' rice husk at fixed excess air of 40%, while secondary-to-primary air ratio (SA/PA) was ranged from 0.26 to 0.75. The effects of SA/PA on CO and NO emissions from the combustor were found to be quite weak, whereas C x H y emissions exhibited an apparent influence of air staging. In the second test series, rice husks with the fuel-moisture content of 8.4% to 35% were fired at excess air varied from 20% to 80%, while the flow rate of secondary air was fixed. Radial and axial temperature and gas concentration (O 2 , CO, NO) profiles in the reactor, as well as CO and NO emissions, are discussed for the selected operating conditions. The temperature and gas concentration profiles for variable fuel quality exhibited significant effects of both fuel-moisture and excess air. As revealed by experimental results, the emission of NO from this SFBC can be substantially reduced through moisturizing rice husk, while CO is effectively mitigated by injection of secondary air into the bed splash zone, resulting in a rather low emission of CO and high (over 99%) combustion efficiency of the combustor for the ranges of operating conditions and fuel properties.

  1. Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, Rebecca

    2013-03-31

    Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

  2. Repairing method and device for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Akiko; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Tachikawa, Nobuo.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of and a device for repairing a first wall and a divertor disposed in a vacuum vessel of a thermonuclear device. Namely, an armour tile of the divertor secured, by a brazing material, in a vacuum vessel of the thermonuclear device in which high temperature plasmas of deuterium and tritium are confined to cause fusion reaction is induction-heated or heated by microwaves to melt the brazing material. Only the armour tile is thus exchanged by its attachment/detachment. This device comprises, in the vacuum vessel, an armour tile attaching/detaching manipulator and a repairing manipulator comprising a heating manipulator having induction heating coils at the top end thereof. Induction heating coils are connected to an AC power source. According to the present invention, the armour tile is exchanged without taking the divertor out of the vacuum vessel. Therefore, cutting of a divertor cooling tube for taking the divertor out of the vacuum vessel and re-welding of the divertor for attaching it to the vacuum vessel again are no more necessary. (I.S.)

  3. High heat flux device of thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Nobuo.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides an equipments for high heat flux device (divertor) of a thermonuclear device, which absorbs thermal deformation during operation, has a high installation accuracy, and sufficiently withstands for thermal stresses. Namely, a heat sink member is joined to a structural base. Armour tiles are joined on the heat sink member. Cooling pipes are disposed between the heat sink member and the armour tiles. With such a constitution, the heat sink member using a highly heat conductive material having ductility, such as oxygen free copper, the cooling pipes using a material having excellent high temperature resistance and excellent elongation, such as aluminum-dispersed reinforced copper, and the armour tiles are completely joined on the structural base. Therefore, when thermal deformation tends to cause in the high heat flux device such as a divertor, cooling pipes cause no plastic deformation because of their high temperature resistance, but the heat sink member such as a oxygen free copper causes plastic deformation to absorb thermal deformation. As a result, the high heat flux device such as a divertor causes no deformation. (I.S.)

  4. Experimental investigation of syngas flame stability using a multi-tube fuel injector in a high pressure combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Sergio Elzar

    Over 92% of the coal consumed by power plants is used to generate electricity in the United States (U.S.). The U.S. has the world's largest recoverable reserves of coal, it is estimated that reserves of coal will last more than 200 years based in current production and demand levels. Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants aim to reduce the amount of pollutants by gasifying coal and producing synthesis gas. Synthesis gas, also known as syngas, is a product of coal gasification and can be used in gas turbines for energy production. Syngas is primarily a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide and is produced by gasifying a solid fuel feedstock such as coal or biomass. The objective of the thesis is to create a flame stability map by performing various experiments using high-content hydrogen fuels with varying compositions of hydrogen representing different coal feedstocks. The experiments shown in this thesis were performed using the High-Pressure Combustion facility in the Center for Space Exploration Technology Research (CSETR) at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). The combustor was fitted with a novel Multi-Tube fuel Injector (MTI) designed to improve flame stability. This thesis presents the results of testing of syngas fuels with compositions of 20, 30, and 40% hydrogen concentrations in mixtures with carbon monoxide. Tests were completed for lean conditions ranging from equivalence ratios between 0.6 and 0.9. The experimental results showed that at an equivalence ratio of 0.6, a stable flame was not achieved for any of the fuel mixtures tested. It was also observed that the stability region of the syngas flame increased as equivalence ratio and the hydrogen concentration in syngas fuel increases with the 40% hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixture demonstrating the greatest stability region. Design improvements to the MTI are also discussed as part of the future work on this topic.

  5. Characterisation of Particulate Matter Emitted from Cofiring of Lignite and Agricultural Residues in a Fixed-Bed Combustor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nattasut Mantananont

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the emission of fixed bed combustor batch operated. Real-time analyser ELPI (electrical low-pressure impactor system was used to size-segregated particulate matter emission ranging from 40 nm to 10 μm. The results show that total number concentration were 3.4×103, 1.6×104, and 1.5×105 particles/cm3⋅kgfuel, while total mass of particles were 12.2, 8.0, and 6.5 mg/Nm3⋅kgfuel for combustion of lignite, rice husk and bagasse, respectively. But it can be noticed that cofiring released more particulate matter. Meanwhile it was found that the effect of ratio of over-fired air to total air supply is more pronounced, since decrease in this ratio, the amount of particles are decreased significantly. For particle size distribution, it can be observed that submicron-sized particles dominate and the most prevailing size is in the range: 50 nm

  6. Fluid dynamic simulation of the fluidized bed using propane-air fuel; Simulacao dinamica de um combustor de leito fluidizado utilizando como combustivel o ar-propanado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima Junior, L.P.; Lucena, S.; Silva, D.J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: limajun@br.inter.net

    2004-07-01

    This paper has for purpose to present the modeling and simulation of the homogeneous combustion of the mixture of propane-air in a combustor of fluidized bed with inert particles, basing on a stationary model with phases in series, being taken into account the thermal changes and mass changes among the phases and it changes thermal with the wall for radiation. Computational methods are used for such simulation and CFX 4.4 as dynamic flowing computation software (CFD), kindred of more proximity with the real aspects. Being studied like this dynamic and kinetic flowing parameters of the involved components. (author)

  7. Mercury emissions during cofiring of sub-bituminous coal and biomass (chicken waste, wood, coffee residue, and tobacco stalk) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Zhou, Hongcang; Fan, Junjie; Zhao, Houyin; Zhou, Tuo; Hack, Pauline; Chan, Chia-Chun; Liou, Jian-Chang; Pan, Wei-Ping

    2008-12-15

    Four types of biomass (chicken waste, wood pellets, coffee residue, and tobacco stalks) were cofired at 30 wt % with a U.S. sub-bituminous coal (Powder River Basin Coal) in a laboratory-scale fluidized bed combustor. A cyclone, followed by a quartz filter, was used for fly ash removal during tests. The temperatures of the cyclone and filter were controlled at 250 and 150 degrees C, respectively. Mercury speciation and emissions during cofiring were investigated using a semicontinuous mercury monitor, which was certified using ASTM standard Ontario Hydra Method. Test results indicated mercury emissions were strongly correlative to the gaseous chlorine concentrations, but not necessarily correlative to the chlorine contents in cofiring fuels. Mercury emissions could be reduced by 35% during firing of sub-bituminous coal using only a quartz filter. Cofiring high-chlorine fuel, such as chicken waste (Cl = 22340 wppm), could largely reduce mercury emissions by over 80%. When low-chlorine biomass, such as wood pellets (Cl = 132 wppm) and coffee residue (Cl = 134 wppm), is cofired, mercury emissions could only be reduced by about 50%. Cofiring tobacco stalks with higher chlorine content (Cl = 4237 wppm) did not significantly reduce mercury emissions. This was also true when limestone was added while cofiring coal and chicken waste because the gaseous chlorine was reduced in the freeboard of the fluidized bed combustor, where the temperature was generally below 650 degrees C without addition of the secondary air. Gaseous speciated mercury in flue gas after a quartz filter indicated the occurrence of about 50% of total gaseous mercury to be the elemental mercury for cofiring chicken waste, but occurrence of above 90% of the elemental mercury for all other cases. Both the higher content of alkali metal oxides or alkali earth metal oxides in tested biomass and the occurrence of temperatures lower than 650 degrees C in the upper part of the fluidized bed combustor seemed to be

  8. Self-activated device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hecht, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    A self-actuated device is described which is of particular use as a valve or an orifice for nuclear reactor fuel and blanket assemblies. A gas, produced by a neutron irradiation-induced nuclear reaction, gradually accumulates as a function of neutron fluence. The gas pressure increase occasioned by such accumulation of gas is used to actuate the device. (author)

  9. Complex Materials and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    Disruptive Basic Research Areas” – Metamaterials and Plasmonics – Quantum Information Science – Cognitive Neuroscience – Nanoscience and...function Complex Electronics and Fundamental Quantum Processes Complex engineered materials and devices Devices based on quantum phenomena...fundamental quantum processes Quantum Electronic Solids (Weinstock) Photonics and Optoelectronics (Pomrenke) GHz-THz Electronics (Hwang) Natural

  10. EPICS GPIB device support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winans, J.

    1993-01-01

    A GPIB device support module is used to provide access to the operating parameters of a GPIB device. GPIB devices may be accessed via National Instruments 1014 cards or via Bitbus Universal Gateways. GPIB devices typically have many parameters, each of which may be thought of in terms of the standard types of database records available in EPICS. It is the job of the device support module designer to decide how the mapping of these parameters will be made to the available record types. Once this mapping is complete, the device support module may be written. The writing of the device support module consists primarily of the construction of a parameter table. This table is used to associate the database record types with the operating parameters of the GPIB instrument. Other aspects of module design include the handling of SRQ events and errors. SRQ events are made available to the device support module if so desired. The processing of an SRQ event is completely up to the designer of the module. They may be ignored, tied to event based record processing, or anything else the designer wishes. Error conditions may be handled in a similar fashion

  11. Process control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toshifumi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi.

    1994-01-01

    A process control device comprises a memory device for memorizing a plant operation target, a plant state or a state of equipments related with each other as control data, a read-only memory device for storing programs, a plant instrumentation control device or other process control devices, an input/output device for performing input/output with an operator, and a processing device which conducts processing in accordance with the program and sends a control demand or a display demand to the input/output device. The program reads out control data relative to a predetermined operation target, compares and verify them with actual values to read out control data to be a practice premise condition which is further to be a practice premise condition if necessary, thereby automatically controlling the plant or requiring or displaying input. Practice presuming conditions for the operation target can be examined succesively in accordance with the program without constituting complicated logical figures and AND/OR graphs. (N.H.)

  12. Partial Device Fingerprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciere, M.; Hernandez Ganan, C.; van Eeten, M.J.G.

    2017-01-01

    In computing, remote devices may be identified by means of device fingerprinting, which works by collecting a myriad of clientside attributes such as the device’s browser and operating system version, installed plugins, screen resolution, hardware artifacts, Wi-Fi settings, and anything else

  13. Positioning devices for patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavens, M.

    1981-01-01

    It has been suggested that it is very important to position patients reproducibly at different stages of radiotherapy treatment planning and treatment, or similar procedures. Devices have been described for positioning a patient's upper and lower thorax. This invention provides reproducible positioning for a female patient's breasts, for example in planning treatment of and treating breast tumours. The patient is placed prone, using for example an upper thorax device. A support device is placed central to and beneath her breasts to partially displace them outwards. The device may be triangular in section with one apex contacting the chest wall at the sternum. Restraining straps may be provided to hold the breasts against the support device. Means may be provided to take a healthy breast from the path of radiation through the tumour. (author)

  14. Compound semiconductor device modelling

    CERN Document Server

    Miles, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Compound semiconductor devices form the foundation of solid-state microwave and optoelectronic technologies used in many modern communication systems. In common with their low frequency counterparts, these devices are often represented using equivalent circuit models, but it is often necessary to resort to physical models in order to gain insight into the detailed operation of compound semiconductor devices. Many of the earliest physical models were indeed developed to understand the 'unusual' phenomena which occur at high frequencies. Such was the case with the Gunn and IMPATI diodes, which led to an increased interest in using numerical simulation methods. Contemporary devices often have feature sizes so small that they no longer operate within the familiar traditional framework, and hot electron or even quantum­ mechanical models are required. The need for accurate and efficient models suitable for computer aided design has increased with the demand for a wider range of integrated devices for operation at...

  15. Device for cutting protrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzorgi, Fariborz M [Knoxville, TN

    2011-07-05

    An apparatus for clipping a protrusion of material is provided. The protrusion may, for example, be a bolt head, a nut, a rivet, a weld bead, or a temporary assembly alignment tab protruding from a substrate surface of assembled components. The apparatus typically includes a cleaver having a cleaving edge and a cutting blade having a cutting edge. Generally, a mounting structure configured to confine the cleaver and the cutting blade and permit a range of relative movement between the cleaving edge and the cutting edge is provided. Also typically included is a power device coupled to the cutting blade. The power device is configured to move the cutting edge toward the cleaving edge. In some embodiments the power device is activated by a momentary switch. A retraction device is also generally provided, where the retraction device is configured to move the cutting edge away from the cleaving edge.

  16. Metallic spintronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaobin

    2014-01-01

    Metallic Spintronic Devices provides a balanced view of the present state of the art of metallic spintronic devices, addressing both mainstream and emerging applications from magnetic tunneling junction sensors and spin torque oscillators to spin torque memory and logic. Featuring contributions from well-known and respected industrial and academic experts, this cutting-edge work not only presents the latest research and developments but also: Describes spintronic applications in current and future magnetic recording devicesDiscusses spin-transfer torque magnetoresistive random-access memory (STT-MRAM) device architectures and modelingExplores prospects of STT-MRAM scaling, such as detailed multilevel cell structure analysisInvestigates spintronic device write and read optimization in light of spintronic memristive effectsConsiders spintronic research directions based on yttrium iron garnet thin films, including spin pumping, magnetic proximity, spin hall, and spin Seebeck effectsProposes unique solutions for ...

  17. Plasma facing device of thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Hideo; Ioki, Kimihiro.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention improves integrity of thermal structures of a plasma facing device. That is, in the plasma facing device, an armour block portion from a metal cooling pipe to a carbon material comprises a mixed material of the metal as the constituent material of the cooling pipe and ceramics. Then, the mixing ratio of the composition is changed continuously or stepwise to suppress peakings of remaining stresses upon production and thermal stresses upon exertion of thermal loads. Accordingly, thermal integrity of the structural materials can further be improved. In this case, a satisfactory characteristic can be obtained also by using ceramics instead of carbon for the mixed material, and the characteristic such as heat expansion coefficient is similar to that of the armour tile. (I.S.)

  18. Optical thin film devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shuzheng

    1991-11-01

    Thin film devices are applied to almost all modern scientific instruments, and these devices, especially optical thin film devices, play an essential role in the performances of the instruments, therefore, they are attracting more and more attention. Now there are numerous kinds of thin film devices and their applications are very diversified. The 300-page book, 'Thin Film Device and Applications,' by Prof. K. L. Chopra gives some general ideas, and my paper also outlines the designs, fabrication, and applications of some optical thin film devices made in my laboratory. Optical thin film devices have been greatly developed in the recent decades. Prof. A. Thelan has given a number of papers on the theory and techniques, Prof. H. A. Macleod's book, 'Thin Film Optical Filters,' has concisely concluded the important concepts of optical thin film devices, and Prof. J. A. Dobrowobski has proposed many successful designs for optical thin film devices. Recently, fully-automatic plants make it easier to produce thin film devices with various spectrum requirements, and some companies, such as Balzers, Leybold AG, Satis Vacuum AG, etc., have manufactured such kinds of coating plants for research or mass-production, and the successful example is the production of multilayer antireflection coatings with high stability and reproducibility. Therefore, it could be said that the design of optical thin film devices and coating plants is quite mature. However, we cannot expect that every problem has been solved, the R&D work still continues, the competition still continues, and new design concepts, new techniques, and new film materials are continually developed. Meanwhile, the high-price of fully-automatic coating plants makes unpopular, and automatic design of coating stacks is only the technique for optimizing the manual design according to the physical concepts and experience, in addition, not only the optical system, but also working environment should be taken into account when

  19. Fuel pattern recognition device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomomi.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors normal fuel exchange upon fuel exchanging operation carried out in a reactor of a nuclear power plant. Namely, a fuel exchanger is movably disposed to the upper portion of the reactor and exchanges fuels. An exclusive computer receives operation signals of the fuel exchanger during operation as inputs, and outputs reactor core fuel pattern information signals to a fuel arrangement diagnosis device. An underwater television camera outputs image signals of a fuel pattern in the reactor core to an image processing device. If there is any change in the image signals for the fuel pattern as a result of the fuel exchange operation of the fuel exchanger, the image processing device outputs the change as image signals to the fuel pattern diagnosis device. The fuel pattern diagnosis device compares the pattern information signals from the exclusive computer with the image signals from the image processing device, to diagnose the result of the fuel exchange operation performed by the fuel exchanger and inform the diagnosis by means of an image display. (I.S.)

  20. Electrolysis iron injection device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataoka, Ichiro; Aizawa, Motohiro; Usui, Naoshi; Osumi, Katsumi; Mizuniwa, Fumio.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a chemical cleaning device and a pipeline for cleaning in addition to an existent device comprising a vessel for supplying gaseous carbon dioxide under pressure, an electrolytic vessel made of an iron plate and a CO 2 disperser. The chemical cleaning device comprises a heater for heating a cleaning liquid, a cleaning liquid vessel for controlling and storing the cleaning liquid and a filter for capturing dissolved and defoliated iron. As the cleaning liquid, oxalic acid, citric acid, sulfuric acid or hydrogen peroxide is used solely or in combination. A closed loop is constituted to a portion in the device, where iron is formed by deposition, by the chemical cleaning device and the cleaning pipeline, and a recycling operation is conducted while heating to 30 to 60degC for a predetermined period to dissolve and remove deposited iron cruds. With such procedures, the device can be operated stably for a long period of time and radioactivity concentration of reactor water in a nuclear power plant can be reduced. (T.M.)

  1. Fundamentals of semiconductor devices

    CERN Document Server

    Lindmayer, Joseph

    1965-01-01

    Semiconductor properties ; semiconductor junctions or diodes ; transistor fundamentals ; inhomogeneous impurity distributions, drift or graded-base transistors ; high-frequency properties of transistors ; band structure of semiconductors ; high current densities and mechanisms of carrier transport ; transistor transient response and recombination processes ; surfaces, field-effect transistors, and composite junctions ; additional semiconductor characteristics ; additional semiconductor devices and microcircuits ; more metal, insulator, and semiconductor combinations for devices ; four-pole parameters and configuration rotation ; four-poles of combined networks and devices ; equivalent circuits ; the error function and its properties ; Fermi-Dirac statistics ; useful physical constants.

  2. Smart devices are different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stisen, Allan; Blunck, Henrik; Bhattacharya, Sourav

    2015-01-01

    The widespread presence of motion sensors on users' personal mobile devices has spawned a growing research interest in human activity recognition (HAR). However, when deployed at a large-scale, e.g., on multiple devices, the performance of a HAR system is often significantly lower than in reported....... Moreover, the impairments vary significantly across devices and depends on the type of recognition technique used. We systematically evaluate the effect of mobile sensing heterogeneities on HAR and propose a novel clustering-based mitigation technique suitable for large-scale deployment of HAR, where...

  3. Proton therapy device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tronc, D.

    1994-01-01

    The invention concerns a proton therapy device using a proton linear accelerator which produces a proton beam with high energies and intensities. The invention lies in actual fact that the proton beam which is produced by the linear accelerator is deflected from 270 deg in its plan by a deflecting magnetic device towards a patient support including a bed the longitudinal axis of which is parallel to the proton beam leaving the linear accelerator. The patient support and the deflecting device turn together around the proton beam axis while the bed stays in an horizontal position. The invention applies to radiotherapy. 6 refs., 5 figs

  4. Physics of photonic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Shun Lien

    2009-01-01

    The most up-to-date book available on the physics of photonic devices This new edition of Physics of Photonic Devices incorporates significant advancements in the field of photonics that have occurred since publication of the first edition (Physics of Optoelectronic Devices). New topics covered include a brief history of the invention of semiconductor lasers, the Lorentz dipole method and metal plasmas, matrix optics, surface plasma waveguides, optical ring resonators, integrated electroabsorption modulator-lasers, and solar cells. It also introduces exciting new fields of research such as:

  5. Thermonuclear power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukunishi, Koyu; Saito, Seiji.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the control accuracy of a thermonuclear power control device by feeding back electron temperature in addition to a thermonuclear power, thereby making the thermonuclear reactor power stably follow an objective value. Constitution: It is aimed at the fact that a high speed neutral particle incidence causes the increase in the electron temperature, and the neutral particle incidence responsive to the electron temperature is controlled by a high speed neutral particle incident device. Thus, the electron temperature is monitored, the thermonuclear power is monitored, and the control accuracy of the thermonuclear power control device is enhanced by employing a control system for feeding back these values. (Aizawa, K.)

  6. Output hardcopy devices

    CERN Document Server

    Durbeck, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Output Hardcopy Devices provides a technical summary of computer output hardcopy devices such as plotters, computer output printers, and CRT generated hardcopy. Important related technical areas such as papers, ribbons and inks, color techniques, controllers, and character fonts are also covered. Emphasis is on techniques primarily associated with printing, as well as the plotting capabilities of printing devices that can be effectively used for computer graphics in addition to their various printing functions. Comprised of 19 chapters, this volume begins with an introduction to vector and ras

  7. Electronic devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, Gordon John

    1972-01-01

    Electronic Devices and Circuits, Volume 3 provides a comprehensive account on electronic devices and circuits and includes introductory network theory and physics. The physics of semiconductor devices is described, along with field effect transistors, small-signal equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, and integrated circuits. Linear and non-linear circuits as well as logic circuits are also considered. This volume is comprised of 12 chapters and begins with an analysis of the use of Laplace transforms for analysis of filter networks, followed by a discussion on the physical properties of

  8. Compound semiconductor device physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Sandip

    2013-01-01

    This book provides one of the most rigorous treatments of compound semiconductor device physics yet published. A complete understanding of modern devices requires a working knowledge of low-dimensional physics, the use of statistical methods, and the use of one-, two-, and three-dimensional analytical and numerical analysis techniques. With its systematic and detailed**discussion of these topics, this book is ideal for both the researcher and the student. Although the emphasis of this text is on compound semiconductor devices, many of the principles discussed will also be useful to those inter

  9. Nanoelectronic device applications handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, James E

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectronic Device Applications Handbook gives a comprehensive snapshot of the state of the art in nanodevices for nanoelectronics applications. Combining breadth and depth, the book includes 68 chapters on topics that range from nano-scaled complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) devices through recent developments in nano capacitors and AlGaAs/GaAs devices. The contributors are world-renowned experts from academia and industry from around the globe. The handbook explores current research into potentially disruptive technologies for a post-CMOS world.These include: Nanoscale advance

  10. Powering biomedical devices

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Edwar

    2013-01-01

    From exoskeletons to neural implants, biomedical devices are no less than life-changing. Compact and constant power sources are necessary to keep these devices running efficiently. Edwar Romero's Powering Biomedical Devices reviews the background, current technologies, and possible future developments of these power sources, examining not only the types of biomedical power sources available (macro, mini, MEMS, and nano), but also what they power (such as prostheses, insulin pumps, and muscular and neural stimulators), and how they work (covering batteries, biofluids, kinetic and ther

  11. Evaluation of Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Devices in Energy Cascade Systems under the Restriction of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Yoichi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    It is necessary to introduce energy cascade systems into the industrial sector in Japan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. The aim of this study is to evaluate the refrigerating and air conditioning devices in cases of introducing both energy cascade systems and thermal recycling systems in industries located around urban areas. The authors have developed an energy cascade model based on linear programming so as to minimize the total system costs with carbon taxes. Five cases are investigated. Limitation of carbon dioxide emissions results in the enhancement of heat cascading, where high temperature heat is supplied for process heating while low temperature one is shifted to refrigeration. It was found that increasing the amount of garbage combustor waste heat can reduce electric power for the turbo refrigerator by promoting waste heat driven ammonia absorption refrigerator.

  12. Plasma shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosogane, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Takahide.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent concentration of plasma currents to the plasma center upon plasma shutdown in a torus type thermonuclear device by the injection of fuels to the plasma center thereby prevent plasma disruption at the plasma center. Constitution: The plasma shutdown device comprises a plasma current measuring device that measures the current distribution of plasmas confined within a vacuum vessel and outputs a control signal for cooling the plasma center when the plasma currents concentrate to the plasma center and a fuel supply device that supplies fuels to the plasma center for cooling the center. The fuels are injected in the form of pellets into the plasmas. The direction and the velocity of the injection are set such that the pellets are ionized at the center of the plasmas. (Horiuchi, T.)

  13. Marine Sanitation Devices (MSDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine sanitation devices treat or retain sewage from vessels, and have performance standards set by the EPA. This page provides information on MSDs, including who must use an MSD, states' roles, types of MSDs and standards.

  14. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  15. Visual Acoustic Device

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belenger, Robert V

    2006-01-01

    ... corresponding to the sound waves. The device includes a rigid plate having a first repetitive pattern and a flexible plate spaced from the rigid plate and having a second repetitive pattern corresponding to the first repetitive pattern...

  16. High temperature measuring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Richard D.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature measuring device for very high design temperatures (to 2,000.degree. C.). The device comprises a homogenous base structure preferably in the form of a sphere or cylinder. The base structure contains a large number of individual walled cells. The base structure has a decreasing coefficient of elasticity within the temperature range being monitored. A predetermined quantity of inert gas is confined within each cell. The cells are dimensionally stable at the normal working temperature of the device. Increases in gaseous pressure within the cells will permanently deform the cell walls at temperatures within the high temperature range to be measured. Such deformation can be correlated to temperature by calibrating similarly constructed devices under known time and temperature conditions.

  17. Tokapole II device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprott, J.G.

    1978-05-01

    A discussion is given of the design and operation of the Tokapole II device. The following topics are considered: physics considerations, vacuum vessel, poloidal field, ring and support design, toroidal field, vacuum system, initial results, and future plans

  18. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  19. Flashback analysis in tangential swirl burners; Analisis de reflujo de flama en combustores tangenciales de flujo giratorio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valera-Medina, A. [CIATEQ A.C., Centro de Tecnologia Avanzada, Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: agustin.valera@ciateq.mx; Syred, N. Abdulsada, M. [United Kingdom Cardiff University (United Kingdom)]. E-mails: syredn@cf.ac.uk; abdulsadam@cf.ac.uk

    2011-10-15

    Premixed lean combustion is widely used in Combustion Processes due to the benefits of good flame stability and blow off limits coupled with low NO{sub x} emissions. However, the use of novel fuels and complex flows have increased the concern about flashback, especially for the use of syngas and highly hydrogen enriched blends. Thus, this paper describes a combined practical and numerical approach to study the phenomenon in order to reduce the effect of flashback in a pilot scale 100 kW tangential swirl burner. Natural gas is used to establish the baseline results and effects of different parameters changes. The flashback phenomenon is studied with the use of high speed photography. The use of a central fuel injector demonstrates substantial benefits in terms of flashback resistance, eliminating coherent structures that may appear in the flow channels. The critical boundary velocity gradient is used for characterization, both via the original Lewis and von Elbe formula and via analysis using CFD and investigation of boundary layer conditions in the flame front. [Spanish] La combustion ligera premezclada se utiliza ampliamente en los procesos de combustion debido a los beneficios que brinda en terminos de buena estabilidad de flama y limites de extincion, aunado a la baja emision de NO{sub x}. Sin embargo, el uso de nuevos combustibles y de flujos complejos han incrementado la preocupacion por el reflujo de flama, especialmente para el uso de gas sintetico (syngas) y mezclas altamente hidrogenadas. Por ello, en este articulo se describe un metodo practico y numerico para el estudio del fenomeno a modo de reducir los efectos del reflujo de flama en un combustor piloto de tipo tangencial de flujo giratorio de 100 kW. Se usa gas natural para establecer la linea base de resultados y los efectos del cambio de diferentes parametros. El fenomeno de reflujo de flama se estudia por medio de fotografia de rapida adquisicion. El uso de un inyector central de combustible

  20. Experimental and numerical analysis of the combustor for a cogeneration system based on the aluminum/water reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milani, Massimo; Montorsi, Luca; Paltrinieri, Fabrizio; Stefani, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Aluminum reaction with water is studied as a technology for hydrogen production. • A test rig is developed for the analysis of aluminum/water reaction. • The system is the core component of a cogeneration plant for hydrogen/power production. • The interaction of liquid aluminum jet and water steam stream is investigated. • The main capabilities of the injection system are assessed. - Abstract: The paper focuses on the design of the experimental apparatus aimed at analyzing the performance of the combustion chamber of a cogeneration system based on the reaction of liquid aluminum and water steam. The cogeneration system exploits the heat released by the oxidation of aluminum with water for super-heating the vapor of a steam cycle and simultaneously producing hydrogen. The only by-product is alumina, which in a closed loop can be recycled back and transformed again into aluminum. Therefore, aluminum is used as an energy carrier to transport the energy from the alumina reduction plant to the location of the proposed system. The water is also used in a closed loop since the amount of water produced employing the hydrogen obtained by the proposed system corresponds to the oxidizing water for the Al/H 2 O reaction. This study investigates the combustor where the liquid aluminum–steam reaction takes place. In particular, the design of the combustion chamber and the interaction between the liquid aluminum jet and the water steam flow are evaluated using a numerical and an experimental approach. The test rig is specifically designed for the analysis of the liquid aluminum injection in a slightly super-heated steam stream. The first experiments are carried out to verify the correct behavior of the test rig. Thermography is employed to qualitatively assess the steam entrainment of the liquid aluminum jet. Finally, the experimental measurements are compared with the multi-dimension multi-phase flow simulations in order to estimate the influence of